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1

RESPONSE OF THE ITALIAN AGILE FROG (RANA LATASTEI) TO A RANAVIRUS, FROG VIRUS 3: A MODEL FOR VIRAL EMERGENCE IN NAIVE POPULATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) is a genus of pathogens of poikilotherms, and some ranaviruses may play a role in widespread mortality of amphibians. Ecology of viral transmission in amphibians is poorly known but can be addressed through experimentation in the laboratory. In this study, we use the Ranavirus frog virus 3 (FV3) as an experimental model for pathogen emergence in naive

Peter B. Pearman; Trenton W. J. Garner; Monika Straub; Urs F. Greber

2

Rana catesbeiana virus Z (RCV-Z): a novel pathogenic ranavirus.  

PubMed

A virus, designated Rana catesbeiana virus Z (RCV-Z), was isolated from the visceral tissue of moribund tadpoles of the North American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) analysis of viral proteins and sequence analysis of the amino terminal end of the major capsid protein showed that RCV-Z was similar to frog virus 3 (FV3) and other ranaviruses isolated from anurans and fish. However, analysis of restriction fragment profiles following digestion of viral genomic DNA with XbaI and BamHI indicated that RCV-Z was markedly different from FV3. Moreover, in contrast to FV3, RCV-Z contained a full-length copy of the viral homolog of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF-2alpha). Experimental infection of bullfrog tadpoles with FV3 and RCV-Z demonstrated that RCV-Z was much more pathogenic than FV3, and that prior infection with FV3 protected them from subsequent RCV-Z induced mortality. Collectively, these results suggest that RCV-Z may represent a novel species of ranavirus capable of infecting frogs and that possession of a viral eIF-2alpha homolog (vIF-2alpha) correlates with enhanced virulence. PMID:17240747

Majji, Sai; LaPatra, Scott; Long, Scott M; Sample, Robert; Bryan, Locke; Sinning, Allan; Chinchar, V Gregory

2006-11-21

3

Recent host-shifts in ranaviruses: signatures of positive selection in the viral genome  

PubMed Central

Ranaviruses have been implicated in recent declines in global amphibian populations. Compared with the family Iridoviridae, to which the genus Ranavirus belongs, ranaviruses have a wide host range in that species/strains are known to infect fish, amphibians and reptiles, presumably due to recent host-switching events. We used eight sequenced ranavirus genomes and two selection-detection methods (site based and branch based) to identify genes that exhibited signatures of positive selection, potentially due to the selective pressures at play during host switching. We found evidence of positive selection acting on four genes via the site-based method, three of which were newly acquired genes unique to ranavirus genomes. Using the branch-based method, we identified eight additional candidate genes that exhibited signatures of dN/dS (non-synonymous/synonymous substitution rate) >1 in the clade where intense host switching had occurred. We found that these branch-specific patterns of elevated dN/dS were enriched in a small group of viral genes that have been acquired most recently in the ranavirus genome, compared with core genes that are shared among all members of the family Iridoviridae. Our results suggest that the group of newly acquired genes in the ranavirus genome may have undergone recent adaptive changes that have facilitated interspecies and interclass host switching. PMID:23784445

Cannatella, David C.; Hillis, David M.; Sawyer, Sara L.

2013-01-01

4

Evidence for Multiple Recent Host Species Shifts among the Ranaviruses (Family Iridoviridae)? †  

PubMed Central

Members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) have been recognized as major viral pathogens of cold-blooded vertebrates. Ranaviruses have been associated with amphibians, fish, and reptiles. At this time, the relationships between ranavirus species are still unclear. Previous studies suggested that ranaviruses from salamanders are more closely related to ranaviruses from fish than they are to ranaviruses from other amphibians, such as frogs. Therefore, to gain a better understanding of the relationships among ranavirus isolates, the genome of epizootic hematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), an Australian fish pathogen, was sequenced. Our findings suggest that the ancestral ranavirus was a fish virus and that several recent host shifts have taken place, with subsequent speciation of viruses in their new hosts. The data suggesting several recent host shifts among ranavirus species increase concern that these pathogens of cold-blooded vertebrates may have the capacity to cross numerous poikilothermic species barriers and the potential to cause devastating disease in their new hosts. PMID:20042506

Jancovich, James K.; Bremont, Michel; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Jacobs, Bertram L.

2010-01-01

5

Evidence for multiple recent host species shifts among the Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae).  

PubMed

Members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) have been recognized as major viral pathogens of cold-blooded vertebrates. Ranaviruses have been associated with amphibians, fish, and reptiles. At this time, the relationships between ranavirus species are still unclear. Previous studies suggested that ranaviruses from salamanders are more closely related to ranaviruses from fish than they are to ranaviruses from other amphibians, such as frogs. Therefore, to gain a better understanding of the relationships among ranavirus isolates, the genome of epizootic hematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), an Australian fish pathogen, was sequenced. Our findings suggest that the ancestral ranavirus was a fish virus and that several recent host shifts have taken place, with subsequent speciation of viruses in their new hosts. The data suggesting several recent host shifts among ranavirus species increase concern that these pathogens of cold-blooded vertebrates may have the capacity to cross numerous poikilothermic species barriers and the potential to cause devastating disease in their new hosts. PMID:20042506

Jancovich, James K; Bremont, Michel; Touchman, Jeffrey W; Jacobs, Bertram L

2010-03-01

6

Immune Evasion Strategies of Ranaviruses and Innate Immune Responses to These Emerging Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Ranaviruses (RV, Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded DNA viruses that infect fish, amphibians and reptiles. For ecological and commercial reasons, considerable attention has been drawn to the increasing prevalence of ranaviral infections of wild populations and in aquacultural settings. Importantly, RVs appear to be capable of crossing species barriers of numerous poikilotherms, suggesting that these pathogens possess a broad host range and potent immune evasion mechanisms. Indeed, while some of the 95–100 predicted ranavirus genes encode putative evasion proteins (e.g., vIF?, vCARD), roughly two-thirds of them do not share significant sequence identity with known viral or eukaryotic genes. Accordingly, the investigation of ranaviral virulence and immune evasion strategies is promising for elucidating potential antiviral targets. In this regard, recombination-based technologies are being employed to knock out gene candidates in the best-characterized RV member, Frog Virus (FV3). Concurrently, by using animal infection models with extensively characterized immune systems, such as the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, it is becoming evident that components of innate immunity are at the forefront of virus-host interactions. For example, cells of the macrophage lineage represent important combatants of RV infections while themselves serving as targets for viral infection, maintenance and possibly dissemination. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of the RV immune evasion strategies with emphasis on the roles of the innate immune system in ranaviral infections. PMID:22852041

Grayfer, Leon; Andino, Francisco De Jesús; Chen, Guangchun; Chinchar, Gregory V.; Robert, Jacques

2012-01-01

7

Leafhopper viral pathogens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

8

Widespread Co-occurrence of Virulent Pathogens Within California Amphibian Communities  

E-print Network

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, ranaviruses, and trematodes (Ribeiroia ondatrae and echinostomes) are highly (Wright and Whitaker 2001; Densmore and Green 2007). In North America, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd), viral pathogens in the genus Ranavirus, and larval trematodes including Ribeiroia

Gray, Matthew

9

The Amphibian (Xenopus laevis) Type I Interferon Response to Frog Virus 3: New Insight into Ranavirus Pathogenicity  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The increasing prevalence of ranavirus (RV; Iridoviridae) infections of wild and commercially maintained aquatic species is raising considerable concerns. While Xenopus laevis is the leading model for studies of immunity to RV, amphibian antiviral interferon (IFN) responses remain largely uncharacterized. Accordingly, an X. laevis type I interferon was identified, the expression of the gene for this IFN was examined in RV (frog virus 3 [FV3])-infected tadpoles and adult frogs by quantitative PCR, and a recombinant form of this molecule (recombinant X. laevis interferon [rXlIFN]) was produced for the purpose of functional studies. This rXlIFN protected the kidney-derived A6 cell line and tadpoles against FV3 infection, decreasing the infectious viral burdens in both cases. Adult frogs are naturally resistant to FV3 and clear the infection within a few weeks, whereas tadpoles typically succumb to this virus. Hence, as predicted, virus-infected adult X. laevis frogs exhibited significantly more robust FV3-elicited IFN gene expression than tadpoles; nevertheless, they also tolerated substantially greater viral burdens following infection. Although tadpole stimulation with rXlIFN prior to FV3 challenge markedly impaired viral replication and viral burdens, it only transiently extended tadpole survival and did not prevent the eventual mortality of these animals. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that despite rXlIFN treatment, infected tadpoles had considerable organ damage, including disrupted tissue architecture and extensive necrosis and apoptosis. Conjointly, these findings indicate a critical protective role for the amphibian type I IFN response during ranaviral infections and suggest that these viruses are more pathogenic to tadpole hosts than was previously believed, causing extensive and fatal damage to multiple organs, even at very low titers. IMPORTANCE Ranavirus infections are threatening wild and commercially maintained aquatic species. The amphibian Xenopus laevis is extensively utilized as an infection model for studying ranavirus-host immune interactions. However, little is known about amphibian antiviral immunity and, specifically, type I interferons (IFNs), which are central to the antiviral defenses of other vertebrates. Accordingly, we identified and characterized an X. laevis type I interferon in the context of infection with the ranavirus frog virus 3 (FV3). FV3-infected adult frogs displayed more robust IFN gene expression than tadpoles, possibly explaining why they typically clear FV3 infections, whereas tadpoles succumb to them. Pretreatment with a recombinant X. laevis IFN (rXlIFN) substantially reduced viral replication and infectious viral burdens in a frog kidney cell line and in tadpoles. Despite reducing FV3 loads and extending the mean survival time, rXlIFN treatments failed to prevent tadpole tissue damage and mortality. Thus, FV3 is more pathogenic than was previously believed, even at very low titers. PMID:24623410

Grayfer, Leon; De Jesús Andino, Francisco

2014-01-01

10

Detection of the emerging amphibian pathogens Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and ranavirus in Russia.  

PubMed

In a population of the European common toad Bufo bufo from a rural pond in the region of Lake Glubokoe Regional Reserve in Moscow province, Russia, unexplained mass mortality events involving larvae and metamorphs have been observed over a monitoring period of >20 yr. We tested toads from this and a nearby site for the emerging amphibian pathogens Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and ranavirus (Rv). Both pathogens were detected, and at the rural pond site, with the above-noted losses and decline in toad breeding success, 40% of B. bufo metamorphs were Bd positive, 46% were Rv positive and 20% were co-infected with both pathogens. Toad metamorphs from a neighbouring water body were also Bd and Rv positive (25 and 55%, respectively). This is the first confirmation of these pathogens in Russia. Questions remain as to the origins of these pathogens in Russia and their roles in documented mass mortality events. PMID:25114047

Reshetnikov, Andrey N; Chestnut, Tara; Brunner, Jesse L; Charles, Kaylene; Nebergall, Emily E; Olson, Deanna H

2014-08-11

11

Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

12

Genome architecture changes and major gene variations of Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV)  

PubMed Central

Ranaviruses are emerging pathogens that have led to global impact and public concern. As a rarely endangered species and the largest amphibian in the world, the Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus, has recently undergone outbreaks of epidemic diseases with high mortality. In this study, we isolated and identified a novel ranavirus from the Chinese giant salamanders that exhibited systemic hemorrhage and swelling syndrome with high death rate in China during May 2011 to August 2012. The isolate, designated Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), not only could induce cytopathic effects in different fish cell lines and yield high viral titers, but also caused severely hemorrhagic lesions and resulted in 100% mortality in experimental infections of salamanders. The complete genome of ADRV was sequenced and compared with other sequenced amphibian ranaviruses. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses revealed that ADRV should belong to an amphibian subgroup in genus Ranavirus, and is more closely related to frog ranaviruses than to other salamander ranaviruses. Homologous gene comparisons show that ADRV contains 99%, 97%, 94%, 93% and 85% homologues in RGV, FV3, CMTV, TFV and ATV genomes respectively. In addition, several variable major genes, such as duplicate US22 family-like genes, viral eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha gene and novel 75L gene with both motifs of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and nuclear export signal (NES), were predicted to contribute to pathogen virulence and host susceptibility. These findings confirm the etiologic role of ADRV in epidemic diseases of Chinese giant salamanders, and broaden our understanding of evolutionary emergence of ranaviruses. PMID:24143877

2013-01-01

13

Ecopathology of Ranaviruses Infecting Amphibians  

PubMed Central

Ranaviruses are capable of infecting amphibians from at least 14 families and over 70 individual species. Ranaviruses infect multiple cell types, often culminating in organ necrosis and massive hemorrhaging. Subclinical infections have been documented, although their role in ranavirus persistence and emergence remains unclear. Water is an effective transmission medium for ranaviruses, and survival outside the host may be for significant duration. In aquatic communities, amphibians, reptiles and fish may serve as reservoirs. Controlled studies have shown that susceptibility to ranavirus infection and disease varies among amphibian species and developmental stages, and likely is impacted by host-pathogen coevolution, as well as, exogenous environmental factors. Field studies have demonstrated that the likelihood of epizootics is increased in areas of cattle grazing, where aquatic vegetation is sparse and water quality is poor. Translocation of infected amphibians through commercial trade (e.g., food, fish bait, pet industry) contributes to the spread of ranaviruses. Such introductions may be of particular concern, as several studies report that ranaviruses isolated from ranaculture, aquaculture, and bait facilities have greater virulence (i.e., ability to cause disease) than wild-type isolates. Future investigations should focus on the genetic basis for pathogen virulence and host susceptibility, ecological and anthropogenic mechanisms contributing to emergence, and vaccine development for use in captive populations and species reintroduction programs. PMID:22163349

Miller, Debra; Gray, Matthew; Storfer, Andrew

2011-01-01

14

Ranavirus outbreaks in amphibian populations of northern Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ranavirus outbreaks, caused by pathogens in the genus Ranavirus (Family Iridoviridae), were the largest single cause of reported amphibian mass mortality events in the United States from 1996–2001 (Green et al. 2002). Mortality events associated with ranaviruses have been documented on five continents and throughout the latitudes and elevations where amphibians occur (Gray et al. 2009). However, the threat of ranaviruses to amphibian and reptile populations in specific regions is still largely unknown (Chinchar 2002; Gray et al. 2009).

Russell, Danelle M.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Sprague, Laura; Waits, Lisette P.; Green, D. Earl; Schuler, Krysten L.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree

2011-01-01

15

Transmission of ranavirus between ectothermic vertebrate hosts.  

PubMed

Transmission is an essential process that contributes to the survival of pathogens. Ranaviruses are known to infect different classes of lower vertebrates including amphibians, fishes and reptiles. Differences in the likelihood of infection among ectothermic vertebrate hosts could explain the successful yearlong persistence of ranaviruses in aquatic environments. The goal of this study was to determine if transmission of a Frog Virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus was possible among three species from different ectothermic vertebrate classes: Cope's gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) larvae, mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis), and red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans). We housed individuals previously exposed to the FV3-like ranavirus with naïve (unexposed) individuals in containers divided by plastic mesh screen to permit water flow between subjects. Our results showed that infected gray treefrog larvae were capable of transmitting ranavirus to naïve larval conspecifics and turtles (60% and 30% infection, respectively), but not to fish. Also, infected turtles and fish transmitted ranavirus to 50% and 10% of the naïve gray treefrog larvae, respectively. Nearly all infected amphibians experienced mortality, whereas infected turtles and fish did not die. Our results demonstrate that ranavirus can be transmitted through water among ectothermic vertebrate classes, which has not been reported previously. Moreover, fish and reptiles might serve as reservoirs for ranavirus given their ability to live with subclinical infections. Subclinical infections of ranavirus in fish and aquatic turtles could contribute to the pathogen's persistence, especially when highly susceptible hosts like amphibians are absent as a result of seasonal fluctuations in relative abundance. PMID:24667325

Brenes, Roberto; Gray, Matthew J; Waltzek, Thomas B; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Miller, Debra L

2014-01-01

16

PREVALENCE OF INFECTION BY BATRACHOCHYTRIUM DENDROBATIDIS AND RANAVIRUS IN EASTERN HELLBENDERS  

E-print Network

PREVALENCE OF INFECTION BY BATRACHOCHYTRIUM DENDROBATIDIS AND RANAVIRUS IN EASTERN HELLBENDERS to estimate the prevalence of infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and Ranavirus in each in the epidemiology of these pathogens. Key words: Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, chytrid, Cryptobranchus

Gray, Matthew

17

Transmission of Ranavirus between Ectothermic Vertebrate Hosts  

PubMed Central

Transmission is an essential process that contributes to the survival of pathogens. Ranaviruses are known to infect different classes of lower vertebrates including amphibians, fishes and reptiles. Differences in the likelihood of infection among ectothermic vertebrate hosts could explain the successful yearlong persistence of ranaviruses in aquatic environments. The goal of this study was to determine if transmission of a Frog Virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus was possible among three species from different ectothermic vertebrate classes: Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) larvae, mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis), and red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans). We housed individuals previously exposed to the FV3-like ranavirus with naïve (unexposed) individuals in containers divided by plastic mesh screen to permit water flow between subjects. Our results showed that infected gray treefrog larvae were capable of transmitting ranavirus to naïve larval conspecifics and turtles (60% and 30% infection, respectively), but not to fish. Also, infected turtles and fish transmitted ranavirus to 50% and 10% of the naïve gray treefrog larvae, respectively. Nearly all infected amphibians experienced mortality, whereas infected turtles and fish did not die. Our results demonstrate that ranavirus can be transmitted through water among ectothermic vertebrate classes, which has not been reported previously. Moreover, fish and reptiles might serve as reservoirs for ranavirus given their ability to live with subclinical infections. Subclinical infections of ranavirus in fish and aquatic turtles could contribute to the pathogen’s persistence, especially when highly susceptible hosts like amphibians are absent as a result of seasonal fluctuations in relative abundance. PMID:24667325

Brenes, Roberto; Gray, Matthew J.; Waltzek, Thomas B.; Wilkes, Rebecca P.; Miller, Debra L.

2014-01-01

18

Global Screening for Human Viral Pathogens  

PubMed Central

We propose a system for continuing surveillance of viral pathogens circulating in large human populations. We base this system on the physical isolation of viruses from large pooled samples of human serum and plasma (e.g., discarded specimens from diagnostic laboratories), followed by shotgun sequencing of the resulting genomes. The technology for concentrating virions from 100-L volumes was developed previously at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the means for purifying and concentrating virions from volumes in microliters have been developed recently. At the same time, marine virologists have developed efficient methods for concentrating, amplifying, and sequencing complex viral mixtures obtained from the ocean. Given this existing technology base, we believe an integrated, automated, and contained system for surveillance of the human “virome” can be implemented within 1 to 2 years. Such a system could monitor the levels of known viruses in human populations, rapidly detect outbreaks, and systematically discover novel or variant human viruses. PMID:12890315

Gerin, John L.; Anderson, N. Leigh

2003-01-01

19

Widespread occurrence of ranavirus in pond-breeding amphibian populations.  

PubMed

Ranaviruses are an emerging threat for many amphibian populations, yet their distribution in amphibian communities and the association of infection with possible stressors and species is not fully understood due to historically sparse surveillance. Agricultural practices that reduce the water quality of amphibian breeding habitats (e.g., cattle access to wetlands) and environmental stressors (e.g., lower temperatures) may contribute to ranavirus emergence. We tested larval amphibians for ranavirus infection across four seasons in farm ponds (n = 40) located in Tennessee, USA. Cattle at various densities were allowed access to half of the sampled ponds. Ranavirus infections were detected in nine species and in 33 of the sampled ponds (83%), illustrating widespread occurrence of the pathogen. Species within the family Ranidae were the most frequently infected. In 13 of the ponds containing infected individuals, prevalence exceeded 40% during at least one season. Infections were detected in multiple seasons in 20 of the sampled ponds containing infections, suggesting that ranaviruses are relatively persistent in these systems. Cattle had negative effects on water quality (turbidity and ammonia) and there was a positive association between cattle abundance and ranavirus prevalence in the summer. Counter to previous field studies in North America, we found a significant positive association between water temperature and ranavirus prevalence in the fall sampling events. Despite these findings, the influences of cattle and temperature on ranavirus prevalence were not consistent across seasons. As such, the mechanisms driving high ranavirus prevalence across the landscape and over time remain unclear. Given the widespread occurrence of ranaviruses in wild amphibians, we encourage the implementation of surveillance programs to help identify potential drivers of emergence. Sites with high ranavirus prevalence should be monitored annually for outbreaks, and the long-term effects on population size determined. PMID:22173292

Hoverman, Jason T; Gray, Matthew J; Miller, Debra L; Haislip, Nathan A

2012-03-01

20

Viral reproductive pathogens of dogs and cats.  

PubMed

This article reviews the current literature on the viral agents that cause reproductive failures in domestic carnivores (dogs and cats). A meaningful update is provided on the etiologic, clinical, pathologic, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the viral infections impacting canine and feline reproduction as a consequence of either direct virus replication or severe debilitation of pregnant animals. PMID:22482820

Decaro, Nicola; Carmichael, Leland E; Buonavoglia, Canio

2012-05-01

21

Isolation and characterization of a ranavirus from koi, Cyprinus carpio L., experiencing mass mortalities in India.  

PubMed

We investigated mass mortalities of koi, Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758, experienced in South Indian fish farms by virus isolation, electron microscopy, PCR detection, sequencing of capsid protein gene and transmission studies. Samples of moribund koi brought to the laboratory suffered continuous mortality exhibiting swimming abnormalities, intermittent surfacing and skin darkening. Irido-like virus was isolated from the infected fish in the indigenous snakehead kidney cell line (SNKD2a). Icosahedral virus particles of 100 to 120 nm were observed in the infected cell cultures, budding from the cell membrane. Virus transmission and pathogenicity studies revealed that horizontal transmission occurred associated with mortality. PCR analysis of infected fish and cell cultures confirmed the presence of Ranavirus capsid protein sequences. Sequence analysis of the major capsid protein gene showed an identity of 99.9% to that of largemouth bass virus isolated from North America. Detection and successful isolation of this viral agent becomes the first record of isolation of a virus resembling Santee-Cooper Ranavirus from a koi and from India. We propose the name koi ranavirus to this agent. PMID:24720625

George, M R; John, K R; Mansoor, M M; Saravanakumar, R; Sundar, P; Pradeep, V

2014-04-10

22

Matthew J. Gray Ranaviruses  

E-print Network

support these claims? #12;History of Ranavirus Die-offs First Isolated: ·Dr. Allan Granoff ·Rana pipiens Hylidae Bufonidae Ambystomatidae Salamandridae Norman Wells, NWT Uncommon Lithobates sylvaticus #12;Are

Gray, Matthew

23

Ranaviruses: Cold Blooded Killers!  

E-print Network

) 34% (12%, 23%) #12;2 History of Ranavirus Die-offs First Isolated: ·Dr. Allan Granoff ·Rana pipiens Norman Wells, NWT >30 States & 20 Spp; 4 Provinces Ambystomatidae Salamandridae Uncommon Lithobates

Gray, Matthew

24

The Amphibian (Xenopus laevis) Type I Interferon Response to Frog Virus 3: New Insight into Ranavirus Pathogenicity  

E-print Network

The Amphibian (Xenopus laevis) Type I Interferon Response to Frog Virus 3: New Insight in RV (frog virus 3 [FV3])-infected tadpoles and adult frogs by quantitative PCR, and a recombinant form the infectious viral burdens in both cases. Adult frogs are naturally resistant to FV3 and clear the infection

Gray, Matthew

25

Susceptibility of pike Esox lucius to a panel of Ranavirus isolates.  

PubMed

In order to study the pathogenicity of ranaviruses to a wild European freshwater fish species, pike Esox lucius fry were challenged with the following Ranavirus isolates: epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), European sheatfish virus (ESV), European catfish virus (ECV), pike-perch iridovirus (PPIV), New Zealand eel virus (NZeelV) and frog virus 3 (FV3). The fry were infected using bath challenge at 12 and 22 degrees C. Significant mortalities were observed at 12 degrees C for EHNV, ESV, PPIV and NZeelV. Background mortality was too high in the experiments performed at 22 degrees C for any conclusions about viral pathogenicity at this temperature to be drawn. Viruses could be re-isolated from samples from all challenged groups, and their presence in infected tissue was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. The findings suggest that pike fry are susceptible to EHNV, ESV, PPIV and NZeelV and can be a vector for ECV and FV3. Statistical analysis of the factors associated with positive virus re-isolation showed that the number of fish in the sample influenced the outcome of virus re-isolation. Moreover, the likelihood of positive virus re-isolation significantly differed among the 6 viral isolates. The temperature from where the sample was taken and the number of days after infection were not associated with the probability of a positive virus re-isolation. PMID:19402450

Jensen, Britt Bang; Ersbøll, Annette Kjaer; Ariel, Ellen

2009-02-25

26

Mass mortality associated with a frog virus 3-like Ranavirus infection in farmed tadpoles Rana catesbeiana from Brazil.  

PubMed

Ranaviruses (Iridoviridae) are increasingly associated with mortality events in amphibians, fish, and reptiles. They have been recently associated with mass mortality events in Brazilian farmed tadpoles of the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana Shaw, 1802. The objectives of the present study were to further characterize the virus isolated from sick R. catesbeiana tadpoles and confirm the etiology in these outbreaks. Sick tadpoles were collected in 3 farms located in Goiás State, Brazil, from 2003 to 2005 and processed for virus isolation and characterization, microbiology, histopathology, and parasitology. The phylogenetic relationships of Rana catesbeiana ranavirus (RCV-BR) with other genus members was investigated by PCR with primers specific for the major capsid protein gene (MCP) and the RNA polymerase DNA-dependent gene (Pol II). Sequence analysis and multiple alignments for MCP products showed >99% amino acid identity with other ranaviruses, while Pol II products showed 100% identity. Further diagnostics of the pathology including histology and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the viral etiology of these mass deaths. As far as we know, this is the first report of a ranaviral infection affecting aquatic organisms in Brazil. Additionally, our results suggest that American bullfrogs may have served as a vector of transmission of this virus, which highlights the potential threat of amphibian translocation in the world distribution of pathogens. PMID:20066953

Mazzoni, Rolando; de Mesquita, Albenones José; Fleury, Luiz Fernando F; de Brito, Wilia Marta Elsner Diederichsen; Nunes, Iolanda A; Robert, Jacques; Morales, Heidi; Coelho, Alexandre Siqueira Guedes; Barthasson, Denise Leão; Galli, Leonardo; Catroxo, Marcia H B

2009-11-01

27

The Role of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens in Gastrointestinal Cancer  

PubMed Central

The association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with gastric cancer is thus far the best understood model to comprehend the causal relationship between a microbial pathogen and cancer in the human gastrointestinal tract. Besides H. pylori, a variety of other pathogens are now being recognized as potential carcinogens in different settings of human cancer. In this context, viral causes of human cancers are central to the issue since these account for 10–20% of cancers worldwide. In the case of H. pylori and gastric cancer, as well as the human papillomavirus and anal cancer, the causal relationship between the infectious agent and the related cancer in the gastrointestinal tract has been clearly confirmed by epidemiological and experimental studies. Similarly, Epstein–Barr virus and the oncogenic JC virus are being suggested as possible causative agents for cancers in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. This review discusses various viral and microbial pathogens and their oncogenic properties in the evolution of gastrointestinal carcinogenesis and summarizes the available experimental data make a convincing agreement favoring the associations between infectious agents and specific human cancers. PMID:18338378

Selgrad, Michael; Malfertheiner, Peter; Fini, Lucia; Goel, Ajay; Boland, C. Richard; Ricciardiello, Luigi

2010-01-01

28

The Genome Sequence of the Emerging Common Midwife Toad Virus Identifies an Evolutionary Intermediate within Ranaviruses  

PubMed Central

Worldwide amphibian population declines have been ascribed to global warming, increasing pollution levels, and other factors directly related to human activities. These factors may additionally be favoring the emergence of novel pathogens. In this report, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad ranavirus (CMTV), which has caused fatal disease in several amphibian species across Europe. Phylogenetic and gene content analyses of the first complete genomic sequence from a ranavirus isolated in Europe show that CMTV is an amphibian-like ranavirus (ALRV). However, the CMTV genome structure is novel and represents an intermediate evolutionary stage between the two previously described ALRV groups. We find that CMTV clusters with several other ranaviruses isolated from different hosts and locations which might also be included in this novel ranavirus group. This work sheds light on the phylogenetic relationships within this complex group of emerging, disease-causing viruses. PMID:22301140

Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Alcamí, Antonio

2012-01-01

29

Amphibian chytrid fungus and ranaviruses in the Northwest Territories, Canada.  

PubMed

Pathogens can cause serious declines in host species, and knowing where pathogens associated with host declines occur facilitates understanding host-pathogen ecology. Suspected drivers of global amphibian declines include infectious diseases, with 2 pathogens in particular, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and ranaviruses, causing concern. We explored the host range and geographic distribution of Bd and ranaviruses in the Taiga Plains ecoregion of the Northwest Territories, Canada, in 2007 and 2008. Both pathogens were detected, greatly extending their known geographic distributions. Ranaviruses were widespread geographically, but found only in wood frogs. In contrast, Bd was found at a single site, but was detected in all 3 species of amphibians in the survey area (wood frogs, boreal chorus frogs, western toads). The presence of Bd in the Northwest Territories is not congruent with predicted distributions based on niche models, even though findings from other studies at northern latitudes are consistent with those same models. Unexpectedly, we also found evidence that swabs routinely used to collect samples for Bd screening detected fewer infections than toe clips. Our use and handling of the swabs was consistent with other studies, and the cause of the apparent lack of integrity of swabs is unknown. The ranaviruses detected in our study were confirmed to be Frog Virus 3 by sequence analysis of a diagnostic 500 bp region of the major capsid protein gene. It is unknown whether Bd or ranaviruses are recent arrivals to the Canadian north. However, the genetic analyses required to answer that question can inform larger debates about the origin of Bd in North America as well as the potential effects of climate change and industrial development on the distributions of these important amphibian pathogens. PMID:21268986

Schock, Danna M; Ruthig, Gregory R; Collins, James P; Kutz, Susan J; Carrière, Suzanne; Gau, Robert J; Veitch, Alasdair M; Larter, Nicholas C; Tate, Douglas P; Guthrie, Glen; Allaire, Daniel G; Popko, Richard A

2010-11-01

30

Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR). Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLR). Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses. PMID:25514371

Nan, Yuchen; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Yan-Jin

2014-01-01

31

High susceptibility of the endangered dusky gopher frog to ranavirus.  

PubMed

Amphibians are one of the most imperiled vertebrate groups, with pathogens playing a role in the decline of some species. Rare species are particularly vulnerable to extinction because populations are often isolated and exist at low abundance. The potential impact of pathogens on rare amphibian species has seldom been investigated. The dusky gopher frog Lithobates sevosus is one of the most endangered amphibian species in North America, with 100-200 individuals remaining in the wild. Our goal was to determine whether adult L. sevosus were susceptible to ranavirus, a pathogen responsible for amphibian die-offs worldwide. We tested the relative susceptibility of adult L. sevosus to ranavirus (103 plaque-forming units) isolated from a morbid bullfrog via 3 routes of exposure: intra-coelomic (IC) injection, oral (OR) inoculation, and water bath (WB) exposure. We observed 100% mortality of adult L. sevosus in the IC and WB treatments after 10 and 19 d, respectively. Ninety-five percent mortality occurred in the OR treatment over the 28 d evaluation period. No mortality was observed in the control treatment after 28 d. Our results indicate that L. sevosus is susceptible to ranavirus, and if adults in the wild are exposed to this pathogen, significant mortality could occur. Additionally, our study demonstrates that some adult amphibian species can be very susceptible to ranavirus, which has been often overlooked in North American studies. We recommend that conservation planners consider testing the susceptibility of rare amphibian species to ranavirus and that the adult age class is included in future challenge experiments. PMID:25392038

Sutton, William B; Gray, Matthew J; Hardman, Rebecca H; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Kouba, Andrew J; Miller, Debra L

2014-11-14

32

LOW LEVEL DETECTION OF VIRAL PATHOGENS BY A SURFACE-ENHANCED RAMAN SCATTERING BASED IMMUNOASSAY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The need for rapid, highly sensitive, and versatile diagnostic tests for viral pathogens spans from human and veterinary medicine to bioterrorism prevention. As an approach to meet these demands, a diagnostic test employing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the selective extraction of viral pathogens...

33

Immunohistochemical staining for ranaviruses Introduction: Ranaviruses negatively impact amphibian populations  

E-print Network

(Trachemys scripta elegans) that were challenged with 4 different FV3-like ranavirus isolates (FV3, isolate, no staining was observed in the tissues of the red eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans; Fig. 3

Gray, Matthew

34

Ranavirus: past, present and future.  

PubMed

Emerging infectious diseases are a significant threat to global biodiversity. While historically overlooked, a group of iridoviruses in the genus Ranavirus has been responsible for die-offs in captive and wild amphibian, reptile and fish populations around the globe over the past two decades. In order to share contemporary information on ranaviruses and identify critical research directions, the First International Symposium on Ranaviruses was held in July 2011 in Minneapolis, MN, USA. Twenty-three scientists and veterinarians from nine countries examined the ecology and evolution of ranavirus-host interactions, potential reservoirs, transmission dynamics, as well as immunological and histopathological responses to infection. In addition, speakers discussed possible mechanisms for die-offs, and conservation strategies to control outbreaks. PMID:22048891

Lesbarrères, D; Balseiro, A; Brunner, J; Chinchar, V G; Duffus, A; Kerby, J; Miller, D L; Robert, J; Schock, D M; Waltzek, T; Gray, M J

2012-08-23

35

of Veterinary Concurrent ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis  

E-print Network

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Concurrent ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection Ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infections have been associated with amphibian mass mortalities) of B. dendrobatidis in the stratum corneum (Fig. 1). . Fig. 1. E: empty sporangia. Multifocal

Gray, Matthew

36

Quantitation of ranaviruses in cell culture and tissue samples.  

PubMed

A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) based on a standard curve was developed for detection and quantitation of ranaviruses. The target gene for the qPCR was viral DNA polymerase (DNApol). All ten ranavirus isolates studied (Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus, EHNV; European catfish virus, ECV; European sheatfish virus, ESV; Frog virus 3, FV3; Bohle iridovirus, BIV; Doctor fish virus, DFV; Guppy virus 6, GV6; Pike-perch iridovirus, PPIV; Rana esculenta virus Italy 282/I02, REV282/I02 and Short-finned eel ranavirus, SERV) were detected with the qPCR assay. In addition, two fish cell lines - epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) and bluegill fry (BF-2) - were infected with four of the isolates (EHNV, ECV, FV3 and DFV), and the viral quantity was determined from seven time points during the first three days after infection. The qPCR was also used to determine the viral load in tissue samples from pike (Esox lucius) fry challenged experimentally with EHNV. PMID:21087639

Holopainen, Riikka; Honkanen, Jarno; Jensen, Britt Bang; Ariel, Ellen; Tapiovaara, Hannele

2011-01-01

37

Phylogeny, life history, and ecology contribute to differences in amphibian susceptibility to ranaviruses.  

PubMed

Research that identifies the potential host range of generalist pathogens as well as variation in host susceptibility is critical for understanding and predicting the dynamics of infectious diseases within ecological communities. Ranaviruses have been linked to amphibian die-off events worldwide with the greatest number of reported mortality events occurring in the United States. While reports of ranavirus-associated mortality events continue to accumulate, few data exist comparing the relative susceptibility of different species. Using a series of laboratory exposure experiments and comparative phylogenetics, we compared the susceptibilities of 19 amphibian species from two salamander families and five anurans families for two ranavirus isolates: frog virus 3 (FV3) and an FV3-like isolate from an American bullfrog culture facility. We discovered that ranaviruses were capable of infecting 17 of the 19 larval amphibian species tested with mortality ranging from 0 to 100%. Phylogenetic comparative methods demonstrated that species within the anuran family Ranidae were generally more susceptible to ranavirus infection compared to species from the other five families. We also found that susceptibility to infection was associated with species that breed in semi-permanent ponds, develop rapidly as larvae, and have limited range sizes. Collectively, these results suggest that phylogeny, life history characteristics, and habitat associations of amphibians have the potential to impact susceptibility to ranaviruses. PMID:22071720

Hoverman, Jason T; Gray, Matthew J; Haislip, Nathan A; Miller, Debra L

2011-09-01

38

Rapid Multiplex PCR Assay To Identify Respiratory Viral Pathogens: Moving Forward Diagnosing The Common Cold  

PubMed Central

Upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) can be a serious burden to the healthcare system. The majority of URIs are viral in etiology, but definitive diagnosis can prove difficult due to frequently overlapping clinical presentations of viral and bacterial infections, and the variable sensitivity, and lengthy turn-around time of viral culture. We tested new automated nested multiplex PCR technology, the FilmArray® system, in the TAMC department of clinical investigations, to determine the feasibility of replacing the standard viral culture with a rapid turn-around system. We conducted a feasibility study using a single-blinded comparison study, comparing PCR results with archived viral culture results from a convenience sample of cryopreserved archived nasopharyngeal swabs from acutely ill ED patients who presented with complaints of URI symptoms. A total of 61 archived samples were processed. Viral culture had previously identified 31 positive specimens from these samples. The automated nested multiplex PCR detected 38 positive samples. In total, PCR was 94.5% concordant with the previously positive viral culture results. However, PCR was only 63.4% concordant with the negative viral culture results, owing to PCR detection of 11 additional viral pathogens not recovered on viral culture. The average time to process a sample was 75 minutes. We determined that an automated nested multiplex PCR is a feasible alternative to viral culture in an acute clinical setting. We were able to detect at least 94.5% as many viral pathogens as viral culture is able to identify, with a faster turn-around time. PMID:24052914

Gordon, Sarah M; Elegino-Steffens, Diane U; Agee, Willie; Barnhill, Jason; Hsue, Gunther

2013-01-01

39

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE TO VIRAL PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

Interferon gamma (IFN-?) was selected as a biomarker for a viral exposure study. Twelve-week-old BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.2ml of 104 PFU/ml of coxsackievirus B3 or B4 diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mice were injected with PBS on...

40

Detection of viral pathogens in high grade gliomas from unmapped next-generation sequencing data.  

PubMed

Viral pathogens have been implicated in the development of certain cancers including human papillomavirus (HPV) in squamous cell carcinoma and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in Burkitt's lymphoma. The significance of viral pathogens in brain tumors is controversial, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been associated with glioblastoma (GBM) in some but not all studies, making the role of HCMV unclear. In this study we sought to determine if viral pathogen sequences could be identified in an unbiased manner from previously discarded, unmapped, non-human, next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads obtained from targeted oncology, panel-based sequencing of high grade gliomas (HGGs), including GBMs. Twenty one sequential HGG cases were analyzed by a targeted NGS clinical oncology panel containing 151 genes using DNA obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Sequencing reads that did not map to the human genome (average of 38,000 non-human reads/case (1.9%)) were filtered and low quality reads removed. Extracted high quality reads were then sequentially aligned to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) non-redundant nucleotide (nt and nr) databases. Aligned reads were classified based on NCBI taxonomy database and all eukaryotic viral sequences were further classified into viral families. Two viral sequences (both herpesviruses), EBV and Roseolovirus were detected in 5/21 (24%) cases and in 1/21 (5%) cases, respectively. None of the cases had detectable HCMV. Of the five HGG cases with detectable EBV DNA, four had additional material for EBV in situ hybridization (ISH), all of which were negative for expressed viral sequence. Overall, a similar discovery approach using unmapped non-human NGS reads could be used to discover viral sequences in other cancer types. PMID:24704430

Cimino, Patrick J; Zhao, Guoyan; Wang, David; Sehn, Jennifer K; Lewis, James S; Duncavage, Eric J

2014-06-01

41

First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong Kong Amphibian Trade  

PubMed Central

The emerging infectious amphibian diseases caused by amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranaviruses are responsible for global amphibian population declines and extinctions. Although likely to have been spread by a variety of activities, transcontinental dispersal appears closely associated with the international trade in live amphibians. The territory of Hong Kong reports frequent, high volume trade in amphibians, and yet the presence of Bd and ranavirus have not previously been detected in either traded or free-ranging amphibians. In 2012, a prospective surveillance project was conducted to investigate the presence of these pathogens in commercial shipments of live amphibians exported from Hong Kong International Airport. Analysis of skin (Bd) and cloacal (ranavirus) swabs by quantitative PCR detected pathogen presence in 31/265 (11.7%) and in 105/185 (56.8%) of amphibians, respectively. In addition, the water in which animals were transported tested positive for Bd, demonstrating the risk of pathogen pollution by the disposal of untreated wastewater. It is uncertain whether Bd and ranavirus remain contained within Hong Kong’s trade sector, or if native amphibians have already been exposed. Rapid response efforts are now urgently needed to determine current pathogen distribution in Hong Kong, evaluate potential trade-associated exposure to free-ranging amphibians, and identify opportunities to prevent disease establishment. PMID:24599268

Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Berger, Lee; Karesh, William B; Preston, Asa; Pessier, Allan P.; Skerratt, Lee F.

2014-01-01

42

First evidence of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and ranavirus in Hong Kong amphibian trade.  

PubMed

The emerging infectious amphibian diseases caused by amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranaviruses are responsible for global amphibian population declines and extinctions. Although likely to have been spread by a variety of activities, transcontinental dispersal appears closely associated with the international trade in live amphibians. The territory of Hong Kong reports frequent, high volume trade in amphibians, and yet the presence of Bd and ranavirus have not previously been detected in either traded or free-ranging amphibians. In 2012, a prospective surveillance project was conducted to investigate the presence of these pathogens in commercial shipments of live amphibians exported from Hong Kong International Airport. Analysis of skin (Bd) and cloacal (ranavirus) swabs by quantitative PCR detected pathogen presence in 31/265 (11.7%) and in 105/185 (56.8%) of amphibians, respectively. In addition, the water in which animals were transported tested positive for Bd, demonstrating the risk of pathogen pollution by the disposal of untreated wastewater. It is uncertain whether Bd and ranavirus remain contained within Hong Kong's trade sector, or if native amphibians have already been exposed. Rapid response efforts are now urgently needed to determine current pathogen distribution in Hong Kong, evaluate potential trade-associated exposure to free-ranging amphibians, and identify opportunities to prevent disease establishment. PMID:24599268

Kolby, Jonathan E; Smith, Kristine M; Berger, Lee; Karesh, William B; Preston, Asa; Pessier, Allan P; Skerratt, Lee F

2014-01-01

43

SEROLOGICAL SURVEY OF VIRAL PATHOGENS IN BEAN AND WHITE-FRONTED GEESE FROM GERMANY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sera from wild geese were tested for antibodies to selected viral pathogens at a resting site for wild waterfowl in Germany. Serum samples from both bean geese (Anserfabalis) and white-fronted geese (Anser albzfrons) collected in October 1991 were examined using sero- logical methods licensed for routine diagnosis in domestic poultry. Of 130 sera tested, antibodies to several infectious agents were

A. Hlinak; T. Muller; M. Kramer; R. U. MUhle; H. Liebherr

44

VIRAL PATHOGENS AND MICROBIOLOGICAL INDICATORS IN GROUND WATER FROM SMALL PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES IN SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

Thirty-eight public ground-water-supply wells serving less than 3,300 people were sampled from July 1999 through July 2001 in southeastern Michigan to determine (1) occurrence of viral pathogens and microbiological indicators, (2) whether indicators are adequate predictors of the...

45

Extraction of total nucleic acids from ticks for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens.  

PubMed

Ticks harbor numerous bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens that can cause serious infections in humans and domestic animals. Active surveillance of the tick vector can provide insight into the frequency and distribution of important pathogens in the environment. Nucleic-acid based detection of tick-borne bacterial, protozoan, and viral pathogens requires the extraction of both DNA and RNA (total nucleic acids) from ticks. Traditional methods for nucleic acid extraction are limited to extraction of either DNA or the RNA from a sample. Here we present a simple bead-beating based protocol for extraction of DNA and RNA from a single tick and show detection of Borrelia burgdorferi and Powassan virus from individual, infected Ixodes scapularis ticks. We determined expected yields for total nucleic acids by this protocol for a variety of adult tick species. The method is applicable to a variety of arthropod vectors, including fleas and mosquitoes, and was partially automated on a liquid handling robot. PMID:20180313

Crowder, Chris D; Rounds, Megan A; Phillipson, Curtis A; Picuri, John M; Matthews, Heather E; Halverson, Justina; Schutzer, Steven E; Ecker, David J; Eshoo, Mark W

2010-01-01

46

Rapid Accurate Identification of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this program were to develop two assays for rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic organisms at the strain level. The first assay "Quantitative Genome Profiling or QGP" is a real time PCR assay with a restriction enzyme-based component. Its underlying concept is that certain enzymes should cleave genomic DNA at many sites and that in some cases these cuts will interrupt the connection on the genomic DNA between flanking PCR primer pairs thereby eliminating selected PCR amplifications. When this occurs the appearance of the real-time PCR threshold (Ct) signal during DNA amplification is totally eliminated or, if cutting is incomplete, greatly delayed compared to an uncut control. This temporal difference in appearance of the Ct signal relative to undigested control DNA provides a rapid, high-throughput approach for DNA-based identification of different but closely related pathogens depending upon the nucleotide sequence of the target region. The second assay we developed uses the nucleotide sequence of pairs of shmi identifier tags (-21 bp) to identify DNA molecules. Subtle differences in linked tag pair combinations can also be used to distinguish between closely related isolates..

Dunn, John

2007-03-09

47

Genomic sequence of a ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) associated with salamander mortalities in North America.  

