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Sample records for viral pathogen ranavirus

  1. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  2. Phylogeny and differentiation of reptilian and amphibian ranaviruses detected in Europe.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Anke C; López-Bueno, Alberto; Blahak, Silvia; Caeiro, Maria F; Rosa, Gonçalo M; Alves de Matos, António Pedro; Martel, An; Alejo, Alí; Marschang, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Ranaviruses in amphibians and fish are considered emerging pathogens and several isolates have been extensively characterized in different studies. Ranaviruses have also been detected in reptiles with increasing frequency, but the role of reptilian hosts is still unclear and only limited sequence data has been provided. In this study, we characterized a number of ranaviruses detected in wild and captive animals in Europe based on sequence data from six genomic regions (major capsid protein (MCP), DNA polymerase (DNApol), ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase alpha and beta subunit-like proteins (RNR-? and -?), viral homolog of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, eIF-2? (vIF-2?) genes and microsatellite region). A total of ten different isolates from reptiles (tortoises, lizards, and a snake) and four ranaviruses from amphibians (anurans, urodeles) were included in the study. Furthermore, the complete genome sequences of three reptilian isolates were determined and a new PCR for rapid classification of the different variants of the genomic arrangement was developed. All ranaviruses showed slight variations on the partial nucleotide sequences from the different genomic regions (92.6-100%). Some very similar isolates could be distinguished by the size of the band from the microsatellite region. Three of the lizard isolates had a truncated vIF-2? gene; the other ranaviruses had full-length genes. In the phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences from different genes (3223 nt/10287 aa), the reptilian ranaviruses were often more closely related to amphibian ranaviruses than to each other, and most clustered together with previously detected ranaviruses from the same geographic region of origin. Comparative analyses show that among the closely related amphibian-like ranaviruses (ALRVs) described to date, three recently split and independently evolving distinct genetic groups can be distinguished. These findings underline the wide host range of ranaviruses and the emergence of pathogen pollution via animal trade of ectothermic vertebrates. PMID:25706285

  3. Phylogeny and Differentiation of Reptilian and Amphibian Ranaviruses Detected in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Stöhr, Anke C.; López-Bueno, Alberto; Blahak, Silvia; Caeiro, Maria F.; Rosa, Gonçalo M.; Alves de Matos, António Pedro; Martel, An; Alejo, Alí; Marschang, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    Ranaviruses in amphibians and fish are considered emerging pathogens and several isolates have been extensively characterized in different studies. Ranaviruses have also been detected in reptiles with increasing frequency, but the role of reptilian hosts is still unclear and only limited sequence data has been provided. In this study, we characterized a number of ranaviruses detected in wild and captive animals in Europe based on sequence data from six genomic regions (major capsid protein (MCP), DNA polymerase (DNApol), ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase alpha and beta subunit-like proteins (RNR-? and -?), viral homolog of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, eIF-2? (vIF-2?) genes and microsatellite region). A total of ten different isolates from reptiles (tortoises, lizards, and a snake) and four ranaviruses from amphibians (anurans, urodeles) were included in the study. Furthermore, the complete genome sequences of three reptilian isolates were determined and a new PCR for rapid classification of the different variants of the genomic arrangement was developed. All ranaviruses showed slight variations on the partial nucleotide sequences from the different genomic regions (92.6–100%). Some very similar isolates could be distinguished by the size of the band from the microsatellite region. Three of the lizard isolates had a truncated vIF-2? gene; the other ranaviruses had full-length genes. In the phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences from different genes (3223 nt/10287 aa), the reptilian ranaviruses were often more closely related to amphibian ranaviruses than to each other, and most clustered together with previously detected ranaviruses from the same geographic region of origin. Comparative analyses show that among the closely related amphibian-like ranaviruses (ALRVs) described to date, three recently split and independently evolving distinct genetic groups can be distinguished. These findings underline the wide host range of ranaviruses and the emergence of pathogen pollution via animal trade of ectothermic vertebrates. PMID:25706285

  4. Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  5. Development of an immunochromatography assay kit for rapid detection of ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Rim; Park, Seong Bin; Fagutao, Fernand F; Nho, Seong Won; Jang, Ho Bin; Cha, In Seok; Thompson, Kim D; Adams, Alexandra; Bayley, Amanda; Jung, Tae Sung

    2015-10-01

    Ranaviruses are large, double-stranded DNA viruses of the family Iridoviridae and are known to be primary pathogens in frogs, fish and other amphibians. These viruses have been shown to be highly adaptable and have the ability to cross species barriers, making them a potent threat to global biodiversity. There is therefore, a need for rapid and efficient diagnostic methods to control the spread of these viruses. To address this, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed against ranavirus strain FV-3 (standard frog virus 3) to detect the major capsid protein and FV-3gorf19R related hypothetical protein in both the FV-3 and KRV-1 (Korean ranavirus) strains. The antibodies were then applied on a colloidal gold-immunochromatographic assay (GICA) as a kit for the detection of ranaviruses. The kit was able to detect low concentrations of the virus (10(1)TCID50/ml) and showed analytical specificity when tested against other viral pathogens, including those belonging to the same family. It was possible to detect ranavirus in experimentally infected frogs within 30 min using the kit. The kit described here is expected to be a valuable and informative tool for on-site detection of ranavirus in frog. PMID:26210698

  6. Ranavirus outbreaks in amphibian populations of northern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Danelle M.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Sprague, Laura; Waits, Lisette P.; Green, D. Earl; Schuler, Krysten L.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    2011-01-01

    Ranavirus outbreaks, caused by pathogens in the genus Ranavirus (Family Iridoviridae), were the largest single cause of reported amphibian mass mortality events in the United States from 1996–2001 (Green et al. 2002). Mortality events associated with ranaviruses have been documented on five continents and throughout the latitudes and elevations where amphibians occur (Gray et al. 2009). However, the threat of ranaviruses to amphibian and reptile populations in specific regions is still largely unknown (Chinchar 2002; Gray et al. 2009).

  7. Widespread occurrence of ranavirus in pond-breeding amphibian populations.

    PubMed

    Hoverman, Jason T; Gray, Matthew J; Miller, Debra L; Haislip, Nathan A

    2012-03-01

    Ranaviruses are an emerging threat for many amphibian populations, yet their distribution in amphibian communities and the association of infection with possible stressors and species is not fully understood due to historically sparse surveillance. Agricultural practices that reduce the water quality of amphibian breeding habitats (e.g., cattle access to wetlands) and environmental stressors (e.g., lower temperatures) may contribute to ranavirus emergence. We tested larval amphibians for ranavirus infection across four seasons in farm ponds (n = 40) located in Tennessee, USA. Cattle at various densities were allowed access to half of the sampled ponds. Ranavirus infections were detected in nine species and in 33 of the sampled ponds (83%), illustrating widespread occurrence of the pathogen. Species within the family Ranidae were the most frequently infected. In 13 of the ponds containing infected individuals, prevalence exceeded 40% during at least one season. Infections were detected in multiple seasons in 20 of the sampled ponds containing infections, suggesting that ranaviruses are relatively persistent in these systems. Cattle had negative effects on water quality (turbidity and ammonia) and there was a positive association between cattle abundance and ranavirus prevalence in the summer. Counter to previous field studies in North America, we found a significant positive association between water temperature and ranavirus prevalence in the fall sampling events. Despite these findings, the influences of cattle and temperature on ranavirus prevalence were not consistent across seasons. As such, the mechanisms driving high ranavirus prevalence across the landscape and over time remain unclear. Given the widespread occurrence of ranaviruses in wild amphibians, we encourage the implementation of surveillance programs to help identify potential drivers of emergence. Sites with high ranavirus prevalence should be monitored annually for outbreaks, and the long-term effects on population size determined. PMID:22173292

  8. Establishment of three cell lines from Chinese giant salamander and their sensitivities to the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiang-Di; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Huang, Xing; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Known as lethal pathogens, Ranaviruses have been identified in diseased fish, amphibians (including Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus, the world's largest amphibian) and reptiles, causing organ necrosis and systemic hemorrhage. Here, three Chinese giant salamander cell lines, thymus cell line (GSTC), spleen cell line (GSSC) and kidney cell line (GSKC) were initially established. Their sensitivities to ranaviruses, wild-type Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) and recombinant Rana grylio virus carrying EGFP gene (rRGV-EGFP) were tested. Temporal transcription pattern of ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP), fluorescence and electron microscopy observations showed that both the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus could replicate in the cell lines. PMID:26070783

  9. Isolation and characterization of a ranavirus from koi, Cyprinus carpio L., experiencing mass mortalities in India.

    PubMed

    George, M R; John, K R; Mansoor, M M; Saravanakumar, R; Sundar, P; Pradeep, V

    2015-04-01

    We investigated mass mortalities of koi, Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758, experienced in South Indian fish farms by virus isolation, electron microscopy, PCR detection, sequencing of capsid protein gene and transmission studies. Samples of moribund koi brought to the laboratory suffered continuous mortality exhibiting swimming abnormalities, intermittent surfacing and skin darkening. Irido-like virus was isolated from the infected fish in the indigenous snakehead kidney cell line (SNKD2a). Icosahedral virus particles of 100 to 120 nm were observed in the infected cell cultures, budding from the cell membrane. Virus transmission and pathogenicity studies revealed that horizontal transmission occurred associated with mortality. PCR analysis of infected fish and cell cultures confirmed the presence of Ranavirus capsid protein sequences. Sequence analysis of the major capsid protein gene showed an identity of 99.9% to that of largemouth bass virus isolated from North America. Detection and successful isolation of this viral agent becomes the first record of isolation of a virus resembling Santee-Cooper Ranavirus from a koi and from India. We propose the name koi ranavirus to this agent. PMID:24720625

  10. Iridovirus infections in finfish - critical review with emphasis on ranaviruses.

    PubMed

    Whittington, R J; Becker, J A; Dennis, M M

    2010-02-01

    Viruses in three genera of the family Iridoviridae (iridoviruses) affect finfish. Ranaviruses and megalocytiviruses are recently emerged pathogens. Both cause severe systemic disease, occur globally and affect a diversity of hosts. In contrast, lymphocystiviruses cause superficial lesions and rarely cause economic loss. The ranavirus epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) from Australia was the first iridovirus to cause epizootic mortality in finfish. Like other ranaviruses, it lacks host specificity. A distinct but closely related virus, European catfish virus, occurs in finfish in Europe, while very similar ranaviruses occur in amphibians in Europe, Asia, Australia, North America and South America. These viruses can be distinguished from one another by conserved differences in the sequence of the major capsid protein gene, which informs policies of the World Organisation for Animal Health to minimize transboundary spread of these agents. However, limited epidemiological information and variations in disease expression create difficulties for design of sampling strategies for surveillance. There is still uncertainty surrounding the taxonomy of some putative ranaviruses such as Singapore grouper iridovirus and Santee-Cooper ranavirus, both of which cause serious disease in fish, and confusion continues with diseases caused by megalocytiviruses. In this review, aspects of the agents and diseases caused by ranaviruses are contrasted with those due to megalocytiviruses to promote accurate diagnosis and characterization of the agents responsible. Ranavirus epizootics in amphibians are also discussed because of possible links with finfish and common anthropogenic mechanisms of spread. The source of the global epizootic of disease caused by systemic iridoviruses in finfish and amphibians is uncertain, but three possibilities are discussed: trade in food fish, trade in ornamental fish, reptiles and amphibians and emergence from unknown reservoir hosts associated with environmental change. PMID:20050967

  11. Marine Bivalve Mollusks as Reservoirs of Viral Finfish Pathogens

    E-print Network

    Marine Bivalve Mollusks as Reservoirs of Viral Finfish Pathogens: Significance to Marine and Anadromous Finfish Aquaculture THEODORE R. MEYERS Introduction Epidemiologists have long known that bivalve in bivalve species from clean and organi- cally polluted waters (Ross, 1956; Mitchell et aI., 1966; Hamblet

  12. Ranaviruses: Cold Blooded Killers!

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    .02 3.9X Results Cattle Land Use Disease of Aquatic Organisms 77:97-103 2005 0.36 0.3 0.15 0 0.1 0.2 0, Pickerel Frog, Newt, Tiger and Spotted Salamanders Jan Apr Jul Oct Ranavirus Hotspots: Oct Die-off: Green

  13. The genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad virus identifies an evolutionary intermediate within ranaviruses.

    PubMed

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Alcamí, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2012-04-01

    Worldwide amphibian population declines have been ascribed to global warming, increasing pollution levels, and other factors directly related to human activities. These factors may additionally be favoring the emergence of novel pathogens. In this report, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad ranavirus (CMTV), which has caused fatal disease in several amphibian species across Europe. Phylogenetic and gene content analyses of the first complete genomic sequence from a ranavirus isolated in Europe show that CMTV is an amphibian-like ranavirus (ALRV). However, the CMTV genome structure is novel and represents an intermediate evolutionary stage between the two previously described ALRV groups. We find that CMTV clusters with several other ranaviruses isolated from different hosts and locations which might also be included in this novel ranavirus group. This work sheds light on the phylogenetic relationships within this complex group of emerging, disease-causing viruses. PMID:22301140

  14. The Genome Sequence of the Emerging Common Midwife Toad Virus Identifies an Evolutionary Intermediate within Ranaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Alcamí, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide amphibian population declines have been ascribed to global warming, increasing pollution levels, and other factors directly related to human activities. These factors may additionally be favoring the emergence of novel pathogens. In this report, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad ranavirus (CMTV), which has caused fatal disease in several amphibian species across Europe. Phylogenetic and gene content analyses of the first complete genomic sequence from a ranavirus isolated in Europe show that CMTV is an amphibian-like ranavirus (ALRV). However, the CMTV genome structure is novel and represents an intermediate evolutionary stage between the two previously described ALRV groups. We find that CMTV clusters with several other ranaviruses isolated from different hosts and locations which might also be included in this novel ranavirus group. This work sheds light on the phylogenetic relationships within this complex group of emerging, disease-causing viruses. PMID:22301140

  15. Porcine semen as a vector for transmission of viral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Maes, Dominiek; Van Soom, Ann; Appeltant, Ruth; Arsenakis, Ioannis; Nauwynck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Different viruses have been detected in porcine semen. Some of them are on the list of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and consequently, these pathogens are of socioeconomic and/or public health importance and are of major importance in the international trade of animals and animal products. Artificial insemination (AI) is one of the most commonly used assisted reproductive technologies in pig production worldwide. This extensive use has enabled pig producers to benefit from superior genetics at a lower cost compared to natural breeding. However, the broad distribution of processed semen doses for field AI has increased the risk of widespread transmission of swine viral pathogens. Contamination of semen can be due to infections of the boar or can occur during semen collection, processing, and storage. It can result in reduced semen quality, embryonic mortality, endometritis, and systemic infection and/or disease in the recipient female. The presence of viral pathogens in semen can be assessed by demonstration of viable virus, nucleic acid of virus, or indirectly by measuring serum antibodies in the boar. The best way to prevent disease transmission via the semen is to assure that the boars in AI centers are free from the disease, to enforce very strict biosecurity protocols, and to perform routine health monitoring of boars. Prevention of viral semen contamination should be the primary focus because it is easier to prevent contamination than to eliminate viruses once present in semen. Nevertheless, research and development of novel semen processing treatments such as single-layer centrifugation is ongoing and may allow in the future to decontaminate semen. PMID:26506911

  16. Investigation of ornamental fish entering the EU for the presence of ranaviruses.

    PubMed

    Vesely, T; Cinkova, K; Reschova, S; Gobbo, F; Ariel, E; Vicenova, M; Pokorova, D; Kulich, P; Bovo, G

    2011-02-01

    A survey was performed on ornamental fish imported into the EU to detect viral agents belonging to the genus Ranavirus. The objective was to gain knowledge of the potential for these systemic iridoviruses to gain entry into the EU via international trade in ornamental fish. A total of 208 pooled samples, representing 753 individual fish, were tested. The samples included 13 orders and 37 families, originating from different countries and continents. Tissues from fish that died during or just after transport were collected and examined by standard virological techniques in epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells, by transmission electron microscopy and by PCR for the detection of the major capsid protein and DNA polymerase gene sequences of ranaviruses. Virus was isolated from nine fish species but ranavirus was not identified in those samples. The results suggest that ranaviruses are not highly prevalent in ornamental fish imported into the EU. PMID:21241323

  17. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR). Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLR). Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses. PMID:25514371

  18. EXPERIMENTAL CHALLENGE STUDY OF FV3-LIKE RANAVIRUS INFECTION IN PREVIOUSLY FV3-LIKE RANAVIRUS INFECTED EASTERN BOX TURTLES (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) TO ASSESS INFECTION AND SURVIVAL.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Jennifer C; Wack, Allison N; Allender, Matthew C; Cranfield, Mike R; Murphy, Kevin J; Barrett, Kevin; Romero, Jennell L; Wellehan, James F X; Blum, Stella A; Zink, M Christine; Bronson, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore experienced an outbreak of Frog virus-3 (FV3)-like ranavirus during the summer of 2011, during which 14 of 27 (52%) of its captive eastern box turtles ( Terrapene carolina carolina) survived. To assess survival, immunity, and viral shedding, an experimental challenge study was performed in which the surviving, previously infected turtles were reinfected with the outbreak strain of FV3-like ranavirus. Seven turtles were inoculated with virus intramuscularly and four control turtles received saline intramuscularly. The turtles were monitored for 8 wk with blood and oral swabs collected for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). During that time, one of seven (14%) inoculated turtles and none of the controls (0%) died; there was no significant difference in survival. Clinical signs of the inoculated turtles, except for the turtle that died, were mild compared to the original outbreak. Quantitative PCR for FV3-like ranavirus on blood and oral swabs was positive for all inoculated turtles and negative for all controls. The turtle that died had intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in multiple organs. Three inoculated and two control turtles were euthanized at the end of the study. No inclusion bodies were present in any of the organs. Quantitative PCR detected FV3-like ranavirus in the spleen of a control turtle, which suggested persistence of the virus. The surviving five turtles were qPCR-negative for FV3-like ranavirus from blood and oral swabs after brumation. Quantitative PCR for Terrapene herpesvirus 1 found no association between ranavirus infection and herpesvirus loads. In conclusion, previously infected eastern box turtles can be reinfected with the same strain of FV3-like ranavirus and show mild to no clinical signs but can shed the virus from the oral cavity. PMID:26667529

  19. Trends in Ranavirus Prevalence Among Plethodontid Salamanders in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    PubMed

    Sutton, William B; Gray, Matthew J; Hoverman, Jason T; Secrist, Richard G; Super, Paul E; Hardman, Rebecca H; Tucker, Jennifer L; Miller, Debra L

    2015-06-01

    Emerging pathogens are a potential contributor to global amphibian declines. Ranaviruses, which infect ectothermic vertebrates and are common in aquatic environments, have been implicated in die-offs of at least 72 amphibian species worldwide. Most studies on the subject have focused on pool-breeding amphibians, and infection trends in other amphibian species assemblages have been understudied. Our primary study objective was to evaluate hypotheses explaining ranavirus prevalence within a lungless salamander assemblage (Family Plethodontidae) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. We sampled 566 total plethodontid salamanders representing 14 species at five sites over a 6-year period (2007-2012). We identified ranavirus-positive individuals in 11 of the 14 (78.6%) sampled species, with salamanders in the genus Desmognathus having greatest infection prevalence. Overall, we found the greatest support for site elevation and sampling year determining infection prevalence. We detected the greatest number of infections in 2007 with 82.5% of sampled individuals testing positive for ranavirus, which we attribute to record drought during this year. Infection prevalence remained relatively high in low-elevation sites in 2008 and 2009. Neither body condition nor aquatic dependence was a significant predictor of ranavirus prevalence. Overall, our results indicate that life history differences among species play a minor role determining ranavirus prevalence compared to the larger effects of site elevation and yearly fluctuations (likely due to environmental stressors) during sampling years. PMID:25537630

  20. Transmission of Ranavirus between Ectothermic Vertebrate Hosts

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Transmission of Ranavirus between Ectothermic Vertebrate Hosts Roberto Brenes1 *, Matthew J. Gray2 ectothermic vertebrate hosts could explain the successful yearlong persistence of ranaviruses in aquatic was possible among three species from different ectothermic vertebrate classes: Cope's gray treefrog (Hyla

  1. First evidence of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and ranavirus in Hong Kong amphibian trade.

    PubMed

    Kolby, Jonathan E; Smith, Kristine M; Berger, Lee; Karesh, William B; Preston, Asa; Pessier, Allan P; Skerratt, Lee F

    2014-01-01

    The emerging infectious amphibian diseases caused by amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranaviruses are responsible for global amphibian population declines and extinctions. Although likely to have been spread by a variety of activities, transcontinental dispersal appears closely associated with the international trade in live amphibians. The territory of Hong Kong reports frequent, high volume trade in amphibians, and yet the presence of Bd and ranavirus have not previously been detected in either traded or free-ranging amphibians. In 2012, a prospective surveillance project was conducted to investigate the presence of these pathogens in commercial shipments of live amphibians exported from Hong Kong International Airport. Analysis of skin (Bd) and cloacal (ranavirus) swabs by quantitative PCR detected pathogen presence in 31/265 (11.7%) and in 105/185 (56.8%) of amphibians, respectively. In addition, the water in which animals were transported tested positive for Bd, demonstrating the risk of pathogen pollution by the disposal of untreated wastewater. It is uncertain whether Bd and ranavirus remain contained within Hong Kong's trade sector, or if native amphibians have already been exposed. Rapid response efforts are now urgently needed to determine current pathogen distribution in Hong Kong, evaluate potential trade-associated exposure to free-ranging amphibians, and identify opportunities to prevent disease establishment. PMID:24599268

  2. Viral pathogen production in a wild grass host driven by host growth and soil nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Briana K; Rúa, Megan A; Mitchell, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    Nutrient limitation is a basic ecological constraint that has received little attention in studies on virus production and disease dynamics. Nutrient availability could directly limit the production of viral nucleic acids and proteins, or alternatively limit host growth and thus indirectly limit metabolic pathways necessary for viral replication. In order to compare direct and indirect effects of nutrient limitation on virus production within hosts, we manipulated soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability in a glasshouse for the wild grass host Bromus hordeaceus and the viral pathogen Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV. We found that soil N additions increased viral concentrations within host tissues, and the effect was mediated by host growth. Specifically, in statistical models evaluating the roles of host biomass production, leaf N and leaf P, viral production depended most strongly on host biomass, rather than the concentration of either nutrient. Furthermore, at low soil N, larger plants supported greater viral concentrations than smaller ones, whereas at high N, smaller plants supported greater viral concentrations. Our results suggest that enhanced viral productivity under N enrichment is an indirect consequence of nutrient stimulation to host growth rate. Heightened pathogen production in plants has important implications for a world facing increasing rates of nutrient deposition. PMID:25782030

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE TO VIRAL PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interferon gamma (IFN-?) was selected as a biomarker for a viral exposure study. Twelve-week-old BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.2ml of 104 PFU/ml of coxsackievirus B3 or B4 diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mice were injected with PBS on...

  4. VIRAL PATHOGENS AND MICROBIOLOGICAL INDICATORS IN GROUND WATER FROM SMALL PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES IN SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty-eight public ground-water-supply wells serving less than 3,300 people were sampled from July 1999 through July 2001 in southeastern Michigan to determine (1) occurrence of viral pathogens and microbiological indicators, (2) whether indicators are adequate predictors of the...

  5. Release of invasive plants from fungal and viral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Charles E; Power, Alison G

    2003-02-01

    Invasive plant species both threaten native biodiversity and are economically costly, but only a few naturalized species become pests. Here we report broad, quantitative support for two long-standing hypotheses that explain why only some naturalized species have large impacts. The enemy release hypothesis argues that invaders' impacts result from reduced natural enemy attack. The biotic resistance hypothesis argues that interactions with native species, including natural enemies, limit invaders' impacts. We tested these hypotheses for viruses and for rust, smut and powdery mildew fungi that infect 473 plant species naturalized to the United States from Europe. On average, 84% fewer fungi and 24% fewer virus species infect each plant species in its naturalized range than in its native range. In addition, invasive plant species that are more completely released from pathogens are more widely reported as harmful invaders of both agricultural and natural ecosystems. Together, these results strongly support the enemy release hypothesis. Among noxious agricultural weeds, species accumulating more pathogens in their naturalized range are less widely noxious, supporting the biotic resistance hypothesis. Our results indicate that invasive plants' impacts may be a function of both release from and accumulation of natural enemies, including pathogens. PMID:12571594

  6. A RANAVIRUS-RELATED MORTALITY EVENT AND THE FIRST REPORT OF RANAVIRUS IN NEW JERSEY

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    . To determine if water containing asymptomatic A. fowleri tadpoles would test positive for Ranavirus DNA, we to "swim" in the tube for approximately 30 s. Healthy tadpoles were released back to the pond and the water fowleri tadpoles. Twenty-four of 114 animals tested positive for Ranavirus with PCR and 32/114 tested

  7. Rapid Accurate Identification of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John

    2007-03-09

    The goals of this program were to develop two assays for rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic organisms at the strain level. The first assay "Quantitative Genome Profiling or QGP" is a real time PCR assay with a restriction enzyme-based component. Its underlying concept is that certain enzymes should cleave genomic DNA at many sites and that in some cases these cuts will interrupt the connection on the genomic DNA between flanking PCR primer pairs thereby eliminating selected PCR amplifications. When this occurs the appearance of the real-time PCR threshold (Ct) signal during DNA amplification is totally eliminated or, if cutting is incomplete, greatly delayed compared to an uncut control. This temporal difference in appearance of the Ct signal relative to undigested control DNA provides a rapid, high-throughput approach for DNA-based identification of different but closely related pathogens depending upon the nucleotide sequence of the target region. The second assay we developed uses the nucleotide sequence of pairs of shmi identifier tags (-21 bp) to identify DNA molecules. Subtle differences in linked tag pair combinations can also be used to distinguish between closely related isolates..

  8. Viral Metagenome Analysis to Guide Human Pathogen Monitoring in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, Kyle; Viau, Emily; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to develop and demonstrate an approach for describing the diversity of human pathogenic viruses in an environmentally isolated viral metagenome. Methods and Results In silico bioinformatic experiments were used to select an optimum annotation strategy for discovering human viruses in virome datasets, and applied to annotate a class B biosolids virome. Results from the in silico study indicated that less than 1% errors in virus identification could be achieved when nucleotide-based search programs (BLASTn or tBLASTx), viral genome only databases, and sequence reads greater than 200 nt were considered. Within the 51,925 annotated sequences, 94 DNA and 19 RNA sequences were identified as human viruses. Virus diversity included environmentally transmitted agents such as parechovirus, coronavirus, adenovirus, and aichi virus, as well as viruses associated with chronic human infections such as human herpes and hepatitis C viruses. Conclusions This study provided a bioinformatic approach for identifying pathogens in a virome dataset, and demonstrated the human virus diversity in a relevant environmental sample. Significance and Impact of Study As the costs of next generation sequencing decrease, the pathogen diversity described by virus metagenomes will provide an unbiased guide for subsequent cell-culture and quantitative pathogen analyses, and ensures that highly enriched and relevant pathogens are not neglected in exposure and risk assessments. PMID:21272046

  9. Recognition of the Hyaloperonospora parasitica effector ATR13 triggers resistance against oomycete, bacterial, and viral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rentel, Maike C; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Zhao, Bingyu; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2008-01-22

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes cause some of the most devastating diseases affecting agricultural crops. Hyaloperonospora parasitica is a native oomycete pathogen of Arabidopsis and is related to other oomycete phytopathogens that include several species of Phytophthora, including the causal agent of potato late blight. Recently, four oomycete effector genes have been isolated, and several oomycete genomes have been sequenced. We have developed an efficient and genetically amenable system to test putative effector genes using the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The H. parasitica effector protein ATR13 was delivered via P. syringae by fusing the ATR13 gene with the avrRpm1 type three secretion signal peptide, a bacterial sequence that allows transfer of proteins into the host cell through the bacterial type III secretion system. We also inserted ATR13 into the genome of the turnip mosaic virus, a single-stranded RNA virus. Our results show that delivery of ATR13 via the bacterial or viral pathogen triggers defense responses in plants containing the cognate resistance protein RPP13(Nd), which restricts proliferation of both pathogens. Hence, recognition of ATR13 by RPP13 initiates defense responses that are effective against oomycete, bacterial and viral pathogens, pointing to a common defense mechanism. We have characterized regions of the RPP13(Nd) resistance protein that are essential for effector recognition and/or downstream signaling, using transient coexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana. PMID:18198274

  10. A de novo Assembly of the Common Frog (Rana temporaria) Transcriptome and Comparison of Transcription Following Exposure to Ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Stephen J.; Garner, Trenton W. J.; Balloux, Francois; Ruis, Chris; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Moore, Karen; Griffiths, Amber G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Amphibians are experiencing global declines and extinctions, with infectious diseases representing a major factor. In this study we examined the transcriptional response of metamorphic hosts (common frog, Rana temporaria) to the two most important amphibian pathogens: Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and Ranavirus. We found strong up-regulation of a gene involved in the adaptive immune response (AP4S1) at four days post-exposure to both pathogens. We detected a significant transcriptional response to Bd, covering the immune response (innate and adaptive immunity, complement activation, and general inflammatory responses), but relatively little transcriptional response to Ranavirus. This may reflect the higher mortality rates found in wild common frogs infected with Ranavirus as opposed to Bd. These data provide a valuable genomic resource for the amphibians, contribute insight into gene expression changes after pathogen exposure, and suggest potential candidate genes for future host-pathogen research. PMID:26111016

  11. Viral pathogens in water: occurrence, public health impact, and available control strategies.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Kristen E

    2014-02-01

    The public health impact of the transmission of viruses in water is significant worldwide. Waterborne viruses can be introduced into our recreational and finished drinking water sources through a variety of pathways ultimately resulting in the onset of illness in a portion of the exposed population. Although there have been advances in both drinking water treatment technologies and source water protection strategies, waterborne disease outbreaks (WBDOs) due to viral pathogens still occur each year worldwide. By highlighting the prevalence of viral pathogens in water as well as (1) the dominant viruses of concern, (2) WBDOs due to viruses, and (3) available water treatment technologies, the goal of this review is to provide insight into the public health impact of viruses in water. PMID:24440908

  12. Efficacy of select disinfectants at inactivating Ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Laura K; Baldwin, Charles A; Gray, Matthew J; Miller, Debra L

    2009-04-01

    Ranavirus can cause disease in reptiles and amphibians. Because survival time outside of a host remains uncertain, equipment must be disinfected to prevent transmission of ranaviruses. However, disinfectant efficacy against amphibian ranaviruses has not been investigated for chlorhexidine (Nolvasan), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), or potassium compounds. Our goal was to determine the efficacy of Nolvasan (0.25, 0.75 and 2.0%), bleach (0.2, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0%), and Virkon S (1.0%) at inactivating Ranavirus at 1 and 5 min contact durations. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) (2.0 and 5.0 ppm) was also tested with a 60 min contact time. Nolvasan at 0.75 and 2.0% and bleach at 3.0 and 5.0% concentration were effective for both contact durations. Virkon S was effective for both durations, but KMnO4 was not effective at either concentration. Concentrations of Nolvasan, bleach and Virkon S that are at least 0.75, 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively, are effective at inactivating Ranavirus after 1 min exposure time. PMID:19476278

  13. Occurrence of viral pathogens in Penaeus monodon post-larvae from aquaculture hatcheries

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Toms C.; James, Roswin; Anbu Rajan, L.; Surendran, P.K.; Lalitha, K.V.

    2015-01-01

    Viral pathogens appear to exert the most signi?cant constraints on the growth and survival of crustaceans under culture conditions. The prevalence of viral pathogens White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), Hepatopancreatic Parvo Virus (HPV), Monodon Baculo Virus (MBV) and Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHHNV) in Penaeus monodon post-larvae was studied. Samples collected from different hatcheries and also samples submitted by farmers from Kerala were analyzed. Out of 104 samples collected, WSSV was detected in 12.5% of the post-larvae samples. Prevalence of concurrent infections by HPV, MBV and WSSV (either dual or triple infection) was present in 60.6% of the total post-larvae tested. Out of the 51 double positives, 98% showed either HPV or IHHNV infection. HPV or IHHNV was detected in 11 post-larval samples showing triple viral infection. This is the first report of IHHNV from India. Result of this study reveals the lack of efficient screening strategies to eradicate viruses in hatchery reared post-larvae. PMID:26217783

  14. Occurrence of viral pathogens in Penaeus monodon post-larvae from aquaculture hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Toms C; James, Roswin; Anbu Rajan, L; Surendran, P K; Lalitha, K V

    2015-09-01

    Viral pathogens appear to exert the most signi?cant constraints on the growth and survival of crustaceans under culture conditions. The prevalence of viral pathogens White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), Hepatopancreatic Parvo Virus (HPV), Monodon Baculo Virus (MBV) and Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHHNV) in Penaeus monodon post-larvae was studied. Samples collected from different hatcheries and also samples submitted by farmers from Kerala were analyzed. Out of 104 samples collected, WSSV was detected in 12.5% of the post-larvae samples. Prevalence of concurrent infections by HPV, MBV and WSSV (either dual or triple infection) was present in 60.6% of the total post-larvae tested. Out of the 51 double positives, 98% showed either HPV or IHHNV infection. HPV or IHHNV was detected in 11 post-larval samples showing triple viral infection. This is the first report of IHHNV from India. Result of this study reveals the lack of efficient screening strategies to eradicate viruses in hatchery reared post-larvae. PMID:26217783

  15. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Ramirez, Sara D.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease. Standardized population monitoring of key amphibian and reptile species should be established with urgency to enable early detection of potential impacts of disease emergence in this global biodiversity hotspot. PMID:26083349

  16. Susceptibility of black bullhead Ameiurus melas to a panel of ranavirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, F; Cappellozza, E; Pastore, M R; Bovo, G

    2010-07-01

    Ranaviruses are considered a serious threat to lower vertebrates, including fish, amphibians and reptiles. However, epidemiological data on these agents are lacking, and further investigations are needed to understand the role of carriers and to update the list of susceptible hosts. We carried out various experimental infections under controlled conditions to contribute to the current knowledge on the susceptibility of black bullhead Ameiurus melas to European catfish virus (ECV) and other ranaviruses. A panel of 7 ranavirus isolates was used to challenge duplicate groups of A. melas juveniles maintained in aquaria supplied with running dechlorinated tap water. The experiments were performed at 15 and 25 degrees C. The results confirmed the high susceptibility of A. melas to ECV infection. Furthermore, a significant mortality associated with the typical signs of systemic viral infections was observed in groups challenged with Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) at 25 degrees C, and to a lesser extent, at 15 degrees C. No significant mortality was recorded in fish challenged with European sheatfish virus (ESV), Frog virus 3 (FV3), Rana esculenta virus-like (REV-like), Bohle iridovirus (BIV) or short-finned eel virus (SERV). PMID:20815324

  17. Clinical differences between respiratory viral and bacterial mono- and dual pathogen detected among Singapore military servicemen with febrile respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Zheng Jie Marc; Zhao, Xiahong; Cook, Alex R; Loh, Jin Phang; Ng, Sock Hoon; Tan, Boon Huan; Lee, Vernon J

    2015-01-01

    Background Although it is known that febrile respiratory illnesses (FRI) may be caused by multiple respiratory pathogens, there are no population-level studies describing its impact on clinical disease. Methods Between May 2009 and October 2012, 7733 FRI patients and controls in the Singapore military had clinical data and nasal wash samples collected prospectively and sent for PCR testing. Patients with one pathogen detected (mono-pathogen) were compared with those with two pathogens (dual pathogen) for differences in basic demographics and clinical presentation. Results In total, 45.8% had one pathogen detected, 20.2% had two pathogens detected, 30.9% had no pathogens detected, and 3.1% had more than two pathogens. Multiple pathogens were associated with recruits, those with asthma and non-smokers. Influenza A (80.0%), influenza B (73.0%) and mycoplasma (70.6%) were most commonly associated with mono-infections, while adenovirus was most commonly associated with dual infections (62.9%). Influenza A paired with S. pneumoniae had higher proportions of chills and rigors than their respective mono-pathogens (P = 0.03, P = 0.009). H. influenzae paired with either enterovirus or parainfluenzae had higher proportions of cough with phlegm than their respective mono-pathogens. Although there were observed differences in mean proportions of body temperature, nasal symptoms, sore throat, body aches and joint pains between viral and bacterial mono-pathogens, there were few differences between distinct dual-pathogen pairs and their respective mono-pathogen counterparts. Conclusion A substantial number of FRI patients have multiple pathogens detected. Observed clinical differences between patients of dual pathogen and mono-pathogen indicate the likely presence of complex microbial interactions between the various pathogens. PMID:25827870

  18. Extended Viral Shedding of a Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus by Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis)

    PubMed Central

    Root, J. Jeffrey; Shriner, Susan A.; Bentler, Kevin T.; Gidlewski, Thomas; Mooers, Nicole L.; Ellis, Jeremy W.; Spraker, Terry R.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Sullivan, Heather J.; Franklin, Alan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) are susceptible to infection with some influenza A viruses. However, the viral shedding capability of this peri-domestic mammal and its potential role in influenza A virus ecology are largely undetermined. Methodology/Principal Findings Striped skunks were experimentally infected with a low pathogenic (LP) H4N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) and monitored for 20 days post infection (DPI). All of the skunks exposed to H4N6 AIV shed large quantities of viral RNA, as detected by real-time RT-PCR and confirmed for live virus with virus isolation, from nasal washes and oral swabs (maximum ?106.02 PCR EID50 equivalent/mL and ?105.19 PCR EID50 equivalent/mL, respectively). Some evidence of potential fecal shedding was also noted. Following necropsy on 20 DPI, viral RNA was detected in the nasal turbinates of one individual. All treatment animals yielded evidence of a serological response by 20 DPI. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that striped skunks have the potential to shed large quantities of viral RNA through the oral and nasal routes following exposure to a LP AIV. Considering the peri-domestic nature of these animals, along with the duration of shedding observed in this species, their presence on poultry and waterfowl operations could influence influenza A virus epidemiology. For example, this species could introduce a virus to a naive poultry flock or act as a trafficking mechanism of AIV to and from an infected poultry flock to naive flocks or wild bird populations. PMID:24489638

  19. Rapid metagenomic identification of viral pathogens in clinical samples by real-time nanopore sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Greninger, Alexander L; Naccache, Samia N; Federman, Scot; Yu, Guixia; Mbala, Placide; Bres, Vanessa; Stryke, Doug; Bouquet, Jerome; Somasekar, Sneha; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Dodd, Roger; Mulembakani, Prime; Schneider, Bradley S; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Stramer, Susan L; Chiu, Charles Y

    2015-01-01

    We report unbiased metagenomic detection of chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Ebola virus (EBOV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) from four human blood samples by MinION nanopore sequencing coupled to a newly developed, web-based pipeline for real-time bioinformatics analysis on a computational server or laptop (MetaPORE). At titers ranging from 10(7)-10(8) copies per milliliter, reads to EBOV from two patients with acute hemorrhagic fever and CHIKV from an asymptomatic blood donor were detected within 4 to 10 min of data acquisition, while lower titer HCV virus (1?×?10(5) copies per milliliter) was detected within 40 min. Analysis of mapped nanopore reads alone, despite an average individual error rate of 24 % (range 8-49 %), permitted identification of the correct viral strain in all four isolates, and 90 % of the genome of CHIKV was recovered with 97-99 % accuracy. Using nanopore sequencing, metagenomic detection of viral pathogens directly from clinical samples was performed within an unprecedented <6 hr sample-to-answer turnaround time, and in a timeframe amenable to actionable clinical and public health diagnostics. PMID:26416663

  20. Co-Infection by Chytrid Fungus and Ranaviruses in Wild and Harvested Frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Warne, Robin W; LaBumbard, Brandon; LaGrange, Seth; Vredenburg, Vance T; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    While global amphibian declines are associated with the spread of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), undetected concurrent co-infection by other pathogens may be little recognized threats to amphibians. Emerging viruses in the genus Ranavirus (Rv) also cause die-offs of amphibians and other ectotherms, but the extent of their distribution globally, or how co-infections with Bd impact amphibians are poorly understood. We provide the first report of Bd and Rv co-infection in South America, and the first report of Rv infections in the amphibian biodiversity hotspot of the Peruvian Andes, where Bd is associated with extinctions. Using these data, we tested the hypothesis that Bd or Rv parasites facilitate co-infection, as assessed by parasite abundance or infection intensity within individual adult frogs. Co-infection occurred in 30% of stream-dwelling frogs; 65% were infected by Bd and 40% by Rv. Among terrestrial, direct-developing Pristimantis frogs 40% were infected by Bd, 35% by Rv, and 20% co-infected. In Telmatobius frogs harvested for the live-trade 49% were co-infected, 92% were infected by Bd, and 53% by Rv. Median Bd and Rv loads were similar in both wild (Bd = 101.2 Ze, Rv = 102.3 viral copies) and harvested frogs (Bd = 103.1 Ze, Rv = 102.7 viral copies). While neither parasite abundance nor infection intensity were associated with co-infection patterns in adults, these data did not include the most susceptible larval and metamorphic life stages. These findings suggest Rv distribution is global and that co-infection among these parasites may be common. These results raise conservation concerns, but greater testing is necessary to determine if parasite interactions increase amphibian vulnerability to secondary infections across differing life stages, and constitute a previously undetected threat to declining populations. Greater surveillance of parasite interactions may increase our capacity to contain and mitigate the impacts of these and other wildlife diseases. PMID:26726999

  1. Assay platforms for the rapid detection of viral pathogens by the ultrahigh sensitivity monitoring of antigen-antibody binding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drive for early disease detection and growing threat of bioterrorism has markedly amplified the demand for ultrasensitive, high-speed diagnostic tests for viral pathogens. This presentation describes innovations in the development of platforms and readout methodologies that potentially address d...

  2. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. PMID:25929158

  3. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-?B immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-?B activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-?B signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

  4. Impacts of Stressors on Ranavirus Prevalence in American Bullfrog and

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    & Investigational Lab #12;4 Methods Ranavirus Testing and Identification Techniques: ·Electron microscopy ·PCR Organ head ha-1 Winter (15 Feb), Summer (15 June), Autumn (15 Oct) 2005 n = 104 R. catesbeiana n = 80 R

  5. Seroprevalences to viral pathogens in free-ranging and captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) on Namibian Farmland.

    PubMed

    Thalwitzer, Susanne; Wachter, Bettina; Robert, Nadia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Müller, Thomas; Lonzer, Johann; Meli, Marina L; Bay, Gert; Hofer, Heribert; Lutz, Hans

    2010-02-01

    Cheetah populations are diminishing rapidly in their natural habitat. One reason for their decline is thought to be a high susceptibility to (infectious) diseases because cheetahs in zoos suffer from high disease-induced mortality. Data on the health status of free-ranging cheetahs are scarce, and little is known about their exposure and susceptibility to infectious diseases. We determined seroprevalences to nine key viruses (feline herpesvirus 1, feline calicivirus, feline parvovirus, feline coronavirus, canine distemper virus, feline immunodeficiency virus [FIV], puma lentivirus, feline leukemia virus, and rabies virus) in 68 free-ranging cheetahs on east-central Namibian farmland, 24 nonvaccinated Namibian captive cheetahs, and several other wild carnivore species and conducted necropsies of cheetahs and other wild carnivores. Eight of 11 other wild carnivores were seropositive for at least one of the viruses, including the first record of an FIV-like infection in a wild felid west of the Kalahari, the caracal (Felis caracal). Seroprevalences of the free-ranging cheetahs were below 5% for all nine viruses, which is significantly lower than seroprevalences in nonvaccinated captive cheetahs and those for five of seven viruses in previously studied free-ranging cheetahs from north-central Namibia (L. Munson, L. Marker, E. Dubovi, J. A. Spencer, J. F. Evermann, and S. J. O'Brien, J. Wildl. Dis. 40:23-31, 2004). There was no clinical or pathological evidence of infectious diseases in living or dead cheetahs. The results suggest that while free-ranging wild carnivores may be a source of pathogens, the distribution of seroprevalences across studies mirrored local human population density and factors associated with human habitation, probably reflecting contact opportunities with (nonvaccinated) domestic and feral cats and dogs. They also suggest that Namibian cheetahs respond effectively to viral challenges, encouraging consistent and sustainable conservation efforts. PMID:19955325

  6. Viral Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns Regulate Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity via Competing Innate Cytokine Signals

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Brian P.; Holman, David W.; Cruz-Orengo, Lillian; Jujjavarapu, Harsha; Durrant, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pattern recognition receptor (PRR) detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as viral RNA, drives innate immune responses against West Nile virus (WNV), an emerging neurotropic pathogen. Here we demonstrate that WNV PAMPs orchestrate endothelial responses to WNV via competing innate immune cytokine signals at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a multicellular interface with highly specialized brain endothelial cells that normally prevents pathogen entry. While Th1 cytokines increase the permeability of endothelial barriers, type I interferon (IFN) promoted and stabilized BBB function. Induction of innate cytokines by pattern recognition pathways directly regulated BBB permeability and tight junction formation via balanced activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA, which in turn regulated the transendothelial trafficking of WNV. In vivo, mice with attenuated type I IFN signaling or IFN induction (Ifnar?/? Irf7?/?) exhibited enhanced BBB permeability and tight junction dysregulation after WNV infection. Together, these data provide new insight into host-pathogen interactions at the BBB during neurotropic viral infection. PMID:25161189

  7. Susceptibility of farmed juvenile giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus to a newly isolated grouper iridovirus (genus Ranavirus).

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Ma, Hongling; Su, Youlu; Wen, Weigeng; Feng, Juan; Guo, Zhixun; Qiu, Lihua

    2015-06-12

    A ranavirus was isolated from the diseased farmed groupers (Grouper iridovirus in genus Ranavirus, GIV-R), Epinephelus hybrids (blotchy rock cod, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus ?×giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus ?), in Sanya, Hainan, in July 2013. In this study, susceptibility of farmed juvenile giant grouper E. lanceolatus to GIV-R was determined by intraperitoneally injection. The cumulative mortality reached to 81% at 5 day post infection. Histologically, severe degeneration with massive pycnotic nuclei in spleen and kidney tissues was observed, and some small-size inclusion body-bearing cells (IBCs) existed in spleen. Hemorrhage and infiltration of inflammatory cells were presented in gill, liver and heart along with tissue degeneration and necrosis of varying severity. The results of immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the strongest immunolabellings were obtained from the kidney and spleen tissues, while intermediate intensity signals were observed in the heart, stomach, gill and liver tissues, and the weakest signals were obtained from the intestine and brain, but no signal was obtained in eyes. Electron microscopy revealed that spleen of moribund fish contained many viral particles in cytoplasm. Interestingly, in surviving fish, abnormal hypertrophic cells were observed in both splenic corpuscle and renal corpuscle, while no hypertrophic cell was observed in the other parts of spleen and kidney tissues. Moreover, immunolabellings only stained the hypertrophic cells in splenic corpuscle and renal corpuscle. This indicated that splenic corpuscle and renal corpuscle play an important role in GIV-R infection and replication. PMID:25912024

  8. The pathogenic role of torque teno sus virus 1 and 2 and their correlations with various viral pathogens and host immunocytes in wasting pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yao; Lin, Chun-Ming; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Chang, Hui-Wen; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Pang, Victor Fei

    2015-11-18

    The pathogenic role of torque teno sus virus (TTSuV) in swine is controversial among different studies. The present study intended to evaluate the potential pathogenicity of TTSuV based on its correlations with the histopathological changes, various common concurrently infected viral pathogens including porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine parvovirus (PPV), as well as changes in the distribution and population of host immunocytes such as B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, and macrophages by using the superficial inguinal lymph nodes (siLNs) of wasting pigs. A tissue microarray consisting of 270 available siLNs collected from 262 clinically wasting and 8 healthy pigs, respectively, were used for the detection of TTSuV1, TTSuV2, PCV2, PRRSV, and PPV by either in situ hybridization (ISH) or immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, and for the detection of various subsets of immunocytes by IHC staining with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD79a, and lysozyme. The slides were then subject to digital scanning followed by a semi-quantitative positive pixel evaluation for further statistical analysis. Although a high prevalence of TTSuV1 and/or TTSuV2 infection was noted in both wasting and healthy pigs, the wasting pigs had a significantly higher intensity in both TTSuV1 and TTSuV2 ISH-positive signals than healthy ones did. In the wasting pigs, a significant positive correlation in the tissue viral load was noted between TTSuV1 and TTSuV2 and between TTSuV2 and PCV2, but not between TTSuV1 and PCV2. Conversely, a significant negative correlation in the tissue viral load was revealed between TTSuV2, but not TTSuV1, and PRRSV. The tissue viral load of TTSuV1 was significantly correlated with B cell hyperplasia, while the tissue viral load of TTSuV2 was significantly correlated with increased macrophage population. The ISH positivity of TTSuV2 was significantly correlated with lymphoid depletion and granulomatous inflammation, which are the characteristic histopathological findings in postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome-affected pigs. These findings suggest that both TTSuV species may have the potential involving the development of porcine circovirus-associated lymphoid lesions via alternating the host immune system. PMID:26390821

  9. Methods and compositions for identifying cellular genes exploited by viral pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods and compositions for rapidly identifying CGEPs required for viral infection of mammalian cells are provided. Also provided are methods of inhibiting viral infection of mammalian cells by inhibiting the activity of one or more CGEPs (e.g., as identified in accordance with methods of the inve...

  10. Prevalence of Swine Viral and Bacterial Pathogens in Rodents and Stray Cats Captured around Pig Farms in Korea

    PubMed Central

    TRUONG, Quang Lam; SEO, Tae Won; YOON, Byung-Il; KIM, Hyeon-Cheol; HAN, Jeong Hee; HAHN, Tae-Wook

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2008, 102 rodents and 24 stray cats from the areas around 9 pig farms in northeast South Korea were used to determine the prevalence of the following selected swine pathogens: ten viral pathogens [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), rotavirus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)] and four bacterial pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, Salmonella and Lawsonia intracellularis). In total, 1,260 tissue samples from 102 rodents and 24 stray cats were examined by specific PCR and RT-PCR assays, including tissue samples of the brain, tonsils, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, small intestine, large intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes. The percentages of PCR-positive rodents for the porcine pathogens were as follows: 63.7% for Leptospira, 39.2% for Brucella, 6.8% for Salmonella, 15.7% for L. intracellularis, 14.7% for PCV2 and 3.9% for EMCV. The percentages of PCR-positive stray cats for the swine pathogens were as follows: 62.5% for Leptospira, 25% for Brucella, 12.5% for Salmonella, 12.5% for L. intracellularis and 4.2% for PEDV. These results may be helpful for developing control measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases of pigs. PMID:23892461

  11. Fate and transport of zoonotic, bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens during swine manure treatment, storage, and land application.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, C J; Bonner, J M; Cole, D; Vinjé, J; Constantini, V; Goyal, S; Gramer, M; Mackie, R; Meng, X J; Myers, G; Saif, L J

    2010-04-01

    Members of the public are always somewhat aware of foodborne and other zoonotic pathogens; however, recent illnesses traced to produce and the emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus have increased the scrutiny on all areas of food production. The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology has recently published a comprehensive review of the fate and transport of zoonotic pathogens that can be associated with swine manure. The majority of microbes in swine manure are not zoonotic, but several bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens have been detected. Awareness of the potential zoonotic pathogens in swine manure and how treatment, storage, and handling affect their survival and their potential to persist in the environment is critical to ensure that producers and consumers are not at risk. This review discusses the primary zoonotic pathogens associated with swine manure, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites, as well as their fate and transport. Because the ecology of microbes in swine waste is still poorly described, several recommendations for future research are made to better understand and reduce human health risks. These recommendations include examination of environmental and ecological conditions that contribute to off-farm transport and development of quantitative risk assessments. PMID:20348375

  12. Prevalence of swine viral and bacterial pathogens in rodents and stray cats captured around pig farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Seo, Tae Won; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Han, Jeong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2013-12-30

    In 2008, 102 rodents and 24 stray cats from the areas around 9 pig farms in northeast South Korea were used to determine the prevalence of the following selected swine pathogens: ten viral pathogens [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), rotavirus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)] and four bacterial pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, Salmonella and Lawsonia intracellularis). In total, 1,260 tissue samples from 102 rodents and 24 stray cats were examined by specific PCR and RT-PCR assays, including tissue samples of the brain, tonsils, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, small intestine, large intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes. The percentages of PCR-positive rodents for the porcine pathogens were as follows: 63.7% for Leptospira, 39.2% for Brucella, 6.8% for Salmonella, 15.7% for L. intracellularis, 14.7% for PCV2 and 3.9% for EMCV. The percentages of PCR-positive stray cats for the swine pathogens were as follows: 62.5% for Leptospira, 25% for Brucella, 12.5% for Salmonella, 12.5% for L. intracellularis and 4.2% for PEDV. These results may be helpful for developing control measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases of pigs. PMID:23892461

  13. INCREASING LEVELS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENS: POTENTIAL FOR AFFECTING VIRAL EVOLUTION AND PATHOGENICITY - A SPECULATIVE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The author examines available data concerning the ways in which information contained in viral genomes is altered. echanisms of damage and repair of nucleic acids are discussed. nformation available on the rates of evolution of various viruses is summarized.

  14. Replacement of a dominant viral pathogen by a fungal pathogen does not alter the collapse of a regional forest insect outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Ann E; Tobin, Patrick C; Haynes, Kyle J

    2015-03-01

    Natural enemies and environmental factors likely both influence the population cycles of many forest-defoliating insect species. Previous work suggests precipitation influences the spatiotemporal patterns of gypsy moth outbreaks in North America, and it has been hypothesized that precipitation could act indirectly through effects on pathogens. We investigated the potential role of climatic and environmental factors in driving pathogen epizootics and parasitism at 57 sites over an area of ?72,300 km(2) in four US mid-Atlantic states during the final year (2009) of a gypsy moth outbreak. Prior work has largely reported that the Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdNPV) was the principal mortality agent responsible for regional collapses of gypsy moth outbreaks. However, in the gypsy moth outbreak-prone US mid-Atlantic region, the fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga has replaced the virus as the dominant source of mortality in dense host populations. The severity of the gypsy moth population crash, measured as the decline in egg mass densities from 2009 to 2010, tended to increase with the prevalence of E. maimaiga and larval parasitoids, but not LdNPV. A significantly negative spatial association was detected between rates of fungal mortality and parasitism, potentially indicating displacement of parasitoids by E. maimaiga. Fungal, viral, and parasitoid mortality agents differed in their associations with local abiotic and biotic conditions, but precipitation significantly influenced both fungal and viral prevalence. This study provides the first spatially robust evidence of the dominance of E. maimaiga during the collapse of a gypsy moth outbreak and highlights the important role played by microclimatic conditions. PMID:25510217

  15. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS IN CAMELIDS: AN EMERGING PATHOGEN AND WAYS TO MONITOR HERD INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The subject of this report will attempt to tie in several aspects of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and its most recent incursion into the camelid family, namely llamas and alpacas. We have known that both llamas and alpacas are susceptible to BVDV infections for over 20 years. In some cases, ...

  16. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  17. Distribution of an invasive aquatic pathogen (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus) in the Great Lakes and its relationship to shipping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bain, Mark B.; Cornwell, Emily R.; Hope, Kristine M.; Eckerlin, Geofrey E.; Casey, Rufina N.; Groocock, Geoffrey H.; Getchell, Rodman G.; Bowser, Paul R.; Winton, James R.; Batts, William N.; Cangelosi, Allegra; Casey, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a rhabdovirus found in fish from oceans of the northern hemisphere and freshwaters of Europe. It has caused extensive losses of cultured and wild fish and has become established in the North American Great Lakes. Large die-offs of wild fish in the Great Lakes due to VHSV have alarmed the public and provoked government attention on the introduction and spread of aquatic animal pathogens in freshwaters. We investigated the relations between VHSV dispersion and shipping and boating activity in the Great Lakes by sampling fish and water at sites that were commercial shipping harbors, recreational boating centers, and open shorelines. Fish and water samples were individually analyzed for VHSV using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and cell culture assays. Of 1,221 fish of 17 species, 55 were VHSV positive with highly varied qRT-PCR titers (1 to 5,950,000 N gene copies). The detections of VHSV in fish and water samples were closely associated and the virus was detected in 21 of 30 sites sampled. The occurrence of VHSV was not related to type of site or shipping related invasion hotspots. Our results indicate that VHSV is widely dispersed in the Great Lakes and is both an enzootic and epizootic pathogen. We demonstrate that pathogen distribution information could be developed quickly and is clearly needed for aquatic ecosystem conservation, management of affected populations, and informed regulation of the worldwide trade of aquatic organisms.

  18. SEWAGE SLUDGE VIRAL AND PATHOGENIC AGENTS IN SOIL-PLANT-ANIMAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary study was carried out to determine the ultimate fate of various toxic elements or pathogens associated with Florida and Chicago municipal sludges when applied to soil-plant-water systems and to determine physiologic, pathologic, growth, and reproductive respon...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOMARKER SYSTEM FOR DETECTING EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE VIRAL PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has published a drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL) that includes waterborne pathogens and chemicals that may be considered for regulation at a future date. For each contaminant on the CCL, the Agency will need sufficient data to conduct analyses on the extent of...

  20. Production of transgenic rainbow trout resistant to infection by bacterial and viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exploiting the natural microbe-defense (innate defense) mechanism, originally discovered in insects and subsequently found in many animal species, may lead to the development of a novel approach for protecting commercially important finfish and crustacean species from infection by microbial pathogen...

  1. Is There Still Room for Novel Viral Pathogens in Pediatric Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A.; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E.; Arias-Ortiz, María A.; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N.; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma. del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E.; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F.; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low. PMID:25412469

  2. Is there still room for novel viral pathogens in pediatric respiratory tract infections?

    PubMed

    Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E; Arias-Ortiz, María A; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I; Arias, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low. PMID:25412469

  3. In Search of Pathogens: Transcriptome-Based Identification of Viral Sequences from the Pine Processionary Moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa)

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowska, Agata K.; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Millán-Leiva, Anabel; Sanz-Carbonell, Alejandro; Muratoglu, Hacer; Herrero, Salvador; Demirbag, Zihni

    2015-01-01

    Thaumetopoea pityocampa (pine processionary moth) is one of the most important pine pests in the forests of Mediterranean countries, Central Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Apart from causing significant damage to pinewoods, T. pityocampa occurrence is also an issue for public and animal health, as it is responsible for dermatological reactions in humans and animals by contact with its irritating hairs. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed the fast and cost-effective generation of genetic information of interest to understand different biological aspects of non-model organisms as well as the identification of potential pathogens. Using these technologies, we have obtained and characterized the transcriptome of T. pityocampa larvae collected in 12 different geographical locations in Turkey. cDNA libraries for Illumina sequencing were prepared from four larval tissues, head, gut, fat body and integument. By pooling the sequences from Illumina platform with those previously published using the Roche 454-FLX and Sanger methods we generated the largest reference transcriptome of T. pityocampa. In addition, this study has also allowed identification of possible viral pathogens with potential application in future biocontrol strategies. PMID:25626148

  4. Canine Enteric Coronaviruses: Emerging Viral Pathogens with Distinct Recombinant Spike Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Licitra, Beth N.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Canine enteric coronavirus (CCoV) is an alphacoronavirus infecting dogs that is closely related to enteric coronaviruses of cats and pigs. While CCoV has traditionally caused mild gastro-intestinal clinical signs, there are increasing reports of lethal CCoV infections in dogs, with evidence of both gastrointestinal and systemic viral dissemination. Consequently, CCoV is now considered to be an emerging infectious disease of dogs. In addition to the two known serotypes of CCoV, novel recombinant variants of CCoV have been found containing spike protein N-terminal domains (NTDs) that are closely related to those of feline and porcine strains. The increase in disease severity in dogs and the emergence of novel CCoVs can be attributed to the high level of recombination within the spike gene that can occur during infection by more than one CCoV type in the same host. PMID:25153347

  5. Source identification of bacterial and viral pathogens and their survival/fading in the process of wastewater treatment, reclamation, and environmental reuse.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinhong; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ji, Zheng; Xu, Limei; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic safety is drawing wide concern in water reclamation and reuse. In order to elucidate survive/fade of pathogens during the processes of wastewater treatment and reclamation, general indicators (fecal coliform and Escherichia coli), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella and Shigella) and viruses (enterovirus, rotavirus and norovirus) were investigated in an A(2)O-MBR system. Attention was paid to their strengths from different sources, at various stages of the treatment, and in the product water. According to findings, black water was the main source for pathogens-at least 1-2-log higher in concentration than those from other sources. The preliminary treatment of wastewater by fine screens could bring about 0.2-0.4-log removal for almost all pathogens. The biological treatment units achieved almost identical removal (1.3-1.7-log) for bacteria and viruses. However, subsequent treatment in the membrane bioreactor showed varied removal for fecal coliform (4.7-log), E. coli (2.6-log) and the other pathogens (0.7-1.0-log), indicating that a high reduction of indicator bacteria may not imply equivalent removal of bacterial and viral pathogens. Chlorination was proved to be effective for eliminating all pathogens. In the artificial lake where the product water was stored, fecal coliform was not detected during the study period, but E. coli and pathogens were frequently detected, indicating that these bacterial and viral pathogens may be originating from non-fecal sources. On sunny summer days, the lake water could be bacteria-free due to sunlight radiation, but viruses were still detectable. Therefore, secondary disinfection may have to be adopted when the reclaimed water stored in such an open reservoir is supplied for strict reuse purposes. PMID:25374337

  6. Pathogenic and pathological characteristic of new type gosling viral enteritis first observed in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, An-Chun; Wang, Ming-Shu; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Guo, Yu-Fei; Liu, Zhao-Yu; Fang, Peng-Fei

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the purifying method and characteristics of new gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV), the etiological agent of new gosling viral enteritis (NGVE) which was first recognized in China, as well as the pathomorphological development in goslings infected artificially with NGVEV. METHODS: ? NGVEV virions were purified by the procedure of treatment with chloroform and ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis to remove the sulfate radical and ammonium ion and separation by gel filtration chromatography, and SDS-PAGE. ? Forty 2-day-old White Sichuan goslings were orally administered with NGVEV and 24 h later 2 birds were randomly selected and killed at 24 h intervals until death occurred. Specimens (duodenum, ileum, liver, heart, kidney, spleen, lung, proventriculus, pancreas, esophagus, and the intestinal embolus) were taken until all birds in this group died and were sectioned and stained with hemotoxylin and eosin and studied by light microscope. RESULTS: NGVEV shared the typical characteristics of Adenovirus and which structural proteins consisted of 15 polypeptides. Necrosis and sloughing of the epithelial cells covering the villus tips of the duodenum were first observed in goslings 2 d postinfection artificially with NGVEV. With the progress of infection, this lesion rapidly occurred in the epithelium at the base of the villus and with infiltration of the inflammatory cells, the jejunum tended to be involved. With the intensification of mucosa necrosis and inflammatory exudation of the small intestine, fibrinonecrotic enteritis was further developed and embolus composed of either intestinal contents wrapped by pseudomembrane or of the mixture of fibrous exudate and necrotic intestinal mucosa were observed in the middle-lower part of the small intestine. This structure occluded the intestinal tract and made the intestine dilated in appearance. The intestinal glandular cells underwent degeneration, necrosis and might be found sloughed into the lumen. Hemorrhage and hyperemia could be observed on the lung and kidney. Epithelial cells of the renal tubular underwent degeneration. In some cases, granular degeneration and fatty degeneration could be found in the liver and in some cases at a later stage of this disease the epithelial cells of trachea and proventriculus might be found sloughed. In some cases at an early stage of this disease, cardiac hyperemia and hemorrhage could be observed. Esophagus, pancreas and brain were found normal. Analyses and comparisons between the pathologic lesions of NGVE and Gosling Plague (GP) were available in this paper as well. CONCLUSION: ? NGVEV is adenovirus. ? Pathological characteristic could be as the data for NGVE diagnosis. PMID:11819853

  7. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Plethora of Viral Pathogens From Single Combinatorial Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. Anthony; Burioni, Roberto; Sanna, Pietro P.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1993-05-01

    Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro.

  8. Direct Metagenomic Detection of Viral Pathogens in Nasal and Fecal Specimens Using an Unbiased High-Throughput Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sakon, Naomi; Ueda, Mayo; Tougan, Takahiro; Yamashita, Akifumi; Goto, Naohisa; Takahashi, Kazuo; Yasunaga, Teruo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Tagami, Michihira; Morita, Ryoji; Maeda, Norihiro; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Horii, Toshihiro; Iida, Tetsuya; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    With the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic of 2003 and renewed attention on avian influenza viral pandemics, new surveillance systems are needed for the earlier detection of emerging infectious diseases. We applied a “next-generation” parallel sequencing platform for viral detection in nasopharyngeal and fecal samples collected during seasonal influenza virus (Flu) infections and norovirus outbreaks from 2005 to 2007 in Osaka, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.1–0.25 ml of nasopharyngeal aspirates (N?=?3) and fecal specimens (N?=?5), and more than 10 µg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing of these 8 samples yielded 15,298–32,335 (average 24,738) reads in a single 7.5 h run. In nasopharyngeal samples, although whole genome analysis was not available because the majority (>90%) of reads were host genome–derived, 20–460 Flu-reads were detected, which was sufficient for subtype identification. In fecal samples, bacteria and host cells were removed by centrifugation, resulting in gain of 484–15,260 reads of norovirus sequence (78–98% of the whole genome was covered), except for one specimen that was under-detectable by RT-PCR. These results suggest that our unbiased high-throughput sequencing approach is useful for directly detecting pathogenic viruses without advance genetic information. Although its cost and technological availability make it unlikely that this system will very soon be the diagnostic standard worldwide, this system could be useful for the earlier discovery of novel emerging viruses and bioterrorism, which are difficult to detect with conventional procedures. PMID:19156205

  9. Impact of Piriformospora indica on tomato growth and on interaction with fungal and viral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fakhro, Ahmad; Andrade-Linares, Diana Rocío; von Bargen, Susanne; Bandte, Martina; Büttner, Carmen; Grosch, Rita; Schwarz, Dietmar; Franken, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root endophytic fungus with plant-promoting properties in numerous plant species and induces resistance against root and shoot pathogens in barley, wheat, and Arabidopsis. A study over several years showed that the endophyte P. indica colonised the roots of the most consumed vegetable crop tomato. P. indica improved the growth of tomato resulting in increased biomass of leaves by up to 20%. Limitation of disease severity caused by Verticillium dahliae by more than 30% was observed on tomato plants colonised by the endophyte. Further experiments were carried out in hydroponic cultures which are commonly used for the indoor production of tomatoes in central Europe. After adaptation of inoculation techniques (inoculum density, plant stage), it was shown that P. indica influences the concentration of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato shoots. The outcome of the interaction seems to be affected by light intensity. Most importantly, the endophyte increases tomato fruit biomass in hydroponic culture concerning fresh weight (up to 100%) and dry matter content (up to 20%). Hence, P. indica represents a suitable growth promoting endophyte for tomato which can be applied in production systems of this important vegetable plant not only in soil, but also in hydroponic cultures. PMID:19789897

  10. Interferometric biosensing platform for multiplexed digital detection of viral pathogens and biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daaboul, George

    Label-free optical biosensors have been established as proven tools for monitoring specific biomolecular interactions. However, compact and robust embodiments of such instruments have yet to be introduced in order to provide sensitive, quantitative, and high-throughput biosensing for low-cost research and clinical applications. Here we present the interferometric reflectance-imaging sensor (IRIS). IRIS allows sensitive label free analysis using an inexpensive and durable multi-color LED illumination source on a silicon based surface. IRIS monitors biomolecular interaction through measurement of biomass addition to the sensor's surface. We demonstrate the capability of this system to dynamically monitor antigen---antibody interactions with a noise floor of 5.2 pg/mm 2 and DNA single mismatch detection under isothermal melting conditions in an array format. Ensemble detection of binding events using IRIS did not provide the sensitivity needed for detection of infectious disease and biomarkers at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, a new approach was adapted to the IRIS platform that allowed the detection and identification of individual nanoparticles on the sensor's surface. The new detection method was termed single-particle IRIS (SP-IRIS). We developed two detection modalities for SP-IRIS. The first modality is when the target is a nanoparticle such as a virus. We verified that SP-IRIS can accurately detect and size individual viral particles. Then we demonstrated that single nanoparticle counting and sizing methodology on SP-IRIS leads to a specific and sensitive virus sensor that can be multiplexed. Finally, we developed an assay for the detection of Ebola and Marburg. A detection limit of 3 x 103 PFU/ml was demonstrated for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotyped with Ebola or Marburg virus glycoprotein. We have demonstrated that virus detection can be done in human whole blood directly without the need for sample preparation. The second modality of SP-IRIS we developed was single molecule counting of biomarkers utilizing a sandwich assay with detection probes labeled with gold nanoparticles. We demonstrated the use of single molecule counting in a nucleic acid assay for melanoma biomarker detection. We showed that a single molecule counting assay can lead to detection limits in the attomolar range. The improved sensitivity of IRIS utilizing single nanoparticle detection holds promise for a simple and low-cost technology for rapid virus detection and multiplexed molecular screening for clinical applications.

  11. Epidemiology of viral pathogens of free-ranging dogs and Indian foxes in a human-dominated landscape in central India.

    PubMed

    Belsare, A V; Vanak, A T; Gompper, M E

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing concern that free-ranging domestic dog (Canis familiaris) populations may serve as reservoirs of pathogens which may be transmitted to wildlife. We documented the prevalence of antibodies to three viral pathogens, canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus (CAV), in free-ranging dog and sympatric Indian fox (Vulpes bengalensis) populations in and around the Great Indian Bustard Wildlife Sanctuary, in Maharashtra, central India. A total of 219 dogs and 33 foxes were sampled during the study period. Ninety-three percentage of dogs and 87% of foxes were exposed to one or more of the three pathogens. Exposure rates in dogs were high: >88% for CPV, >72% for CDV and 71% for CAV. A large proportion of adult dogs had antibodies against these pathogens due to seroconversion following earlier natural infection. The high prevalence of exposure to these pathogens across the sampling sessions, significantly higher exposure rates of adults compared with juveniles, and seroconversion in some unvaccinated dogs documented during the study period suggests that these pathogens are enzootic. The prevalence of exposure to CPV, CDV and CAV in foxes was 48%, 18% and 52%, respectively. Further, a high rate of mortality was documented in foxes with serologic evidence of ongoing CDV infection. Dogs could be playing a role in the maintenance and transmission of these pathogens in the fox population, but our findings show that most dogs in the population are immune to these pathogens by virtue of earlier natural infection, and therefore, these individuals make little current or future contribution to viral maintenance. Vaccination of this cohort will neither greatly improve their collective immune status nor contribute to herd immunity. Our findings have potentially important implications for dog disease control programmes that propose using canine vaccination as a tool for conservation management of wild carnivore populations. PMID:25135467

  12. Pinellia ternata agglutinin expression in chloroplasts confers broad spectrum resistance against aphid, whitefly, Lepidopteran insects, bacterial and viral pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Broad spectrum protection against different insects and pathogens requires multigene engineering. However, such broad spectrum protection against biotic stress is provided by a single protein in some medicinal plants. Therefore, tobacco chloroplasts were transformed with the agglutinin gene from Pinellia ternata (pta), a widely cultivated Chinese medicinal herb. Pinellia ternata agglutinin (PTA) was expressed up to 9.2% of total soluble protein in mature leaves. Purified PTA showed similar hemagglutination activity as snowdrop lectin. Artificial diet with purified PTA from transplastomic plants showed marked and broad insecticidal activity. In planta bioassays conducted with T0 or T1 generation PTA lines showed that the growth of aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer) was reduced by 89%–92% when compared with untransformed (UT) plants. Similarly, the larval survival and total population of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) on transplastomic lines were reduced by 91%–93% when compared with UT plants. This is indeed the first report of lectin controlling whitefly infestation. When transplastomic PTA leaves were fed to corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens) or the beet armyworm (spodoptera exigua), 100% mortality was observed against all these three insects. In planta bioassays revealed Erwinia population to be 10 000-fold higher in control than in PTA lines. Similar results were observed with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) challenge. Therefore, broad spectrum resistance to homopteran (sap-sucking), Lepidopteran insects as well as anti-bacterial or anti-viral activity observed in PTA lines provides a new option to engineer protection against biotic stress by hyper-expression of an unique protein that is naturally present in a medicinal plant. PMID:22077160

  13. Respiratory viral pathogens associated with lower respiratory tract disease among young children in the highlands of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Chidlow, Glenys R.; Laing, Ingrid A.; Harnett, Gerald B.; Greenhill, Andrew R.; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Siba, Peter M.; Pomat, William S.; Shellam, Geoffrey R.; Smith, David W.; Lehmann, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) commonly result in fatal outcomes in the young children of Papua New Guinea (PNG). However, comprehensive studies of the viral aetiology of ALRI have not been conducted in PNG for almost 30 years. Objectives To determine the viruses associated with ALRI among children living in the PNG highlands using sensitive molecular detection techniques. Study design Pernasal swabs were collected routinely between 1 week and 18 months of age and also during episodes of ALRI, as part of a neonatal pneumococcal conjugate vaccine trial. A tandem multiplex real-time PCR assay was used to test for a comprehensive range of respiratory viruses in samples collected from 221 young children. Picornavirus typing was supported by DNA sequence analysis. Results Recognized pathogenic respiratory viruses were detected in 198/273 (73%) samples collected from children with no evidence of ALRI and 69/80 (86%) samples collected during ALRI episodes. Human rhinoviruses (HRV) species A, B and C were detected in 152 (56%) samples from non-ALRI children and 50 (63%) samples collected during ALRI episodes. Partial structural region sequences for two new species C rhinoviruses were added to the GenBank database. ALRI was associated with detection of adenovirus species B (p < 0.01) or C (p < 0.05), influenza A (p < 0.0001) or respiratory syncytial virus (p < 0.0001). Multiple viruses were detected more often during ALRI episodes (49%) than when children displayed no symptoms of ALRI (18%) (p < 0.0001). Conclusions The burden of infection with respiratory viruses remains significant in young children living in the PNG highlands. PMID:22595309

  14. 1918 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin (HA) and the Viral RNA Polymerase Complex Enhance Viral Pathogenicity, but Only HA Induces Aberrant Host Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Watanabe, Shinji; Benecke, Arndt G.; Katze, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The 1918 pandemic influenza virus was the most devastating infectious agent in human history, causing fatal pneumonia and an estimated 20 to 50 million deaths worldwide. Previous studies indicated a prominent role of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene in efficient replication and high virulence of the 1918 virus in mice. It is, however, still unclear whether the high replication ability or the 1918 influenza virus HA gene is required for 1918 virus to exhibit high virulence in mice. Here, we examined the biological properties of reassortant viruses between the 1918 virus and a contemporary human H1N1 virus (A/Kawasaki/173/2001 [K173]) in a mouse model. In addition to the 1918 influenza virus HA, we demonstrated the role of the viral RNA replication complex in efficient replication of viruses in mouse lungs, whereas only the HA gene is responsible for lethality in mice. Global gene expression profiling of infected mouse lungs revealed that the 1918 influenza virus HA was sufficient to induce transcriptional changes similar to those induced by the 1918 virus, despite difference in lymphocyte gene expression. Increased expression of genes associated with the acute-phase response and the protein ubiquitination pathway were enriched during infections with the 1918 and 1918HA/K173 viruses, whereas reassortant viruses bearing the 1918 viral RNA polymerase complex induced transcriptional changes similar to those seen with the K173 virus. Taken together, these data suggest that HA and the viral RNA polymerase complex are critical determinants of Spanish influenza pathogenesis, but only HA, and not the viral RNA polymerase complex and NP, is responsible for extreme host responses observed in mice infected with the 1918 influenza virus. PMID:23449804

  15. 1918 Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and the viral RNA polymerase complex enhance viral pathogenicity, but only HA induces aberrant host responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Watanabe, Shinji; Benecke, Arndt G; Katze, Michael G; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-05-01

    The 1918 pandemic influenza virus was the most devastating infectious agent in human history, causing fatal pneumonia and an estimated 20 to 50 million deaths worldwide. Previous studies indicated a prominent role of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene in efficient replication and high virulence of the 1918 virus in mice. It is, however, still unclear whether the high replication ability or the 1918 influenza virus HA gene is required for 1918 virus to exhibit high virulence in mice. Here, we examined the biological properties of reassortant viruses between the 1918 virus and a contemporary human H1N1 virus (A/Kawasaki/173/2001 [K173]) in a mouse model. In addition to the 1918 influenza virus HA, we demonstrated the role of the viral RNA replication complex in efficient replication of viruses in mouse lungs, whereas only the HA gene is responsible for lethality in mice. Global gene expression profiling of infected mouse lungs revealed that the 1918 influenza virus HA was sufficient to induce transcriptional changes similar to those induced by the 1918 virus, despite difference in lymphocyte gene expression. Increased expression of genes associated with the acute-phase response and the protein ubiquitination pathway were enriched during infections with the 1918 and 1918HA/K173 viruses, whereas reassortant viruses bearing the 1918 viral RNA polymerase complex induced transcriptional changes similar to those seen with the K173 virus. Taken together, these data suggest that HA and the viral RNA polymerase complex are critical determinants of Spanish influenza pathogenesis, but only HA, and not the viral RNA polymerase complex and NP, is responsible for extreme host responses observed in mice infected with the 1918 influenza virus. PMID:23449804

  16. The 18S rDNA sequence of Synchytrium endobioticum and its utility in microarrays for the simultaneous detection of fungal and viral pathogens of potato.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Ismail; Koerbler, Marianne; Stachewicz, Hans; Winter, Stephan

    2005-08-01

    Resting spores extracted from wart (Synchytrium endobioticum)-infected potato tubers were used for DNA extraction and amplification of 18S rDNA. Analysis of the cloned, sequenced fragment revealed high similarity to members of the Chytridiomycota. Using this information, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed and arrayed onto glass slides for detection of the pathogen. Viral sequence information available in the databank was retrieved, or new viral sequences were generated, and used to design probes for specific detection of important quarantine viruses of potato. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the oligonucleotide probes, total RNA from infected plants was reverse transcribed, labelled with Cyanine 5, and hybridised with the microarray. A significant number of the oligonucleotide probes exhibited high specificity to S. endobioticum, Andean potato latent virus, Andean potato mottle virus, Potato black ringspot virus, and Potato spindle tuber viroid. Hybridisation signals of sub-arrays within slides were reproducible (r = 0.79) with a high correlation coefficient of hybridisation repetitions (0.73). Our results demonstrate the potential of microarray-based hybridisation for identification of multiple pathogen targets, which will find application in quarantine laboratories, where parallel testing for diverse pathogens is essential. PMID:15800764

  17. A reverse genetics system for the Great Lakes strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: the NV gene is required for pathogenicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammayappan, Arun; Kurath, Gael; Thompson, Tarin M.; Vakharia, Vikram N.

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), belonging to the genus Novirhabdovirus in the family of Rhabdoviridae, causes a highly contagious disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. Recently, a novel genotype of VHSV, designated IVb, has invaded the Great Lakes in North America, causing large-scale epidemics in wild fish. An efficient reverse genetics system was developed to generate a recombinant VHSV of genotype IVb from cloned cDNA. The recombinant VHSV (rVHSV) was comparable to the parental wild-type strain both in vitro and in vivo, causing high mortality in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A modified recombinant VHSV was generated in which the NV gene was substituted with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (rVHSV-?NV-EGFP), and another recombinant was made by inserting the EGFP gene into the full-length viral clone between the P and M genes (rVHSV-EGFP). The in vitro replication kinetics of rVHSV-EGFP was similar to rVHSV; however, the rVHSV-?NV-EGFP grew 2 logs lower. In yellow perch challenges, wtVHSV and rVHSV induced 82-100% cumulative per cent mortality (CPM), respectively, whereas rVHSV-EGFP produced 62% CPM and rVHSV-?NV-EGFP caused only 15% CPM. No reversion of mutation was detected in the recovered viruses and the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign gene after several passages. These results indicate that the NV gene of VHSV is not essential for viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but it plays an important role in viral replication efficiency and pathogenicity. This system will facilitate studies of VHSV replication, virulence, and production of viral vectored vaccines.

  18. Seroprevalence of selected viral and bacterial pathogens in free-ranging European bison from the Bia?owieza Primeval Forest (Poland).

    PubMed

    Salwa, A; Anusz, K; Arent, Z; Paprocka, G; Kita, J

    2007-01-01

    Blood was collected from bison that were selected between 1991 and 2001 for poor body condition, cachexia, lameness and balanoposthitis. Sera were tested for antibodies to bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PI-3), Brucella abortus, Chlamydophila abortus, Coxiella burnetti, and Leptospira interrogans. The results of serological tests showed a prevalence of low titers of a serological reaction to Chlamydophila abortus (45.1%), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (29.5%), Leptospira interrogans (21.3%) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (13.9%). There were differences in the prevalence of antibodies to Ch. abortus between female and male bison. Futhermore, a relationship between age and antibodies to BVDV was observed in older bison. These results suggest that there is some transmission of bacterial and viral pathogens occurring between domestic and wild ruminants grazing in the same pastures in the peripherial areas of Bialowieza Primeval Forest. PMID:17388020

  19. 3 ``Ranaviruses: An emerging threat to ectothermic vertebrates'' Report of the 4 First International Symposium on Ranaviruses, Minneapolis MN July 8, 2011

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    1 2 Review 3 ``Ranaviruses: An emerging threat to ectothermic vertebrates'' Report of the 4 First to the global biodiversity of ectothermic ver- 26tebrates was addressed by 23 scientists from nine countries fish, amphibian and reptilian species. Thus, RVs 45 are an emerging threat to ectothermic vertebrates

  20. Ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhances host resistance to viral, bacterial, and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Jeong Mee; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-10-01

    In many plants, including hot pepper plants, productivity is greatly affected by pathogen attack. We reported previously that tobacco stress-induced gene 1 (Tsi1) may play an important role in regulating stress responsive genes and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. In this study, we demonstrated that overexpression of Tsi1 gene in transgenic hot pepper plants induced constitutive expression of several PR genes in the absence of stress or pathogen treatment. The transgenic hot pepper plants expressing Tsi1 exhibited resistance to Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Furthermore, these transgenic plants showed increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and also an oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. These results suggested that ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhanced the resistance of the plants to various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and oomycete. These results suggest that using transcriptional regulatory protein genes may contribute to developing broad-spectrum resistance in crop plants. PMID:12437295

  1. Experimental evidence in support of single host maintenance of a multihost pathogen

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    in common toad (Bufo bufo) populations. Here we present experimental evidence that a single host may be able to maintain a multihost pathogen. We exposed common frog tadpoles and common toad tadpoles to ranavirus ¼ 0.0320, Wilcoxon: P ¼ 0.0835, df ¼ 1) than those exposed to common toad isolates. The high dose

  2. The population genetics of drug resistance evolution in natural1 populations of viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic pathogens2

    E-print Network

    Petrov, Dmitri

    to the costs borne by human19 health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate the economic to jump from multiple host species to humans (e.g.15 SARS coronavirus or Ebola virus; Woolhouse et al 2005 to control epidemic pathogens, there22 is an urgent need to understand the evolution and spread of drug

  3. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction and purification on an automated microfluidic cassette from bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Spang, Peter; Schwind, Carmen; Drese, Klaus S; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Nieto, Benjamin; Camps, Marta; Landgraf, Bryan; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; Samitier, Josep; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Roeser, Tina

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of an automated sample preparation procedure for etiological agents of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (CA-LRTI). The consecutive assay steps, including sample re-suspension, pre-treatment, lysis, nucleic acid purification, and concentration, were integrated into a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) cassette that is operated hands-free by a demonstrator setup, providing fluidic and valve actuation. The performance of the assay was evaluated on viral and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial broth cultures previously sampled using a nasopharyngeal swab. Sample preparation on the microfluidic cassette resulted in higher or similar concentrations of pure bacterial DNA or viral RNA compared to manual benchtop experiments. The miniaturization and integration of the complete sample preparation procedure, to extract purified nucleic acids from real samples of CA-LRTI pathogens to, and above, lab quality and efficiency, represent important steps towards its application in a point-of-care test (POCT) for rapid diagnosis of CA-LRTI. PMID:24615272

  4. A new ranavirus isolated from Pseudacris clarkii tadpoles in playa wetlands in the southern High Plains, Texas.

    PubMed

    Torrence, Shannon M; Green, D Earl; Benson, Catherine J; Ip, Hon S; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2010-06-01

    Mass die-offs of amphibian populations pose a challenging problem for conservation biologists. Ranaviruses often cause systemic infections in amphibians and, in North America, are especially virulent and lethal to larvae and metamorphs. In this paper we describe a novel ranavirus isolate as well as the first recorded occurrence of ranavirus in the southern High Plains of Texas and in associated populations of the spotted chorus frog Pseudacris clarkii. The breeding sites were playas, that is, wetlands that fill via isolated thunderstorms that can occur infrequently; thus, not every playa has water or breeding amphibians annually. We did not detect ranavirus in sympatric anurans, but other reports document ranaviruses in Pseudacris spp. elsewhere. The occurrence of multiple isolates of ranavirus in a number of Pseudacris species suggests that this genus of frogs is highly susceptible to ranaviruses and may experience exceptionally high mortality rates from infection. Thus, the virus may contribute to substantial seasonal population declines and low seasonal recruitment, with negative impacts on populations of breeding adults in successive years. PMID:20848879

  5. A multiplexed reverse transcriptase PCR assay for identification of viral respiratory pathogens at point-of-care

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; .Ortiz, J I; Tammero, L; Birch, J M; Derlet, R W; Cohen, S; Manning, D; McBride, M T

    2007-04-11

    We have developed a nucleic acid-based assay that is rapid, sensitive, specific, and can be used for the simultaneous detection of 5 common human respiratory pathogens including influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza type 1 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus group B, C, and E. Typically, diagnosis on an un-extracted clinical sample can be provided in less than 3 hours, including sample collection, preparation, and processing, as well as data analysis. Such a multiplexed panel would enable rapid broad-spectrum pathogen testing on nasal swabs, and therefore allow implementation of infection control measures, and timely administration of antiviral therapies. This article presents a summary of the assay performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Limits of detection are provided for each targeted respiratory pathogen, and result comparisons are performed on clinical samples, our goal being to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the multiplexed assay to the combination of immunofluorescence and shell vial culture currently implemented at the UCDMC hospital. Overall, the use of the multiplexed RT-PCR assay reduced the rate of false negatives by 4% and reduced the rate of false positives by up to 10%. The assay correctly identified 99.3% of the clinical negatives, 97% of adenovirus, 95% of RSV, 92% of influenza B, and 77% of influenza A without any extraction performed on the clinical samples. The data also showed that extraction will be needed for parainfluenza virus, which was only identified correctly 24% of the time on un-extracted samples.