PubMed

Disease is among the suspected causes of amphibian population declines, and an iridovirus and a chytrid fungus are the primary pathogens associated with amphibian mortalities. Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) and a closely related strain, Regina ranavirus (RRV), are implicated in salamander die-offs in Arizona and Canada, respectively. We report the complete sequence of the ATV genome and partial sequence of the RRV genome. Sequence analysis of the ATV/RRV genomes showed marked similarity to other ranaviruses, including tiger frog virus (TFV) and frog virus 3 (FV3), the type virus of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae), as well as more distant relationships to lymphocystis disease virus, Chilo iridescent virus, and infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus. Putative open reading frames (ORFs) in the ATV sequence identified 24 genes that appear to control virus replication and block antiviral responses. In addition, >50 other putative genes, homologous to ORFs in other iridoviral genomes but of unknown function, were also identified. Sequence comparison performed by dot plot analysis between ATV and itself revealed a conserved 14-bp palindromic repeat within most intragenic regions. Dot plot analysis of ATV vs RRV sequences identified several polymorphisms between the two isolates. Finally, a comparison of ATV and TFV genomic sequences identified genomic rearrangements consistent with the high recombination frequency of iridoviruses. Given the adverse effects that ranavirus infections have on amphibian and fish populations, ATV/RRV sequence information will allow the design of better diagnostic probes for identifying ranavirus infections and extend our understanding of molecular events in ranavirus-infected cells. PMID:14599794

Jancovich, James K; Mao, Jinghe; Chinchar, V Gregory; Wyatt, Christopher; Case, Steven T; Kumar, Sudhir; Valente, Graziela; Subramanian, Sankar; Davidson, Elizabeth W; Collins, James P; Jacobs, Bertram L

2003-11-10

48

Mortality rates differ among amphibian populations exposed to three strains of a lethal ranavirus.  

PubMed

Infectious diseases are a growing threat to biodiversity, in many cases because of synergistic effects with habitat loss, environmental contamination, and climate change. Emergence of pathogens as new threats to host populations can also arise when novel combinations of hosts and pathogens are unintentionally brought together, for example, via commercial trade or wildlife relocations and reintroductions. Chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and amphibian ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae) are pathogens implicated in global amphibian declines. The emergence of disease associated with these pathogens appears to be at least partly related to recent translocations over large geographic distances. We experimentally examined the outcomes of novel combinations of host populations and pathogen strains using the amphibian ranavirus Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) and barred tiger salamanders (Ambystoma mavortium, formerly considered part of the Ambystoma tigrinum complex). One salamander population was highly resistant to lethal infections by all ATV strains, including its own strain, and mortality rates differed among ATV strains according to salamander population. Mortality rates in novel pairings of salamander population and ATV strain were not predictable based on knowledge of mortality rates when salamander populations were exposed to their own ATV strain. The underlying cause(s) for the differences in mortality rates are unknown, but local selection pressures on salamanders, viruses, or both, across the range of this widespread host-pathogen system are a plausible hypothesis. Our study highlights the need to minimize translocations of amphibian ranaviruses, even among conspecifc host populations, and the importance of considering intraspecific variation in endeavors to manage wildlife diseases. PMID:20143127

Schock, Danna M; Bollinger, Trent K; Collins, James P

2009-09-01

49

First case of ranavirus-associated morbidity and mortality in natural populations of the South American frog Atelognathus patagonicus.  

PubMed

Atelognathus patagonicus is an endangered leptodactylid frog endemic to a small region in and around Laguna Blanca National Park in northern Patagonia, Argentina. All of the lakes and small ponds of the region (except Laguna Blanca itself) contain A. patagonicus and in all but one of these lakes the species shows clinical signs of a previously undiagnosed disease, the characteristics of which suggested a ranavirus. We collected symptomatic and asymptomatic A. patagonicus frogs and tadpoles from 4 small lakes and analyzed tissues for ranavirus and the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis using PCR amplification of pathogen DNA. Of the 32 specimens tested, 25 were positive for ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP). Sequence alignments of the ranavirus MCP from these specimens showed 100% similarity with published FV3 and FV3-like viruses from anurans, 98 to 99 % similarity with Bohle iridovirus, and 95 % similarity with Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) and Regina ranavirus (RRV). A search of the NCBI Blast nucleotide database using the 500 base pair MCP sequence obtained from these samples did not suggest any homology to any other pathogen. In addition, 1 sample (3 pooled individuals) from 1 lake tested positive for B. dendrobatidis. The clinical signs observed primarily in late-stage tadpoles and recent metamorphs, which have reoccurred each year since at least 2001, are consistent with ranaviral disease, but until histopathology of diseased individuals is carried out, chytridiomycosis or other diseases cannot be ruled out. PMID:17067077

Fox, Stanley F; Greer, Amy L; Torres-Cervantes, Ricardo; Collins, James P

2006-09-14

50

Metagenomic approaches to disclose disease-associated pathogens: detection of viral pathogens in honeybees.  

PubMed

Metagenomic approaches have become invaluable for culture-independent and sequence-independent detection and characterization of disease-associated pathogens. Here, the sequential steps from sampling to verification of results are described for a metagenomic-based approach to detect potential pathogens in honeybees. The pre-sequencing steps are given in detail, but due to the rapid development of sequencing technologies, all platform-specific procedures, as well as subsequent bioinformatics analysis, are more generally described. It should also be noted that this approach could, with minor modifications, be adapted for other organisms and sample matrices. PMID:25399116

Granberg, Fredrik; Karlsson, Oskar E; Belák, Sándor

2015-01-01

51

Short Communication Concurrent ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in captive  

E-print Network

Short Communication Concurrent ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in captive Dendrobates Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis a b s t r a c t A ranavirus infection with concurrent Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection and mortality in captive Phyllobates and Dendrobates species is reported

Gray, Matthew

52

Conservation Medicine: Human Health:Ecosystem Sustainability Official  

E-print Network

, Vermillion, SD 57069 Abstract: The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, ranaviruses, and trematodes, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd), viral pathogens in the genus Ranavirus

Johnson, Pieter

53

RNA Viral Community in Human Feces: Prevalence of Plant Pathogenic Viruses  

PubMed Central

The human gut is known to be a reservoir of a wide variety of microbes, including viruses. Many RNA viruses are known to be associated with gastroenteritis; however, the enteric RNA viral community present in healthy humans has not been described. Here, we present a comparative metagenomic analysis of the RNA viruses found in three fecal samples from two healthy human individuals. For this study, uncultured viruses were concentrated by tangential flow filtration, and viral RNA was extracted and cloned into shotgun viral cDNA libraries for sequencing analysis. The vast majority of the 36,769 viral sequences obtained were similar to plant pathogenic RNA viruses. The most abundant fecal virus in this study was pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV), which was found in high concentrations—up to 109 virions per gram of dry weight fecal matter. PMMV was also detected in 12 (66.7%) of 18 fecal samples collected from healthy individuals on two continents, indicating that this plant virus is prevalent in the human population. A number of pepper-based foods tested positive for PMMV, suggesting dietary origins for this virus. Intriguingly, the fecal PMMV was infectious to host plants, suggesting that humans might act as a vehicle for the dissemination of certain plant viruses. PMID:16336043

Lee, Wah Heng; Run, Jin-Quan; Wei, Chia Lin; Soh, Shirlena Wee Ling; Hibberd, Martin L; Liu, Edison T; Rohwer, Forest

2006-01-01

54

Serological survey of viral pathogens in bean and white-fronted geese from Germany.  

PubMed

Sera from wild geese were tested for antibodies to selected viral pathogens at a resting site for wild waterfowl in Germany. Serum samples from both bean geese (Anser fabalis) and white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) collected in October 1991 were examined using serological methods licensed for routine diagnosis in domestic poultry. Of 130 sera tested, antibodies to several infectious agents were found including Newcastle disease virus (45%), goose parvovirus (48%), avian reovirus (29%), and avian adenovirus or egg drop syndrome 76 virus (6%). Antibodies against duck hepatitis virus were not detected. Differences in seroprevalences were not detected between the two geese species. While role and significance of wild geese in the epidemiology of avian diseases remains to be determined, it is possible that they could be of some importance as reservoirs and carriers of certain viral diseases of domestic poultry. PMID:9706557

Hlinak, A; Müller, T; Kramer, M; Mühle, R U; Liebherr, H; Ziedler, K

1998-07-01

55

First molecular detection of a viral pathogen in Ugandan honey bees.  

PubMed

Ugandan honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) produce honey, and are key pollinators within commercial crops and natural ecosystems. Real-time RT-PCR was used to screen immature and adult bees collected from 63 beekeeping sites across Uganda for seven viral pathogens. No samples tested positive for Chronic bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Deformed wing virus, Acute bee paralysis virus, Apis iridescent virus or Israeli acute paralysis virus. However, Black queen cell virus (BQCV) was found in 35.6% of samples. It occurred in adults and larvae, and was most prevalent in the Western highlands, accounting for over 40% of positive results nationally. PMID:20219470

Kajobe, Robert; Marris, Gay; Budge, Giles; Laurenson, Lynn; Cordoni, Guido; Jones, Ben; Wilkins, Selwyn; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Brown, Mike A

2010-06-01

56

Efficacy of select disinfectants at inactivating Ranavirus.  

PubMed

Ranavirus can cause disease in reptiles and amphibians. Because survival time outside of a host remains uncertain, equipment must be disinfected to prevent transmission of ranaviruses. However, disinfectant efficacy against amphibian ranaviruses has not been investigated for chlorhexidine (Nolvasan), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), or potassium compounds. Our goal was to determine the efficacy of Nolvasan (0.25, 0.75 and 2.0%), bleach (0.2, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0%), and Virkon S (1.0%) at inactivating Ranavirus at 1 and 5 min contact durations. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) (2.0 and 5.0 ppm) was also tested with a 60 min contact time. Nolvasan at 0.75 and 2.0% and bleach at 3.0 and 5.0% concentration were effective for both contact durations. Virkon S was effective for both durations, but KMnO4 was not effective at either concentration. Concentrations of Nolvasan, bleach and Virkon S that are at least 0.75, 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively, are effective at inactivating Ranavirus after 1 min exposure time. PMID:19476278

Bryan, Laura K; Baldwin, Charles A; Gray, Matthew J; Miller, Debra L

2009-04-01

57

Comparison of four multiplex PCR assays for the detection of viral pathogens in respiratory specimens.  

PubMed

Multiplex PCR has become the test of choice for the detection of multiple respiratory viruses in clinical specimens. However, there are few direct comparisons of different PCR assays. This study compares 4 different multiplex PCR assays for the recovery of common respiratory viruses. We tested 213 respiratory specimens using four different multiplex PCR assays: the xTAG respiratory viral panel fast (Abbott Molecular Laboratories), Fast-track Respiratory Pathogen assay (Fast-track Diagnostics), Easyplex respiratory pathogen 12 kit (Ausdiagnostics), and an in-house multiplex real-time PCR assay. The performance of the four assays was very similar, with 93-100% agreement for all comparisons. Other issues, such as through-put, technical requirements and cost, are likely to be as important for making a decision about which of these assays to use given their comparative performance. PMID:23583489

Anderson, Trevor P; Werno, Anja M; Barratt, Kevin; Mahagamasekera, Patalee; Murdoch, David R; Jennings, Lance C

2013-08-01

58

Herpetological First Report of Ranavirus Infecting Lungless  

E-print Network

-related mortality events in amphibians (Green et al. 2002; Muths et al. 2006). There is evidence that ranaviruses and 2001 (Converse and Green 2005; Green et al. 2002). Despite these mortality events, surveillance April 2007 at three locations in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee: 1) Ash Hopper

Gray, Matthew

59

Ranaviruses in European h bAmphibians  

E-print Network

· Future Directions R i R ti S t· Ranavirus Reporting System #12;7/16/2011 2 Common or Smooth Newts 2010) Life History Stage: Adult Newt not visibly diseased, but RV infection detected Vi ibl di d f Visibly diseased common frogs present Site long known for M&M in common frogs Alpine Newt Mesotriton

Gray, Matthew

60

NANOMETRIC BASED METHODOLOGIES FOR SENSITIVE, HIGH THROUGHPUT DETECTION OF VIRAL PATHOGENS: SURFACE ENHANCED RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The threat of bioterrorism has markedly amplified the demand for rapid, highly sensitive, and versatile diagnostic tests for a wide range of viral pathogens. This presentation describes efforts to develop immunoassay platforms that require minimal sample preparation and readout methodologies that fa...

61

Assay platforms for the rapid detection of viral pathogens by the ultrahigh sensitivity monitoring of antigen-antibody binding  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The drive for early disease detection and growing threat of bioterrorism has markedly amplified the demand for ultrasensitive, high-speed diagnostic tests for viral pathogens. This presentation describes innovations in the development of platforms and readout methodologies that potentially address d...

62

Efficient transmission of Cassava brown streak disease viral pathogens by chip bud grafting  

PubMed Central

Background Techniques to study plant viral diseases under controlled growth conditions are required to fully understand their biology and investigate host resistance. Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) presents a major threat to cassava production in East Africa. No infectious clones of the causal viruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) or Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) are available, and mechanical transmission to cassava is not effective. An improved method for transmission of the viruses, both singly and as co-infections has been developed using bud grafts. Findings Axillary buds from CBSD symptomatic plants infected with virulent isolates of CBSV and UCBSV were excised and grafted onto 6–8 week old greenhouse-grown, disease-free cassava plants of cultivars Ebwanateraka, TME204 and 60444. Plants were assessed visually for development of CBSD symptoms and by RT-PCR for presence of the viruses in leaf and storage root tissues. Across replicated experiments, 70-100% of plants inoculated with CBSV developed CBSD leaf and stem symptoms 2–6 weeks after bud grafting. Infected plants showed typical, severe necrotic lesions in storage roots at harvest 12–14 weeks after graft inoculation. Sequential grafting of buds from plants infected with UCBSV followed 10–14 days later by buds carrying CBSV, onto the same test plant, resulted in 100% of the rootstocks becoming co-infected with both pathogens. This dual transmission rate was greater than that achieved by simultaneous grafting with UCBSV and CBSV (67%), or when grafting first with CBSV followed by UCBSV (17%). Conclusions The bud grafting method described presents an improved tool for screening cassava germplasm for resistance to CBSD causal viruses, and for studying pathogenicity of this important disease. Bud grafting provides new opportunities compared to previously reported top and side grafting systems. Test plants can be inoculated as young, uniform plants of a size easily handled in a small greenhouse or large growth chamber and can be inoculated in a controlled manner with CBSV and UCBSV, either singly or together. Disease symptoms develop rapidly, allowing better studies of interactions between these viral pathogens, their movement within shoot and root systems, and how they induce their destructive disease symptoms. PMID:24314370

2013-01-01

63

Respiratory viral pathogens among Singapore military servicemen 2009 – 2012: epidemiology and clinical characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Few studies have comprehensively described tropical respiratory disease surveillance in military populations. There is also a lack of studies comparing clinical characteristics of the non-influenza pathogens with influenza and amongst themselves. Methods From May 2009 through October 2012, 7733 consenting cases of febrile respiratory illness (FRI) (temperature [greater than or equal to]37.5degreesC with cough or sorethroat) and controls in the Singapore military had clinical data and nasal washes collected prospectively. Nasal washes underwent multiplex PCR, and the analysis was limited to viral mono-infections. Results 49% of cases tested positive for at least one virus, of whom 10% had multiple infections. 53% of the FRI cases fulfilled the definition of influenza-like illness (ILI), of whom 52% were positive for at least one virus. The most frequent etiologies for mono-infections among FRI cases were Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (13%), Influenza B (13%) and coxsackevirus (9%). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of ILI for influenza among FRI cases were 72%, 48%, 40% and 69% respectively. On logistic regression, there were marked differences in the prevalence of different symptoms and signs between viruses with fever more prevalent amongst influenza and adenovirus infections than other viruses. Conclusion There are multiple viral etiologies for FRI and ILI with differing clinical symptoms in the Singapore military. Influenza and coxsackevirus were the most common etiology for FRI, while influenza and adenoviruses displayed the most febrile symptoms. Further studies should explore these differences and possible interventions. PMID:24735158

2014-01-01

64

Genes controlling vaccine responses and disease resistance to respiratory viral pathogens in cattle  

PubMed Central

Farm animals remain at risk of endemic, exotic and newly emerging viruses. Vaccination is often promoted as the best possible solution, and yet for many pathogens, either there are no appropriate vaccines or those that are available are far from ideal. A complementary approach to disease control may be to identify genes and chromosomal regions that underlie genetic variation in disease resistance and response to vaccination. However, identification of the causal polymorphisms is not straightforward as it generally requires large numbers of animals with linked phenotypes and genotypes. Investigation of genes underlying complex traits such as resistance or response to viral pathogens requires several genetic approaches including candidate genes deduced from knowledge about the cellular pathways leading to protection or pathology, or unbiased whole genome scans using markers spread across the genome. Evidence for host genetic variation exists for a number of viral diseases in cattle including bovine respiratory disease and anecdotally, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). We immunised and vaccinated a cattle cross herd with a 40-mer peptide derived from FMDV and a vaccine against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Genetic variation has been quantified. A candidate gene approach has grouped high and low antibody and T cell responders by common motifs in the peptide binding pockets of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) DRB3 gene. This suggests that vaccines with a minimal number of epitopes that are recognised by most cattle could be designed. Whole genome scans using microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers has revealed many novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNP markers controlling both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, some of which are in genes of known immunological relevance including the toll-like receptors (TLRs). The sequencing, assembly and annotation of livestock genomes and is continuing apace. In addition, provision of high-density SNP chips should make it possible to link phenotypes with genotypes in field populations without the need for structured populations or pedigree information. This will hopefully enable fine mapping of QTL and ultimate identification of the causal gene(s). The research could lead to selection of animals that are more resistant to disease and new ways to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:21621277

Glass, Elizabeth J.; Baxter, Rebecca; Leach, Richard J.; Jann, Oliver C.

2012-01-01

65

Magnitude of the US trade in amphibians and presence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and ranavirus infection in imported North American bullfrogs ( Rana catesbeiana)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amphibians are globally threatened by anthropogenic habitat loss, the wildlife trade and emerging diseases. Previous authors have hypothesized that the spread of the amphibian disease chytridiomycosis (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and amphibian ranaviruses are associated with the international trade in live amphibians. The North American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) is thought to be a carrier of these pathogens, is globally traded as a

Lisa M. Schloegel; Angela M. Picco; A. Marm Kilpatrick; Angela J. Davies; Alex D. Hyatt; Peter Daszak

2009-01-01

66

Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees  

PubMed Central

Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-?B immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-?B activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-?B signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

2013-01-01

67

Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.  

PubMed

Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-?B immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-?B activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-?B signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

2013-11-12

68

Inflammation-Induced Reactivation of the Ranavirus Frog Virus 3 in Asymptomatic Xenopus laevis  

PubMed Central

Natural infections of ectothermic vertebrates by ranaviruses (RV, family Iridoviridae) are rapidly increasing, with an alarming expansion of RV tropism and resulting die-offs of numerous animal populations. Notably, infection studies of the amphibian Xenopus laevis with the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3) have revealed that although the adult frog immune system is efficient at controlling RV infections, residual quiescent virus can be detected in mononuclear phagocytes of otherwise asymptomatic animals following the resolution of RV infections. It is noteworthy that macrophage-lineage cells are now believed to be a critical element in the RV infection strategy. In the present work, we report that inflammation induced by peritoneal injection of heat-killed bacteria in asymptomatic frogs one month after infection with FV3 resulted in viral reactivation including detectable viral DNA and viral gene expression in otherwise asymptomatic frogs. FV3 reactivation was most prominently detected in kidneys and in peritoneal HAM56+ mononuclear phagocytes. Notably, unlike adult frogs that typically clear primary FV3 infections, a proportion of the animals succumbed to the reactivated FV3 infection, indicating that previous exposure does not provide protection against subsequent reactivation in these animals. PMID:25390636

Robert, Jacques; Grayfer, Leon; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Ward, Brian; De Jesús Andino, Francisco

2014-01-01

69

Seroprevalences to viral pathogens in free-ranging and captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) on Namibian Farmland.  

PubMed

Cheetah populations are diminishing rapidly in their natural habitat. One reason for their decline is thought to be a high susceptibility to (infectious) diseases because cheetahs in zoos suffer from high disease-induced mortality. Data on the health status of free-ranging cheetahs are scarce, and little is known about their exposure and susceptibility to infectious diseases. We determined seroprevalences to nine key viruses (feline herpesvirus 1, feline calicivirus, feline parvovirus, feline coronavirus, canine distemper virus, feline immunodeficiency virus [FIV], puma lentivirus, feline leukemia virus, and rabies virus) in 68 free-ranging cheetahs on east-central Namibian farmland, 24 nonvaccinated Namibian captive cheetahs, and several other wild carnivore species and conducted necropsies of cheetahs and other wild carnivores. Eight of 11 other wild carnivores were seropositive for at least one of the viruses, including the first record of an FIV-like infection in a wild felid west of the Kalahari, the caracal (Felis caracal). Seroprevalences of the free-ranging cheetahs were below 5% for all nine viruses, which is significantly lower than seroprevalences in nonvaccinated captive cheetahs and those for five of seven viruses in previously studied free-ranging cheetahs from north-central Namibia (L. Munson, L. Marker, E. Dubovi, J. A. Spencer, J. F. Evermann, and S. J. O'Brien, J. Wildl. Dis. 40:23-31, 2004). There was no clinical or pathological evidence of infectious diseases in living or dead cheetahs. The results suggest that while free-ranging wild carnivores may be a source of pathogens, the distribution of seroprevalences across studies mirrored local human population density and factors associated with human habitation, probably reflecting contact opportunities with (nonvaccinated) domestic and feral cats and dogs. They also suggest that Namibian cheetahs respond effectively to viral challenges, encouraging consistent and sustainable conservation efforts. PMID:19955325

Thalwitzer, Susanne; Wachter, Bettina; Robert, Nadia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Müller, Thomas; Lonzer, Johann; Meli, Marina L; Bay, Gert; Hofer, Heribert; Lutz, Hans

2010-02-01

70

Viral Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns Regulate Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity via Competing Innate Cytokine Signals  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Pattern recognition receptor (PRR) detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as viral RNA, drives innate immune responses against West Nile virus (WNV), an emerging neurotropic pathogen. Here we demonstrate that WNV PAMPs orchestrate endothelial responses to WNV via competing innate immune cytokine signals at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a multicellular interface with highly specialized brain endothelial cells that normally prevents pathogen entry. While Th1 cytokines increase the permeability of endothelial barriers, type I interferon (IFN) promoted and stabilized BBB function. Induction of innate cytokines by pattern recognition pathways directly regulated BBB permeability and tight junction formation via balanced activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA, which in turn regulated the transendothelial trafficking of WNV. In vivo, mice with attenuated type I IFN signaling or IFN induction (Ifnar?/? Irf7?/?) exhibited enhanced BBB permeability and tight junction dysregulation after WNV infection. Together, these data provide new insight into host-pathogen interactions at the BBB during neurotropic viral infection. PMID:25161189

Daniels, Brian P.; Holman, David W.; Cruz-Orengo, Lillian; Jujjavarapu, Harsha; Durrant, Douglas M.

2014-01-01

71

Herpesvirus Saimiri vFLIP Provides an Antiapoptotic Function but Is Not Essential for Viral Replication, Transformation, or Pathogenicity  

PubMed Central

Apoptosis of infected cells is an important host defense mechanism, and many viruses have exploited antiapoptotic proteins that interfere with crucial cellular pathways. Viral FLICE inhibitory proteins (vFLIPs) are encoded by rhadinoviruses like herpesvirus saimiri, the related Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8), and the poxvirus responsible for molluscum contagiosum. The vFLIPs can block the interaction of the death receptor-adapter complex with the cellular effector FLICE (caspase-8), and this prevents the initiation of the downstream caspase cascade. KSHV/HHV8 vFLIP overexpression can confer resistance to T-cell-mediated apoptosis and acts as a tumor progression factor in a murine B-cell lymphoma model. To analyze the function of herpesvirus vFLIPs in the genetic background of the virus and in a model for viral pathogenesis, we deleted the vFLIP gene (open reading frame 71) from the genome of herpesvirus saimiri strain C488. The viral deletion mutant was viable and replicated like the wild-type virus. An antiapoptotic effect could be attributed to the vFLIP gene, but we also show that the vFLIP gene of herpesvirus saimiri is dispensable for viral transformation of T cells in vitro and for pathogenicity in cottontop tamarins in vivo. PMID:11090192

Glykofrydes, Diana; Niphuis, Henk; Kuhn, Eva M.; Rosenwirth, Brigitte; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Bruder, Joseph; Niedobitek, Gerald; Müller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Ensser, Armin

2000-01-01

72

INCREASING LEVELS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENS: POTENTIAL FOR AFFECTING VIRAL EVOLUTION AND PATHOGENICITY - A SPECULATIVE REVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

The author examines available data concerning the ways in which information contained in viral genomes is altered. echanisms of damage and repair of nucleic acids are discussed. nformation available on the rates of evolution of various viruses is summarized....

73

Different incubation temperatures affect viral polymerase activity and yields of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses in embryonated chicken eggs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various incubation conditions (35°C–38°C, 2–7 days) have been used in surveillance studies of the prevalence of avian influenza\\u000a viruses in wild birds. Here, we studied viral polymerase activity and virus growth kinetics of low-pathogenic avian influenza\\u000a viruses (LPAIVs) isolated from field samples [A\\/duck\\/Hong Kong\\/365\\/1978 (H4N6) and A\\/duck\\/Nanchang\\/2–0480\\/2000 (H9N2)] during\\u000a incubation at different temperatures (35°C, 37°C, and 39°C) in the allantoic cavity

Victoria Lang; Henju Marjuki; Scott L. Krauss; Richard J. Webby; Robert G. Webster

2011-01-01

74

A single amino acid mutation, R42A, in the Newcastle disease virus matrix protein abrogates its nuclear localization and attenuates viral replication and pathogenicity.  

PubMed

The Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix (M) protein is a highly basic and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling viral protein. Previous study has demonstrated that the N-terminal 100 aa of NDV M protein are somewhat acidic overall, but the remainder of the polypeptide is strongly basic. In this study, we investigated the role of the N-terminal basic residues in the subcellular localization of M protein and in the replication and pathogenicity of NDV. We found that mutation of the basic residue arginine (R) to alanine (A) at position 42 disrupted M's nuclear localization. Moreover, a recombinant virus with R42A mutation in the M protein reduced viral replication in DF-1 cells and attenuated the virulence and pathogenicity of the virus in chickens. This is the first report to show that a basic residue mutation in the NDV M protein abrogates its nuclear localization and attenuates viral replication and pathogenicity. PMID:24603525

Duan, Zhiqiang; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Jian; Xu, Haixu; Wang, Yuyang; Liu, Huimou; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

2014-05-01

75

Distribution of an Invasive Aquatic Pathogen (Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus) in the Great Lakes and Its Relationship to Shipping  

PubMed Central

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a rhabdovirus found in fish from oceans of the northern hemisphere and freshwaters of Europe. It has caused extensive losses of cultured and wild fish and has become established in the North American Great Lakes. Large die-offs of wild fish in the Great Lakes due to VHSV have alarmed the public and provoked government attention on the introduction and spread of aquatic animal pathogens in freshwaters. We investigated the relations between VHSV dispersion and shipping and boating activity in the Great Lakes by sampling fish and water at sites that were commercial shipping harbors, recreational boating centers, and open shorelines. Fish and water samples were individually analyzed for VHSV using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and cell culture assays. Of 1,221 fish of 17 species, 55 were VHSV positive with highly varied qRT-PCR titers (1 to 5,950,000 N gene copies). The detections of VHSV in fish and water samples were closely associated and the virus was detected in 21 of 30 sites sampled. The occurrence of VHSV was not related to type of site or shipping related invasion hotspots. Our results indicate that VHSV is widely dispersed in the Great Lakes and is both an enzootic and epizootic pathogen. We demonstrate that pathogen distribution information could be developed quickly and is clearly needed for aquatic ecosystem conservation, management of affected populations, and informed regulation of the worldwide trade of aquatic organisms. PMID:20405014

Bain, Mark B.; Cornwell, Emily R.; Hope, Kristine M.; Eckerlin, Geofrey E.; Casey, Rufina N.; Groocock, Geoffrey H.; Getchell, Rodman G.; Bowser, Paul R.; Winton, James R.; Batts, William N.; Cangelosi, Allegra; Casey, James W.

2010-01-01

76

Environmental dependency of amphibian-ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases.  

PubMed

The context-dependent investigations of host-pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host-strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype-genotype-environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics. PMID:25469155

Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

2014-08-01

77

Environmental dependency of amphibian–ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases  

PubMed Central

The context-dependent investigations of host–pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host–strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype–genotype–environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics. PMID:25469155

Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

2014-01-01

78

Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards  

PubMed Central

Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards. PMID:24073785

2013-01-01

79

Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards.  

PubMed

Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards. PMID:24073785

Stöhr, Anke C; Blahak, Silvia; Heckers, Kim O; Wiechert, Jutta; Behncke, Helge; Mathes, Karina; Günther, Pascale; Zwart, Peer; Ball, Inna; Rüschoff, Birgit; Marschang, Rachel E

2013-01-01

80

Viral proteins and Src family kinases: Mechanisms of pathogenicity from a “liaison dangereuse”  

PubMed Central

To complete their life cycle and spread, viruses interfere with and gain control of diverse cellular processes, this most often occurring through interaction between viral proteins (VPs) and resident protein partners. Among the latter, Src family kinases (SFKs), a class of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that contributes to the conversion of extracellular signals into intracellular signaling cascades and is involved in virtually all cellular processes, have recently emerged as critical mediators between the cell’s infrastructure and the viral demands. In this scenario, structural or ex novo synthesized VPs are able to bind to the different domains of these enzymes through specific short linear motifs present along their sequences. Proline-rich motifs displaying the conserved minimal consensus PxxP and recognizing the SFK Src homology (SH)3 domain constitute a cardinal signature for the formation of multiprotein complexes and this interaction may promote phosphorylation of VPs by SFKs, thus creating phosphotyrosine motifs that become a docking site for the SH2 domains of SFKs or other SH2 domain-bearing signaling molecules. Importantly, the formation of these assemblies also results in a change in the activity and/or location of SFKs, and these events are critical in perturbing key signaling pathways so that viruses can utilize the cell’s machinery to their own benefit. In the light of these observations, although VPs as such, especially those with enzyme activity, are still regarded as valuable targets for therapeutic strategies, multiprotein complexes composed of viral and host cell proteins are increasingly becoming objects of investigation with a view to deeply characterize the structural aspects that favor their formation and to develop new compounds able to contrast viral diseases in an alternative manner. PMID:24175231

Pagano, Mario Angelo; Tibaldi, Elena; Palù, Giorgio; Brunati, Anna Maria

2013-01-01

81

DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOMARKER SYSTEM FOR DETECTING EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE VIRAL PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has published a drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL) that includes waterborne pathogens and chemicals that may be considered for regulation at a future date. For each contaminant on the CCL, the Agency will need sufficient data to conduct analyses on the extent of...

82

Intact Dendritic Cell Pathogen-Recognition Receptor Functions Associate with Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment-Induced Viral Clearance  

PubMed Central

Although studies have addressed the exhaustion of the host's immune response to HCV and its role in treatment, there is little information about the possible contribution of innate immunity to treatment-induced clearance. We hypothesized that because intact myeloid dendritic cell (MDC) pathogen sensing functions are associated with improved HCV-specific CD8+ T cell functionality in some chronically infected patients, it might enhance HCV clearance rate under standard interferon therapy. To investigate this hypothesis, TLR-induced MDC activation and HCV-specific CD8+ T cell response quality were monitored longitudinally at the single-cell level using polychromatic flow cytometry in chronically infected patients undergoing interferon therapy. We correlated the immunological, biochemical and virological data with response to treatment. We demonstrate that the clinical efficacy of interferon-induced viral clearance is influenced by the extent to which HCV inhibits MDC functions before treatment, rather than solely on a breakdown of the extrinsic T cell immunosuppressive environment. Thus, viral inhibition of MDC functions before treatment emerges as a co-determining factor in the clinical efficacy of interferon therapy during chronic HCV infection. PMID:25033043

Rodrigue-Gervais, Ian Gaël; Willems, Bernard; Lamarre, Daniel

2014-01-01

83

Is There Still Room for Novel Viral Pathogens in Pediatric Respiratory Tract Infections?  

PubMed Central

Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low. PMID:25412469

Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A.; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E.; Arias-Ortiz, María A.; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N.; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma. del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E.; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F.; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Arias, Carlos F.

2014-01-01

84

In Search of Pathogens: Transcriptome-Based Identification of Viral Sequences from the Pine Processionary Moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa).  

PubMed

Thaumetopoea pityocampa (pine processionary moth) is one of the most important pine pests in the forests of Mediterranean countries, Central Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Apart from causing significant damage to pinewoods, T. pityocampa occurrence is also an issue for public and animal health, as it is responsible for dermatological reactions in humans and animals by contact with its irritating hairs. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed the fast and cost-effective generation of genetic information of interest to understand different biological aspects of non-model organisms as well as the identification of potential pathogens. Using these technologies, we have obtained and characterized the transcriptome of T. pityocampa larvae collected in 12 different geographical locations in Turkey. cDNA libraries for Illumina sequencing were prepared from four larval tissues, head, gut, fat body and integument. By pooling the sequences from Illumina platform with those previously published using the Roche 454-FLX and Sanger methods we generated the largest reference transcriptome of T. pityocampa. In addition, this study has also allowed identification of possible viral pathogens with potential application in future biocontrol strategies. PMID:25626148

Jakubowska, Agata K; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Millán-Leiva, Anabel; Sanz-Carbonell, Alejandro; Muratoglu, Hacer; Herrero, Salvador; Demirbag, Zihni

2015-01-01

85

Canine Enteric Coronaviruses: Emerging Viral Pathogens with Distinct Recombinant Spike Proteins  

PubMed Central

Canine enteric coronavirus (CCoV) is an alphacoronavirus infecting dogs that is closely related to enteric coronaviruses of cats and pigs. While CCoV has traditionally caused mild gastro-intestinal clinical signs, there are increasing reports of lethal CCoV infections in dogs, with evidence of both gastrointestinal and systemic viral dissemination. Consequently, CCoV is now considered to be an emerging infectious disease of dogs. In addition to the two known serotypes of CCoV, novel recombinant variants of CCoV have been found containing spike protein N-terminal domains (NTDs) that are closely related to those of feline and porcine strains. The increase in disease severity in dogs and the emergence of novel CCoVs can be attributed to the high level of recombination within the spike gene that can occur during infection by more than one CCoV type in the same host. PMID:25153347

Licitra, Beth N.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Whittaker, Gary R.

2014-01-01

86

Viral Pathogens and Acute Lung Injury: Investigations Inspired by the SARS Epidemic and the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic  

PubMed Central

Acute viral pneumonia is an important cause of acute lung injury (ALI), although not enough is known about the exact incidence of viral infection in ALI. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays, direct fluorescent antigen (DFA) assays, and viral cultures can detect viruses in samples from the human respiratory tract, but the presence of the virus does not prove it to be a pathogen, nor does it give information regarding the interaction of viruses with the host immune response and bacterial flora of the respiratory tract. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic provided a better understanding of how viral pathogens mediate lung injury. Although the viruses initially infect the respiratory epithelium, the relative role of epithelial damage and endothelial dysfunction has not been well defined. The inflammatory host immune response to H1N1 infection is a major contributor to lung injury. The SARS coronavirus causes lung injury and inflammation in part through actions on the nonclassical renin angiotensin pathway. The lessons learned from the pandemic outbreaks of SARS coronavirus and H1N1 capture key principles of virally mediated ALI. There are pathogen-specific pathways underlying virally mediated ALI that converge onto a common end pathway resulting in diffuse alveolar damage. In terms of therapy, lung protective ventilation is the cornerstone of supportive care. There is little evidence that corticosteroids are beneficial, and they might be harmful. Future therapeutic strategies may be targeted to specific pathogens, the pathogenetic pathways in the host immune response, or enhancing repair and regeneration of tissue damage. PMID:23934716

Hendrickson, Carolyn M.; Matthay, Michael A.

2014-01-01

87

Source identification of bacterial and viral pathogens and their survival/fading in the process of wastewater treatment, reclamation, and environmental reuse.  

PubMed

Pathogenic safety is drawing wide concern in water reclamation and reuse. In order to elucidate survive/fade of pathogens during the processes of wastewater treatment and reclamation, general indicators (fecal coliform and Escherichia coli), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella and Shigella) and viruses (enterovirus, rotavirus and norovirus) were investigated in an A(2)O-MBR system. Attention was paid to their strengths from different sources, at various stages of the treatment, and in the product water. According to findings, black water was the main source for pathogens-at least 1-2-log higher in concentration than those from other sources. The preliminary treatment of wastewater by fine screens could bring about 0.2-0.4-log removal for almost all pathogens. The biological treatment units achieved almost identical removal (1.3-1.7-log) for bacteria and viruses. However, subsequent treatment in the membrane bioreactor showed varied removal for fecal coliform (4.7-log), E. coli (2.6-log) and the other pathogens (0.7-1.0-log), indicating that a high reduction of indicator bacteria may not imply equivalent removal of bacterial and viral pathogens. Chlorination was proved to be effective for eliminating all pathogens. In the artificial lake where the product water was stored, fecal coliform was not detected during the study period, but E. coli and pathogens were frequently detected, indicating that these bacterial and viral pathogens may be originating from non-fecal sources. On sunny summer days, the lake water could be bacteria-free due to sunlight radiation, but viruses were still detectable. Therefore, secondary disinfection may have to be adopted when the reclaimed water stored in such an open reservoir is supplied for strict reuse purposes. PMID:25374337

Zhou, Jinhong; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ji, Zheng; Xu, Limei; Yu, Zhenzhen

2015-01-01

88

Are Ranaviruses Capable of Contributing to Species Declines?  

E-print Network

of Ranavirus Die-offs First Isolated: ·Dr. Allan Granoff ·R i i (1962) ·St. Jude Hospital ·Rana pipiens (1962 Ambystomatidae Salamandridae Norman Wells, NWT >30 States & 5 Provinces; 25 Spp Uncommon Lithobates sylvaticus

Gray, Matthew

89

Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Plethora of Viral Pathogens From Single Combinatorial Libraries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro.

Williamson, R. Anthony; Burioni, Roberto; Sanna, Pietro P.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

1993-05-01

90

Human monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of viral pathogens from single combinatorial libraries.  

PubMed Central

Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7683424

Williamson, R A; Burioni, R; Sanna, P P; Partridge, L J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R

1993-01-01

91

Impact of Piriformospora indica on tomato growth and on interaction with fungal and viral pathogens.  

PubMed

Piriformospora indica is a root endophytic fungus with plant-promoting properties in numerous plant species and induces resistance against root and shoot pathogens in barley, wheat, and Arabidopsis. A study over several years showed that the endophyte P. indica colonised the roots of the most consumed vegetable crop tomato. P. indica improved the growth of tomato resulting in increased biomass of leaves by up to 20%. Limitation of disease severity caused by Verticillium dahliae by more than 30% was observed on tomato plants colonised by the endophyte. Further experiments were carried out in hydroponic cultures which are commonly used for the indoor production of tomatoes in central Europe. After adaptation of inoculation techniques (inoculum density, plant stage), it was shown that P. indica influences the concentration of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato shoots. The outcome of the interaction seems to be affected by light intensity. Most importantly, the endophyte increases tomato fruit biomass in hydroponic culture concerning fresh weight (up to 100%) and dry matter content (up to 20%). Hence, P. indica represents a suitable growth promoting endophyte for tomato which can be applied in production systems of this important vegetable plant not only in soil, but also in hydroponic cultures. PMID:19789897

Fakhro, Ahmad; Andrade-Linares, Diana Rocío; von Bargen, Susanne; Bandte, Martina; Büttner, Carmen; Grosch, Rita; Schwarz, Dietmar; Franken, Philipp

2010-03-01

92

Interferometric biosensing platform for multiplexed digital detection of viral pathogens and biomarkers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Label-free optical biosensors have been established as proven tools for monitoring specific biomolecular interactions. However, compact and robust embodiments of such instruments have yet to be introduced in order to provide sensitive, quantitative, and high-throughput biosensing for low-cost research and clinical applications. Here we present the interferometric reflectance-imaging sensor (IRIS). IRIS allows sensitive label free analysis using an inexpensive and durable multi-color LED illumination source on a silicon based surface. IRIS monitors biomolecular interaction through measurement of biomass addition to the sensor's surface. We demonstrate the capability of this system to dynamically monitor antigen---antibody interactions with a noise floor of 5.2 pg/mm 2 and DNA single mismatch detection under isothermal melting conditions in an array format. Ensemble detection of binding events using IRIS did not provide the sensitivity needed for detection of infectious disease and biomarkers at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, a new approach was adapted to the IRIS platform that allowed the detection and identification of individual nanoparticles on the sensor's surface. The new detection method was termed single-particle IRIS (SP-IRIS). We developed two detection modalities for SP-IRIS. The first modality is when the target is a nanoparticle such as a virus. We verified that SP-IRIS can accurately detect and size individual viral particles. Then we demonstrated that single nanoparticle counting and sizing methodology on SP-IRIS leads to a specific and sensitive virus sensor that can be multiplexed. Finally, we developed an assay for the detection of Ebola and Marburg. A detection limit of 3 x 103 PFU/ml was demonstrated for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotyped with Ebola or Marburg virus glycoprotein. We have demonstrated that virus detection can be done in human whole blood directly without the need for sample preparation. The second modality of SP-IRIS we developed was single molecule counting of biomarkers utilizing a sandwich assay with detection probes labeled with gold nanoparticles. We demonstrated the use of single molecule counting in a nucleic acid assay for melanoma biomarker detection. We showed that a single molecule counting assay can lead to detection limits in the attomolar range. The improved sensitivity of IRIS utilizing single nanoparticle detection holds promise for a simple and low-cost technology for rapid virus detection and multiplexed molecular screening for clinical applications.

Daaboul, George

93

Characterization of a ranavirus inhibitor of the antiviral protein kinase PKR  

PubMed Central

Background Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae) are important pathogens of lower vertebrates. However, little is known about how they circumvent the immune response of their hosts. Many ranaviruses contain a predicted protein, designated vIF2?, which shows homology with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2?. In analogy to distantly related proteins found in poxviruses vIF2? might act as an inhibitor of the antiviral protein kinase PKR. Results We have characterized the function of vIF2? from Rana catesbeiana virus Z (RCV-Z). Multiple sequence alignments and secondary structure prediction revealed homology of vIF2? with eIF2? throughout the S1-, helical- and C-terminal domains. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed that vIF2? blocked the toxic effects of human and zebrafish PKR in a heterologous yeast system. Rather than complementing eIF2? function, vIF2? acted in a manner comparable to the vaccinia virus (VACV) K3L protein (K3), a pseudosubstrate inhibitor of PKR. Both vIF2? and K3 inhibited human PKR-mediated eIF2? phosphorylation, but not PKR autophosphorylation on Thr446. In contrast the E3L protein (E3), another poxvirus inhibitor of PKR, inhibited both Thr446 and eIF2? Ser51 phosphorylation. Interestingly, phosphorylation of eIF2? by zebrafish PKR was inhibited by vIF2? and E3, but not by K3. Effective inhibition of PKR activity coincided with increased PKR expression levels, indicative of relieved autoinhibition of PKR expression. Experiments with vIF2? deletion constructs, showed that both the N-terminal and helical domains were sufficient for inhibition of PKR, whereas the C-terminal domain was dispensable. Conclusions Our results show that RCV-Z vIF2? is a functional inhibitor of human and zebrafish PKR, and probably functions in similar fashion as VACV K3. This constitutes an important step in understanding the interaction of ranaviruses and the host innate immune system. PMID:21418572

2011-01-01

94

Epidemiology of viral pathogens of free-ranging dogs and Indian foxes in a human-dominated landscape in central India.  

PubMed

There is an increasing concern that free-ranging domestic dog (Canis familiaris) populations may serve as reservoirs of pathogens which may be transmitted to wildlife. We documented the prevalence of antibodies to three viral pathogens, canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus (CAV), in free-ranging dog and sympatric Indian fox (Vulpes bengalensis) populations in and around the Great Indian Bustard Wildlife Sanctuary, in Maharashtra, central India. A total of 219 dogs and 33 foxes were sampled during the study period. Ninety-three percentage of dogs and 87% of foxes were exposed to one or more of the three pathogens. Exposure rates in dogs were high: >88% for CPV, >72% for CDV and 71% for CAV. A large proportion of adult dogs had antibodies against these pathogens due to seroconversion following earlier natural infection. The high prevalence of exposure to these pathogens across the sampling sessions, significantly higher exposure rates of adults compared with juveniles, and seroconversion in some unvaccinated dogs documented during the study period suggests that these pathogens are enzootic. The prevalence of exposure to CPV, CDV and CAV in foxes was 48%, 18% and 52%, respectively. Further, a high rate of mortality was documented in foxes with serologic evidence of ongoing CDV infection. Dogs could be playing a role in the maintenance and transmission of these pathogens in the fox population, but our findings show that most dogs in the population are immune to these pathogens by virtue of earlier natural infection, and therefore, these individuals make little current or future contribution to viral maintenance. Vaccination of this cohort will neither greatly improve their collective immune status nor contribute to herd immunity. Our findings have potentially important implications for dog disease control programmes that propose using canine vaccination as a tool for conservation management of wild carnivore populations. PMID:25135467

Belsare, A V; Vanak, A T; Gompper, M E

2014-08-01

95

1918 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin (HA) and the Viral RNA Polymerase Complex Enhance Viral Pathogenicity, but Only HA Induces Aberrant Host Responses in Mice  

PubMed Central

The 1918 pandemic influenza virus was the most devastating infectious agent in human history, causing fatal pneumonia and an estimated 20 to 50 million deaths worldwide. Previous studies indicated a prominent role of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene in efficient replication and high virulence of the 1918 virus in mice. It is, however, still unclear whether the high replication ability or the 1918 influenza virus HA gene is required for 1918 virus to exhibit high virulence in mice. Here, we examined the biological properties of reassortant viruses between the 1918 virus and a contemporary human H1N1 virus (A/Kawasaki/173/2001 [K173]) in a mouse model. In addition to the 1918 influenza virus HA, we demonstrated the role of the viral RNA replication complex in efficient replication of viruses in mouse lungs, whereas only the HA gene is responsible for lethality in mice. Global gene expression profiling of infected mouse lungs revealed that the 1918 influenza virus HA was sufficient to induce transcriptional changes similar to those induced by the 1918 virus, despite difference in lymphocyte gene expression. Increased expression of genes associated with the acute-phase response and the protein ubiquitination pathway were enriched during infections with the 1918 and 1918HA/K173 viruses, whereas reassortant viruses bearing the 1918 viral RNA polymerase complex induced transcriptional changes similar to those seen with the K173 virus. Taken together, these data suggest that HA and the viral RNA polymerase complex are critical determinants of Spanish influenza pathogenesis, but only HA, and not the viral RNA polymerase complex and NP, is responsible for extreme host responses observed in mice infected with the 1918 influenza virus. PMID:23449804

Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Watanabe, Shinji; Benecke, Arndt G.; Katze, Michael G.