  6. Problem of immunoglobulin M co-detection in serological response to bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens among children suspected of legionellosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was an analysis of the serological response to respiratory bacterial and viral pathogens, in 156 children admitted to hospital in Warsaw with a suspicion of legionellosis. Levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) M to Bordetella pertussis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenoviruses, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) t. 1-4 and influenza t. A + B viruses were determined retrospectively by ELISAs. In the prospective examinations (only Legionella pneumophila sg1), a positive level of IgM was found in 35 patients, but in 59 children together with retrospective tests. There were positive results for B. pertussis (21 children), followed by HPIV (10 children), M. pneumoniae (5 patients), RSV (4 persons), adenoviruses (3 children), and influenza A + B virus (3 persons). Positive results for > 1 agent were found in 16 children. The most often co-detected IgM were to L. pneumophila sg1 and B. pertussis (9 children) and L. pneumophila sg1 and M. pneumoniae (5 patients). The distribution of IgM to L. pneumophila sg1, B. pertussis and HPIV among children ? 4 years differed significantly from IgM specific to other pathogens. A high number of HPIV infections, mainly single, was found among infants. Positive results of IgM to L. pneumophila sg1 were mainly found in children aged 4-5 years. and the oldest children (over 10 years.). However, among the oldest children, anti-L. pneumophila sg1 antibodies were often found together with IgM to B. pertussis. Infections due to more than 2 pathogens were only observed among patients with pneumonia, especially due to L. pneumophila sg1 and/or B. pertussis. Conversely, co-detection of IgM ELISA for L. pneumophila and M. pneumoniae were mainly detected among patients hospitalized without pneumonia. PMID:26557031

  7. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S.; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R.; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M.

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus). PMID:26381398

  8. First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong Kong Amphibian Trade Jonathan E. Kolby1,2 *, Kristine M. Smith2 , Lee Berger1 , William B. Karesh2 of America, 3 Amphibian Disease Laboratory, Institute for Conservation Research, San Diego Zoo Global, San

  9. BIOMARKERS OF VIRAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Viral and protozoan pathogens associated with raw sludge can cause encephalitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and a number of other diseases. Raw sludge that has been treated to reduce these pathogens can be used for land application according to the regulations spec...

  10. The Laurentian Great Lakes strain (MI03) of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus is highly pathogenic for juvenile muskellunge, Esox masquinongy (Mitchill).

    PubMed

    Kim, R K; Faisal, M

    2010-06-01

    The Great Lakes strain of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolated from adult subclinical muskellunge, Esox masquinongy (Mitchill), in Lake St. Clair, MI, USA was shown to be highly pathogenic in juvenile muskellunge through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and waterborne challenge. Mortality began as early as 3 days after exposure in waterborne challenged fish, whereas fish infected by the i.p. route experienced the first mortality by 5 days post-infection (p.i.). The median lethal intraperitoneal injection dose (IP-LD(50)) was approximately 2.21 plaque forming units (PFU) as opposed to the median lethal immersion challenge dose (IM-LD(50)) of 1.7 x 10(4) PFU mL(-1). A high, medium and low dose of infection caused acute, subacute and chronic progression of the disease, respectively, as was evident by the cumulative mortality data. Clinical signs of disease observed in dead and moribund fish were very pale gills, dermal petechial haemorrhages along the flanks, severe nuchal haemorrhages, intramuscular haemorrhages at the fin-muscle junction and focal haemorrhaging on the caudal peduncle. Internal lesions included livers that were pale, discoloured and friable, and kidneys that were either congested or degenerative in appearance, and petechial to ecchymotic haemorrhages on the swim bladder wall. Histopathologic examination demonstrated massive haemorrhages in the swimbladder wall and muscle, severe vacuolation and multifocal necrosis of the liver, multifocal necrosis of the gills and depletion of lymphoid tissues within the spleen. Kidney tissues also exhibited a mixed pattern of degeneration that included tubular necrosis, interstitial oedema and congestion. Virus was recovered from kidney and spleen tissues through tissue culture and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PMID:20367742

  11. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  12. Bovine viral diarrhea viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) result in significant economic losses for beef and dairy producers worldwide. BVDV is actually an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. While denoted as a bovine pathogen...

  13. Thymic pathogenicity of an HIV-1 envelope is associated with increased CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-dependent activity, but not V1/V2-associated CD4 binding efficiency and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Eric G.; Coffield, Vernon M.; Su Lishan . E-mail: lsu@med.unc.edu

    2005-06-05

    We previously described a thymus-tropic HIV-1 envelope (R3A Env) from a rapid progressor obtained at the time of transmission. An HIV-1 molecular recombinant with the R3A Env supported extensive replication and pathogenesis in the thymus and did not require Nef. Another Env from the same patient did not display the same thymus-tropic pathogenesis (R3B Env). Here, we show that relative to R3B Env, R3A Env enhances viral entry of T cells, increases fusion-induced cytopathicity, and shows elevated binding efficiency for both CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, in vitro. We created chimeric envelopes to determine the region(s) responsible for each in vitro phenotype and for thymic pathogenesis. Surprisingly, while V1/V2 contributed to enhanced viral entry, CD4 binding efficiency, and cytopathicity in vitro, it made no contribution to thymic pathogenesis. Rather, CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-associated activity appear to independently contribute to thymic pathogenesis of the R3A Env. These data highlight the contribution of unique HIV pathogenic factors in the thymic microenvironment and suggest that novel mechanisms may be involved in Env pathogenic activity in vivo.

  14. First case of ranavirus and associated morbidity and mortality in an eastern mud turtle Kinosternon subrubrum in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Winzeler, Megan E; Hamilton, Matthew T; Tuberville, Tracey D; Lance, Stacey L

    2015-05-11

    Ranaviruses are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect amphibians, fish, and reptiles, causing global epidemics in some amphibian populations. It is important to identify new species that may be susceptible to the disease, particularly if they reside in the same habitat as other at-risk species. On the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, USA, ranaviruses are present in several amphibian populations, but information is lacking on the presence, prevalence, and morbidity of the virus in reptile species. An eastern mud turtle Kinosternon subrubrum captured on the SRS in April 2014 exhibited clinical signs of a ranaviral infection, including oral plaque and conjunctivitis. Quantitative PCR analyses of DNA from liver tissue, ocular, oral, nasal, and cloacal swabs were all positive for ranavirus, and sequencing of the template confirmed infection with a FV3-like ranavirus. Histopathologic examination of postmortem tissue samples revealed ulceration of the oral and tracheal mucosa, intracytoplasmic epithelial inclusions in the oral mucosa and tongue sections, individualized and clusters of melanomacrophages in the liver, and bacterial rods located in the liver, kidney, heart, stomach, and small intestine. This is the first report of morbidity and mortality of a mud turtle with a systemic ranaviral infection. PMID:25958808

  15. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get viral hepatitis vaccines? How long do the hepatitis A and B vaccines protect you? Is it safe ... of viral hepatitis in the United States are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. This fact sheet ...

  16. Genetic diversification of an emerging pathogen: A decade of mutation by the fish Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) virus in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) is an RNA rhabdovirus, which causes one of the world's most serious fish diseases, infecting >80 freshwater and marine species across the Northern Hemisphere. A new, novel, and especially virulent substrain - VHSv-IVb - first appeared in the Laurentian Gre...

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF H5N1 HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRAL ANTIGEN IN FORMALIN-FIXED AVIAN TISSUE SPECIMENS BY AN AVIDIN-BIOTIN IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY PROCEDURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avidin-biotin immunohistochemistry (IHC) procedure has been used successfully to identify a variety of bacterial, viral and cellular antigens in formalin-fixed tissues. The procedure is rapid, reproducible, and specific making it an extremely useful method for screening diagnostic specimens. T...

  18. Complete genome sequence and construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of tobacco ringspot Nepovirus, a viral pathogen causing bud blight in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fumei; Hwang, Un Sun; Lim, Seungmo; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV, genus Nepovirus), causes severe diseases in soybean and tobacco plants. TRSV-induced bud blight disease significantly reduced both the yield and quality of soybeans. The function of the encoded viral gene product involved in TRSV infection was unclear due to the limitation of reverse genetics studies on the viral genome. Here, we represent the successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of TRSV genome (RNA1 and RNA2). The cDNAs of TRSV RNA1 and RNA2 were cloned into the binary vector pPZP211 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and upstream of the nopaline synthase terminator. Seven days after agrobacterium-mediated co-inoculation of these two constructs, Nicotiana benthamiana plants developed a systemic infection with necrotic ringspot symptoms and weak stunting of the leaves, similar to that induced by natural TRSV. The systemic infection was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Western blot analysis. Simultaneously, soybean, tomato, and Arabidopsis ecotype Estland were mechanically inoculated with sap prepared from TRSV-agroinfiltrated N. benthamiana leaves, showing typical symptoms of bud blight, necrotic spots, and lethal systemic necrosis, respectively. The system developed herein will be an appealing way to determine TRSV viral gene functions and study host-TRSV interactions. PMID:26159876

  19. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  20. Anti-viral properties and mode of action of standardized Echinacea purpurea extract against highly pathogenic avian Influenza virus (H5N1, H7N7) and swine-origin H1N1 (S-OIV)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza virus (IV) infections are a major threat to human welfare and animal health worldwide. Anti-viral therapy includes vaccines and a few anti-viral drugs. However vaccines are not always available in time, as demonstrated by the emergence of the new 2009 H1N1-type pandemic strain of swine origin (S-OIV) in April 2009, and the acquisition of resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors such as Tamiflu® (oseltamivir) is a potential problem. Therefore the prospects for the control of IV by existing anti-viral drugs are limited. As an alternative approach to the common anti-virals we studied in more detail a commercial standardized extract of the widely used herb Echinacea purpurea (Echinaforce®, EF) in order to elucidate the nature of its anti-IV activity. Results Human H1N1-type IV, highly pathogenic avian IV (HPAIV) of the H5- and H7-types, as well as swine origin IV (S-OIV, H1N1), were all inactivated in cell culture assays by the EF preparation at concentrations ranging from the recommended dose for oral consumption to several orders of magnitude lower. Detailed studies with the H5N1 HPAIV strain indicated that direct contact between EF and virus was required, prior to infection, in order to obtain maximum inhibition in virus replication. Hemagglutination assays showed that the extract inhibited the receptor binding activity of the virus, suggesting that the extract interferes with the viral entry into cells. In sequential passage studies under treatment in cell culture with the H5N1 virus no EF-resistant variants emerged, in contrast to Tamiflu®, which produced resistant viruses upon passaging. Furthermore, the Tamiflu®-resistant virus was just as susceptible to EF as the wild type virus. Conclusion As a result of these investigations, we believe that this standard Echinacea preparation, used at the recommended dose for oral consumption, could be a useful, readily available and affordable addition to existing control options for IV replication and dissemination. PMID:19912623

  1. Equine herpesvirus type 1 tegument protein VP22 is not essential for pathogenicity in a hamster model, but is required for efficient viral growth in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ayaka; Izume, Satoko; Ohya, Kenji; Fukushi, Hideto

    2015-11-01

    VP22 is a major tegument protein of Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) that is a conserved protein among alphaherpesviruses. However, the roles of VP22 differ among each virus, and the roles of EHV-1 VP22 are still unclear. Here, we constructed an EHV-1 VP22 deletion mutant and a revertant virus to clarify the role of VP22. We found that EHV-1 VP22 was required for efficient viral growth in cultured cells, but not for virulence in a hamster model. PMID:25948053

  2. Molecular testing for viral and bacterial enteric pathogens: gold standard for viruses, but don't let culture go just yet?

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Maxim G; Balm, Michelle N D; Blackmore, Timothy K

    2015-04-01

    Contemporary diagnostic microbiology is increasingly adopting molecular methods as front line tests for a variety of samples. This trend holds true for detection of enteric pathogens (EP), where nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) for viruses are well established as the gold standard, and an increasing number of commercial multi-target assays are now available for bacteria and parasites. NAAT have significant sensitivity and turnaround time advantages over traditional methods, potentially returning same-day results. Multiplex panels offer an attractive 'one-stop shop' that may provide workflow and cost advantages to laboratories processing large sample volumes. However, there are a number of issues which need consideration. Reflex culture is required for antibiotic susceptibility testing and strain typing when needed for food safety and other epidemiological investigations. Surveillance systems will need to allow for differences in disease incidence due to the enhanced sensitivity of NAAT. Laboratories should be mindful of local epidemiology when selecting which pathogens to include in multiplex panels, and be thoughtful regarding which pathogens will not be detected. Multiplex panels may not be appropriate in certain situations, such as hospital-onset diarrhoea, where Clostridium difficile testing might be all that is required, and laboratories may wish to retain the flexibility to run single tests in such situations. The clinical impact of rapid results is also likely to be relatively minor, as infective diarrhoea is a self-limiting illness in the majority of cases. Laboratories will require strategies to assist users in the interpretation of the results produced by NAAT, particularly where pathogens are detected at low levels with uncertain clinical significance. These caveats aside, faecal NAAT are increasingly being used and introduce a new era of diagnosis of gastrointestinal infection. PMID:25719855

  3. Gene Diversification of an Emerging Pathogen: A Decade of Mutation in a Novel Fish Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) Substrain since Its First Appearance in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Leaman, Douglas W.; Niner, Megan D.; Shepherd, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) is an RNA rhabdovirus, which causes one of the world's most serious fish diseases, infecting >80 freshwater and marine species across the Northern Hemisphere. A new, novel, and especially virulent substrain—VHSv-IVb—first appeared in the Laurentian Great Lakes about a decade ago, resulting in massive fish kills. It rapidly spread and has genetically diversified. This study analyzes temporal and spatial mutational patterns of VHSv-IVb across the Great Lakes for the novel non-virion (Nv) gene that is unique to this group of novirhabdoviruses, in relation to its glycoprotein (G), phosphoprotein (P), and matrix (M) genes. Results show that the Nv-gene has been evolving the fastest (k = 2.0x10-3 substitutions/site/year), with the G-gene at ~1/7 that rate (k = 2.8x10-4). Most (all but one) of the 12 unique Nv- haplotypes identified encode different amino acids, totaling 26 changes. Among the 12 corresponding G-gene haplotypes, seven vary in amino acids with eight total changes. The P- and M- genes are more evolutionarily conserved, evolving at just ~1/15 (k = 1.2x10-4) of the Nv-gene’s rate. The 12 isolates contained four P-gene haplotypes with two amino acid changes, and six M-gene haplotypes with three amino acid differences. Patterns of evolutionary changes coincided among the genes for some of the isolates, but appeared independent in others. New viral variants were discovered following the large 2006 outbreak; such differentiation may have been in response to fish populations developing resistance, meriting further investigation. Two 2012 variants were isolated by us from central Lake Erie fish that lacked classic VHSv symptoms, having genetically distinctive Nv-, G-, and M-gene sequences (with one of them also differing in its P-gene); they differ from each other by a G-gene amino acid change and also differ from all other isolates by a shared Nv-gene amino acid change. Such rapid evolutionary differentiation may allow new viral variants to evade fish host recognition and immune responses, facilitating long-time persistence along with expansion to new geographic areas. PMID:26313549

  4. The pathogenicity determinant of Citrus tristeza virus causing the seedling yellows syndrome maps at the 3'-terminal region of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Marti, Maria R; Robertson, Cecile; Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Belliure, Belén; Garnsey, Stephen M; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Moreno, Pedro; Dawson, William O

    2010-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of some isolates of CTV is the ability to induce seedling yellows (SY) in sour orange, lemon and grapefruit seedlings. In Florida, the decline isolate of CTV, T36, induces SY, whereas a widely distributed mild isolate, T30, does not. To delimit the viral sequences associated with the SY syndrome, we created a number of T36/T30 hybrids by substituting T30 sequences into different regions of the 3' half of the genome of an infectious cDNA of T36. Eleven T36/T30 hybrids replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts. Five of these hybrids formed viable virions that were mechanically transmitted to Citrus macrophylla, a permissive host for CTV. All induced systemic infections, similar to that of the parental T36 clone. Tissues from these C. macrophylla source plants were then used to graft inoculate sour orange and grapefruit seedlings. Inoculation with three of the T30/T36 hybrid constructs induced SY symptoms identical to those of T36; however, two hybrids with T30 substitutions in the p23-3' nontranslated region (NTR) (nucleotides 18 394-19 296) failed to induce SY. Sour orange seedlings infected with a recombinant non-SY p23-3' NTR hybrid also remained symptomless when challenged with the parental virus (T36), demonstrating the potential feasibility of using engineered constructs of CTV to mitigate disease. PMID:20078776

  5. Serologic survey for selected viral pathogens in free-ranging endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) and other mustelids from south-western France.

    PubMed

    Philippa, Joost; Fournier-Chambrillon, Christine; Fournier, Pascal; Schaftenaar, Willem; van de Bildt, Marco; van Herweijnen, Rob; Kuiken, Thijs; Liabeuf, Marie; Ditcharry, Sébastien; Joubert, Laurent; Bégnier, Michel; Osterhaus, Ab

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the possible role of selected pathogens in the decline of endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) populations and the potential for these pathogens to affect mink survival, a serologic survey was conducted using serum samples collected from March 1996 to March 2003 in eight departments of south-western France. In total, 481 free-ranging individuals of five mustelid species (including the European mink) were tested. Sympatric mustelids can serve as sentinels to determine the presence of antibodies to viruses in the study area that could potentially infect mink. Antibodies to Canine distemper virus (CDV) were detected in all species; 9% of 127 European mink, 20% of 210 polecats (Mustela putorius), 5% of 112 American mink (Mustela vison), 33% of 21 stone marten (Martes foina) and 5% of 20 pine marten (Martes martes). Antibody prevalence was significantly higher in stone marten and polecats, possibly because their ranges overlap more closely with that of domestic species than that of the other species tested. Antibodies to Canine adenovirus were detected in all species but the pine marten; antibody prevalence estimates ranging from 2% to 10%. Antibodies to canine parainfluenza virus were detected in 1% of European mink, 1% of American mink and 5% of tested polecats but were not detected in Martes species. Antibodies to Rabies virus (RV) were detected in three animals, possibly because of interspecies transmission of bat lyssaviruses as the sampling area is considered to be free of RV, or to a lack of test specificity, as antibody titers were low. The high antibody prevalence to potentially lethal CDV suggests that this pathogen could have significant effects on the free-ranging populations and has implications for the conservation efforts for the endangered European mink. PMID:18957635

  6. IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion

    E-print Network

    2013-01-01

    an intermediate of fusion, referred to as a cold arrestedcold arrested state (CAS), PLOS Pathogens | www.plospathogens.org January 2013 | Volume 9 | Issue 1 | e1003124 Restriction of Viral Membrane Fusion

  7. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  8. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Viral Meningitis Recommend on ... Arboviruses Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease File Formats Help: How ...

  9. Viral Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. ... can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  10. Viral Gastroenteritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The symptoms are milder than the symptoms of norovirus or rotavirus infections. Infections occur year-round, but the virus is most active during the winter months. Viral gastroenteritis is often mistakenly called “stomach ...

  11. Molecular basis of viral and microbial pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, R.; Goebel, W.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Correlation Between Viroid Structure and Pathogenicty; Antigenicity of the Influenza Haemagglutinia Membrane Glycoprotein; Viral Glycoproteins as Determinants of Pathogenicity; Virus Genes Involved in Host Range and Pathogenicity; Molecular Heterogenetiy of Pathogenic Herpus Viruses; Recombination of Foreign (Viral) DNA with Host Genome: Studies in Vivo and in a Cell-Free system; Disorders of Cellular Neuro-Functions by Persistent Viral Infection; Pathogenic Aspects of Measles Virus-Persistent Infections in Man; Analysis of the Dual Lineage Specificity of E26 Avian Leukemia Virus; Mx Gene Control of Influenza Virus Susceptibility; Shiga and Shika-Like Toxins: A Family of Related Cytokinons; and Molecular Mechanisms of Pathogenicity in Shigella Flexneri.

  12. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Tollefson, Ann E.; Sagartz, John E.; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models. PMID:26291525

  13. Present and future projections of habitat suitability of the Asian tiger mosquito, a vector of viral pathogens, from global climate simulation.

    PubMed

    Proestos, Y; Christophides, G K; Ergüler, K; Tanarhte, M; Waldock, J; Lelieveld, J

    2015-04-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause chikungunya, dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the twenty-first century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that approximately 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million km(2) will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making. PMID:25688015

  14. Detection of Viral Pathogens by Reverse Transcriptase PCR and of Microbial Indicators by Standard Methods in the Canals of the Florida Keys

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Dale W.; Gibson, Charles J.; Lipp, Erin K.; Riley, Kelley; Paul, John H.; Rose, Joan B.

    1999-01-01

    In order to assess the microbial water quality in canal waters throughout the Florida Keys, a survey was conducted to determine the concentration of microbial fecal indicators and the presence of human pathogenic microorganisms. A total of 19 sites, including 17 canal sites and 2 nearshore water sites, were assayed for total coliforms, fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, enterococci, coliphages, F-specific (F+) RNA coliphages, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, and human enteric viruses (polioviruses, coxsackie A and B viruses, echoviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, and small round-structured viruses). Numbers of coliforms ranged from <1 to 1,410, E. coli organisms from <1 to 130, Clostridium spp. from <1 to 520, and enterococci from <1 to 800 CFU/100 ml of sample. Two sites were positive for coliphages, but no F+ phages were identified. The sites were ranked according to microbial water quality and compared to various water quality standards and guidelines. Seventy-nine percent of the sites were positive for the presence of enteroviruses by reverse transcriptase PCR (polioviruses, coxsackie A and B viruses, and echoviruses). Sixty-three percent of the sites were positive for the presence of hepatitis A viruses. Ten percent of the sites were positive for the presence of Norwalk viruses. Ninety-five percent of the sites were positive for at least one of the virus groups. These results indicate that the canals and nearshore waters throughout the Florida Keys are being impacted by human fecal material carrying human enteric viruses through current wastewater treatment strategies such as septic tanks. Exposure to canal waters through recreation and work may be contributing to human health risks. PMID:10473424

  15. Present and Future Projections of Habitat Suitability of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, a Vector of Viral Pathogens, from Global Climate Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestos, Y.; Christophides, G.; Erguler, K.; Tanarhte, M.; Waldock, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause Chikungunya, Dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model (GCM) at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the 21st century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that about 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million square kilometres will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making.

  16. Present and future projections of habitat suitability of the Asian tiger mosquito, a vector of viral pathogens, from global climate simulation

    PubMed Central

    Proestos, Y.; Christophides, G. K.; Ergüler, K.; Tanarhte, M.; Waldock, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause chikungunya, dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the twenty-first century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that approximately 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million km2 will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making. PMID:25688015

  17. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  18. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two virus types have been clearly shown to have epidemiologic importance in viral gastroenteritis, i.e., rotavirus and Norwalk virus. Four other virus types have been associated with gastroenteritis but their epidemiologic importance is not yet known, i.e., enteric adenovirus, ca...

  19. Synthesis of minus-strand copies of a viral transgene during viral infections of transgenic plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants can be genetically engineered to express viral sequences, often resulting in resistance to the virus from which the sequence was derived. The generally accepted mechanism for this pathogen induced resistance is gene silencing. Previous work has demonstrated that viral transgenes can be incorp...

  20. Development of an EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis for simultaneous detection and differentiation of six viral pathogens of porcine reproductive and respiratory disorder.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pinbin; Wu, Haigang; Jiang, Yonghou; Opriessnig, Tanja; Zheng, Xiaowen; Mo, Yecheng; Yang, Zongqi

    2014-11-01

    Concurrent infection of pigs with two or more pathogens is common in pigs under intensive rearing conditions. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), classical swine fever virus (CSFV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) are all associated with reproductive or respiratory disorders or both and can cause significant economic losses in pig production worldwide. An EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR (EG-mPCR) with melting curve analysis was developed in this study for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these six viruses in pigs. This method is able to detect and distinguish PCV2, PPV, PRRSV, CSFV, JEV and PRV with the limits of detection ranging from 100 to 500 copies/?L, high reproducibility, and intra-assay and inter-assay variation ranging from 0.11 to 3.20%. After validation, a total of 118 field samples were tested by the newly developed EG-mPCR. PCV2 was identified in 23%, PPV in 15%, PRRSV in 17% and PRV in 5% of the samples. Concurrent PCV2 and PRRSV infection was detected in 6.7%, PCV2 and PPV in 5% and PPV2 and PRRSV infection was detected in 5% of the cases. The agreement of the EG-mPCR and conventional PCR tests was 99.2%. This EG-mPCR will be a useful, rapid, reliable and cost-effective alternative for routine surveillance testing of viral infections in pigs. PMID:25102430

  1. Determination of the relative economic impact of different molecular-based laboratory algorithms for respiratory viral pathogen detection, including Pandemic (H1N1), using a secure web based platform

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During period of crisis, laboratory planners may be faced with a need to make operational and clinical decisions in the face of limited information. To avoid this dilemma, our laboratory utilizes a secure web based platform, Data Integration for Alberta Laboratories (DIAL) to make near real-time decisions. This manuscript utilizes the data collected by DIAL as well as laboratory test cost modeling to identify the relative economic impact of four proposed scenarios of testing for Pandemic H1N1 (2009) and other respiratory viral pathogens. Methods Historical data was collected from the two waves of the pandemic using DIAL. Four proposed molecular testing scenarios were generated: A) Luminex respiratory virus panel (RVP) first with/without US centers for Disease Control Influenza A Matrix gene assay (CDC-M), B) CDC-M first with/without RVP, C) RVP only, and D) CDC-M only. Relative cost estimates of different testing algorithm were generated from a review of historical costs in the lab and were based on 2009 Canadian dollars. Results Scenarios A and B had similar costs when the rate of influenza A was low (< 10%) with higher relative cost in Scenario A with increasing incidence. Scenario A provided more information about mixed respiratory virus infection as compared with Scenario B. Conclusions No one approach is applicable to all conditions. Testing costs will vary depending on the test volume, prevalence of influenza A strains, as well as other circulating viruses and a more costly algorithm involving a combination of different tests may be chosen to ensure that tests results are returned to the clinician in a quicker manner. Costing should not be the only consideration for determination of laboratory algorithms. PMID:21645365

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated drinking water is major source of waterborne diseases. EPA has published a drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL) that contains a number of pathogens that potentially could be regulated in drinking water. Studies indicate that certain viral pathogens (adenov...

  3. Viral Quasispecies Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory. PMID:22688811

  4. Viral diseases and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It includes classification of viral infection. It describes common ways of virus entry, replication, and transmission. It introduces the routes of viral invasion and molecular basis for viral pathogenesis....

  5. Susceptibility of common fish and chelonians to ranavirus Tucker, J. L.1, R. Brenes1, D. L. Miller1,3, T. B. Waltzek2, R. P. Wilkes3, , M. D. Brand1, J. C. Chaney1, R. Hardman1,3,

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    ranaviruses have been isolated from different ectothermic vertebrate classes; however, few studies have ectothermic vertebrate classes. Virus The challenges were conducted using FV3-like ranavirus isolates obtained from three different ectothermic hosts; fish (pallid sturgeon), turtle (Box Turtle), and amphibian

  6. MARINE MAMMAL DISEASES: PATHOGENS AND PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide a concise overview of the pathogens and processes that alter the health of marine mammals. Viral disease is the most common etiology of significant mortality events in marine mammals. Discussion of viral disease focuses on effects in the ...

  7. Anti-viral Responses in Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the study of anti-viral responses in insects has lagged behind studies of responses to other types of pathogens, progress has begun to rapidly accelerate over the past few years. Insects are subject to infection by many different kinds of DNA and RNA viruses. These include viruses that ar...

  8. Pathogenesis of the viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Paessler, Slobodan; Walker, David H

    2013-01-24

    Four families of enveloped RNA viruses, filoviruses, flaviviruses, arenaviruses, and bunyaviruses, cause hemorrhagic fevers. These viruses are maintained in specific natural cycles involving nonhuman primates, bats, rodents, domestic ruminants, humans, mosquitoes, and ticks. Vascular instability varies from mild to fatal shock, and hemorrhage ranges from none to life threatening. The pathogenic mechanisms are extremely diverse and include deficiency of hepatic synthesis of coagulation factors owing to hepatocellular necrosis, cytokine storm, increased permeability by vascular endothelial growth factor, complement activation, and disseminated intravascular coagulation in one or more hemorrhagic fevers. The severity of disease caused by these agents varies tremendously; there are extremely high fatality rates in Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers, and asymptomatic infection predominates in yellow fever and dengue viral infections. Although ineffective immunity and high viral loads are characteristic of several viral hemorrhagic fevers, severe plasma leakage occurs at the time of viral clearance and defervescence in dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:23121052

  9. Indo-US Symposium -Viral Infections of the Nervous System

    E-print Network

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    , India; "Viral encephalitis: Changing scenario, emerging pathogens" 02:50 - 03:10 pm Platform Talk (3 "Lessons learnt from encephalitis" 09:00 ­ 09:20 am Platform Talk (10): Anirban Basu, NBRC, India "Host pathogen interaction in Japanese encephalitis virus infection: From bench to bedside" 09:25 - 09:45 am

  10. Pathogen-pathogen interaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There is growing awareness of the health implications of the fact that infectious agents often do not act independently; rather their disease potential is mediated in diverse and significant ways by their relationships with other pathogens. Pathogen-pathogen interaction (PPI), for example, impacts various virulence factors in human infection. Although still in its infancy, the study of PPI, a form of epidemiological synergism, is emerging as an important arena of new research and new understanding in health and clinical care. The aims of this paper are to: (1) draw attention to the role of PPI in human disease patterns; (2) present the syndemics model as a biosocial approach for examining the nature, pathways, contexts, and health implications of PPI and (3) suggest the utility of this approach to PPI. Toward these ends, this paper (a) reviews three case examples of alternative PPIs, (b) describes the development and key concepts and components of the syndemics model with specific reference to interacting infectious agents, (c) contextualizes this discussion with a brief review of broader syndemics disease processes (not necessarily involving infections disease) and (d) comments on the research, treatment and prevention implications of syndemic interaction among pathogens. PMID:21178409

  11. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity are, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes. PMID:25566226

  12. Ecology of Waterborne Pathogens Instructor

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    Prerequisites: MCB3020 (Basic Biology of Microorganisms), or MCB3023 or MCB4203 (Bacterial and Viral Pathogens- porters + 2 investigators). The Reporters will: a) Conceive a scenario of an outbreak and discuss it with the course instructor (example: An outbreak of salmonellosis associated with the consumption of raw shellfish

  13. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  14. 51www.wildlife.org The Wildlife Society The Rise of Ranavirus

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    . Miller an eMeRGinG patHoGen tHReatenS eCtotHeRMiC VeRteBRateS R anaviruses have been called "cold ectothermic vertebrate classes (amphibians, reptiles, and fish). Experi- ments have also demonstrated. 1965), yet their role in widespread die-offs of ectothermic ver- tebrates wasn't realized until

  15. Broad-Spectrum Drugs Against Viral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Mary E.; Wong, Jonathan P.

    2008-01-01

    Development of antivirals has focused primarily on vaccines and on treatments for specific viral agents. Although effective, these approaches may be limited in situations where the etiologic agent is unknown or when the target virus has undergone mutation, recombination or reassortment. Augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Nonspecific, broad-spectrum immune responses can be induced by double-stranded (ds)RNAs such as poly (ICLC), or oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated deocycytidyl-deoxyguanosinyl (CpG) motifs. These may offer protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens regardless of their genetic makeup, zoonotic origin or drug resistance. PMID:19325820

  16. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity and distribution of viral antigen in chickens after infection with a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (H4N6) isolated from wild ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four-week-old commercial chickens were intranasally inoculated with an H4N6 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) isolated from a duck in Ukraine. Cecum, spleen, lung, and trachea samples were collected from birds from 1 to 21 days post inoculation (dpi) and examined by immunohistochemica...

  17. Viral infection of the lung: Host response and sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Taeg S.; Hufford, Matthew M.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its essential role in gas exchange and oxygen delivery, the lung has evolved a variety of strategies to control inflammation and maintain homeostasis. Invasion of the lung by pathogens (and in some instances exposure to certain noninfectious particulates) disrupts this equilibrium and triggers a cascade of events aimed at preventing or limiting colonization (and more importantly infection) by pathogenic microorganisms. In this review we focus on viral infection of the lung and summarize recent advances in our understanding of the triggering of innate and adaptive immune responses to viral respiratory tract infection, mechanisms of viral clearance, and the well-recognized consequences of acute viral infection complicating underlying lung diseases, such as asthma. PMID:23915713

  18. Simultaneous Extraction of Viral and Bacterial Nucleic Acids for Molecular Diagnostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kajiura, Lauren N.; Stewart, Scott D.; Dresios, John; Uyehara, Catherine F. T.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular detection of microbial pathogens in clinical samples requires the application of efficient sample lysis protocols and subsequent extraction and isolation of their nucleic acids. Here, we describe a simple and time-efficient method for simultaneous extraction of genomic DNA from gram-positive and -negative bacteria, as well as RNA from viral agents present in a sample. This method compared well with existing bacterial- and viral-specialized extraction protocols, worked reliably on clinical samples, and was not pathogen specific. This method may be used to extract DNA and RNA concurrently from viral and bacterial pathogens present in a sample and effectively detect coinfections in routine clinical diagnostics. PMID:26543438

  19. Simultaneous Extraction of Viral and Bacterial Nucleic Acids for Molecular Diagnostic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Lauren N; Stewart, Scott D; Dresios, John; Uyehara, Catherine F T

    2015-12-01

    Molecular detection of microbial pathogens in clinical samples requires the application of efficient sample lysis protocols and subsequent extraction and isolation of their nucleic acids. Here, we describe a simple and time-efficient method for simultaneous extraction of genomic DNA from gram-positive and -negative bacteria, as well as RNA from viral agents present in a sample. This method compared well with existing bacterial- and viral-specialized extraction protocols, worked reliably on clinical samples, and was not pathogen specific. This method may be used to extract DNA and RNA concurrently from viral and bacterial pathogens present in a sample and effectively detect coinfections in routine clinical diagnostics. PMID:26543438

  20. The PA and HA gene-mediated high viral load and intense innate immune response in the brain contribute to the high pathogenicity of H5N1 avian influenza virus in mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiao; Hu, Zenglei; Mo, Yiqun; Wu, Qiwen; Cui, Zhu; Duan, Zhiqiang; Huang, Junqing; Chen, Hongzhi; Chen, Yuxin; Gu, Min; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Huimou; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-10-01

    Most highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses cause only mild clinical signs in ducks, serving as an important natural reservoir of influenza A viruses. However, we isolated two H5N1 viruses that are genetically similar but differ greatly in virulence in ducks. A/Chicken/Jiangsu/k0402/2010 (CK10) is highly pathogenic, whereas A/Goose/Jiangsu/k0403/2010 (GS10) is low pathogenic. To determine the genetic basis for the high virulence of CK10 in ducks, we generated a series of single-gene reassortants between CK10 and GS10 and tested their virulence in ducks. Expression of the CK10 PA or hemagglutinin (HA) gene in the GS10 context resulted in increased virulence and virus replication. Conversely, inclusion of the GS10 PA or HA gene in the CK10 background attenuated the virulence and virus replication. Moreover, the PA gene had a greater contribution. We further determined that residues 101G and 237E in the PA gene contribute to the high virulence of CK10. Mutations at these two positions produced changes in virulence, virus replication, and polymerase activity of CK10 or GS10. Position 237 plays a greater role in determining these phenotypes. Moreover, the K237E mutation in the GS10 PA gene increased PA nuclear accumulation. Mutant GS10 viruses carrying the CK10 HA gene or the PA101G or PA237E mutation induced an enhanced innate immune response. A sustained innate response was detected in the brain rather than in the lung and spleen. Our results suggest that the PA and HA gene-mediated high virus replication and the intense innate immune response in the brain contribute to the high virulence of H5N1 virus in ducks. PMID:23926340

  1. Current Status of Deltabaculoviruses, Cypoviruses and Chloriridoviruses Pathogenic for Mosquitoes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are a variety of viral pathogens that cause disease in mosquitoes with most belonging to three major groups. The most common viruses of mosquitoes are the baculoviruses (DBVs) (Baculoviridae: Deltabaculovirus), cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs) (Reoviridae: Cypovirus) and the iridovirus...

  2. Molecular probes for identification of pathogenic viruses in mosquitoes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral pathogens that cause disease in mosquitoes belong to three major groups: baculoviruses (DBVs) (Baculoviridae: Deltabaculovirus); iridoviruses (MIVs) (Iridoviridae: Chloriridovirus); and cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs) (Reoviridae: Cypovirus). Baculoviruses and iridoviruses are DNA vir...

  3. ADEQUACY OF DISINFECTION FOR CONTROL OF NEWLY RECOGNIZED WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Agents recently recognized as causes or potential causes of waterborne outbreaks include pathogenic bacteria (Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocoliticia), viruses (rotavirus, Norwalk virus and other poorly defined viral agents) and Giardia lamblia, a protozoan agent. Although...

  4. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  5. Viral-like symptoms induced by the ectopic expression of the p23 gene of Citrus tristeza virus are citrus specific and do not correlate with the pathogenicity of the virus strain.

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2005-05-01

    Ectopic expression of the p23 gene from a severe (T36) strain of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) induces viral-like symptoms in Mexican lime. Here, we report that expressing the same gene from a mild strain induced similar symptoms that correlated with accumulation of p23 protein irrespective of the source strain. CTV inoculation of transgenic limes showing CTV-like leaf symptoms and high p23 accumulation did not modify symptoms initially, with the virus titer being as in inoculated nontransgenic controls; however, at later stages, symptoms became attenuated. Transformation with p23-T36 of CTV-susceptible sweet and sour orange and CTV-resistant trifoliate orange also led to CTV-like leaf symptoms that did not develop when plants were transformed with a truncated p23 version. In transgenic citrus species and relatives other than Mexican lime, p23 was barely detectable, although symptom intensity correlated with levels of p23 transcripts. The lower accumulation of p23 in sweet and sour orange compared with Mexican lime also was observed in nontransgenic plants inoculated with CTV, suggesting that minimal p23 levels cause deleterious effects in the first two species. Conversely, transgenic expression of p23 in CTV nonhost Nicotiana spp. led to accumulation of p23 without phenotypic aberrations, indicating that p23 interferes with plant development only in citrus species and relatives. PMID:15915642

  6. Identification of a Natural Viral RNA Motif That Optimizes Sensing of Viral RNA by RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Mercado-López, Xiomara; Grier, Jennifer T.; Kim, Won-keun; Chun, Lauren F.; Irvine, Edward B.; Del Toro Duany, Yoandris; Kell, Alison; Hur, Sun; Gale, Michael; Raj, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stimulation of the antiviral response depends on the sensing of viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by specialized cellular proteins. During infection with RNA viruses, 5?-di- or -triphosphates accompanying specific single or double-stranded RNA motifs trigger signaling of intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and initiate the antiviral response. Although these molecular signatures are present during the replication of many viruses, it is unknown whether they are sufficient for strong activation of RLRs during infection. Immunostimulatory defective viral genomes (iDVGs) from Sendai virus (SeV) are among the most potent natural viral triggers of antiviral immunity. Here we describe an RNA motif (DVG70-114) that is essential for the potent immunostimulatory activity of 5?-triphosphate-containing SeV iDVGs. DVG70-114 enhances viral sensing by the host cell independently of the long stretches of complementary RNA flanking the iDVGs, and it retains its stimulatory potential when transferred to otherwise inert viral RNA. In vitro analysis showed that DVG70-114 augments the binding of RIG-I to viral RNA and promotes enhanced RIG-I polymerization, thereby facilitating the onset of the antiviral response. Together, our results define a new natural viral PAMP enhancer motif that promotes viral recognition by RLRs and confers potent immunostimulatory activity to viral RNA. PMID:26443454

  7. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of Penaeus and causes catastrophic mortalities in P. stylirostris, but usually exhibits only inapparent infection in P. vannamei. Some shrimp viruses apparently are latent in larvae, causing disease only when shrimp have reached the postlarval or juvenile stages. Others are equally or more pathogenic in larvae. Studies of shrimp viruses and iridovirus-associated disease in cultured oysters point up the need for rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Until appropriate cell cultures from marine invertebrates are devised, the viral identifications necessary for understanding of epizootiology, rapid containment of epizootics in cultured animals, and decisions regarding introductions of exotic species will be difficult or impossible.