2013-01-01

96

Experimentally Infected Domestic Ducks Show Efficient Transmission of Indonesian H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, but Lack Persistent Viral Shedding  

PubMed Central

Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n?=?15), which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2–8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1–15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1–24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40). Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks). However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n?=?10) and contact ducks (n?=?9) when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5) than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15). We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection. PMID:24392085

Wibawa, Hendra; Bingham, John; Nuradji, Harimurti; Lowther, Sue; Payne, Jean; Harper, Jenni; Junaidi, Akhmad; Middleton, Deborah; Meers, Joanne

2014-01-01

97

Nuclear factor 45 of tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis): evidence for functional differentiation between two isoforms in immune defense against viral and bacterial pathogens.  

PubMed

Nuclear factor 45 (NF45) is known to play an important role in regulating interleukin-2 expression in mammals. The function of fish NF45 is largely unknown. In a previous study, we reported the identification of a NF45 (named CsNF45) from half smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). In the present study, we identified an isoform of CsNF45 (named CsNF45i) from half smooth tongue sole and examined its biological properties in comparison with CsNF45. We found that CsNF45i is a truncated version of CsNF45 and lacks the N-terminal 38 residues of CsNF45. Genetic analysis showed that the CsNF45 gene consists of 14 exons and 13 introns, and that CsNF45 and CsNF45i are the products of alternative splicing. Constitutive expression of CsNF45 and CsNF45i occurred in multiple tissues but differed in patterns. Experimental infection with viral and bacterial pathogens upregulated the expression of both isoforms but to different degrees, with potent induction of CsNF45 being induced by bacterial pathogen, while dramatic induction of CsNF45i being induced by viral pathogen. Transient transfection analysis showed that both isoforms were localized in the nucleus and able to stimulate the activity of IL-2 promoter to comparable extents. To examine their in vivo effects, the two isoforms were overexpressed in tongue sole. Subsequent analysis showed that following viral and bacterial infection, the viral loads in CsNF45i-overexpressing fish were significantly lower than those in CsNF45-overexpressing fish, whereas the bacterial loads in CsNF45-overexpressing fish were significantly lower than those in CsNF45i-overexpressing fish. These results indicate that both CsNF45 and CsNF45i possess immunoregulatory properties, however, the two isoforms most likely participate in different aspects of host immune defense that target different pathogens. PMID:24060504

Chi, Heng; Hu, Yong-hua; Xiao, Zhi-zhong; Sun, Li

2014-02-01

98

A reverse genetics system for the Great Lakes strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: the NV gene is required for pathogenicity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), belonging to the genus Novirhabdovirus in the family of Rhabdoviridae, causes a highly contagious disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. Recently, a novel genotype of VHSV, designated IVb, has invaded the Great Lakes in North America, causing large-scale epidemics in wild fish. An efficient reverse genetics system was developed to generate a recombinant VHSV of genotype IVb from cloned cDNA. The recombinant VHSV (rVHSV) was comparable to the parental wild-type strain both in vitro and in vivo, causing high mortality in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A modified recombinant VHSV was generated in which the NV gene was substituted with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (rVHSV-?NV-EGFP), and another recombinant was made by inserting the EGFP gene into the full-length viral clone between the P and M genes (rVHSV-EGFP). The in vitro replication kinetics of rVHSV-EGFP was similar to rVHSV; however, the rVHSV-?NV-EGFP grew 2 logs lower. In yellow perch challenges, wtVHSV and rVHSV induced 82-100% cumulative per cent mortality (CPM), respectively, whereas rVHSV-EGFP produced 62% CPM and rVHSV-?NV-EGFP caused only 15% CPM. No reversion of mutation was detected in the recovered viruses and the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign gene after several passages. These results indicate that the NV gene of VHSV is not essential for viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but it plays an important role in viral replication efficiency and pathogenicity. This system will facilitate studies of VHSV replication, virulence, and production of viral vectored vaccines.

Ammayappan, Arun; Kurath, Gael; Thompson, Tarin M.; Vakharia, Vikram N.

2011-01-01

99

A reverse genetics system for the Great Lakes strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: the NV gene is required for pathogenicity.  

PubMed

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), belonging to the genus Novirhabdovirus in the family of Rhabdoviridae, causes a highly contagious disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. Recently, a novel genotype of VHSV, designated IVb, has invaded the Great Lakes in North America, causing large-scale epidemics in wild fish. An efficient reverse genetics system was developed to generate a recombinant VHSV of genotype IVb from cloned cDNA. The recombinant VHSV (rVHSV) was comparable to the parental wild-type strain both in vitro and in vivo, causing high mortality in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A modified recombinant VHSV was generated in which the NV gene was substituted with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (rVHSV-?NV-EGFP), and another recombinant was made by inserting the EGFP gene into the full-length viral clone between the P and M genes (rVHSV-EGFP). The in vitro replication kinetics of rVHSV-EGFP was similar to rVHSV; however, the rVHSV-?NV-EGFP grew 2 logs lower. In yellow perch challenges, wtVHSV and rVHSV induced 82-100% cumulative per cent mortality (CPM), respectively, whereas rVHSV-EGFP produced 62% CPM and rVHSV-?NV-EGFP caused only 15% CPM. No reversion of mutation was detected in the recovered viruses and the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign gene after several passages. These results indicate that the NV gene of VHSV is not essential for viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but it plays an important role in viral replication efficiency and pathogenicity. This system will facilitate studies of VHSV replication, virulence, and production of viral vectored vaccines. PMID:20936318

Ammayappan, Arun; Kurath, Gael; Thompson, Tarin M; Vakharia, Vikram N

2011-08-01

100

A single amino acid change, Q114R, in the cleavage-site sequence of Newcastle disease virus fusion protein attenuates viral replication and pathogenicity.  

PubMed

A key determinant of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) virulence is the amino acid sequence at the fusion (F) protein cleavage site. The NDV F protein is synthesized as an inactive precursor, F(0), and is activated by proteolytic cleavage between amino acids 116 and 117 to produce two disulfide-linked subunits, F(1) and F(2). The consensus sequence of the F protein cleavage site of virulent [(112)(R/K)-R-Q-(R/K)-R?F-I(118)] and avirulent [(112)(G/E)-(K/R)-Q-(G/E)-R?L-I(118)] strains contains a conserved glutamine residue at position 114. Recently, some NDV strains from Africa and Madagascar were isolated from healthy birds and have been reported to contain five basic residues (R-R-R-K-R?F-I/V or R-R-R-R-R?F-I/V) at the F protein cleavage site. In this study, we have evaluated the role of this conserved glutamine residue in the replication and pathogenicity of NDV by using the moderately pathogenic Beaudette C strain and by making Q114R, K115R and I118V mutants of the F protein in this strain. Our results showed that changing the glutamine to a basic arginine residue reduced viral replication and attenuated the pathogenicity of the virus in chickens. The pathogenicity was further reduced when the isoleucine at position 118 was substituted for valine. PMID:21677091

Samal, Sweety; Kumar, Sachin; Khattar, Sunil K; Samal, Siba K

2011-10-01

101

PCR detection of ranavirus in adult anurans from the Louisville Zoological Garden.  

PubMed

Ranaviruses are known to cause mortality in a variety of anuran species and have the potential to significantly impact wild and captive frog populations. In this study, 16 captive frogs and toads from the Louisville Zoological Garden were examined for the presence of ranavirus; this group included 14 Cope's grey tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis), an American toad (Bufo americanus), and a southern toad (Bufo terrestris). All animals were wild caught and were evaluated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while animals that died were also assessed via histologic study to understand the role of ranaviral disease in these specimens. Of the animals that died, 82% were positive for ranavirus via PCR. Multiple swab samples collected over time from live tree frogs were positive for ranavirus via PCR. These findings reveal that ranaviral infection in captive adult anurans may occur without clinical signs or consistent histopathologic lesions. PMID:19746873

Driskell, Elizabeth A; Miller, Debra L; Swist, Shannon L; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

2009-09-01

102

Effects of ranavirus infection of red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) on plasma proteins.  

PubMed

Ranavirus is an emerging disease that infects fish, amphibians, and reptiles. Ranavirus induces an inflammatory response leading to death in many susceptible species. Red-eared sliders (RES; Trachemys scripta elegans) are vulnerable to ranavirus infection and are economically significant chelonians kept in the pet trade and utilized in research. Early identification of RES with inflammatory diseases would allow for isolation of affected individuals and subsequent disease investigation, including molecular testing for ranavirus. Validation of an inexpensive, clinically relevant, and reproducible diagnostic test that detects inflammation in turtles is needed. Although commonly used, plasma protein electrophoresis to detect an inflammatory acute-phase protein response has not been evaluated in a controlled environment in turtles with experimentally induced inflammatory disease. The objective of this study was to measure plasma protein fractions by electrophoresis to determine if an acute-phase protein response occurs in RES during infection with a frog virus 3-like ranavirus (FV3-like virus) isolated from a chelonian. A Bradford assay and agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) were performed using plasma collected during a study of the effect of temperature on the pathogenesis of ranavirus in RES. In RES at the time of viremia, total albumin (ALB(mg/ml)) and albumin to globulin ratio were significantly lower and beta-globulin percentage was significantly higher in RES exposed to ranavirus (n = 4) as compared to matched, uninfected RES (n = 8). In the last sample collected prior to death, total protein (TP(mg/ml)), ALB(mg/ml), alpha-globulin percentage, and total alpha-globulin (alpha(mg/ml)) were significantly lower in RES exposed to ranavirus (n = 4) than control individuals (n = 8). In summary, FV3-like virus induces a decrease in plasma albumin concentration at the onset ofviremia and decreases in TP(mg/ml, ALB(mg/ml), and alpha(mg/ml) concentrations prior to death in RES as measured by AGE. PMID:25000690

Moore, A Russell; Allender, Matthew C; MacNeill, Amy L

2014-06-01

103

Applications of In Vivo Imaging in the Evaluation of the Pathophysiology of Viral and Bacterial Infections and in Development of Countermeasures to BSL3/4 Pathogens.  

PubMed

While preclinical and clinical imaging have been applied to drug discovery/development and characterization of disease pathology, few examples exist where imaging has been used to evaluate infectious agents or countermeasures to biosafety level (BSL)3/4 threat agents. Viruses engineered with reporter constructs, i.e., enzymes and receptors, which are amenable to detection by positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to evaluate the biodistribution of viruses containing specific therapeutic or gene transfer payloads. Bioluminescence and nuclear approaches involving engineered reporters, direct labeling of bacteria with radiotracers, or tracking bacteria through their constitutively expressed thymidine kinase have been utilized to characterize viral and bacterial pathogens post-infection. Most PET, SPECT, CT, or MRI approaches have focused on evaluating host responses to the pathogens such as inflammation, brain neurochemistry, and structural changes and on assessing the biodistribution of radiolabeled drugs. Imaging has the potential when applied preclinically to the development of countermeasures against BSL3/4 threat agents to address the following: (1) presence, biodistribution, and time course of infection in the presence or absence of drug; (2) binding of the therapeutic to the target; and (3) expression of a pharmacologic effect either related to drug mechanism, efficacy, or safety. Preclinical imaging could potentially provide real-time dynamic tools to characterize the pathogen and animal model and for developing countermeasures under the U.S. FDA Animal Rule provision with high confidence of success and clinical benefit. PMID:25008802

Bocan, Thomas M; Panchal, Rekha G; Bavari, Sina

2015-02-01

104

Integrated DNA and RNA extraction and purification on an automated microfluidic cassette from bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.  

PubMed

In this paper, we describe the development of an automated sample preparation procedure for etiological agents of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (CA-LRTI). The consecutive assay steps, including sample re-suspension, pre-treatment, lysis, nucleic acid purification, and concentration, were integrated into a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) cassette that is operated hands-free by a demonstrator setup, providing fluidic and valve actuation. The performance of the assay was evaluated on viral and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial broth cultures previously sampled using a nasopharyngeal swab. Sample preparation on the microfluidic cassette resulted in higher or similar concentrations of pure bacterial DNA or viral RNA compared to manual benchtop experiments. The miniaturization and integration of the complete sample preparation procedure, to extract purified nucleic acids from real samples of CA-LRTI pathogens to, and above, lab quality and efficiency, represent important steps towards its application in a point-of-care test (POCT) for rapid diagnosis of CA-LRTI. PMID:24615272

Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Spang, Peter; Schwind, Carmen; Drese, Klaus S; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Nieto, Benjamin; Camps, Marta; Landgraf, Bryan; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; Samitier, Josep; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Roeser, Tina

2014-05-01

105

Multiple viral determinants contribute to pathogenicity of the acutely lethal simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj variant.  

PubMed Central

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) induces an immunodeficiency syndrome similar to human AIDS. Although the disease course of SIV-induced immunodeficiency is generally measured in months to years, a disease syndrome that results in death in 5 to 14 days has been described in pig-tailed macaques infected with the SIVsmmPBj (PBj) strain. The purpose of this study was to derive an acutely lethal PBj molecular clone in order to study viral genes involved in pathogenesis. Six infectious molecular clones were generated; acutely fatal disease was induced by experimental inoculation of pig-tailed macaques with virus stocks derived from either of two clones, PBj6.6 or PBj14.6. Molecular chimeras were constructed by exchange of regions of the genome of PBj6.6 and a nonlethal, related clone, SIVsmH4. Only a chimera expressing the PBj genome under the control of a SIVsmH4 long terminal repeat induced death soon after inoculation. These studies suggest that multiple viral genes of PBj are critical for development of acute disease. More specifically, the env gene but not the long terminal repeat PBj was required for acute disease induction; however env must act in concert with another gene(s) of the PBj genome. PMID:8474153

Novembre, F J; Johnson, P R; Lewis, M G; Anderson, D C; Klumpp, S; McClure, H M; Hirsch, V M

1993-01-01

106

Epitope-specific CD8+ T cells play a differential pathogenic role in the development of a viral disease model for multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease has been extensively investigated as a model for persistent viral infection and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the role of CD8(+) T cells in the development of disease remains unclear. To assess the role of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease, a single amino acid substitution was introduced into the predominant viral epitope (VP3 from residues 159 to 166 [VP3(159-166)]) and/or a subdominant viral epitope (VP3(173-181)) of susceptible SJL/J mice by site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting variant viruses (N160V, P179A, and N160V/P179A) failed to induce CD8(+) T cell responses to the respective epitopes. Surprisingly, mice infected with N160V or N160V/P179A virus, which lacks CD8(+) T cells against VP3(159-166), did not develop demyelinating disease, in contrast to wild-type virus or P179A virus lacking VP3(173-181)-specific CD8(+) T cells. Our findings clearly show that the presence of VP3(159-166)-specific CD8(+) T cells, rather than viral persistence itself, is strongly correlated with disease development. VP3(173-181)-specific CD8(+) T cells in the central nervous system (CNS) of these virus-infected mice expressed higher levels of transforming growth factor ?, forkhead box P3, interleukin-22 (IL-22), and IL-17 mRNA but caused minimal cytotoxicity compared to that caused by VP3(159-166)-specific CD8(+) T cells. VP3(159-166)-specific CD8(+) T cells exhibited high functional avidity for gamma interferon production, whereas VP3(173-181)-specific CD8(+) T cells showed low avidity. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that the induction of the IL-17-producing CD8(+) T cell type is largely epitope specific and that this specificity apparently plays a differential role in the pathogenicity of virus-induced demyelinating disease. These results strongly advocate for the careful consideration of CD8(+) T cell-mediated intervention of virus-induced inflammatory diseases. PMID:23055563

Myoung, Jinjong; Kang, Hyun Seok; Hou, Wanqiu; Meng, Liping; Dal Canto, Mauro C; Kim, Byung S

2012-12-01

107

Viral Entry through CXCR4 Is a Pathogenic Factor and Therapeutic Target in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Disease  

PubMed Central

The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 function as the principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Coreceptor function has also been demonstrated for a variety of related receptors in vitro. The relative contributions of CCR5, CXCR4, and other putative coreceptors to HIV-1 disease in vivo have yet to be defined. In this study, we used sequential primary isolates and recombinant strains of HIV-1 to demonstrate that CXCR4-using (X4) viruses emerging in association with disease progression are highly pathogenic in ex vivo lymphoid tissues compared to CXCR4-independent viruses. Furthermore, synthetic receptor antagonists that specifically block CXCR4-mediated entry dramatically suppressed the depletion of CD4+ T cells by recombinant and clinically derived X4 HIV-1 isolates. Moreover, in vitro specificity for the additional coreceptors CCR3, CCR8, BOB, and Bonzo did not augment cytopathicity or diminish sensitivity toward CXCR4 antagonists in lymphoid tissues. These data provide strong evidence to support the concept that adaptation to CXCR4 specificity in vivo accelerates HIV-1 disease progression. Thus, therapeutic intervention targeting the interaction of HIV-1 gp120 with CXCR4 may be highly valuable for suppressing the pathogenic effects of late-stage viruses. PMID:10590105

Schramm, Birgit; Penn, Michael L.; Speck, Roberto F.; Chan, Stephen Y.; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique; Connor, Ruth I.; Goldsmith, Mark A.

2000-01-01

108

Ranavirus infection of free-ranging and captive box turtles and tortoises in the United States.  

PubMed

Iridoviruses of the genus Ranavirus are well known for causing mass mortality events of fish and amphibians with sporadic reports of infection in reptiles. This article describes five instances of Ranavirus infection in chelonians between 2003 and 2005 in Georgia, Florida, New York, and Pennsylvania, USA. Affected species included captive Burmese star tortoises (Geochelone platynota), a free-ranging gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), free-ranging eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina), and a Florida box turtle (Terrepene carolina bauri). Evidence for Ranavirus infection was also found in archived material from previously unexplained mass mortality events of eastern box turtles from Georgia in 1991 and from Texas in 1998. Consistent lesions in affected animals included necrotizing stomatitis and/or esophagitis, fibrinous and necrotizing splenitis, and multicentric fibrinoid vasculitis. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were rarely observed in affected tissues. A portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene was sequenced from each case in 2003-2005 and found to be identical to each other and to Frog virus 3 (FV3) across 420 base pairs. Ranavirus infections were also documented in sympatric species of amphibians at two locations with infected chelonians. The fragment profiles of HindIII-digested whole genomic DNA of Ranavirus, isolated from a dead Burmese star tortoise and a southern leopard frog (Rana utricularia) found nearby, were similar. The box turtle isolate had a low molecular weight fragment that was not seen in the digestion profiles for the other isolates. These results suggest that certain amphibians and chelonians are infected with a similar virus and that different viruses exist among different chelonians. Amphibians may serve as a reservoir host for susceptible chelonians. This report also demonstrated that significant disease associated with Ranavirus infections are likely more widespread in chelonians than previously suspected. PMID:18957641

Johnson, April J; Pessier, Allan P; Wellehan, James F X; Childress, April; Norton, Terry M; Stedman, Nancy L; Bloom, David C; Belzer, William; Titus, Valorie R; Wagner, Robert; Brooks, Jason W; Spratt, Jeffrey; Jacobson, Elliott R

2008-10-01

109

The mouse model is suitable for the study of viral factors governing transmission and pathogenesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in mammals  

PubMed Central

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtype pose a major public health threat due to their capacity to cross the species barrier and infect mammals, for example dogs, cats and humans. In the present study we tested the capacity of selected H7 and H5 HPAI viruses to infect and to be transmitted from infected BALB/c mice to contact sentinels. Previous experiments have shown that viruses belonging to both H5 and H7 subtypes replicate in the respiratory tract and central nervous system of experimentally infected mice. In this study we show that selected H7N1 and H5N1 HPAI viruses can be transmitted from mouse-to-mouse by direct contact, and that in experimentally infected animals they exhibit a different pattern of replication and transmission. Our results can be considered as a starting point for transmission experiments involving other influenza A viruses with ? 2-3 receptor affinity in order to better understand the viral factors influencing transmissibility of these viruses in selected mammalian species. PMID:20546698

Rigoni, Michela; Toffan, Anna; Viale, Elisabetta; Mancin, Marzia; Cilloni, Filippo; Bertoli, Elena; Salomoni, Angela; Marciano, Sabrina; Milani, Adelaide; Zecchin, Bianca; Capua, Ilaria; Cattoli, Giovanni

2010-01-01

110

First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong  

E-print Network

First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong Kong Amphibian Trade Jonathan E. Kolby1,2 *, Kristine M. Smith2 , Lee Berger1 , William B. Karesh2 of America, 3 Amphibian Disease Laboratory, Institute for Conservation Research, San Diego Zoo Global, San

Gray, Matthew

111

Infection studies with two highly pathogenic avian influenza strains (Vietnamese and Indonesian) in Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos), with particular reference to clinical disease, tissue tropism and viral shedding.  

PubMed

Pekin ducks were infected by the mucosal route (oral, nasal, ocular) with one of two strains of Eurasian lineage H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus: A/Muscovy duck/Vietnam/453/2004 and A/duck/Indramayu/BBVW/109/2006 (from Indonesia). Ducks were killed humanely on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 after challenge, or whenever morbidity was severe enough to justify euthanasia. Morbidity was recorded by observation of clinical signs and cloacal temperatures; the disease was characterized by histopathology; tissue tropism was studied by immunohistochemistry and virus titration on tissue samples; and viral shedding patterns were determined by virus isolation and titration of oral and cloacal swabs. The Vietnamese strain caused severe morbidity with fever and depression; the Indonesian strain caused only transient fever. Both viruses had a predilection for a similar range of tissue types, but the quantity of tissue antigen and tissue virus titres were considerably higher with the Vietnamese strain. The Vietnamese strain caused severe myocarditis and skeletal myositis; both strains caused non-suppurative encephalitis and a range of other inflammatory reactions of varying severity. The principal epithelial tissue infected was that of the air sacs, but antigen was not abundant. Epithelium of the turbinates, trachea and bronchi had only rare infection with virus. Virus was shed from both the oral and cloacal routes; it was first detected 24 h after challenge and persisted until day 5 after challenge. The higher prevalence of virus from swabs from ducks infected with the Vietnamese strain indicates that this strain may be more adapted to ducks than the Indonesia strain. PMID:19937511

Bingham, John; Green, Diane J; Lowther, Sue; Klippel, Jessica; Burggraaf, Simon; Anderson, Danielle E; Wibawa, Hendra; Hoa, Dong Manh; Long, Ngo Thanh; Vu, Pham Phong; Middleton, Deborah J; Daniels, Peter W

2009-08-01

112

Viruses and viral proteins.  

PubMed

For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R N

2014-11-01

113

Viruses and viral proteins  

PubMed Central

For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

2014-01-01

114

Low detection of ranavirus DNA in wild postmetamorphic green frogs, Rana (Lithobates) clamitans, despite previous or concurrent tadpole mortality.  

PubMed

Ranavirus (Iridoviridae) infection is a significant cause of mortality in amphibians. Detection of infected individuals, particularly carriers, is necessary to prevent and control outbreaks. Recently, the use of toe clips to detect ranavirus infection through PCR was proposed as an alternative to the more frequently used lethal liver sampling in green frogs (Rana [Lithobates] clamitans). We attempted reevaluate the use of toe clips, evaluate the potential use of blood onto filter paper and hepatic fine needle aspirates (FNAs) as further alternatives, and explore the adequacy of using green frogs as a target-sampling species when searching for ranavirus infection in the wild. Samples were obtained from 190 postmetamorphic (?1-yr-old) green frogs from five ponds on Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. Three of the ponds had contemporary or recent tadpole mortalities due to Frog Virus 3 (FV3) ranavirus. PCR testing for ranavirus DNA was performed on 190 toe clips, 188 blood samples, 72 hepatic FNAs, and 72 liver tissue samples. Only two frogs were ranavirus-positive: liver and toe clip were positive in one, liver only was positive in the other; all blood and FNAs, including those from the two positive frogs, were negative. Results did not yield a definitive answer on the efficacy of testing each type of sample, but resemble what is found in salamanders infected with Ambystoma tigrinum (rana)virus. Findings indicate a low prevalence of FV3 in postmetamorphic green frogs on PEI (?2.78%) and suggest that green frogs are poor reservoirs (carriers) for the virus. PMID:24502715

Forzán, María J; Wood, John

2013-10-01

115

SEROLOGIC SURVEY FOR SELECTED VIRAL PATHOGENS IN FREE RANGING ENDANGERED EUROPEAN MINK (MUSTELA LUTREOLA) AND OTHER MUSTELIDS FROM SOUTH-WESTERN FRANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the possible role of selected pathogens in the decline of endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) populations and the potential for these pathogens to affect mink survival, a serologic survey was conducted using serum samples collected from March 1996 to March 2003 in eight departments of south-western France. In total, 481 free-ranging individuals of five mustelid species (including the

Joost Philippa; Christine Fournier-Chambrillon; Pascal Fournier; Willem Schaftenaar; Marco van de Bildt; Rob van Herweijnen; Thijs Kuiken; Marie Liabeuf; Sebastien Ditcharry; Laurent Joubert

2008-01-01

116

Thymic pathogenicity of an HIV-1 envelope is associated with increased CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-dependent activity, but not V1/V2-associated CD4 binding efficiency and viral entry  

SciTech Connect

We previously described a thymus-tropic HIV-1 envelope (R3A Env) from a rapid progressor obtained at the time of transmission. An HIV-1 molecular recombinant with the R3A Env supported extensive replication and pathogenesis in the thymus and did not require Nef. Another Env from the same patient did not display the same thymus-tropic pathogenesis (R3B Env). Here, we show that relative to R3B Env, R3A Env enhances viral entry of T cells, increases fusion-induced cytopathicity, and shows elevated binding efficiency for both CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, in vitro. We created chimeric envelopes to determine the region(s) responsible for each in vitro phenotype and for thymic pathogenesis. Surprisingly, while V1/V2 contributed to enhanced viral entry, CD4 binding efficiency, and cytopathicity in vitro, it made no contribution to thymic pathogenesis. Rather, CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-associated activity appear to independently contribute to thymic pathogenesis of the R3A Env. These data highlight the contribution of unique HIV pathogenic factors in the thymic microenvironment and suggest that novel mechanisms may be involved in Env pathogenic activity in vivo.

Meissner, Eric G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Coffield, Vernon M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Su Lishan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)]. E-mail: lsu@med.unc.edu

2005-06-05

117

Outbreak of common midwife toad virus in alpine newts (Mesotriton alpestris cyreni) and common midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) in northern Spain: a comparative pathological study of an emerging ranavirus.  

PubMed

This report describes the isolation and characterisation of the common midwife toad virus (CMTV) from juvenile alpine newts (Mesotriton alpestris cyreni) and common midwife toad (CMT) tadpoles (Alytes obstetricans) in the Picos de Europa National Park in Northern Spain in August 2008. A comparative pathological and immunohistochemical study was carried out using anti-CMTV polyclonal serum. In the kidneys, glomeruli had the most severe histological lesions in CMT tadpoles, while both glomeruli and renal tubular epithelial cells exhibited foci of necrosis in juvenile alpine newts. Viral antigens were detected by immunohistochemical labelling mainly in the kidneys of CMT tadpoles and in ganglia of juvenile alpine newts. This is the first report of ranavirus infection in the alpine newt, the second known species to be affected by CMTV in the past 2 years. PMID:19703784

Balseiro, Ana; Dalton, Kevin P; del Cerro, Ana; Márquez, Isabel; Parra, Francisco; Prieto, José M; Casais, R

2010-11-01

118

Ranavirus infection in a group of wild-caught Lake Urmia newts Neurergus crocatus imported from Iraq into Germany.  

PubMed

High mortality, in association with anorexia and skin ulcerations, occurred in a group of wild-caught Lake Urmia newts Neurergus crocatus, imported from Iraq in 2011. Predominant findings in the pathological examinations consisted of systemic hemorrhages and ulcerative dermatitis. Ranavirus DNA was detected via PCR in 2 of 3 dead animals, and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene was sequenced. The analyzed portion of the MCP gene was 99% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 genome. This is the first description of a ranavirus in Lake Urmia newts and in wild-caught amphibians from Iraq, as well as the first description of ranavirus infection in a urodele from the Middle East. PMID:23574704

Stöhr, Anke C; Fleck, Jürgen; Mutschmann, Frank; Marschang, Rachel E

2013-04-11

119

Use of viral pathogens and indicators to differentiate between human and non-human fecal contamination in a microbial source tracking comparison study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assays for the detection and typing of adenoviruses, enteroviruses and F+ specific coliphages were performed on samples created as part of a national microbial source tracking methods comparison study. The samples were created blind to the researchers, and were inoculated with a variety of types of fecal contamination source (human, sewage, dog, seagull and cow) and mixtures of sources. Viral

Rachel T. Noble; Steven M. Allen; Angelia D. Blackwood; Weiping Chu; Sunny C. Jiang; Greg L. Lovelace; Mark D. Sobsey; Jill R. Stewart; Douglas A. Wait

2003-01-01

120

Viral pathogens in children hospitalized with features of central nervous system infection in a malaria-endemic region of Papua New Guinea.  

PubMed

BackgroundViral central nervous system (CNS) infections are common in countries where malaria is endemic but, due to limited laboratory facilities, few studies have systematically examined the prevalence and clinical consequences of the presence of viruses in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from children with suspected CNS infection.MethodsWe performed a prospective study of Papua New Guinean children hospitalized with signs and symptoms of CNS infection. CSF samples from 300 children without proven bacterial/fungal meningitis were analyzed for human herpes viruses (HHV), picornaviruses, influenza, adenoviruses, flaviviruses and bacteria.ResultsFifty-five children (18%) had viral (42), bacterial (20) or both viral and bacterial (7) nucleic acids (NA) identified in their CSF. Human herpes viruses accounted for 91% of all viruses found. The identification of viral or bacterial NA was not associated with any characteristic clinical features. By contrast, malaria was associated with increased identification of viral and bacterial NA and with impaired consciousness, multiple convulsions and age. Malaria was also inversely associated with an adverse outcome. Amongst children with HHV infection, those with HHV-6 and ¿7 were younger, were more likely have impaired consciousness and had a higher proportion of adverse outcomes than children with CMV. Dengue and enteroviral infections were infrequent. Adenoviral and influenza infections were not identified.ConclusionInfections with HHV-6, HHV-7, dengue and enterovirus have the potential to cause serious CNS disease in young PNG children. However most HHVs in this malaria-endemic setting should be considered to be the result of reactivation from a latent reservoir without clinical sequelae. PMID:25423900

Laman, Moses; Hwaiwhanje, Ilomo; Bona, Cathy; Warrel, Jonathan; Aipit, Susan; Smith, David; Noronha, Joanna; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy; Manning, Laurens

2014-11-26

121

Pharyngitis - viral  

MedlinePLUS

... throat. Pharyngitis may occur as part of a viral infection that also involves other organ systems, such as ... when a sore throat is due to a viral infection. The antibiotics will not help. Using them to ...

122

A SEROLOGIC ASSESSMENT OF EXPOSURE TO VIRAL PATHOGENS AND LEPTOSPIRA IN AN URBAN RACCOON (PROCYON LOTOR) POPULATION INHABITING A LARGE ZOOLOGICAL PARK  

Microsoft Academic Search

In urban environments, raccoons (Procyon lotor) may act as reservoirs for an array of pathogenic organ- isms, presenting spillover risks for human, domestic animal, and captive (zoo) animal populations. Over 5 yr, 159 raccoons from a high-density raccoon population in St. Louis, Missouri (USA), were surveyed for exposure to canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus 1 (CAV-1); feline parvovirus (FPV;

Randall E. Junge; Karen Bauman; Melanie King; Matthew E. Gompper

2007-01-01

123

Detection of Viral Pathogens by Reverse Transcriptase PCR and of Microbial Indicators by Standard Methods in the Canals of the Florida Keys  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to assess the microbial water quality in canal waters throughout the Florida Keys, a survey was conducted to determine the concentration of microbial fecal indicators and the presence of human pathogenic microorganisms. A total of 19 sites, including 17 canal sites and 2 nearshore water sites, were assayed for total coliforms, fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, enterococci,

DALE W. GRIFFIN; CHARLES J. GIBSON; ERIN K. LIPP; KELLEY RILEY; JOHN H. PAUL; JOAN B. ROSE

1999-01-01

124

A Gag-Pol\\/Env-Rev SIV239 DNA vaccine improves CD4 counts, and reduce viral loads after pathogenic intrarectal SIV mac251 challenge in Rhesus Macaques  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA vaccines are an important vaccine approach for many infectious diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Recently, there have been exciting results reported for plasmid vaccination in pathogenic SHIV model systems. In these studies, plasmid vaccines supplemented by IL-2 Ig cytokine gene adjuvants or boosted by recombinant MVA vectors expressing relevant SIV and HIV antigens prevented CD4+ T-cell loss and

Karuppiah Muthumani; Mark Bagarazzi; Dan Conway; Daniel S. Hwang; Kelledy Manson; Richard Ciccarelli; Zimmra Israel; David C. Montefiori; Kenneth Ugen; Nancy Miller; Jong Kim; Jean Boyer; David B. Weiner

2003-01-01

125

Ecological Database of the World's Insect Pathogens  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A search enabled relational database focusing on pathogens of insects including non-viral, viral, and nematodes, for purposes of insect control. This page does not include information about Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). (shows 2002 as last update)

0000-00-00

126

NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF SUB-TOXIC LEVELS OF ATRAZINE ON IMMUNITY TO RANAVIRUS USING XENOPUS AS A NOVEL MODEL SYSTEM  

E-print Network

NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF SUB-TOXIC LEVELS OF ATRAZINE ON IMMUNITY TO RANAVIRUS USING XENOPUS AS A NOVEL antiviral immunity. Common environmental pollutants, such as the herbicide atrazine, are believed to induce to other aquatic vertebrates. We hypothesized that while waterborne atrazine may induce deleterious effects

Gray, Matthew

127

Characterisation of acute respiratory infections at a United Kingdom paediatric teaching hospital: observational study assessing the impact of influenza A (2009 pdmH1N1) on predominant viral pathogens  

PubMed Central

Background According to the World Health Organisation, influenza A (2009 pdmH1N1) has moved into the post-pandemic phase, but there were still high numbers of infections occurring in the United Kingdom in 2010-11. It is therefore important to examine the burden of acute respiratory infections at a large children’s hospital to determine pathogen prevalence, occurrence of co-infection, prevalence of co-morbidities and diagnostic yield of sampling methods. Methods This was a retrospective study of respiratory virus aetiology in acute admissions to a paediatric teaching hospital in the North West of England between 1st April 2010 and 31st March 2011. Respiratory samples were analysed either with a rapid RSV test if the patient had symptoms suggestive of bronchiolitis, followed by multiplex PCR testing for ten respiratory viruses, or with multiplex PCR testing alone if the patient had suspected other ARI. Patient demographics and data regarding severity of illness, presence of co-morbidities and respiratory virus sampling method were retrieved from case notes. Results 645 patients were admitted during the study period. 82/645 (12.7%) patients were positive for 2009 pdmH1N1, of whom 24 (29.2%) required PICU admission, with 7.3% mortality rate. Viral co-infection occurred in 48/645 (7.4%) patients and was not associated with more severe disease. Co-morbidities were present more frequently in older children, but there was no significant difference in prevalence of co-morbidity between 2009 pdmH1N1 patients and those with other ARI. NPA samples had the highest diagnostic yield with 192/210 (91.4%) samples yielding an organism. Conclusions Influenza A (2009 pdmH1N1) is an ongoing cause of occasionally severe disease affecting both healthy children and those with co-morbidities. Surveillance of viral pathogens provides valuable information on patterns of disease. PMID:24948099

2014-01-01

128

Mapping the Landscape of Host-Pathogen Coevolution: HLA Class I Binding and Its Relationship with Evolutionary Conservation in Human and Viral Proteins ? † ‡  

PubMed Central

The high diversity of HLA binding preferences has been driven by the sequence diversity of short segments of relevant pathogenic proteins presented by HLA molecules to the immune system. To identify possible commonalities in HLA binding preferences, we quantify these using a novel measure termed “targeting efficiency,” which captures the correlation between HLA-peptide binding affinities and the conservation of the targeted proteomic regions. Analysis of targeting efficiencies for 95 HLA class I alleles over thousands of human proteins and 52 human viruses indicates that HLA molecules preferentially target conserved regions in these proteomes, although the arboviral Flaviviridae are a notable exception where nonconserved regions are preferentially targeted by most alleles. HLA-A alleles and several HLA-B alleles that have maintained close sequence identity with chimpanzee homologues target conserved human proteins and DNA viruses such as Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae most efficiently, while all HLA-B alleles studied efficiently target RNA viruses. These patterns of host and pathogen specialization are both consistent with coevolutionary selection and functionally relevant in specific cases; for example, preferential HLA targeting of conserved proteomic regions is associated with improved outcomes in HIV infection and with protection against dengue hemorrhagic fever. Efficiency analysis provides a novel perspective on the coevolutionary relationship between HLA class I molecular diversity, self-derived peptides that shape T-cell immunity through ontogeny, and the broad range of viruses that subsequently engage with the adaptive immune response. PMID:21084470

Hertz, Tomer; Nolan, David; James, Ian; John, Mina; Gaudieri, Silvana; Phillips, Elizabeth; Huang, Jim C.; Riadi, Gonzalo; Mallal, Simon; Jojic, Nebojsa

2011-01-01

129

The Ac124 protein is not essential for the propagation of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus, but it is a viral pathogenicity factor.  

PubMed

orf124 (ac124) of AcMNPV is one of the highly conserved unique genes in group I lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses. So far, its function remains unknown. In this study, infection with a virus expressing an ac124-gfp fusion showed that Ac124 localized to the cytoplasm throughout the infection. In addition, an ac124 knockout virus was generated to determine the role of ac124 in the baculovirus life cycle. Our results showed that an ac124 knockout AcMNPV could produce infectious budded viruses (BVs) and occlusion bodies (OBs) like those produced by the wild virus and ac124 repair virus. These three viruses had similar growth kinetics during the infection phase. There was no significant difference in nucleocapsids, occlusion-derived viruses and OBs visualized by electron microscopy. The ac124 deletion mutant did not reduce AcMNPV infectivity for S. exigua in an LD50 bioassay. However, it took 20 h longer for the ac124 deletion mutant to kill S. exigua than wild-type virus in the LT50 bioassay. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ac124 is not required for viral replication, but it accelerates the killing of infected larvae. PMID:25380680

Liang, Changyong; Lan, Dandan; Zhao, Shuling; Liu, Lulu; Xue, Yanan; Zhang, Yongli; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen

2015-01-01

130

Metagenomic detection of viral pathogens in Spanish honeybees: co-infection by Aphid Lethal Paralysis, Israel Acute Paralysis and Lake Sinai Viruses.  

PubMed

The situation in Europe concerning honeybees has in recent years become increasingly aggravated with steady decline in populations and/or catastrophic winter losses. This has largely been attributed to the occurrence of a variety of known and "unknown", emerging novel diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that colonies often can harbour more than one pathogen, making identification of etiological agents with classical methods difficult. By employing an unbiased metagenomic approach, which allows the detection of both unexpected and previously unknown infectious agents, the detection of three viruses, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV), Israel Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV), and Lake Sinai Virus (LSV), in honeybees from Spain is reported in this article. The existence of a subgroup of ALPV with the ability to infect bees was only recently reported and this is the first identification of such a strain in Europe. Similarly, LSV appear to be a still unclassified group of viruses with unclear impact on colony health and these viruses have not previously been identified outside of the United States. Furthermore, our study also reveals that these bees carried a plant virus, Turnip Ringspot Virus (TuRSV), potentially serving as important vector organisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate the new possibilities opened up by high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to study emerging new diseases in domestic and wild animal populations, including honeybees. PMID:23460860

Granberg, Fredrik; Vicente-Rubiano, Marina; Rubio-Guerri, Consuelo; Karlsson, Oskar E; Kukielka, Deborah; Belák, Sándor; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

2013-01-01

131

The impact of viral tropism and housing conditions on the transmission of three H5/H7 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens.  

PubMed

In this study, shedding and transmission of three H5/H7 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) in poultry was characterized and the impact of floor system on transmission was assessed. Transmission experiments were simultaneously conducted with two groups of animals housed on either a grid or a floor covered with litter. Transmission was observed for H5N2 A/Ch/Belgium/150VB/99 LPAIV. This virus was shed almost exclusively via the oropharynx and no impact of floor system was seen. Transmission was also seen for H7N1 A/Ch/Italy/1067/v99 LPAIV, which was shed via both the oropharynx and cloaca. A slight increase in transmission was seen for animals housed on litter. H5N3 A/Anas Platyrhynchos/Belgium/09-884/2008 LPAIV did not spread to susceptible animals, regardless of the floor system. This study shows that environmental factors such as floor systems used in poultry barns may act upon the transmission of LPAIVs. However, the level of influence depends on the virus under consideration and, more specifically, its principal replication sites. PMID:23398968

Claes, G; Welby, S; Van Den Berg, T; Van Der Stede, Y; Dewulf, J; Lambrecht, B; Marché, S

2013-11-01

132

Viral Meningitis  

MedlinePLUS

... more likely to have severe illness. Causes Non-polio enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral ... following viruses spread by visiting CDC’s websites: Non-polio enteroviruses Mumps virus Herpesviruses, including Epstein-Barr virus , ...

133

Viral encephalitis in travellers.  

PubMed

Viral infections are the commonest cause of encephalitis, and the purpose of this article is to inform UK clinicians of the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral encephalitis in travellers returning to the UK. The classical presentation is as a triad of fever, headache and altered mental state. There may be other findings either on examination or on imaging which, together with a travel history, may give clues as to the aetiology. It is important to note that in high- and middle-income countries the commonest cause of viral encephalitis is herpes simplex. This, coupled with the fact that untreated herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) has a mortality of over 70%, means that aciclovir should always be included in the treatment of patients with suspected encephalitis, regardless of their history of travel. In the UK, the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory (RIPL) at Public Health England can perform specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses on blood and CSF samples for many imported causes of viral encephalitis. PMID:25650207

Aryee, Anna; Thwaites, Guy

2015-02-01

134

Detection of Viral Pathogens by Reverse Transcriptase PCR and of Microbial Indicators by Standard Methods in the Canals of the Florida Keys  

PubMed Central

In order to assess the microbial water quality in canal waters throughout the Florida Keys, a survey was conducted to determine the concentration of microbial fecal indicators and the presence of human pathogenic microorganisms. A total of 19 sites, including 17 canal sites and 2 nearshore water sites, were assayed for total coliforms, fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, enterococci, coliphages, F-specific (F+) RNA coliphages, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, and human enteric viruses (polioviruses, coxsackie A and B viruses, echoviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, and small round-structured viruses). Numbers of coliforms ranged from <1 to 1,410, E. coli organisms from <1 to 130, Clostridium spp. from <1 to 520, and enterococci from <1 to 800 CFU/100 ml of sample. Two sites were positive for coliphages, but no F+ phages were identified. The sites were ranked according to microbial water quality and compared to various water quality standards and guidelines. Seventy-nine percent of the sites were positive for the presence of enteroviruses by reverse transcriptase PCR (polioviruses, coxsackie A and B viruses, and echoviruses). Sixty-three percent of the sites were positive for the presence of hepatitis A viruses. Ten percent of the sites were positive for the presence of Norwalk viruses. Ninety-five percent of the sites were positive for at least one of the virus groups. These results indicate that the canals and nearshore waters throughout the Florida Keys are being impacted by human fecal material carrying human enteric viruses through current wastewater treatment strategies such as septic tanks. Exposure to canal waters through recreation and work may be contributing to human health risks. PMID:10473424

Griffin, Dale W.; Gibson, Charles J.; Lipp, Erin K.; Riley, Kelley; Paul, John H.; Rose, Joan B.