  8. HIV Viral Load

    MedlinePLUS

    ... begin treatment Guide recommendations for therapy Monitor the effectiveness of therapy and help detect drug resistance Predict ... effective. A decreasing viral load indicates improvement, treatment effectiveness, and suppression of the HIV infection. ^ Back to ...

  9. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  10. Cellular and viral determinants of retroviral nuclear entry.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Faysal Bin; Kim, Jinsun; Shin, Cha-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA into the host genome to generate proviruses. Viral DNA-protein complexes interact with cellular proteins and produce pre-integration complexes, which carry the viral genome and cross the nuclear pore channel to enter the nucleus and integrate viral DNA into host chromosomal DNA. If the reverse transcripts fail to integrate, linear or circular DNA species such as 1- and 2-long terminal repeats are generated. Such complexes encounter numerous cellular proteins in the cytoplasm, which restrict viral infection and protect the nucleus. To overcome host cell defenses, the pathogens have evolved several evasion strategies. Viral proteins often contain nuclear localization signals, allowing entry into the nucleus. Among more than 1000 proteins identified as required for HIV infection by RNA interference screening, karyopherins, cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6, and nucleoporins have been predominantly studied. This review discusses current opinions about the synergistic relationship between the viral and cellular factors involved in nuclear import, with focus on the unveiled mysteries of the host-pathogen interaction, and highlights novel approaches to pinpoint therapeutic targets. PMID:26553381

  11. Intranasal Antibody Prophylaxis for Protection against Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weltzin, Richard; Monath, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    For more than a century, antibody has been used for passive parenteral immunization against viral and bacterial pathogens. This approach has been successful for prevention of viral respiratory infection and has led to testing of intranasal or aerosol delivery of antibody to passively immunize the respiratory tract mucosal surface. Mucosal delivery may be advantageous because it allows the antibody to neutralize the virus particles before they initiate infection and because it concentrates the antibody where viral replication takes place. Animal studies have shown the feasibility of passive intranasal immunization against a number of respiratory tract viruses. Development of nasal antibody treatments for humans is under way, and early clinical studies have confirmed that this approach is safe and can be used to prevent respiratory tract disease. Polyclonal human immunoglobulin from pooled plasma preparations can be used to provide broad protection against a number of different pathogens, while monoclonal antibodies or their fragments can be used to target specific viruses. PMID:10398671

  12. Analysis of host genetic diversity and viral entry as sources of between-host variation in viral load

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kell, Alison M.; Scott, Robert J.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that drive the high levels of between-host variation in pathogen burden that are frequently observed in viral infections. Here, two factors thought to impact viral load variability, host genetic diversity and stochastic processes linked with viral entry into the host, were examined. This work was conducted with the aquatic vertebrate virus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in its natural host, rainbow trout. It was found that in controlled in vivo infections of IHNV, a suggestive trend of reduced between-fish viral load variation was observed in a clonal population of isogenic trout compared to a genetically diverse population of out-bred trout. However, this trend was not statistically significant for any of the four viral genotypes examined, and high levels of fish-to-fish variation persisted even in the isogenic trout population. A decrease in fish-to-fish viral load variation was also observed in virus injection challenges that bypassed the host entry step, compared to fish exposed to the virus through the natural water-borne immersion route of infection. This trend was significant for three of the four virus genotypes examined and suggests host entry may play a role in viral load variability. However, high levels of viral load variation also remained in the injection challenges. Together, these results indicate that although host genetic diversity and viral entry may play some role in between-fish viral load variation, they are not major factors. Other biological and non-biological parameters that may influence viral load variation are discussed.

  13. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  14. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  15. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating...

  16. PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS-3 PULMONARY LESIONS ARE NOT ENHANCED BY BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parainfluenza virus-3 (PI-3) is a common respiratory pathogen of cattle and sheep. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a common bovine pathogen that may enhance respiratory disease. Two groups of neonatal lambs were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with PI-3/BVDV or PI-3 alone. Both...

  17. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  18. Pathogen intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  19. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health issues. PMID:18331700

  20. WATERBORNE VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the study of human gastroenteritis, the use of electron microscopy and related techniques has led to the identification of new viral agents which had previously escaped detection by routine cell-culture procedures. Efforts to characterize and further study these agents are cur...

  1. Physics of viral shells

    E-print Network

    Bruinsma, RF; Klug, WS

    2015-01-01

    stress of a viral capsid, namely the one due to the incompatibility between a Physicsstress-free reference configuration and apply the concept of structural phase transitions Bruinsma and Klug from condensed matter physics [stress-free reference configuration? It may indeed be neither the assembled nor isolated Physics

  2. [Viral encephalitis in children].

    PubMed

    Téllez de Meneses, Monserrat; Vila, Miguel T; Barbero Aguirre, Pedro; Montoya, José F

    2013-01-01

    Viral encephalitis is a severe illness that produces inflammation of the brain. CNS viral infections frequently occur as a complication of systemic viral infections. Over 100 viruses are implicated as causative agents, including herpes simplex virus type I which is the most common agent implied in non-epidemic encephalitis in all population groups in the world, and is responsible for the most severe cases in all ages. Many viruses, for which there are vaccines, may also cause encephalitis: measles, mumps, polio, rabies, rubella, and chickenpox. The virus causes an inflammation of the brain tissue, which may progress to destruction of nerve cells, cause bleeding and brain damage, leading to severe encephalitis, such as hemorrhagic or necrotizing encephalitis, with a worse prognosis, producing serious sequelae or death. The clinical evolution includes the presence of headache, fever and altered consciousness rapidly progressive. The outcome of viral encephalitis is variable, some cases are mild, with full recovery, but there are serious cases that can cause severe sequel in the brain. To diagnose this illness as soon as possible is essential, through laboratory tests (biochemistry, virus PCR, culture) and neuroimaging (CT, MRI) and above all, the establishment of early treatment to prevent the development of the process and possible complications. The prognosis worsens if the initiation of treatment is delayed. PMID:24072056

  3. Viral Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, A.; Butterfield, M. C.

    2012-09-01

    Viral SSA takes advantage of the amateur astronomy community to provide an extremely low-cost and geographically-diverse network of optical SSA sites. In the spirit of programs such as DARPA's Grand Challenge and the National Weather Service's program of providing amateur meteorologists with weather stations linked to a central professional meteorological facility, we form a cooperative bond with a willing community of technically-minded individuals. We term this program "viral" because we will qualify an initial set of astronomers for SSA operation and then use word of mouth in the astronomy community, as well as an outreach program, to pull in new observers. The use of modern remote controlled telescopes allows the incorporation of certified amateur, university, and commercial telescope systems. The availability of the local Viral SSA member for troubleshooting eliminates most significant costs of operating a large network. In this talk, we discuss the key concepts of Viral SSA and the route to a network of 100+ sites in a three year or less timeframe.

  4. Transport of viral specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F B

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of viral infections by culture relies on the collection of proper specimens, proper care to protect the virus in the specimens from environmental damage, and use of an adequate transport system to maintain virus activity. Collection of specimens with swabs that are toxic to either virus or cell culture should be avoided. A variety of transport media have been formulated, beginning with early bacteriological transport media. Certain swab-tube combinations have proven to be both effective and convenient. Of the liquid transport media, sucrose-based and broth-based media appear to be the most widely accepted and used. Studies on virus stability show that most viruses tested are sufficiently stable in transport media to withstand a transport time of 1 to 3 days. Some viruses may withstand longer transport times. In many cases, it is not necessary to store virus specimens in a refrigerator or send them to the laboratory on wet ice or frozen on dry ice. However, the specimen should not be exposed to environmental extremes. Modern viral transport media allow for more effective use of viral culture and culture enhancement techniques for the diagnosis of human viral infections. PMID:2187591

  5. Ranaviruses in European reptiles

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    · Necrotizing stomatitis, dehydration, apathy, and anorexia · Animal treated and recovered after 4 months Second, captive bred · Kept together with other reptiles and a toad · Died after 2 weeks of anorexia · Other

  6. The Emerging Role of Nuclear Viral DNA Sensors.

    PubMed

    Diner, Benjamin A; Lum, Krystal K; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-10-30

    Detecting pathogenic DNA by intracellular receptors termed "sensors" is critical toward galvanizing host immune responses and eliminating microbial infections. Emerging evidence has challenged the dogma that sensing of viral DNA occurs exclusively in sub-cellular compartments normally devoid of cellular DNA. The interferon-inducible protein IFI16 was shown to bind nuclear viral DNA and initiate immune signaling, culminating in antiviral cytokine secretion. Here, we review the newly characterized nucleus-originating immune signaling pathways, their links to other crucial host defenses, and unique mechanisms by which viruses suppress their functions. We frame these findings in the context of human pathologies associated with nuclear replicating DNA viruses. PMID:26354430

  7. Vaccines 87, modern approaches to new vaccines: Prevention of AIDS and other viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Chanock, R.M.; Lerner, R.A.; Brown, F.; Ginsberg, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections and a summary. Each section consists of several papers. The section titles are: Immunology, AIDS, Pathogenic Bacteria and Viral Glycoproteins, Pathogenesis and Attenuation, and Recombinant Vectors and Paraviruses.

  8. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  9. Pathogenic Human Viruses in Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, John H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and important field. PMID:12525429

  10. TIA-1 and TIAR interact with 5'-UTR of enterovirus 71 genome and facilitate viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Huanru; Li, Yixuan; Jin, Yu; Chu, Ying; Su, Airong; Wu, Zhiwei

    2015-10-16

    Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative pathogens of HFMD in children. Upon infection, the viral RNA is translated in an IRES-dependent manner and requires several host factors for effective replication. Here, we found that T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1), and TIA-1 related protein (TIAR) were translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm after EV71 infection and localized to the sites of viral replication. We found that TIA-1 and TIAR can facilitate EV71 replication by enhancing the viral genome synthesis in host cells. We demonstrated that both proteins bound to the stem-loop I of 5'-UTR of viral genome and improved the stability of viral genomic RNA. Our results suggest that TIA-1 and TIAR are two new host factors that interact with 5-UTR of EV71 genome and positively regulate viral replication. PMID:26363455

  11. Discovery of a viral pathogen in the Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a Metagenomics approach and discovered an insect-infecting virus in adult Asian citrus psyllids in Florida. Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a Fijivirus in North America. The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a small insect tha...

  12. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  13. Polypyrrole nanoribbon based chemiresistive immunosensors for viral plant pathogen detection

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    the electrical conductivity from 1 to 0.005 S cmÀ1 or by decreasing the thickness of the nanoribbon from 100 nm was covalently conjugated on the surface of the structure via N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N0 -ethylcarbodiimide to 25 nm. The reduction in the ionic strength of the pH buffer solutions (i.e., 10 mM PBS to 10 mM PB

  14. LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES: A CORNUCOPIA OF VIRAL PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study sought to determine the frequency and types of respiratory viruses circulating in 33 Boston long term care facilities during a three year period and correlate rates of infection with serum zinc levels. Participants were residents of long term care that had previously participated in a tria...

  15. Resistant Pathogens, Fungi, and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, Christopher A.; Mansfield, Sara A.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Cook, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    The first reports of antibiotic pathogens occurred a few short years after the introduction of these powerful new agents, heralding a new kind of war between medicine and pathogens. Although originally described in Staphylococcus aureus, resistance among bacteria has now become a grim race to determine which classes of bacteria will become more resistant, pitting the Gram positive staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci against the increasingly resistant Gram negative pathogens, e. g., carbapenemase-resistant enterobacteriaceae. In addition, the availability of antibacterial agents has allowed the development of whole new kinds of diseases caused by non-bacterial pathogens, related largely to fungi that are inherently resistant to antibacterials. All of these organisms are becoming more prevalent and, ultimately, more clinically relevant for surgeons. It is ironic that despite their ubiquity in our communities, there is seldom a second thought given to viral infections in patients with surgical illness. The extent of most surgeon’s interest in viral infections ends with hepatitis and HIV, no doubt related to transmissibility as well as the implications that these viruses might have in a patient’s hepatic or immune functions. There are chapters and even textbooks written about these viruses so these will not be considered here. Instead, we will present the growing body of knowledge of the herpes family viruses and their occurrence and consequences in patients with concomitant surgical disease or critical illness. We have also chosen to focus this chapter on previously immune competent patients, as the impact of herpes family viruses in immunosuppressed patients such as transplant or AIDS patients has received thorough treatment elsewhere. PMID:25440119

  16. Viral Membrane Scission

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Virus budding is a complex, multistep process in which viral proteins make specific alterations in membrane curvature. Many different viral proteins can deform the membrane and form a budding virion, but very few can mediate membrane scission to complete the budding process. As a result, enveloped viruses have developed numerous ways of facilitating membrane scission, including hijacking host cellular scission machinery and expressing their own scission proteins. These proteins mediate scission in very different ways, though the biophysical mechanics underlying their actions may be similar. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of membrane scission and the ways in which enveloped viruses use these systems to mediate the release of budding virions. PMID:24099087

  17. Viral Vector Production: Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Morshed, Ramin A; Kane, J Robert; Auffinger, Brenda; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have proven to be valuable resources in the development of novel therapies aimed at targeting pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease and neoplastic brain lesions. Not only can some genetically engineered adenoviral vectors achieve remarkably efficient and specific gene delivery to target cells, but they also may act as anticancer agents by selectively replicating within cancer cells.Due to the great interest in using adenoviral vectors for various purposes, the need for a comprehensive protocol for viral vector production is especially apparent. Here, we describe the process of generating an adenoviral vector in its entirety, including the more complex process of adenoviral fiber modification to restrict viral tropism in order to achieve more efficient and specific gene delivery. PMID:26611583

  18. Biosensors for Monitoring Airborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fronczek, Christopher F; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-08-01

    Airborne pathogens affect both humans and animals and are often highly and rapidly transmittable. Many problematic airborne pathogens, both viral (influenza A/H1N1, Rubella, and avian influenza/H5N1) and bacterial (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Bacillus anthracis), have huge impacts on health care and agricultural applications, and can potentially be used as bioterrorism agents. Many different laboratory-based methods have been introduced and are currently being used. However, such detection is generally limited by sample collection, including nasal swabs and blood analysis. Direct identification from air (specifically, aerosol samples) would be ideal, but such detection has not been very successful due to the difficulty in sample collection and the extremely low pathogen concentration found in aerosol samples. In this review, we will discuss the portable biosensors and/or micro total analysis systems (µTAS) that can be used for monitoring such airborne pathogens, similar to smoke detectors. Current laboratory-based methods will be reviewed, and possible solutions to convert these lab-based methods into µTAS biosensors will be discussed. PMID:25862683

  19. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness. PMID:26210765

  20. Viral entry mechanisms: the increasing diversity of paramyxovirus entry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Popa, Andreea; Chang, Andres; Masante, Cyril; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2009-01-01

    The paramyxovirus family contains established human pathogens such as measles virus and human respiratory syncytial virus, and emerging pathogens including the Hendra and Nipah viruses and the recently identified human metapneumovirus. Two major envelope glycoproteins, the attachment protein and the fusion protein, promote the processes of viral attachment and virus-cell membrane fusion required for entry. While common mechanisms of fusion protein proteolytic activation and the mechanism of membrane fusion promotion have been shown in recent years, considerable diversity exists in the family related to receptor binding and the potential mechanisms of fusion triggering. PMID:19878307

  1. Viral Interference and Persistence in Mosquito-Borne Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Benito, Juan Santiago; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are important pathogens for humans, and the detection of two or more flaviviruses cocirculating in the same geographic area has often been reported. However, the epidemiological impact remains to be determined. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are primarily transmitted through Aedes and Culex mosquitoes; these viruses establish a life-long or persistent infection without apparent pathological effects. This establishment requires a balance between virus replication and the antiviral host response. Viral interference is a phenomenon whereby one virus inhibits the replication of other viruses, and this condition is frequently associated with persistent infections. Viral interference and persistent infection are determined by several factors, such as defective interfering particles, competition for cellular factors required for translation/replication, and the host antiviral response. The interaction between two flaviviruses typically results in viral interference, indicating that these viruses share common features during the replicative cycle in the vector. The potential mechanisms involved in these processes are reviewed here. PMID:26583158

  2. Viral Interference and Persistence in Mosquito-Borne Flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Salas-Benito, Juan Santiago; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are important pathogens for humans, and the detection of two or more flaviviruses cocirculating in the same geographic area has often been reported. However, the epidemiological impact remains to be determined. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are primarily transmitted through Aedes and Culex mosquitoes; these viruses establish a life-long or persistent infection without apparent pathological effects. This establishment requires a balance between virus replication and the antiviral host response. Viral interference is a phenomenon whereby one virus inhibits the replication of other viruses, and this condition is frequently associated with persistent infections. Viral interference and persistent infection are determined by several factors, such as defective interfering particles, competition for cellular factors required for translation/replication, and the host antiviral response. The interaction between two flaviviruses typically results in viral interference, indicating that these viruses share common features during the replicative cycle in the vector. The potential mechanisms involved in these processes are reviewed here. PMID:26583158

  3. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R

    2015-08-21

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  4. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R.; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  5. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development and the Perlin lab in sample preparation and testing in animal models.

  6. Cellular immune therapy for viral infections in transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rajiv; Smith, Corey

    2013-11-01

    Stem cell and organ transplantation are considered as the major advances of modern medicine. Unfortunately the success of transplantation is limited by its toxicity and infectious complications as a result of profound immunosuppression. Viral infections are an extremely common and predictable problem in these patients. Antiviral drugs given either prophylactically or as early therapy for patients with detectable viral loads appear to be an effective strategy for reducing viral infections. However, long-term treatment with these drugs is associated with significant toxicity, expense and the appearance of drug resistant virus isolates ultimately resulting in treatment failure. Over the last few years, there is increasing evidence that cellular immune therapies can reverse the outgrowth of haematological malignancies and can also provide therapeutic benefit against lethal viral infections. While the expansion and adoptive transfer of virus-specific T-cells from the healthy donor can be an effective strategy to control viral replication, this is not possible when donors are seronegative or are subsequently inaccessible. Recent studies have demonstrated successful expansion of virus-specific T-cells from seropositive stem cell transplant recipients of a seronegative graft with active virus disease and the long term reconstitution of protective anti-viral immunity following their adoptive transfer back into the patients. Furthermore, this immunotherapeutic strategy has also been extended for multiple pathogens including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus and BK polyoma-virus. This approach can be employed to rapidly expand multiple pathogens-specific T cells that can be used for adoptive immunotherapy. Finally, new assays to monitor T cell immunity have been developed which will allow to identify the high risk transplant patients who may develop virus-associated complications post-transplantation and can be given adoptive T cell therapy prophylactically. PMID:24434332

  7. Assessment of Virally Vectored Autoimmunity as a Biocontrol Strategy for Cane Toads

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Anthony J.; Venables, Daryl; Voysey, Rhonda D.; Boyle, Donna G.; Shanmuganathan, Thayalini; Hardy, Christopher M.; Siddon, Nicole A.; Hyatt, Alex D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The cane toad, Bufo (Chaunus) marinus, is one of the most notorious vertebrate pests introduced into Australia over the last 200 years and, so far, efforts to identify a naturally occurring B. marinus-specific pathogen for use as a biological control agent have been unsuccessful. We explored an alternative approach that entailed genetically modifying a pathogen with broad host specificity so that it no longer caused disease, but carried a gene to disrupt the cane toad life cycle in a species specific manner. Methodology/Principal Findings The adult beta globin gene was selected as the model gene for proof of concept of autoimmunity as a biocontrol method for cane toads. A previous report showed injection of bullfrog tadpoles with adult beta globin resulted in an alteration in the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs as well as reduced survival. In B. marinus we established for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin exists. The effect of injecting B. marinus tadpoles with purified recombinant adult globin protein was then assessed using behavioural (swim speed in tadpoles and jump length in metamorphs), developmental (time to metamorphosis, weight and length at various developmental stages, protein profile of adult globin) and genetic (adult globin mRNA levels) measures. However, we were unable to detect any differences between treated and control animals. Further, globin delivery using Bohle iridovirus, an Australian ranavirus isolate belonging to the Iridovirus family, did not reduce the survival of metamorphs or alter the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs. Conclusions/Significance While we were able to show for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin does occur in B. marinus, we were not able to induce autoimmunity and disrupt metamorphosis. The short development time of B. marinus tadpoles may preclude this approach. PMID:21283623

  8. Animal migration and risk of spread of viral infections: Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prosser, Diann J.; Nagel, Jessica; Takekawa, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    The potential contribution of migration towards the spread of disease is as varied as the ecology of the pathogens themselves and their host populations. This chapter outlines multiple examples of viral diseases in animal populations and their mechanisms of viral spread. Many species of insects, mammals, fish, and birds exhibit migratory behavior and have the potential to disperse diseases over long distances. The majority of studies available on viral zoonoses have focused on birds and bats, due to their highly migratory life histories. A number of studies have reported evidence of changes in the timing of animal migrations in response to climate change. The majority indicate an advancement of spring migration, with few or inconclusive results for fall migration. Predicting the combined effects of climate change on migratory patterns of host species and epidemiology of viral pathogens is complex and not fully realistic.

  9. Host and viral ecology determine bat rabies seasonality and maintenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, D.B.; Webb, C.T.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; O'Shea, T.J.; Bowen, R.A.; Smith, D.L.; Stanley, T.R.; Ellison, L.E.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Rabies is an acute viral infection that is typically fatal. Most rabies modeling has focused on disease dynamics and control within terrestrial mammals (e.g., raccoons and foxes). As such, rabies in bats has been largely neglected until recently. Because bats have been implicated as natural reservoirs for several emerging zoonotic viruses, including SARS-like corona viruses, henipaviruses, and lyssaviruses, understanding how pathogens are maintained within a population becomes vital. Unfortunately, little is known about maintenance mechanisms for any pathogen in bat populations. We present a mathematical model parameterized with unique data from an extensive study of rabies in a Colorado population of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to elucidate general maintenance mechanisms. We propose that life history patterns of many species of temperate-zone bats, coupled with sufficiently long incubation periods, allows for rabies virus maintenance. Seasonal variability in bat mortality rates, specifically low mortality during hibernation, allows long-term bat population viability. Within viable bat populations, sufficiently long incubation periods allow enough infected individuals to enter hibernation and survive until the following year, and hence avoid an epizootic fadeout of rabies virus. We hypothesize that the slowing effects of hibernation on metabolic and viral activity maintains infected individuals and their pathogens until susceptibles from the annual birth pulse become infected and continue the cycle. This research provides a context to explore similar host ecology and viral dynamics that may explain seasonal patterns and maintenance of other bat-borne diseases.

  10. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  11. Saliva and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Corstjens, Paul L A M; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 10 years there have been only a handful of publications dealing with the oral virome, which is in contrast to the oral microbiome, an area that has seen considerable interest. Here, we survey viral infections in general and then focus on those viruses that are found in and/or are transmitted via the oral cavity; norovirus, rabies, human papillomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex viruses, hepatitis C virus, and HIV. Increasingly, viral infections have been diagnosed using an oral sample (e.g. saliva mucosal transudate or an oral swab) instead of blood or urine. The results of two studies using a rapid and semi-quantitative lateral flow assay format demonstrating the correlation of HIV anti-IgG/sIgA detection with saliva and serum samples are presented. When immediate detection of infection is important, point-of-care devices that obtain a non-invasive sample from the oral cavity can be used to provide a first line diagnosis to assist in determining appropriate counselling and therapeutic path for an increasing number of diseases. PMID:26662485

  12. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  13. Viral infections and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2013-01-01

    Besides their essential role in the immune system, sphingolipids and their metabolites are potential key regulators in the life cycle of obligatory intracellular pathogens such as viruses. They are involved in lateral and vertical segregation of receptors required for attachment, membrane fusion and endocytosis, as well as in the intracellular replication, assembly and release of viruses. Glycosphingolipids may themselves act as receptors for viruses, such as Galactosylceramide for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In addition, sphingolipids and their metabolites are inseparably interwoven in signal transduction processes, dynamic alterations of the cytoskeleton, and the regulation of innate and intrinsic responses of infected target cells. Depending on the nature of the intracellular pathogen, they may support or inhibit infections. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms depending on the specific virus, immune control, and type of disease may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23563664

  14. Viral diseases in zebrafish: what is known and unknown.

    PubMed

    Crim, Marcus J; Riley, Lela K

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  15. Clinical and experimental aspects of viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K; Blay, R; Haisch, C; Lodge, A; Weller, A; Huber, S

    1989-01-01

    Picornaviruses are frequently implicated as the etiological agents of acute myocarditis. This association is based historically on serological evidence of rising antibody titers to specific pathogens and more recently on identification of viral genomic material in endocardial biopsy specimens through in situ hybridization. Only rarely is infectious virus isolated from either the patient or the heart during periods of maximum myocardial inflammation and injury. Thus, despite a probable viral etiology, much interest centers on the role of the immune system in cardiac damage and the likelihood that the infection triggers an autoimmune response to heart-specific antigens. Heart-reactive antibodies and T cells are found in most myocarditis patients, and immunosuppressive therapy has proven beneficial in many, though not all, cases. Furthermore, murine models of coxsackievirus group B type 3-induced myocarditis also demonstrate that virus infection initiates autoimmunity and that these autoimmune effectors are predominately responsible for tissue injury. How virus-host interactions overcome presumed self-tolerance to heart antigens is discussed, and evidence supporting various theories of virus-initiated autoimmunity and disease pathogenesis are delineated. PMID:2650861

  16. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Viral Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Barbara A.; Lessler, Justin; Bianco, Simone; Kaufman, James H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses methods drawn from physics to study the life cycle of viruses. The paper analyzes a model of viral infection and evolution using the "grand canonical ensemble" and formalisms from statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Using this approach we enumerate all possible genetic states of a model virus and host as a function of two independent pressures–immune response and system temperature. We prove the system has a real thermodynamic temperature, and discover a new phase transition between a positive temperature regime of normal replication and a negative temperature “disordered” phase of the virus. We distinguish this from previous observations of a phase transition that arises as a function of mutation rate. From an evolutionary biology point of view, at steady state the viruses naturally evolve to distinct quasispecies. This paper also reveals a universal relationship that relates the order parameter (as a measure of mutational robustness) to evolvability in agreement with recent experimental and theoretical work. Given that real viruses have finite length RNA segments that encode proteins which determine virus fitness, the approach used here could be refined to apply to real biological systems, perhaps providing insight into immune escape, the emergence of novel pathogens and other results of viral evolution. PMID:26422205

  17. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2007-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish and is listed as reportable by many nations and international organizations (Office International des Epizooties 2006). Prior to 1988, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that the virus is endemic among many marine and anadromous fish species in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005). Genetic analysis reveals that isolates of VHSV can be divided into four genotypes that generally correlate with geographic location with the North American isolates generally falling into VHSV Genotype IV (Snow et al. 2004). In 2005-2006, reports from the Great Lakes region indicated that wild fish had experienced disease or, in some cases, very large die-offs from VHSV (Elsayed et al. 2006, Lumsden et al. 2007). The new strain from the Great Lakes, now identified as VHSV Genotype IVb, appears most closely related to isolates of VHSV from mortalities that occurred during 2000-2004 in rivers and near-shore areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Gagne et al. 2007). The type IVb isolate found in the Great Lakes region is the only strain outside of Europe that has been associated with significant mortality in freshwater species.

  18. [Viral encephalitis virus, a new bioterrorist menace].

    PubMed

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Micol, Romain; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    Often responsible for little known infections, today viral encephalitis viruses appear as a new bioterrorist menace, because of their easy production and their great pathogenic potential. Spraying is the best way to permit the rapid diffusion of certain encephalitis viruses. Diagnosis of viral encephalitis, predominating in tropical surroundings, is difficult. In the majority of cases, symptoms differ little from those of common flu. With supplementary examinations, the biological abnormalities are usually non-specific. There are no characteristic images on scans or MRI. Identification of the virus in the nasopharynx, blood or cerebrospinal fluid, in serology, PCR or RT-PCR permits confirmation of the virus. Treatment is essentially symptomatic and relies on appropriate reanimation measures. Ribavirin can be indicated in some cases such as the Rift Valley fever, but is formally contraindicated in West Nile encephalitis. The aim of terrorist groups who would use this type of weapon is more to provoke panic and disorganisation than to kill as many people as possible. PMID:15687967

  19. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  20. Staying Alive: Cell Death in Anti-Viral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Upton, Jason W.; Chan, Francis Ka-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral part of host defense against invading intracellular pathogens. Apoptosis, programmed necrosis, and pyroptosis each serve to limit pathogen replication in infected cells, while simultaneously promoting the inflammatory and innate responses that shape effective long-term host immunity. The importance of carefully regulated cell death is evident in the spectrum of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders caused by defects in these pathways. Moreover, many viruses encode inhibitors of programmed cell death to subvert these host responses during infection, thereby facilitating their own replication and persistence. Thus, as both virus and cell vie for control of these pathways, the battle for survival has shaped a complex host-pathogen interaction. This review will discuss the multifaceted role programmed cell death plays in maintaining the immune system and its critical function in host defense, with a special emphasis on viral infections. PMID:24766891

  1. New global viral threats

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Hakan; Ünal, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases have caused great catastrophes in human history, as in the example of the plague, which wiped out half of the population in Europe in the 14th century. Ebola virus and H7N9 avian influenza virus are 2 lethal pathogens that we have encountered in the second decade of the 21st century. Ebola infection is currently being seen in West Africa, and H7N9 avian flu appears to have settled in Southeast Asia. This article focuses on the current situation and the future prospects of these potential infectious threats to mankind. PMID:25828274

  2. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF TWO INTERNET-BASED DATABASES OF INSECT PATHOGENS: EDWIP AND VIDIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1996, two searchable databases covering insect pathogens were posted on the World Wide Web: the Ecological Database of the World's Insect Pathogens (EDWIP) and the Viral Diseases of Insects in the Literature database (VIDIL). In this paper, we describe the format and contents of EDWIP and VIDIL ...

  3. Viral infection, inflammation and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kneeland, Rachel E.; Fatemi, S. Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic and environmental etiologies. Prenatal viral/bacterial infections and inflammation play major roles in the genesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we describe a viral model of schizophrenia tested in mice whereby the offspring of mice prenatally infected with influenza at E7, E9, E16, and E18 show significant gene, protein, and brain structural abnormalities postnatally. Similarly, we describe data on rodents exposed to bacterial infection or injected with a synthetic viral mimic (PolyI:C) also demonstrating brain structural and behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, human serologic data has been indispensible in supporting the viral theory of schizophrenia. Individuals born seropositive for bacterial and viral agents are at a significantly elevated risk of developing schizophrenia. While the specific mechanisms of prenatal viral/bacterial infections and brain disorder are unclear, recent findings suggest that the maternal inflammatory response may be associated with fetal brain injury. Preventive and therapeutic treatment options are also proposed. This review presents data related to epidemiology, human serology, and experimental animal models which support the viral model of schizophrenia. PMID:22349576

  4. FGI-104: a broad-spectrum small molecule inhibitor of viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Michael S.; Yunus, Abdul S.; Lear, Calli; Mao, Hanwen; Chen, Hanson; Fesseha, Zena; Luo, Guangxiang; Nelson, Eric A.; Li, Limin; Huang, Zhuhui; Murray, Michael; Ellis, William Y.; Hensley, Lisa; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Olinger, Gene G.; Goldblatt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of viral diseases remains an intractable problem facing the medical community. Conventional antivirals focus upon selective targeting of virus-encoded targets. However, the plasticity of viral nucleic acid mutation, coupled with the large number of progeny that can emerge from a single infected cells, often conspire to render conventional antivirals ineffective as resistant variants emerge. Compounding this, new viral pathogens are increasingly recognized and it is highly improbable that conventional approaches could address emerging pathogens in a timely manner. Our laboratories have adopted an orthogonal approach to combat viral disease: Target the host to deny the pathogen the ability to cause disease. The advantages of this novel approach are many-fold, including the potential to identify host pathways that are applicable to a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The acquisition of drug resistance might also be minimized since selective pressure is not directly placed upon the viral pathogen. Herein, we utilized this strategy of host-oriented therapeutics to screen small molecules for their abilities to block infection by multiple, unrelated virus types and identified FGI-104. FGI-104 demonstrates broad-spectrum inhibition of multiple blood-borne pathogens (HCV, HBV, HIV) as well as emerging biothreats (Ebola, VEE, Cowpox, PRRSV infection). We also demonstrate that FGI-104 displays an ability to prevent lethality from Ebola in vivo. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept of host-oriented therapeutics and present a much-needed opportunity to identify antiviral drugs that are broad-spectrum and durable in their application. PMID:19966942

  5. FGI-104: a broad-spectrum small molecule inhibitor of viral infection.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Yunus, Abdul S; Lear, Calli; Mao, Hanwen; Chen, Hanson; Fesseha, Zena; Luo, Guangxiang; Nelson, Eric A; Li, Limin; Huang, Zhuhui; Murray, Michael; Ellis, William Y; Hensley, Lisa; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Olinger, Gene G; Goldblatt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of viral diseases remains an intractable problem facing the medical community. Conventional antivirals focus upon selective targeting of virus-encoded targets. However, the plasticity of viral nucleic acid mutation, coupled with the large number of progeny that can emerge from a single infected cells, often conspire to render conventional antivirals ineffective as resistant variants emerge. Compounding this, new viral pathogens are increasingly recognized and it is highly improbable that conventional approaches could address emerging pathogens in a timely manner. Our laboratories have adopted an orthogonal approach to combat viral disease: Target the host to deny the pathogen the ability to cause disease. The advantages of this novel approach are many-fold, including the potential to identify host pathways that are applicable to a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The acquisition of drug resistance might also be minimized since selective pressure is not directly placed upon the viral pathogen. Herein, we utilized this strategy of host-oriented therapeutics to screen small molecules for their abilities to block infection by multiple, unrelated virus types and identified FGI-104. FGI-104 demonstrates broad-spectrum inhibition of multiple blood-borne pathogens (HCV, HBV, HIV) as well as emerging biothreats (Ebola, VEE, Cowpox, PRRSV infection). We also demonstrate that FGI-104 displays an ability to prevent lethality from Ebola in vivo. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept of host-oriented therapeutics and present a much-needed opportunity to identify antiviral drugs that are broad-spectrum and durable in their application. PMID:19966942

  6. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  7. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  8. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-09-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  9. Statistical Mechanics of Viral Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements—yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy—ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together—is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  10. Viral marketing as epidemiological model

    E-print Network

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of the critical factors to this communications strategy effectiveness remain largely unknown, the mathematical models in epidemiology are presented in this marketing specific field. In this paper, an epidemiological model SIR (Susceptible- Infected-Recovered) to study the effects of a viral marketing strategy is presented. It is made a comparison between the disease parameters and the marketing application, and simulations using the Matlab software are performed. Finally, some conclusions are given and their marketing impli...

  11. Aseptic Meningitis and Viral Myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Irani, David N.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS), respectively. Indeed, the number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal CNS infections, on the other hand, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with non-infectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). This chapter will review some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus will be placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses (EVs), which as a group account for the vast majority of all aseptic meningitis cases as well as many focal infections of the spinal cord. PMID:18657719

  12. Mathematical models of viral latency.

    PubMed

    Selinger, Christian; Katze, Michael G

    2013-08-01

    While viral latency remains one of the biggest challenges for successful antiviral therapy, it has also inspired mathematical modelers to develop dynamical system approaches with the aim of predicting the impact of drug efficacy on disease progression and the persistence of latent viral reservoirs. In this review we present several differential equation models and assess their relative success in giving advice to the working clinician and their predictive power for inferring long term viral eradication from short term abatement. Many models predict that there is a considerable likelihood of viral rebound due to continuous reseeding of latent reservoirs. Most mathematical models of HIV latency suffer from being reductionist by ignoring the growing variety of different cell types harboring latent virus, the considerable intercellular delay involved in reactivation, and host-related epigenetic modifications which may alter considerably the dynamical system of immune cell populations. PMID:23896280

  13. Molecular Basis of Latency in Pathogenic Human Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    1991-11-01

    Several human viruses are able to latently infect specific target cell populations in vivo. Analysis of the replication cycles of herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human immunodeficiency virus suggests that the latent infections established by these human pathogens primarily result from a lack of host factors critical for the expression of viral early gene products. The subsequent activation of specific cellular transcription factors in response to extracellular stimuli can induce the expression of these viral regulatory proteins and lead to a burst of lytic viral replication. Latency in these eukaryotic viruses therefore contrasts with latency in bacteriophage, which is maintained primarily by the expression of virally encoded repressors of lytic replication.

  14. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  15. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed Central

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and extending the range of species that can be studied. PMID:26190977

  16. Discovery and initial analysis of novel viral genomes in the soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are the most abundant multi-cellular animals on earth, yet little is known about their natural viral pathogens and no nematode virus genomes have been published. Consequently, nematode viruses have been overlooked as important biotic factors in the study of nematode ecology. Here we show t...

  17. 77 FR 22333 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Oncolytic Viral Cancer Therapies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Chimeric Gene Having Foreign DNA Flanked by Vaccinia Regulatory DNA'' [HHS Ref. No. E-552-1982/2-US- 03]; 2... virus has been modified by inserting a chimeric gene containing foreign DNA adjacent to poxvirus... gene is expressed. For example, the foreign DNA can be related to a viral pathogen, tumor-...

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection alters global transcription profiles in bovine endothelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are significant pathogens of cattle worldwide. These viruses exist in both non-cytopathic and cytopathic biotypes. Non-cytopathic BVDV can establish persistent lifelong infections in cattle and are a frequent contaminant of biological reagents such as cell cultur...

  19. Cellular visualization of macrophage pyroptosis and interleukin-1? release in a viral hemorrhagic infection in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Varela, Mónica; Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; van der Vaart, Michiel; Figueras, Antonio; Meijer, Annemarie H; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-10-01

    Hemorrhagic viral diseases are distributed worldwide with important pathogens, such as dengue virus or hantaviruses. The lack of adequate in vivo infection models has limited the research on viral pathogenesis and the current understanding of the underlying infection mechanisms. Although hemorrhages have been associated with the infection of endothelial cells, other cellular types could be the main targets for hemorrhagic viruses. Our objective was to take advantage of the use of zebrafish larvae in the study of viral hemorrhagic diseases, focusing on the interaction between viruses and host cells. Cellular processes, such as transendothelial migration of leukocytes, virus-induced pyroptosis of macrophages. and interleukin-1? (Il-1?) release, could be observed in individual cells, providing a deeper knowledge of the immune mechanisms implicated in the disease. Furthermore, the application of these techniques to other pathogens will improve the current knowledge of host-pathogen interactions and increase the potential for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. Importance: Pathogenic mechanisms of hemorrhagic viruses are diverse, and most of the research regarding interactions between viruses and host cells has been performed in cell lines that might not be major targets during natural infections. Thus, viral pathogenesis research has been limited because of the lack of adequate in vivo infection models. The understanding of the relative pathogenic roles of the viral agent and the host response to the infection is crucial. This will be facilitated by the establishment of in vivo infection models using organisms such as zebrafish, which allows the study of the diseases in the context of a complete individual. The use of this animal model with other pathogens could improve the current knowledge on host-pathogen interactions and increase the potential for the discovery of new therapeutic targets against diverse viral diseases. PMID:25100833

  20. The role of autophagy in intracellular pathogen nutrient acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Shaun; Brunton, Jason; Kawula, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Following entry into host cells intracellular pathogens must simultaneously evade innate host defense mechanisms and acquire energy and anabolic substrates from the nutrient-limited intracellular environment. Most of the potential intracellular nutrient sources are stored within complex macromolecules that are not immediately accessible by intracellular pathogens. To obtain nutrients for proliferation, intracellular pathogens must compete with the host cell for newly-imported simple nutrients or degrade host nutrient storage structures into their constituent components (fatty acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids). It is becoming increasingly evident that intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide variety of strategies to accomplish this task. One recurrent microbial strategy is to exploit host degradative processes that break down host macromolecules into simple nutrients that the microbe can use. Herein we focus on how a subset of bacterial, viral, and eukaryotic pathogens leverage the host process of autophagy to acquire nutrients that support their growth within infected cells. PMID:26106587

  1. RAB11-mediated trafficking in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Annabel; Nizet, Victor; Bier, Ethan

    2014-09-01

    Many bacterial and viral pathogens block or subvert host cellular processes to promote successful infection. One host protein that is targeted by invading pathogens is the small GTPase RAB11, which functions in vesicular trafficking. RAB11 functions in conjunction with a protein complex known as the exocyst to mediate terminal steps in cargo transport via the recycling endosome to cell-cell junctions, phagosomes and cellular protrusions. These processes contribute to host innate immunity by promoting epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity, sensing and immobilizing pathogens and repairing pathogen-induced cellular damage. In this Review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pathogens have evolved to disrupt or subvert RAB11-dependent pathways as part of their infection strategy. PMID:25118884

  2. Pathogens Hijack the Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Silmon de Monerri, Natalie C.; Kim, Kami

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved strategies to promote their survival by dramatically modifying the transcriptional profile and protein content of the host cells they infect. Modifications of the host transcriptome and proteome are mediated by pathogen-encoded effector molecules that modulate host cells through a variety of different mechanisms. Recent studies highlight the importance of the host chromatin and other epigenetic regulators as targets of pathogens. Host gene regulatory mechanisms may be targeted through cytoplasmic signaling, directly by pathogen effector proteins, and possibly by pathogen RNA. Although many of these changes are short-lived and persist only during the course of infection, several studies indicate that pathogens are able to induce long-term, heritable changes that are essential to pathogenesis of infectious diseases and persistence of pathogens within their hosts. In this review, we discuss how pathogens modulate the epigenome of host cells, a new and flourishing avenue of host-pathogen interaction studies. PMID:24525150

  3. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-González, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: “what is causing the disease?” in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by “what is out there?” In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral genome from a metagenomic sample. However, retrieval of a full-length genome of a divergent virus is technically challenging and can be time-consuming and costly. Here we discuss different assembly and fragment linkage strategies such as iterative assembly, motif searches, k-mer frequency profiling, coverage profile binning, and other strategies used to recover genomes of potential viral pathogens in a timely and cost-effective manner. PMID:26483782

  4. Enteric pathogens through life stages

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Glynis; Wu, Martin; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Enteric infections and diarrheal diseases constitute pervasive health burdens throughout the world, with rates being highest at the two ends of life. During the first 2–3 years of life, much of the disease burden may be attributed to infection with enteric pathogens including Salmonella, rotavirus, and many other bacterial, viral, and protozoan organisms; however, infections due to Clostridium difficile exhibit steady increases with age. Still others, like Campylobacter infections in industrialized settings are high in early life (<2 years old) and increase again in early adulthood (called the “second weaning” by some). The reasons for these differences undoubtedly reside in part in pathogen differences; however, host factors including the commensal intestinal microbial communities, immune responses (innate and acquired), and age-dependant shifts likely play important roles. Interplay of these factors is illustrated by studies examining changes in human gut microbiota with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Recent gut microbial surveys have indicated dramatic shifts in gut microbial population structure from infants to young adults to the elders. An understanding of the evolution of these factors and their interactions (e.g., how does gut microbiota modulate the “inflamm-aging” process or vice versa) through the human life “cycle” will be important in better addressing and controlling these enteric infections and their consequences for both quality and quantity of life (often assessed as disability adjusted life-years or “DALYs”). PMID:22937528

  5. Enteric pathogens through life stages.

    PubMed

    Kolling, Glynis; Wu, Martin; Guerrant, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Enteric infections and diarrheal diseases constitute pervasive health burdens throughout the world, with rates being highest at the two ends of life. During the first 2-3 years of life, much of the disease burden may be attributed to infection with enteric pathogens including Salmonella, rotavirus, and many other bacterial, viral, and protozoan organisms; however, infections due to Clostridium difficile exhibit steady increases with age. Still others, like Campylobacter infections in industrialized settings are high in early life (<2 years old) and increase again in early adulthood (called the "second weaning" by some). The reasons for these differences undoubtedly reside in part in pathogen differences; however, host factors including the commensal intestinal microbial communities, immune responses (innate and acquired), and age-dependant shifts likely play important roles. Interplay of these factors is illustrated by studies examining changes in human gut microbiota with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Recent gut microbial surveys have indicated dramatic shifts in gut microbial population structure from infants to young adults to the elders. An understanding of the evolution of these factors and their interactions (e.g., how does gut microbiota modulate the "inflamm-aging" process or vice versa) through the human life "cycle" will be important in better addressing and controlling these enteric infections and their consequences for both quality and quantity of life (often assessed as disability adjusted life-years or "DALYs"). PMID:22937528

  6. [Treatment of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Miguet, J; Hrusovský, S

    1995-09-01

    Chronic forms of viral B,C and D hepatitis and fulminant hepatitis represent a serious healthcare problem. The study deals with the changes in the strategy in treating these diseases. During the chronic active hepatitis caused by the B hepatitis virus, the main aim of treatment is to cease multiplication of viruses, eliminate the clinical symptoms, prevent the development of cirrhosis, or the origin of hepatocellular carcinoma. The authors analyze the possibilities of the application of corticosteroids, viricidal drugs (vidarabin and interferons) and other medicaments (acyclovir, zidovudin, duramin, gancyclovir, chinacrin, and others) besides corticosteroids, interleukin 2 and tymozin from the group of immunomodulators were tested. The testing included the factor stimulating the colonies of granulocytes and myeloblasts and other substances. The therapy of acute protracted B hepatitis by means of interferon still requires controlled studies. Superinfection by D virus in chronic carriers of HBsAG causes chronic hepatitis which quickly leads to the development of cirrhosis. The therapy on basis of alpha interferon decreases the RNA virus D hepatitis serum level and leads to an improvement in the development of chronic hepatitis in half of the patients. Therapy of chronic C hepatitis on basis of corticosteroids is ineffective, and can be dangerous. Acyclovir is proved to be ineffective as well. The open study indicated certain positive results in application of interferon. The fulminant hepatitis can be defined as a development of encephalopathy and a decrease of the prothrombin time to less than 50% in the course of acute hepatitis. The break-point in the therapy of fulminant hepatitis took place in association with the performance of the transplantation of the liver. Impossibility to transplant the liver means that the effect of therapy of fulminant hepatitis is merely of supportive value. Majority of patients die due to neurologic complications, namely unmanageable oedema of the brain. But still, neither the antioedema therapy, e.g. on basis of manitol, as well as by means of corticosteroids, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, plasmapheresis and hemoperfusion, nor the treatment on basis of E1 prostaglandine improved the survival of patients. (Tab. 2, Ref. 82). PMID:8556359

  7. Papillomaviruses: Viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ignacio G; Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  8. Recent insights into the evolution of innate viral sensing in animals

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Samuel H; Obbard, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of viral sensors is likely to be shaped by the constraint imposed through high conservation of viral Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), and by the potential for ‘arms race’ coevolution with more rapidly evolving viral proteins. Here we review the recent progress made in understanding the evolutionary history of two types of viral sensor, RNA helicases and Toll-like receptors. We find differences both in their rates of evolution, and in the levels of positive selection they experience. We suggest that positive selection has been the primary driver of the rapid evolution of the RNA helicases, while selective constraint has been a stronger influence shaping the slow evolution of the Toll-like receptors. PMID:25042205

  9. Influence of host resistance on viral adaptation: hepatitis C virus as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Plauzolles, Anne; Lucas, Michaela; Gaudieri, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and cellular studies have shown that the host’s innate and adaptive immune responses are an important correlate of viral infection outcome. The features of the host’s immune response (host resistance) reflect the coevolution between hosts and pathogens that has occurred over millennia, and that has also resulted in a number of strategies developed by viruses to improve fitness and survival within the host (viral adaptation). In this review, we discuss viral adaptation to host immune pressure via protein–protein interactions and sequence-specific mutations. Specifically, we will present the “state of play” on viral escape mutations to host T-cell responses in the context of the hepatitis C virus, and their influence on infection outcome. PMID:25897250

  10. Viral (hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, HIV) persistence and immune homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q; Jia, Zhan S

    2014-01-01

    Immune homeostasis is a host characteristic that maintains biological balance within a host. Humans have evolved many host defence mechanisms that ensure the survival of individuals upon encountering a pathogenic infection, with recovery or persistence from a viral infection being determined by both viral factors and host immunity. Chronic viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and HIV, often result in chronic fluctuating viraemia in the face of host cellular and humoral immune responses, which are dysregulated by multi-faceted mechanisms that are incompletely understood. This review attempts to illuminate the mechanisms involved in this process, focusing on immune homeostasis in the setting of persistent viral infection from the aspects of host defence mechanism, including interferon-stimulated genes, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3), autophagy and interactions of various immune cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules. PMID:24965611

  11. Viral Membrane Channels: Role and Function in the Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Ching Wooen; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Viroporins are small, hydrophobic trans-membrane viral proteins that oligomerize to form hydrophilic pores in the host cell membranes. These proteins are crucial for the pathogenicity and replication of viruses as they aid in various stages of the viral life cycle, from genome uncoating to viral release. In addition, the ion channel activity of viroporin causes disruption in the cellular ion homeostasis, in particular the calcium ion. Fluctuation in the calcium level triggers the activation of the host defensive programmed cell death pathways as well as the inflammasome, which in turn are being subverted for the viruses’ replication benefits. This review article summarizes recent developments in the functional investigation of viroporins from various viruses and their contributions to viral replication and virulence. PMID:26110585

  12. Superinfection exclusion by Citrus tristeza virus does not correlate with the production of viral small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Harper, Scott J; Leonard, Michael T; Triplett, Eric W; Shilts, Turksen

    2014-11-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a preexisting viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been described for different viruses, including important pathogens of humans, animals, and plants. Several mechanisms acting at various stages of the viral life cycle have been proposed to explain SIE. Most cases of SIE in plant virus systems were attributed to induction of RNA silencing, a host defense mechanism that is mediated by small RNAs. Here we show that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) does not correlate with the production of viral small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). CTV variants, which differed in the SIE ability, had similar siRNAs profiles. Along with our previous observations that the exclusion phenomenon requires a specific viral protein, p33, the new data suggest that SIE by CTV is highly complex and appears to use different mechanisms than those proposed for other viruses. PMID:25248160

  13. Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity. PMID:26038515

  14. Diagnostics and Discovery in Viral Central Nervous System Infections.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, Walter Ian; Hornig, Mady

    2015-09-01

    The range of viruses implicated in central nervous system disease continues to grow with globalization of travel and trade, emergence and reemergence of zoonoses and investments in discovery science. Diagnosis of viral central nervous system infections is challenging in that brain tissue, where the pathogen concentration is likely to be highest, is not readily obtained and sensitive methods for molecular and serological detection of infection are not available in most clinical microbiology laboratories. Here we review these challenges and discuss how they may be addressed using advances in molecular, proteomic and immunological methods. PMID:26276023

  15. Expression of chicken interleukin-2 by a highly virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus leads to decreased systemic viral load but does not significantly affect mortality in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mammals, interleukin 2 (IL-2) has been shown to decrease replication or attenuate pathogenicity of numerous viral pathogens by activating natural killer cells (NK), cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and expanding subsets of memory cells. In chickens, IL-2 has been shown to activate T cells, and as such i...

  16. Reverse transcriptase directs viral evolution in a deep ocean methane seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. G.; Bagby, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep ocean methane seeps are sites of intense microbial activity, with complex communities fueled by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophy. Methane consumption in these communities has a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle, yet little is known about their evolutionary history or their likely evolutionary trajectories in a warming ocean. As in other marine systems, viral predation and virally mediated horizontal gene transfer are expected to be major drivers of evolutionary change in these communities; however, the host cells' resistance to cultivation has impeded direct study of the viral population. We conducted a metagenomic study of viruses in the anoxic sediments of a deep methane seep in the Santa Monica Basin in the Southern California Bight. We retrieved 1660 partial viral genomes, tentatively assigning 1232 to bacterial hosts and 428 to archaea. One abundant viral genome, likely hosted by Clostridia species present in the sediment, was found to encode a diversity-generating retroelement (DGR), a module for reverse transcriptase-mediated directed mutagenesis of a distal tail fiber protein. While DGRs have previously been described in the viruses of human pathogens, where diversification of viral tail fibers permits infection of a range of host cell types, to our knowledge this is the first description of such an element in a marine virus. By providing a mechanism for massively broadening potential host range, the presence of DGRs in these systems may have a major impact on the prevalence of virally mediated horizontal gene transfer, and even on the phylogenetic distances across which genes are moved.

  17. No association between HPV positive breast cancer and expression of human papilloma viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Orla M; Antonsson, Annika; Milevskiy, Michael; Brown, Melissa A; Saunders, Nicholas A; Bennett, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    Infectious agents are thought to be responsible for approximately 16% of cancers worldwide, however there are mixed reports in the literature as to the prevalence and potential pathogenicity of viruses in breast cancer. Furthermore, most studies to date have focused primarily on viral DNA rather than the expression of viral transcripts. We screened a large cohort of fresh frozen breast cancer and normal breast tissue specimens collected from patients in Australia for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA, with an overall prevalence of HPV of 16% and 10% in malignant and non-malignant tissue respectively. Samples that were positive for HPV DNA by nested PCR were screened by RNA-sequencing for the presence of transcripts of viral origin, using three different bioinformatic pipelines. We did not find any evidence for HPV or other viral transcripts in HPV DNA positive samples. In addition, we also screened publicly available breast RNA-seq data sets for the presence of viral transcripts and did not find any evidence for the expression of viral transcripts (HPV or otherwise) in other data sets. This data suggests that transcription of viral genomes is unlikely to be a significant factor in breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26658849

  18. No association between HPV positive breast cancer and expression of human papilloma viral transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Orla M.; Antonsson, Annika; Milevskiy, Michael; Brown, Melissa A.; Saunders, Nicholas A.; Bennett, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious agents are thought to be responsible for approximately 16% of cancers worldwide, however there are mixed reports in the literature as to the prevalence and potential pathogenicity of viruses in breast cancer. Furthermore, most studies to date have focused primarily on viral DNA rather than the expression of viral transcripts. We screened a large cohort of fresh frozen breast cancer and normal breast tissue specimens collected from patients in Australia for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA, with an overall prevalence of HPV of 16% and 10% in malignant and non-malignant tissue respectively. Samples that were positive for HPV DNA by nested PCR were screened by RNA-sequencing for the presence of transcripts of viral origin, using three different bioinformatic pipelines. We did not find any evidence for HPV or other viral transcripts in HPV DNA positive samples. In addition, we also screened publicly available breast RNA-seq data sets for the presence of viral transcripts and did not find any evidence for the expression of viral transcripts (HPV or otherwise) in other data sets. This data suggests that transcription of viral genomes is unlikely to be a significant factor in breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26658849

  19. Assessing the risk of transmission of viral diseases in flooded areas: viral load of the River Elbe in Dresden during the flood of August 2002.

    PubMed

    Rohayem, Jacques; Dumke, Roger; Jaeger, Katrin; Schröter-Bobsin, Ute; Mogel, Michael; Kruse, Alex; Jacobs, Enno; Rethwilm, Axel

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the risk of transmission of viral diseases during floods, the viral burden in flooded areas of the city of Dresden (Germany) in August 2002 was investigated. Water samples were collected from 9 sampling sites and tested for the presence of 11 enteric viral pathogens. As a control, water samples from the same sites were analyzed in seasonal intervals over the following year. A total of 36 samples were collected, 92% (33/36) being positive for at least one virus. Adenovirus type 40/41 was the most frequently detected (53%), followed by astrovirus (50%) and enterovirus (50%). In all samples, low levels of bacteriophages were detected with no specificity as to sampling site and season, indicating a moderate river contamination with wastewater. A striking association between water temperature and viral genome detection was observed, as illustrated in August 2002 (mean water temperature of 17.8 degrees, 8 sites positive for 17 viruses), in comparison to November 2002 (mean water temperature of 7.6 degrees, 9 sites positive for 45 viruses). Importantly, hepatitis A viral RNA was not detected in the flooded area. In conclusion, our results indicate no increased risk for transmission of viral diseases through water contact in flooded areas. PMID:16926550

  20. Geophysiology of Wood Frogs: Landscape Patterns of Prevalence of Disease and Circulating Hormone Concentrations across the Eastern Range.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Erica J; Rissler, Leslie J; Mattheus, Nichole M; Engbrecht, Kristin; Duncan, Sarah I; Seaborn, Travis; Hall, Emily M; Peterson, John D; Brunner, Jesse L

    2015-10-01

    One of the major challenges for conservation physiologists is to determine how current or future environmental conditions relate to the health of animals at the population level. In this study, we measured prevalence of disease, mean condition of the body, and mean resting levels of corticosterone and testosterone in a total of 28 populations across the years 2011 and 2012, and correlated these measures of health to climatic suitability of habitat, using estimates from a model of the ecological niche of the wood frog's geographic range. Using the core-periphery hypothesis as a theoretical framework, we predicted a higher prevalence and intensity of infection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and ranaviruses, two major amphibian pathogens causing disease, and higher resting levels of circulating corticosterone, an indicator of allostatic load incurred from living in marginal habitats. We found that Bd infections were rare (2% of individuals tested), while infections with ranavirus were much more common: ranavirus-infected individuals were found in 92% of ponds tested over the 2 years. Contrary to our predictions, rates of infection with ranaviruses were positively correlated with quality of the habitat with the highest prevalence at the core of the range, and plasma corticosterone concentrations measured when frogs were at rest were not correlated with quality of the habitat, the prevalence of ranavirus, or the intensity of infection. Prevalence and mean viral titers of ranavirus infection were higher in 2012 than in 2011, which coincided with lower levels of circulating corticosterone and testosterone and an extremely early time of breeding due to relatively higher temperatures during the winter. In addition, the odds of having a ranavirus infection increased with decreased body condition, and if animals had an infection, viral titers were positively correlated to levels of circulating testosterone concentration. By resolving these patterns, experiments can be designed to test hypotheses about the mechanisms that produce them, such as whether transmission of the ranavirus and tolerance of the host are greater or whether virulence is lower in populations within core habitats. While there is debate about which metrics serve as the best bioindicators of population health, the findings of this study demonstrate the importance of long-term monitoring of multiple physiological parameters to better understand the dynamic relationship between the environment and the health of wildlife populations over space and time. PMID:26269462

  1. Detection of viral sequences in semen of honeybees (Apis mellifera): evidence for vertical transmission of viruses through drones.

    PubMed

    Yue, Constanze; Schröder, Marion; Bienefeld, Kaspar; Genersch, Elke

    2006-06-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) can be attacked by many eukaryotic parasites, and bacterial as well as viral pathogens. Especially in combination with the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, viral honeybee diseases are becoming a major problem in apiculture, causing economic losses worldwide. Several horizontal transmission routes are described for some honeybee viruses. Here, we report for the first time the detection of viral sequences in semen of honeybee drones suggesting mating as another horizontal and/or vertical route of virus transmission. Since artificial insemination and controlled mating is widely used in honeybee breeding, the impact of our findings for disease transmission is discussed. PMID:16630626

  2. GeMInA, Genomic Metadata for Infectious Agents, a geospatial surveillance pathogen database

    PubMed Central

    Schriml, Lynn M.; Arze, Cesar; Nadendla, Suvarna; Ganapathy, Anu; Felix, Victor; Mahurkar, Anup; Phillippy, Katherine; Gussman, Aaron; Angiuoli, Sam; Ghedin, Elodie; White, Owen; Hall, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The Gemina system (http://gemina.igs.umaryland.edu) identifies, standardizes and integrates the outbreak metadata for the breadth of NIAID category A–C viral and bacterial pathogens, thereby providing an investigative and surveillance tool describing the Who [Host], What [Disease, Symptom], When [Date], Where [Location] and How [Pathogen, Environmental Source, Reservoir, Transmission Method] for each pathogen. The Gemina database will provide a greater understanding of the interactions of viral and bacterial pathogens with their hosts and infectious diseases through in-depth literature text-mining, integrated outbreak metadata, outbreak surveillance tools, extensive ontology development, metadata curation and representative genomic sequence identification and standards development. The Gemina web interface provides metadata selection and retrieval of a pathogen's; Infection Systems (Pathogen, Host, Disease, Transmission Method and Anatomy) and Incidents (Location and Date) along with a hosts Age and Gender. The Gemina system provides an integrated investigative and geospatial surveillance system connecting pathogens, pathogen products and disease anchored on the taxonomic ID of the pathogen and host to identify the breadth of hosts and diseases known for these pathogens, to identify the extent of outbreak locations, and to identify unique genomic regions with the DNA Signature Insignia Detection Tool. PMID:19850722

  3. Infection of United States swine with a Chinese highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the pathogenic effects of Type 2 highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) on healthy 10-week old commercial swine in the United States, viral kinetics and resultant disease caused by intranasal inoculation of such virus rescued from an infectious clo...

  4. Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyomyositis, psoas abscess, Staphylococcus aureus myositis, group A streptococcal necrotizing myositis, group B streptococcal myositis, clostridial gas gangrene, and nonclostridial myositis. Fungal myositis is rare and usually occurs among immunocompromised hosts. Parasitic myositis is most commonly a result of trichinosis or cystericercosis, but other protozoa or helminths may be involved. A parasitic cause of myositis is suggested by the travel history and presence of eosinophilia. Viruses may cause diffuse muscle involvement with clinical manifestations, such as benign acute myositis (most commonly due to influenza virus), pleurodynia (coxsackievirus B), acute rhabdomyolysis, or an immune-mediated polymyositis. The diagnosis of myositis is suggested by the clinical picture and radiologic imaging, and the etiologic agent is confirmed by microbiologic or serologic testing. Therapy is based on the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen. PMID:18625683

  5. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James R.; Walker, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

  6. Characterization of Viral Entry Inhibitors 

    E-print Network

    Chamoun Emanuelli, Ana M

    2014-08-06

    family, widely used as antipsychotic drugs. Phenothiazines were shown to suppress HCV entry by intercalating into cholesterol-rich membrane domains of target cells thus reducing viral-host fusion. The second candidates studied are two members of the H1...

  7. The Paradigm of Viral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welker, Carl B.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of idea viruses and viral communication, a technology-based communication that spreads ideas quickly. Explains its applicability in the area of direct marketing and discusses a technology platform that provides the opportunity of sending a message to a large number of people and emotional or pecuniary incentives to…

  8. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  9. H5N1 influenza virulence, pathogenicity and transmissibility: what do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have infected more than 600 people since 1997, resulting in the deaths of approximately 60% of those infected. Multiple studies have established the viral hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein as the major determinant of H5N1 virulence. HA mediates host-specific virus binding to cells, and mutations that allow efficient binding to viral receptors on mammalian cells are critical (although not sufficient) for H5N1 transmissibility among mammals. The viral polymerase PB2 protein is also a critical virulence determinant, and adaptive mutations in this protein are crucial for efficient H5N1 virus replication in mammals. Additionally, viral proteins (such as NS1 and PB1-F2) with roles in innate immune responses also affect the virulence of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses.

  10. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways. PMID:25680890

  11. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2012

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  12. Direct exposure to animal enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, C; Nwachuku, N; Gerba, C P

    2001-01-01

    Humans have very close interactions with working, food-producing, and companion animals. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, there are more than one hundred million cat and dog pets in the United States. Furthermore, non-traditional pets like reptiles and exotic birds are not unusual companion animals in households. In addition to sharing with animals our living and/or working space and time, we also share, unfortunately, many disease causing microorganisms. In the past few years, we have become aware that several enteric pathogens that were thought to be mostly restricted to animals are a major cause of human disease. Examples of such pathogens include the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum and bacteria such as Campylobacter spp. This review will examine the characteristics of zoonotic enteric pathogens including bacterial (Helicobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli); parasitic (Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia spp., Cryptosporidium spp.); and viral (rotavirus, norwalk-like virus, hepatitis E virus), and the status of our knowledge with regard to the impact of such pathogens on human health. PMID:11512628

  13. Emerging Pathogens – How Safe is Blood?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael; Geilenkeuser, Wolf-Jochen; Sireis, Walid; Seifried, Erhard; Hourfar, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Summary During the last few decades, blood safety efforts were mainly focused on preventing viral infections. However, humanity's increased mobility and improved migration pathways necessitate a global perspective regarding other transfusion-transmitted pathogens. This review focuses on the general infection risk of blood components for malaria, dengue virus, Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Babesia spp. Approximately 250 million people become infected by Plasmodium spp. per year. Dengue virus affects more than 50 million people annually in more than 100 countries; clinically, it can cause serious diseases, such as dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Chagas disease, which is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, mainly occurs in South America and infects approximately 10 million people annually. Babesia spp. is a parasitic infection that infects red blood cells; although many infections are asymptomatic, severe clinical disease has been reported, especially in the elderly. Screening assays are available for all considered pathogens but make screening strategies more complex and more expensive. A general pathogen inactivation for all blood components (whole blood) promises to be a long-term, sustainable solution for both known and unknown pathogens. Transfusion medicine therefore eagerly awaits such a system. PMID:24659943

  14. Invasive ants carry novel viruses in their new range and form reservoirs for a honeybee pathogen.

    PubMed

    Sébastien, Alexandra; Lester, Philip J; Hall, Richard J; Wang, Jing; Moore, Nicole E; Gruber, Monica A M

    2015-09-01

    When exotic animal species invade new environments they also bring an often unknown microbial diversity, including pathogens. We describe a novel and widely distributed virus in one of the most globally widespread, abundant and damaging invasive ants (Argentine ants, Linepithema humile). The Linepithema humile virus 1 is a dicistrovirus, a viral family including species known to cause widespread arthropod disease. It was detected in samples from Argentina, Australia and New Zealand. Argentine ants in New Zealand were also infected with a strain of Deformed wing virus common to local hymenopteran species, which is a major pathogen widely associated with honeybee mortality. Evidence for active replication of viral RNA was apparent for both viruses. Our results suggest co-introduction and exchange of pathogens within local hymenopteran communities. These viral species may contribute to the collapse of Argentine ant populations and offer new options for the control of a globally widespread invader. PMID:26562935

  15. Development of an aquatic pathogen database (AquaPathogen X) and its utilization in tracking emerging fish virus pathogens in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kentop, E.; Thompson, T.M.; Pittam, S.; Ryan, A.; Keon, D.; Carlino, J.A.; Ranson, J.; Life, R.B.; Troyer, R.M.; Garver, K.A.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    The AquaPathogen X database is a template for recording information on individual isolates of aquatic pathogens and is freely available for download (http://wfrc.usgs.gov). This database can accommodate the nucleotide sequence data generated in molecular epidemiological studies along with the myriad of abiotic and biotic traits associated with isolates of various pathogens (e.g. viruses, parasites and bacteria) from multiple aquatic animal host species (e.g. fish, shellfish and shrimp). The cataloguing of isolates from different aquatic pathogens simultaneously is a unique feature to the AquaPathogen X database, which can be used in surveillance of emerging aquatic animal diseases and elucidation of key risk factors associated with pathogen incursions into new water systems. An application of the template database that stores the epidemiological profiles of fish virus isolates, called Fish ViroTrak, was also developed. Exported records for two aquatic rhabdovirus species emerging in North America were used in the implementation of two separate web-accessible databases: the Molecular Epidemiology of Aquatic Pathogens infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (MEAP-IHNV) database (http://gis.nacse.org/ihnv/) released in 2006 and the MEAP- viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (http://gis.nacse.org/vhsv/) database released in 2010.

  16. Vaccines and Vaccination for Veterinary Viral Diseases: A General Overview.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A high number of infectious diseases affecting livestock and companion animals are caused by pathogens of viral etiology. Ensuring the maximum standards of quality and welfare in animal production requires developing effective tools to halt and prevent the spread of those infectious diseases affecting animal husbandry. To date, one of the best strategies is to implement vaccination policies whenever possible. However many of the currently manufactured vaccines relies in classical vaccine technologies (killed or attenuated vaccines) which, under some circumstances, may not be optimal in terms of safety or adequate for widespread application in disease-free countries at risk of disease introduction. One step ahead is needed to improve and adapt vaccine manufacturing to the use of new generation vaccine technologies already tested in experimental settings. Here we present in the context of animal viral diseases of veterinary interest, an overview of some current vaccine technologies that can be approached for virus pathogens with a brief insight in the type of immunity elicited. PMID:26458826

  17. Applying horizontal gene transfer phenomena to enhance non-viral gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Jacob J.; Christensen, Matthew D.; Rege, Kaushal

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is widespread amongst prokaryotes, but eukaryotes tend to be far less promiscuous with their genetic information. However, several examples of HGT from pathogens into eukaryotic cells have been discovered and mimicked to improve non-viral gene delivery techniques. For example, several viral proteins and DNA sequences have been used to significantly increase cytoplasmic and nuclear gene delivery. Plant genetic engineering is routinely performed with the pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens and similar pathogens (e.g. Bartonella henselae) may also be able to transform human cells. Intracellular parasites like Trypanosoma cruzi may also provide new insights into overcoming cellular barriers to gene delivery. Finally, intercellular nucleic acid transfer between host cells will also be briefly discussed. This article will review the unique characteristics of several different viruses and microbes and discuss how their traits have been successfully applied to improve non-viral gene delivery techniques. Consequently, pathogenic traits that originally caused diseases may eventually be used to treat many genetic diseases. PMID:23994344

  18. Reprogramming the host: Modification of cell functions upon viral infection.

    PubMed

    Alvisi, Gualtiero; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-05-12

    Viruses and their hosts have co-evolved for million years. In order to successfully replicate their genome, viruses need to usurp the biosynthetic machinery of the host cell. Depending on the complexity and the nature of the genome, replication might involve or not a relatively large subset of viral products, in addition to a number of host cell factors, and take place in several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus, the cytoplasm, as well as virus-induced, rearranged membranes. Therefore viruses need to ensure the correct subcellular localization of their effectors and to be capable of disguising from the cellular defensive mechanisms. In addition, viruses are capable of exploiting host cell activities, by modulating their post-translational modification apparatus, resulting in profound modifications in the function of cellular and viral products. Not surprisingly infection of host cells by these parasites can lead to alterations of cellular differentiation and growing properties, with important pathogenic consequences. In the present hot topic highlight entitled "Reprogramming the host: modification of cell functions upon viral infection", a number of leading virologists and cell biologist thoroughly describe recent advances in our understanding of how viruses modulate cellular functions to achieve successful replication and propagation at the expenses of human cells. PMID:24175226

  19. Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C; Coutts, Robert H A; Lomonossoff, George P; Rowlands, David J; Phillips, Simon E V; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G

    2015-02-17

    We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

  20. Intracellular antibody receptor TRIM21 prevents fatal viral infection.

    PubMed

    Vaysburd, Marina; Watkinson, Ruth E; Cooper, Helen; Reed, Martin; O'Connell, Kevin; Smith, Jackie; Cruickshanks, James; James, Leo C

    2013-07-23

    Host species have evolved mechanisms that can inhibit pathogen replication even after a cell has been successfully invaded. Here we show that tripartite-motif protein 21 (TRIM21), a ubiquitously expressed E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets viruses inside the cytosol, protects mice against fatal viral infection. Upon infection with mouse adenovirus-1, naive mice lacking TRIM21 succumb to encephalomyelitis within 7 d. In contrast, wild-type mice rapidly up-regulate TRIM21 and control viremia. Trim21 heterozygous mice have a haploinsufficiency phenotype in which reduced TRIM21 expression leads to a viral load that is higher than wild types but lower than knockouts. TRIM21 is a high-affinity antibody receptor that allows antibodies to operate inside an infected cell. In passive transfer experiments at high viral dose, antisera that fully protects wild-type mice fails to protect most Trim21 knockout animals. These results demonstrate that TRIM21 provides potent antiviral protection and forms an important part of the humoral immune response. PMID:23840060

  1. Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C.; Coutts, Robert H. A.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

  2. Metagenomic Investigation of Viral Communities in Ballast Water.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yiseul; Aw, Tiong Gim; Teal, Tracy K; Rose, Joan B

    2015-07-21

    Ballast water is one of the most important vectors for the transport of non-native species to new aquatic environments. Due to the development of new ballast water quality standards for viruses, this study aimed to determine the taxonomic diversity and composition of viral communities (viromes) in ballast and harbor waters using metagenomics approaches. Ballast waters from different sources within the North America Great Lakes and paired harbor waters were collected around the Port of Duluth-Superior. Bioinformatics analysis of over 550 million sequences showed that a majority of the viral sequences could not be assigned to any taxa associated with reference sequences, indicating the lack of knowledge on viruses in ballast and harbor waters. However, the assigned viruses were dominated by double-stranded DNA phages, and sequences associated with potentially emerging viral pathogens of fish and shrimp were detected with low amino acid similarity in both ballast and harbor waters. Annotation-independent comparisons showed that viromes were distinct among the Great Lakes, and the Great Lakes viromes were closely related to viromes of other cold natural freshwater systems but distant from viromes of marine and human designed/managed freshwater systems. These results represent the most detailed characterization to date of viruses in ballast water, demonstrating their diversity and the potential significance of the ship-mediated spread of viruses. PMID:26107908

  3. Gene TherapyGene Therapy Using Viral and Non-Viral Vectors to DeliverUsing Viral and Non-Viral Vectors to Deliver

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Gene TherapyGene Therapy Using Viral and Non-Viral Vectors to DeliverUsing Viral and NonBy Jay Bhat #12;IntroductionIntroduction 2 Types2 Types ­ Germline Gene Therapy (Theoretical)Germline Gene Therapy (Theoretical) ­ Somatic Gene Therapy (Clinical)Somatic Gene Therapy (Clinical) Goal

  4. Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM) for prospective detection and identification of emergent pathogen strains and variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, Clark; Lichanska, Agnieszka M.; Borsuk, Lisa A.; Weslowski, Brian; Morris, Leah M.; Lorence, Matthew C.; Schafer, Klaus O.; Campos, Joseph; Sene, Mohamadou; Myers, Christopher A.; Faix, Dennis; Blair, Patrick J.; Brown, Jason; Metzgar, David

    2010-04-01

    High-density resequencing microarrays support simultaneous detection and identification of multiple viral and bacterial pathogens. Because detection and identification using RPM is based upon multiple specimen-specific target pathogen gene sequences generated in the individual test, the test results enable both a differential diagnostic analysis and epidemiological tracking of detected pathogen strains and variants from one specimen to the next. The RPM assay enables detection and identification of pathogen sequences that share as little as 80% sequence similarity to prototype target gene sequences represented as detector tiles on the array. This capability enables the RPM to detect and identify previously unknown strains and variants of a detected pathogen, as in sentinel cases associated with an infectious disease outbreak. We illustrate this capability using assay results from testing influenza A virus vaccines configured with strains that were first defined years after the design of the RPM microarray. Results are also presented from RPM-Flu testing of three specimens independently confirmed to the positive for the 2009 Novel H1N1 outbreak strain of influenza virus.

  5. The role of Rel/NF-kappa B proteins in viral oncogenesis and the regulation of viral transcription.

    PubMed

    Mosialos, G

    1997-04-01

    Rel/NF-kappa B is a ubiquitous transcription factor that consists of multiple polypeptide subunits, and is subject to complex regulatory mechanisms that involve protein-protein interactions, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, proteolytic degradation, and nucleocytoplasmic translocation. The sophisticated control of Rel/NF-kappa B activity is not surprising since this transcription factor is involved in a wide array of cellular responses to extracellular cues, associated with growth, development, apoptosis, and pathogen invasion. Thus, it is not unexpected that this versatile cellular homeostatic switch would be affected by a variety of viral pathogens, which have evolved mechanisms to utilize various aspects of Rel/NF-kappa B activity to facilitate their replication, cell survival and possibly evasion of immune responses. This review will cover the molecular mechanisms that are utilized by mammalian oncogenic viruses to affect the activity of Rel/NF-kappa B transcription factors and the role of Rel/NF-kappa B in the regulation of viral gene expression and replication. PMID:9299590

  6. Dynamics of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, viral erythrocytic necrosis and ichthyophoniasis in confined juvenile Pacific herring Clupea pallasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.; Hart, A.; Gregg, J.; Elder, N.; Winton, J.

    2006-01-01

    Capture of wild, juvenile herring Clupea pallasii from Puget Sound (Washington, USA) and confinement in laboratory tanks resulted in outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) and ichthyophoniasis; however, the timing and progression of the 3 diseases differed. The VHS epidemic occurred first, characterized by an initially low infection prevalence that increased quickly with confinement time, peaking at 93 to 98% after confinement for 6 d, then decreasing to negligible levels after 20 d. The VHS outbreak was followed by a VEN epidemic that, within 12 d of confinement, progressed from undetectable levels to 100% infection prevalence with >90% of erythrocytes demonstrating inclusions. The VEN epidemic persisted for 54 d, after which the study was terminated, and was characterized by severe blood dyscrasias including reduction of mean hematocrit from 42 to 6% and replacement of mature erythrocytes with circulating erythroblasts and ghost cells. All fish with ichthyophoniasis at capture died within the first 3 wk of confinement, probably as a result of the multiple stressors associated with capture, transport, confinement, and progression of concomitant viral diseases. The results illustrate the differences in disease ecology and possible synergistic effects of pathogens affecting marine fish and highlight the difficulty in ascribing a single causation to outbreaks of disease among populations of wild fishes. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  7. Fruits of Virus Discovery: New Pathogens and New Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing has led to a tremendous increase in the rate of discovery of viral sequences. In some instances, novel pathogens have been identified. What has been less well appreciated is that novel virus discoveries in distinct hosts have led to the establishment of unique experimental systems to define host-virus interactions. These new systems have opened new frontiers in the study of fundamental virology and infectious disease. PMID:25410872

  8. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

  9. Influence of temperature on viral hemorrhagic septicemia (Genogroup IVa) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Purcell, M.K.; Hart, L.M.; Gregg, J.L.; Thompson, R.L.; Garver, K.A.; Winton, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    An inverse relationship between water temperature and susceptibility of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) to viral hemorrhagic septicemia, genogroup IVa (VHS) was indicated by controlled exposure studies where cumulative mortalities, viral shedding rates, and viral persistence in survivors were greatest at the coolest exposure temperatures. Among groups of specific pathogen-free (SPF) Pacific herring maintained at 8, 11, and 15 °C, cumulative mortalities after waterborne exposure to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were 78%, 40%, and 13%, respectively. The prevalence of survivors with VHSV-positive tissues 25 d post-exposure was 64%, 16%, and 0% (at 8, 11 and 15 °C, respectively) with viral prevalence typically higher in brain tissues than in kidney/spleen tissue pools at each temperature. Similarly, geometric mean viral titers in brain tissues and kidney/spleen tissue pools decreased at higher temperatures, and kidney/spleen titers were generally 10-fold lower than those in brain tissues at each temperature. This inverse relationship between temperature and VHS severity was likely mediated by an enhanced immune response at the warmer temperatures, where a robust type I interferon response was indicated by rapid and significant upregulation of the herring Mx gene. The effect of relatively small temperature differences on the susceptibility of a natural host to VHS provides insights into conditions that preface periodic VHSV epizootics in wild populations throughout the NE Pacific.

  10. Molecular Engineering of Viral Gene Delivery Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, David V.; Koerber, James T.; Lim, Kwang-il

    2009-01-01

    Viruses can be engineered to efficiently deliver exogenous genes, but their natural gene delivery properties often fail to meet human therapeutic needs. Therefore, engineering viral vectors with new properties, including enhanced targeting abilities and resistance to immune responses, is a growing area of research. This review discusses protein engineering approaches to generate viral vectors with novel gene delivery capabilities. Rational design of viral vectors has yielded successful advances in vitro, and to an extent in vivo. However, there is often insufficient knowledge of viral structure-function relationships to reengineer existing functions or create new capabilities, such as virus-cell interactions, whose molecular basis is distributed throughout the primary sequence of the viral proteins. Therefore, high-throughput library and directed evolution methods offer alternative approaches to engineer viral vectors with desired properties. Parallel and integrated efforts in rational and library-based design promise to aid the translation of engineered viral vectors toward the clinic. PMID:18647114

  11. Sudden Deafness: Is It Viral?

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Durand, Marlene L.; Adams, Joe C.

    2008-01-01

    A number of theories have been proposed to explain the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), including viral infection, vascular occlusion, breaks of labyrinthine membranes, immune-mediated mechanisms and abnormal cellular stress responses within the cochlea. In the present paper, we provide a critical review of the viral hypothesis of ISSHL. The evidence reviewed includes published reports of epidemiological and serological studies, clinical observations and results of antiviral therapy, morphological and histopathological studies, as well as results of animal experiments. The published evidence does not satisfy the majority of the Henle-Koch postulates for viral causation of an infectious disease. Possible explanations as to why these postulates remain unfulfilled are reviewed, and future studies that may provide more insight are described. We also discuss other mechanisms that have been postulated to explain ISSHL. Our review indicates that vascular occlusion, labyrinthine membrane breaks and immune-mediated mechanisms are unlikely to be common causes of ISSHL. Finally, we review our recently proposed theory that abnormal cellular stress responses within the cochlea may be responsible for ISSHL. PMID:18235206

  12. Amphibian ranavirus transmission and persistence

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    undergoing die-offs to kiddie pools with wood frog tadpoles Routes of transmission: via water #12;Are. 2011 " RUK Cunningham et al. 2007 " LMBV Grant et al. 2003 " Small particles (filtered water) and chunky bits (filtrate) are both very infectious (Brunner et al. 2007) Routes of transmission: via water

  13. Gene Expression Profiles from Disease Discordant Twins Suggest Shared Antiviral Pathways and Viral Exposures among Multiple Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Lai, Zhennan; Fannin, Rick; Weller, Melodie L.; Rider, Lisa G.; Chiorini, John A.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    Viral agents are of interest as possible autoimmune triggers due to prior reported associations and widely studied molecular mechanisms of antiviral immune responses in autoimmunity. Here we examined new viral candidates for the initiation and/or promotion of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), as well as possible related signaling pathways shared in the pathogenesis of those disorders. RNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 33 twins discordant for SAID and 33 matched, unrelated healthy controls was analyzed using a custom viral-human gene microarray. Paired comparisons were made among three study groups—probands with SAID, their unaffected twins, and matched, unrelated healthy controls—using statistical and molecular pathway analyses. Probands and unaffected twins differed significantly in the expression of 537 human genes, and 107 of those were associated with viral infections. These 537 differentially expressed human genes participate in overlapping networks of several canonical, biologic pathways relating to antiviral responses and inflammation. Moreover, certain viral genes were expressed at higher levels in probands compared to either unaffected twins or unrelated, healthy controls. Interestingly, viral gene expression levels in unaffected twins appeared intermediate between those of probands and the matched, unrelated healthy controls. Of the viruses with overexpressed viral genes, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) was the only human viral pathogen identified using four distinct oligonucleotide probes corresponding to three HSV-2 genes associated with different stages of viral infection. Although the effects from immunosuppressive therapy on viral gene expression remain unclear, this exploratory study suggests a new approach to evaluate shared viral agents and antiviral immune responses that may be involved in the development of SAID. PMID:26556803

  14. Differences in pathogenicity of A/Duck/Vietnam/201/05 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus reassortants in ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand which viral genes contribute to the high virulence of A/Dk/Vietnam/201/05 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in ducks, we used reverse genetics to generate single-gene reassortant viruses with genes from A/Ck/Indonesia/7/03, a virus that produces mild disease ...