1999-01-01

135

A viral deubiquitylating enzyme targets viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and affects viral infectivity  

PubMed Central

Selective protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays an essential role in many major cellular processes, including host–pathogen interactions. We previously reported that the tightly regulated viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of the positive-strand RNA virus Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) is degraded by the UPS in infected cells, a process that affects viral infectivity. Here, we show that the TYMV 98K replication protein can counteract this degradation process thanks to its proteinase domain. In-vitro assays revealed that the recombinant proteinase domain is a functional ovarian tumour (OTU)-like deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB), as is the 98K produced during viral infection. We also demonstrate that 98K mediates in-vivo deubiquitylation of TYMV RdRp protein—its binding partner within replication complexes—leading to its stabilization. Finally, we show that this DUB activity contributes to viral infectivity in plant cells. The identification of viral RdRp as a specific substrate of the viral DUB enzyme thus reveals the intricate interplay between ubiquitylation, deubiquitylation and the interaction between viral proteins in controlling levels of RdRp and viral infectivity. PMID:22117220

Chenon, Mélanie; Camborde, Laurent; Cheminant, Soizic; Jupin, Isabelle

2012-01-01

136

Synthesis of minus-strand copies of a viral transgene during viral infections of transgenic plants  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Plants can be genetically engineered to express viral sequences, often resulting in resistance to the virus from which the sequence was derived. The generally accepted mechanism for this pathogen induced resistance is gene silencing. Previous work has demonstrated that viral transgenes can be incorp...

137

Development of an EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis for simultaneous detection and differentiation of six viral pathogens of porcine reproductive and respiratory disorder.  

PubMed

Concurrent infection of pigs with two or more pathogens is common in pigs under intensive rearing conditions. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), classical swine fever virus (CSFV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) are all associated with reproductive or respiratory disorders or both and can cause significant economic losses in pig production worldwide. An EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR (EG-mPCR) with melting curve analysis was developed in this study for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these six viruses in pigs. This method is able to detect and distinguish PCV2, PPV, PRRSV, CSFV, JEV and PRV with the limits of detection ranging from 100 to 500 copies/?L, high reproducibility, and intra-assay and inter-assay variation ranging from 0.11 to 3.20%. After validation, a total of 118 field samples were tested by the newly developed EG-mPCR. PCV2 was identified in 23%, PPV in 15%, PRRSV in 17% and PRV in 5% of the samples. Concurrent PCV2 and PRRSV infection was detected in 6.7%, PCV2 and PPV in 5% and PPV2 and PRRSV infection was detected in 5% of the cases. The agreement of the EG-mPCR and conventional PCR tests was 99.2%. This EG-mPCR will be a useful, rapid, reliable and cost-effective alternative for routine surveillance testing of viral infections in pigs. PMID:25102430

Rao, Pinbin; Wu, Haigang; Jiang, Yonghou; Opriessnig, Tanja; Zheng, Xiaowen; Mo, Yecheng; Yang, Zongqi

2014-11-01

138

Lactoferrin for prevention of common viral infections.  

PubMed

Although lactoferrin has many biological functions, the host-protective effects against pathogenic microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses are regarded as one of the most important. Here, we review research on the protective role of lactoferrin administration against common viral infections. Many studies have shown the in vitro antiviral activity of lactoferrin against viral pathogens that cause common infections such as the common cold, influenza, gastroenteritis, summer cold, and herpes, where lactoferrin inhibits mainly viral attachment to the target cells. Recently, studies indicating the in vivo protective effects of lactoferrin by oral administration against common viral infections have been increasing. For instance, norovirus is an extremely important emerging human pathogen that causes a majority of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide that may be a target candidate for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin consumption reduced the incidence of noroviral gastroenteritis in children and a similar effect was observed in a wide range of ages in a preliminary survey. A recent in vitro study reported that lactoferrin inhibits both cellular attachment of the murine norovirus, a virus closely-related to the human norovirus, and viral replication in the cells by inducing antiviral cytokines interferon (IFN)-?/?. Lactoferrin administration also enhances NK cell activity and Th1 cytokine responses, which lead to protection against viral infections. In conclusion, lactoferrin consumption may protect the host from viral infections through inhibiting the attachment of a virus to the cells, replication of the virus in the cells, and enhancement of systemic immune functions. PMID:25182867

Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Oda, Hirotsugu; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki

2014-11-01

139

Human adenovirus: Viral pathogen with increasing importance.  

PubMed

The aim of this review is to describe the biology of human adenovirus (HAdV), the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of adenoviral epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and to present a practical update on its diagnosis, treatment, and prophylaxis. There are two well-defined adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis clinical syndromes: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) and pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF), which are caused by different HAdV serotypes. The exact incidence of adenoviral conjunctivitis is still poorly known. However, cases are more frequent during warmer months. The virus is endemic in the general population, and frequently causes severe disease in immunocompromised patients, especially the pediatric patients. Contagion is possible through direct contact or fomites, and the virus is extremely resistant to different physical and chemical agents. The clinical signs or symptoms of conjunctival infection are similar to any other conjunctivitis, with a higher incidence of pseudomembranes. In the cornea, adenoviral infection may lead to keratitis nummularis. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, but its etiology can be confirmed using cell cultures, antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction or immunochromatography. Multiple treatments have been tried for this disease, but none of them seem to be completely effective. Prevention is the most reliable and recommended strategy to control this contagious infection. PMID:24678403

Ghebremedhin, B

2014-03-01

140

Eventual AIDS vaccine failure in a rhesus monkey by viral escape from cytotoxic T lymphocytes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Potent virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by candidate AIDS vaccines have recently been shown to control viral replication and prevent clinical disease progression after pathogenic viral challenges in rhesus monkeys. Here we show that viral escape from CTL recognition can result in the eventual failure of this partial immune protection. Viral mutations that escape from CTL recognition have

Dan H. Barouch; Jennifer Kunstman; Marcelo J. Kuroda; Jörn E. Schmitz; Sampa Santra; Fred W. Peyerl; Georgia R. Krivulka; Kristin Beaudry; Michelle A. Lifton; Darci A. Gorgone; David C. Montefiori; Mark G. Lewis; Steven M. Wolinsky; Norman L. Letvin

2002-01-01

141

DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

Contaminated drinking water is major source of waterborne diseases. EPA has published a drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL) that contains a number of pathogens that potentially could be regulated in drinking water. Studies indicate that certain viral pathogens (adenov...

142

Viral epigenetics.  

PubMed

DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can have either a direct or indirect effect on epigenetic regulation of cellular expression. Nevertheless, many questions still remain with respect to the specific mechanisms underlying epigenetic regulation of the viruses and transformation. PMID:25421681

Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

2015-01-01

143

Complete Genome Sequence of a Common Midwife Toad Virus-Like Ranavirus Associated with Mass Mortalities in Wild Amphibians in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

A ranavirus associated with mass mortalities in wild water frogs (Pelophylax spp.) and other amphibians in the Netherlands since 2010 was isolated, and its complete genome sequence was determined. The virus has a genome of 107,772 bp and shows 96.5% sequence identity with the common midwife toad virus from Spain. PMID:25540340

Hughes, Joseph; Saucedo, Bernardo; Rijks, Jolianne; Kik, Marja; Haenen, Olga L. M.; Engelsma, Marc Y.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, M. Helene; Wilkie, Gavin

2014-01-01

144

Complete genome sequence of a common midwife toad virus-like ranavirus associated with mass mortalities in wild amphibians in the Netherlands.  

PubMed

A ranavirus associated with mass mortalities in wild water frogs (Pelophylax spp.) and other amphibians in the Netherlands since 2010 was isolated, and its complete genome sequence was determined. The virus has a genome of 107,772 bp and shows 96.5% sequence identity with the common midwife toad virus from Spain. PMID:25540340

van Beurden, Steven J; Hughes, Joseph; Saucedo, Bernardo; Rijks, Jolianne; Kik, Marja; Haenen, Olga L M; Engelsma, Marc Y; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, M Helene; Wilkie, Gavin

2014-01-01

145

Viral Quasispecies Evolution  

PubMed Central

Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory. PMID:22688811

Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

2012-01-01

146

Viral Hijackers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn how viruses invade host cells and hijack the hosts' cell-reproduction mechanisms in order to make new viruses, which can in turn attack additional host cells. Students also learn how the immune system responds to a viral invasion, eventually defeating the viruses—if all goes well. Finally, they consider the special case of HIV, in which the virus' host cell is a key component of the immune system itself, severely crippling it and ultimately leading to AIDS. The associated activity sets the stage for this lesson with a dramatic simulation that allows students to see for themselves how quickly a virus can spread through a population, and then challenges students to determine who the initial bearers of the virus were.

Engineering K-PhD Program,

147

Viral hepatitis.  

PubMed

Hepatitis A is still the most frequently reported vaccine preventable disease. A reduction in the incidence will only be achieved by routine childhood vaccination rather than by targeted vaccination of high-risk groups. A larger vaccine program is warranted. Hepatitis B remains a large public health problem. Vaccination targeted to high-risk adults failed to decrease the incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Sexual as well as nosocomial transmission remain serious problems. Vaccine escape variants have also been identified in newborns from infected mothers who had been vaccinated at birth. Clearance of HBV infection results from complex immune mechanisms including TH1 cytokines significantly associated with HLA class II alleles. Escape HBV mutants, especially precore mutants, influence the outcome. The sequences of the promoter and other critical regions were associated with severe activity. Lamivudine is a major advance in therapy of chronic hepatitis B which was recently approved in many countries. Although drug resistant mutants may be selected during therapy, additional nucleoside analogues including adefovir are promising. Optimal combination strategies of different active compounds need to be researched. Three per cent of the world population has been infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Epidemiology has shifted from transfusion to non-transfusion settings. Intravenous drug abuse is currently the main risk but nosocomial infection is also of concern. Three independent factors seem associated with fibrosis progression: age, daily alcohol consumption of 50 g or more and male gender. Median duration of progression to cirrhosis is about 30 years. At the cirrhotic stage, about 3-5% of patients per year develop hepatocellular carcinoma. There is little evidence that direct cytopathicity plays a significant role in liver cell injury. HCV also infects extrahepatic cells which seems critical in the pathogenesis of the many extrahepatic manifestations. The recent identification of CD81 protein as one of the HCV receptor candidates may help us to understand how chronic HCV infection may trigger a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, autoimmune or even lymphoproliferative, through potent continuous B cell activation in the context of various host and/or environmental cofactors. Direct measurement of HCV RNA has clarified HCV replication kinetics and variability. Among patients with chronic hepatitis C, 48 weeks of treatment with interferon/ribavirin therapy produced a response rate of 28% among those with genotype 1 and 66% with other genotypes. Similar differences were found for combination therapy among patients who had relapsed following previous interferon (IFN) therapy. Viral load prior to treatment has been clearly shown to be predictive of response to interferon treatment, with increased viral load associated with decrease rates of response. In patients non-responsive to interferon, a second course of interferon alone has no beneficial effect whereas combination therapy may induce response in 25%. In conclusion, combination therapy should be given in all situations. Viral eradication should not be the only objective of the treatment since histological improvement may be obtained despite persisting viral replication with prolonged maintenance of antiviral therapy. PMID:17035815

Trépo, C; Zoulim, F; Pradat, P

1999-10-01

148

Unexpected rarity of the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Appalachian Plethodon Salamanders: 1957-2011.  

PubMed

Widespread population declines in terrestrial Plethodon salamanders occurred by the 1980s throughout the Appalachian Mountains, the center of global salamander diversity, with no evident recovery. We tested the hypothesis that the historic introduction and spread of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) into the eastern US was followed by Plethodon population declines. We expected to detect elevated prevalence of Bd prior to population declines as observed for Central American plethodontids. We tested 1,498 Plethodon salamanders of 12 species (892 museum specimens, 606 wild individuals) for the presence of Bd, and tested 94 of those for Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bs) and for ranavirus. Field samples were collected in 2011 from 48 field sites across a 767 km transect. Historic samples from museum specimens were collected at five sites with the greatest number and longest duration of collection (1957-987), four of which were sampled in the field in 2011. None of the museum specimens were positive for Bd, but four P. cinereus from field surveys were positive. The overall Bd prevalence from 1957-2011 for 12 Plethodon species sampled across a 757 km transect was 0.2% (95% CI 0.1-0.7%). All 94 samples were negative for Bs and ranavirus. We conclude that known amphibian pathogens are unlikely causes for declines in these Plethodon populations. Furthermore, these exceptionally low levels of Bd, in a region known to harbor Bd, may indicate that Plethodon specific traits limit Bd infection. PMID:25084159

Muletz, Carly; Caruso, Nicholas M; Fleischer, Robert C; McDiarmid, Roy W; Lips, Karen R

2014-01-01

149

Unexpected Rarity of the Pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Appalachian Plethodon Salamanders: 1957–2011  

PubMed Central

Widespread population declines in terrestrial Plethodon salamanders occurred by the 1980s throughout the Appalachian Mountains, the center of global salamander diversity, with no evident recovery. We tested the hypothesis that the historic introduction and spread of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) into the eastern US was followed by Plethodon population declines. We expected to detect elevated prevalence of Bd prior to population declines as observed for Central American plethodontids. We tested 1,498 Plethodon salamanders of 12 species (892 museum specimens, 606 wild individuals) for the presence of Bd, and tested 94 of those for Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bs) and for ranavirus. Field samples were collected in 2011 from 48 field sites across a 767 km transect. Historic samples from museum specimens were collected at five sites with the greatest number and longest duration of collection (1957–987), four of which were sampled in the field in 2011. None of the museum specimens were positive for Bd, but four P. cinereus from field surveys were positive. The overall Bd prevalence from 1957–2011 for 12 Plethodon species sampled across a 757 km transect was 0.2% (95% CI 0.1–0.7%). All 94 samples were negative for Bs and ranavirus. We conclude that known amphibian pathogens are unlikely causes for declines in these Plethodon populations. Furthermore, these exceptionally low levels of Bd, in a region known to harbor Bd, may indicate that Plethodon specific traits limit Bd infection. PMID:25084159

Muletz, Carly; Caruso, Nicholas M.; Fleischer, Robert C.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Lips, Karen R.

2014-01-01

150

Host–Pathogen Systems Biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Unlike traditional biological research that focuses on a small set of components, systems biology studies the complex interactions\\u000a among a large number of genes, proteins, and other elements of biological networks and systems. Host-pathogen systems biology\\u000a examines the interactions between the components of two distinct organisms: a microbial or viral pathogen and its animal host.\\u000a With the availability of complete

Christian V. Forst

151

Central roles of NLRs and inflammasomes in viral infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The immune response to viral infections is determined by a complex interplay between the pathogen and the host. Innate immune cells express a set of cytosolic sensors to detect viral infection. Recognition by these sensors induces the production of type I interferons and the assembly of inflammasome complexes that activate caspase-1, leading to production of interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and IL-18. Here,

Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti

2010-01-01

152

Detection of 11 Common Viral and Bacterial Pathogens Causing Community-Acquired Pneumonia or Sepsis in Asymptomatic Patients by Using a Multiplex Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay with Manual (Enzyme Hybridization) or Automated (Electronic Microarray) Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and sepsis are important causes of morbidity and mortality. We describe the development of two molecular assays for the detection of 11 common viral and bacterial agents of CAP and sepsis: influenza virus A, influenza virus B, respiratory syncytial virus A (RSV A), RSV B, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Legionella micdadei, Bordetella pertussis, Staph- ylococcus

Swati Kumar; Lihua Wang; Jiang Fan; Andrea Kraft; Michael E. Bose; Sagarika Tiwari; Meredith Van Dyke; Robert Haigis; Tingquo Luo; Madhushree Ghosh; Huong Tang; Marjan Haghnia; Elizabeth L. Mather; William G. Weisburg; Kelly J. Henrickson

153

Detection of 11 Common Viral and Bacterial Pathogens Causing Community-Acquired Pneumonia or Sepsis in Asymptomatic Patients by Using a Multiplex Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay with Manual (Enzyme Hybridization) or Automated (Electronic Microarray) Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and sepsis are important causes of morbidity and mortality. We describe the development of two molecular assays for the detection of 11 common viral and bacterial agents of CAP and sepsis: influenza virus A, influenza virus B, respiratory syncytial virus A (RSV A), RSV B, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Legionella micdadei, Bordetella pertussis, Staph- ylococcus

Swati Kumar; Lihua Wang; Jiang Fan; Andrea Kraft; Michael E. Bose; Sagarika Tiwari; Meredith Van Dyke; Robert Haigis; Tingquo Luo; Madhushree Ghosh; Huong Tang; Marjan Haghnia; Elizabeth L. Mather; William G. Weisburg; Kelly J. Henrickson

2008-01-01

154

Signal perception in plant pathogen defense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Highly sensitive and specific recognition systems for microbial pathogens are essential for disease resistance in plants. Structurally diverse elicitors from various pathogens have been identified and shown to trigger plant defense mechanisms. Elicitor recognition by the plant is assumed to be mediated by receptors. Plant receptors for fungus-derived elicitors appear to reside preferentially in the plasma membrane, whereas viral and

T. Nürnberger

1999-01-01

155

51www.wildlife.org The Wildlife Society The Rise of Ranavirus  

E-print Network

die and rot at the bottom of a wetland or lake. In more than 40 years of contemporary research on pathogens affecting ectothermic vertebrates, few pathogens have been found to have as great an abil- ity the transport of infected tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) used for fishing bait (Storfer et al. 2007

Gray, Matthew

156

Severe Viral Infections and Primary Immunodeficiencies  

PubMed Central

Patients with severe viral infections are often not thoroughly evaluated for immunodeficiencies. In this review, we summarize primary immunodeficiencies that predispose individuals to severe viral infections. Some immunodeficiencies enhance susceptibility to disease with a specific virus or family of viruses, whereas others predispose to diseases with multiple viruses in addition to disease with other microbes. Although the role of cytotoxic T cells in controlling viral infections is well known, a number of immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral diseases have recently been ascribed to defects in the Toll-like receptor–interferon signaling pathway. These immunodeficiencies are rare, but it is important to identify them both for prognostic information and for genetic counseling. Undoubtedly, additional mutations in proteins in the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system will be identified in the future, which will reveal the importance of these proteins in controlling infections caused by viruses and other pathogens. PMID:21960712

Cohen, Jeffrey I.

2011-01-01

157

Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes  

PubMed Central

Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity are, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes. PMID:25566226

Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

2014-01-01

158

Mortality Rates Differ Among Amphibian Populations Exposed to Three Strains of a Lethal Ranavirus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infectious diseases are a growing threat to biodiversity, in many cases because of synergistic effects with habitat loss,\\u000a environmental contamination, and climate change. Emergence of pathogens as new threats to host populations can also arise\\u000a when novel combinations of hosts and pathogens are unintentionally brought together, for example, via commercial trade or\\u000a wildlife relocations and reintroductions. Chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis)

Danna M. Schock; Trent K. Bollinger; James P. Collins

2009-01-01

159

Broad-Spectrum Drugs Against Viral Agents  

PubMed Central

Development of antivirals has focused primarily on vaccines and on treatments for specific viral agents. Although effective, these approaches may be limited in situations where the etiologic agent is unknown or when the target virus has undergone mutation, recombination or reassortment. Augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Nonspecific, broad-spectrum immune responses can be induced by double-stranded (ds)RNAs such as poly (ICLC), or oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated deocycytidyl-deoxyguanosinyl (CpG) motifs. These may offer protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens regardless of their genetic makeup, zoonotic origin or drug resistance. PMID:19325820

Christopher, Mary E.; Wong, Jonathan P.

2008-01-01

160

Pathogenicity of reassortant H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time. These changes in virulence have been reported with viruses from countries with high population of domestic ducks, including Egypt. In order to understand which viral genes are contri...

161

Sensitive Detection of Viral Transcripts in Human Tumor Transcriptomes  

PubMed Central

In excess of % of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates analyzed. Therefore, our results suggest that frequent viral cofactors of metastatic neuroblastoma are unlikely. PMID:24098097

Schelhorn, Sven-Eric; Fischer, Matthias; Tolosi, Laura; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Lengauer, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

2013-01-01

162

The PA and HA Gene-Mediated High Viral Load and Intense Innate Immune Response in the Brain Contribute to the High Pathogenicity of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus in Mallard Ducks  

PubMed Central

Most highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses cause only mild clinical signs in ducks, serving as an important natural reservoir of influenza A viruses. However, we isolated two H5N1 viruses that are genetically similar but differ greatly in virulence in ducks. A/Chicken/Jiangsu/k0402/2010 (CK10) is highly pathogenic, whereas A/Goose/Jiangsu/k0403/2010 (GS10) is low pathogenic. To determine the genetic basis for the high virulence of CK10 in ducks, we generated a series of single-gene reassortants between CK10 and GS10 and tested their virulence in ducks. Expression of the CK10 PA or hemagglutinin (HA) gene in the GS10 context resulted in increased virulence and virus replication. Conversely, inclusion of the GS10 PA or HA gene in the CK10 background attenuated the virulence and virus replication. Moreover, the PA gene had a greater contribution. We further determined that residues 101G and 237E in the PA gene contribute to the high virulence of CK10. Mutations at these two positions produced changes in virulence, virus replication, and polymerase activity of CK10 or GS10. Position 237 plays a greater role in determining these phenotypes. Moreover, the K237E mutation in the GS10 PA gene increased PA nuclear accumulation. Mutant GS10 viruses carrying the CK10 HA gene or the PA101G or PA237E mutation induced an enhanced innate immune response. A sustained innate response was detected in the brain rather than in the lung and spleen. Our results suggest that the PA and HA gene-mediated high virus replication and the intense innate immune response in the brain contribute to the high virulence of H5N1 virus in ducks. PMID:23926340

Hu, Jiao; Hu, Zenglei; Mo, Yiqun; Wu, Qiwen; Cui, Zhu; Duan, Zhiqiang; Huang, Junqing; Chen, Hongzhi; Chen, Yuxin; Gu, Min; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Huimou; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaowen

2013-01-01

163

ADEQUACY OF DISINFECTION FOR CONTROL OF NEWLY RECOGNIZED WATERBORNE PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

Agents recently recognized as causes or potential causes of waterborne outbreaks include pathogenic bacteria (Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocoliticia), viruses (rotavirus, Norwalk virus and other poorly defined viral agents) and Giardia lamblia, a protozoan agent. Although...

164

Mitophagy in viral infections.  

PubMed

Antiviral innate immune responses and apoptosis are the two major factors limiting viral infections. Successful viral infection requires the virus to take advantage of the cellular machinery to bypass cellular defenses. Accumulated evidences show that autophagy plays a crucial role in cell-to-virus interaction. Here, we focus on how viruses subvert mitophagy to favor viral replication by mitigating innate immune responses and apoptotic signaling. PMID:25050805

Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Li, Min; Wei, Jiwu

2014-11-01

165

Viral metagenomics: a tool for virus discovery and diversity in aquaculture.  

PubMed

Viruses are abundant biological entities on earth and the emergence of viral pathogens has become a serious threat to aquaculture and fisheries worldwide. However, our response to viral pathogens has been largely reactive, in the sense that a new pathogen is usually not discovered until it has already reached epidemic proportions. Current diagnostic methods such as PCR, immunological assays and pan-viral microarrays are limited in their ability to identify novel viruses. In this context, the knowledge on the diversity of viruses in healthy and disease situations becomes important for understanding their role on the health of animals in aquaculture species. Viral metagenomics, which involves viral purification and shotgun sequencing, has proven to be useful for understanding viral diversity and describing novel viruses in new diseases and has been recognized as an important tool for discovering novel viruses in human and veterinary medicine. With the advancements in sequencing technology and development of bioinformatics tools for nucleic acid sequence assembly and annotation, information on novel viruses and diversity of viruses in marine ecosystems has been rapidly expanding through viral metagenomics. Novel circoviruses and RNA viruses in Tampa bay pink shrimp, annelovirus in sea lion, picornavirus in ringed seals and several new viruses of marine animals have been recently described using viral metagenomics and this tool has been also recently used in describing viral diversity in aquaculture ponds. Further, a large amount of information has been generated on the diversity of viruses in the marine environment using viral metagenomics during the last decade. There exists a great potential with viral metagenomics for discovering novel viruses in asymptomatic marine candidate animals of aquaculture/mariculture, some of which may assume pathogenic status under high density culture and stress. Additionally, viral metagenomics can help our understanding of viruses present in aquaculture/mariculture settings and routine pathogen surveillance programmes. PMID:23997432

Alavandi, S V; Poornima, M

2012-09-01

166

Pathogenicity of frog virus 3-like virus in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) at two environmental temperatures.  

PubMed

Ranaviral disease has affected several species of reptiles, but disease progression and mortality in relation to environmental temperature has yet to be determined. In this study, two separate trials challenged adult female red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) with a ranavirus (frog virus 3-like virus; FV3) isolate at environmental temperatures of 22 °C (n = 4) and 28 °C (n = 4). The mortality rates in the turtles in the 22 °C and 28 °C trials were 100% and 50%, respectively. Median survival time for turtles exposed to FV3 at 22 °C was 24 days, while it was 30 days in the group kept at 28 °C. Consistent microscopical lesions were observed only in the group inoculated at 22 °C and included fibrinoid necrosis of vessels in the spleen, vascular and sinusoidal thrombi in the liver, necrotizing myositis and a mild heterophilic interstitial pneumonia. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, targeting a conserved portion of the major capsid protein, was able to detect virus copies in whole blood, oral and cloacal swabs, tongue, skeletal muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, ovary and kidney. Viral copy number in ante-mortem clinical samples was non-significantly highest in whole blood, while kidney had the highest viral copy number in post-mortem samples. All samples had higher virus copy number in turtles exposed to FV3 at 22 °C compared with 28 °C. This study determined that environmental temperature affects the survival and disease progression in ranavirus-infected red-eared slider turtles, which will aid in managing animals in a clinical or free-ranging setting. PMID:23582975

Allender, M C; Mitchell, M A; Torres, T; Sekowska, J; Driskell, E A

2013-01-01

167

Viral diseases of marine invertebrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of Penaeus and causes catastrophic mortalities in P. stylirostris, but usually exhibits only inapparent infection in P. vannamei. Some shrimp viruses apparently are latent in larvae, causing disease only when shrimp have reached the postlarval or juvenile stages. Others are equally or more pathogenic in larvae. Studies of shrimp viruses and iridovirus-associated disease in cultured oysters point up the need for rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Until appropriate cell cultures from marine invertebrates are devised, the viral identifications necessary for understanding of epizootiology, rapid containment of epizootics in cultured animals, and decisions regarding introductions of exotic species will be difficult or impossible.

Johnson, P. T.

1984-03-01

168

The Fecal Viral Flora of Wild Rodents  

PubMed Central

The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat) collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in mammals. PMID:21909269

Phan, Tung G.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunlin; Rose, Robert K.; Lipton, Howard L.; Delwart, Eric L.

2011-01-01

169

The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.  

PubMed

The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat) collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in mammals. PMID:21909269

Phan, Tung G; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunlin; Rose, Robert K; Lipton, Howard L; Delwart, Eric L

2011-09-01

170

Pathogen intelligence  

PubMed Central

Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

Steinert, Michael

2014-01-01

171

Viral infections during pregnancy.  

PubMed

Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be 'immunosuppressed', the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Kwon, Ja-Young; Racicot, Karen; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

2015-03-01

172

AndreGratia: A Forerunner in Microbial and Viral Genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

riophages in connection with the study of viruses and cell biology; and (e) unknown aspects of lysogeny and When people spoke of microbes in the early 1900s, colicinogeny described long ago and possibly connected they were thinking almost exclusively of bacterial (and with new findings on imprinting in bacteria. viral) pathogens affecting humans. Of course, Antonie Microbiology has undeniably played

James F. Crow; William F. Dove; Jean-Pierre Gratia

173

NCBI Viral Genomes Resource.  

PubMed

Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets. PMID:25428358

Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

2015-01-28

174

Analysis of host genetic diversity and viral entry as sources of between-host variation in viral load  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Little is known about the factors that drive the high levels of between-host variation in pathogen burden that are frequently observed in viral infections. Here, two factors thought to impact viral load variability, host genetic diversity and stochastic processes linked with viral entry into the host, were examined. This work was conducted with the aquatic vertebrate virus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in its natural host, rainbow trout. It was found that in controlled in vivo infections of IHNV, a suggestive trend of reduced between-fish viral load variation was observed in a clonal population of isogenic trout compared to a genetically diverse population of out-bred trout. However, this trend was not statistically significant for any of the four viral genotypes examined, and high levels of fish-to-fish variation persisted even in the isogenic trout population. A decrease in fish-to-fish viral load variation was also observed in virus injection challenges that bypassed the host entry step, compared to fish exposed to the virus through the natural water-borne immersion route of infection. This trend was significant for three of the four virus genotypes examined and suggests host entry may play a role in viral load variability. However, high levels of viral load variation also remained in the injection challenges. Together, these results indicate that although host genetic diversity and viral entry may play some role in between-fish viral load variation, they are not major factors. Other biological and non-biological parameters that may influence viral load variation are discussed.

Wargo, Andrew R.; Kell, Alison M.; Scott, Robert J.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Kurath, Gael

2012-01-01

175

[Bovine viral diarrhea control in Russian Federation].  

PubMed

Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is one of the greatest challenges for breeding and commercial livestock. It is characterized by lesions of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, abortion, infertility, immune deficiency, and persistence of the pathogen. In this work, a set of measures for the rehabilitation and prevention of BVD in cattle is described. It includes the data of the literature, guidance documents for the diagnosis and control of BVD adopted by OIE, EU countries, USA, as well as the results of this research. PMID:24772640

Guliukin, M I; Iurov, K P; Glotov, A G; Donchenko, N A

2013-01-01

176

Prevalence of selected pathogens in western pond turtles and sympatric introduced red-eared sliders in California, USA.  

PubMed

Pathogen introduction by invasive species has been speculated to be a cause of declining western pond turtle Emys marmorata populations in California, USA. This study determined the prevalence of Ranavirus spp., Herpesvirus spp., Mycoplasma spp. (via polymerase chain reaction of blood and nasal flush contents), and Salmonella spp. infection (via fecal culture) in native E. marmorata and invasive red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans and compared infection prevalence in E. marmorata populations sympatric with T. scripta elegans to E. marmorata populations that were not sympatric by sampling 145 E. marmorata and 33 T. scripta elegans at 10 study sites throughout California. Mycoplasma spp. were detected in both species: prevalence in E. marmorata was 7.8% in the northern, 9.8% in the central, and 23.3% in the southern California regions. In T. scripta elegans, Mycoplasma spp. were not detected in the northern California region but were detected at 4.5 and 14.3% in the central and southern regions, respectively. All turtles tested negative for Herpesvirus spp. and Ranavirus spp. Enteric bacteria but not Salmonella spp. were isolated from feces. E. marmorata populations that were sympatric with T. scripta elegans did not have increased risk of Mycoplasma spp. infection. For E. marmorata, there was a significant association between Mycoplasma spp. infection and lower body weight and being located in the southern California region. This study is the first of its kind to document pathogen prevalence in native E. marmorata habitats and those sympatric with T. scripta elegans in California. PMID:24270022

Silbernagel, C; Clifford, D L; Bettaso, J; Worth, S; Foley, J

2013-11-25

177

Characterization of the Viral Microbiome in Patients with Severe Lower Respiratory Tract Infections, Using Metagenomic Sequencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The human respiratory tract is heavily exposed to microorganisms. Viral respiratory tract pathogens, like RSV, influenza and rhinoviruses cause major morbidity and mortality from respiratory tract disease. Furthermore, as viruses have limited means of transmission, viruses that cause pathogenicity in other tissues may be transmitted through the respiratory tract. It is therefore important to chart the human virome in this

Fredrik Lysholm; Anna Wetterbom; Cecilia Lindau; Hamid Darban; Annelie Bjerkner; Kristina Fahlander; A. Michael Lindberg; Bengt Persson; Tobias Allander; Björn Andersson

2012-01-01

178

Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters.  

PubMed

This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and important field. PMID:12525429

Griffin, Dale W; Donaldson, Kim A; Paul, John H; Rose, Joan B

2003-01-01

179

Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

2003-01-01

180

RNA-based viral vectors.  

PubMed

The advent of reverse genetic approaches to manipulate the genomes of both positive (+) and negative (-) sense RNA viruses allowed researchers to harness these genomes for basic research. Manipulation of positive sense RNA virus genomes occurred first largely because infectious RNA could be transcribed directly from cDNA versions of the RNA genomes. Manipulation of negative strand RNA virus genomes rapidly followed as more sophisticated approaches to provide RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complexes coupled with negative-strand RNA templates were developed. These advances have driven an explosion of RNA virus vaccine vector development. That is, development of approaches to exploit the basic replication and expression strategies of RNA viruses to produce vaccine antigens that have been engineered into their genomes. This study has led to significant preclinical testing of many RNA virus vectors against a wide range of pathogens as well as cancer targets. Multiple RNA virus vectors have advanced through preclinical testing to human clinical evaluation. This review will focus on RNA virus vectors designed to express heterologous genes that are packaged into viral particles and have progressed to clinical testing. PMID:25382613

Mogler, Mark A; Kamrud, Kurt I

2015-02-01

181

Les fièvres hémorragiques virales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF) include a variety of infections which associated usually high fever with hemorrhages more or less intense with a high fatality rate. The viruses belong to different families: the Flaviviridae (dengue, Yellow fever, Omsk, Kyasanur, Alkhurma), and Bunyaviridae (Crimean-Congo, Rift Valley fever) transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks, the Arenaviridae (Lassa, Junin…) and hantaviruses transmitted by excretas from

H. Zeller; M. C. Georges-Courbot

2006-01-01

182

Virally Inspired: Gen Y Attitudes Towards Viral Stealth Marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing use of viral stealth marketing as a contemporary marketing technique is not well represented in empirical research, particularly in examining consumers' attitudes towards the ethics and effectiveness of viral stealth marketing. Capitalizing on the efficacy of the electronic medium, viral stealth marketing seeks to disguise the relationship between the individual(s) conveying the message and the organisation endorsing it.

Celeste Swanepoel; Ashley Lye; Robert Rugimbana

183

Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens  

SciTech Connect

During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

David Bradley

2011-03-31

184

Discovery of a viral pathogen in the Asian citrus psyllid  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We used a Metagenomics approach and discovered an insect-infecting virus in adult Asian citrus psyllids in Florida. Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a Fijivirus in North America. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a small insect tha...

185

Release of invasive plants from fungal and viral pathogens  

E-print Network

............................................................................................................................................................................. Invasive plant species both threaten native biodiversity and are economically costly1­5 , but only a few hypothesis argues that interactions with native species, including natural enemies, limit invaders' impacts6 virus species infect each plant species in its naturalized range than in its native range. In addition

Crews, Stephen

186

Phylodynamic analysis of a viral infection network  

PubMed Central

Viral infections by sexual and droplet transmission routes typically spread through a complex host-to-host contact network. Clarifying the transmission network and epidemiological parameters affecting the variations and dynamics of a specific pathogen is a major issue in the control of infectious diseases. However, conventional methods such as interview and/or classical phylogenetic analysis of viral gene sequences have inherent limitations and often fail to detect infectious clusters and transmission connections. Recent improvements in computational environments now permit the analysis of large datasets. In addition, novel analytical methods have been developed that serve to infer the evolutionary dynamics of virus genetic diversity using sample date information and sequence data. This type of framework, termed “phylodynamics,” helps connect some of the missing links on viral transmission networks, which are often hard to detect by conventional methods of epidemiology. With sufficient number of sequences available, one can use this new inference method to estimate theoretical epidemiological parameters such as temporal distributions of the primary infection, fluctuation of the pathogen population size, basic reproductive number, and the mean time span of disease infectiousness. Transmission networks estimated by this framework often have the properties of a scale-free network, which are characteristic of infectious and social communication processes. Network analysis based on phylodynamics has alluded to various suggestions concerning the infection dynamics associated with a given community and/or risk behavior. In this review, I will summarize the current methods available for identifying the transmission network using phylogeny, and present an argument on the possibilities of applying the scale-free properties to these existing frameworks. PMID:22993510

Shiino, Teiichiro

2012-01-01

187

Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors  

PubMed Central

Upon viral infection, the major defensive strategy employed by the host immune system is the activation of the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral pathway, which is overseen by IFN regulatory factors (IRFs). In order to complete their life cycles, viruses must find a way to modulate the host IFN-mediated immune response. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a human tumor-inducing herpesvirus, has developed a unique mechanism for antagonizing cellular IFN-mediated antiviral activity by incorporating viral homolog of the cellular IRFs, called vIRFs, into its genome. Here, we summarize the novel evasion mechanisms by which KSHV, through its vIRFs, circumvents IFN-mediated innate immune responses and deregulates the cell growth control mechanism. PMID:19715458

Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Liang, Chengyu; Jung, Jae U.

2009-01-01

188

Viral Membrane Scission  

PubMed Central

Virus budding is a complex, multistep process in which viral proteins make specific alterations in membrane curvature. Many different viral proteins can deform the membrane and form a budding virion, but very few can mediate membrane scission to complete the budding process. As a result, enveloped viruses have developed numerous ways of facilitating membrane scission, including hijacking host cellular scission machinery and expressing their own scission proteins. These proteins mediate scission in very different ways, though the biophysical mechanics underlying their actions may be similar. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of membrane scission and the ways in which enveloped viruses use these systems to mediate the release of budding virions. PMID:24099087

Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

2014-01-01

189

Viral haemorrhagic fever.  

PubMed

Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are a range of viral infections with potential to cause life-threatening illness in humans. Apart from Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF), they are largely confined to Africa, distribution being dependent on the ecology of reservoir hosts. At present, the largest ever epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD or Ebola) is occurring in West Africa, raising the possibility that cases could be imported into non-endemic countries. Diagnosis and management is challenging due to the non-specificity of early symptoms, limited laboratory facilities in endemic areas, severity of disease, lack of effective therapy, strict infection control requirements and propensity to cause epidemics with secondary cases in healthcare workers. PMID:25650201

Fhogartaigh, Caoimhe Nic; Aarons, Emma

2015-02-01

190

Viral entry mechanisms: the increasing diversity of paramyxovirus entry  

PubMed Central

The paramyxovirus family contains established human pathogens such as measles virus and human respiratory syncytial virus, and emerging pathogens including the Hendra and Nipah viruses and the recently identified human metapneumovirus. Two major envelope glycoproteins, the attachment protein and the fusion protein, promote the processes of viral attachment and virus-cell membrane fusion required for entry. While common mechanisms of fusion protein proteolytic activation and the mechanism of membrane fusion promotion have been shown in recent years, considerable diversity exists in the family related to receptor binding and the potential mechanisms of fusion triggering. PMID:19878307

Smith, Everett Clinton; Popa, Andreea; Chang, Andres; Masante, Cyril; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

2009-01-01

191

Ranaviruses in European reptiles  

E-print Network

examined virologically First case: chelonians (Marschang et al., 1999) #12;· Hyperemic, ulcerated mucosa: ­ Animal 1: · Tongue, trachea, lung, liver, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, cloaca

Gray, Matthew

192

Equine Viral Arteritis.  

PubMed

Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), is a respiratory and reproductive disease that occurs throughout the world. EAV infection is highly species-specific and exclusively limited to members of the family Equidae, which includes horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras. EVA is an economically important disease and outbreaks could cause significant losses to the equine industry. The primary objective of this article is to summarize current understanding of EVA, specifically the disease, pathogenesis, epidemiology, host immune response, vaccination and treatment strategies, prevention and control measures, and future directions. PMID:25441113

Balasuriya, Udeni B R

2014-12-01

193

Viral surveillance and discovery  

PubMed Central

The field of virus discovery has burgeoned with the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and bioinformatics programs that enable rapid identification and molecular characterization of known and novel agents, investments in global microbial surveillance that include wildlife and domestic animals as well as humans, and recognition that viruses may be implicated in chronic as well as acute diseases. Here we review methods for viral surveillance and discovery, strategies and pitfalls in linking discoveries to disease, and identify opportunities for improvements in sequencing instrumentation and analysis, the use of social media and medical informatics that will further advance clinical medicine and public health. PMID:23602435

Lipkin, Walter Ian; Firth, Cadhla

2014-01-01

194

Animal migration and risk of spread of viral infections: Chapter 9  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The potential contribution of migration towards the spread of disease is as varied as the ecology of the pathogens themselves and their host populations. This chapter outlines multiple examples of viral diseases in animal populations and their mechanisms of viral spread. Many species of insects, mammals, fish, and birds exhibit migratory behavior and have the potential to disperse diseases over long distances. The majority of studies available on viral zoonoses have focused on birds and bats, due to their highly migratory life histories. A number of studies have reported evidence of changes in the timing of animal migrations in response to climate change. The majority indicate an advancement of spring migration, with few or inconclusive results for fall migration. Predicting the combined effects of climate change on migratory patterns of host species and epidemiology of viral pathogens is complex and not fully realistic.

Prosser, Diann J.; Nagel, Jessica; Takekawa, John Y.

2013-01-01

195

Host and viral ecology determine bat rabies seasonality and maintenance  

PubMed Central

Rabies is an acute viral infection that is typically fatal. Most rabies modeling has focused on disease dynamics and control within terrestrial mammals (e.g., raccoons and foxes). As such, rabies in bats has been largely neglected until recently. Because bats have been implicated as natural reservoirs for several emerging zoonotic viruses, including SARS-like corona viruses, henipaviruses, and lyssaviruses, understanding how pathogens are maintained within a population becomes vital. Unfortunately, little is known about maintenance mechanisms for any pathogen in bat populations. We present a mathematical model parameterized with unique data from an extensive study of rabies in a Colorado population of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to elucidate general maintenance mechanisms. We propose that life history patterns of many species of temperate-zone bats, coupled with sufficiently long incubation periods, allows for rabies virus maintenance. Seasonal variability in bat mortality rates, specifically low mortality during hibernation, allows long-term bat population viability. Within viable bat populations, sufficiently long incubation periods allow enough infected individuals to enter hibernation and survive until the following year, and hence avoid an epizootic fadeout of rabies virus. We hypothesize that the slowing effects of hibernation on metabolic and viral activity maintains infected individuals and their pathogens until susceptibles from the annual birth pulse become infected and continue the cycle. This research provides a context to explore similar host ecology and viral dynamics that may explain seasonal patterns and maintenance of other bat-borne diseases. PMID:21646516

George, Dylan B.; Webb, Colleen T.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Bowen, Richard A.; Smith, David L.; Stanley, Thomas R.; Ellison, Laura E.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

2011-01-01

196

Host and viral ecology determine bat rabies seasonality and maintenance.  

PubMed

Rabies is an acute viral infection that is typically fatal. Most rabies modeling has focused on disease dynamics and control within terrestrial mammals (e.g., raccoons and foxes). As such, rabies in bats has been largely neglected until recently. Because bats have been implicated as natural reservoirs for several emerging zoonotic viruses, including SARS-like corona viruses, henipaviruses, and lyssaviruses, understanding how pathogens are maintained within a population becomes vital. Unfortunately, little is known about maintenance mechanisms for any pathogen in bat populations. We present a mathematical model parameterized with unique data from an extensive study of rabies in a Colorado population of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to elucidate general maintenance mechanisms. We propose that life history patterns of many species of temperate-zone bats, coupled with sufficiently long incubation periods, allows for rabies virus maintenance. Seasonal variability in bat mortality rates, specifically low mortality during hibernation, allows long-term bat population viability. Within viable bat populations, sufficiently long incubation periods allow enough infected individuals to enter hibernation and survive until the following year, and hence avoid an epizootic fadeout of rabies virus. We hypothesize that the slowing effects of hibernation on metabolic and viral activity maintains infected individuals and their pathogens until susceptibles from the annual birth pulse become infected and continue the cycle. This research provides a context to explore similar host ecology and viral dynamics that may explain seasonal patterns and maintenance of other bat-borne diseases. PMID:21646516

George, Dylan B; Webb, Colleen T; Farnsworth, Matthew L; O'Shea, Thomas J; Bowen, Richard A; Smith, David L; Stanley, Thomas R; Ellison, Laura E; Rupprecht, Charles E

2011-06-21

197

Host and viral ecology determine bat rabies seasonality and maintenance  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rabies is an acute viral infection that is typically fatal. Most rabies modeling has focused on disease dynamics and control within terrestrial mammals (e.g., raccoons and foxes). As such, rabies in bats has been largely neglected until recently. Because bats have been implicated as natural reservoirs for several emerging zoonotic viruses, including SARS-like corona viruses, henipaviruses, and lyssaviruses, understanding how pathogens are maintained within a population becomes vital. Unfortunately, little is known about maintenance mechanisms for any pathogen in bat populations. We present a mathematical model parameterized with unique data from an extensive study of rabies in a Colorado population of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to elucidate general maintenance mechanisms. We propose that life history patterns of many species of temperate-zone bats, coupled with sufficiently long incubation periods, allows for rabies virus maintenance. Seasonal variability in bat mortality rates, specifically low mortality during hibernation, allows long-term bat population viability. Within viable bat populations, sufficiently long incubation periods allow enough infected individuals to enter hibernation and survive until the following year, and hence avoid an epizootic fadeout of rabies virus. We hypothesize that the slowing effects of hibernation on metabolic and viral activity maintains infected individuals and their pathogens until susceptibles from the annual birth pulse become infected and continue the cycle. This research provides a context to explore similar host ecology and viral dynamics that may explain seasonal patterns and maintenance of other bat-borne diseases.

George, D.B.; Webb, C.T.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; O'Shea, T.J.; Bowen, R.A.; Smith, D.L.; Stanley, T.R.; Ellison, L.E.; Rupprecht, C.E.

2011-01-01

198

Involvement of the PI3K and ERK signaling pathways in largemouth bass virus-induced apoptosis and viral replication.  