  15. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and reuse as well as facile product recovery. Reaction condition studies show that the solvent ratio played an important role in the selectivity of the Suzuki reaction, and that a higher water/acetonitrile ratio significantly facilitated the cross-coupling pathway. Meanwhile, in-depth characterizations including Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were carried out for these chip-based viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts. In the second approach, catalytically active TMV-templated Pd nanoparticles are encapsulated in readily exploited polymeric microparticle formats. Specifically, small (1˜2 nm), uniform and highly crystalline palladium (Pd) nanoparticles are spontaneously formed along (TMV) biotemplates without external reducing agents. The as-prepared Pd-TMV complexes are integrated into the hybrid poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-based microparticles via replica molding (RM) technique in a simple, robust and highly reproducible manner. The Pd-TMV complex structure was characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The hybrid Pd-TMV-PEG microparticles are examined to have high catalytic activity, recyclability and stability through dichromate reduction. Combined these findings represent a significant step toward simple, robust, scalable synthesis and fabrication of efficient biotemplate-supported Pd nanocatalysts in readily deployable polymeric formats with high capacity in a well-controlled manner. These two simple, robust and readily controllable approaches for the fabrication of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts, in both chip-based and hydrogel-encapsulated formats, can be readily extended to a variety of other nano-bio hybrid material synthesis in other catalytic reaction systems.

  16. Transmission of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Acutely Infected White Tailed Deer to Cattle via Indirect Contact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are found worldwide, and acute infections in cattle results in enteric, respiratory, and reproductive diseases of varying severity, depending on the BVDV strain, the immune and reproductive status of the host and the presence of secondary pathogens. While most c...

  17. Application of RT-PCR to study in vitro development of Cryptosporidium parvum and its viral symbiont CPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis contain a double-stranded RNA viral symbiont termed CPV. Our research seeks to find a role for CPV in the pathogenicity and development of C. parvum. Cell cultures were infected with C. parvum sporozoites, and extracted at various times post-infection for DNA ...

  18. Investigating the complex viral community of the turkey gut: an update from the laboratory and the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Periodic monitoring of poultry flocks in the United States via molecular diagnostic methods has revealed a number of potential enteric viral pathogens in continuous circulation in turkeys and chickens. Recently, numerous enteric samples collected from turkey flocks in the southeastern United States ...

  19. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  20. University of Virginia Institutional Biosafety Committee Policy for Biosafety Level Assignment of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors (AAV)

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    . Unless viral purification and quality control measures for AAV are effectively applied, it is likely: Potential AAV Health Hazards: While AAV is generally considered non-pathogenic; there are several reports and spontaneous preterm birth (Tobiasch et al, 1994; Burguete et al., 1999; Arechavaleta-Velasco et al., 2008

  1. Activation of cell signaling pathways is dependant on the biotype of bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family, is an economically important cattle pathogen with a world wide distribution. Besides the segregation into two distinct species (BVDV1 / BVDV2) two different biotypes, a cytopathic (cp) and a noncytopathic (ncp) biotype, are...

  2. Histophathologic and Immunohistochemical Findings in Two White-tail Deer Fawns Persistently Infected with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important pathogen of domestic cattle. Serological, experimental and individual case studies have explored the presence and pathogenesis of the virus in wild ungulates; however there remain large gaps in knowledge regarding BVDV infection in non-bovine speci...

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of multiple viral antigens using magnetic capture of SERS-active nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A highly sensitive immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has been developed for multiplex detection of surface envelope and capsid antigens of the viral zoonotic pathogens West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Detection was mediated by antibo...

  4. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  5. Plant pathogen resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  6. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of new foodborne pathogens is due to a number of factors. An important factor is the globalization of the food supply with the possibility of the introduction of foodborne pathogens from other countries. Animal husbandry, food production, food processing, and food distribution system...

  7. Plant pathogen resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  8. [Knowledge about viral hepatitis in a sample of Brazilian students from Vale do Araguaia, Legal Amazonia].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carlos K B; Savazzi, Kamirri; Honorio-França, Adenilda C; Ferrari, Graziele S L; França, Eduardo L

    2012-06-01

    Viral and non-viral hepatitis are of great concern among developing nations because of their pathogenicity and virulence, and also their wide spreading by contaminated blood, food or water. The objective of this work was to evaluate the knowledge about hepatitis of academic students from three life/health sciences courses and also students from the last year of high school To measure the students' knowledge on hepatitis an instrument containing 22 questions was applied. Surprinsingly, it was verified that 41.9% of students had poor knowledge of viral hepatitis. Among the high school students, 31.8% ignored that viral hepatitis are infectious and transmissible diseases. Considering hepatitis symptomatology, just 18% of high school students declared knowledge of the symptons, but none of those cited the ictericia. Among the academic students, 75.9% of nursing students had adequate knowledge of hepatitis, followed by pharmacy (51.3%), and biology students (18.2%). Nursing students had also higher scores of right answers regarding viral hepatitis and chronic disease. On contrary, biology and high school students had poor knowledge of that matter (37% and 44.5%, respectively). Less than 15% of nursing and pharmacy students did not know that viral hepatitis are sexually transmissible, whereas 78.6% of the 3rd year and 52.4% of the 4th year biology course ignored the sexual transmission of viral hepatitis. Still considering the same question, 54.5% of the high school students also ignored that viral hepatitis are sexually transmitted diseases. Important conclusions can be drawn from this study, since the higher hepatitis knowledge scores were found among nursing students, followed by pharmacy academics. However, biology students, which will serve as high school teachers, had poor and insufficient knowledge on hepatitis. This finding could explain the same poor disease knowledge among high school pupils. PMID:22876714

  9. Direct association between pharyngeal viral secretion and host cytokine response in severe pandemic influenza

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe disease caused by 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1virus is characterized by the presence of hypercytokinemia. The origin of the exacerbated cytokine response is unclear. As observed previously, uncontrolled influenza virus replication could strongly influence cytokine production. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between host cytokine responses and viral levels in pandemic influenza critically ill patients. Methods Twenty three patients admitted to the ICU with primary viral pneumonia were included in this study. A quantitative PCR based method targeting the M1 influenza gene was developed to quantify pharyngeal viral load. In addition, by using a multiplex based assay, we systematically evaluated host cytokine responses to the viral infection at admission to the ICU. Correlation studies between cytokine levels and viral load were done by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Fifteen patients needed of intubation and ventilation, while eight did not need of mechanical ventilation during ICU hospitalization. Viral load in pharyngeal swabs was 300 fold higher in the group of patients with the worst respiratory condition at admission to the ICU. Pharyngeal viral load directly correlated with plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12p70, IFN-?, the chemotactic factors MIP-1?, GM-CSF, the angiogenic mediator VEGF and also of the immuno-modulatory cytokine IL-1ra (p < 0.05). Correlation studies demonstrated also the existence of a significant positive association between the levels of these mediators, evidencing that they are simultaneously regulated in response to the virus. Conclusions Severe respiratory disease caused by the 2009 pandemic influenza virus is characterized by the existence of a direct association between viral replication and host cytokine response, revealing a potential pathogenic link with the severe disease caused by other influenza subtypes such as H5N1. PMID:21880131

  10. Molecular epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in the Great Lakes region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2008-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered by many nations and international organizations to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish (Office International des Epizooties 2007). For several decades following its initial characterization in the 1950s, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe where it was regarded as an endemic pathogen of freshwater fish that was especially problematic for farmed rainbow trout, an introduced species (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that VHSV was present among many species of marine and anadromous fishes in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans where it has been associated with substantial mortality among both wild and cultured fish (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005).

  11. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skore?ski, Marcin; Sie?czyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  12. Recombinant protein-based viral disease diagnostics in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Sen, Arnab; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Identification of pathogens or antibody response to pathogens in human and animals modulates the treatment strategies for naive population and subsequent infections. Diseases can be controlled and even eradicated based on the epidemiology and effective prophylaxis, which often depends on development of efficient diagnostics. In addition, combating newly emerging diseases in human as well as animal healthcare is challenging and is dependent on developing safe and efficient diagnostics. Detection of antibodies directed against specific antigens has been the method of choice for documenting prior infection. Other than zoonosis, development of inexpensive vaccines and diagnostics is a unique problem in animal healthcare. The advent of recombinant DNA technology and its application in the biotechnology industry has revolutionized animal healthcare. The use of recombinant DNA technology in animal disease diagnosis has improved the rapidity, specificity and sensitivity of various diagnostic assays. This is because of the absence of host cellular proteins in the recombinant derived antigen preparations that dramatically decrease the rate of false-positive reactions. Various recombinant products are used for disease diagnosis in veterinary medicine and this article discusses recombinant-based viral disease diagnostics currently used for detection of pathogens in livestock and poultry. PMID:20843198

  13. Viral enteric infections of poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric diseases cause great economic losses to the poultry industry mostly from depressed weight gains, impaired feed efficiency, and decreased flock uniformity. Enteric syndromes have been described in both young turkeys and chickens and likely result from infection by a mixture of pathogenic age...

  14. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter J.; Winton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change. PMID:20409453

  15. Maize-Pathogen Interactions: An Ongoing Combat from a Proteomics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pechanova, Olga; Pechan, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a host to numerous pathogenic species that impose serious diseases to its ear and foliage, negatively affecting the yield and the quality of the maize crop. A considerable amount of research has been carried out to elucidate mechanisms of maize-pathogen interactions with a major goal to identify defense-associated proteins. In this review, we summarize interactions of maize with its agriculturally important pathogens that were assessed at the proteome level. Employing differential analyses, such as the comparison of pathogen-resistant and susceptible maize varieties, as well as changes in maize proteomes after pathogen challenge, numerous proteins were identified as possible candidates in maize resistance. We describe findings of various research groups that used mainly mass spectrometry-based, high through-put proteomic tools to investigate maize interactions with fungal pathogens Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium spp., and Curvularia lunata, and viral agents Rice Black-streaked Dwarf Virus and Sugarcane Mosaic Virus. PMID:26633370

  16. Maize-Pathogen Interactions: An Ongoing Combat from a Proteomics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pechanova, Olga; Pechan, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a host to numerous pathogenic species that impose serious diseases to its ear and foliage, negatively affecting the yield and the quality of the maize crop. A considerable amount of research has been carried out to elucidate mechanisms of maize-pathogen interactions with a major goal to identify defense-associated proteins. In this review, we summarize interactions of maize with its agriculturally important pathogens that were assessed at the proteome level. Employing differential analyses, such as the comparison of pathogen-resistant and susceptible maize varieties, as well as changes in maize proteomes after pathogen challenge, numerous proteins were identified as possible candidates in maize resistance. We describe findings of various research groups that used mainly mass spectrometry-based, high through-put proteomic tools to investigate maize interactions with fungal pathogens Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium spp., and Curvularia lunata, and viral agents Rice Black-streaked Dwarf Virus and Sugarcane Mosaic Virus. PMID:26633370

  17. Drug Sanctuaries, Low Steady State Viral Loads and Viral Blips.

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.,; Callaway, D.; Pomerantz, R. J.; Chen, H. Y.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, David D.; Di Mascio, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients on HAART for long periods of time obtain viral loads (VLs) below 50 copies/ml. Ultrasensitive VL assays show that some of these patients obtain a low steady state VL, while others continue to exhibit VL declines to below 5 copies/ml. Low steady states can be explained by two-compartment models that incorporate a drug sanctuary. Interestingly, when patients exhibit continued declines below 50 copies/ml the rate of decline has a half-life of {approx} 6 months, consistent with some estimates of the rate of latent cell decline. Some patients, despite having sustained undetectable VLs show periods of transient viremia (blips). I will present some statistical characterization of the blips observed in a set of 123 patients, suggesting that blips are generated largely by random processes, that blips tend to correspond to periods of a few weeks in which VLs are elevated, and that VL decay from the peak of a blip may have two-phases. Using new results suggesting that the viral burst size, N {approx} 5 x 10{sup 4}, we estimate the number of cells needed to produce a blip.

  18. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. PMID:25742731

  19. Intercellular Transmission of Viral Populations with Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Chen, Ying-Han

    2015-12-15

    A common paradigm holds that during cell-to-cell transmission, viruses behave as lone soldiers. Recently, we discovered not only that enteroviruses are transmitted via vesicles as populations of viral particles but also that this type of transmission enhances their infection efficiency (Y. H. Chen et al., Cell 160: 619-630, 2015). This mechanism could be advantageous for the overall fitness of the viral population, promoting genetic interplay by enabling viral quasispecies to collectively infect a susceptible host cell. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of viral pathogenesis and also propose that this novel type of vesicular transmission is widespread among different virus families and includes populations of both viral particles and naked viral genomes. PMID:26423944

  20. The anti-viral factor APOBEC3G enhances natural killer cell recognition of HIV-infected primary T cells

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Jason M.; Mashiba, Michael; McNamara, Lucy A; Onafuwa-Nuga, Adewunmi; Chiari-Fort, Estelle; Shen, Wenwen; Collins, Kathleen L.

    2011-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is an intrinsic antiviral factor that inhibits HIV replication by deaminating cytidine residues to uridine. This causes G-to-A hypermutation in the opposite strand and results in viral inactivation. HIV counteracts A3G through the activity of viral infectivity factor (Vif), which promotes A3G degradation. We report that viral protein R (Vpr), which interacts with a uracil glycosylase, also counteracts A3G by reducing uridine incorporation. However, this process results in activation of the DNA damage response pathway and expression of NK cell activating ligands. Our results reveal that pathogen-induced cytidine deamination and the DNA damage response to viral-mediated repair of uridine incorporation enhance recognition of HIV-infected cells by NK cells. PMID:21874023

  1. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew F; Baigent, Susan J; Powers, Claire; Kgosana, Lydia B; Blackwell, Luke; Smith, Lorraine P; Kennedy, David A; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W; Nair, Venugopal K

    2015-07-01

    Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts. PMID:26214839

  2. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Read, Andrew F.; Baigent, Susan J.; Powers, Claire; Kgosana, Lydia B.; Blackwell, Luke; Smith, Lorraine P.; Kennedy, David A.; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W.; Nair, Venugopal K.

    2015-01-01

    Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts. PMID:26214839

  3. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  4. Immediate early responses of avian tracheal epithelial cells to infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza viruses (AIV) present an on going threat to the U.S. poultry industry. In order to develop new AIV control strategies it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism of viral infection. Because the early events of AIV infection can occur on tracheal ep...

  5. Life-History Responses to Pathogens in Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) Larvae

    E-print Network

    Life-History Responses to Pathogens in Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) Larvae MATTHEW J in Arizona Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum nebulosum). Viral epidemics cause extreme mortality; Kiesecker et al., 2004). Disease may affect the population dynamics of several subspecies of Tiger

  6. Immediate early responses of avian tracheal epithelial cells to infection with highly pathogenic avian invluenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza viruses (AIV) present an ongoing threat to the world poultry industry. In order to develop new AIV control strategies it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism of viral infection at mucosal respiratory sites. Chicken and duck tracheal epithelial ...

  7. The role of eriophyoids in fungal pathogen epidemiology, mere association or true interaction?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A considerable number of plant feeding mites representing different families such as Acaridae, Siteroptidae, Tydeidae and Tarsonemidae interact with plant pathogenic fungi. While species within the Eriophyoidea appear to be the most common phytophagous mites vectoring viral diseases little is known ...

  8. The dependence of viral parameter estimates on the assumed viral life cycle: limitations

    E-print Network

    Lloyd, Alun

    -host dynamics of viral diseases such as human immuno- de¢ciency virus, hepatitis B or hepatitis C immunode¢ciency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C has increased enormously with the developmentThe dependence of viral parameter estimates on the assumed viral life cycle: limitations of studies

  9. In silico approach to reveal viral populations in grapevine cultivar Tannat using transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong; Kyong Cho, Jin; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kyong Cho, Won

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous and present in a wide range of settings, from living organisms to various environments. Although viruses are regarded as important pathogens in higher plants, viral populations in specific host plants have not yet been fully examined. This study revealed viral populations in grape berries obtained from a cultivar from a single vineyard using currently available grapevine transcriptomes. Eight viruses and two viroids were identified using 11 grapevine libraries. Virus-associated sequences in each transcriptome ranged from 0.2% (seed) to 8.8% (skin). The amount of viral RNAs and virus copy numbers was quantified, thus revealing the dominant virus or viroid in each individual library. In addition, five viral genomes were successfully assembled de novo using transcriptome data. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the viruses and viroids might have originated from Europe, along with the host. Single nucleotide variation studies revealed the quasispecies of RNA viruses. Taken together, this study defines complex viral populations in three different grape tissues from a single vineyard. PMID:26508692

  10. (Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    During the last year we have made a number of important observations in the fields of virology and plant molecular biology. By directly sequencing Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV) movement genes, previously undetected sequence alterations common to specific viral strains were found. The difficulty in regenerating transgenic tomato plants containing the Tm-2 gene was overcome. Tobacco plants transformed with Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) are being characterized. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing CMV coat protein have shown no correlation between coat protein expression and level of resistance. Specific amino acid changes have been found to correlate with CMV resistance breaking and degree of pathogenicity. Satellite RNAs are shown to be too unstable for use as a biological control agent. The aphid transmission domain CMV has been localized to one (or more) of three amino acids; constructs have been made to determine the exact amino acids involved. 15 refs.

  11. Pathogen-like particles: biomimetic vaccine carriers engineered at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joseph A; Chen, Linxiao; Baker, Jenny L; Putnam, David; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2014-08-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are an essential component of vaccine design, helping to generate immunity to pathogen antigens in the absence of infection. Recent advances in nanoscale engineering have created a new class of particulate bionanotechnology that uses biomimicry to better integrate adjuvant and antigen. These pathogen-like particles, or PLPs, can come from a variety of sources, ranging from fully synthetic platforms to biologically derived, self-assembling systems. By employing molecularly engineered targeting and stimulation of key immune cells, recent studies utilizing PLPs as vaccine delivery platforms have shown great promise against high-impact, unsolved vaccine targets ranging from bacterial and viral pathogens to cancer and addiction. PMID:24832075

  12. Production and Titering of Recombinant Adeno-associated Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Peer; Klugmann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have become increasingly valuable for in vivo studies in animals, and are also currently being tested in human clinical trials. Wild-type AAV is a non-pathogenic member of the parvoviridae family and inherently replication-deficient. The broad transduction profile, low immune response as well as the strong and persistent transgene expression achieved with these vectors has made them a popular and versatile tool for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. rAAVs can be easily and cheaply produced in the laboratory and, based on their favourable safety profile, are generally given a low safety classification. Here, we describe a method for the production and titering of chimeric rAAVs containing the capsid proteins of both AAV1 and AAV2. The use of these so-called chimeric vectors combines the benefits of both parental serotypes such as high titres stocks (AAV1) and purification by affinity chromatography (AAV2). These AAV serotypes are the best studied of all AAV serotypes, and individually have a broad infectivity pattern. The chimeric vectors described here should have the infectious properties of AAV1 and AAV2 and can thus be expected to infect a large range of tissues, including neurons, skeletal muscle, pancreas, kidney among others. The method described here uses heparin column purification, a method believed to give a higher viral titer and cleaner viral preparation than other purification methods, such as centrifugation through a caesium chloride gradient. Additionally, we describe how these vectors can be quickly and easily titered to give accurate reading of the number of infectious particles produced. PMID:22143312

  13. Evaluation of viral concentration methods from irrigation and processing water.

    PubMed

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Baert, Leen; Duarte, Alexandra; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-02-01

    Four viral concentration methods were evaluated for their efficiency in recovering murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) (surrogate for human noroviruses (NoV)) and MS2 bacteriophages from processing water (1L) and four different types of irrigation water (bore hole water, rain water, open well and river water) (2-5L). Three methods were based on the viral adsorption and elution principle, two methods using an electronegative HA-membrane (Katayama et al., 2002), one method using an electropositive Zetapor membrane according to CEN/TC275/WG6/TAG4 and the fourth method was based on size exclusion using a tangential flow filtration system. Detection of MNV-1 was achieved by real-time RT-PCR and detection of MS2 by double-layer plaque assay. For the recovery of MNV-1, the method using an electronegative HA-filter in combination with an elution buffer earlier optimized by Hamza et al. (2009) (Method 1) performed best for all types of water (recovery: 5.8-21.9%). In case of MS2 detection, the best method depended upon the type of water although Method 1 provided the most consistent recovery. To complete this evaluation, the Method 1 was evaluated further for the concentration of human enteric viruses (GI and GII NoV, hepatitis A virus (HAV) and rotaviruses) in the same five types of water. Although detection of rotaviruses (RV) was somewhat less efficient, Method 1 proved reliable for the detection of NoV and HAV in all water types. Mean recovery efficiencies ranging from 4.8% for detection of GI NoV in open well water to 32.1% for detection of HAV in bore hole water, depending on the water type and the viral pathogen analyzed. PMID:23201288

  14. Building a viral capsid in the presence of genomic RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Stockley, Peter G.; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-02-01

    Virus capsid assembly has traditionally been considered as a process that can be described primarily via self-assembly of the capsid proteins, neglecting interactions with other viral or cellular components. Our recent work on several ssRNA viruses, a major class of viral pathogens containing important human, animal, and plant viruses, has shown that this protein-centric view is too simplistic. Capsid assembly for these viruses relies strongly on a number of cooperative roles played by the genomic RNA. This realization requires a new theoretical framework for the modeling and prediction of the assembly behavior of these viruses. In a seminal paper Zlotnick [J. Mol. Biol.0022-283610.1006/jmbi.1994.1473 241, 59 (1994)] laid the foundations for the modeling of capsid assembly as a protein-only self-assembly process, illustrating his approach using the example of a dodecahedral study system. We describe here a generalized framework for modeling assembly that incorporates the regulatory functions provided by cognate protein-nucleic-acid interactions between capsid proteins and segments of the genomic RNA, called packaging signals, into the model. Using the same dodecahedron system we demonstrate, using a Gillespie-type algorithm to deal with the enhanced complexity of the problem instead of a master equation approach, that assembly kinetics and yield strongly depend on the distribution and nature of the packaging signals, highlighting the importance of the crucial roles of the RNA in this process.

  15. Tryptophan Catabolism in Chronic Viral Infections: Handling Uninvited Guests

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    l-Tryptophan (l-Trp) is an essential amino acid that possesses diverse metabolic, neurological, and immunological roles spanning from the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitter serotonin, and neurohormone melatonin, to its degradation into immunosuppressive catabolites by indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) in the kynurenine pathway (KP). Trp catabolites, by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), play an important role in antimicrobial defense and immune regulation. IDO/AhR acts as a double-edged sword by both depleting l-Trp to starve the invaders and by contributing to the state of immunosuppression with microorganisms that were not cleared during acute infection. Pathogens experiencing Trp deprivation by IDO-mediated degradation include certain bacteria, parasites, and less likely viruses. However, chronic viral infections highjack the host immune response to create a state of disease tolerance via kynurenine catabolites. This review covers the latest data involving chronic viral infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) and their cellular interplay with Trp catabolites. Strategies developed by viruses to escape immune control also represent new avenues for therapeutic interventions based on Trp metabolism. PMID:26309411

  16. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is responsible for approximately 40,000 congenital infections in the United States each year. Congenital CMV disease frequently produces serious neurodevelopmental disability, as well as vision impairment and sensorineural hearing loss. Development of a CMV vaccine is therefore considered to be a major public health priority. The mechanisms by which CMV injures the fetus are complex and likely include a combination of direct fetal injury induced by pathologic virally-encoded gene products, an inability of the maternal immune response to control infection, and the direct impact of infection on placental function. CMV encodes gene products that function, both at the RNA and the protein level, to interfere with many cellular processes. These include gene products that modify the cell cycle; interfere with apoptosis; induce an inflammatory response; mediate vascular injury; induce site-specific breakage of chromosomes; promote oncogenesis; dysregulate cellular proliferation; and facilitate evasion of host immune responses. This minireview summarizes current concepts regarding these aspects of the molecular virology of CMV and the potential pathogenic impact of viral gene expression on the developing fetus. Areas for potential development of novel therapeutic intervention are suggested for improving the outcome of this disabling congenital infection. PMID:21827434

  17. A comprehensive Prunus pathogen array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive pathogen array was developed for the detection of pathogens of many major crops in the Prunus genus. The APS disease lists for peach, plum, apricot and cherry were combined into a single Prunus pathogen list, containing 102 pathogens (75 fungi, 18 viruses, 6 bacteria and 3 phytoplasm...

  18. Replication of Epstein–Barr Viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Sugden, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a paradigm for human tumor viruses: it is the first virus recognized to cause cancer in people; it causes both lymphomas and carcinomas; yet these tumors arise infrequently given that most people in the world are infected with the virus. EBV is maintained extrachromosomally in infected normal and tumor cells. Eighty-four percent of these viral plasmids replicate each S phase, are licensed, require a single viral protein for their synthesis, and can use two functionally distinct origins of DNA replication, oriP, and Raji ori. Eighty-eight percent of newly synthesized plasmids are segregated faithfully to the daughter cells. Infectious viral particles are not synthesized under these conditions of latent infection. This plasmid replication is consistent with survival of EBV’s host cells. Rare cells in an infected population either spontaneously or following exogenous induction support EBV’s lytic cycle, which is lethal for the cell. In this case, the viral DNA replicates 100-fold or more, uses a third kind of viral origin of DNA replication, oriLyt, and many viral proteins. Here we shall describe the three modes of EBV’s replication as a function of the viral origins used and the viral and cellular proteins that mediate the DNA synthesis from these origins focusing, where practical, on recent advances in our understanding. PMID:23284049

  19. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  20. Ferret models of viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Enkirch, T; von Messling, V

    2015-05-01

    Emerging and well-known viral diseases remain one the most important global public health threats. A better understanding of their pathogenesis and mechanisms of transmission requires animal models that accurately reproduce these aspects of the disease. Here we review the role of ferrets as an animal model for the pathogenesis of different respiratory viruses with an emphasis on influenza and paramyxoviruses. We will describe the anatomic and physiologic characteristics that contribute to the natural susceptibility of ferrets to these viruses, and provide an overview of the approaches available to analyze their immune responses. Recent insights gained using this model will be highlighted, including the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. To provide decision criteria for the use of this animal model, its strengths and limitations will be discussed. PMID:25816764

  1. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  2. Non-random patterns in viral diversity.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Simon J; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mazet, Jonna K; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  3. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  4. A genome-to-genome analysis of associations between human genetic variation, HIV-1 sequence diversity, and viral control

    PubMed Central

    Bartha, István; Carlson, Jonathan M; Brumme, Chanson J; McLaren, Paul J; Brumme, Zabrina L; John, Mina; Haas, David W; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Dalmau, Judith; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Casado, Concepción; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Bernasconi, Enos; Vernazza, Pietro; Klimkait, Thomas; Yerly, Sabine; O’Brien, Stephen J; Listgarten, Jennifer; Pfeifer, Nico; Lippert, Christoph; Fusi, Nicolo; Kutalik, Zoltán; Allen, Todd M; Müller, Viktor; Harrigan, P Richard; Heckerman, David; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 sequence diversity is affected by selection pressures arising from host genomic factors. Using paired human and viral data from 1071 individuals, we ran >3000 genome-wide scans, testing for associations between host DNA polymorphisms, HIV-1 sequence variation and plasma viral load (VL), while considering human and viral population structure. We observed significant human SNP associations to a total of 48 HIV-1 amino acid variants (p<2.4 × 10?12). All associated SNPs mapped to the HLA class I region. Clinical relevance of host and pathogen variation was assessed using VL results. We identified two critical advantages to the use of viral variation for identifying host factors: (1) association signals are much stronger for HIV-1 sequence variants than VL, reflecting the ‘intermediate phenotype’ nature of viral variation; (2) association testing can be run without any clinical data. The proposed genome-to-genome approach highlights sites of genomic conflict and is a strategy generally applicable to studies of host–pathogen interaction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01123.001 PMID:24171102

  5. Stomata and pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. PMID:20514224

  6. Pathogenicity of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N1 in Naturally Infected Poultry in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Ibrahim Thabet; Mansour, Shimaa M. G.; Zhang, Zerui; Ali, Ahmed A. H.; Ismaiel, El-Bakry M.; Salama, Ali A.; Cardona, Carol J.; Collins, James; Xing, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 has been endemic in Egypt since 2006, and there is increasing concern for its potential to become highly transmissible among humans. Infection by HPAIV H5N1 has been described in experimentally challenged birds. However, the pathogenicity of the H5N1 isolated in Egypt has never been reported in naturally infected chickens and ducks. Here we report a 2013 outbreak of HPAIV H5N1 in commercial poultry farms and backyards in Sharkia Province, Egypt. The main symptoms were ecchymosis on the shanks and feet, cyanosis of the comb and wattles, subcutaneous edema of the head and neck for chickens, and nervous signs (torticollis) for ducks. Within 48-72 hrs of the onset of illness, the average mortality rates were 22.8-30% and 28.5-40% in vaccinated chickens and non-vaccinated ducks, respectively. Tissue samples of chickens and ducks were collected for analyses with cross-section immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR for specific viral RNA transcripts. While viral RNA was detected in nearly all tissues and sera collected, viral nucleoprotein was detected almost ubiquitously in all tissues, including testis. Interestingly, viral antigen was also observed in endothelial cells of most organs in chickens, and clearly detected in the trachea and brain in particular. Viral nucleoprotein was also detected in mononuclear cells of various organs, especially pulmonary tissue. We performed phylogenetic analyses and compared the genomic sequences of the hemagglutinin (HA) and nonstructural proteins (NS) among the isolated viruses, the HPAIV circulated in Egypt in the past and currently, and some available vaccine strains. Further analysis of deduced amino acids of both HA and NS1 revealed that our isolates carried molecular determinants of HPAIV, including the multibasic amino acids (PQGERRRK/KR*GLF) in the cleavage site in HA and glutamate at position 92 (D92E) in NS1. This is the first report of the pathogenicity of the HPAIVH5N1 strain currently circulating in naturally infected poultry in Egypt, which may provide unique insights into the viral pathogenesis in HPAIV-infected chickens and ducks. PMID:25962145

  7. Blowback: new formal perspectives on agriculturally driven pathogen evolution and spread.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R; Wallace, R G

    2015-07-01

    By their diversity in time, space, and mode, traditional and conservation agricultures can create barriers limiting pathogen evolution and spread analogous to a sterilizing temperature. Large-scale monocropping and confined animal feeding-lot operations remove such barriers, resulting, above agroecologically specific thresholds, in the development and wide propagation of novel disease strains. We apply a newly developed class of necessary-conditions statistical models of evolutionary process, first using the theory on an evolutionarily stable viral pathogen vulnerable to vaccine treatment: post-World War II poliomyelitis emerged in the UK and USA from sudden widespread adoption of automobile ownership and usage. We then examine an evolutionarily variable pathogen, swine influenza in North America. The model suggests epidemiological blowback from globalizing intensive husbandry and the raising and shipping of monoculture livestock across increasing expanses, is likely to be far more consequential, driving viral selection for greater virulence and lowered response to biomedical intervention. PMID:26050716

  8. Deficiency of the B Cell-Activating Factor Receptor Results in Limited CD169+ Macrophage Function during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haifeng C.; Huang, Jun; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Grusdat, Melanie; Shinde, Prashant; McIlwain, David R.; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Gommerman, Jennifer; Löhning, Max; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W.; Pieper, Kathrin; Sic, Heiko; Speletas, Matthaios; Eibel, Hermann; Ware, Carl F.; Tumanov, Alexei V.; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell development and humoral immunity in mice and humans. While the role of BAFF in B cells has been widely described, its role in innate immunity remains unknown. Using BAFF receptor (BAFFR)-deficient mice, we characterized BAFFR-related innate and adaptive immune functions following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We identified a critical role for BAFFR signaling in the generation and maintenance of the CD169+ macrophage compartment. Consequently, Baffr?/? mice exhibited limited induction of innate type I interferon production after viral infection. Lack of BAFFR signaling reduced virus amplification and presentation following viral infection, resulting in highly reduced antiviral adaptive immune responses. As a consequence, BAFFR-deficient mice showed exacerbated and fatal disease after viral infection. Mechanistically, transient lack of B cells in Baffr?/? animals resulted in limited lymphotoxin expression, which is critical for maintenance of CD169+ cells. In conclusion, BAFFR signaling affects both innate and adaptive immune activation during viral infections. IMPORTANCE Viruses cause acute and chronic infections in humans resulting in millions of deaths every year. Innate immunity is critical for the outcome of a viral infection. Innate type I interferon production can limit viral replication, while adaptive immune priming by innate immune cells induces pathogen-specific immunity with long-term protection. Here, we show that BAFFR deficiency not only perturbed B cells, but also resulted in limited CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages are critical in amplifying viral particles to trigger type I interferon production and initiate adaptive immune priming. Consequently, BAFFR deficiency resulted in reduced enforced viral replication, limited type I interferon production, and reduced adaptive immunity compared to BAFFR-competent controls. As a result, BAFFR-deficient mice were predisposed to fatal viral infections. Thus, BAFFR expression is critical for innate immune activation and antiviral immunity. PMID:25673724

  9. Utilization of zebrafish for intravital study of eukaryotic pathogen–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gratacap, Remi L.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Unique imaging tools and practical advantages have made zebrafish a popular model to investigate in vivo host–pathogen interactions. These studies have uncovered details of the mechanisms involved in several human infections. Until recently, studies using this versatile host were limited to viral and prokaryotic pathogens. Eukaryotic pathogens are a diverse group with a major impact on the human and fish populations. The relationships of eukaryote pathogens with their hosts are complex and many aspects remain obscure. The small and transparent zebrafish, with its conserved immune system and amenability to genetic manipulation, make it an exciting model for quantitative study of the core strategies of eukaryotic pathogens and their hosts. The only thing to do now is realize its potential for advancement of biomedical and aquaculture research. PMID:24491522

  10. Bloodborne Pathogens Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasdell, Sharon

    1993-01-01

    The final rule on the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens was published in the Federal Register on Dec. 6, 1991. This Standard, 29 CFR Part 1910.130, is expected to prevent 8,900 hepatitis B infections and nearly 200 deaths a year in healthcare workers in the U.S. The Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health Services at KSC has been planning to implement this standard for several years. Various aspects of this standard and its Bloodborne Pathogens Program at KSC are discussed.

  11. The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

  12. A Natural Genetic Variant of Granzyme B Confers Lethality to a Common Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Andoniou, Christopher E.; Sutton, Vivien R.; Wikstrom, Matthew E.; Fleming, Peter; Thia, Kevin Y. T.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Kaiserman, Dion; Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Eldi, Preethi; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Bird, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB) gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we describe the biochemical and cytotoxic functions of a common allele of GzmB (GzmBW) common in wild mouse. While retaining ‘Asp-ase’ activity, GzmBW has substrate preferences that differ considerably from GzmBP, which is common to all inbred strains. In vitro, GzmBW preferentially cleaves recombinant Bid, whereas GzmBP activates pro-caspases directly. Recombinant GzmBW and GzmBP induced equivalent apoptosis of uninfected targets cells when delivered with perforin in vitro. Nonetheless, mice homozygous for GzmBW were unable to control murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, and succumbed as a result of excessive liver damage. Although similar numbers of anti-viral CD8 T cells were generated in both mouse strains, GzmBW-expressing CD8 T cells isolated from infected mice were unable to kill MCMV-infected targets in vitro. Our results suggest that known virally-encoded inhibitors of the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway account for the increased susceptibility of GzmBW mice to MCMV. We conclude that different natural variants of GzmB have a profound impact on the immune response to a common and authentic viral pathogen. PMID:25502180

  13. Viral infections of the folds (intertriginous areas).

    PubMed

    Ad??en, Esra; Önder, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are considered intracellular obligates with a nucleic acid, either RNA or DNA. They have the ability to encode proteins involved in viral replication and production of the protective coat within the host cells but require host cell ribosomes and mitochondria for translation. The members of the families Herpesviridae, Poxviridae, Papovaviridae, and Picornaviridae are the most commonly known agents for the cutaneous viral diseases, but other virus families, such as Adenoviridae, Togaviridae, Parvoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Flaviviridae, and Hepadnaviridae, can also infect the skin. Though the cutaneous manifestations of viral infections are closely related to the type and the transmission route of the virus, viral skin diseases may occur in almost any part of the body. In addition to friction caused by skin-to-skin touch, skin folds are warm and moist areas of the skin that have limited air circulation. These features provide a fertile breeding ground for many kinds of microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. In contrast to specific bacterial and fungal agents that have an affinity for the skin folds, except for viral diseases of the anogenital area, which have well-known presentations, viral skin infections that have a special affinity to the skin folds are not known. Many viral exanthems may affect the skin folds during the course of the infection, but here we focus only on the ones that usually affect the fold areas and also on the less well-known conditions or recently described associations. PMID:26051057

  14. New Metrics for Evaluating Viral Respiratory Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Baric, Ralph S.; Ferris, Martin T.

    2015-01-01

    Viral pathogenesis studies in mice have relied on markers of severe systemic disease, rather than clinically relevant measures, to evaluate respiratory virus infection; thus confounding connections to human disease. Here, whole-body plethysmography was used to directly measure changes in pulmonary function during two respiratory viral infections. This methodology closely tracked with traditional pathogenesis metrics, distinguished both virus- and dose-specific responses, and identified long-term respiratory changes following both SARS-CoV and Influenza A Virus infection. Together, the work highlights the utility of examining respiratory function following infection in order to fully understand viral pathogenesis. PMID:26115403

  15. A Novel Host-Proteome Signature for Distinguishing between Acute Bacterial and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Oved, Kfir; Cohen, Asi; Boico, Olga; Navon, Roy; Friedman, Tom; Etshtein, Liat; Kriger, Or; Bamberger, Ellen; Fonar, Yura; Yacobov, Renata; Wolchinsky, Ron; Denkberg, Galit; Dotan, Yaniv; Hochberg, Amit; Reiter, Yoram; Grupper, Moti; Srugo, Isaac; Feigin, Paul; Gorfine, Malka; Chistyakov, Irina; Dagan, Ron; Klein, Adi; Potasman, Israel; Eden, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and viral infections are often clinically indistinguishable, leading to inappropriate patient management and antibiotic misuse. Bacterial-induced host proteins such as procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and Interleukin-6, are routinely used to support diagnosis of infection. However, their performance is negatively affected by inter-patient variability, including time from symptom onset, clinical syndrome, and pathogens. Our aim was to identify novel viral-induced host proteins that can complement bacterial-induced proteins to increase diagnostic accuracy. Initially, we conducted a bioinformatic screen to identify putative circulating host immune response proteins. The resulting 600 candidates were then quantitatively screened for diagnostic potential using blood samples from 1002 prospectively recruited patients with suspected acute infectious disease and controls with no apparent infection. For each patient, three independent physicians assigned a diagnosis based on comprehensive clinical and laboratory investigation including PCR for 21 pathogens yielding 319 bacterial, 334 viral, 112 control and 98 indeterminate diagnoses; 139 patients were excluded based on predetermined criteria. The best performing host-protein was TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 0.91), which was consistently up-regulated in viral infected patients. We further developed a multi-protein signature using logistic-regression on half of the patients and validated it on the remaining half. The signature with the highest precision included both viral- and bacterial-induced proteins: TRAIL, Interferon gamma-induced protein-10, and CRP (AUC of 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96). The signature was superior to any of the individual proteins (P<0.001), as well as routinely used clinical parameters and their combinations (P<0.001). It remained robust across different physiological systems, times from symptom onset, and pathogens (AUCs 0.87-1.0). The accurate differential diagnosis provided by this novel combination of viral- and bacterial-induced proteins has the potential to improve management of patients with acute infections and reduce antibiotic misuse. PMID:25785720

  16. Ebola viral disease and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Caluwaerts, Séverine; Achar, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viral disease’s interaction with pregnancy is poorly understood and remains a particular challenge for medical and para-medical personnel responding to an outbreak. This review article is written with the benefit of hindsight and experience from the largest recorded Ebola outbreak in history. We have provided a broad overview of the issues that arise for pregnant women and for the professionals treating them during an Ebola outbreak. The discussion focuses on the specifics of Ebola infection in pregnancy and possible management strategies, including the delivery of an infected woman. We have also discussed the wider challenges posed to pregnant women and their carers during an epidemic, including the identification of suspected Ebola-infected pregnant women and the impact of the disease on pre-existing health services. This paper outlines current practices in the field, as well as highlighting the gaps in our knowledge and the paramount need to protect the health-care workers directly involved in the management of pregnant women. PMID:26457118

  17. Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    . * If the organism affects both humans AND animals, then an animal pathogen importation permit from the Canadian Food are not required for Risk Group 1 materals. If the material is deemed to be non- pathogenic, a courtesy notice may

  18. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  19. Pathogenicity and virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many pathogenic microorganisms are host-specific in that they parasitize only one or a few animal species. For example, the cause of equine strangles, Streptococcus equi subspecies equi, is essentially limited to infection of horses. Others—certain Salmonella serotypes, for example—have a broad host...

  20. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

  1. DISINFECTION OF EMERGING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing awareness of the need to control waterborne microbial pathogens. This presentation will concentate on the role of chemical inactivation, using chlorine, chloramines and ozone as a means of controlling bacterial and protozoan species. Information will be present...

  2. Immunological memory to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Slifka, Mark K

    2004-08-01

    Immunological memory is defined by the ability of a host to remember a past encounter with a specific pathogen and to respond to it in an effective manner upon re-exposure. How long immunological memory can be maintained in the absence of re-infection continues to be a subject of great controversy. Recent studies on immunity following smallpox vaccination demonstrate that T-cell memory declines steadily with a half-life of 8-15 years, whereas antiviral antibody responses are maintained for up to 75 years without appreciable decline. By combining recent advances in quantitative immunology with historical accounts of protection against smallpox dating back to the time of Edward Jenner, we are gaining a better understanding of the duration and magnitude of immunological memory and how it relates to protective immunity. PMID:15245737

  3. Analysis of viral microRNA expression by elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Yuki; Dastjerdi, Akbar; Seilern-Moy, Katharina; Steinbach, Falko; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-04-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus 1 (EEHV1), a member of the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily, has recently emerged as an important viral pathogen of Asian elephants that can cause a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic disease. EEHV1 does not replicate in culture and little is currently known about the molecular biology of this emerging pathogen, with the notable exception of its genomic DNA sequence. Here, we have used small RNA deep sequencing to determine whether EEHV1, like other human and murine betaherpesviruses, expresses viral microRNAs in infected tissues in vivo. Our data provide evidence supporting the existence of at least three novel viral microRNAs encoded by EEHV1 and one of these, miR-E3-5p, is shown to repress target mRNA expression. Moreover, miR-E3-5p expression was readily detectable in tissue samples derived from two infected elephants, including in whole blood. These data shed new light on the biology of EEHV1 and identify small RNAs that have the potential to be useful in the diagnosis of sub-clinical infections in captive Asian and African elephants. PMID:24725936

  4. Aptamer-Based Therapeutics: New Approaches to Combat Human Viral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses replicate inside the cells of an organism and continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment. Many life-threatening diseases, such as AIDS, SARS, hepatitis and some cancers, are caused by viruses. Because viruses have small genome sizes and high mutability, there is currently a lack of and an urgent need for effective treatment for many viral pathogens. One approach that has recently received much attention is aptamer-based therapeutics. Aptamer technology has high target specificity and versatility, i.e., any viral proteins could potentially be targeted. Consequently, new aptamer-based therapeutics have the potential to lead a revolution in the development of anti-infective drugs. Additionally, aptamers can potentially bind any targets and any pathogen that is theoretically amenable to rapid targeting, making aptamers invaluable tools for treating a wide range of diseases. This review will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of viral therapies that use aptamers. The aptamer selection process will be described, followed by an explanation of the potential for treating virus infection by aptamers. Recent progress and prospective use of aptamers against a large variety of human viruses, such as HIV-1, HCV, HBV, SCoV, Rabies virus, HPV, HSV and influenza virus, with particular focus on clinical development of aptamers will also be described. Finally, we will discuss the challenges of advancing antiviral aptamer therapeutics and prospects for future success. PMID:24287493

  5. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2?-O methylation.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jennifer L; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    N-7 and 2'-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m(7)GpppN; cap 1, m(7)GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2'-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5'-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease. PMID:25682435

  6. Evaluation of viral inactivation of pseudorabies virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus and porcine parvovirus in pancreatin of porcine origin.

    PubMed

    Caruso, C; Gobbi, E; Biosa, T; Andra', M; Cavallazzi, U; Masoero, L

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatin is a substance containing enzymes, principally amylase, lipase, and protease. It is obtained from bovine or porcine pancreas and used in the treatment of pancreatic endocrine insufficiency in humans. Regulations and safety concerns mandate viral clearance (virus removal or inactivation) in biopharmaceuticals such as pancreatin. A virus validation study was performed to evaluate virus clearance achieved in the final step of drying under vacuum by testing a panel of four animal viruses: Pseudorabies virus (PRV), Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Porcine parvovirus (PPV). Because of the product's virucidal effect and high cytotoxicity, the starting material was diluted to a ratio of 0.67 g of dried pancreatin resuspended in 13.5 mL of cell culture medium followed by a 50-fold dilution in cell culture medium before spiking. After heating at 60±1°C for 5 h, the samples were diluted about 5-fold in cell culture medium and titered by the plaque assay method. The virus reduction factor ranged from 5.59 (for PPV) to 7.07 (for EMCV) and no viral plaque was observed, indicating that the process step was effective in the reduction and removal of virus contamination. Though no virus contamination events in pancreatin have been reported to date, evaluation of the production process for its ability to inactivate and/or remove virus contamination, particularly from zoonotic viral agents such as hepatitis E virus and Norovirus considered emerging pathogens, is necessary to ensure the viral safety of animal-derived biopharmaceuticals. PMID:25110118

  7. MicroRNA regulation of viral immunity, latency, and carcinogenesis of selected tumor viruses and HIV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Li, Guangyu; Yao, Zhi Q; Moorman, Jonathan P; Ning, Shunbin

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function as key regulators in immune responses and cancer development. In the contexts of infection with oncogenic viruses, miRNAs are engaged in viral persistence, latency establishment and maintenance, and oncogenesis. In this review, we summarize the potential roles and mechanisms of viral and cellular miRNAs in the host-pathogen interactions during infection with selected tumor viruses and HIV, which include (i) repressing viral replication and facilitating latency establishment by targeting viral transcripts, (ii) evading innate and adaptive immune responses via toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, T-cell receptor, and B-cell receptor pathways by targeting signaling molecules such as TRAF6, IRAK1, IKK?, and MyD88, as well as downstream targets including regulatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor ?, interferon ?, interleukin 10, and transforming growth factor ?, (iii) antagonizing intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways by targeting pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic gene transcripts such as the Bcl-2 family and caspase-3, (iv) modulating cell proliferation and survival through regulation of the Wnt, PI3K/Akt, Erk/MAPK, and Jak/STAT signaling pathways, as well as the signaling pathways triggered by viral oncoproteins such as Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1, by targeting Wnt-inhibiting factor 1, SHIP, pTEN, and SOCSs, and (v) regulating cell cycle progression by targeting cell cycle inhibitors such as p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1. Further elucidation of the interaction between miRNAs and these key biological events will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of viral latency and oncogenesis and may lead to the identification of miRNAs as novel targets for developing new therapeutic or preventive interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26258805

  8. Acute Viral Respiratory Infection Rapidly Induces a CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion-like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John J; Lu, Pengcheng; Wen, Sherry; Hastings, Andrew K; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Joyce, Sebastian; Shyr, Yu; Williams, John V

    2015-11-01

    Acute viral infections typically generate functional effector CD8(+) T cells (TCD8) that aid in pathogen clearance. However, during acute viral lower respiratory infection, lung TCD8 are functionally impaired and do not optimally control viral replication. T cells also become unresponsive to Ag during chronic infections and cancer via signaling by inhibitory receptors such as programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). PD-1 also contributes to TCD8 impairment during viral lower respiratory infection, but how it regulates TCD8 impairment and the connection between this state and T cell exhaustion during chronic infections are unknown. In this study, we show that PD-1 operates in a cell-intrinsic manner to impair lung TCD8. In light of this, we compared global gene expression profiles of impaired epitope-specific lung TCD8 to functional spleen TCD8 in the same human metapneumovirus-infected mice. These two populations differentially regulate hundreds of genes, including the upregulation of numerous inhibitory receptors by lung TCD8. We then compared the gene expression of TCD8 during human metapneumovirus infection to those in acute or chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. We find that the immunophenotype of lung TCD8 more closely resembles T cell exhaustion late into chronic infection than do functional effector T cells arising early in acute infection. Finally, we demonstrate that trafficking to the infected lung alone is insufficient for TCD8 impairment or inhibitory receptor upregulation, but that viral Ag-induced TCR signaling is also required. Our results indicate that viral Ag in infected lungs rapidly induces an exhaustion-like state in lung TCD8 characterized by progressive functional impairment and upregulation of numerous inhibitory receptors. PMID:26401005

  9. The Dynamics of Viral Marketing JURE LESKOVEC

    E-print Network

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Key Words and Phrases: Viral marketing, word-of-mouth, e-commerce, long tail, recom- mender systems Foundation under grants SENSOR- 0329549 IIS-0326322 IIS-0534205. This work is also supported in part

  10. Viral evolution: beyond drift and shift.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Ghedin, Elodie

    2015-08-01

    Technological advances have allowed aspects of viral evolution to be explored at unprecedented scales. As a consequence, new quantitative approaches are needed to investigate features of viral evolution that fall outside traditional areas of study, such as antigenic evolution. We examine three areas of viral evolution where tools from disciplines such as statistical physics, topology, and information theory have been used recently as quantitative frameworks for large-scale studies and, in some cases, suggest a novel theoretical approach to a problem. Ongoing interaction among these disciplines with biology is necessary so that experimental researchers can determine which quantitative tools are right for them and quantitative researchers can learn which aspects of viral evolution can be understood and advanced with their approaches. PMID:26189048

  11. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  12. The Contribution of Viral Genotype to Plasma Viral Set-Point in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hodcroft, Emma; Hadfield, Jarrod D.; Fearnhill, Esther; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pillay, Deenan; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression in HIV-infected individuals varies greatly, and while the environmental and host factors influencing this variation have been widely investigated, the viral contribution to variation in set-point viral load, a predictor of disease progression, is less clear. Previous studies, using transmission-pairs and analysis of phylogenetic signal in small numbers of individuals, have produced a wide range of viral genetic effect estimates. Here we present a novel application of a population-scale method based in quantitative genetics to estimate the viral genetic effect on set-point viral load in the UK subtype B HIV-1 epidemic, based on a very large data set. Analyzing the initial viral load and associated pol sequence, both taken before anti-retroviral therapy, of 8,483 patients, we estimate the proportion of variance in viral load explained by viral genetic effects to be 5.7% (CI 2.8–8.6%). We also estimated the change in viral load over time due to selection on the virus and environmental effects to be a decline of 0.05 log10 copies/mL/year, in contrast to recent studies which suggested a reported small increase in viral load over the last 20 years might be due to evolutionary changes in the virus. Our results suggest that in the UK epidemic, subtype B has a small but significant viral genetic effect on viral load. By allowing the analysis of large sample sizes, we expect our approach to be applicable to the estimation of the genetic contribution to traits in many organisms. PMID:24789308

  13. Neutrophil in Viral Infections, Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Drescher, Brandon; Bai, Fengwei

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils are the first immune cells to the site of injury and microbial infection. Neutrophils are crucial players in controlling bacterial and fungal infections, and in particular secondary infections, by phagocytosis, degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). While neutrophils have been shown to play important roles in viral pathogenesis, there is a lack of detailed investigation. In this article, we will review recent progresses toward understanding the role of neutrophils in viral pathogenesis. PMID:23178588

  14. WATERBORNE PATHOGENS IN URBAN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogens are microorganisms that can cause sickness or even death. A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combi...

  15. Computational investigation of pathogen evolution

    E-print Network

    Sealfon, Rachel (Rachel Sima)

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen genomes, especially those of viruses, often change rapidly. Changes in pathogen genomes may have important functional implications, for example by altering adaptation to the host or conferring drug resistance. ...

  16. Dynamic Constitution of the Pathogens Inducing Encephalitis in Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Kunming, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohui; Zhang, Ying; Du, Cengqing; Yang, Ting; Liu, Qiong; Pan, Yue; Chen, Junying; Shi, Haijing; Sun, Qiangming; Liu, Longding; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-20

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), caused by various viral pathogens, is an emerging infectious disease in children in Asia. Understanding the composition of these pathogens is necessary to prevent and control this disease. In the present study, the pathogens in 436 HFMD patients (from 2009 to 2011) with concurrent clinical indications of encephalitis, meningoencephalitis, or both, were defined using the semi-nested PCR. A systematic analysis of the composition of these pathogens was performed. Various enteroviruses that are capable of inducing central nervous system (CNS) damage in HFMD patients were identified, including enterovirus 71, coxsackievirus A16, and Echovirus 9. Most of these pathogens were found co-infecting the patients. The composition of the pathogens that induced CNS damage in the HFMD patients was dynamically modulated in the cases. PMID:25866107

  17. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thanunchai, Maytawan; Hongeng, Suradej; Thitithanyanont, Arunee

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) are a subset of nonhematopoietic adult stem cells, readily isolated from various tissues and easily culture-expanded ex vivo. Intensive studies of the immune modulation and tissue regeneration over the past few years have demonstrated the great potential of MSCs for the prevention and treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), immune-related disorders, and viral diseases. In immunocompromised individuals, the immunomodulatory activities of MSCs have raised safety concerns regarding the greater risk of primary viral infection and viral reactivation, which is a major cause of mortality after allogeneic transplantation. Moreover, high susceptibilities of MSCs to viral infections in vitro could reflect the destructive outcomes that might impair the clinical efficacy of MSCs infusion. However, the interplay between MSCs and virus is like a double-edge sword, and it also provides beneficial effects such as allowing the proliferation and function of antiviral specific effector cells instead of suppressing them, serving as an ideal tool for study of viral pathogenesis, and protecting hosts against viral challenge by using the antimicrobial activity. Here, we therefore review favorable and unfavorable consequences of MSCs and virus interaction with the highlight of safety and efficacy for applying MSCs as cell therapy. PMID:26294919

  18. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    PubMed Central

    Wood-Charlson, Elisha M.; Suttle, Curtis A.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

  19. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  20. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  1. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  2. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  3. Accurate detection and quantification of the fish viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSv) with a two-color fluorometric real-time PCR assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) is one of the world's most serious fish pathogens, infecting > 80 marine, freshwater, and estuarine fish species from Eurasia and North America. A novel and especially virulent strain - IVb - appeared in the Great Lakes in 2003, killed many game fish species...

  4. Replication of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in chickens is affected by the PB1, PB2 and NP viral genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Devastating losses to the poultry industry can result from pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIVs) created by natural reassortment events. The role of individual viral genes on the pathogenesis of AIVs in chickens is unclear. Reverse genetics was used to create single-gene reassortants to determ...

  5. Avian influenza H5N1 viral and bird migration networks in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huaiyu; Zhou, Sen; Dong, Lu; Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Cui, Yujun; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Xiao, Xiangming; Wu, Yarong; Cazelles, Bernard; Huang, Shanqian; Yang, Ruifu; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The spatial spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and its long-term persistence in Asia have resulted in avian influenza panzootics and enormous economic losses in the poultry sector. However, an understanding of the regional long-distance transmission and seasonal patterns of the virus is still lacking. In this study, we present a phylogeographic approach to reconstruct the viral migration network. We show that within each wild fowl migratory flyway, the timing of H5N1 outbreaks and viral migrations are closely associated, but little viral transmission was observed between the flyways. The bird migration network is shown to better reflect the observed viral gene sequence data than other networks and contributes to seasonal H5N1 epidemics in local regions and its large-scale transmission along flyways. These findings have potentially far-reaching consequences, improving our understanding of how bird migration drives the periodic reemergence of H5N1 in Asia. PMID:25535385

  6. Averaging of Viral Envelope Glycoprotein Spikes from Electron Cryotomography Reconstructions using Jsubtomo

    PubMed Central

    Huiskonen, Juha T.; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Li, Sai; Bitto, David; Renner, Max; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Enveloped viruses utilize membrane glycoproteins on their surface to mediate entry into host cells. Three-dimensional structural analysis of these glycoprotein ‘spikes’ is often technically challenging but important for understanding viral pathogenesis and in drug design. Here, a protocol is presented for viral spike structure determination through computational averaging of electron cryo-tomography data. Electron cryo-tomography is a technique in electron microscopy used to derive three-dimensional tomographic volume reconstructions, or tomograms, of pleomorphic biological specimens such as membrane viruses in a near-native, frozen-hydrated state. These tomograms reveal structures of interest in three dimensions, albeit at low resolution. Computational averaging of sub-volumes, or sub-tomograms, is necessary to obtain higher resolution detail of repeating structural motifs, such as viral glycoprotein spikes. A detailed computational approach for aligning and averaging sub-tomograms using the Jsubtomo software package is outlined. This approach enables visualization of the structure of viral glycoprotein spikes to a resolution in the range of 20-40 Å and study of the study of higher order spike-to-spike interactions on the virion membrane. Typical results are presented for Bunyamwera virus, an enveloped virus from the family Bunyaviridae. This family is a structurally diverse group of pathogens posing a threat to human and animal health. PMID:25350719

  7. Avian influenza H5N1 viral and bird migration networks in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huaiyu; Zhou, Sen; Dong, Lu; Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Cui, Yujun; Newman, Scott H; Takekawa, John Y; Prosser, Diann J; Xiao, Xiangming; Wu, Yarong; Cazelles, Bernard; Huang, Shanqian; Yang, Ruifu; Grenfell, Bryan T; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The spatial spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and its long-term persistence in Asia have resulted in avian influenza panzootics and enormous economic losses in the poultry sector. However, an understanding of the regional long-distance transmission and seasonal patterns of the virus is still lacking. In this study, we present a phylogeographic approach to reconstruct the viral migration network. We show that within each wild fowl migratory flyway, the timing of H5N1 outbreaks and viral migrations are closely associated, but little viral transmission was observed between the flyways. The bird migration network is shown to better reflect the observed viral gene sequence data than other networks and contributes to seasonal H5N1 epidemics in local regions and its large-scale transmission along flyways. These findings have potentially far-reaching consequences, improving our understanding of how bird migration drives the periodic reemergence of H5N1 in Asia. PMID:25535385

  8. The Toll-Dorsal Pathway Is Required for Resistance to Viral Oral Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Álvaro Gil; Naylor, Huw; Esteves, Sara Santana; Pais, Inês Silva; Martins, Nelson Eduardo; Teixeira, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen entry route can have a strong impact on the result of microbial infections in different hosts, including insects. Drosophila melanogaster has been a successful model system to study the immune response to systemic viral infection. Here we investigate the role of the Toll pathway in resistance to oral viral infection in D. melanogaster. We show that several Toll pathway components, including Spätzle, Toll, Pelle and the NF-kB-like transcription factor Dorsal, are required to resist oral infection with Drosophila C virus. Furthermore, in the fat body Dorsal is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and a Toll pathway target gene reporter is upregulated in response to Drosophila C Virus infection. This pathway also mediates resistance to several other RNA viruses (Cricket paralysis virus, Flock House virus, and Nora virus). Compared with control, viral titres are highly increased in Toll pathway mutants. The role of the Toll pathway in resistance to viruses in D. melanogaster is restricted to oral infection since we do not observe a phenotype associated with systemic infection. We also show that Wolbachia and other Drosophila-associated microbiota do not interact with the Toll pathway-mediated resistance to oral infection. We therefore identify the Toll pathway as a new general inducible pathway that mediates strong resistance to viruses with a route-specific role. These results contribute to a better understanding of viral oral infection resistance in insects, which is particularly relevant in the context of transmission of arboviruses by insect vectors. PMID:25473839

  9. Cullin4 Is Pro-Viral during West Nile Virus Infection of Culex Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Paradkar, Prasad N.; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Trinidad, Lee; Walker, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Although mosquitoes serve as vectors of many pathogens of public health importance, their response to viral infection is poorly understood. It also remains to be investigated whether viruses deploy some mechanism to be able to overcome this immune response. Here, we have used an RNA-Seq approach to identify differentially regulated genes in Culex quinquefasciatus cells following West Nile virus (WNV) infection, identifying 265 transcripts from various cellular pathways that were either upregulated or downregulated. Ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway genes, comprising 12% of total differentially regulated genes, were selected for further validation by real time RT-qPCR and functional analysis. It was found that treatment of infected cells with proteasomal inhibitor, MG-132, decreased WNV titers, indicating importance of this pathway during infection process. In infection models, the Culex ortholog of mammalian Cul4A/B (cullin RING ubiquitin ligase) was found to be upregulated in vitro as well as in vivo, especially in midguts of mosquitoes. Gene knockdown using dsRNA and overexpression studies indicated that Culex Cul4 acts as a pro-viral protein by degradation of CxSTAT via ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway. We also show that gene knockdown of Culex Cul4 leads to activation of the Jak-STAT pathway in mosquitoes leading to decrease viral replication in the body as well as saliva. Our results suggest a novel mechanism adopted by WNV to overcome mosquito immune response and increase viral replication. PMID:26325027

  10. Avian influenza H5N1 viral and bird migration networks in Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tian, Huaivu; Zhou, Sen; Dong, Lu; Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Cui, Yujun; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Xiao, Xiangming; Wu, Yarong; Cazelles, Bernard; Huang, Shanqian; Yang, Ruifu; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The spatial spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and its long-term persistence in Asia have resulted in avian influenza panzootics and enormous economic losses in the poultry sector. However, an understanding of the regional long-distance transmission and seasonal patterns of the virus is still lacking. In this study, we present a phylogeographic approach to reconstruct the viral migration network. We show that within each wild fowl migratory flyway, the timing of H5N1 outbreaks and viral migrations are closely associated, but little viral transmission was observed between the flyways. The bird migration network is shown to better reflect the observed viral gene sequence data than other networks and contributes to seasonal H5N1 epidemics in local regions and its large-scale transmission along flyways. These findings have potentially far-reaching consequences, improving our understanding of how bird migration drives the periodic reemergence of H5N1 in Asia.

  11. Viral marketing for dedicated customers Cheng Long a,n

    E-print Network

    Wong, Raymond Chi-Wing

    instances of viral marketing succeed in real life. For example, Nike Inc. used social networking websitesViral marketing for dedicated customers Cheng Long a,n , Raymond Chi-Wing Wong b a Rm 4212 May 2014 Keywords: Viral marketing Interest-Specified Dedicated customers a b s t r a c t Viral

  12. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagen; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean; Clauss, Therese R.W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Green, Richard R.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sara; Law, G. Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa; McDermott, Jason; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie M.; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection. PMID:25977790

  13. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archivedmore »at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.« less

  14. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  15. Sequence analysis and characterisation of virally induced viperin in the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Milic, Natalie L; Davis, Steven; Carr, Jillian M; Isberg, Sally; Beard, Michael R; Helbig, Karla J

    2015-07-01

    A number of pathogens have been detected in crocodiles, however little is known about their ability to control these pathogens. The interferon stimulated gene (ISG), viperin, has gained attention recently as an important host protein involved in multiple arms of the immune response. Viperin in concert with a number of other ISGs was upregulated in response to viral nucleic acid mimics and sendai virus in the C. porosus cell line, LV-1, indicating an intact early innate response to viral infection in these animals for the first time. Viperin was cloned from the LV-1 cell line and shown to have similar localisation patterns as human viperin, as well as demonstrating extremely high conservation with the human orthologue, excepting at the N-terminus. Interestingly, C. porosus viperin was also able to inhibit Dengue virus replication in vitro, showing a high level of intact functionality for this protein across divergent animal species, and perhaps demonstrating its importance in the early innate response to pathogens in the animal kingdom. PMID:25766282

  16. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Aevermann, Brian D; Pickett, Brett E; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagen; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean; Clauss, Therese R W; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H; Eisfeld, Amie J; Ellis, Amy; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T; Gralinski, Lisa E; Green, Richard R; Gritsenko, Marina A; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A; Jacobs, Jon M; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M; Kelly, Sara; Law, G Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L; Matzke, Melissa; McDermott, Jason; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O; Mitchell, Hugh; Monroe, Matthew E; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L; Purvine, Samuel O; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Sanders, Catherine J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Shukla, Anil K; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Thomas, Paul G; Tilton, Susan C; Totura, Allison; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D; Waters, Katrina M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection. PMID:25977790

  17. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI IN FOODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli are defined as those E. coli strains that are capable of causing diarrhoeal disease in humans. Subdivision of the pathogenic forms is made on the basis of the mechanism underlying the illness. Presently, four types of pathogenic E. coli have been implicated in foodborne...

  18. Viral Replication and Lung Lesions in BALB/c Mice Experimentally Inoculated with Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Isolated from Chickens

    PubMed Central

    She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xu; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Du, Fang; Wei, Ting; Liu, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) emerged as an important respiratory pathogen causing acute respiratory tract infection in avian species. Here we used a chicken aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) isolate to inoculate experimentally BALB/c mice and found that the aMPV/C can efficiently replicate and persist in the lungs of mice for at least 21 days with a peak viral load at day 6 postinoculation. Lung pathological changes were characterized by increased inflammatory cells. Immunochemical assay showed the presence of viral antigens in the lungs and significant upregulation of pulmonary inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including MCP-1, MIP-1?, RANTES, IL-1?, IFN-?, and TNF-? were detected following inoculation. These results indicate for the first time that chicken aMPV/C may replicate in the lung of mice. Whether aMPV/C has potential as zoonotic pathogen, further investigation will be required. PMID:24637582

  19. Influenza virus pathogenicity regulated by host cellular proteases, cytokines and metabolites, and its therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Kido, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes significant morbidity and mortality. The knowledge gained within the last decade on the pandemic IAV(H1N1)2009 improved our understanding not only of the viral pathogenicity but also the host cellular factors involved in the pathogenicity of multiorgan failure (MOF), such as cellular trypsin-type hemagglutinin (HA0) processing proteases for viral multiplication, cytokine storm, metabolic disorders and energy crisis. The HA processing proteases in the airway and organs for all IAV known to date have been identified. Recently, a new concept on the pathogenicity of MOF, the "influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin" cycle, has been proposed involving up-regulation of trypsin through pro-inflammatory cytokines, and potentiation of viral multiplication in various organs. Furthermore, the relationship between causative factors has been summarized as the "influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin" cycle interconnected with the "metabolic disorders-cytokine" cycle. These cycles provide new treatment concepts for ATP crisis and MOF. This review discusses IAV pathogenicity on cellular proteases, cytokines, metabolites and therapeutic options. PMID:26460316

  20. Immunodominant viral peptides as determinants of cross-reactivity in the immune system--Can we develop wide spectrum viral vaccines?

    PubMed

    Vieira, G F; Chies, J A B

    2005-01-01

    When we look back to Edward Jenner vaccination of a young man in 1796, we cannot help thinking that he was both lucky and crazy. Crazy because he decided to test in a human being a hypothesis based mainly in the traditional belief that people who had acquired cowpox from the udders of a cow were thereafter resistant to smallpox, a quite devastating disease, and lucky because (even considering that he did not know this at that time) he succeeded to induce protection against a pathogen through the induction of an immune response directed against a different agent. Not only was he able to protect the young man but he took the first step towards the development of a vast new field, vaccination. It is acceptable to say that Jenner was lucky because he succeeded in promoting protection against smallpox using a cowpox virus and this induction of protection in a cross-reactive way is believed to be quite rare. Nevertheless, more and more examples of cross-reactive immune responses are being described and we are beginning to admit that cross-reactivity is far more common and important than we used to think. Here we review cross-reactivity in the immune system and the plasticity of T cell recognition. Based on the existence of T cell receptor promiscuous recognition and cross-recognition of conserved viral immunodominant epitopes, we propose two approaches to develop wide spectrum viral vaccines. The first one is based on the identification, characterization, and cloning of immunodominant viral epitopes able to stimulate responses against different viruses. The produced peptides could then be purified and serve as a basis for vaccine therapies. A second strategy is based on the identification of conserved patterns in immunodominant viral peptides and the production of synthetic peptides containing the amino acid residues necessary for MHC anchoring and TCR contact. Although we are still far from a complete knowledge of the cross-reactivity phenomenon in the immune system, the analysis of immunodominant viral epitopes and the identification of particular "viral patterns" seems to be important steps towards the development of wide spectrum viral vaccines. PMID:16051445

  1. Compounds Derived from Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) as a Novel Approach to the Prevention of Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic viral infections pose major health risks to humans and livestock due to viral infection-associated illnesses such as chronic or acute inflammation in crucial organs and systems, malignant and benign lesions. These lead to large number of illnesses and deaths worldwide each year. Outbreaks of emerging lethal viruses, such as Ebola virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus, could lead to epidemics or even pandemics if they are not effectively controlled. Current strategies to prevent viral entry into the human body are focused on cleansing the surface of the skin that covers hands and fingers. Surface protection and disinfection against microorganisms, including viruses, is performed by sanitization of the skin surface through hand washing with soap and water, surface disinfectants, and hand sanitizers, particularly alcohol-based hand sanitizers. However, concerns about the overall ineffectiveness, toxicity of certain ingredients of disinfectants, pollution of the environment, and the short duration of antimicrobial activity of alcohol have not been addressed, and the epidemiology of certain major viral infections are not correlated inversely with the current measures of viral prevention. In addition to a short duration on the skin surface, alcohol is ineffective against certain viruses such as norovirus, rabies virus, and polio virus. There is a need for a novel approach to protect humans and livestock from infections of pathogenic viruses that is broadly effective, long-lasting (persistent), non-toxic, and environment-friendly. A strong candidate is a group of unique compounds found in Camellia sinensis (tea plant): the green tea polyphenols, in particular epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and its lipophilic derivatives. This review discussed the weaknesses of current hand sanitizers, gathered published results from many studies on the antiviral activities of EGCG and its lipophilic derivatives, and the potential use of these compounds as a novel strategy for disease prevention, especially against pathogenic viruses. PMID:26490660

  2. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Marta; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Desole, Giovanna; Berto, Alessandro; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance. PMID:26184286

  3. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  4. A bio-synthetic interface for discovery of viral entry mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzler, Mike; Maar, Dianna; Negrete, Oscar; Hayden, Carl C.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Wang, Julia

    2010-09-01

    Understanding and defending against pathogenic viruses is an important public health and biodefense challenge. The focus of our LDRD project has been to uncover the mechanisms enveloped viruses use to identify and invade host cells. We have constructed interfaces between viral particles and synthetic lipid bilayers. This approach provides a minimal setting for investigating the initial events of host-virus interaction - (i) recognition of, and (ii) entry into the host via membrane fusion. This understanding could enable rational design of therapeutics that block viral entry as well as future construction of synthetic, non-proliferating sensors that detect live virus in the environment. We have observed fusion between synthetic lipid vesicles and Vesicular Stomatitis virus particles, and we have observed interactions between Nipah virus-like particles and supported lipid bilayers and giant unilamellar vesicles.

  5. Structure of Nipah virus unassembled nucleoprotein in complex with its viral chaperone.

    PubMed

    Yabukarski, Filip; Lawrence, Philip; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Delaforge, Elise; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Blackledge, Martin; Volchkov, Viktor; Jamin, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic emergent paramyxovirus causing deadly encephalitis in humans. Its replication requires a constant supply of unassembled nucleoprotein (N(0)) in complex with its viral chaperone, the phosphoprotein (P). To elucidate the chaperone function of P, we reconstituted NiV the N(0)-P core complex and determined its crystal structure. The binding of the N-terminal region of P blocks the polymerization of N by interfering with subdomain exchange between N protomers and keeps N(0) in an open conformation, ready to grasp an RNA molecule. We found that a peptide derived from the N-binding region of P protects cells against viral infection and demonstrated by structure-based mutagenesis that this peptide acts by inhibiting N(0)-P formation. These results provide new insights about the assembly of N along genomic RNA and validate the N(0)-P complex as a target for drug development. PMID:25108352

  6. Mechanisms of Coronavirus Cell Entry Mediated by the Viral Spike Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belouzard, Sandrine; Millet, Jean K.; Licitra, Beth N.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. To deliver their nucleocapsid into the host cell, they rely on the fusion of their envelope with the host cell membrane. The spike glycoprotein (S) mediates virus entry and is a primary determinant of cell tropism and pathogenesis. It is classified as a class I fusion protein, and is responsible for binding to the receptor on the host cell as well as mediating the fusion of host and viral membranes—A process driven by major conformational changes of the S protein. This review discusses coronavirus entry mechanisms focusing on the different triggers used by coronaviruses to initiate the conformational change of the S protein: receptor binding, low pH exposure and proteolytic activation. We also highlight commonalities between coronavirus S proteins and other class I viral fusion proteins, as well as distinctive features that confer distinct tropism, pathogenicity and host interspecies transmission characteristics to coronaviruses. PMID:22816037

  7. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-03-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997-2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting. PMID:25146854

  8. HTLV Tax: A Fascinating Multifunctional Co-Regulator of Viral and Cellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Currer, Robert; Van Duyne, Rachel; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Das, Ravi; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been identified as the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2–5% develop ATL. The past 35?years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator, and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-?B pathway to both post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Tax and subcellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis. PMID:23226145

  9. PIPS: Pathogenicity Island Prediction Software

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Siomar C.; Abreu, Vinícius A. C.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Cerdeira, Louise; Silva, Artur; Baumbach, Jan; Trost, Eva; Tauch, Andreas; Hirata, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The adaptability of pathogenic bacteria to hosts is influenced by the genomic plasticity of the bacteria, which can be increased by such mechanisms as horizontal gene transfer. Pathogenicity islands play a major role in this type of gene transfer because they are large, horizontally acquired regions that harbor clusters of virulence genes that mediate the adhesion, colonization, invasion, immune system evasion, and toxigenic properties of the acceptor organism. Currently, pathogenicity islands are mainly identified in silico based on various characteristic features: (1) deviations in codon usage, G+C content or dinucleotide frequency and (2) insertion sequences and/or tRNA genetic flanking regions together with transposase coding genes. Several computational techniques for identifying pathogenicity islands exist. However, most of these techniques are only directed at the detection of horizontally transferred genes and/or the absence of certain genomic regions of the pathogenic bacterium in closely related non-pathogenic species. Here, we present a novel software suite designed for the prediction of pathogenicity islands (pathogenicity island prediction software, or PIPS). In contrast to other existing tools, our approach is capable of utilizing multiple features for pathogenicity island detection in an integrative manner. We show that PIPS provides better accuracy than other available software packages. As an example, we used PIPS to study the veterinary pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, in which we identified seven putative pathogenicity islands. PMID:22355329

  10. Etiological epidemiology of viral diarrhea on the basis of sentinel surveillance in children younger than 5 years in Gansu, northwest China, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Meng, Lei; Li, Juansheng; Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Yana; Yu, Deshan; Ren, Xiaowei; Liu, Haixia; Shen, Xiping; Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaobin; Wei, Kongfu; Pei, Hongbo; Kang, Qian

    2015-12-01

    To explore the etiological spectrum of diarrhea and its epidemiological characteristics in diarrhea symptoms surveillance cases younger than 5 years from 2009 to 2013 in Gansu province, northwest China. Systematic diarrhea symptoms surveillance were conducted in 27 sentinel sites in Gansu province and outpatients with three or more loose, watery, or sticky pus stools per day were defined as surveillance cases. All stool specimens were tested for Rotavirus, Human calicivirus, Adenovirus, and Astrovirus. Totally, 1,119 cases (51.54%) were identified as any enteric virus. The average isolation rate of Rotavirus was 51.13%, Astrovirus was 10.84%, Adenovirus was 6.94%, and Human calicivirus was 6.60% (P?pathogens except in 2011, with a notable downward trend over time (P?Viral-positive rate was higher among children aged group of 0-12 and 13-24 months (P?viral pathogens showed a similar distinct seasonal variation with a higher rate in spring, autumn, and winter months. Rotavirus was the major epidemiological viral pathogen in diarrhea symptom surveillance cases in Gansu province, northwest China, during period 2009-2013. Seasonal and age-related variations were observed in enteric viral pathogen isolation rate. The comprehensive and continuous surveillance is needed to identify the prevalence of different enteric viral pathogens. PMID:26081875

  11. Microarray analysis following infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in naive and vaccinated SPF chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) is a viral disease of poultry that remains a constant threat to commercial poultry throughout the world. Within the last few years, outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 have originated in Southeast Asia and spread to several European, Middle Eastern, and A...

  12. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF NORTH AMERICAN DUCKS AND GULLS TO H5N1 HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2002, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have been associated with mortality in numerous wild avian species throughout Eurasia. In this study, we assessed the clinical response and extent and duration of viral shedding in five species of North American ducks and laughing gul...

  13. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  14. Proteomic screening of variola virus reveals a unique NF-?B inhibitor that is highly conserved among pathogenic orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Shattuck, Donna; Neff, Chris; Dufford, Max; van Buuren, Nick; Fagan, Katharine; Barry, Michele; Smith, Scott; Damon, Inger; McFadden, Grant

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the binary interactions between viral and host proteins has become a valuable tool for investigating viral tropism and pathogenesis. Here, we present the first systematic protein interaction screening of the unique variola virus proteome by using yeast 2-hybrid screening against a variety of human cDNA libraries. Several protein–protein interactions were identified, including an interaction between variola G1R, an ankryin/F-box containing protein, and human nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-?B1)/p105. This represents the first direct interaction between a pathogen-encoded protein and NF-?B1/p105. Orthologs of G1R are present in a variety of pathogenic orthopoxviruses, but not in vaccinia virus, and expression of any one of these viral proteins blocks NF-?B signaling in human cells. Thus, proteomic screening of variola virus has the potential to uncover modulators of the human innate antiviral responses. PMID:19451633

  15. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S

    2014-10-01

    Viral kinetic (VK) modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how VK modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viral replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, VK modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. We expect that VK modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases. PMID:24961742

  16. Viral-associated glomerulopathies in children.

    PubMed

    Wenderfer, Scott E

    2015-11-01

    Viral infections associate temporally with the onset of many glomerular diseases, particularly in children. In other cases of glomerulonephritis, when infection is clinically silent, viral syndromes can still be implicated as a trigger. However, strong evidence for viral causality in most glomerular disease is still lacking. While numerous case reports in children document the occurrence of specific forms of glomerular disease after seroconversion to a wide range of viruses, relatively few reports provide pathologic evidence of viral infection associated with glomerular lesions on kidney biopsy. Strong associations between hepatitis viruses and glomerular injury have been acknowledged in adults, but hepatitis C virus appears not to be an etiology in children. In the context of treating glomerular diseases, when diagnosed, the treatment of hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency virus in children with membranoproliferative, membranous and collapsing glomerulopathy plays an important role. Otherwise, there is no evidence suggesting that the identification of a viral infection in a child with glomerulopathy should change the management of the infection or the glomerulonephritis. Therefore, additional research into this topic is very much needed. PMID:25752759

  17. Unrestricted migration favours virulent pathogens in experimental metapopulations: evolutionary genetics of a rapacious life history.

    PubMed

    Eshelman, Christal M; Vouk, Roxanne; Stewart, Jodi L; Halsne, Elizabeth; Lindsey, Haley A; Schneider, Stacy; Gualu, Miliyard; Dean, Antony M; Kerr, Benjamin

    2010-08-27

    Understanding pathogen infectivity and virulence requires combining insights from epidemiology, ecology, evolution and genetics. Although theoretical work in these fields has identified population structure as important for pathogen life-history evolution, experimental tests are scarce. Here, we explore the impact of population structure on life-history evolution in phage T4, a viral pathogen of Escherichia coli. The host-pathogen system is propagated as a metapopulation in which migration between subpopulations is either spatially restricted or unrestricted. Restricted migration favours pathogens with low infectivity and low virulence. Unrestricted migration favours pathogens that enter and exit their hosts quickly, although they are less productive owing to rapid extirpation of the host population. The rise of such 'rapacious' phage produces a 'tragedy of the commons', in which better competitors lower productivity. We have now identified a genetic basis for a rapacious life history. Mutations at a single locus (rI) cause increased virulence and are sufficient to account for a negative relationship between phage competitive ability and productivity. A higher frequency of rI mutants under unrestricted migration signifies the evolution of rapaciousness in this treatment. Conversely, spatially restricted migration favours a more 'prudent' pathogen strategy, in which the tragedy of the commons is averted. As our results illustrate, profound epidemiological and ecological consequences of life-history evolution in a pathogen can have a simple genetic cause. PMID:20643740

  18. Comparison of fecal indicators with pathogenic bacteria and rotavirus in groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew S.; Layton, Alice C.; Mailloux, Brian J; Culligan, Patricia J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Sayler, Gary S.; Feighery, John; McKay, Larry; Knappett, Peter S.K.; Alexandrova, Ekaterina; Arbit, Talia; Emch, Michael; Escamilla, Veronica; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Streatfield, P. Kim; Yunus, Mohammad; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is routinely analyzed for fecal indicators but direct comparisons of fecal indicators to the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens are rare. This study was conducted in rural Bangladesh where the human population density is high, sanitation is poor, and groundwater pumped from shallow tubewells is often contaminated with fecal bacteria. Five indicator microorganisms (E. coli, total coliform, F+RNA coliphage, Bacteroides and human-associated Bacteroides) and various environmental parameters were compared to the direct detection of waterborne pathogens by quantitative PCR in groundwater pumped from 50 tubewells. Rotavirus was detected in groundwater filtrate from the largest proportion of tubewells (40%), followed by Shigella (10%), Vibrio (10%), and pathogenic E. coli (8%). Spearman rank correlations and sensitivity-specificity calculations indicate that some, but not all, combinations of indicators and environmental parameters can predict the presence of pathogens. Culture-dependent fecal indicator bacteria measured on a single date did not predict total bacterial pathogens, but annually averaged monthly measurements of culturable E. coli did improve prediction for total bacterial pathogens. A qPCR-based E. coli assay was the best indicator for the bacterial pathogens. F+RNA coliphage were neither correlated nor sufficiently sensitive towards rotavirus, but were predictive of bacterial pathogens. Since groundwater cannot be excluded as a significant source of diarrheal disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries with similar characteristics, the need to develop more effective methods for screening tubewells with respect to microbial contamination is necessary. PMID:22705866

  19. Leptospira and paramyxovirus infection dynamics in a bat maternity enlightens pathogen maintenance in wildlife.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Muriel; Wilkinson, David A; Benlali, Aude; Lagadec, Erwan; Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Tortosa, Pablo

    2015-11-01

    Bats are reservoirs for several zoonotic pathogens of medical importance; however, infection dynamics of pathogens in wild bat populations remain poorly understood. Here, we examine the influence of host crowding and population age structure on pathogen transmission and diversity in bat populations. Focusing on two pathogen taxa of medical importance, Leptospira bacteria and paramyxoviruses, we monitored host population and pathogen shedding dynamics within a maternity colony of the tropical bat species Mormopterus francoismoutoui, endemic to Réunion Island. Our data reveal astonishingly similar infection dynamics for Leptospira and paramyxoviruses, with infection peaks during late pregnancy and 2 months after the initial birth pulse. Furthermore, although co-infection occurs frequently during the peaks of transmission, the patterns do not suggest any interaction between the two pathogens. Partial sequencing reveals a unique bat-specific Leptospira strain contrasting with the co-circulation of four separate paramyxovirus lineages along the whole breeding period. Patterns of infection highlight the importance of host crowding in pathogen transmission and suggest that most bats developed immune response and stop excreting pathogens. Our results support that bat maternity colonies may represent hot spots of transmission for bacterial and viral infectious agents, and highlight how seasonality can be an important determinant of host-parasite interactions and disease emergence. PMID:25580582

  20. MODELING HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS: COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESEARCH (Session introduction)

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Braun, Pascal; Bonneau, Richard A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic infections are a major cause of both human disease and loss of crop yields and animal stocks and thus cause immense damage to the worldwide economy. The significance of infectious diseases is expected to increase in an ever more connected warming world, in which new viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens can find novel hosts and ecologic niches. At the same time, the complex and sophisticated mechanisms by which diverse pathogenic agents evade defense mechanisms and subvert their hosts networks to suit their lifestyle needs is still very incompletely understood especially from a systems perspective [1]. Thus, understanding host-pathogen interactions is both an important and a scientifically fascinating topic. Recently, technology has offered the opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions on a level of detail and scope that offers immense computational and analytical possibilities. Genome sequencing was pioneered on some of these pathogens, and the number of strains and variants of pathogens sequenced to date vastly outnumbers the number of host genomes available. At the same time, for both plant and human hosts more and more data on population level genomic variation becomes available and offers a rich field for analysis into the genetic interactions between host and pathogen.