PubMed

Increased reports demonstrated that largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides in natural and artificial environments were always suffered from an emerging iridovirus disease, largemouth Bass virus (LMBV). However, the underlying mechanism of LMBV pathogenesis remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated the cell signaling events involved in virus induced cell death and viral replication in vitro. We found that LMBV infection in epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells induced typical apoptosis, evidenced by the appearance of apoptotic bodies, cytochrome c release, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) destruction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Two initiators of apoptosis, caspase-8 and caspase-9, and the executioner of apoptosis, caspase-3, were all significantly activated with the infection time, suggested that not only mitochondrion-mediated, but also death receptor-mediated apoptosis were involved in LMBV infection. Reporter gene assay showed that the promoter activity of transcription factors including p53, NF-?B, AP-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) were decreased during LMBV infection. After treatment with different signaling pathway inhibitors, virus production were significantly suppressed by the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling pathway. Furthermore, LMBV infection induced apoptosis was enhanced by PI3K inhibitor LY294002, but decreased by addition of ERK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, we speculated that apoptosis was sophisticatedly regulated by a series of cell signaling events for efficient virus propagation. Taken together, our results provided new insights into the molecular mechanism of ranavirus infection. PMID:25260912

Huang, Xiaohong; Wang, Wei; Huang, Youhua; Xu, Liwen; Qin, Qiwei

2014-12-01

199

Application of Nucleic-acid-based Therapeutics for Viral Infections in Shrimp Aquaculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viral infections are one of the major reasons for the huge economic losses in shrimp farming. The control of viral diseases\\u000a in shrimp remains a serious challenge for the shrimp aquacultural industry, with major pathogens, such as the white spot syndrome\\u000a virus, yellow head virus, Taura syndrome virus, hepatopancreatic parvovirus, and baculoviruses, being geographically widespread.\\u000a In the absence of a

Mudagandur S. Shekhar; Yuanan Lu

2009-01-01

200

Human viral gastroenteritis.  

PubMed Central

During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

Christensen, M L

1989-01-01

201

Genetic change in the open reading frame of bovine viral diarrhea virus is introduced more rapidly during the establishment of a single persistent infection than by multiple acute infections  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are ubiquitous viral pathogens of cattle. There is a high degree of sequence diversity between strains circulating in livestock herds. The driving force behind change in sequence is not known but the inaccurate replication of the genomic RNA by a viral RNA polyme...

202

Induction of neutralising antibodies by virus-like particles harbouring surface proteins from highly pathogenic H5N1 and H7N1 influenza viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY: There is an urgent need to develop novel approaches to vaccination against the emerging, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Here, we engineered influenza viral-like particles (Flu-VLPs) derived from retroviral core particles that mimic the properties of the viral surface of two highly pathogenic influenza viruses of either H7N1 or H5N1 antigenic subtype. We demonstrate that, upon recovery of viral

Judit Szécsi; Bertrand Boson; Per Johnsson; Pia Dupeyrot-Lacas; Mikhail Matrosovich; Hans-Dieter Klenk; David Klatzmann; Viktor Volchkov; François-Loïc Cosset

2006-01-01

203

A Strategy To Estimate Unknown Viral Diversity in Mammals  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The majority of emerging zoonoses originate in wildlife, and many are caused by viruses. However, there are no rigorous estimates of total viral diversity (here termed “virodiversity”) for any wildlife species, despite the utility of this to future surveillance and control of emerging zoonoses. In this case study, we repeatedly sampled a mammalian wildlife host known to harbor emerging zoonotic pathogens (the Indian Flying Fox, Pteropus giganteus) and used PCR with degenerate viral family-level primers to discover and analyze the occurrence patterns of 55 viruses from nine viral families. We then adapted statistical techniques used to estimate biodiversity in vertebrates and plants and estimated the total viral richness of these nine families in P. giganteus to be 58 viruses. Our analyses demonstrate proof-of-concept of a strategy for estimating viral richness and provide the first statistically supported estimate of the number of undiscovered viruses in a mammalian host. We used a simple extrapolation to estimate that there are a minimum of 320,000 mammalian viruses awaiting discovery within these nine families, assuming all species harbor a similar number of viruses, with minimal turnover between host species. We estimate the cost of discovering these viruses to be ~$6.3 billion (or ~$1.4 billion for 85% of the total diversity), which if annualized over a 10-year study time frame would represent a small fraction of the cost of many pandemic zoonoses. PMID:24003179

Anthony, Simon J.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Murray, Kris A.; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos M.; Solovyov, Alexander; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Arrigo, Nicole C.; Islam, Ariful; Ali Khan, Shahneaz; Hosseini, Parviez; Bogich, Tiffany L.; Olival, Kevin J.; Sanchez-Leon, Maria D.; Karesh, William B.; Goldstein, Tracey; Luby, Stephen P.; Morse, Stephen S.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

2013-01-01

204

STAT2 deficiency and susceptibility to viral illness in humans  

PubMed Central

Severe infectious disease in children may be a manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. These genetic disorders represent important experiments of nature with the capacity to elucidate nonredundant mechanisms of human immunity. We hypothesized that a primary defect of innate antiviral immunity was responsible for unusually severe viral illness in two siblings; the proband developed disseminated vaccine strain measles following routine immunization, whereas an infant brother died after a 2-d febrile illness from an unknown viral infection. Patient fibroblasts were indeed abnormally permissive for viral replication in vitro, associated with profound failure of type I IFN signaling and absence of STAT2 protein. Sequencing of genomic DNA and RNA revealed a homozygous mutation in intron 4 of STAT2 that prevented correct splicing in patient cells. Subsequently, other family members were identified with the same genetic lesion. Despite documented infection by known viral pathogens, some of which have been more severe than normal, surviving STAT2-deficient individuals have remained generally healthy, with no obvious defects in their adaptive immunity or developmental abnormalities. These findings imply that type I IFN signaling [through interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3)] is surprisingly not essential for host defense against the majority of common childhood viral infections. PMID:23391734

Hambleton, Sophie; Goodbourn, Stephen; Young, Dan F.; Dickinson, Paul; Mohamad, Siti M. B.; Valappil, Manoj; McGovern, Naomi; Cant, Andrew J.; Hackett, Scott J.; Ghazal, Peter; Morgan, Neil V.; Randall, Richard E.

2013-01-01

205

Viral infection of engrafted human islets leads to diabetes.  

PubMed

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by the destruction of the insulin-producing ?-cells of pancreatic islets. Genetic and environmental factors both contribute to T1D development. Viral infection with enteroviruses is a suspected trigger for T1D but a causal role remains unproven and controversial. Studies in animals are problematic because of species-specific differences in host cell susceptibility and immune responses to candidate viral pathogens such as coxsackie B virus (CVB). In order to resolve the controversial role of viruses in human T1D, we developed a viral infection model in immunodeficient mice bearing human islet grafts. Hyperglycemia was induced in mice by specific ablation of native ?-cells. Human islets, which are naturally susceptible to CVB infection, were transplanted to restore normoglycemia. Transplanted mice were infected with CVB4 and monitored for hyperglycemia. Forty-seven percent of CVB4-infected mice developed hyperglycemia. Human islet grafts from infected mice contained viral RNA, expressed viral protein, and had reduced insulin compared to grafts from uninfected mice. Human-specific gene expression profiles in grafts from infected mice revealed the induction of multiple interferon stimulated genes. Thus, human islets can become severely dysfunctional with diminished insulin production following CVB infection of ?-cells, resulting in diabetes. PMID:25392246

Gallagher, Glen R; Brehm, Michael A; Finberg, Robert W; Barton, Bruce A; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita; Wang, Jennifer P

2014-11-12

206

NK Cell Subset Redistribution during the Course of Viral Infections  

PubMed Central

Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 as well as human cytomegalovirus infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of these two chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment. PMID:25177322

Lugli, Enrico; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Mavilio, Domenico

2014-01-01

207

Architecture and regulation of negative-strand viral enzymatic machinery  

PubMed Central

Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses initiate infection with a unique polymerase complex that mediates both mRNA transcription and subsequent genomic RNA replication. For nearly all NS RNA viruses, distinct enzymatic domains catalyzing RNA polymerization and multiple steps of 5? mRNA cap formation are contained within a single large polymerase protein (L). While NS RNA viruses include a variety of emerging human and agricultural pathogens, the enzymatic machinery driving viral replication and gene expression remains poorly understood. Recent insights with Machupo virus and vesicular stomatitis virus have provided the first structural information of viral L proteins, and revealed how the various enzymatic domains are arranged into a conserved architecture shared by both segmented and nonsegmented NS RNA viruses. In vitro systems reconstituting RNA synthesis from purified components provide new tools to understand the viral replicative machinery, and demonstrate the arenavirus matrix protein regulates RNA synthesis by locking a polymerase–template complex. Inhibition of gene expression by the viral matrix protein is a distinctive feature also shared with influenza A virus and nonsegmented NS RNA viruses, possibly illuminating a conserved mechanism for coordination of viral transcription and polymerase packaging PMID:22767259

Kranzusch, Philip J.; Whelan, Sean P.J.

2012-01-01

208

Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown  

PubMed Central

Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

2013-01-01

209

Innate immune responses of salmonid fish to viral infections.  

PubMed

Viruses are the most serious pathogenic threat to the production of the main aquacultured salmonid species the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and the Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. The viral diseases Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN), Pancreatic Disease (PD), Infectious Haemorrhagic Necrosis (IHN), Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (VHS), and Infectious Salmon Anaemia (ISA) cause massive economic losses to the global salmonid aquaculture industry every year. To date, no solution exists to treat livestock affected by a viral disease and only a small number of efficient vaccines are available to prevent infection. As a consequence, understanding the host immune response against viruses in these fish species is critical to develop prophylactic and preventive control measures. The innate immune response represents an important part of the host defence mechanism preventing viral replication after infection. It is a fast acting response designed to inhibit virus propagation immediately within the host, allowing for the adaptive specific immunity to develop. It has cellular and humoral components which act in synergy. This review will cover inflammation responses, the cell types involved, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides. Particular attention will be given to the type I interferon system as the major player in the innate antiviral defence mechanism of salmonids. Viral evasion strategies will also be discussed. PMID:23981327

Collet, Bertrand

2014-04-01

210

Viral infections in mice with reconstituted human immune system components.  

PubMed

Pathogenic viruses are often difficult to study due to their exclusive tropism for humans. The development of mice with human immune system components opens the possibility to study those human pathogens with a tropism for the human hematopoietic lineage in vivo. These include HCMV, EBV, KSHV, HIV, HTLV-1, dengue virus and JC virus. Furthermore, some human pathogens, like HSV-2, adenovirus, HCV, HBV and influenza A virus, with an additional tropism for somatic mouse tissues or for additional transplanted human tissues, mainly liver, have been explored in these models. The cellular tropism of these viruses, their associated diseases and primarily cell-mediated immune responses to these viral infections will be discussed in this review. Already some exciting information has been gained from these novel chimeric in vivo models and future avenues to gain more insights into the pathology, but also potential therapies, will be outlined. Although the respective in vivo models of human immune responses can still be significantly improved, they already provide preclinical systems for in vivo studies of important viral pathogens of humans. PMID:24953718

Münz, Christian

2014-09-01

211

Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish and is listed as reportable by many nations and international organizations (Office International des Epizooties 2006). Prior to 1988, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that the virus is endemic among many marine and anadromous fish species in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005). Genetic analysis reveals that isolates of VHSV can be divided into four genotypes that generally correlate with geographic location with the North American isolates generally falling into VHSV Genotype IV (Snow et al. 2004). In 2005-2006, reports from the Great Lakes region indicated that wild fish had experienced disease or, in some cases, very large die-offs from VHSV (Elsayed et al. 2006, Lumsden et al. 2007). The new strain from the Great Lakes, now identified as VHSV Genotype IVb, appears most closely related to isolates of VHSV from mortalities that occurred during 2000-2004 in rivers and near-shore areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Gagne et al. 2007). The type IVb isolate found in the Great Lakes region is the only strain outside of Europe that has been associated with significant mortality in freshwater species.

Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

2007-01-01

212

Clinical and experimental aspects of viral myocarditis.  

PubMed Central

Picornaviruses are frequently implicated as the etiological agents of acute myocarditis. This association is based historically on serological evidence of rising antibody titers to specific pathogens and more recently on identification of viral genomic material in endocardial biopsy specimens through in situ hybridization. Only rarely is infectious virus isolated from either the patient or the heart during periods of maximum myocardial inflammation and injury. Thus, despite a probable viral etiology, much interest centers on the role of the immune system in cardiac damage and the likelihood that the infection triggers an autoimmune response to heart-specific antigens. Heart-reactive antibodies and T cells are found in most myocarditis patients, and immunosuppressive therapy has proven beneficial in many, though not all, cases. Furthermore, murine models of coxsackievirus group B type 3-induced myocarditis also demonstrate that virus infection initiates autoimmunity and that these autoimmune effectors are predominately responsible for tissue injury. How virus-host interactions overcome presumed self-tolerance to heart antigens is discussed, and evidence supporting various theories of virus-initiated autoimmunity and disease pathogenesis are delineated. PMID:2650861

Leslie, K; Blay, R; Haisch, C; Lodge, A; Weller, A; Huber, S

1989-01-01

213

Dengue viral infections  

PubMed Central

Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

2004-01-01

214

Influenza Viral Manipulation of Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling to Modulate Host Defense System  

PubMed Central

Viruses attempt to create a distinctive cellular environment to favor viral replication and spread. Recent studies uncovered new functions of the sphingolipid signaling/metabolism during pathogenic virus infections. While sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide were reported to influence the entry step of several viruses, sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes could directly alter viral replication processes. Influenza virus was shown to increase the level of sphingosine kinase (SK) 1 to promote virus propagation. The mechanism involves regulation of intracellular signaling pathways, leading to the amplification of influenza viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. However, bovine viral diarrhea virus inhibits SK1 to enhance the efficacy of virus replication, demonstrating the presence of virus-specific strategies for modulation of the sphingolipid system. Therefore, investigating the sphingolipid metabolism and signaling in the context of virus replication could help us design innovative therapeutic approaches to improve human health. PMID:24672735

Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Hahm, Bumsuk

2014-01-01

215

Characterization of an Antigenic Determinant of the Glycoprotein That Correlates with Pathogenicity of Rabies Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pathogenicity of fixed rabies virus strains for adult mice depends on the presence of an antigenic determinant on the viral glycoprotein. Two virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been used to identify this determinant. All pathogenic strains of fixed rabies virus bind to these antibodies and are neutralized by them, whereas nonpathogenic strains fail to react with these monoclonal antibodies and

Bernhard Dietzschold; William H. Wunner; Tadeusz J. Wiktor; A. Dwight Lopes; Monique Lafon; Carolyn L. Smith; Hilary Koprowski

1983-01-01

216

Molecular Determinants of Virulence, Cell Tropism, and Pathogenic Phenotype of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs), belonging to the family Birnaviridae, exhibit a wide range of immunosuppressive potential, pathogenicity, and virulence for chickens. The genomic segment A encodes all the structural (VP2, VP4, and VP3) and nonstructural proteins, whereas segment B encodes the viral RNA- dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). To identify the molecular determinants for the virulence, pathogenic phenotype, and cell

MEGGIN BRANDT; KUN YAO; MEIHONG LIU; ROBERT A. HECKERT; VIKRAM N. VAKHARIA

2001-01-01

217

Deep Sequencing to Identify the Causes of Viral Encephalitis  

PubMed Central

Deep sequencing allows for a rapid, accurate characterization of microbial DNA and RNA sequences in many types of samples. Deep sequencing (also called next generation sequencing or NGS) is being developed to assist with the diagnosis of a wide variety of infectious diseases. In this study, seven frozen brain samples from deceased subjects with recent encephalitis were investigated. RNA from each sample was extracted, randomly reverse transcribed and sequenced. The sequence analysis was performed in a blinded fashion and confirmed with pathogen-specific PCR. This analysis successfully identified measles virus sequences in two brain samples and herpes simplex virus type-1 sequences in three brain samples. No pathogen was identified in the other two brain specimens. These results were concordant with pathogen-specific PCR and partially concordant with prior neuropathological examinations, demonstrating that deep sequencing can accurately identify viral infections in frozen brain tissue. PMID:24699691

Chan, Benjamin K.; Wilson, Theodore; Fischer, Kael F.; Kriesel, John D.

2014-01-01

218

Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with expansion of the enteric virome  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with enteropathy which likely contributes to AIDS progression. To identify candidate etiologies for AIDS enteropathy, we used next generation sequencing to define the enteric virome during SIV infection in nonhuman primates. Pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic, SIV infection was associated with significant expansion of the enteric virome. We identified at least 32 previously undescribed enteric viruses during pathogenic SIV infection and confirmed their presence using viral culture and PCR testing. We detected unsuspected mucosal adenovirus infection associated with enteritis as well as parvovirus viremia in animals with advanced AIDS, indicating the pathogenic potential of SIV-associated expansion of the enteric virome. No association between pathogenic SIV infection and the family-level taxonomy of enteric bacteria was detected. Thus, enteric viral infections may contribute to AIDS enteropathy and disease progression. These findings underline the importance of metagenomic analysis of the virome for understanding AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:23063120

Handley, Scott; Thackray, Larissa B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel; Miller, Andrew; Droit, Lindsay; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Stanley, Kelly; Kramer, Joshua; Macri, Sheila C.; Permar, Sallie R.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Mansfield, Keith; Brenchley, Jason M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H.; Virgin, Herbert W.

2012-01-01

219

Papel de los receptores tipo toll en las infecciones virales: el VIH-1 como modelo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The toll-like receptors are an essential component of the innate and adaptive immune response. They are responsible for the recognition of different pathogens agents and trigger responses directed at eliminating the pathogens as well as the development of immunological long-term memory. During viral infections, several different toll-like receptors are activated. These generally induce a protective immune response, but at the

Juan Carlos Hernández; Carlos Julio Montoya; Silvio Urcuqui-Inchima

2007-01-01

220

Evolution of a simian immunodeficiency virus pathogen.  

PubMed

Analysis of disease induction by simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) in macaques was initially hampered by a lack of molecularly defined pathogenic strains. The first molecularly cloned SIV strains inoculated into macaques, SIVmacBK28 and SIVmacBK44 (hereafter designated BK28 and BK44, respectively), were cases in point, since they failed to induce disease within 1 year postinoculation in any inoculated animal. Here we report the natural history of infection with BK28 and BK44 in inoculated rhesus macaques and efforts to increase the pathogenicity of BK28 through genetic manipulation and in vivo passage. BK44 infection resulted in no disease in four animals infected for more than 7 years, whereas BK28 induced disease in less than half of animals monitored for up to 7 years. Elongation of the BK28 transmembrane protein (TM) coding sequence truncated by prior passage in human cells marginally increased pathogenicity, with two of four animals dying in the third year and one dying in the seventh year of infection. Modification of the BK28 long terminal repeat to include four consensus nuclear factor SP1 and two consensus NF-kappaB binding sites enhanced early virus replication without augmenting pathogenicity. In contrast, in vivo passage of BK28 from the first animal to die from immunodeficiency disease (1.5 years after infection) resulted in a consistently pathogenic strain and a 50% survival time of about 1.3 years, thus corresponding to one of the most pathogenic SIV strains identified to date. To determine whether the diverse viral quasispecies that evolved during in vivo passage was required for pathogenicity or whether a more virulent virus variant had evolved, we generated a molecular clone composed of the 3' half of the viral genome derived from the in vivo-passaged virus (H824) fused with the 5' half of the BK28 genome. Kinetics of disease induction with this cloned virus (BK28/H824) were similar to those with the in vivo-passaged virus, with four of five animals surviving less than 1.7 years. Thus, evolution of variants with enhanced pathogenicity can account for the increased pathogenicity of this SIV strain. The genetic changes responsible for this virulent transformation included at most 59 point mutations and 3 length-change mutations. The critical mutations were likely to have been multiple and dispersed, including elongation of the TM and Nef coding sequences; changes in RNA splice donor and acceptor sites, TATA box sites, and Sp1 sites; multiple changes in the V2 region of SU, including a consensus neutralization epitope; and five new N-linked glycosylation sites in SU. PMID:9420239

Edmonson, P; Murphey-Corb, M; Martin, L N; Delahunty, C; Heeney, J; Kornfeld, H; Donahue, P R; Learn, G H; Hood, L; Mullins, J I

1998-01-01

221

Potential lactoferrin activity against pathogenic viruses.  

PubMed

Lactoferrin (LF) is an 80-kDa globular glycoprotein with high affinity for metal ions, particularly for iron. This protein possesses many biological functions, including the binding and release of iron and serves as one of the important components of the innate immune system, where it acts as a potent inhibitor of several pathogens. LF has efficacious antibacterial and antiviral activities against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and against both naked and enveloped DNA and RNA viruses. In its antiviral pursuit, LF acts predominantly at the acute phase of the viral infection or even at the intracellular stage, as in hepatitis C virus infection. LF inhibits the entry of viral particles into host cells, either by direct attachment to the viral particles or by blocking their cellular receptors. This wide range of activities may be attributed to the capacity of LF to bind iron and its ability to interfere with the cellular receptors of both hosts and pathogenic microbes. PMID:25282173

Redwan, Elrashdy M; Uversky, Vladimir N; El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Al-Mehdar, Hussein

2014-10-01

222

Pathogen detection using short-RNA deep sequencing subtraction and assembly  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Early and accurate detection of human pathogen infection is critical for treatment and therapeutics. Here we describe pathogen identification using short RNA subtraction and assembly (SRSA), a detection method that overcomes the requirement of prior knowledge and culturing of pathogens, by using degraded small RNA and deep sequencing technology. We prove our approach's efficiency through identification of a combined viral and bacterial infection in human cells. Contact: nshomron@post.tau.ac.il PMID:21666269

Isakov, Ofer; Modai, Shira; Shomron, Noam

2011-01-01

223

[Epidemiology of viral hepatitis].  

PubMed

Understanding the country-specific epidemiology of disease, which may vary greatly among countries, is crucial for identifying the most appropriate preventive and control measures. An overview of the local epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Croatia is given in this paper. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B in Croatia is low (less than 2% HBsAg carriers in the general population). Hepatitis B incidence and prevalence began to decline significantly following the introduction of universal hepatitis B vaccination in 1999. Information on HBsAg seroprevalence is derived from routine testing of certain subpopulations (pregnant women, blood donors) and seroprevalence studies mostly targeted at high-risk populations. Universal childhood vaccination against hepatitis B remains the main preventive measure. We recommend testing for immunity one to two months after the third dose of hepatitis B vaccine for health-care workers. The incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C have also been declining in the general population. The main preventive measures are ensuring safety of blood products, prevention of drug abuse, and harm reduction programs for intravenous drug users. Hepatitis A incidence has declined dramatically since fifty years ago, when thousands of cases were reported annually. In the last five years, an average of twenty cases have been reported per year. The reduction of hepatitis A is a consequence of improved personal and community hygiene and sanitation. Hepatitis D has not been reported in Croatia. The risk of hepatitis D will get to be even smaller as the proportion of population vaccinated against hepatitis B builds up. Hepatitis E is reported only sporadically in Croatia, mostly in persons occupationally in contact with pigs and in travelers to endemic countries. In conclusion, Croatia is a low prevalence country for hepatitides A, B and C. Hepatitis D has not been reported to occur in Croatia and there are only sporadic cases of hepatitis E. Since hepatitis A is a rare disease occurring sporadically, which is a consequence of improved sanitation and hygiene, hepatitides B and C are the main causes of viral hepatitis in Croatia. The introduction of universal mandatory hepatitis B vaccination of schoolchildren in 1999 resulted in a decrease in the incidence of hepatitis B, which is most pronounced in adolescents and young adults, and further decrease in the incidence and prevalence is expected as the pool of susceptible individuals decreases through vaccination. The incidence of hepatitis C is decreasing as well. In spite of a relatively favorable epidemiological situation, hepatitis B and C are still a significant public health burden with an estimated 25,000 persons chronically infected with HBV and about 40,000 persons chronically infected with HCV in Croatia. PMID:24984326

Kai?, Bernard; Vilibi?-Cavlek, Tatjana; Filipovi?, Sanja Kureci?; Nemeth-Blazi?, Tatjana; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Vucina, Vesna Visekruna; Simunovi?, Aleksandar; Zajec, Martina; Radi?, Ivan; Pavli?, Jasmina; Glamocanin, Marica; Gjenero-Margan, Ira

2013-10-01

224

The role of epithelial tight junctions involved in pathogen infections.  

PubMed

Tight junctions (TJs) are sealing complexes between adjacent epithelial cells, functioning by controlling paracellular passage and maintaining cell polarity. These functions of TJs are primarily based on structural integrity as well as dynamic regulatory balance, indicating plasticity of TJ in response to external stimuli. An indispensable role of TJs involved in pathogen infection has been widely demonstrated since disruption of TJs leads to a distinct increase in paracellular permeability and polarity defects which facilitate viral or bacterial entry and spread. In addition to pathological changes in TJ integrity, TJ proteins such as occludin and claudins can either function as receptors for pathogen entry or interact with viral/bacterial effector molecules as an essential step for characterizing an infective stage. This suggests a more complicated role for TJ itself and especially specific TJ components. Thus, this review surveys the role of the epithelial TJs involved in various pathogen infections, and extends TJ targeted therapeutic and pharmacological application prospects. PMID:24965148

Lu, Ru-Yi; Yang, Wan-Xi; Hu, Yan-Jun

2014-10-01

225

Viral infection, inflammation and schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Schizophrenia is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic and environmental etiologies. Prenatal viral/bacterial infections and inflammation play major roles in the genesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we describe a viral model of schizophrenia tested in mice whereby the offspring of mice prenatally infected with influenza at E7, E9, E16, and E18 show significant gene, protein, and brain structural abnormalities postnatally. Similarly, we describe data on rodents exposed to bacterial infection or injected with a synthetic viral mimic (PolyI:C) also demonstrating brain structural and behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, human serologic data has been indispensible in supporting the viral theory of schizophrenia. Individuals born seropositive for bacterial and viral agents are at a significantly elevated risk of developing schizophrenia. While the specific mechanisms of prenatal viral/bacterial infections and brain disorder are unclear, recent findings suggest that the maternal inflammatory response may be associated with fetal brain injury. Preventive and therapeutic treatment options are also proposed. This review presents data related to epidemiology, human serology, and experimental animal models which support the viral model of schizophrenia. PMID:22349576

Kneeland, Rachel E.; Fatemi, S. Hossein

2012-01-01

226

RAB11-mediated trafficking in host-pathogen interactions.  

PubMed

Many bacterial and viral pathogens block or subvert host cellular processes to promote successful infection. One host protein that is targeted by invading pathogens is the small GTPase RAB11, which functions in vesicular trafficking. RAB11 functions in conjunction with a protein complex known as the exocyst to mediate terminal steps in cargo transport via the recycling endosome to cell-cell junctions, phagosomes and cellular protrusions. These processes contribute to host innate immunity by promoting epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity, sensing and immobilizing pathogens and repairing pathogen-induced cellular damage. In this Review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pathogens have evolved to disrupt or subvert RAB11-dependent pathways as part of their infection strategy. PMID:25118884

Guichard, Annabel; Nizet, Victor; Bier, Ethan

2014-09-01

227

Molecular Basis of Latency in Pathogenic Human Viruses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several human viruses are able to latently infect specific target cell populations in vivo. Analysis of the replication cycles of herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human immunodeficiency virus suggests that the latent infections established by these human pathogens primarily result from a lack of host factors critical for the expression of viral early gene products. The subsequent activation of specific cellular transcription factors in response to extracellular stimuli can induce the expression of these viral regulatory proteins and lead to a burst of lytic viral replication. Latency in these eukaryotic viruses therefore contrasts with latency in bacteriophage, which is maintained primarily by the expression of virally encoded repressors of lytic replication.

Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Cullen, Bryan R.

1991-11-01

228

PATHOGENS: VIEWS OF EPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE  

EPA Science Inventory

This presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in municipal sewage sludge and the commonly employed Class A and B processes for controlling pathogens. It notes how extensively they are used and discusses issues and concerns with their application. Pre...

229

Viral triggers for autoimmunity  

PubMed Central

In this review we want to consider some of the requirements for autoimmune disease to develop and how this may be reproduced in animal models. Besides a genetic predisposition, environmental triggering factors seem to play a central role in the etiology of many autoimmune diseases. In theory, a structural similarity or identity between the host and an invading pathogen might cause the immune system of the host to react not only to the pathogen but also to self-components. However, in order for such a process of molecular mimicry to induce autoimmunity the mechanisms of maintaining tolerance or ignorance to the self-components need to be circumvented. Subsequently, in order to advance autoimmunity to overt autoimmune disease the frequency and avidity of autoaggressive lymphocytes has to be of sufficient magnitude. Intuitively, one would assume that tolerance might be stronger to identical structures than to structures that just share a certain degree of similarity. Self-reactive lymphocytes with high-avidity are more likely to be deleted or functionally silenced by central and/or peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Thus, perfect mimicry between identical structures might fail in inducing autoimmunity because of efficient tolerance mechanisms. In contrast, imperfect mimicry between similar but not identical structures might on one hand circumvent tolerance but on the other hand result in the generation of lymphocytes with only low- to intermediate avidity. Here we examine animal models that use the concept of molecular mimicry as a potential mechanism for inducing or accelerating autoimmunity. We focus on the RIP-LCMV model for type 1 diabetes and the novel cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) model for autoimmune hepatitis, which use either identical or similar triggering and target antigens. PMID:19716269

Christen, Urs; Hintermann, Edith; Holdener, Martin; von Herrath, Matthias G.

2009-01-01

230

DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS  

PubMed Central

Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

2010-01-01

231

Pathogen Chip for Respiratory Tract Infections  

PubMed Central

Determining the viral etiology of respiratory tract infections (RTI) has been limited for the most part to specific primer PCR-based methods due to their increased sensitivity and specificity compared to other methods, such as tissue culture. However, specific primer approaches have limited the ability to fully understand the diversity of infecting pathogens. A pathogen chip system (PathChip), developed at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), using a random-tagged PCR coupled to a chip with over 170,000 probes, has the potential to recognize all known human viral pathogens. We tested 290 nasal wash specimens from Filipino children <2 years of age with respiratory tract infections using culture and 3 PCR methods—EraGen, Luminex, and the GIS PathChip. The PathChip had good diagnostic accuracy, ranging from 85.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.3 to 89.7%) for rhinovirus/enteroviruses to 98.6% (95% CI, 96.5 to 99.6%) for PIV 2, compared to the other methods and additionally identified a number of viruses not detected by these methods. PMID:23303493

Patel, Champa; Sung, Wing-Kin; Lee, Charlie W. H.; Loh, Kuan Hon; Lucero, Marilla; Nohynek, Hanna; Nai, Geraldine; Thien, Pei Ling; Koh, Chee Wee; Chan, Yang Sun; Ma, Jianmin; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Hibberd, Martin L.; Wong, Christopher W.

2013-01-01

232

Validation of real time RT-PCR applied to cell culture for diagnosis of any known genotype of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), a member of the Rhabdoviridae family, is a major viral pathogen of cultured salmonid fish, and also infects a wide range of marine fish species. In the present study, two real time PCR protocols (based on SYBR Green and TaqMan®) were developed for the detection of strains belonging to all known genotypes of VHSV. Validation

J. M. Cutrín; J. G. Olveira; I. Bandín; C. P. Dopazo

2009-01-01

233

Mathematical models of viral latency.  

PubMed

While viral latency remains one of the biggest challenges for successful antiviral therapy, it has also inspired mathematical modelers to develop dynamical system approaches with the aim of predicting the impact of drug efficacy on disease progression and the persistence of latent viral reservoirs. In this review we present several differential equation models and assess their relative success in giving advice to the working clinician and their predictive power for inferring long term viral eradication from short term abatement. Many models predict that there is a considerable likelihood of viral rebound due to continuous reseeding of latent reservoirs. Most mathematical models of HIV latency suffer from being reductionist by ignoring the growing variety of different cell types harboring latent virus, the considerable intercellular delay involved in reactivation, and host-related epigenetic modifications which may alter considerably the dynamical system of immune cell populations. PMID:23896280

Selinger, Christian; Katze, Michael G

2013-08-01

234

Aseptic Meningitis and Viral Myelitis  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS), respectively. Indeed, the number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal CNS infections, on the other hand, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with non-infectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). This chapter will review some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus will be placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses (EVs), which as a group account for the vast majority of all aseptic meningitis cases as well as many focal infections of the spinal cord. PMID:18657719

Irani, David N.

2008-01-01

235

Statistical Mechanics of Viral Entry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements—yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy—ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together—is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

2015-01-01

236

The Role of Viral Population Diversity in Adaptation of Bovine Coronavirus to New Host Environments  

E-print Network

The Role of Viral Population Diversity in Adaptation of Bovine Coronavirus to New Host Environments-switching events. Multiple new coronaviruses, including SARS, have been identified in human samples just within the last ten years, demonstrating the potential of coronaviruses as emergent human pathogens. Deep

Lazzaro, Brian

237

Discovery and initial analysis of novel viral genomes in the soybean cyst nematode  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Nematodes are the most abundant multi-cellular animals on earth, yet little is known about their natural viral pathogens and no nematode virus genomes have been published. Consequently, nematode viruses have been overlooked as important biotic factors in the study of nematode ecology. Here we show t...

238

Diametrically opposed effects of hypoxia and oxidative stress on two viral transactivators  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Many pathogens exist in multiple physiological niches within the host. Differences between aerobic and anaerobic conditions are known to alter the expression of bacterial virulence factors, typically through the conditional activity of transactivators that modulate their expression. More recently, changes in physiological niches have been shown to affect the expression of viral genes. For many viruses, differences in oxygen

Amber T Washington; Gyanendra Singh; Ashok Aiyar

2010-01-01

239

Experimental viral evolution to specific host MHC genotypes reveals fitness and virulence trade-offs  

E-print Network

Experimental viral evolution to specific host MHC genotypes reveals fitness and virulence trade a never-ending molecular arms race where pathogens evolve to evade immune recognition by com- mon MHC and virulence evolution of a mouse-specific retrovirus to its mammalian host across multiple MHC genotypes

Potts, Wayne

240

Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity.

Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

2014-01-01

241

Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact  

PubMed Central

A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

2014-01-01

242

A Viral-Human Interactome Based on Structural Motif-Domain Interactions Captures the Human Infectome  

PubMed Central

Protein interactions between a pathogen and its host are fundamental in the establishment of the pathogen and underline the infection mechanism. In the present work, we developed a single predictive model for building a host-viral interactome based on the identification of structural descriptors from motif-domain interactions of protein complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The structural descriptors were used for searching, in a database of protein sequences of human and five clinically important viruses; therefore, viral and human proteins sharing a descriptor were predicted as interacting proteins. The analysis of the host-viral interactome allowed to identify a set of new interactions that further explain molecular mechanism associated with viral infections and showed that it was able to capture human proteins already associated to viral infections (human infectome) and non-infectious diseases (human diseasome). The analysis of human proteins targeted by viral proteins in the context of a human interactome showed that their neighbors are enriched in proteins reported with differential expression under infection and disease conditions. It is expected that the findings of this work will contribute to the development of systems biology for infectious diseases, and help guide the rational identification and prioritization of novel drug targets. PMID:23951184

Guo, Xianwu; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.

2013-01-01

243

Viruses of Fish: An Overview of Significant Pathogens  

PubMed Central

The growing global demand for seafood together with the limited capacity of the wild-capture sector to meet this demand has seen the aquaculture industry continue to grow around the world. A vast array of aquatic animal species is farmed in high density in freshwater, brackish and marine systems where they are exposed to new environments and potentially new diseases. On-farm stresses may compromise their ability to combat infection, and farming practices facilitate rapid transmission of disease. Viral pathogens, whether they have been established for decades or whether they are newly emerging as disease threats, are particularly challenging since there are few, if any, efficacious treatments, and the development of effective viral vaccines for delivery in aquatic systems remains elusive. Here, we review a few of the more significant viral pathogens of finfish, including aquabirnaviruses and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus which have been known since the first half of the 20th century, and more recent viral pathogens, for example betanodaviruses, that have emerged as aquaculture has undergone a dramatic expansion in the past few decades. PMID:22163333

Crane, Mark; Hyatt, Alex

2011-01-01

244

Viral replication and genetics Nabil A. NIMER  

E-print Network

because much is going on inside the cell at the molecular level, such as transcription of the `incoming' viral genes to form viral mRNAs, and their translation to produce early viral proteins, including in the cytoplasm, carries many of the enzymes needed for viral transcription and replication and sets up small

245

Commentary on the Regulation of Viral Proteins in Autophagy Process  

PubMed Central

The ability to subvert intracellular antiviral defenses is necessary for virus to survive as its replication occurs only in the host cells. Viruses have to modulate cellular processes and antiviral mechanisms to their own advantage during the entire virus life cycle. Autophagy plays important roles in cell regulation. Its function is not only to catabolize aggregate proteins and damaged organelles for recycling but also to serve as innate immunity to remove intracellular pathogenic elements such as viruses. Nevertheless, some viruses have evolved to negatively regulate autophagy by inhibiting its formation. Even more, some viruses have employed autophagy to benefit their replication. To date, there are more and more growing evidences uncovering the functions of many viral proteins to regulate autophagy through different cellular pathways. In this review, we will discuss the relationship between viruses and autophagy and summarize the current knowledge on the functions of viral proteins contributing to affect autophagy process. PMID:24734254

Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Chi, Pei-I

2014-01-01

246

Current challenges in viral safety and extraneous agent testing.  

PubMed

There are three principal elements related to viral safety in the context of immunological veterinary medicinal products: the presence of extraneous agents in either raw material used for production or in the finished product, residual pathogenicity of live viruses used as active ingredients, and incomplete inactivation of inactivated viruses used as active ingredients. Although the approach to controlling these areas of risk has not substantially changed in the recent past, a number of events, combined with advances in science and changes in the regulatory approach, make it timely to review the requirements in this area. This article reviews the major areas of change and progress with respect to the viral safety of immunological veterinary medicinal products and identifies current challenges from the perspectives of both industry and regulators. PMID:20338787

Mackay, David; Kriz, Nikolaus

2010-05-01

247

Microretroreflector-sedimentation immunoassays for pathogen detection.  

PubMed

Point-of-care detection of pathogens is medically valuable but poses challenging trade-offs between instrument complexity and clinical and analytical sensitivity. Here we introduce a diagnostic platform utilizing lithographically fabricated micron-scale forms of cubic retroreflectors, arguably one of the most optically detectable human artifacts, as reporter labels for use in sensitive immunoassays. We demonstrate the applicability of this novel optical label in a simple assay format in which retroreflector cubes are first mixed with the sample. The cubes are then allowed to settle onto an immuno-capture surface, followed by inversion for gravity-driven removal of nonspecifically bound cubes. Cubes bridged to the capture surface by the analyte are detected using inexpensive, low-numerical aperture optics. For model bacterial and viral pathogens, sensitivity in 10% human serum was found to be 10(4) bacterial cells/mL and 10(4) virus particles/mL, consistent with clinical utility. PMID:25133758

Garvey, Gavin; Shakarisaz, David; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Hagström, Anna E V; Raja, Balakrishnan; Pascente, Carmen; Kar, Archana; Kourentzi, Katerina; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Willson, Richard C

2014-09-16

248

Recent insights into the evolution of innate viral sensing in animals  

PubMed Central

The evolution of viral sensors is likely to be shaped by the constraint imposed through high conservation of viral Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), and by the potential for ‘arms race’ coevolution with more rapidly evolving viral proteins. Here we review the recent progress made in understanding the evolutionary history of two types of viral sensor, RNA helicases and Toll-like receptors. We find differences both in their rates of evolution, and in the levels of positive selection they experience. We suggest that positive selection has been the primary driver of the rapid evolution of the RNA helicases, while selective constraint has been a stronger influence shaping the slow evolution of the Toll-like receptors. PMID:25042205

Lewis, Samuel H; Obbard, Darren J

2014-01-01

249

Coinfection. Helminth infection reactivates latent ?-herpesvirus via cytokine competition at a viral promoter.  

PubMed

Mammals are coinfected by multiple pathogens that interact through unknown mechanisms. We found that helminth infection, characterized by the induction of the cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) and the activation of the transcription factor Stat6, reactivated murine ?-herpesvirus infection in vivo. IL-4 promoted viral replication and blocked the antiviral effects of interferon-? (IFN?) by inducing Stat6 binding to the promoter for an important viral transcriptional transactivator. IL-4 also reactivated human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus from latency in cultured cells. Exogenous IL-4 plus blockade of IFN? reactivated latent murine ?-herpesvirus infection in vivo, suggesting a "two-signal" model for viral reactivation. Thus, chronic herpesvirus infection, a component of the mammalian virome, is regulated by the counterpoised actions of multiple cytokines on viral promoters that have evolved to sense host immune status. PMID:24968940

Reese, T A; Wakeman, B S; Choi, H S; Hufford, M M; Huang, S C; Zhang, X; Buck, M D; Jezewski, A; Kambal, A; Liu, C Y; Goel, G; Murray, P J; Xavier, R J; Kaplan, M H; Renne, R; Speck, S H; Artyomov, M N; Pearce, E J; Virgin, H W

2014-08-01

250

Recent insights into the evolution of innate viral sensing in animals.  

PubMed

The evolution of viral sensors is likely to be shaped by the constraint imposed through high conservation of viral Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), and by the potential for 'arms race' coevolution with more rapidly evolving viral proteins. Here we review the recent progress made in understanding the evolutionary history of two types of viral sensor, RNA helicases and Toll-like receptors. We find differences both in their rates of evolution, and in the levels of positive selection they experience. We suggest that positive selection has been the primary driver of the rapid evolution of the RNA helicases, while selective constraint has been a stronger influence shaping the slow evolution of the Toll-like receptors. PMID:25042205

Lewis, Samuel H; Obbard, Darren J

2014-08-01

251

Hepcidin Induction by Pathogens and Pathogen-Derived Molecules Is Strongly Dependent on Interleukin-6  

PubMed Central

Hepcidin, the iron-regulatory hormone, is increased during infection or inflammation, causing hypoferremia. This response is thought to be a host defense mechanism that restricts iron availability to invading pathogens. It is not known if hepcidin is differentially induced by bacterial versus viral infections, whether the stimulation of pattern recognition receptors directly regulates hepcidin transcription, or which of the proposed signaling pathways are essential for hepcidin increase during infection. We analyzed hepcidin induction and its dependence on interleukin-6 (IL-6) in response to common bacterial or viral infections in mice or in response to a panel of pathogen-derived molecules (PAMPs) in mice and human primary hepatocytes. In wild-type (WT) mice, hepcidin mRNA was induced several hundred-fold both by a bacterial (Streptococcus pneumoniae) and a viral infection (influenza virus PR8) within 2 to 5 days. Treatment of mice and human primary hepatocytes with most Toll-like receptor ligands increased hepcidin mRNA within 6 h. Hepcidin induction by microbial stimuli was IL-6 dependent. IL-6 knockout mice failed to increase hepcidin in response to S. pneumoniae or influenza infection and had greatly diminished hepcidin response to PAMPs. In vitro, hepcidin induction by PAMPs in primary human hepatocytes was abolished by the addition of neutralizing IL-6 antibodies. Our results support the key role of IL-6 in hepcidin regulation in response to a variety of infectious and inflammatory stimuli. PMID:24478088

Rodriguez, Richard; Jung, Chun-Ling; Gabayan, Victoria; Deng, Jane C.; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

2014-01-01

252

Computational mechanics of viral capsids.  

PubMed

Viral capsids undergo significant mechanical deformations during their assembly, maturation, and infective life-span. In order to characterize the mechanics of viral capsids, their response to applied external forces is analyzed in several experimental studies using, for instance, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) indentation experiments. In recent years, a broader approach to study the mechanics of viral capsids has leveraged the theoretical tools proper of continuum mechanics. Even though the theory of continuum elasticity is most commonly used to study deformable bodies at larger macroscopic length scales, it has been shown that this very rich theoretical field can still offer useful insights into the mechanics of viral structures at the nanometer scale. Here we show the construction of viral capsid continuum mechanics models starting from different forms of experimental data. We will discuss the kinematics assumptions, the issue of the reference configuration, the material constitutive laws, and the numerical discretization necessary to construct a complete Finite Element capsid mechanical model. Some examples in the second part of the chapter will show the predictive capabilities of the constructed models and underline useful practical aspects related to efficiency and accuracy. We conclude each example by collecting several key findings discovered by simulating AFM indentation experiments using the constructed numerical models. PMID:25358779

Gibbons, Melissa M; Perotti, Luigi E; Klug, William S

2015-01-01

253

Evaluation system for an experimental study of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus (H9N2) infection in specific pathogen free chickens using lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum KFCC11389P  

Microsoft Academic Search

In low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) virus, the effects of prophylactic oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum KFCC11389P on immunity, viral loads and levels of nitric oxide and interferon-? in splenocytes from specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens were investigated. For in vitro screening of the antiviral effect, haemagglutination activities of four different lactic acid bacterial strains by direct contact with virus were

Heeson Chon; Byungryul Choi; Gajin Jeong; Inpil Mo

2008-01-01

254

The interplay between Siglecs and sialylated pathogens.  

PubMed

Siglecs are mammalian sialic acid (Sia) recognizing immunoglobulin-like receptors expressed across the major leukocyte lineages, and function to recognize ubiquitous Sia epitopes on cell surface glycoconjugates and regulate immunological and inflammatory activities of these cells. A large subset referred to as CD33-related Siglecs are inhibitory receptors that limit leukocyte activation, and recent research has shown that the pathogen group B Streptococcus (GBS) binds to these Siglecs in Sia- and protein-dependent fashion to downregulate leukocyte bactericidal capacity. Conversely, sialoadhesin is a macrophage phagocytic receptor that engages GBS and other sialylated pathogens to promote effective phagocytosis and antigen presentation for the adaptive immune response. A variety of other important Siglec interactions with bacterial, viral and protozoan pathogens are beginning to be recognized. Siglec genes and binding specificities are rapidly evolving among primates, with key extant polymorphisms in human populations that may influence susceptibility to infection-associated disorders including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and premature birth. This review summarizes current understanding of interactions between pathogens and Siglecs, a field of investigation that is likely to continue expanding in scope and medical importance. PMID:24996821

Chang, Yung-Chi; Nizet, Victor

2014-09-01

255

Mechanical Properties of Viral Capsids  

E-print Network

Viruses are known to tolerate wide ranges of pH and salt conditions and to withstand internal pressures as high as 100 atmospheres. In this paper we investigate the mechanical properties of viral capsids, calling explicit attention to the inhomogeneity of the shells that is inherent to their discrete and polyhedral nature. We calculate the distribution of stress in these capsids and analyze their response to isotropic internal pressure (arising, for instance, from genome confinement and/or osmotic activity). We compare our results with appropriate generalizations of classical (i.e., continuum) elasticity theory. We also examine competing mechanisms for viral shell failure, e.g., in-plane crack formation versus radial bursting. The biological consequences of the special stabilities and stress distributions of viral capsids are also discussed.

Roya Zandi; David Reguera

2005-10-01

256

Noncoding RNPs of viral origin.  

PubMed

Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host's response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

2011-03-01

257

Noncoding RNPs of Viral Origin  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host’s response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

2011-01-01

258

Systems Integration of Biodefense Omics Data for Analysis of Pathogen-Host Interactions and Identification of Potential Targets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NIAID (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Biodefense Proteomics program aims to identify targets for potential vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for agents of concern in bioterrorism, including bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens. The program includes seven Proteomics Research Centers, generating diverse types of pathogen-host data, including mass spectrometry, microarray transcriptional profiles, protein interactions, protein structures and biological reagents.

Peter B. McGarvey; Hongzhan Huang; Raja Mazumder; Jian Zhang; Yongxing Chen; Chengdong Zhang; Stephen Cammer; Rebecca Will; Margie Odle; Bruno Sobral; Margaret Moore; Cathy H. Wu; Jörg Hoheisel

2009-01-01

259

Infection of United States swine with a Chinese highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

To assess the pathogenic effects of Type 2 highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) on healthy 10-week old commercial swine in the United States, viral kinetics and resultant disease caused by intranasal inoculation of such virus rescued from an infectious clo...

260

Development of an aquatic pathogen database (AquaPathogen X) and its utilization in tracking emerging fish virus pathogens in North America  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The AquaPathogen X database is a template for recording information on individual isolates of aquatic pathogens and is freely available for download (http://wfrc.usgs.gov). This database can accommodate the nucleotide sequence data generated in molecular epidemiological studies along with the myriad of abiotic and biotic traits associated with isolates of various pathogens (e.g. viruses, parasites and bacteria) from multiple aquatic animal host species (e.g. fish, shellfish and shrimp). The cataloguing of isolates from different aquatic pathogens simultaneously is a unique feature to the AquaPathogen X database, which can be used in surveillance of emerging aquatic animal diseases and elucidation of key risk factors associated with pathogen incursions into new water systems. An application of the template database that stores the epidemiological profiles of fish virus isolates, called Fish ViroTrak, was also developed. Exported records for two aquatic rhabdovirus species emerging in North America were used in the implementation of two separate web-accessible databases: the Molecular Epidemiology of Aquatic Pathogens infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (MEAP-IHNV) database (http://gis.nacse.org/ihnv/) released in 2006 and the MEAP- viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (http://gis.nacse.org/vhsv/) database released in 2010.

Emmenegger, E.J.; Kentop, E.; Thompson, T.M.; Pittam, S.; Ryan, A.; Keon, D.; Carlino, J.A.; Ranson, J.; Life, R.B.; Troyer, R.M.; Garver, K.A.; Kurath, G.

2011-01-01

261

Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM) for prospective detection and identification of emergent pathogen strains and variants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-density resequencing microarrays support simultaneous detection and identification of multiple viral and bacterial pathogens. Because detection and identification using RPM is based upon multiple specimen-specific target pathogen gene sequences generated in the individual test, the test results enable both a differential diagnostic analysis and epidemiological tracking of detected pathogen strains and variants from one specimen to the next. The RPM assay enables detection and identification of pathogen sequences that share as little as 80% sequence similarity to prototype target gene sequences represented as detector tiles on the array. This capability enables the RPM to detect and identify previously unknown strains and variants of a detected pathogen, as in sentinel cases associated with an infectious disease outbreak. We illustrate this capability using assay results from testing influenza A virus vaccines configured with strains that were first defined years after the design of the RPM microarray. Results are also presented from RPM-Flu testing of three specimens independently confirmed to the positive for the 2009 Novel H1N1 outbreak strain of influenza virus.

Tibbetts, Clark; Lichanska, Agnieszka M.; Borsuk, Lisa A.; Weslowski, Brian; Morris, Leah M.; Lorence, Matthew C.; Schafer, Klaus O.; Campos, Joseph; Sene, Mohamadou; Myers, Christopher A.; Faix, Dennis; Blair, Patrick J.; Brown, Jason; Metzgar, David

2010-04-01

262

Pathogenic Microorganisms in Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pathogenic Microorganisms in Water: Traditionally, groundwater has been used without treatment because the soil acts as a filter, removing pathogenic microorganisms. Some potential sources of pathogens (or disease causing organisms) in groundwater include septic tanks, leaking sewer lines, sewage sludge, intentional groundwater recharge with sewage, irrigation with sewage, direct injection of sewage, domestic solid waste disposal (landfills) and sewage oxidation ponds. The objective of the session is to introduce hydrogeologist to the types of microorganisms, sources of pathogens, and a simple exercise that can be incorporated into a hydrogeology class.

Melissa Lenczewski

263

Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

Winton, James R.; Walker, Peter J.

2010-01-01

264

Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis  

PubMed Central

Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyomyositis, psoas abscess, Staphylococcus aureus myositis, group A streptococcal necrotizing myositis, group B streptococcal myositis, clostridial gas gangrene, and nonclostridial myositis. Fungal myositis is rare and usually occurs among immunocompromised hosts. Parasitic myositis is most commonly a result of trichinosis or cystericercosis, but other protozoa or helminths may be involved. A parasitic cause of myositis is suggested by the travel history and presence of eosinophilia. Viruses may cause diffuse muscle involvement with clinical manifestations, such as benign acute myositis (most commonly due to influenza virus), pleurodynia (coxsackievirus B), acute rhabdomyolysis, or an immune-mediated polymyositis. The diagnosis of myositis is suggested by the clinical picture and radiologic imaging, and the etiologic agent is confirmed by microbiologic or serologic testing. Therapy is based on the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen. PMID:18625683

Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

2008-01-01

265

Characterization of Viral Entry Inhibitors  

E-print Network

Hepatitis C virus (HCV), Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) are pathogenic viruses known to cause liver disorder, acquired immunodeficiency and skin lesions, respectively. Although current therapies have played...

Chamoun Emanuelli, Ana M

2014-08-06

266

VIRAL EVOLUTION Genomic surveillance elucidates  

E-print Network

VIRAL EVOLUTION Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014,12,13 § Robert F. Garry,8 § S. Humarr Khan,3 § Pardis C. Sabeti1,2 § In its largest outbreak, Ebola virus disease is spreading through Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. We sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes from 78

Napp, Nils

267

The Paradigm of Viral Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the concepts of idea viruses and viral communication, a technology-based communication that spreads ideas quickly. Explains its applicability in the area of direct marketing and discusses a technology platform that provides the opportunity of sending a message to a large number of people and emotional or pecuniary incentives to…

Welker, Carl B.

2002-01-01

268

Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease  

PubMed Central

Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

2001-01-01

269

Nosocomial spread of viral disease.  

PubMed

Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

Aitken, C; Jeffries, D J

2001-07-01

270

BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

271

Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA.  

PubMed

We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C; Coutts, Robert H A; Lomonossoff, George P; Rowlands, David J; Phillips, Simon E V; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G

2015-02-17

272

Protection against Lethal Influenza with a Viral Mimic  

PubMed Central

Despite countermeasures against influenza virus that prevent (vaccines) and treat (antivirals) infection, this upper respiratory tract human pathogen remains a global health burden, causing both seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. More potent and safe new vaccine technologies would contribute significantly to the battle against influenza and other respiratory infections. Using plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, we have developed a single-cycle infectious influenza virus (sciIV) with immunoprotective potential. In our sciIV approach, the fourth viral segment, which codes for the receptor-binding and fusion protein hemagglutinin (HA), has been removed. Thus, upon infection of normal cells, although no infectious progeny are produced, the expression of other viral proteins occurs and is immunogenic. Consequently, sciIV is protective against influenza homologous and heterologous viral challenges in a mouse model. Vaccination with sciIV protects in a dose- and replication-dependent manner, which is attributed to both humoral responses and T cells. Safety, immunogenicity, and protection conferred by sciIV vaccination were also demonstrated in ferrets, where this immunization additionally blocked direct and aerosol transmission events. All together, our studies suggest that sciIV may have potential as a broadly protective vaccine against influenza virus. PMID:23720727

Baker, Steven F.; Guo, Hailong; Albrecht, Randy A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

2013-01-01

273

Development of one-step SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR for quantifying bovine viral diarrhea virus type-1 and its comparison with conventional RT-PCR  

E-print Network

Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a worldwide pathogen in cattle and acts as a surrogate model for hepatitis C virus (HCV). One-step real-time fluorogenic quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay...

Zhang, Ni; Liu, Zhengwen; Han, Qunying; Qiu, Jianming; Chen, Jinghong; Zhang, Guoyu; Li, Zhu; Lou, Sai; Li, Na

2011-07-29

274

Viral channel forming proteins — Modeling the target  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cellular and subcellular membranes encounter an important playground for the activity of membrane proteins encoded by viruses. Viral membrane proteins, similar to their host companions, can be integral or attached to the membrane. They are involved in directing the cellular and viral reproduction, the fusion and budding processes. This review focuses especially on those integral viral membrane proteins which

Wolfgang B. Fischer; Hao-Jen Hsu

2011-01-01

275

Viral ecology of a shallow eutrophic lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis aims to give an insight into the ecology of the viral community in a shallow eutrophic lake. To achieve this, the population dynamics, diversity and control of the viral community in Lake Loosdrecht were studied, as well as the impact of the viral community on plankton mortality and community composition. A seasonal study of Lake Loosdrecht revealed the

M. Tijdens

2007-01-01

276

Differential Contribution of PB1-F2 to the Virulence of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza A Virus in Mammalian and Avian Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses (HPAIV) of the H5N1 subtype occasionally transmit from birds to humans and can cause severe systemic infections in both hosts. PB1-F2 is an alternative translation product of the viral PB1 segment that was initially characterized as a pro-apoptotic mitochondrial viral pathogenicity factor. A full-length PB1-F2 has been present in all human influenza pandemic virus

Mirco Schmolke; Balaji Manicassamy; Lindomar Pena; Troy Sutton; Rong Hai; Zsuzsanna T. Varga; Benjamin G. Hale; John Steel; Daniel R. Pérez; Adolfo García-Sastre

2011-01-01

277

Pathogenesis and transmissibility of highly (H7N1) and low (H7N9) pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) and low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) was carried out in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) in order to study clinical signs, gross and microscopic lesions, and viral distribution in tissues and viral shedding. Birds were infected with a HPAIV subtype H7N1 (A\\/Chicken\\/Italy\\/5093\\/1999) and a LPAIV subtype H7N9 (A\\/Anas crecca\\/Spain\\/1460\\/2008). Uninoculated

Kateri Bertran; Elisa Pérez-Ramírez; Núria Busquets; Roser Dolz; Antonio Ramis; Ayub Darji; Francesc Xavier Abad; Rosa Valle; Aida Chaves; Júlia Vergara-Alert; Marta Barral; Ursula Höfle; Natàlia Majó

2011-01-01

278

Viral Video Style: A Closer Look at Viral Videos on YouTube  

E-print Network

Viral Video Style: A Closer Look at Viral Videos on YouTube Lu Jiang, Yajie Miao, Yi Yang Introduction CMU Viral Video Dataset Statistical Characteristics Peak Day Prediction Conclusions #12;Outline Introduction CMU Viral Video Dataset Statistical Characteristics Peak Day Prediction

Shamos, Michael I.

279

Differences in pathogenicity of A/Duck/Vietnam/201/05 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus reassortants in ducks  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In order to understand which viral genes contribute to the high virulence of A/Dk/Vietnam/201/05 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in ducks, we used reverse genetics to generate single-gene reassortant viruses with genes from A/Ck/Indonesia/7/03, a virus that produces mild disease ...

280

Signaling During Pathogen Infection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pathogens infect almost every living organism. In animals, including humans, the diversity of pathogens ranges from viruses, bacteria, and unicellular parasites to complex fungi, worms, and arthropods. Because pathogens have coevolved with their hosts and have sometimes been coopted as symbionts or commensals, each pathogen/host pair represents a striking success story of survival that reflects the biological complexity of both parties. All invading microorganisms face similar problems, such as gaining access to their host, achieving successful replication, and spreading to a similar or different host. It is therefore not surprising that many different pathogens target similar organs, cell types, and even molecules to achieve their goals. However, no two microbial parasites appear to be completely alike. Although they often target similar signaling networks, they do so in subtly different ways to achieve the desired outcome. This review has eight figures, three movies, and 139 citations and emphasizes two well-established signaling pathways that are often activated during the interaction of different pathogens with their host cells. It illustrates a small part of how the dissection of host/pathogen interactions can reveal, on a molecular scale, a nature shaped by evolutionary forces that can rival the great descriptions of our macroscopic world.

Sylvia Munter (University of Heidelberg Medical School; Department of Parasitology REV)

2006-05-16

281

Paleovirology and virally derived immunity.  

PubMed

Paleovirology, the study of viruses on evolutionary timescales, can exploit information from endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which are the result of heritable horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from viruses to hosts. The availability of genomic data has increased opportunities to study EVEs, and bioinformatics techniques have been crucial in cataloguing EVE diversity and taxonomic coverage. Recent advances show that some EVEs have been co-opted as cellular genes, often as inhibitors of viral infection. These genes are an intriguing strategy in virus-host evolutionary battles in that genetic material is transferred from virus to host, and then used by the host against the virus. In this review, we consider the genes and processes involved in EVE-derived immunity (EDI), assess factors leading to its emergence, and outline how future work will benefit from incorporating evolutionary approaches. PMID:22901901

Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

2012-11-01

282

Increased Tolerance to Two Oomycete Pathogens in Transgenic Tobacco Expressing Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1a  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expression of pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR-1a), a protein of unknown biochemical function, is induced to high levels in tobacco in response to pathogen infection. The induction of PR-1a expression is tightly correlated with the onset of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a defense response effective against a variety of fungal, viral, and bacterial pathogens. While PR-1a has been postulated to be

Danny Alexander; Robert M. Goodman; Manuela Gut-Rella; Christopher Glascock; Kristianna Weymann; Leslie Friedrich; Daryl Maddox; Patricia Ahl-Goy; Tom Luntz; Eric Ward; John Ryals

1993-01-01

283

Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.  

PubMed

DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

2014-08-01

284

Influence of temperature on viral hemorrhagic septicemia (Genogroup IVa) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An inverse relationship between water temperature and susceptibility of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) to viral hemorrhagic septicemia, genogroup IVa (VHS) was indicated by controlled exposure studies where cumulative mortalities, viral shedding rates, and viral persistence in survivors were greatest at the coolest exposure temperatures. Among groups of specific pathogen-free (SPF) Pacific herring maintained at 8, 11, and 15 °C, cumulative mortalities after waterborne exposure to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were 78%, 40%, and 13%, respectively. The prevalence of survivors with VHSV-positive tissues 25 d post-exposure was 64%, 16%, and 0% (at 8, 11 and 15 °C, respectively) with viral prevalence typically higher in brain tissues than in kidney/spleen tissue pools at each temperature. Similarly, geometric mean viral titers in brain tissues and kidney/spleen tissue pools decreased at higher temperatures, and kidney/spleen titers were generally 10-fold lower than those in brain tissues at each temperature. This inverse relationship between temperature and VHS severity was likely mediated by an enhanced immune response at the warmer temperatures, where a robust type I interferon response was indicated by rapid and significant upregulation of the herring Mx gene. The effect of relatively small temperature differences on the susceptibility of a natural host to VHS provides insights into conditions that preface periodic VHSV epizootics in wild populations throughout the NE Pacific.

Hershberger, P.K.; Purcell, M.K.; Hart, L.M.; Gregg, J.L.; Thompson, R.L.; Garver, K.A.; Winton, J.R.

2013-01-01

285

Immune response genes and pathogen presence predict migration survival in wild salmon smolts.  

PubMed

We present the first data to link physiological responses and pathogen presence with subsequent fate during migration of wild salmonid smolts. We tagged and non-lethally sampled gill tissue from sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) smolts as they left their nursery lake (Chilko Lake, BC, Canada) to compare gene expression profiles and freshwater pathogen loads with migration success over the first ~1150 km of their migration to the North Pacific Ocean using acoustic telemetry. Fifteen per cent of smolts were never detected again after release, and these fish had gene expression profiles consistent with an immune response to one or more viral pathogens compared with fish that survived their freshwater migration. Among the significantly upregulated genes of the fish that were never detected postrelease were MX (interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx) and STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-alpha/beta), which are characteristic of a type I interferon response to viral pathogens. The most commonly detected pathogen in the smolts leaving the nursery lake was infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Collectively, these data show that some of the fish assumed to have died after leaving the nursery lake appeared to be responding to one or more viral pathogens and had elevated stress levels that could have contributed to some of the mortality shortly after release. We present the first evidence that changes in gene expression may be predictive of some of the freshwater migration mortality in wild salmonid smolts. PMID:25354752

Jeffries, Ken M; Hinch, Scott G; Gale, Marika Kirstin; Clark, Timothy D; Lotto, Andrew G; Casselman, Matthew T; Li, Shaorong; Rechisky, Erin L; Porter, Aswea D; Welch, David W; Miller, Kristina M

2014-12-01

286

Application of RT-PCR to study in vitro development of Cryptosporidium parvum and its viral symbiont CPV  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis contain a double-stranded RNA viral symbiont termed CPV. Our research seeks to find a role for CPV in the pathogenicity and development of C. parvum. Cell cultures were infected with C. parvum sporozoites, and extracted at various times post-infection for DNA ...

287

Activation of cell signaling pathways is dependant on the biotype of bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family, is an economically important cattle pathogen with a world wide distribution. Besides the segregation into two distinct species (BVDV1 / BVDV2) two different biotypes, a cytopathic (cp) and a noncytopathic (ncp) biotype, are...

288

Histophathologic and Immunohistochemical Findings in Two White-tail Deer Fawns Persistently Infected with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important pathogen of domestic cattle. Serological, experimental and individual case studies have explored the presence and pathogenesis of the virus in wild ungulates; however there remain large gaps in knowledge regarding BVDV infection in non-bovine speci...

289

Comparison of the immune response between a pair of NCP and CP bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1 isolates  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a major pathogen of cattle causing severe respiratory and reproductive disease. BVDV vaccines remain an important part of the control strategy. Previous work has described higher antibody responses in animals infected with a noncytopathic (NCP) BVDV when compa...

290

Transmission of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Acutely Infected White Tailed Deer to Cattle via Indirect Contact  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are found worldwide, and acute infections in cattle results in enteric, respiratory, and reproductive diseases of varying severity, depending on the BVDV strain, the immune and reproductive status of the host and the presence of secondary pathogens. While most c...

291

Noncytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) reduces cleavage but increases blastocyst yield of in vitro produced embryos  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing application of in vitro embryo production systems that utilize slaughterhouse tissues of animals of unknown health status conveys the risk of disease transmission. One pathogen of concern in this regard is bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of BVDV on in vitro embryonic development. A bovine in vitro

P. J. Booth; M. E Collins; L Jenner; H Prentice; J Ross; J. H Badsberg; J Brownlie

1998-01-01

292

Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and reuse as well as facile product recovery. Reaction condition studies show that the solvent ratio played an important role in the selectivity of the Suzuki reaction, and that a higher water/acetonitrile ratio significantly facilitated the cross-coupling pathway. Meanwhile, in-depth characterizations including Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were carried out for these chip-based viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts. In the second approach, catalytically active TMV-templated Pd nanoparticles are encapsulated in readily exploited polymeric microparticle formats. Specifically, small (1˜2 nm), uniform and highly crystalline palladium (Pd) nanoparticles are spontaneously formed along (TMV) biotemplates without external reducing agents. The as-prepared Pd-TMV complexes are integrated into the hybrid poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-based microparticles via replica molding (RM) technique in a simple, robust and highly reproducible manner. The Pd-TMV complex structure was characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The hybrid Pd-TMV-PEG microparticles are examined to have high catalytic activity, recyclability and stability through dichromate reduction. Combined these findings represent a significant step toward simple, robust, scalable synthesis and fabrication of efficient biotemplate-supported Pd nanocatalysts in readily deployable polymeric formats with high capacity in a well-controlled manner. These two simple, robust and readily controllable approaches for the fabrication of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts, in both chip-based and hydrogel-encapsulated formats, can be readily extended to a variety of other nano-bio hybrid material synthesis in other catalytic reaction systems.

Yang, Cuixian

293

Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada  

E-print Network

Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits.gc.ca/ols-bsl/pathogen/index.html and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can download the "Application for Permit to Import Human Human Pathogens" and "CL2 Checklist" to PHAC at (613) 941-0596. There are no fees for this service. 5

294

Impact of global warming on viral diseases: what is the evidence?  

PubMed

Global warming is believed to induce a gradual climate change. Hence, it was predicted that tropical insects might expand their habitats thereby transmitting pathogens to humans. Although this concept is a conclusive presumption, clear evidence is still lacking--at least for viral diseases. Epidemiological data indicate that seasonality of many diseases is further influenced by strong single weather events, interannual climate phenomena, and anthropogenic factors. So far, emergence of new diseases was unlinked to global warming. Re-emergence and dispersion of diseases was correlated with translocation of pathogen-infected vectors or hosts. Coupled ocean/atmosphere circulations and 'global change' that also includes shifting of demographic, social, and economical conditions are important drivers of viral disease variability whereas global warming at best contributes. PMID:18983917

Zell, Roland; Krumbholz, Andi; Wutzler, Peter

2008-12-01

295

Molecular epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in the Great Lakes region  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered by many nations and international organizations to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish (Office International des Epizooties 2007). For several decades following its initial characterization in the 1950s, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe where it was regarded as an endemic pathogen of freshwater fish that was especially problematic for farmed rainbow trout, an introduced species (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that VHSV was present among many species of marine and anadromous fishes in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans where it has been associated with substantial mortality among both wild and cultured fish (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005).

Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

2008-01-01

296

Tickling the TLR7 to cure viral hepatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic hepatitis B and C are the leading causes of liver disease and liver transplantation worldwide. Ability to mount an effective immune response against both HBV and HCV is associated with spontaneous clearance of both infections, while an inability to do so leads to chronicity of both infections. To mount an effective immune response, both innate and adaptive immune responses must work in tandem. Hence, developing protective immunity to hepatitis viruses is an important goal in order to reduce the global burden of these two infections and prevent development of long-term complications. In this regard, the initial interactions between the pathogen and immune system are pivotal in determining the effectiveness of immune response and subsequent elimination of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses to various pathogens and are often involved in initiating and augmenting effective antiviral immunity. Immune-based therapeutic strategies that specifically induce type I interferon responses are associated with functional cure for both chronic HBV and HCV infections. Precisely, TLR7 stimulation mediates an endogenous type I interferon response, which is critical in development of a broad, effective and protective immunity against hepatitis viruses. This review focuses on anti-viral strategies that involve targeting TLR7 that may lead to development of protective immunity and eradication of hepatitis B. PMID:24884741

2014-01-01

297

Viral Control of Mitochondrial Apoptosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout the process of pathogen–host co-evolution, viruses have developed a battery of distinct strategies to overcome biochemical and immunological defenses of the host. Thus, viruses have acquired the capacity to subvert host cell apoptosis, control inflammatory responses, and evade immune reactions. Since the elimination of infected cells via programmed cell death is one of the most ancestral defense mechanisms against

Lorenzo Galluzzi; Catherine Brenner; Eugenia Morselli; Zahia Touat; Guido Kroemer

2008-01-01

298

From bench to bedside: stealth of enteroinvasive pathogens.  

PubMed

Bacterial enteric infections are often associated with diarrhoea or vomiting, which are clinical presentations commonly referred to as gastroenteritis. However, some enteric pathogens, including typhoidal Salmonella serotypes, Brucella species and enteropathogenic Yersinia species are associated with a clinical syndrome that is characterized by abdominal pain and/or fever and is distinct from acute gastroenteritis. Recent insights into molecular mechanisms of the host-pathogen interaction show that these enteric pathogens share important characteristics that explain why the initial host responses associated with these agents more closely resemble host responses to viral or parasitic infections. Host responses contribute to the clinical presentation of disease and improved understanding of these responses in the laboratory is beginning to bridge the gap between bench and bedside. PMID:18955984

Tsolis, Renée M; Young, Glenn M; Solnick, Jay V; Bäumler, Andreas J

2008-12-01

299

Optimization and clinical validation of a pathogen detection microarray  

PubMed Central

DNA microarrays used as 'genomic sensors' have great potential in clinical diagnostics. Biases inherent in random PCR-amplification, cross-hybridization effects, and inadequate microarray analysis, however, limit detection sensitivity and specificity. Here, we have studied the relationships between viral amplification efficiency, hybridization signal, and target-probe annealing specificity using a customized microarray platform. Novel features of this platform include the development of a robust algorithm that accurately predicts PCR bias during DNA amplification and can be used to improve PCR primer design, as well as a powerful statistical concept for inferring pathogen identity from probe recognition signatures. Compared to real-time PCR, the microarray platform identified pathogens with 94% accuracy (76% sensitivity and 100% specificity) in a panel of 36 patient specimens. Our findings show that microarrays can be used for the robust and accurate diagnosis of pathogens, and further substantiate the use of microarray technology in clinical diagnostics. PMID:17531104

Wong, Christopher W; Heng, Charlie Lee Wah; Wan Yee, Leong; Soh, Shirlena WL; Kartasasmita, Cissy B; Simoes, Eric AF; Hibberd, Martin L; Sung, Wing-Kin; Miller, Lance D

2007-01-01

300

Selective Expansion of Viral Variants following Experimental Transmission of a Reconstituted Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Quasispecies  

PubMed Central

Following long-term infection with virus derived from the pathogenic GL8 molecular clone of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a range of viral variants emerged with distinct modes of interaction with the viral receptors CD134 and CXCR4, and sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies. In order to assess whether this viral diversity would be maintained following subsequent transmission, a synthetic quasispecies was reconstituted comprising molecular clones bearing envs from six viral variants and its replicative capacity compared in vivo with a clonal preparation of the parent virus. Infection with either clonal (Group 1) or diverse (Group 2) challenge viruses, resulted in a reduction in CD4+ lymphocytes and an increase in CD8+ lymphocytes. Proviral loads were similar in both study groups, peaking by 10 weeks post-infection, a higher plateau (set-point) being achieved and maintained in study Group 1. Marked differences in the ability of individual viral variants to replicate were noted in Group 2; those most similar to GL8 achieved higher viral loads while variants such as the chimaeras bearing the B14 and B28 Envs grew less well. The defective replication of these variants was not due to suppression by the humoral immune response as virus neutralising antibodies were not elicited within the study period. Similarly, although potent cellular immune responses were detected against determinants in Env, no qualitative differences were revealed between animals infected with either the clonal or the diverse inocula. However, in vitro studies indicated that the reduced replicative capacity of variants B14 and B28 in vivo was associated with altered interactions between the viruses and the viral receptor and co-receptor. The data suggest that viral variants with GL8-like characteristics have an early, replicative advantage and should provide the focus for future vaccine development. PMID:23372784

Willett, Brian J.; Kraase, Martin; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Varela, Mariana; Hosie, Margaret J.

2013-01-01

301

Direct association between pharyngeal viral secretion and host cytokine response in severe pandemic influenza  

PubMed Central

Background Severe disease caused by 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1virus is characterized by the presence of hypercytokinemia. The origin of the exacerbated cytokine response is unclear. As observed previously, uncontrolled influenza virus replication could strongly influence cytokine production. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between host cytokine responses and viral levels in pandemic influenza critically ill patients. Methods Twenty three patients admitted to the ICU with primary viral pneumonia were included in this study. A quantitative PCR based method targeting the M1 influenza gene was developed to quantify pharyngeal viral load. In addition, by using a multiplex based assay, we systematically evaluated host cytokine responses to the viral infection at admission to the ICU. Correlation studies between cytokine levels and viral load were done by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Fifteen patients needed of intubation and ventilation, while eight did not need of mechanical ventilation during ICU hospitalization. Viral load in pharyngeal swabs was 300 fold higher in the group of patients with the worst respiratory condition at admission to the ICU. Pharyngeal viral load directly correlated with plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12p70, IFN-?, the chemotactic factors MIP-1?, GM-CSF, the angiogenic mediator VEGF and also of the immuno-modulatory cytokine IL-1ra (p < 0.05). Correlation studies demonstrated also the existence of a significant positive association between the levels of these mediators, evidencing that they are simultaneously regulated in response to the virus. Conclusions Severe respiratory disease caused by the 2009 pandemic influenza virus is characterized by the existence of a direct association between viral replication and host cytokine response, revealing a potential pathogenic link with the severe disease caused by other influenza subtypes such as H5N1. PMID:21880131

2011-01-01

302

Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp.  

PubMed

The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change. PMID:20409453

Walker, Peter J; Winton, James R

2010-01-01

303

Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp  

PubMed Central

The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change. PMID:20409453

Walker, Peter J.; Winton, James R.

2010-01-01

304

Lactoferrin-derived resistance against plant pathogens in transgenic plants.  

PubMed

Lactoferrin (LF) is a ubiquitous cationic iron-binding milk glycoprotein that contributes to nutrition and exerts a broad-spectrum primary defense against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses in mammals. These qualities make lactoferrin protein and its antimicrobial motifs highly desirable candidates to be incorporated in plants to impart broad-based resistance against plant pathogens or to economically produce them in bulk quantities for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes. This study introduced bovine LF (BLF) gene into tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi), Arabidopsis ( A. thaliana ) and wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) via Agrobacterium -mediated plant transformation. Transgenic plants or detached leaves exhibited high levels of resistance against the damping-off causing fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and the head blight causing fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum . LF also imparted resistance to tomato plants against a bacterial pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum . Similarly, other researchers demonstrated expression of LF and LF-mediated high-quality resistance to several other aggressive fungal and bacterial plant pathogens in transgenic plants and against viral pathogens by foliar applications of LF or its derivatives. Taken together, these studies demonstrated the effectiveness of LF for improving crop quality and its biopharming potentials for pharmaceautical and nutritional applications. PMID:23889215

Lakshman, Dilip K; Natarajan, Savithiry; Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mitra, Amitava

2013-12-01

305

Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for intracellular pathogen infection  

PubMed Central

Summary The genetically tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a convenient host for studies of pathogen infection. With the recent identification of two types of natural intracellular pathogens of C. elegans, this host now provides the opportunity to examine interactions and defence against intracellular pathogens in a whole-animal model for infection. C. elegans is the natural host for a genus of microsporidia, which comprise a phylum of fungal-related pathogens of widespread importance for agriculture and medicine. More recently, C. elegans has been shown to be a natural host for viruses related to the Nodaviridae family. Both microsporidian and viral pathogens infect the C. elegans intestine, which is composed of cells that share striking similarities to human intestinal epithelial cells. Because C. elegans nematodes are transparent, these infections provide a unique opportunity to visualize differentiated intestinal cells in vivo during the course of intracellular infection. Together, these two natural pathogens of C. elegans provide powerful systems in which to study microbial pathogenesis and host responses to intracellular infection. PMID:23617769

Balla, Keir M.; Troemel, Emily R.

2014-01-01

306

Viral proteases as targets for drug design.  

PubMed

In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

Skore?ski, Marcin; Sie?czyk, Marcin

2013-01-01

307

CL385319 inhibits H5N1 avian influenza A virus infection by blocking viral entry  

Microsoft Academic Search

CL-385319, an N-substituted piperidine, is effective in inhibiting infection of H1-, H2-, and to a lesser extent, H3-typed influenza A viruses by interfering with the fusogenic function of the viral hemagglutinin. Here we show that CL-385319 is effective in inhibiting infection of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells with an IC50 of 27.03±2.54?M. This

Shuwen Liu; Runming Li; Ruitao Zhang; Chris C. S. Chan; Baomin Xi; Zhibo Zhu; Jie Yang; Vincent K. M. Poon; Jie Zhou; Min Chen; Jan Münch; Frank Kirchhoff; Stephan Pleschka; Thomas Haarmann; Ursula Dietrich; Chungen Pan; Lanying Du; Shibo Jiang; Bojian Zheng

2011-01-01

308

Prevalence of antibodies in goats in north-eastern Brazil to selected viral and bacterial agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

North-east Brazil is a semi-arid plateau plagued by recurrent droughts and predominated by a subsistence type of agriculture. Goats play a major economic role yet animal disease status in the area is not well-defined. It was the purpose of this investigation to examine by serological assays the prevalance of selected viral and bacterial pathogens. Blood samples were obtained from 76

C. C. Brown; H. J. Olander; A. E. Castro; D. E. Behymer

1989-01-01

309

Compartmentalization of the gut viral reservoir in HIV-1 infected patients  

PubMed Central

Background Recently there has been an increasing interest and appreciation for the gut as both a viral reservoir as well as an important host-pathogen interface in human immunodefiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. The gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is the largest lymphoid organ infected by HIV-1. In this study we examined if different HIV-1 quasispecies are found in different parts of the gut of HIV-1 infected individuals. Results Gut biopsies (esophagus, stomach, duodenum and colorectum) were obtained from eight HIV-1 infected preHAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) patients. HIV-1 Nef and Reverse transcriptase (RT) encoding sequences were obtained through nested PCR amplification from DNA isolated from the gut biopsy tissues. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced. The resulting sequences were subjected to various phylogenetic analyses. Expression of the nef gene and viral RNA in the different gut tissues was determined using real-time RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the Nef protein-encoding region revealed compartmentalization of viral replication in the gut within patients. Viral diversity in both the Nef and RT encoding region varied in different parts of the gut. Moreover, increased nef gene expression (p < 0.05) and higher levels of viral genome were observed in the colorectum (p < 0.05). These differences could reflect an adaptation of HIV-1 to the various tissues. Conclusion Our results indicated that different HIV-1 quasispecies populate different parts of the gut, and that viral replication in the gut is compartmentalized. These observations underscore the importance of the gut as a host-pathogen interface in HIV-1 infection. PMID:18053211

van Marle, Guido; Gill, M John; Kolodka, Dione; McManus, Leah; Grant, Tannika; Church, Deirdre L

2007-01-01

310

Immediate early responses of avian tracheal epithelial cells to infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza viruses (AIV) present an on going threat to the U.S. poultry industry. In order to develop new AIV control strategies it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism of viral infection. Because the early events of AIV infection can occur on tracheal ep...

311

Immediate Early Responses of Avian Tracheal Epithelial Cells to Infection with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza viruses (AIV) present an ongoing threat to the world poultry industry. In order to develop new AIV control strategies it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism of viral infection at mucosal respiratory sites. Chicken and duck tracheal epithelial cells systems (TEC) were developed to study early host responses to AIV infection on TEC. Infection

L. Sarmento; M. Pantin-Jackwood; D. R. Kapczynski; D. E. Swayne; C. L. Afonso

2008-01-01

312

Host-pathogen interaction in HIV infection  

PubMed Central

The host pathogen interaction is strikingly complex during HIV infection. While several immune effector mechanisms (i.e., cytotoxic T cells, neutralizing antibodies, NK cells, etc) can play a strong antiviral role in vivo, the virus is remarkably able to evade these responses. In addition, the virus preferentially infects and kills activated memory CD4+ T cells, thus exploiting the host antiviral immune response as a source of new cellular targets for infection. Recent advances in understanding (i) how HIV perturbs the host immune system, (ii) how the immune system fights HIV; and (iii) how HIV disease persists when virus replication is suppressed by antiretroviral drugs may hopefully lead to better prevention and treatment strategies for this deadly viral infection. PMID:23890585

Chowdhury, Ankita; Silvestri, Guido

2013-01-01

313

Pathogen-like particles: biomimetic vaccine carriers engineered at the nanoscale.  

PubMed

Vaccine adjuvants are an essential component of vaccine design, helping to generate immunity to pathogen antigens in the absence of infection. Recent advances in nanoscale engineering have created a new class of particulate bionanotechnology that uses biomimicry to better integrate adjuvant and antigen. These pathogen-like particles, or PLPs, can come from a variety of sources, ranging from fully synthetic platforms to biologically derived, self-assembling systems. By employing molecularly engineered targeting and stimulation of key immune cells, recent studies utilizing PLPs as vaccine delivery platforms have shown great promise against high-impact, unsolved vaccine targets ranging from bacterial and viral pathogens to cancer and addiction. PMID:24832075

Rosenthal, Joseph A; Chen, Linxiao; Baker, Jenny L; Putnam, David; DeLisa, Matthew P

2014-08-01

314

Stomata and pathogens  

PubMed Central

Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. PMID:20514224

Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S

2009-01-01

315

Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

2004-01-26

316

Mechanical limits of viral capsids  

PubMed Central

We studied the elastic properties and mechanical stability of viral capsids under external force-loading with computer simulations. Our approach allows the implementation of specific geometries corresponding to specific phages, such as ?29 and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. We demonstrate how, in a combined numerical and experimental approach, the elastic parameters can be determined with high precision. The experimentally observed bimodality of elastic spring constants is shown to be of geometrical origin, namely the presence of pentavalent units in the viral shell. We define a criterion for capsid breakage that explains well the experimentally observed rupture. From our numerics we find a crossover from ?2/3 to ?1/2 for the dependence of the rupture force on the Föppl-von Kármán number, ?. For filled capsids, high internal pressures lead to a stronger destabilization for viruses with buckled ground states versus viruses with unbuckled ground states. Finally, we show how our numerically calculated energy maps can be used to extract information about the strength of protein–protein interactions from rupture experiments. PMID:17545309

Buenemann, Mathias; Lenz, Peter

2007-01-01

317

Recruitment of RED-SMU1 Complex by Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase to Control Viral mRNA Splicing  

PubMed Central

Influenza A viruses are major pathogens in humans and in animals, whose genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA segments of negative polarity. Viral mRNAs are synthesized by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in the nucleus of infected cells, in close association with the cellular transcriptional machinery. Two proteins essential for viral multiplication, the exportin NS2/NEP and the ion channel protein M2, are produced by splicing of the NS1 and M1 mRNAs, respectively. Here we identify two human spliceosomal factors, RED and SMU1, that control the expression of NS2/NEP and are required for efficient viral multiplication. We provide several lines of evidence that in infected cells, the hetero-trimeric viral polymerase recruits a complex formed by RED and SMU1 through interaction with its PB2 and PB1 subunits. We demonstrate that the splicing of the NS1 viral mRNA is specifically affected in cells depleted of RED or SMU1, leading to a decreased production of the spliced mRNA species NS2, and to a reduced NS2/NS1 protein ratio. In agreement with the exportin function of NS2, these defects impair the transport of newly synthesized viral ribonucleoproteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and strongly reduce the production of infectious influenza virions. Overall, our results unravel a new mechanism of viral subversion of the cellular splicing machinery, by establishing that the human splicing factors RED and SMU1 act jointly as key regulators of influenza virus gene expression. In addition, our data point to a central role of the viral RNA polymerase in coupling transcription and alternative splicing of the viral mRNAs. PMID:24945353

Munier, Sandie; Tomoiu, Andru; Demeret, Caroline; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Jacob, Yves; Naffakh, Nadia

2014-01-01

318

Food, pathogen, signal  

PubMed Central

C.elegans, both in the wild and in the lab, live on a diet of live bacteria. The bacterial diet provides nutrients for C. elegans, but can also play a number of other roles in C. elegans physiology. Recently, we compared the effects of different bacterial diets on life history traits and gene expression. Here, we discuss our recent findings in the context of other dietary studies and highlight challenges in understanding dietary effects. For instance, since bacteria can be pathogenic it can be difficult to disentangle pathogenic from dietary effects. Here we summarize different bacterial diets used for C. elegans and how they affect the animal. PMID:24744980

MacNeil, Lesley T; Walhout, Albertha JM

2013-01-01

319

The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

2012-01-01

320

BST-2/tetherin: viral tether, viral sensor or both?  

PubMed Central

In the fields of virology and innate immunity, BST-2/tetherin is well known for its ability to block the egress of enveloped viruses from infected cells. This appears to be accomplished by ‘tethering’ virions to the cell surface, thereby limiting virion release. In the past year, several groups have discovered that BST-2/tetherin can activate NF-?B, a transcriptional activator that leads to the rapid expression of both proinflammatory cytokines and proteins involved in cell survival. While this new BST-2 function has been interpreted as a possible viral-sensing mechanism, there may also be broader implications for HIV gene regulation. This article reviews the evidence for BST-2-dependent NF-?B activation, and explores the significance of these exciting new results. PMID:24396393

Gustin, Jean K; Douglas, Janet L

2013-01-01

321

(Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants)  

SciTech Connect

During the last year we have made a number of important observations in the fields of virology and plant molecular biology. By directly sequencing Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV) movement genes, previously undetected sequence alterations common to specific viral strains were found. The difficulty in regenerating transgenic tomato plants containing the Tm-2 gene was overcome. Tobacco plants transformed with Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) are being characterized. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing CMV coat protein have shown no correlation between coat protein expression and level of resistance. Specific amino acid changes have been found to correlate with CMV resistance breaking and degree of pathogenicity. Satellite RNAs are shown to be too unstable for use as a biological control agent. The aphid transmission domain CMV has been localized to one (or more) of three amino acids; constructs have been made to determine the exact amino acids involved. 15 refs.

Not Available

1991-01-01

322

New Insights into IDO Biology in Bacterial and Viral Infections  

PubMed Central

Initially, indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been introduced as a bactericidal effector mechanism and has been linked to T-cell immunosuppression and tolerance. In recent years, evidence has been accumulated that IDO also plays an important role during viral infections including HIV, influenza, and hepatitis B and C. Moreover, novel aspects about the role of IDO in bacterial infections and sepsis have been revealed. Here, we review these recent findings highlighting the central role of IDO and tryptophan metabolism in many major human infections. Moreover, we also shed light on issues concerning human-specific and mouse-specific host–pathogen interactions that need to be considered when studying the biology of IDO in the context of infections. PMID:25157255

Schmidt, Susanne V.; Schultze, Joachim L.

2014-01-01

323

Picornavirus-host interactions to construct viral secretory membranes.  

PubMed

Picornaviruses are positive-stranded RNA viruses of significant disease burden and ubiquitous global reach. Microscopic examination of picornavirus-infected cells has long revealed a drastic reordering of intracellular membranes. Through a confluence of candidate-based approaches and genomic and proteomic screens, the past decade has seen great leaps in understanding how picornaviruses usurp intracellular membranes for their own replication. The growing cast of assembled characters allows for a rich plot in the upcoming years. With their widespread genomic divergence, the number of potential mechanisms for RNA virus vesicogenesis for driving membrane formation and lipid synthesis required for viral replication is broad, but the overall story arch remains surprisingly recognizable. This chapter reviews the major discoveries associating picornavirus pathogenic interactions with the secretory system and highlights important questions and opportunities for future study. PMID:25595805

Greninger, Alexander L

2015-01-01

324

Roles of bovine viral diarrhea virus envelope glycoproteins in inducing autophagy in MDBK cells.  

PubMed

Macroautophagy (autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved control process that maintains cellular homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Autophagy principally serves an adaptive role to degrade dysfunctional proteins and to clean damaged organelles in response to pathogenic, viral, or microbial infection, nutrient deprivation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In previous study, we showed bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) NADL infection induced autophagy and significantly elevated the expression levels of autophagy-related genes, Beclin1 and ATG14, at 12 h post-infection in MDBK cells. However, the specific mechanisms involved in controlling autophagic activity remain unclear. Here, we investigate the effects of BVDV NADL envelope glycoproteins overexpression on inducing autophagy. The results show that viral envelope glycoproteins E(rns) and E2 overexpression mediated by lentivirus increase the formation of autophagosome, the percentage of GFP-LC3 puncta-positive cells and the expression levels of Beclin1 and ATG14. Whereas E1 overexpression doesn't affect autophagic activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that the viral envelope glycoproteins E(rns) and E2 are involved in inducing autophagy, and provide a mechanistic insight into the regulation of autophagy in viral infected cells. PMID:25245007

Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Shi, Mengting; Meng, Luping; Bao, Haiyang; Zhang, Guoqi; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Fei; Qiao, Jun; Jia, Bin; Wang, Pengyan; Ni, Wei; Sheng, Jinliang; Chen, Chuangfu

2014-11-01

325

Molecular anatomy of Chilo iridescent virus genome and the evolution of viral genes.  

PubMed

Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) or Insect iridescent virus 6 (IIV-6) is the type species of the genus iridovirus, a member of the Iridoviridae family. CIV is highly pathogenic for a variety of insect larvae and this implicates a possible use as a biological insecticide. CIV progeny and assembly occur in the cytoplasm of the infected cell and accumulate in the fatbody of the infected insects. Since the discovery of CIV in 1966, many attempts were made to elucidate the viral genome structure and the amino acid sequences of different viral gene products. The elucidation of the coding capacity and strategy of CIV was the first step towards understanding the underlying mechanisms of viral infection, replication and virus-host interaction. The virions contain a single linear ds DNA molecule that is circularly permuted and terminally redundant. The coding capacity of the CIV genome was determined by the analysis of the complete DNA nucleotide sequence consisting of 212,482 bp that represent 468 open reading frames encoding for polypeptides ranging from 40 to 2432 amino acid residues. The analysis of the coding capacity of the CIV genome revealed that 50% (234 ORFs) of all identified ORFs (468 ORFs) were non-overlapping. The identification of several putative viral gene products including a DNA ligase and a viral antibiotic peptide is a powerful tool for the investigation of the phylogenetic relatedness of this evolutionary and ecologically relevant eukaryotic virus. PMID:12881641

Jakob, Nurith J; Darai, Gholamreza

2002-12-01

326

Discovery and initial analysis of novel viral genomes in the soybean cyst nematode.  

PubMed

Nematodes are the most abundant multicellular animals on earth, yet little is known about their natural viral pathogens. To date, only two nematode virus genomes have been reported. Consequently, nematode viruses have been overlooked as important biotic factors in the study of nematode ecology. Here, we show that one plant parasitic nematode species, Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), harbours four different RNA viruses. The nematode virus genomes were discovered in the SCN transcriptome after high-throughput sequencing and assembly. All four viruses have negative-sense RNA genomes, and are distantly related to nyaviruses and bornaviruses, rhabdoviruses, bunyaviruses and tenuiviruses. Some members of these families replicate in and are vectored by insects, and can cause significant diseases in animals and plants. The novel viral sequences were detected in both eggs and the second juvenile stage of SCN, suggesting that these viruses are transmitted vertically. While there was no evidence of integration of viral sequences into the nematode genome, we indeed detected transcripts from these viruses by using quantitative PCR. These data are the first finding of virus genomes in parasitic nematodes. This discovery highlights the need for further exploration for nematode viruses in all tropic groups of these diverse and abundant animals, to determine how the presence of these viruses affects the fitness of the nematode, strategies of viral transmission and mechanisms of viral pathogenesis. PMID:21490246

Bekal, Sadia; Domier, Leslie L; Niblack, Terry L; Lambert, Kris N

2011-08-01

327

Curing a viral infection by targeting the host: The example of cyclophilin inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Every step of the viral life cycle is dependent on the host, which potentially can be explored for antiviral targets. Historically, however, drug discovery has focused mainly on viral targets, because of their perceived specificity. Efforts to pursue host targets have been largely hampered by concern over potential on-target toxicity, the lack of predictive cell culture and animal models, and the complexity of host–virus interactions. On the other hand, there are distinct advantages of targeting the host, such as creating a high barrier to resistance, providing broad coverage of different genotypes/serotypes and possibly even multiple viruses, and expanding the list of potential targets, when druggable viral targets are limited. Taking hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the example, there are more than 20 inhibitors of the viral protease, polymerase and NS5A protein currently in advanced clinical testing. However, resistance has become a main challenge with these direct-acting antivirals, because HCV, an RNA virus, is notoriously prone to mutation, and a single mutation in the viral target may prevent the binding of an inhibitor, and rendering it ineffective. Host cyclophilin inhibitors have shown promising effects both in vitro and in patients to prevent the emergence of resistance and to cure HCV infection, either alone or in combination with other agents. They are also capable of blocking the replication of a number of other viral pathogens. While the road to developing host-targeting antivirals has been less traveled, and significant challenges remain, delivering the most effective antiviral regimen, which may comprise inhibitors of both host and viral targets, should be well worth the effort. PMID:23578729

Lin, Kai; Gallay, Philippe

2015-01-01

328

DISINFECTION OF EMERGING PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

There is a growing awareness of the need to control waterborne microbial pathogens. This presentation will concentate on the role of chemical inactivation, using chlorine, chloramines and ozone as a means of controlling bacterial and protozoan species. Information will be present...

329

PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

330

Synthetic DNA vaccine strategies against persistent viral infections.  

PubMed

The human body has developed an elaborate defense system against microbial pathogens and foreign antigens. However, particular microbes have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to evade immune surveillance, allowing persistence within the human host. In an effort to combat such infections, intensive research has focused on the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic countermeasures to suppress or clear persistent viral infections. To date, popular therapeutic strategies have included the use of live-attenuated microbes, viral vectors and dendritic-cell vaccines aiming to help suppress or clear infection. In recent years, improved DNA vaccines have now re-emerged as a promising candidate for therapeutic intervention due to the development of advanced optimization and delivery technologies. For instance, genetic optimization of synthetic plasmid constructs and their encoded antigens, in vivo electroporation-mediated vaccine delivery, as well as codelivery with molecular adjuvants have collectively enhanced both transgene expression and the elicitation of vaccine-induced immunity. In addition, the development of potent heterologous prime-boost regimens has also provided significant contributions to DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Herein, the authors will focus on these recent improvements to this synthetic platform in relation to their application in combating persistent virus infection. PMID:23659301

Villarreal, Daniel O; Talbott, Kendra T; Choo, Daniel K; Shedlock, Devon J; Weiner, David B

2013-05-01

331

Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection induces autophagy in MDBK cells.  

PubMed

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae). The signaling pathways and levels of signaling molecules are altered in Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells infected with BVDV. Autophagy is a conservative biological degradation pathway that mainly eliminates and degrades damaged or superfluous organelles and macromolecular complexes for intracellular recycling in eukaryotic cells. Autophagy can also be induced as an effective response to maintain cellular homeostasis in response to different stresses, such as nutrient or growth factor deprivation, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species exposure and pathogen infection. However, the effects of BVDV infection on autophagy in MDBK cells remain unclear. Therefore, we performed an analysis of autophagic activity after BVDV NADL infection using real-time PCR, electron microscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and Western blotting analysis. The results demonstrated that BVDV NADL infection increased autophagic activity and significantly elevated the expression levels of the autophagy-related genes Beclin1 and ATG14 in MDBK cells. However, the knockdown of Beclin1 and ATG14 by RNA interference (RNAi) did not affect BVDV NADL infection-related autophagic activity. These findings provided a novel perspective to elaborate the effects of viral infection on the host cells. PMID:24972811

Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Ren, Yan; Guo, Fei; Ni, Wei; Qiao, Jun; Wang, Pengyan; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuangfu

2014-07-01

332

Non-viral infections in children after renal transplantation.  

PubMed

Renal transplantation has long been recognised as the gold standard treatment for children with end-stage renal failure. There has been an improvement over the years in patient and renal allograft survival because of improved immunosuppression, surgical techniques and living kidney donation. Despite reduced acute allograft rejection rates, non-viral infections continue to be a serious complication for paediatric renal transplant recipients (RTR). The risk of infections in RTR is determined by the pre-transplantation immunisation status, post-transplant exposure to potential pathogens and the amount of immunosuppression. The greatest risk of life-threatening and Cytomegalovirus infections is during the first 6 months post-transplant owing to a high immunosuppressive burden. The potential sources of bacterial infections are donor derived, transplant medium fluid, peritoneal and haemodialysis catheter and transplant ureteric stent. Urinary tract infections are frequent in patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction and can result in renal allograft damage. This review outlines the incidence, timing, risk factors, prevention and treatment of non-viral infections in paediatric RTR by critically reviewing current immunosuppressive regimens, their risk-benefit ratio in order to optimise renal allograft survival with reduced rates of rejection and infectious complications. PMID:22318475

Mencarelli, Francesca; Marks, Stephen D

2012-09-01

333

Building a viral capsid in the presence of genomic RNA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Virus capsid assembly has traditionally been considered as a process that can be described primarily via self-assembly of the capsid proteins, neglecting interactions with other viral or cellular components. Our recent work on several ssRNA viruses, a major class of viral pathogens containing important human, animal, and plant viruses, has shown that this protein-centric view is too simplistic. Capsid assembly for these viruses relies strongly on a number of cooperative roles played by the genomic RNA. This realization requires a new theoretical framework for the modeling and prediction of the assembly behavior of these viruses. In a seminal paper Zlotnick [J. Mol. Biol.0022-283610.1006/jmbi.1994.1473 241, 59 (1994)] laid the foundations for the modeling of capsid assembly as a protein-only self-assembly process, illustrating his approach using the example of a dodecahedral study system. We describe here a generalized framework for modeling assembly that incorporates the regulatory functions provided by cognate protein-nucleic-acid interactions between capsid proteins and segments of the genomic RNA, called packaging signals, into the model. Using the same dodecahedron system we demonstrate, using a Gillespie-type algorithm to deal with the enhanced complexity of the problem instead of a master equation approach, that assembly kinetics and yield strongly depend on the distribution and nature of the packaging signals, highlighting the importance of the crucial roles of the RNA in this process.

Dykeman, Eric C.; Stockley, Peter G.; Twarock, Reidun

2013-02-01

334

Synthetic DNA vaccine strategies against persistent viral infections  

PubMed Central

The human body has developed an elaborate defense system against microbial pathogens and foreign antigens. However, particular microbes have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to evade immune surveillance, allowing persistence within the human host. In an effort to combat such infections, intensive research has focused on the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic countermeasures to suppress or clear persistent viral infections. To date, popular therapeutic strategies have included the use of live-attenuated microbes, viral vectors and dendritic-cell vaccines aiming to help suppress or clear infection. In recent years, improved DNA vaccines have now re-emerged as a promising candidate for therapeutic intervention due to the development of advanced optimization and delivery technologies. For instance, genetic optimization of synthetic plasmid constructs and their encoded antigens, in vivo electroporation-mediated vaccine delivery, as well as codelivery with molecular adjuvants have collectively enhanced both transgene expression and the elicitation of vaccine-induced immunity. In addition, the development of potent heterologous prime–boost regimens has also provided significant contributions to DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Herein, the authors will focus on these recent improvements to this synthetic platform in relation to their application in combating persistent virus infection. PMID:23659301

Villarreal, Daniel O; Talbott, Kendra T; Choo, Daniel K; Shedlock, Devon J; Weiner, David B

2015-01-01

335

Seroprevalence of specific viral infections in confiscated orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus).  

PubMed

A serological survey of confiscated orangutans was conducted to determine the prevalence of specific viral infections cross reacting with human viruses. Antibodies specific for human hepatitis A (HAV) and B (HBV) viruses, herpes simplex viruses (HSV), and human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV types I and II), as well as for the simian type D retroviruses (SRV types 1 to 3) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) were tested in samples from 143 orangutans. Results revealed a high prevalence of potential pathogens. The most prevalent viral infection found was HBV (59.4% prevalence) of which 89.4% of infected individuals seroconverted to the non-infectious state and 10.6% remained as chronic carriers. Antibodies to HAV, HSV, HTLV-1, and SRV were also detected but at a lower prevalence. There was no evidence of lentiviral infections in this group of animals. The results confirm the importance of quarantine and the need for diagnostic differentiation of virus infections to determine if they are of human origin or unique orangutan viruses. PMID:9606041

Warren, K S; Niphuis, H; Heriyanto; Verschoor, E J; Swan, R A; Heeney, J L

1998-02-01

336

Evaluation of viral concentration methods from irrigation and processing water.  

PubMed

Four viral concentration methods were evaluated for their efficiency in recovering murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) (surrogate for human noroviruses (NoV)) and MS2 bacteriophages from processing water (1L) and four different types of irrigation water (bore hole water, rain water, open well and river water) (2-5L). Three methods were based on the viral adsorption and elution principle, two methods using an electronegative HA-membrane (Katayama et al., 2002), one method using an electropositive Zetapor membrane according to CEN/TC275/WG6/TAG4 and the fourth method was based on size exclusion using a tangential flow filtration system. Detection of MNV-1 was achieved by real-time RT-PCR and detection of MS2 by double-layer plaque assay. For the recovery of MNV-1, the method using an electronegative HA-filter in combination with an elution buffer earlier optimized by Hamza et al. (2009) (Method 1) performed best for all types of water (recovery: 5.8-21.9%). In case of MS2 detection, the best method depended upon the type of water although Method 1 provided the most consistent recovery. To complete this evaluation, the Method 1 was evaluated further for the concentration of human enteric viruses (GI and GII NoV, hepatitis A virus (HAV) and rotaviruses) in the same five types of water. Although detection of rotaviruses (RV) was somewhat less efficient, Method 1 proved reliable for the detection of NoV and HAV in all water types. Mean recovery efficiencies ranging from 4.8% for detection of GI NoV in open well water to 32.1% for detection of HAV in bore hole water, depending on the water type and the viral pathogen analyzed. PMID:23201288

De Keuckelaere, Ann; Baert, Leen; Duarte, Alexandra; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

2013-02-01

337

Production and Titering of Recombinant Adeno-associated Viral Vectors  

PubMed Central

In recent years recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have become increasingly valuable for in vivo studies in animals, and are also currently being tested in human clinical trials. Wild-type AAV is a non-pathogenic member of the parvoviridae family and inherently replication-deficient. The broad transduction profile, low immune response as well as the strong and persistent transgene expression achieved with these vectors has made them a popular and versatile tool for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. rAAVs can be easily and cheaply produced in the laboratory and, based on their favourable safety profile, are generally given a low safety classification. Here, we describe a method for the production and titering of chimeric rAAVs containing the capsid proteins of both AAV1 and AAV2. The use of these so-called chimeric vectors combines the benefits of both parental serotypes such as high titres stocks (AAV1) and purification by affinity chromatography (AAV2). These AAV serotypes are the best studied of all AAV serotypes, and individually have a broad infectivity pattern. The chimeric vectors described here should have the infectious properties of AAV1 and AAV2 and can thus be expected to infect a large range of tissues, including neurons, skeletal muscle, pancreas, kidney among others. The method described here uses heparin column purification, a method believed to give a higher viral titer and cleaner viral preparation than other purification methods, such as centrifugation through a caesium chloride gradient. Additionally, we describe how these vectors can be quickly and easily titered to give accurate reading of the number of infectious particles produced. PMID:22143312

Wulff, Peer; Klugmann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew J.

2011-01-01

338

Structure unifies the viral universe.  

PubMed

Is it possible to meaningfully comprehend the diversity of the viral world? We propose that it is. This is based on the observation that, although there is immense genomic variation, every infective virion is restricted by strict constraints in structure space (i.e., there are a limited number of ways to fold a protein chain, and only a small subset of these have the potential to construct a virion, the hallmark of a virus). We have previously suggested the use of structure for the higher-order classification of viruses, where genomic similarities are no longer observable. Here, we summarize the arguments behind this proposal, describe the current status of structural work, highlighting its power to infer common ancestry, and discuss the limitations and obstacles ahead of us. We also reflect on the future opportunities for a more concerted effort to provide high-throughput methods to facilitate the large-scale sampling of the virosphere. PMID:22482909

Abrescia, Nicola G A; Bamford, Dennis H; Grimes, Jonathan M; Stuart, David I

2012-01-01

339

Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.  

PubMed

All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

Villarreal, Luis P

2011-10-01

340

A circadian model for viral persistence.  

PubMed

Persistently infecting DNA viruses depend heavily on host cell DNA synthesis machinery. Replication of cellular and viral DNA is inhibited by mutagenic stress. It is hypothesized that diurnal regulation of viral DNA replication may occur at the level of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair, to protect DNA from exposure to UV light or other mutagens. This highly conserved mechanism is traced back to viruses that persist in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Inhibition of viral DNA replication and the cell cycle in response to UV light may represent a functional building block in the evolution of circadian-gated DNA replication. Viral DNA replication appears to be closely linked to the circadian clock by interaction of viral promoters, early viral proteins and transcription factors. It is proposed here that under certain conditions viral oncogene expression is phase-shifted relative to that of tumor suppressor and DNA repair genes. The resulting desynchrony of checkpoint controls and DNA repair from diurnal genotoxic exposure produces cyclic periods of suboptimal response to DNA damage. This temporal vulnerability to genotoxic stress produces a "mutator phenotype" with inherent genome instability. The proposed model delineates areas of research with implications for viral pathogenesis and therapeutics. PMID:17030450

Shadan, Farhad F

2007-01-01

341

Replication of Epstein–Barr Viral DNA  

PubMed Central

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a paradigm for human tumor viruses: it is the first virus recognized to cause cancer in people; it causes both lymphomas and carcinomas; yet these tumors arise infrequently given that most people in the world are infected with the virus. EBV is maintained extrachromosomally in infected normal and tumor cells. Eighty-four percent of these viral plasmids replicate each S phase, are licensed, require a single viral protein for their synthesis, and can use two functionally distinct origins of DNA replication, oriP, and Raji ori. Eighty-eight percent of newly synthesized plasmids are segregated faithfully to the daughter cells. Infectious viral particles are not synthesized under these conditions of latent infection. This plasmid replication is consistent with survival of EBV’s host cells. Rare cells in an infected population either spontaneously or following exogenous induction support EBV’s lytic cycle, which is lethal for the cell. In this case, the viral DNA replicates 100-fold or more, uses a third kind of viral origin of DNA replication, oriLyt, and many viral proteins. Here we shall describe the three modes of EBV’s replication as a function of the viral origins used and the viral and cellular proteins that mediate the DNA synthesis from these origins focusing, where practical, on recent advances in our understanding. PMID:23284049

Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Sugden, Bill

2013-01-01

342

Preparation of viral DNA from nucleocapsids.  

PubMed

Viruses are obligate cellular parasites, and thus the study of their DNA requires isolating viral material away from host cell contaminants and DNA. Several downstream applications require large quantities of pure viral DNA, which is provided by this protocol. These applications include viral genome sequencing, where the removal of host DNA is crucial to optimize data output for viral sequences, and the production of new viral recombinant strains, where co-transfection of purified plasmid and linear viral DNA facilitates recombination.(1,2,3) This procedure utilizes a combination of extractions and density-based centrifugation to isolate purified linear herpesvirus nucleocapsid DNA from infected cells.(4,5) The initial purification steps aim to isolate purified viral capsids, which contain and protect the viral DNA during the extractions and centrifugation steps that remove cellular proteins and DNA. Lysis of nucleocapsids then releases viral DNA, and two final phenol-chloroform steps remove remaining proteins. The final DNA captured from solution is highly concentrated and pure, with an average OD(260/280;) of 1.90. Depending on the quantity of infected cells used, yields of viral DNA range from 150-800 ?g or more. The purity of this DNA makes it stable during long-term storage at 4C. This DNA is thus ideally suited for high-throughput sequencing, high fidelity PCR reactions, and transfections. Prior to beginning the protocol, it is important to know the average number of cells per dish (e.g. an average of 8 x 10(6) PK-15 cells in a confluent 15 cm dish), and the titer of the viral stock to be used (e.g. 1 x 10(8) plaque-forming units per ml). These are necessary to calculate the appropriate multiplicity of infection (MOI) for the protocol.(6) For instance, to infect one 15 cm dish of PK-15 cells with the above viral stock, at an MOI of 5, you would use 400 ?l of viral stock and dilute it with 3.6 ml of medium (total inoculation volume of 4 ml for one 15 cm plate). Multiple viral DNA preparations can be prepared at the same time. The number of simultaneous preparations is limited only by the number of tubes held by the ultracentrifuge rotor (one per virus; see step 3.9 below). Here we describe the procedure as though being done for one virus. PMID:21876519

Szpara, Moriah L; Tafuri, Yolanda R; Enquist, L W

2011-01-01

343

Preparation of Viral DNA from Nucleocapsids  

PubMed Central

Viruses are obligate cellular parasites, and thus the study of their DNA requires isolating viral material away from host cell contaminants and DNA. Several downstream applications require large quantities of pure viral DNA, which is provided by this protocol. These applications include viral genome sequencing, where the removal of host DNA is crucial to optimize data output for viral sequences, and the production of new viral recombinant strains, where co-transfection of purified plasmid and linear viral DNA facilitates recombination.1,2,3 This procedure utilizes a combination of extractions and density-based centrifugation to isolate purified linear herpesvirus nucleocapsid DNA from infected cells.4,5 The initial purification steps aim to isolate purified viral capsids, which contain and protect the viral DNA during the extractions and centrifugation steps that remove cellular proteins and DNA. Lysis of nucleocapsids then releases viral DNA, and two final phenol-chloroform steps remove remaining proteins. The final DNA captured from solution is highly concentrated and pure, with an average OD260/280 of 1.90. Depending on the quantity of infected cells used, yields of viral DNA range from 150-800 ?g or more. The purity of this DNA makes it stable during long-term storage at 4C. This DNA is thus ideally suited for high-throughput sequencing, high fidelity PCR reactions, and transfections. Prior to beginning the protocol, it is important to know the average number of cells per dish (e.g. an average of 8 x 106 PK-15 cells in a confluent 15 cm dish), and the titer of the viral stock to be used (e.g. 1 x 108 plaque-forming units per ml). These are necessary to calculate the appropriate multiplicity of infection (MOI) for the protocol.6 For instance, to infect one 15 cm dish of PK-15 cells with the above viral stock, at an MOI of 5, you would use 400 ?l of viral stock and dilute it with 3.6 ml of medium (total inoculation volume of 4 ml for one 15 cm plate). Multiple viral DNA preparations can be prepared at the same time. The number of simultaneous preparations is limited only by the number of tubes held by the ultracentrifuge rotor (one per virus; see step 3.9 below). Here we describe the procedure as though being done for one virus. PMID:21876519

Szpara, Moriah L.; Tafuri, Yolanda R.; Enquist, L. W.

2011-01-01

344

Production of non viral DNA vectors.  

PubMed

After some decades of research, development and first clinical approaches to use DNA vectors in gene therapy, cell therapy and DNA vaccination, the requirements for the pharmaceutical manufacturing of gene vectors has improved significantly step by step. Even the expression level and specificity of non viral DNA vectors were significantly modified and followed the success of viral vectors. The strict separation of "viral" and "non viral" gene transfer are historic borders between scientist and we will show that both fields together are able to allow the next step towards successful prevention and therapy. Here we summarize the features of producing and modifying these non-viral gene vectors to ensure the required quality to modify cells and to treat human and animals. PMID:21054244

Schleef, Martin; Blaesen, Markus; Schmeer, Marco; Baier, Ruth; Marie, Corinne; Dickson, George; Scherman, Daniel

2010-12-01

345

Hepatitis C Viral Kinetics in Special Populations.  

PubMed

Mathematical models of hepatitis C viral (HCV) kinetics provide a means of estimating the antiviral effectiveness of therapy, the rate of virion clearance and the rate of loss of HCV-infected cells. They have also proved useful in evaluating the extrahepatic contribution to HCV plasma viremia and they have suggested mechanisms of action for both interferon-? and ribavirin. Viral kinetic models can explain the observed HCV RNA profiles under treatment, e.g., flat partial response, biphasic and triphasic viral decay and viral rebound. Current therapy with (pegylated) interferon-? and ribavirin has a poorer success in patients having insulin resistance, hepatic fibrosis, African American ethnicity, HCV/HIV-coinfection, HCV genotype-1 and high baseline viral load. The use of mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of experimental data have been useful in understanding some of these treatment obstacles. PMID:19148305

Dahari, Harel; Layden-Almer, Jennifer E; Perelson, Alan S; Layden, Thomas J

2008-01-01

346

Reovirus ?NS Protein Is Required for Nucleation of Viral Assembly Complexes and Formation of Viral Inclusions  

PubMed Central

Progeny virions of mammalian reoviruses are assembled in the cytoplasm of infected cells at discrete sites termed viral inclusions. Studies of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant viruses indicate that nonstructural protein ?NS and core protein ?2 are required for synthesis of double-stranded (ds) RNA, a process that occurs at sites of viral assembly. We used confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and ts mutant reoviruses to define the roles of ?NS and ?2 in viral inclusion formation. In cells infected with wild-type (wt) reovirus, ?NS and ?2 colocalize to large, perinuclear structures that correspond to viral inclusions. In cells infected at a nonpermissive temperature with ?NS-mutant virus tsE320, ?NS is distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm and ?2 is contained in small, punctate foci that do not resemble viral inclusions. In cells infected at a nonpermissive temperature with ?2-mutant virus tsH11.2, ?2 is distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. However, ?NS localizes to discrete structures in the cytoplasm that contain other viral proteins and are morphologically indistinguishable from viral inclusions seen in cells infected with wt reovirus. Examination of cells infected with wt reovirus over a time course demonstrates that ?NS precedes ?2 in localization to viral inclusions. These findings suggest that viral RNA-protein complexes containing ?NS nucleate sites of viral replication to which other viral proteins, including ?2, are recruited to commence dsRNA synthesis. PMID:11152519

Becker, Michelle M.; Goral, Mehmet I.; Hazelton, Paul R.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Rodgers, Steven E.; Brown, Earl G.; Coombs, Kevin M.; Dermody, Terence S.

2001-01-01

347

Insect Vectors of Human Pathogens  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Four orders of insects (Hemiptera, Phthiraptera, Diptera, and Siphonaptera) are covered detailing vector species along with their pathogens of human importance. Links to pathogens as well as vectors are highlighted (some of these are CDC, and WHO).

0000-00-00

348

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOEpatents

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

2010-09-14

349

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOEpatents

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

2013-01-15

350

Viral and Bacterial Interactions in the Upper Respiratory Tract  

PubMed Central

Respiratory infectious diseases are mainly caused by viruses or bacteria that often interact with one another. Although their presence is a prerequisite for subsequent infections, viruses and bacteria may be present in the nasopharynx without causing any respiratory symptoms. The upper respiratory tract hosts a vast range of commensals and potential pathogenic bacteria, which form a complex microbial community. This community is assumed to be constantly subject to synergistic and competitive interspecies interactions. Disturbances in the equilibrium, for instance due to the acquisition of new bacteria or viruses, may lead to overgrowth and invasion. A better understanding of the dynamics between commensals and pathogens in the upper respiratory tract may provide better insight into the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Here we review the current knowledge regarding specific bacterial–bacterial and viral–bacterial interactions that occur in the upper respiratory niche, and discuss mechanisms by which these interactions might be mediated. Finally, we propose a theoretical model to summarize and illustrate these mechanisms. PMID:23326226

Bosch, Astrid A. T. M.; Biesbroek, Giske; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Bogaert, Debby

2013-01-01

351

PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI IN FOODS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pathogenic Escherichia coli are defined as those E. coli strains that are capable of causing diarrhoeal disease in humans. Subdivision of the pathogenic forms is made on the basis of the mechanism underlying the illness. Presently, four types of pathogenic E. coli have been implicated in foodborne...

352

Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:14726454

Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

2004-01-01

353

Human coronaviruses: Viral and cellular factors involved in neuroinvasiveness and neuropathogenesis.  

PubMed

Among the various respiratory viruses infecting human beings, coronaviruses are important pathogens, which usually infect the upper respiratory tract, where they are mainly associated with common colds. However, in more vulnerable populations, such as newborns, infants, the elderly and immune-compromised individuals, these opportunistic pathogens can also affect the lower respiratory tract, leading to pneumonia, exacerbations of asthma, and various types of respiratory distress syndrome. The respiratory involvement of human coronaviruses has been clearly established since the 1960s. Nevertheless, for almost three decades now, data reported in the scientific literature has also demonstrated that, like it was described for other human viruses, coronaviruses have neuroinvasive capacities since they can spread from the respiratory tract to the central nervous system (CNS). Once there, infection of CNS cells (neurotropism) could lead to human health problems, such as encephalitis and long-term neurological diseases. Neuroinvasive coronaviruses could damage the CNS as a result of misdirected host immune responses that could be associated with autoimmunity in susceptible individuals (virus-induced neuroimmunopathology) and/or viral replication, which directly induces damage to CNS cells (virus-induced neuropathology). Given all these properties, it has been suggested that these opportunistic human respiratory pathogens could be associated with the triggering or the exacerbation of neurologic diseases for which the etiology remains poorly understood. Herein, we present host and viral factors that participate in the regulation of the possible pathogenic processes associated with CNS infection by human coronaviruses and we try to decipher the intricate interplay between virus and host target cells in order to characterize their role in the virus life cycle as well as in the capacity of the cell to respond to viral invasion. PMID:25281913

Desforges, Marc; Le Coupanec, Alain; Stodola, Jenny K; Meessen-Pinard, Mathieu; Talbot, Pierre J

2014-12-19

354

A Natural Genetic Variant of Granzyme B Confers Lethality to a Common Viral Infection  

PubMed Central

Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB) gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we describe the biochemical and cytotoxic functions of a common allele of GzmB (GzmBW) common in wild mouse. While retaining ‘Asp-ase’ activity, GzmBW has substrate preferences that differ considerably from GzmBP, which is common to all inbred strains. In vitro, GzmBW preferentially cleaves recombinant Bid, whereas GzmBP activates pro-caspases directly. Recombinant GzmBW and GzmBP induced equivalent apoptosis of uninfected targets cells when delivered with perforin in vitro. Nonetheless, mice homozygous for GzmBW were unable to control murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, and succumbed as a result of excessive liver damage. Although similar numbers of anti-viral CD8 T cells were generated in both mouse strains, GzmBW-expressing CD8 T cells isolated from infected mice were unable to kill MCMV-infected targets in vitro. Our results suggest that known virally-encoded inhibitors of the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway account for the increased susceptibility of GzmBW mice to MCMV. We conclude that different natural variants of GzmB have a profound impact on the immune response to a common and authentic viral pathogen. PMID:25502180

Andoniou, Christopher E.; Sutton, Vivien R.; Wikstrom, Matthew E.; Fleming, Peter; Thia, Kevin Y. T.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Kaiserman, Dion; Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Eldi, Preethi; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Bird, Phillip I.

2014-01-01

355

A natural genetic variant of granzyme B confers lethality to a common viral infection.  

PubMed

Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB) gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we describe the biochemical and cytotoxic functions of a common allele of GzmB (GzmBW) common in wild mouse. While retaining 'Asp-ase' activity, GzmBW has substrate preferences that differ considerably from GzmBP, which is common to all inbred strains. In vitro, GzmBW preferentially cleaves recombinant Bid, whereas GzmBP activates pro-caspases directly. Recombinant GzmBW and GzmBP induced equivalent apoptosis of uninfected targets cells when delivered with perforin in vitro. Nonetheless, mice homozygous for GzmBW were unable to control murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, and succumbed as a result of excessive liver damage. Although similar numbers of anti-viral CD8 T cells were generated in both mouse strains, GzmBW-expressing CD8 T cells isolated from infected mice were unable to kill MCMV-infected targets in vitro. Our results suggest that known virally-encoded inhibitors of the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway account for the increased susceptibility of GzmBW mice to MCMV. We conclude that different natural variants of GzmB have a profound impact on the immune response to a common and authentic viral pathogen. PMID:25502180

Andoniou, Christopher E; Sutton, Vivien R; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Fleming, Peter; Thia, Kevin Y T; Matthews, Antony Y; Kaiserman, Dion; Schuster, Iona S; Coudert, Jerome D; Eldi, Preethi; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Bird, Phillip I; Trapani, Joseph A; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A

2014-12-01

356

A Pathogenic Threshold of Virus Load Defined in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus or Simian-Human Immunodeficiency VirusInfected Macaques  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine if a specific pathogenic threshold of plasma viral RNA could be defined irrespective of virus strain, RNA levels in the plasma of more than 50 infected rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were measured. Animals were inoculated intravenously with either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strains of known pathogenic potential (SIV8980, SIVsmm-3, SIVmac32H\\/J5, SIVmac32H\\/1XC, reverse transcriptase-SHIV,

PETER TEN HAAFT; BABS VERSTREPEN; KLAUS UBERLA; BRIGITTE ROSENWIRTH; JONATHAN HEENEY

1998-01-01

357

Host envelope glycoprotein processing proteases are indispensable for entry into human cells by seasonal and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influenza A virus (IAV) is one of the most common infectious pathogens in humans and causes considerable morbidity and mortality. The recent spread of highly-pathogenic avian IAV H5N1 viruses has reinforced the importance of pandemic preparedness. In the pathogenesis of IAV infection, cellular proteases play critical roles in the process of viral entry into cells that subsequently leads to tissue

Hiroshi Kido; Yuushi Okumura; Etsuhisa Takahashi; Siye Wang; Junji Chida; Mihiro Yano

2009-01-01

358

Chitosan against cutaneous pathogens  

PubMed Central

Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus are cutaneous pathogens that have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics. We sought to determine if chitosan, a polymer of deacetylated chitin, could be used as a potential treatment against these bacteria. We found that higher molecular weight chitosan had superior antimicrobial properties compared to lower molecular weights, and that this activity occurred in a pH dependent manner. Electron and fluorescence microscopy revealed that chitosan forms aggregates and binds to the surface of bacteria, causing shrinkage of the bacterial membrane from the cell wall. Of special relevance, clinical isolates of P. acnes were vulnerable to chitosan, which could be combined with benzoyl peroxide for additive antibacterial effect. Chitosan also demonstrated significantly less cytotoxicity to monocytes than benzoyl peroxide. Overall, chitosan demonstrates many promising qualities for treatment of cutaneous pathogens. PMID:23829873

2013-01-01

359

Adhesion by Pathogenic Corynebacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pathogenic members of the genus Corynebacterium cause a wide range of serious infections in humans including diphtheria. Adhesion to host cells is a crucial step during\\u000a infection. In Corynebacterium diphtheriae, adhesion is mediated primarily by filamentous structures called pili or fimbriae that are covalently attached to the bacterial\\u000a cell wall. C. diphtheriae produces three distinct pilus structures, SpaA-, SpaD- and

Elizabeth A. Rogers; Asis Das; Hung Ton-That

360

Dynamic models of viral replication and latency  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review HIV targets primary CD4+ T cells. The virus depends on the physiological state of its target cells for efficient replication, and, in turn, viral infection perturbs the cellular state significantly. Identifying the virus–host interactions that drive these dynamic changes is important for a better understanding of viral pathogenesis and persistence. The present review focuses on experimental and computational approaches to study the dynamics of viral replication and latency. Recent findings It was recently shown that only a fraction of the inducible latently infected reservoirs are successfully induced upon stimulation in ex-vivo models while additional rounds of stimulation make allowance for reactivation of more latently infected cells. This highlights the potential role of treatment duration and timing as important factors for successful reactivation of latently infected cells. The dynamics of HIV productive infection and latency have been investigated using transcriptome and proteome data. The cellular activation state has shown to be a major determinant of viral reactivation success. Mathematical models of latency have been used to explore the dynamics of the latent viral reservoir decay. Summary Timing is an important component of biological interactions. Temporal analyses covering aspects of viral life cycle are essential for gathering a comprehensive picture of HIV interaction with the host cell and untangling the complexity of latency. Understanding the dynamic changes tipping the balance between success and failure of HIV particle production might be key to eradicate the viral reservoir. PMID:25565177

Mohammadi, Pejman; Ciuffi, Angela; Beerenwinkel, Niko

2015-01-01

361

Chikungunya triggers an autophagic process which promotes viral replication  

PubMed Central

Background Chikungunya Virus (ChikV) surprised by a massive re-emerging outbreak in Indian Ocean in 2006, reaching Europe in 2007 and exhibited exceptional severe physiopathology in infants and elderly patients. In this context, it is important to analyze the innate immune host responses triggered against ChikV. Autophagy has been shown to be an important component of the innate immune response and is involved in host defense elimination of different pathogens. However, the autophagic process was recently observed to be hijacked by virus for their own replication. Here we provide the first evidence that hallmarks of autophagy are specifically found in HEK.293 infected cells and are involved in ChikV replication. Methods To test the capacity of ChikV to mobilize the autophagic machinery, we performed fluorescence microscopy experiments on HEK.GFP.LC3 stable cells, and followed the LC3 distribution during the time course of ChikV infection. To confirm this, we performed electron microscopy on HEK.293 infected cells. To test the effect of ChikV-induced-autophagy on viral replication, we blocked the autophagic process, either by pharmacological (3-MA) or genetic inhibition (siRNA against the transcript of Beclin 1, an autophagic protein), and analyzed the percentage of infected cells and the viral RNA load released in the supernatant. Moreover, the effect of induction of autophagy by Rapamycin on viral replication was tested. Results The increasing number of GFP-LC3 positive cells with a punctate staining together with the enhanced number of GFP-LC3 dots per cell showed that ChikV triggered an autophagic process in HEK.293 infected cells. Those results were confirmed by electron microscopy analysis since numerous membrane-bound vacuoles characteristic of autophagosomes were observed in infected cells. Moreover, we found that inhibition of autophagy, either by biochemical reagent and RNA interference, dramatically decreases ChikV replication. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may play a promoting role in ChikV replication. Investigating in details the relationship between autophagy and viral replication will greatly improve our knowledge of the pathogenesis of ChikV and provide insight for the design of candidate antiviral therapeutics. PMID:21902836

2011-01-01

362

Identification of novel viral receptors with cell line expressing viral receptor-binding protein  

PubMed Central

The viral cell receptors and infection can be blocked by the expression of the viral receptor-binding protein. Thus, the viral cell receptor is an attractive target for anti-viral strategies, and the identification of viral cell receptor is critical for better understanding and controlling viral disease. As a model system for viral entry and anti-retroviral approaches, avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV, including the A-J ten subgroups) has been studied intensively and many milestone discoveries have been achieved based on work with ASLV. Here, we used a DF1 cell line expressed viral receptor-binding protein to efficiently identify chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus ALV-J (avian leukosis virus subgroup J). Our data demonstrate that antibodies or siRNA to chANXA2 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chANXA2 permitted the entry of ALV-J into its non-permissible cells. Our findings have not only identified chANXA2 as a novel biomarker for anti-ALV-J, but also demonstrated that cell lines with the expression of viral receptor-binding protein could be as efficient tools for isolating functional receptors to identify novel anti-viral targets. PMID:25604889

Mei, Mei; Ye, Jianqiang; Qin, Aijian; Wang, Lin; Hu, Xuming; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

2015-01-01

363

Identification of novel viral receptors with cell line expressing viral receptor-binding protein.  

PubMed

The viral cell receptors and infection can be blocked by the expression of the viral receptor-binding protein. Thus, the viral cell receptor is an attractive target for anti-viral strategies, and the identification of viral cell receptor is critical for better understanding and controlling viral disease. As a model system for viral entry and anti-retroviral approaches, avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV, including the A-J ten subgroups) has been studied intensively and many milestone discoveries have been achieved based on work with ASLV. Here, we used a DF1 cell line expressed viral receptor-binding protein to efficiently identify chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus ALV-J (avian leukosis virus subgroup J). Our data demonstrate that antibodies or siRNA to chANXA2 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chANXA2 permitted the entry of ALV-J into its non-permissible cells. Our findings have not only identified chANXA2 as a novel biomarker for anti-ALV-J, but also demonstrated that cell lines with the expression of viral receptor-binding protein could be as efficient tools for isolating functional receptors to identify novel anti-viral targets. PMID:25604889

Mei, Mei; Ye, Jianqiang; Qin, Aijian; Wang, Lin; Hu, Xuming; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

2015-01-01

364

Viral tagging reveals discrete populations in Synechococcus viral genome sequence space.  

PubMed

Microbes and their viruses drive myriad processes across ecosystems ranging from oceans and soils to bioreactors and humans. Despite this importance, microbial diversity is only now being mapped at scales relevant to nature, while the viral diversity associated with any particular host remains little researched. Here we quantify host-associated viral diversity using viral-tagged metagenomics, which links viruses to specific host cells for high-throughput screening and sequencing. In a single experiment, we screened 10(7) Pacific Ocean viruses against a single strain of Synechococcus and found that naturally occurring cyanophage genome sequence space is statistically clustered into discrete populations. These population-based, host-linked viral ecological data suggest that, for this single host and seawater sample alone, there are at least 26 double-stranded DNA viral populations with estimated relative abundances ranging from 0.06 to 18.2%. These populations include previously cultivated cyanophage and new viral types missed by decades of isolate-based studies. Nucleotide identities of homologous genes mostly varied by less than 1% within populations, even in hypervariable genome regions, and by 42-71% between populations, which provides benchmarks for viral metagenomics and genome-based viral species definitions. Together these findings showcase a new approach to viral ecology that quantitatively links objectively defined environmental viral populations, and their genomes, to their hosts. PMID:25043051

Deng, Li; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Gregory, Ann C; Poulos, Bonnie T; Weitz, Joshua S; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

2014-09-11

365

Immunological memory to viral infection.  

PubMed

Immunological memory is defined by the ability of a host to remember a past encounter with a specific pathogen and to respond to it in an effective manner upon re-exposure. How long immunological memory can be maintained in the absence of re-infection continues to be a subject of great controversy. Recent studies on immunity following smallpox vaccination demonstrate that T-cell memory declines steadily with a half-life of 8-15 years, whereas antiviral antibody responses are maintained for up to 75 years without appreciable decline. By combining recent advances in quantitative immunology with historical accounts of protection against smallpox dating back to the time of Edward Jenner, we are gaining a better understanding of the duration and magnitude of immunological memory and how it relates to protective immunity. PMID:15245737

Slifka, Mark K

2004-08-01

366

Health Care–Acquired Viral Respiratory Diseases  

PubMed Central

Health care–associated viral respiratory infections, common among hospitalized children, also occur among adults and institutionalized persons and result in increased patient morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Approximately 20% of patients with health care–associated pneumonia have viral respiratory infections, with 70% of these infections caused by adenovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).1 These infections typically reflect the level of viral activity within the community.1,2 This article focuses on the epidemiology, transmission, and control of health care–associated RSV and influenza virus. PMID:21316002

Goins, William P.; Talbot, H. Keipp; Talbot, Thomas R.

2014-01-01

367

PIPS: Pathogenicity Island Prediction Software  

PubMed Central

The adaptability of pathogenic bacteria to hosts is influenced by the genomic plasticity of the bacteria, which can be increased by such mechanisms as horizontal gene transfer. Pathogenicity islands play a major role in this type of gene transfer because they are large, horizontally acquired regions that harbor clusters of virulence genes that mediate the adhesion, colonization, invasion, immune system evasion, and toxigenic properties of the acceptor organism. Currently, pathogenicity islands are mainly identified in silico based on various characteristic features: (1) deviations in codon usage, G+C content or dinucleotide frequency and (2) insertion sequences and/or tRNA genetic flanking regions together with transposase coding genes. Several computational techniques for identifying pathogenicity islands exist. However, most of these techniques are only directed at the detection of horizontally transferred genes and/or the absence of certain genomic regions of the pathogenic bacterium in closely related non-pathogenic species. Here, we present a novel software suite designed for the prediction of pathogenicity islands (pathogenicity island prediction software, or PIPS). In contrast to other existing tools, our approach is capable of utilizing multiple features for pathogenicity island detection in an integrative manner. We show that PIPS provides better accuracy than other available software packages. As an example, we used PIPS to study the veterinary pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, in which we identified seven putative pathogenicity islands. PMID:22355329

Soares, Siomar C.; Abreu, Vinícius A. C.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Cerdeira, Louise; Silva, Artur; Baumbach, Jan; Trost, Eva; Tauch, Andreas; Hirata, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

2012-01-01

368

Characterization of conserved viral leader RNA sequences that stimulate innate immunity through TLRs.  

PubMed

Viruses of the order Mononegavirales encompass life-threatening pathogens with single-stranded segmented or nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genomes. The RNA genomes are characterized by highly conserved sequences at the extreme untranslated 3' and 5' termini that are most important for virus infection and viral RNA synthetic processes. The 3' terminal genome regions of negative-strand viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus, Sendai virus, or influenza virus contain a high number of conserved U and G nucleotides, and synthetic oligoribonucleotides encoding such sequences stimulate sequence-dependent cytokine responses via TLR7 and TLR8. Immune cells responding to such sequences include NK cells, NK/T cells, plasmacytoid, and myeloid dendritic cells, as well as monocytes and B cells. Strong Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses are also induced upon in vivo application of oligoribonucleotides. It appears possible that the presence of highly conserved untranslated terminal regions in the viral genome fulfilling fundamental functions for the viral replication may enable the host to induce directed innate immune defense mechanisms, by allowing pathogen detection through essential RNA regions that the virus cannot readily mutate. PMID:18072859

Forsbach, Alexandra; Nemorin, Jean-Guy; Völp, Kirsten; Samulowitz, Ulrike; Montino, Carmen; Müller, Christian; Tluk, Sibylle; Hamm, Svetlana; Bauer, Stefan; Lipford, Grayson B; Vollmer, Jörg

2007-01-01

369

Analysis of viral microRNA expression by elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus 1.  

PubMed

Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus 1 (EEHV1), a member of the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily, has recently emerged as an important viral pathogen of Asian elephants that can cause a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic disease. EEHV1 does not replicate in culture and little is currently known about the molecular biology of this emerging pathogen, with the notable exception of its genomic DNA sequence. Here, we have used small RNA deep sequencing to determine whether EEHV1, like other human and murine betaherpesviruses, expresses viral microRNAs in infected tissues in vivo. Our data provide evidence supporting the existence of at least three novel viral microRNAs encoded by EEHV1 and one of these, miR-E3-5p, is shown to repress target mRNA expression. Moreover, miR-E3-5p expression was readily detectable in tissue samples derived from two infected elephants, including in whole blood. These data shed new light on the biology of EEHV1 and identify small RNAs that have the potential to be useful in the diagnosis of sub-clinical infections in captive Asian and African elephants. PMID:24725936

Furuse, Yuki; Dastjerdi, Akbar; Seilern-Moy, Katharina; Steinbach, Falko; Cullen, Bryan R

2014-04-01

370

Aptamer-Based Therapeutics: New Approaches to Combat Human Viral Diseases  

PubMed Central

Viruses replicate inside the cells of an organism and continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment. Many life-threatening diseases, such as AIDS, SARS, hepatitis and some cancers, are caused by viruses. Because viruses have small genome sizes and high mutability, there is currently a lack of and an urgent need for effective treatment for many viral pathogens. One approach that has recently received much attention is aptamer-based therapeutics. Aptamer technology has high target specificity and versatility, i.e., any viral proteins could potentially be targeted. Consequently, new aptamer-based therapeutics have the potential to lead a revolution in the development of anti-infective drugs. Additionally, aptamers can potentially bind any targets and any pathogen that is theoretically amenable to rapid targeting, making aptamers invaluable tools for treating a wide range of diseases. This review will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of viral therapies that use aptamers. The aptamer selection process will be described, followed by an explanation of the potential for treating virus infection by aptamers. Recent progress and prospective use of aptamers against a large variety of human viruses, such as HIV-1, HCV, HBV, SCoV, Rabies virus, HPV, HSV and influenza virus, with particular focus on clinical development of aptamers will also be described. Finally, we will discuss the challenges of advancing antiviral aptamer therapeutics and prospects for future success. PMID:24287493

Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

2013-01-01

371

A microfluidic system integrated with buried optical fibers for detection of Phalaenopsis orchid pathogens.  

PubMed

Orchids of the genus Phalaenopsis are some of the most economically important plants in Taiwan. Fast, accurate, and on-site detection of pathogens in these orchids is therefore of critical importance in order to prevent or suppress costly disease outbreaks. Traditional pathogen detection methods are time-consuming, require well-equipped laboratories with highly trained personnel, and cannot be conducted in situ. In this study, a microfluidic system integrated with buried optical fibers was developed to detect viral pathogens of Phalaenopsis spp. Briefly, virus-specific ribonucleic acid (RNA) purification was achieved by a pre-treatment incubation with magnetic beads, and reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was used subsequently to amplify the viral RNA. Positive RT-LAMP reactions resulted in the precipitation of magnesium pyrophosphate, which caused a change in turbidity that could be seen by the naked eye. A buried optical fiber-based detection module and a micro-stirring device were then integrated into the microfluidic chip to detect the RT-LAMP reaction product directly on the chip itself by measuring the change in the optical signals caused by the turbidity change associated with a positive amplification. The limit of detection for this system was found to be 25 fg, which is of similar sensitivity to existing, more laborious methods. Therefore, by using the integrated microfluidic system, a sensitive, rapid, accurate, and automatic diagnosis of viral pathogens in Phalaenopsis spp. orchids could be achieved within only 65 min. PMID:25168766

Lin, Chih-Lin; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chia-Hwa; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Jan, Fuh-Jyh; Lee, Gwo-Bin

2015-01-15

372

A Conserved Gammaherpesvirus Protein Kinase Targets Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 To Facilitate Viral Replication in Primary Macrophages  

PubMed Central

Gammaherpesviruses are ubiquitious pathogens that establish lifelong infection and are associated with several malignancies. All gammaherpesviruses encode a conserved protein kinase that facilitates viral replication and chronic infection and thus represents an attractive therapeutic target. In this study, we identify a novel function of gammaherpesvirus protein kinase as a regulator of class I histone deacetylases (HDAC). Mouse gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68)-encoded protein kinase orf36 interacted with HDAC1 and 2 and prevented association of these HDACs with the viral promoter driving expression of RTA, a critical immediate early transcriptional activator. Furthermore, the ability to interact with HDAC1 and 2 was not limited to the MHV68 orf36, as BGLF4, a related viral protein kinase encoded by Epstein-Barr virus, interacted with HDAC1 in vitro. Importantly, targeting of HDAC1 and 2 by orf36 was independent of the kinase's enzymatic activity. Additionally, orf36 expression, but not its enzymatic activity, induced changes in the global deacetylase activity observed in infected primary macrophages. Combined deficiency of HDAC1 and 2 rescued attenuated replication and viral DNA synthesis of the orf36 null MHV68 mutant, indicating that the regulation of HDAC1 and 2 by orf36 was relevant for viral replication. Understanding the mechanism by which orf36 facilitates viral replication, including through HDAC targeting, will facilitate the development of improved therapeutics against gammaherpesvirus kinases. PMID:23616648

Mounce, Bryan C.; Mboko, Wadzanai P.; Bigley, Tarin M.; Terhune, Scott S.

2013-01-01

373

Evaluation of viral inactivation of pseudorabies virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus and porcine parvovirus in pancreatin of porcine origin.  

PubMed

Pancreatin is a substance containing enzymes, principally amylase, lipase, and protease. It is obtained from bovine or porcine pancreas and used in the treatment of pancreatic endocrine insufficiency in humans. Regulations and safety concerns mandate viral clearance (virus removal or inactivation) in biopharmaceuticals such as pancreatin. A virus validation study was performed to evaluate virus clearance achieved in the final step of drying under vacuum by testing a panel of four animal viruses: Pseudorabies virus (PRV), Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Porcine parvovirus (PPV). Because of the product's virucidal effect and high cytotoxicity, the starting material was diluted to a ratio of 0.67 g of dried pancreatin resuspended in 13.5 mL of cell culture medium followed by a 50-fold dilution in cell culture medium before spiking. After heating at 60±1°C for 5 h, the samples were diluted about 5-fold in cell culture medium and titered by the plaque assay method. The virus reduction factor ranged from 5.59 (for PPV) to 7.07 (for EMCV) and no viral plaque was observed, indicating that the process step was effective in the reduction and removal of virus contamination. Though no virus contamination events in pancreatin have been reported to date, evaluation of the production process for its ability to inactivate and/or remove virus contamination, particularly from zoonotic viral agents such as hepatitis E virus and Norovirus considered emerging pathogens, is necessary to ensure the viral safety of animal-derived biopharmaceuticals. PMID:25110118

Caruso, C; Gobbi, E; Biosa, T; Andra', M; Cavallazzi, U; Masoero, L

2014-11-01

374

A Host-Based RT-PCR Gene Expression Signature to Identify Acute Respiratory Viral Infection  

PubMed Central

Improved ways to diagnose acute respiratory viral infections could decrease inappropriate antibacterial use and serve as a vital triage mechanism in the event of a potential viral pandemic. Measurement of the host response to infection is an alternative to pathogen-based diagnostic testing and may improve diagnostic accuracy. We have developed a host-based assay with a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) platform for classifying respiratory viral infection. We developed the assay using two cohorts experimentally infected with influenza A H3N2/Wisconsin or influenza A H1N1/Brisbane, and validated the assay in a sample of adults presenting to the emergency department with fever (n = 102) and in healthy volunteers (n = 41). Peripheral blood RNA samples were obtained from individuals who underwent experimental viral challenge or who presented to the emergency department and had microbiologically proven viral respiratory infection or systemic bacterial infection. The selected gene set on the RT-PCR TLDA assay classified participants with experimentally induced influenza H3N2 and H1N1 infection with 100 and 87% accuracy, respectively. We validated this host gene expression signature in a cohort of 102 individuals arriving at the emergency department. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR test was 89% [95% confidence interval (CI), 72 to 98%], and the specificity was 94% (95% CI, 86 to 99%). These results show that RT-PCR–based detection of a host gene expression signature can classify individuals with respiratory viral infection and sets the stage for prospective evaluation of this diagnostic approach in a clinical setting. PMID:24048524

Zaas, Aimee K.; Burke, Thomas; Chen, Minhua; McClain, Micah; Nicholson, Bradly; Veldman, Timothy; Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Fowler, Vance; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Voora, Deepak; Lucas, Joseph; Hero, Alfred O.; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

2014-01-01

375

Do viral proteins possess unique biophysical features?  

PubMed

Natural selection shapes the sequence, structure and biophysical properties of proteins to fit their environment. We hypothesize that highly thermostable proteins and viral proteins represent two opposing adaptation strategies. Thermostable proteins are highly compact and possess well-packed hydrophobic cores and intensely charged surfaces. By contrast, viral proteins, and RNA viral proteins in particular, display a high occurrence of disordered segments and loosely packed cores. These features might endow viral proteins with increased structural flexibility and effective ways to interact with the components of the host. They could also be related to high adaptability levels and mutation rates observed in viruses, thus, representing a unique strategy for buffering the deleterious effects of mutations, such that those that have little (interactions), have little to lose. PMID:19062293

Tokuriki, Nobuhiko; Oldfield, Christopher J; Uversky, Vladimir N; Berezovsky, Igor N; Tawfik, Dan S

2009-02-01

376

[Pediatrics. New treatment options for viral bronchiolitis].  

PubMed

The combination of nebulized epinephrine and high dose dexamethasone, or nebulized hypertonic saline, are promising new therapeutic strategies for viral bronchiolitis in the young infant. However, further research is needed before a general recommendation can be given. PMID:23409652

Rochat, I; Hafen, G

2013-01-16

377

The Contribution of Viral Genotype to Plasma Viral Set-Point in HIV Infection  

PubMed Central

Disease progression in HIV-infected individuals varies greatly, and while the environmental and host factors influencing this variation have been widely investigated, the viral contribution to variation in set-point viral load, a predictor of disease progression, is less clear. Previous studies, using transmission-pairs and analysis of phylogenetic signal in small numbers of individuals, have produced a wide range of viral genetic effect estimates. Here we present a novel application of a population-scale method based in quantitative genetics to estimate the viral genetic effect on set-point viral load in the UK subtype B HIV-1 epidemic, based on a very large data set. Analyzing the initial viral load and associated pol sequence, both taken before anti-retroviral therapy, of 8,483 patients, we estimate the proportion of variance in viral load explained by viral genetic effects to be 5.7% (CI 2.8–8.6%). We also estimated the change in viral load over time due to selection on the virus and environmental effects to be a decline of 0.05 log10 copies/mL/year, in contrast to recent studies which suggested a reported small increase in viral load over the last 20 years might be due to evolutionary changes in the virus. Our results suggest that in the UK epidemic, subtype B has a small but significant viral genetic effect on viral load. By allowing the analysis of large sample sizes, we expect our approach to be applicable to the estimation of the genetic contribution to traits in many organisms. PMID:24789308

Hodcroft, Emma; Hadfield, Jarrod D.; Fearnhill, Esther; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pillay, Deenan; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.

2014-01-01

378

The contribution of viral genotype to plasma viral set-point in HIV infection.  

PubMed

Disease progression in HIV-infected individuals varies greatly, and while the environmental and host factors influencing this variation have been widely investigated, the viral contribution to variation in set-point viral load, a predictor of disease progression, is less clear. Previous studies, using transmission-pairs and analysis of phylogenetic signal in small numbers of individuals, have produced a wide range of viral genetic effect estimates. Here we present a novel application of a population-scale method based in quantitative genetics to estimate the viral genetic effect on set-point viral load in the UK subtype B HIV-1 epidemic, based on a very large data set. Analyzing the initial viral load and associated pol sequence, both taken before anti-retroviral therapy, of 8,483 patients, we estimate the proportion of variance in viral load explained by viral genetic effects to be 5.7% (CI 2.8-8.6%). We also estimated the change in viral load over time due to selection on the virus and environmental effects to be a decline of 0.05 log10 copies/mL/year, in contrast to recent studies which suggested a reported small increase in viral load over the last 20 years might be due to evolutionary changes in the virus. Our results suggest that in the UK epidemic, subtype B has a small but significant viral genetic effect on viral load. By allowing the analysis of large sample sizes, we expect our approach to be applicable to the estimation of the genetic contribution to traits in many organisms. PMID:24789308

Hodcroft, Emma; Hadfield, Jarrod D; Fearnhill, Esther; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pillay, Deenan; Leigh Brown, Andrew J

2014-05-01

379

A Mutation in the Ebola Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Restricts Viral Entry in a Host Species-and Cell-Type-Specific Manner  

E-print Network

A Mutation in the Ebola Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Restricts Viral Entry in a Host Species, Bronx, New York, USAb Zaire Ebola virus (EBOV) is a zoonotic pathogen that causes severe hemorrhagic-linked im- munosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that while the F88A mutation impairs GP binding to human

Chandran, Kartik

380

Mutations induced in the NS5B gene of bovine viral diarrhea virus by antiviral treatment convey resistance to the compound  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a widespread bovine pathogen for which there is no specific therapeutic agent. A previous study using 2-(2-benzimidazolyl)-5-[4-(2-imidazolino)phenyl]furan dihydrochloride (DB772) to treat calves persistently infected with BVDV resulted in a decrease in the vira...

381

Replication of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in chickens is affected by the PB1, PB2 and NP viral genes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Devastating losses to the poultry industry can result from pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIVs) created by natural reassortment events. The role of individual viral genes on the pathogenesis of AIVs in chickens is unclear. Reverse genetics was used to create single-gene reassortants to determ...

382

[Bioterrorism and pathogenic microorganisms].  

PubMed

In recent years the use of pathogenic microorganisms in acts of bioterrorism has been the subject of major concern in many countries. This paper presents a possible application of viruses and bacteria for warfare and terrorist purposes, as well as a laboratory diagnosis to identify those agents. The viruses of smallpox (orthopoxvirus), of hemorrhagic fever and those belonging to filovirus have been highlighted, inter alia, as agents of human infection with bioterrorist intent. Among the bacteria, the emphasis has been on anthrax (Bacillus anthracis), the plague (Yersinia pestis), botulism (Clostridium botulinum) and tularemia (Francisella tularensis), not to mention ricin (Ricinus communis), as one of the Group B agents. PMID:24473660

Schatzmayr, Hermann G; Barth, Ortrud Monika

2013-10-01

383

Host behavior alters spiny lobster-viral disease dynamics: a simulation study.  

PubMed

Social behavior confers numerous benefits to animals but also risks, among them an increase in the spread of pathogenic diseases. We examined the trade-off between risk of predation and disease transmission under different scenarios of host spatial structure and disease avoidance behavior using a spatially explicit, individual-based model of the host pathogen interaction between juvenile Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) and Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1). Spiny lobsters are normally social but modify their behavior to avoid diseased conspecifics, a potentially effective means of reducing transmission but one rarely observed in the wild. We found that without lobster avoidance of diseased conspecifics, viral outbreaks grew in intensity and duration in simulations until the virus was maintained continuously at unrealistically high levels. However, when we invoked disease avoidance at empirically observed levels, the intensity and duration of outbreaks was reduced and the disease extirpated within five years. Increased lobster (host) spatial aggregation mimicking that which occurs when sponge shelters for lobsters are diminished by harmful algal blooms, did not significantly increase PaV1 transmission or persistence in lobster populations. On the contrary, behavioral aversion of diseased conspecifics effectively reduced viral prevalence, even when shelters were limited, which reduced shelter availability for all lobsters but increased predation, especially of infected lobsters. Therefore, avoidance of diseased conspecifics selects against transmission by contact, promotes alternative modes of transmission, and results in a more resilient host-pathogen system. PMID:25230484

Dolan, Thomas W; Butler, Mark J; Shields, Jeffrey D

2014-08-01

384

A Comprehensive Collection of Systems Biology Data Characterizing the Host Response to Viral Infection  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

Aevermann, Brian; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese RW; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale L.; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

2014-10-14

385

Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont.  

PubMed

Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

Weynberg, Karen D; Wood-Charlson, Elisha M; Suttle, Curtis A; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

2014-01-01

386

Genomic analysis of uncultured marine viral communities  

PubMed Central

Viruses are the most common biological entities in the oceans by an order of magnitude. However, very little is known about their diversity. Here we report a genomic analysis of two uncultured marine viral communities. Over 65% of the sequences were not significantly similar to previously reported sequences, suggesting that much of the diversity is previously uncharacterized. The most common significant hits among the known sequences were to viruses. The viral hits included sequences from all of the major families of dsDNA tailed phages, as well as some algal viruses. Several independent mathematical models based on the observed number of contigs predicted that the most abundant viral genome comprised 2–3% of the total population in both communities, which was estimated to contain between 374 and 7,114 viral types. Overall, diversity of the viral communities was extremely high. The results also showed that it would be possible to sequence the entire genome of an uncultured marine viral community. PMID:12384570

Breitbart, Mya; Salamon, Peter; Andresen, Bjarne; Mahaffy, Joseph M.; Segall, Anca M.; Mead, David; Azam, Farooq; Rohwer, Forest

2002-01-01

387

Genomic analysis of uncultured marine viral communities.  

PubMed

Viruses are the most common biological entities in the oceans by an order of magnitude. However, very little is known about their diversity. Here we report a genomic analysis of two uncultured marine viral communities. Over 65% of the sequences were not significantly similar to previously reported sequences, suggesting that much of the diversity is previously uncharacterized. The most common significant hits among the known sequences were to viruses. The viral hits included sequences from all of the major families of dsDNA tailed phages, as well as some algal viruses. Several independent mathematical models based on the observed number of contigs predicted that the most abundant viral genome comprised 2-3% of the total population in both communities, which was estimated to contain between 374 and 7,114 viral types. Overall, diversity of the viral communities was extremely high. The results also showed that it would be possible to sequence the entire genome of an uncultured marine viral community. PMID:12384570

Breitbart, Mya; Salamon, Peter; Andresen, Bjarne; Mahaffy, Joseph M; Segall, Anca M; Mead, David; Azam, Farooq; Rohwer, Forest

2002-10-29

388

Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

Zhou, C; Smith, J

2007-10-22

389

Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont  

PubMed Central

Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

Wood-Charlson, Elisha M.; Suttle, Curtis A.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

2014-01-01

390

Noninvasive visualization of respiratory viral infection using bioorthogonal conjugated near-infrared-emitting quantum dots.  

PubMed

Highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses are emerging pandemic threats in human beings. Monitoring the in vivo dynamics of avian influenza viruses is extremely important for understanding viral pathogenesis and developing antiviral drugs. Although a number of technologies have been applied for tracking viral infection in vivo, most of them are laborious with unsatisfactory detection sensitivity. Herein we labeled avian influenza H5N1 pseudotype virus (H5N1p) with near-infrared (NIR)-emitting QDs by bioorthogonal chemistry. The conjugation of QDs onto H5N1p was highly efficient with superior stability both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, QD-labeled H5N1p (QD-H5N1p) demonstrated bright and sustained fluorescent signals in mouse lung tissues, allowing us to visualize respiratory viral infection in a noninvasive and real-time manner. The fluorescence signals of QD-H5N1p in lung were correlated with the severity of virus infection and significantly attenuated by antiviral agents, such as oseltamivir carboxylate and mouse antiserum against H5N1p. The biodistribution of QD-H5N1p in lungs and other organs could be easily quantified by measuring fluorescent signals and cadmium concentration of virus-conjugated QDs in tissues. Hence, virus labeling with NIR QDs provides a simple, reliable, and quantitative strategy for tracking respiratory viral infection and for antiviral drug screening. PMID:24797178

Pan, Hong; Zhang, Pengfei; Gao, Duyang; Zhang, Yijuan; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Wang, Ce; Wang, Hanzhong; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

2014-06-24

391

The toll-dorsal pathway is required for resistance to viral oral infection in Drosophila.  

PubMed

Pathogen entry route can have a strong impact on the result of microbial infections in different hosts, including insects. Drosophila melanogaster has been a successful model system to study the immune response to systemic viral infection. Here we investigate the role of the Toll pathway in resistance to oral viral infection in D. melanogaster. We show that several Toll pathway components, including Spätzle, Toll, Pelle and the NF-kB-like transcription factor Dorsal, are required to resist oral infection with Drosophila C virus. Furthermore, in the fat body Dorsal is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and a Toll pathway target gene reporter is upregulated in response to Drosophila C Virus infection. This pathway also mediates resistance to several other RNA viruses (Cricket paralysis virus, Flock House virus, and Nora virus). Compared with control, viral titres are highly increased in Toll pathway mutants. The role of the Toll pathway in resistance to viruses in D. melanogaster is restricted to oral infection since we do not observe a phenotype associated with systemic infection. We also show that Wolbachia and other Drosophila-associated microbiota do not interact with the Toll pathway-mediated resistance to oral infection. We therefore identify the Toll pathway as a new general inducible pathway that mediates strong resistance to viruses with a route-specific role. These results contribute to a better understanding of viral oral infection resistance in insects, which is particularly relevant in the context of transmission of arboviruses by insect vectors. PMID:25473839

Ferreira, Alvaro Gil; Naylor, Huw; Esteves, Sara Santana; Pais, Inês Silva; Martins, Nelson Eduardo; Teixeira, Luis

2014-12-01

392

Cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV): emerging pestiviruses doomed to extinction.  

PubMed

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a Flaviviridae pestivirus, is arguably one of the most widespread cattle pathogens worldwide. Each of its two genotypes has two biotypes, non-cytopathic (ncp) and cytopathic (cp). Only the ncp biotype of BVDV may establish persistent infection in the fetus when infecting a dam early in gestation, a time point which predates maturity of the adaptive immune system. Such fetuses may develop and be born healthy but remain infected for life. Due to this early initiation of fetal infection and to the expression of interferon antagonistic proteins, persistently infected (PI) animals remain immunotolerant to the infecting viral strain. Although only accounting for some 1% of all animals in regions where BVDV is endemic, PI animals ensure the viral persistence in the host population. These animals may, however, develop the fatal mucosal disease, which is characterized by widespread lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. Cp BVD virus, in addition to the persisting ncp biotype, can be isolated from such animals. The cp viruses are characterized by unrestrained genome replication, and their emergence from the persisting ncp ones is due to mutations that are unique in each virus analyzed. They include recombinations with host cell mRNA, gene translocations and duplications, and point mutations. Cytopathic BVD viruses fail to establish chains of infection and are unable to cause persistent infection. Hence, these viruses illustrate a case of "viral emergence to extinction" - irrelevant for BVDV evolution, but fatal for the PI host. PMID:20197026

Peterhans, Ernst; Bachofen, Claudia; Stalder, Hanspeter; Schweizer, Matthias

2010-01-01

393

The Toll-Dorsal Pathway Is Required for Resistance to Viral Oral Infection in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Pathogen entry route can have a strong impact on the result of microbial infections in different hosts, including insects. Drosophila melanogaster has been a successful model system to study the immune response to systemic viral infection. Here we investigate the role of the Toll pathway in resistance to oral viral infection in D. melanogaster. We show that several Toll pathway components, including Spätzle, Toll, Pelle and the NF-kB-like transcription factor Dorsal, are required to resist oral infection with Drosophila C virus. Furthermore, in the fat body Dorsal is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and a Toll pathway target gene reporter is upregulated in response to Drosophila C Virus infection. This pathway also mediates resistance to several other RNA viruses (Cricket paralysis virus, Flock House virus, and Nora virus). Compared with control, viral titres are highly increased in Toll pathway mutants. The role of the Toll pathway in resistance to viruses in D. melanogaster is restricted to oral infection since we do not observe a phenotype associated with systemic infection. We also show that Wolbachia and other Drosophila-associated microbiota do not interact with the Toll pathway-mediated resistance to oral infection. We therefore identify the Toll pathway as a new general inducible pathway that mediates strong resistance to viruses with a route-specific role. These results contribute to a better understanding of viral oral infection resistance in insects, which is particularly relevant in the context of transmission of arboviruses by insect vectors. PMID:25473839

Ferreira, Álvaro Gil; Naylor, Huw; Esteves, Sara Santana; Pais, Inês Silva; Martins, Nelson Eduardo; Teixeira, Luis

2014-01-01

394

METAGENOMICS AND METATRANSCRIPTOMICS: WINDOWS ON CF-ASSOCIATED VIRAL AND MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES  

PubMed Central

Background Samples collected from CF patient airways often contain large amounts of host-derived nucleic acids that interfere with recovery and purification of microbial and viral nucleic acids. This study describes metagenomic and metatranscriptomic methods that address these issues. Methods Microbial and viral metagenomes, and microbial metatranscriptomes, were successfully prepared from sputum samples from five adult CF patients. Results Contaminating host DNA was dramatically reduced in the metagenomes. Each CF patient presented a unique microbiome; in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa was replaced by other opportunistic bacteria. Even though the taxonomic composition of the microbiomes are very different, the metabolic potentials encoded by the community are very similar. The viral communities were dominated by phages that infect major CF pathogens. The metatranscriptomes reveal differential expression of encoded metabolic potential with changing health status. Conclusions Microbial and viral metagenomics combined with microbial transcriptomics characterize the dynamic polymicrobial communities found in CF airways, revealing both the taxa present and their current metabolic activities. These approaches can facilitate the development of individualized treatment plans and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:22951208

Lim, Yan Wei; Schmieder, Robert; Haynes, Matthew; Willner, Dana; Furlan, Mike; Youle, Merry; Abbott, Katelynn; Edwards, Robert; Evangelista, Jose; Conrad, Douglas; Rohwer, Forest

2012-01-01

395

Avian influenza H5N1 viral and bird migration networks in Asia  

PubMed Central

The spatial spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and its long-term persistence in Asia have resulted in avian influenza panzootics and enormous economic losses in the poultry sector. However, an understanding of the regional long-distance transmission and seasonal patterns of the virus is still lacking. In this study, we present a phylogeographic approach to reconstruct the viral migration network. We show that within each wild fowl migratory flyway, the timing of H5N1 outbreaks and viral migrations are closely associated, but little viral transmission was observed between the flyways. The bird migration network is shown to better reflect the observed viral gene sequence data than other networks and contributes to seasonal H5N1 epidemics in local regions and its large-scale transmission along flyways. These findings have potentially far-reaching consequences, improving our understanding of how bird migration drives the periodic reemergence of H5N1 in Asia. PMID:25535385

Tian, Huaiyu; Zhou, Sen; Dong, Lu; Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Cui, Yujun; Wu, Yarong; Cazelles, Bernard; Huang, Shanqian; Yang, Ruifu; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Xu, Bing

2015-01-01

396

Antiviral and metabolic gene expression responses to viral infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).  

PubMed

Salmonid alphavirus (SAV), the aetiological agent of pancreas disease, is recognized as a serious pathogen of farmed Atlantic salmon. This disease results in loss of weight followed by poor growth of surviving fish, as such it is viewed as a wasting disease. SAV and other chronic disease causing viruses affect the heart and skeletal muscle tissues, at present the mechanisms by which pathology occurs is unknown. The relationship between antiviral activity and other physiological parameters especially in skeletal muscle are currently not examined in depth in fish. An experimental SAV (isotype 3) infection was carried out using a cohabitation approach, from which samples were collected at 0, 4, 8 & 12 week post challenge. Maximum viral load in the muscle tissue was 4 weeks post infection which was reduced at 8 weeks and undetectable by 12 weeks. Histopathology score peaked at 4 weeks post infection in pancreas and heart whereas there was maximum damage in skeletal muscle at 8 weeks. The peak expression of antiviral immune genes coincided with the viral load. Several genes involved in protein degradation were increased following infection including atrogin-1 and cathepsin D, at 4 weeks post challenge suggesting reallocation of amino acid reserves. Taken together, these observations increase our understanding of salmon poor growth during viral infection, and will serve as a basis to develop strategies to manage this viral wasting disease. PMID:25462555

Heidari, Zeynab; Tinsley, John; Bickerdike, Ralph; McLoughlin, Marian F; Zou, Jun; Martin, Samuel A M

2015-02-01

397

Avian influenza H5N1 viral and bird migration networks in Asia.  

PubMed

The spatial spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and its long-term persistence in Asia have resulted in avian influenza panzootics and enormous economic losses in the poultry sector. However, an understanding of the regional long-distance transmission and seasonal patterns of the virus is still lacking. In this study, we present a phylogeographic approach to reconstruct the viral migration network. We show that within each wild fowl migratory flyway, the timing of H5N1 outbreaks and viral migrations are closely associated, but little viral transmission was observed between the flyways. The bird migration network is shown to better reflect the observed viral gene sequence data than other networks and contributes to seasonal H5N1 epidemics in local regions and its large-scale transmission along flyways. These findings have potentially far-reaching consequences, improving our understanding of how bird migration drives the periodic reemergence of H5N1 in Asia. PMID:25535385

Tian, Huaiyu; Zhou, Sen; Dong, Lu; Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Cui, Yujun; Wu, Yarong; Cazelles, Bernard; Huang, Shanqian; Yang, Ruifu; Grenfell, Bryan T; Xu, Bing

2015-01-01

398

QuRe: software for viral quasispecies reconstruction from next-generation sequencing data  

PubMed Central

Summary: Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an ideal framework for the characterization of highly variable pathogens, with a deep resolution able to capture minority variants. However, the reconstruction of all variants of a viral population infecting a host is a challenging task for genome regions larger than the average NGS read length. QuRe is a program for viral quasispecies reconstruction, specifically developed to analyze long read (>100 bp) NGS data. The software performs alignments of sequence fragments against a reference genome, finds an optimal division of the genome into sliding windows based on coverage and diversity and attempts to reconstruct all the individual sequences of the viral quasispecies—along with their prevalence—using a heuristic algorithm, which matches multinomial distributions of distinct viral variants overlapping across the genome division. QuRe comes with a built-in Poisson error correction method and a post-reconstruction probabilistic clustering, both parameterized on given error rates in homopolymeric and non-homopolymeric regions. Availability: QuRe is platform-independent, multi-threaded software implemented in Java. It is distributed under the GNU General Public License, available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/qure/. Contact: ahnven@yahoo.it; ahnven@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22088846

Prosperi, Mattia C. F.; Salemi, Marco

2012-01-01

399

Role of gut pathogens in development of irritable bowel syndrome.  

PubMed

Acute infectious gastroenteritis is one of the most commonly identifiable risk factors for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens have been found to be associated with the development of IBS and other functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Epidemiological studies have identified demographic and acute enteritis-related risk factors for the development of post-infectious-IBS (PI-IBS). Immune dysregulation, alterations in barrier function, serotonergic and mast cell activation have been identified as potential pathophysiological mechanisms. Additionally, variations in host genes involved in barrier function, antigen presentation and cytokine response have been associated with PI-IBS development. However, it is unknown whether specific pathogens have unique effects on long-term alterations in gut physiology or different pathogens converge to cause common alterations resulting in similar phenotype. The role of microbial virulence and pathogenicity factors in development of PI-IBS is also largely unknown. Additionally, alterations in host gut sensation, motility, secretion, and barrier function in PI-IBS need to be elucidated. Finally, both GI infections and antibiotics used to treat these infections can cause long-term alterations in host commensal microbiota. It is plausible that alteration in the commensal microbiome persists in a subset of patients predisposing them to develop PI-IBS. PMID:24604037

Grover, Madhusudan

2014-01-01

400

Comparison of fecal indicators with pathogenic bacteria and rotavirus in groundwater  

PubMed Central

Groundwater is routinely analyzed for fecal indicators but direct comparisons of fecal indicators to the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens are rare. This study was conducted in rural Bangladesh where the human population density is high, sanitation is poor, and groundwater pumped from shallow tubewells is often contaminated with fecal bacteria. Five indicator microorganisms (E. coli, total coliform, F+RNA coliphage, Bacteroides and human-associated Bacteroides) and various environmental parameters were compared to the direct detection of waterborne pathogens by quantitative PCR in groundwater pumped from 50 tubewells. Rotavirus was detected in groundwater filtrate from the largest proportion of tubewells (40%), followed by Shigella (10%), Vibrio (10%), and pathogenic E. coli (8%). Spearman rank correlations and sensitivity-specificity calculations indicate that some, but not all, combinations of indicators and environmental parameters can predict the presence of pathogens. Culture-dependent fecal indicator bacteria measured on a single date did not predict total bacterial pathogens, but annually averaged monthly measurements of culturable E. coli did improve prediction for total bacterial pathogens. A qPCR-based E. coli assay was the best indicator for the bacterial pathogens. F+RNA coliphage were neither correlated nor sufficiently sensitive towards rotavirus, but were predictive of bacterial pathogens. Since groundwater cannot be excluded as a significant source of diarrheal disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries with similar characteristics, the need to develop more effective methods for screening tubewells with respect to microbial contamination is necessary. PMID:22705866

Ferguson, Andrew S.; Layton, Alice C.; Mailloux, Brian J; Culligan, Patricia J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Sayler, Gary S.; Feighery, John; McKay, Larry; Knappett, Peter S.K.; Alexandrova, Ekaterina; Arbit, Talia; Emch, Michael; Escamilla, Veronica; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Streatfield, P. Kim; Yunus, Mohammad; van Geen, Alexander

2012-01-01

401

Comparison of fecal indicators with pathogenic bacteria and rotavirus in groundwater.  

PubMed

Groundwater is routinely analyzed for fecal indicators but direct comparisons of fecal indicators to the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens are rare. This study was conducted in rural Bangladesh where the human population density is high, sanitation is poor, and groundwater pumped from shallow tubewells is often contaminated with fecal bacteria. Five indicator microorganisms (E. coli, total coliform, F+RNA coliphage, Bacteroides and human-associated Bacteroides) and various environmental parameters were compared to the direct detection of waterborne pathogens by quantitative PCR in groundwater pumped from 50 tubewells. Rotavirus was detected in groundwater filtrate from the largest proportion of tubewells (40%), followed by Shigella (10%), Vibrio (10%), and pathogenic E. coli (8%). Spearman rank correlations and sensitivity-specificity calculations indicate that some, but not all, combinations of indicators and environmental parameters can predict the presence of pathogens. Culture-dependent fecal indicator bacteria measured on a single date did not predict total bacterial pathogens, but annually averaged monthly measurements of culturable E. coli did improve prediction for total bacterial pathogens. A qPCR-based E. coli assay was the best indicator for the bacterial pathogens. F+RNA coliphage were neither correlated nor sufficiently sensitive towards rotavirus, but were predictive of bacterial pathogens. Since groundwater cannot be excluded as a significant source of diarrheal disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries with similar characteristics, the need to develop more effective methods for screening tubewells with respect to microbial contamination is necessary. PMID:22705866

Ferguson, Andrew S; Layton, Alice C; Mailloux, Brian J; Culligan, Patricia J; Williams, Daniel E; Smartt, Abby E; Sayler, Gary S; Feighery, John; McKay, Larry D; Knappett, Peter S K; Alexandrova, Ekaterina; Arbit, Talia; Emch, Michael; Escamilla, Veronica; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md Jahangir; Streatfield, P Kim; Yunus, Mohammad; van Geen, Alexander

2012-08-01

402

Microarray analysis following infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in naive and vaccinated SPF chickens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Avian influenza (AI) is a viral disease of poultry that remains a constant threat to commercial poultry throughout the world. Within the last few years, outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 have originated in Southeast Asia and spread to several European, Middle Eastern, and A...

403

Viral Studies in Burkitt Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, composed of a monomorphic population of medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL with different frequencies depending on the clinical variant. Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), infects a wide range of normal cells, having a well-established role in the pathogenesis of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) and MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. In secondary immunodeficiencies, such as HIV-1 infection and organ transplantation, HHV-8 is considered an opportunistic pathogen linked to the development of lymphomas in patients with AIDS and HIV+ patients. We studied the association of EBV and HHV-8 by immunohistochemical analysis, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction in a large number of well-characterized BLs. EBV was present in 45.0% of all BL cases with higher incidence in the pediatric group; most cases were EBV type A. We found no association of BL with HHV-8 in EBV+ BL or in EBV–cases, including the HIV+ BL group. PMID:18628086

Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

2009-01-01

404

Identification and origin of plant pathogenic microorganisms in recirculating nutrient solutions.  

PubMed

Avoidance of root-infecting microorganisms was originally considered one of the advantages of cultivation of crops in a soilless, recirculating nutrient solution. However, to date, four viral, three bacterial and 21 fungal pathogens have been identified as causal agents of root disease in hydroponically-grown crops. Root-infecting fungi, particularly those which produce a motile stage known as a zoospore, have been the primary pathogens associated with extensive crop losses. Documented sources of these root pathogens in hydroponic systems include peat, surface water such as rivers and streams, and insects. The severity of disease caused by these introduced root pathogens is primarily governed by the genetic susceptibility of each crop and the temperature of the recirculating nutrient solution. PMID:11540205

Stanghellini, M E; Rasmussen, S L

1994-11-01

405

The Role of Viral and Host MicroRNAs in the Aujeszky’s Disease Virus during the Infection Process  

PubMed Central

Porcine production is a primary market in the world economy. Controlling swine diseases in the farm is essential in order to achieve the sector necessities. Aujeszky’s disease is a viral condition affecting pigs and is endemic in many countries of the world, causing important economic losses in the swine industry. microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs which modulates gene expression in animals, plants and viruses. With the aim of understanding miRNA roles during the Aujeszky’s disease virus [ADV] (also known as suid herpesvirus type 1 [SuHV-1]) infection, the expression profiles of host and viral miRNAs were determined through deep sequencing in SuHV-1 infected porcine cell line (PK-15) and in an animal experimental SuHV-1 infection with virulent (NIA-3) and attenuated (Begonia) strains. In the in vivo approach miR-206, miR-133a, miR-133b and miR-378 presented differential expression between virus strains infection. In the in vitro approach, most miRNAs were down-regulated in infected groups. miR-92a and miR-92b-3p were up-regulated in Begonia infected samples. Functional analysis of all this over expressed miRNAs during the infection revealed their association in pathways related to viral infection processes and immune response. Furthermore, 8 viral miRNAs were detected by stem loop RT-qPCR in both in vitro and in vivo approaches, presenting a gene regulatory network affecting 59 viral genes. Most described viral miRNAs were related to Large Latency Transcript (LLT) and to viral transcription activators EP0 and IE180, and also to regulatory genes regarding their important roles in the host – pathogen interaction during viral infection. PMID:24475202

Timoneda, Oriol; Núñez-Hernández, Fernando; Balcells, Ingrid; Muñoz, Marta; Castelló, Anna; Vera, Gonzalo; Pérez, Lester J.; Egea, Raquel; Mir, Gisela; Córdoba, Sarai; Rosell, Rosa; Segalés, Joaquim; Tomàs, Anna; Sánchez, Armand; Núñez, José I.

2014-01-01

406

Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence  

PubMed Central

Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

2013-01-01

407

Immunodominant viral peptides as determinants of cross-reactivity in the immune system--Can we develop wide spectrum viral vaccines?  

PubMed

When we look back to Edward Jenner vaccination of a young man in 1796, we cannot help thinking that he was both lucky and crazy. Crazy because he decided to test in a human being a hypothesis based mainly in the traditional belief that people who had acquired cowpox from the udders of a cow were thereafter resistant to smallpox, a quite devastating disease, and lucky because (even considering that he did not know this at that time) he succeeded to induce protection against a pathogen through the induction of an immune response directed against a different agent. Not only was he able to protect the young man but he took the first step towards the development of a vast new field, vaccination. It is acceptable to say that Jenner was lucky because he succeeded in promoting protection against smallpox using a cowpox virus and this induction of protection in a cross-reactive way is believed to be quite rare. Nevertheless, more and more examples of cross-reactive immune responses are being described and we are beginning to admit that cross-reactivity is far more common and important than we used to think. Here we review cross-reactivity in the immune system and the plasticity of T cell recognition. Based on the existence of T cell receptor promiscuous recognition and cross-recognition of conserved viral immunodominant epitopes, we propose two approaches to develop wide spectrum viral vaccines. The first one is based on the identification, characterization, and cloning of immunodominant viral epitopes able to stimulate responses against different viruses. The produced peptides could then be purified and serve as a basis for vaccine therapies. A second strategy is based on the identification of conserved patterns in immunodominant viral peptides and the production of synthetic peptides containing the amino acid residues necessary for MHC anchoring and TCR contact. Although we are still far from a complete knowledge of the cross-reactivity phenomenon in the immune system, the analysis of immunodominant viral epitopes and the identification of particular "viral patterns" seems to be important steps towards the development of wide spectrum viral vaccines. PMID:16051445

Vieira, G F; Chies, J A B

2005-01-01

408

Development and Application of Quantitative Detection Method for Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Genogroup IVa  

PubMed Central

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a problematic pathogen in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) aquaculture farms in Korea. Thus, it is necessary to develop a rapid and accurate diagnostic method to detect this virus. We developed a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method based on the nucleocapsid (N) gene sequence of Korean VHSV isolate (Genogroup IVa). The slope and R2 values of the primer set developed in this study were ?0.2928 (96% efficiency) and 0.9979, respectively. Its comparison with viral infectivity calculated by traditional quantifying method (TCID50) showed a similar pattern of kinetic changes in vitro and in vivo. The qRT-PCR method reduced detection time compared to that of TCID50, making it a very useful tool for VHSV diagnosis. PMID:24859343

Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Kim, Si-Woo; Han, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Myoung Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

2014-01-01

409

Model of influenza A virus infection: dynamics of viral antagonism and innate immune response.  

PubMed

Viral antagonism of host responses is an essential component of virus pathogenicity. The study of the interplay between immune response and viral antagonism is challenging due to the involvement of many processes acting at multiple time scales. Here we develop an ordinary differential equation model to investigate the early, experimentally measured, responses of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells to infection by two H1N1 influenza A viruses of different clinical outcomes: pandemic A/California/4/2009 and seasonal A/New Caledonia/20/1999. Our results reveal how the strength of virus antagonism, and the time scale over which it acts to thwart the innate immune response, differs significantly between the two viruses, as is made clear by their impact on the temporal behavior of a number of measured genes. The model thus sheds light on the mechanisms that underlie the variability of innate immune responses to different H1N1 viruses. PMID:24594370

Fribourg, M; Hartmann, B; Schmolke, M; Marjanovic, N; Albrecht, R A; García-Sastre, A; Sealfon, S C; Jayaprakash, C; Hayot, F

2014-06-21

410

A bio-synthetic interface for discovery of viral entry mechanisms.  

SciTech Connect

Understanding and defending against pathogenic viruses is an important public health and biodefense challenge. The focus of our LDRD project has been to uncover the mechanisms enveloped viruses use to identify and invade host cells. We have constructed interfaces between viral particles and synthetic lipid bilayers. This approach provides a minimal setting for investigating the initial events of host-virus interaction - (i) recognition of, and (ii) entry into the host via membrane fusion. This understanding could enable rational design of therapeutics that block viral entry as well as future construction of synthetic, non-proliferating sensors that detect live virus in the environment. We have observed fusion between synthetic lipid vesicles and Vesicular Stomatitis virus particles, and we have observed interactions between Nipah virus-like particles and supported lipid bilayers and giant unilamellar vesicles.

Gutzler, Mike; Maar, Dianna; Negrete, Oscar; Hayden, Carl C.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Wang, Julia

2010-09-01

411

Vaccinia reporter viruses for quantifying viral function at all stages of gene expression.  

PubMed

Poxviruses are a family of double stranded DNA viruses that include active human pathogens such as monkeypox, molluscum contagiousum, and Contagalo virus. The family also includes the smallpox virus, Variola. Due to the complexity of poxvirus replication, many questions still remain regarding their gene expression strategy. In this article we describe the conceptualization and usage of recombinant vaccinia viruses that enable real-time measurement of single and multiple stages of viral gene expression in a high-throughput format. This is enabled through the use of spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins as reporters for each of three stages of viral replication. These viruses provide a high signal-to-noise ratio while retaining stage specific expression patterns, enabling plate-based assays and microscopic observations of virus propagation and replication. These tools have uses for antiviral discovery, studies of the virus-host interaction, and evolutionary biology. PMID:24894622

Rozelle, Daniel K; Filone, Claire Marie; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H

2014-01-01

412

Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

2010-01-01

413

dbDiarrhea: the database of pathogen proteins and vaccine antigens from diarrheal pathogens.  

PubMed

Diarrhea occurs world-wide and is most commonly caused by gastrointestinal infections which kill around 2.2 million people globally each year, mostly children in developing countries. We describe here dbDiarrhea, which is currently the most comprehensive catalog of proteins implicated in the pathogenesis of diarrhea caused by major bacterial, viral and parasitic species. The current release of the database houses 820 proteins gleaned through an extensive and critical survey of research articles from PubMed. The major contributors to this compendium of proteins are Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These proteins are classified into different categories such as Type III secretion system effectors, Type III secretion system components, and Pathogen proteins. There is another complementary module called 'Host proteins'. dbDiarrhea also serves as a repository of the research articles describing (1) trials of subunit and whole organism vaccines (2) high-throughput screening of Type III secretion system inhibitors and (3) diagnostic assays, for various diarrheal pathogens. The database is web accessible through an intuitive user interface that allows querying proteins and research articles for different organism, keywords and accession number. Besides providing the search facility through browsing, the database supports sequence similarity search with the BLAST tool. With the rapidly burgeoning global burden of the diarrhea, we anticipate that this database would serve as a source of useful information for furthering research on diarrhea. The database can be freely accessed at http://www.juit.ac.in/attachments/dbdiarrhea/diarrhea_home.html. PMID:22917656

Ramana, Jayashree; Tamanna

2012-12-01

414

Viruses accumulate in aging infection centers of a fungal forest pathogen.  

PubMed

Fungal viruses (mycoviruses) with RNA genomes are believed to lack extracellular infective particles. These viruses are transmitted laterally among fungal strains through mycelial anastomoses or vertically via their infected spores, but little is known regarding their prevalence and patterns of dispersal under natural conditions. Here, we examined, in detail, the spatial and temporal changes in a mycovirus community and its host fungus Heterobasidion parviporum, the most devastating fungal pathogen of conifers in the Boreal forest region. During the 7-year sampling period, viruses accumulated in clonal host individuals as a result of indigenous viruses spreading within and between clones as well as novel strains arriving via airborne spores. Viral community changes produced pockets of heterogeneity within large H. parviporum clones. The appearance of novel viral infections in aging clones indicated that transient cell-to-cell contacts between Heterobasidion strains are likely to occur more frequently than what was inferred from genotypic analyses. Intraspecific variation was low among the three partitivirus species at the study site, whereas the unassigned viral species HetRV6 was highly polymorphic. The accumulation of point mutations during persistent infections resulted in viral diversification, that is, the presence of nearly identical viral sequence variants within single clones. Our results also suggest that co-infections by distantly related viral species are more stable than those between conspecific strains, and mutual exclusion may play a role in determining mycoviral communities. PMID:25126757

Vainio, Eeva J; Müller, Michael M; Korhonen, Kari; Piri, Tuula; Hantula, Jarkko

2015-02-01