  1. Identification and origin of plant pathogenic microorganisms in recirculating nutrient solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, M. E.; Rasmussen, S. L.

    1994-11-01

    Avoidance of root-infecting microorganisms was originally considered one of the advantages of cultivation of crops in a soilless, recirculating nutrient solution. However, to date, four viral, three bacterial and 21 fungal pathogens have been identified as causal agents of root disease in hydroponically-grown crops. Root-infecting fungi, particularly those which produce a motile stage known as a zoospore, have been the primary pathogens associated with extensive crop losses. Documented sources of these root pathogens in hydroponic systems include peat, surface water such as rivers and streams, and insects. The severity of disease caused by these introduced root pathogens is primarily governed by the genetic susceptibility of each crop and the temperature of the recirculating nutrient solution.

  2. Viral croup: diagnosis and a treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Petrocheilou, Argyri; Tanou, Kalliopi; Kalampouka, Efthimia; Malakasioti, Georgia; Giannios, Christos; Kaditis, Athanasios G

    2014-05-01

    Viral croup is a frequent disease in early childhood. Although it is usually self-limited, it may occasionally become life-threatening. Mild croup is characterized by the presence of stridor without intercostal retractions, whereas moderate-to-severe croup is accompanied by increased work of breathing. A single dose of orally administered dexamethasone (0.15-0.6?mg/kg) is the mainstay of treatment with addition of nebulized epinephrine only in cases of moderate-to-severe croup. Nebulized budesonide (2?mg) can be given alternatively to children who do not tolerate oral dexamethasone. Exposure to cold air or administration of cool mist are treatment interventions for viral croup that are not supported by published evidence, but breathing heliox can potentially reduce the work of breathing related to upper airway obstruction. In summary, corticosteroids may decrease the intensity of viral croup symptoms irrespective to their severity on presentation to the emergency department. PMID:24596395

  3. Viral diseases of livestock in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mweene, A S; Pandey, G S; Sinyangwe, P; Nambota, A; Samui, K; Kida, H

    1996-08-01

    This review is to provide information on viral diseases of livestock in Zambia. The distribution of the diseases as well as the control measures and limited research that has been done, are described. Foot and mouth disease (FMD) causes serious economic losses in the cattle industry. So far five serotypes (SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, O and At of FMD virus have been isolated in Zambia. Other notifiable viral diseases are rabies, Rift Valley fever, Lumpy skin disease, African horse sickness, bluetongue, African swine fever, Newcastle disease, Marek's disease, fowlpox and infectious bursal disease. Based on the reports of clinical and/or serological diagnoses, these are widespread in the country, although their precise incidence rates are not known. With the establishment of a veterinary school equipped with modern diagnostic facilities and the increasing number of qualified veterinary personnel, this review would stimulate surveillance study on the viral diseases for the ultimate goal of achieving effective disease control measures. PMID:8870389

  4. HUMAN VIRAL ONCOGENESIS: A CANCER HALLMARKS ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Mesri, Enrique A.; Feitelson, Mark; Munger, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Approximately twelve percent of all human cancers are caused by oncoviruses. Human viral oncogenesis is complex and only a small percentage of the infected individuals develop cancer and often many years to decades after initial infection. This reflects the multistep nature of viral oncogenesis, host genetic variability and the fact that viruses contribute to only a portion of the oncogenic events. In this review, the Hallmarks of Cancer framework of Hanahan & Weinberg (2000 and 2011) is used to dissect the viral, host and environmental co-factors that contribute to the biology of multistep oncogenesis mediated by established human oncoviruses. The viruses discussed include Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPV16/18), Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV, HCV respectively), Human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) and Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV). PMID:24629334

  5. V-GAP: Viral genome assembly pipeline.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoji; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nishiki, Issei; Iwasaki, Yuki; Fujiwara, Atushi; Kawato, Yasuhiko; Nakai, Toshihiro; Nagai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Gojobori, Takashi; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed the rapid determination of the complete genomes of many organisms. Although shotgun sequences from large genome organisms are still difficult to reconstruct perfect contigs each of which represents a full chromosome, those from small genomes have been assembled successfully into a very small number of contigs. In this study, we show that shotgun reads from phage genomes can be reconstructed into a single contig by controlling the number of read sequences used in de novo assembly. We have developed a pipeline to assemble small viral genomes with good reliability using a resampling method from shotgun data. This pipeline, named V-GAP (Viral Genome Assembly Pipeline), will contribute to the rapid genome typing of viruses, which are highly divergent, and thus will meet the increasing need for viral genome comparisons in metagenomic studies. PMID:26475935

  6. Controlling Viral Capsid Assembly with Templating

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We develop coarse-grained models that describe the dynamic encapsidation of functionalized nanoparticles by viral capsid proteins. We find that some forms of cooperative interactions between protein subunits and nanoparticles can dramatically enhance rates and robustness of assembly, as compared to the spontaneous assembly of subunits into empty capsids. For large core-subunit interactions, subunits adsorb onto core surfaces en masse in a disordered manner, and then undergo a cooperative rearrangement into an ordered capsid structure. These assembly pathways are unlike any identified for empty capsid formation. Our models can be directly applied to recent experiments in which viral capsid proteins assemble around the functionalized inorganic nanoparticles [Sun et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci (2007) 104, 1354]. In addition, we discuss broader implications for understanding the dynamic encapsidation of single-stranded genomic molecules during viral replication and for developing multicomponent nanostructured materials. PMID:18643099

  7. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  8. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Protects from Fatal Neurotropic Infection with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Specific Inhibition of Viral Replication in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sharmila; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin; Finsterbusch, Katja; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Bruder, Dunja; Grashoff, Martina; Korte, Martin; Köster, Mario; Kalinke, Ulrich; Hauser, Hansjörg; Kröger, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system protects cells against invading viral pathogens by the auto- and paracrine action of type I interferon (IFN). In addition, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 can induce alternative intrinsic antiviral responses. Although both, type I IFN and IRF-1 mediate their antiviral action by inducing overlapping subsets of IFN stimulated genes, the functional role of this alternative antiviral action of IRF-1 in context of viral infections in vivo remains unknown. Here, we report that IRF-1 is essential to counteract the neuropathology of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). IFN- and IRF-1-dependent antiviral responses act sequentially to create a layered antiviral protection program against VSV infections. Upon intranasal infection, VSV is cleared in the presence or absence of IRF-1 in peripheral organs, but IRF-1?/? mice continue to propagate the virus in the brain and succumb. Although rapid IFN induction leads to a decline in VSV titers early on, viral replication is re-enforced in the brains of IRF-1?/? mice. While IFN provides short-term protection, IRF-1 is induced with delayed kinetics and controls viral replication at later stages of infection. IRF-1 has no influence on viral entry but inhibits viral replication in neurons and viral spread through the CNS, which leads to fatal inflammatory responses in the CNS. These data support a temporal, non-redundant antiviral function of type I IFN and IRF-1, the latter playing a crucial role in late time points of VSV infection in the brain. PMID:24675692

  9. Effect of different routes of inoculation on infectivity and viral shedding of LPAI viruses in mallards.

    PubMed

    França, M; Poulson, R; Brown, J; Howerth, E W; Berghaus, R D; Carter, D; StallknechtD, E

    2012-12-01

    We studied the effect of different routes of inoculation on the infectivity and duration of viral shedding in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) infected with wild bird-origin low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs). One-month-old mallards were inoculated with 10(6) median embryo infectious doses of either A/mallard/MN/199106/99 (H3N8) or A/mallard/MN/355779/00 (H5N2) via 1 of 5 different routes: intranasal (IN), intratracheal (IT), intraocular (IO), intracloacal (IC), or intra-ingluvial (II). Birds in all routes of inoculation groups became infected with LPAIV as detected by virus isolation, real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and serology. Mallards in different route of inoculation groups had similar viral shedding through oropharynx and cloaca from 1 day postinoculation (dpi). The peak of oropharyngeal (OP) viral shedding was reached between 2 and 3 dpi in all routes of inoculation groups infected with either virus. The peak of cloacal (CL) viral excretion was reached between 2 and 3 dpi in all routes of inoculation groups infected with H3N8 LPAIV and in the IO-, IC-, and II-inoculated groups infected with H5N2 LPAIV, with a delayed and shorter peak for the IN- and IT-inoculated groups. The birds inoculated via the II route had more productive OP and CL viral shedding after infection with either LPAIV, as evidenced by higher number of swabs testing positive over the study period. In conclusion, mallards can be infected with LPAIV by various routes of inoculation, and this corroborates their high susceptibility to infection by these viruses. PMID:23402123

  10. Alterations in favipiravir (T-705) pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in a hamster model of viral hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Brian B; Sefing, Eric J; Westover, Jonna B; Smee, Donald F; Hagloch, Joseph; Furuta, Yousuke; Hall, Jeffery O

    2015-09-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new anti-influenza drug approved for human use in Japan and progressing through Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. In addition to its potent inhibitory effects against influenza virus infection, the compound has been shown to be broadly active against RNA viruses from 9 different families, including the Arenaviridae. Several members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses are significant human pathogens that cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe systemic syndrome where vascular leak is a cardinal feature. Because arenaviral infections are unlikely to be diagnosed and treated until the illness has progressed to a more advanced state, it is important to understand the effects of the disease state on favipiravir pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution to help guide therapeutic strategy. During acute arenavirus infection in hamsters, we found reduced plasma favipiravir concentrations and altered kinetics of absorption, elimination and time to maximum drug concentration. In addition, the amounts of the favipiravir M1 primary metabolite were higher in the infected animals, suggesting that favipiravir metabolism may favor the formation of this inactive metabolite during viral infection. We also discovered differences in favipiravir and M1 PK parameters associated with arenavirus infection in a number of hamster tissues. Finally, analysis at the individual animal level demonstrated a correlation between reduced plasma favipiravir concentration with increased disease burden as reflected by weight loss and viral load. Our study is the first to show the impact of active viral infection and disease on favipiravir PK and biodistribution, highlighting the need to consider alterations in these parameters when treating individuals with viral hemorrhagic fever of arenavirus or other etiology. PMID:26186980

  11. Improving gene annotation of complete viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Ryan; Rozanov, Michael; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Tatusova, Tatiana; Borodovsky, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Gene annotation in viruses often relies upon similarity search methods. These methods possess high specificity but some genes may be missed, either those unique to a particular genome or those highly divergent from known homologs. To identify potentially missing viral genes we have analyzed all complete viral genomes currently available in GenBank with a specialized and augmented version of the gene finding program GeneMarkS. In particular, by implementing genome-specific self-training protocols we have better adjusted the GeneMarkS statistical models to sequences of viral genomes. Hundreds of new genes were identified, some in well studied viral genomes. For example, a new gene predicted in the genome of the Epstein–Barr virus was shown to encode a protein similar to ?-herpesvirus minor tegument protein UL14 with heat shock functions. Convincing evidence of this similarity was obtained after only 12 PSI-BLAST iterations. In another example, several iterations of PSI-BLAST were required to demonstrate that a gene predicted in the genome of Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 encodes a BALF1-like protein which is thought to be involved in apoptosis regulation and, potentially, carcinogenesis. New predictions were used to refine annotations of viral genomes in the RefSeq collection curated by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Importantly, even in those cases where no sequence similarities were detected, GeneMarkS significantly reduced the number of primary targets for experimental characterization by identifying the most probable candidate genes. The new genome annotations were stored in VIOLIN, an interactive database which provides access to similarity search tools for up-to-date analysis of predicted viral proteins. PMID:14627837

  12. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  13. The Art of Engineering Viral Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pokorski, Jonathan K.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanotechnology is an emerging and highly interdisciplinary field in which viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are applied in diverse areas such as electronics, energy and next-generation medical devices. VNPs have been developed as candidates for novel materials, and are often described as “programmable” because they can be modified and functionalized using a number of techniques. In this review, we discuss the concepts and methods that allow VNPs to be engineered, including (i) bioconjugation chemistries, (ii) encapsulation techniques, (iii) mineralization strategies, and (iv) film and hydrogel development. With all these techniques in hand, the potential applications of VNPs are limited only by the imagination. PMID:21047140

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in chronic viral hepatitis. Evidence for a virus-induced gene upregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Majano, P L; García-Monzón, C; López-Cabrera, M; Lara-Pezzi, E; Fernández-Ruiz, E; García-Iglesias, C; Borque, M J; Moreno-Otero, R

    1998-01-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) production may contribute to the pathological changes featuring in some inflammatory diseases, but the role of NO in chronic viral hepatitis is still unknown. We compared the inducible NO synthase (NOS2) expression in the liver of patients with chronic viral hepatitis with that of both nonviral liver disease and histologically normal liver. NOS2 expression was assessed by immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies of liver biopsy sections. An intense hepatocellular NOS2 reactivity was detected in chronic viral hepatitis, whereas it was weakly or not observed in nonviral liver disease or normal liver, respectively. In addition, we determined whether the hepatitis B virus (HBV) might regulate the synthesis of this enzyme. NOS2 mRNA and protein levels as well as enzyme activity were assessed in cytokine-stimulated HBV-transfected and untransfected hepatoma cells. Transfection with either HBV genome or HBV X gene resulted in induction of NOS2 mRNA expression, and the maximal induction of this transcript and NO production was observed in cytokine-stimulated HBV-transfected cells. These results indicate that hepatotropic viral infections are able to upregulate the NOS2 gene expression in human hepatocytes, suggesting that NO may mediate important pathogenic events in the course of chronic viral hepatitis. PMID:9525976

  15. Variability and pathogenicity of hepatitis E virus genotype 3 variants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald B; Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard S; Hogema, Boris; Zaaijer, Hans L; Izopet, Jacques; Bradley-Stewart, Amanda; Gunson, Rory; Harvala, Heli; Kokki, Inka; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be clinically inapparent or produce symptoms and signs of hepatitis of varying severity and occasional fatality. This variability in clinical outcomes may reflect differences in host susceptibility or the presence of virally encoded determinants of pathogenicity. Analysis of complete genome sequences supports the division of HEV genotype 3 (HEV-3) variants into three major clades: 3ra comprising HEV isolates from rabbits, and 3efg and 3abchij comprising the corresponding named subtypes derived from humans and pigs. Using this framework, we investigated associations between viral genetic variability of HEV-3 in symptomatic and asymptomatic infections by comparing HEV-3 subgenomic sequences previously obtained from blood donors with those from patients presenting with hepatitis in the UK (54 blood donors, 148 hepatitis patients), the Netherlands (38 blood donors, 119 hepatitis patients), France (24 blood donors, 55 hepatitis patients) and Germany (14 blood donors, 36 hepatitis patients). In none of these countries was evidence found for a significant association between virus variants and patient group (P>0.05 Fisher's exact test). Furthermore, within a group of 123 patients in Scotland with clinically apparent HEV infections, we found no evidence for an association between variants of HEV-3 and disease severity or alanine aminotransferase level. The lack of detectable virally encoded determinants of disease outcomes in HEV-3 infection implies a more important role for host factors in its clinical phenotype. PMID:26282123

  16. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  17. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  18. Phosphorylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 dUTPase Regulates Viral Virulence and Genome Integrity by Compensating for Low Cellular dUTPase Activity in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihisa; Arii, Jun; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A mutation in herpes simplex virus 1 dUTPase (vdUTPase), which precluded its phosphorylation at Ser-187, decreased viral neurovirulence and increased mutation frequency in progeny virus genomes in the brains of mice where endogenous cellular dUTPase activity was relatively low, and overexpression of cellular dUTPase restored viral neurovirulence and mutation frequency altered by the mutation. Thus, phosphorylation of vdUTPase appeared to regulate viral virulence and genome integrity by compensating for low cellular dUTPase activity in vivo. IMPORTANCE Many DNA viruses encode a homolog of host cell dUTPases, which are known to function in accurate replication of cellular DNA genomes. The viral dUTPase activity has long been assumed to play a role in viral replication by preventing mutations in progeny virus genomes if cellular dUTPase activity was not sufficient. Here, we showed that a mutation in herpes simplex virus 1 dUTPase, which precluded its phosphorylation at Ser-187 and reduced its activity, decreased viral neurovirulence and increased mutation frequency in progeny virus genomes in the brains of mice where endogenous cellular dUTPase activity was relatively low. In contrast, overexpression of cellular dUTPase restored viral neurovirulence and mutation frequency altered by the mutation in the brains of mice. This is the first report, to our knowledge, directly showing that viral dUTPase activity regulates viral genome integrity and pathogenicity by compensating for insufficient cellular dUTPase activity in vivo. PMID:25320299

  19. Emergence of a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus from a Low-Pathogenic Progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Fusaro, Alice; Nelson, Martha I.; Bonfanti, Lebana; Mulatti, Paolo; Hughes, Joseph; Murcia, Pablo R.; Schivo, Alessia; Valastro, Viviana; Moreno, Ana; Holmes, Edward C.; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian influenza (AI) viruses of the H7 subtype have the potential to evolve into highly pathogenic (HP) viruses that represent a major economic problem for the poultry industry and a threat to global health. However, the emergence of HPAI viruses from low-pathogenic (LPAI) progenitor viruses currently is poorly understood. To investigate the origin and evolution of one of the most important avian influenza epidemics described in Europe, we investigated the evolutionary and spatial dynamics of the entire genome of 109 H7N1 (46 LPAI and 63 HPAI) viruses collected during Italian H7N1 outbreaks between March 1999 and February 2001. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the LPAI and HPAI epidemics shared a single ancestor, that the HPAI strains evolved from the LPAI viruses in the absence of reassortment, and that there was a parallel emergence of mutations among HPAI and later LPAI lineages. Notably, an ultradeep-sequencing analysis demonstrated that some of the amino acid changes characterizing the HPAI virus cluster were already present with low frequency within several individual viral populations from the beginning of the LPAI H7N1 epidemic. A Bayesian phylogeographic analysis revealed stronger spatial structure during the LPAI outbreak, reflecting the more rapid spread of the virus following the emergence of HPAI. The data generated in this study provide the most complete evolutionary and phylogeographic analysis of epidemiologically intertwined high- and low-pathogenicity viruses undertaken to date and highlight the importance of implementing prompt eradication measures against LPAI to prevent the appearance of viruses with fitness advantages and unpredictable pathogenic properties. IMPORTANCE The Italian H7 AI epidemic of 1999 to 2001 was one of the most important AI outbreaks described in Europe. H7 viruses have the ability to evolve into HP forms from LP precursors, although the mechanisms underlying this evolutionary transition are only poorly understood. We combined epidemiological information, whole-genome sequence data, and ultradeep sequencing approaches to provide the most complete characterization of the evolution of HPAI from LPAI viruses undertaken to date. Our analysis revealed that the LPAI viruses were the direct ancestors of the HPAI strains and identified low-frequency minority variants with HPAI mutations that were present in the LPAI samples. Spatial analysis provided key information for the design of effective control strategies for AI at both local and global scales. Overall, this work highlights the importance of implementing rapid eradication measures to prevent the emergence of novel influenza viruses with severe pathogenic properties. PMID:24501401

  20. to identify surface proteins from viral and bacterial pathogens that share structural fea-

    E-print Network

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    of the underlying function of the identified mimics. Furthermore, because functional mimicry can evolve of infectious disease today. Matthew F. Barber and Nels C. Elde are in the Department of Human Genetics temperatures -- a finding that has implications for carbon-cycle models. See Letter p.88 CHRISTOPHER STILL A n

  1. Revealing the evolutionary history and epidemiological dynamics of emerging RNA viral pathogens 

    E-print Network

    Raghwani, Jayna

    2012-06-22

    Fast-evolving RNA viruses are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among human and animal populations, contributing significantly to both global health and economic burden. The advent and revolution of high-throughput ...

  2. DNA-Directed Antibody Immobilization for Enhanced Detection of Single Viral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Elif; Daaboul, George G; Zhang, Xirui; Scherr, Steven M; Ünlü, Nese Lortlar; Connor, John H; Ünlü, M Selim

    2015-10-20

    Here, we describe the use of DNA-conjugated antibodies for rapid and sensitive detection of whole viruses using a single-particle interferometric reflectance imaging sensor (SP-IRIS), a simple, label-free biosensor capable of imaging individual nanoparticles. First, we characterize the elevation of the antibodies conjugated to a DNA sequence on a three-dimensional (3-D) polymeric surface using a fluorescence axial localization technique, spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM). Our results indicate that using DNA linkers results in significant elevation of the antibodies on the 3-D polymeric surface. We subsequently show the specific detection of pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model virus on SP-IRIS platform. We demonstrate that DNA-conjugated antibodies improve the capture efficiency by achieving the maximal virus capture for an antibody density as low as 0.72 ng/mm(2), whereas for unmodified antibody, the optimal virus capture requires six times greater antibody density on the sensor surface. We also show that using DNA conjugated anti-EBOV GP (Ebola virus glycoprotein) improves the sensitivity of EBOV-GP carrying VSV detection compared to directly immobilized antibodies. Furthermore, utilizing a DNA surface for conversion to an antibody array offers an easier manufacturing process by replacing the antibody printing step with DNA printing. The DNA-directed immobilization technique also has the added advantages of programmable sensor surface generation based on the need and resistance to high temperatures required for microfluidic device fabrication. These capabilities improve the existing SP-IRIS technology, resulting in a more robust and versatile platform, ideal for point-of-care diagnostics applications. PMID:26378807

  3. Kinetics of UV254 inactivation of selected viral pathogens in a static system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to ascertain baseline inactivation constants for Influenza Type A, PRRSV, BVDV, and Reovirus at varying UV254 dosages. Viruses in culture medium were exposed to 9 different dosages of UV254. Following exposure, the viruses were harvested, stored at -80 C and titrated ...

  4. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  5. Host Specificity of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas; Fang, Ferric C.

    2013-01-01

    Most pathogens are able to infect multiple hosts but some are highly adapted to a single-host species. A detailed understanding of the basis of host specificity can provide important insights into molecular pathogenesis, the evolution of pathogenic microbes, and the potential for pathogens to cross the species barrier to infect new hosts. Comparative genomics and the development of humanized mouse models have provided important new tools with which to explore the basis of generalism and specialism. This review will examine host specificity of bacterial pathogens with a focus on generalist and specialist serovars of Salmonella enterica. PMID:24296346

  6. Neuropathogenesis of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H7N1) in experimentally infected chickens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of neuroinvasion of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) into the central nervous system (CNS) of chickens, specific pathogen free chickens were inoculated with a H7N1 HPAIV. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nasal cavity and brain tissue samples were obtained from 1 to 4 days post-inoculation (dpi) of infected and control chickens. Viral antigen topographical distribution, presence of influenza A virus receptors in the brain, as well as, the role of the olfactory route in virus CNS invasion were studied using different immunohistochemistry techniques. Besides, viral RNA load in CSF and blood was quantified by means of a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Viral antigen was observed widely distributed in the CNS, showing bilateral and symmetrical distribution in the nuclei of the diencephalon, mesencephalon and rhombencephalon. Viral RNA was detected in blood and CSF at one dpi, indicating that the virus crosses the blood-CSF-barrier early during infection. This early dissemination is possibly favoured by the presence of Sia?2,3 Gal and Sia?2,6 Gal receptors in brain vascular endothelial cells, and Sia?2,3 Gal receptors in ependymal and choroid plexus cells. No viral antigen was observed in olfactory sensory neurons, while the olfactory bulb showed only weak staining, suggesting that the virus did not use this pathway to enter into the brain. The sequence of virus appearance and the topographical distribution of this H7N1 HPAIV indicate that the viral entry occurs via the haematogenous route, with early and generalized spreading through the CSF. PMID:21982125

  7. Small RNAs in plant defense responses during viral and bacterial interactions: similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Pablo; Sanchez, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs constitute an important class of gene expression regulators that control different biological processes in most eukaryotes. In plants, several small RNA (sRNA) silencing pathways have evolved to produce a wide range of small RNAs with specialized functions. Evidence for the diverse mode of action of the small RNA pathways has been highlighted during plant–microbe interactions. Host sRNAs and small RNA silencing pathways have been recognized as essential components of plant immunity. One way plants respond and defend against pathogen infections is through the small RNA silencing immune system. To deal with plant defense responses, pathogens have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid and counterattack this defense strategy. The relevance of the small RNA-mediated plant defense responses during viral infections has been well-established. Recent evidence points out its importance also during plant–bacteria interactions. Herein, this review discusses recent findings, similarities and differences about the small RNA-mediated arms race between plants and these two groups of microbes, including the small RNA silencing pathway components that contribute to plant immune responses, the pathogen-responsive endogenous sRNAs and the pathogen-delivered effector proteins. PMID:24046772

  8. Molecular epidemiology and viral load of HCV in different regions of Punjab, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly infectious pathogen which is responsible for causing Hepatitis around 200 million individuals worldwide. In Pakistan, 4.7% of HCV prevalence has been reported and HCV genotype 3a has been found to be the major source of infection in Pakistan but still there is lack of information on distribution of HCV genotypes and viral load in various geographical regions of Pakistan. Therefore, current study was designed to determine distribution of HCV genotypes as well viral load in different areas of Punjab province of Pakistan. Findings A total of 995 serum samples were taken from those individuals in which antibodies against HCV were detected through ELISA, from different regions of Punjab i.e. Lahore 317(31.85%), Faisalabad 70(7.03%), Gujranwala 129(12.96%), Gujrat 106(10.65%), Sialkot 94(9.44%), Sargodha 60(6.03%), Mandibaha-ud-din 135(13.56%), Jhang 86(8.64%). Qualitative PCR was performed to determine viral load and genotyping was performed using Nested PCR. Chi-square test was used to determine the age and sex-wise prevalence of HCV. Out of 995 samples, 888 samples were found positive for HCV RNA. In all regions, genotype 3a showed highest prevalence (82.81%) followed by genotype 1 (3.41%), mixed genotypes (2.41%), genotype 2 (0.50%), genotype 5 (0.1%) and unclassified genotypes (10.75%). Viral load in 29.5% patients infected with genotype 3a was less than 600,000 IU/mL, while it was between 600,000-800,000 IU/mL in 27.9% patients and 25.22% patients had more than 800,000 IU/mL viral load. Conclusion HCV genotype 3a is the most prevalent genotype in various regions of Punjab. Viral load of HCV patients in these different regions of Punjab are reported for the first time. Moreover, based upon these results the Patients having viral load below 800,000 IU/mL would be expected to show better response of anti-HCV therapy. PMID:24512668

  9. First report of viral infections that affect argentine honeybees.

    PubMed

    Reynaldi, Francisco José; Sguazza, Guillermo Hernán; Pecoraro, Marcelo Ricardo; Tizzano, Marco Andrés; Galosi, Cecilia Mónica

    2010-12-01

    Honey is one of the most important agricultural products for export in Argentina. In fact, more than 3.5 million beehives and 50?000 beekeepers are related with this production, mainly located in Buenos Aires province. Honeybee mortality is a serious problem that beekeepers in Argentina have had to face during the last 3 years. It is known that the consequence of the complex interactions between environmental and beekeeping parameters added to the effect of different disease agents such as viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasitic mites may result in a sudden collapse of the colony. In addition, multiple viral infections are frequently detected concomitantly in bee colonies. We describe here the preliminary results of a survey of three honeybee-pathogenic viruses, acute bee paralysis viruses (ABPV), chronic bee paralysis viruses (CBPV) and Sacbrood viruses (SBV) detected during a screening of 61 apiaries located in the main honey producer province using a RT-PCR assay. This is the first molecular report of the presence of these viruses in Argentine apiaries. PMID:23766280

  10. Sensors of Infection: Viral Nucleic Acid PRRs in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Poynter, Sarah; Lisser, Graeme; Monjo, Andrea; DeWitte-Orr, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Viruses produce nucleic acids during their replication, either during genomic replication or transcription. These nucleic acids are present in the cytoplasm or endosome of an infected cell, or in the extracellular space to be sensed by neighboring cells during lytic infections. Cells have mechanisms of sensing virus-generated nucleic acids; these nucleic acids act as flags to the cell, indicating an infection requiring defense mechanisms. The viral nucleic acids are called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and the sensors that bind them are called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review article focuses on the most recent findings regarding nucleic acids PRRs in fish, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), cytoplasmic DNA sensors (CDSs) and class A scavenger receptors (SR-As). It also discusses what is currently known of the downstream signaling molecules for each PRR family and the resulting antiviral response, either type I interferons (IFNs) or pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The review highlights what is known but also defines what still requires elucidation in this economically important animal. Understanding innate immune systems to virus infections will aid in the development of better antiviral therapies and vaccines for the future. PMID:26184332

  11. Physiological and metabolic consequences of viral infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Pieter A; Johnson, Karyn N; White, Craig R

    2013-09-01

    An extensively used model system for investigating anti-pathogen defence and innate immunity involves Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Drosophila melanogaster. While there has been a significant effort to understand infection consequences at molecular and genetic levels, an understanding of fundamental higher-level physiology of this system is lacking. Here, we investigate the metabolic rate, locomotory activity, dry mass and water content of adult male flies injected with DCV, measured over the 4 days prior to virus-induced mortality. DCV infection resulted in multiple pathologies, notably the depression of metabolic rate beginning 2 days post-infection as a response to physiological stress. Even in this depressed metabolic state, infected flies did not decrease their activity until 1 day prior to mortality, which further suggests that cellular processes and synthesis are disrupted because of viral infection. Growth rate was also reduced, indicating that energy partitioning is altered as infection progresses. Microbial infection in insects typically results in an increase in excretion; however, water appeared to be retained in DCV-infected flies. We hypothesise that this is due to a fluid intake-output imbalance due to disrupted transport signalling and a reduced rate of metabolic processing. Furthermore, infected flies had a reduced rate of respiration as a consequence of metabolic depression, which minimised water loss, and the excess mass as a result of water retention is concurrent with impaired locomotory ability. These findings contribute to developing a mechanistic understanding of how pathologies accumulate and lead to mortality in infected flies. PMID:23685974

  12. Comparative transcriptomics of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species

    E-print Network

    Sorek, Rotem

    Received 5.1.12; accepted 9.3.12 Listeria monocytogenes is a human, food-borne pathogen. Genomic Introduction Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous food-borne pathogen that can be silently present of Science, PO 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel. Tel.: þ 972 8 934 6342; Fax: þ 972 8 934 4108; E-mail: rotem.sorek@weizmann.ac.il

  13. STUDIES OF WATERBORNE AGENTS OF VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The etiologic agent of a large outbreak of waterborne viral gastroenteritis was detected employing immune electron microscopy (IEM) and a newly developed solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA). This agent, referred to as the Snow Mountain Agent (SMA), is 27-32 nm. in diameter, has cu...

  14. Viral genome sequencing bt random priming methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most emerging health threats are of zoonotic origin. For the overwhelming majority, their causative agents are viruses which include but are not limited to HIV, Influenza, SARS, Ebola, Dengue, and Hantavirus. Of increasing importance therefore is an understanding of the viral diversity to enable b...

  15. Viral replication and genetics Nabil A. NIMER

    E-print Network

    Viral replication and genetics Nabil A. NIMER Dept . Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering Faculty, and sometimes without even a single enzyme to start the process of replication. This is why it must rely so heavily on the host cell for the materials it needs for reproduction and why the replication of viruses

  16. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biosecurity and control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses the recommended procedures involved in setting up biosecurity and control programs designed to limit bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in beef cattle operations. For the purpose of these discussions, a working definition of a biosecurity plan was considered to be an organiz...

  17. Chauves-souris et mergences virales

    E-print Network

    Fouque, Pierre-Alain

    'actualité : Bilan sur l'épidémie d'Ebola en Afrique de l'Ouest Bilan au 30/09/2015 pour les 3 pays les plus touchés origin of the West African Ebola epidemic #12;#12;Chauves-souris et émergences virales I. Quelques

  18. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS AGENTS AND WATERBORNE DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of electron microscopic techniques in the study of human gastroenteritis led in the 1970's to the identification of new viral agents that had previously escaped detection by routine cell culture procedures. These agents have been the focus of study by researchers ...

  19. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  20. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  1. Comparative Viral Metagenomics of Environmental Samples from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Soo; Whon, Tae Woong

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metagenomics into the field of virology has facilitated the exploration of viral communities in various natural habitats. Understanding the viral ecology of a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere is important per se, but it also has potential applications in clinical and diagnostic virology. However, the procedures used by viral metagenomics may produce technical errors, such as amplification bias, while public viral databases are very limited, which may hamper the determination of the viral diversity in samples. This review considers the current state of viral metagenomics, based on examples from Korean viral metagenomic studies-i.e., rice paddy soil, fermented foods, human gut, seawater, and the near-surface atmosphere. Viral metagenomics has become widespread due to various methodological developments, and much attention has been focused on studies that consider the intrinsic role of viruses that interact with their hosts. PMID:24124407

  2. New Methods in Tissue Engineering: Improved Models for Viral Infection

    E-print Network

    Ramanan, Vyas

    New insights in the study of virus and host biology in the context of viral infection are made possible by the development of model systems that faithfully recapitulate the in vivo viral life cycle. Standard tissue culture ...

  3. Anti-viral RNAi and its suppression in plants. 

    E-print Network

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.

    2010-01-16

    As a defense against viral infection, plants are thought to use RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) to target and cleave viral RNA. To counteract this, some viruses have evolved proteins to inhibit RISC-mediated activity, thus ensuring continued...

  4. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Health Disparities Social ... Islanders LGBT Populations/MSM MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources ...

  5. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Summerell, B A; Swart, L; Denman, S; Taylor, J E; Bezuidenhout, C M; Palm, M E; Marincowitz, S; Groenewald, J Z

    2011-12-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study was to characterise several of these pathogens using morphology, culture characteristics, and DNA sequence data of the rRNA-ITS and LSU genes. In some cases additional genes such as TEF 1-? and CHS were also sequenced. Based on the results of this study, several novel species and genera are described. Brunneosphaerella leaf blight is shown to be caused by three species, namely B. jonkershoekensis on Protea repens, B. nitidae sp. nov. on Protea nitida and B. protearum on a wide host range of Protea spp. (South Africa). Coniothyrium-like species associated with Coniothyrium leaf spot are allocated to other genera, namely Curreya grandicipis on Protea grandiceps, and Microsphaeropsis proteae on P. nitida (South Africa). Diaporthe leucospermi is described on Leucospermum sp. (Australia), and Diplodina microsperma newly reported on Protea sp. (New Zealand). Pyrenophora blight is caused by a novel species, Pyrenophora leucospermi, and not Drechslera biseptata or D. dematoidea as previously reported. Fusicladium proteae is described on Protea sp. (South Africa), Pestalotiopsis protearum on Leucospermum cuneiforme (Zimbabwe), Ramularia vizellae and R. stellenboschensis on Protea spp. (South Africa), and Teratosphaeria capensis on Protea spp. (Portugal, South Africa). Aureobasidium leaf spot is shown to be caused by two species, namely A. proteae comb. nov. on Protea spp. (South Africa), and A. leucospermi sp. nov. on Leucospermum spp. (Indonesia, Portugal, South Africa). Novel genera and species elucidated in this study include Gordonomyces mucovaginatus and Pseudopassalora gouriqua (hyphomycetes), and Xenoconiothyrium catenata (coelomycete), all on Protea spp. (South Africa). PMID:22403475

  6. Pathogens at the livestock-wildlife interface in Western Alberta: does transmission route matter?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In southwestern Alberta, interactions between beef cattle and free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) may provide opportunities for pathogen transmission. To assess the importance of the transmission route on the potential for interspecies transmission, we conducted a cross-sectional study on four endemic livestock pathogens with three different transmission routes: Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Bovine Herpesvirus 1 (predominantly direct transmission), Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) (indirect fecal-oral transmission), Neospora caninum (indirect transmission with definitive host). We assessed the occurrence of these pathogens in 28 cow-calf operations exposed or non-exposed to elk, and in 10 elk herds exposed or not to cattle. We characterized the effect of species commingling as a risk factor of pathogen exposure and documented the perceived risk of pathogen transmission at this wildlife-livestock interface in the rural community. Herpesviruses found in elk were elk-specific gamma-herpesviruses unrelated to cattle viruses. Pestivirus exposure in elk could not be ascertained to be of livestock origin. Evidence of MAP circulation was found in both elk and cattle, but there was no statistical effect of the species commingling. Finally, N. caninum was more frequently detected in elk exposed to cattle and this association was still significant after adjustment for herd and sampling year clustering, and individual elk age and sex. Only indirectly transmitted pathogens co-occurred in cattle and elk, indicating the potential importance of the transmission route in assessing the risk of pathogen transmission in multi-species grazing systems. PMID:24517283

  7. Parasite and viral species richness of Southeast Asian bats: Fragmentation of area distribution matters

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Noellie; Olival, Kevin J.; Bumrungsri, Sara; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Morand, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Interest in bat-borne diseases and parasites has grown in the past decade over concerns for human health. However, the drivers of parasite diversity among bat host species are understudied as are the links between parasite richness and emerging risks. Thus, we aimed at exploring factors that explain macro and microparasite species richness in bats from Southeast Asia, a hotspot of emerging infectious diseases. First, we identified bat species that need increased sampling effort for pathogen discovery. Our approach highlights pathogen investigation disparities among species within the same genus, such as Rhinolophus and Pteropus. Secondly, comparative analysis using independent contrasts method allowed the identification of likely factors explaining parasite and viral diversity of bats. Our results showed a key role of bat distribution shape, an index of the fragmentation of bat distribution, on parasite diversity, linked to a decrease for both viral and endoparasite species richness. We discuss how our study may contribute to a better understanding of the link between parasite species richness and emergence. PMID:25161915

  8. Multiple Infections of Rodents with Zoonotic Pathogens in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sabrina; Essbauer, Sandra S.; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Poppert, Sven; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Klempa, Boris; Henning, Klaus; Schares, Gereon; Groschup, Martin H.; Spitzenberger, Friederike; Richter, Dania; Heckel, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rodents are important reservoirs for a large number of zoonotic pathogens. We examined the occurrence of 11 viral, bacterial, and parasitic agents in rodent populations in Austria, including three different hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox virus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia spp., Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Toxoplasma gondii. In 2008, 110 rodents of four species (40 Clethrionomys glareolus, 29 Apodemus flavicollis, 26 Apodemus sylvaticus, and 15 Microtus arvalis) were trapped at two rural sites in Lower Austria. Chest cavity fluid and samples of lung, spleen, kidney, liver, brain, and ear pinna skin were collected. We screened selected tissue samples for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, Leptospira, Borrelia, Rickettsia, Bartonella spp., C. burnetii, and T. gondii by RT-PCR/PCR and detected nucleic acids of Tula hantavirus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia afzelii, Rickettsia spp., and different Bartonella species. Serological investigations were performed for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, and Rickettsia spp. Here, Dobrava-Belgrade hantavirus-, Tula hantavirus-, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-, orthopox virus-, and rickettsia-specific antibodies were demonstrated. Puumala hantavirus, C. burnetii, and T. gondii were neither detected by RT-PCR/PCR nor by serological methods. In addition, multiple infections with up to three pathogens were shown in nine animals of three rodent species from different trapping sites. In conclusion, these results show that rodents in Austria may host multiple zoonotic pathogens. Our observation raises important questions regarding the interactions of different pathogens in the host, the countermeasures of the host's immune system, the impact of the host–pathogen interaction on the fitness of the host, and the spread of infectious agents among wild rodents and from those to other animals or humans. PMID:24915446

  9. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.; Gregg, J.; Grady, C.; Collins, R.; Winton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 10 1 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml-1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 ?? ?10 8 pfu fish-1 d-1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring. ?? Inter-Research 2010.

  10. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Courtney; Collins, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 101 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml–1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 × 108 pfu fish–1 d–1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring.

  11. Common themes in microbial pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, B B; Falkow, S

    1989-01-01

    A bacterial pathogen is a highly adapted microorganism which has the capacity to cause disease. The mechanisms used by pathogenic bacteria to cause infection and disease usually include an interactive group of virulence determinants, sometimes coregulated, which are suited for the interaction of a particular microorganism with a specific host. Because pathogens must overcome similar host barriers, common themes in microbial pathogenesis have evolved. However, these mechanisms are diverse between species and not necessarily conserved; instead, convergent evolution has developed several different mechanisms to overcome host barriers. The success of a bacterial pathogen can be measured by the degree with which it replicates after entering the host and reaching its specific niche. Successful microbial infection reflects persistence within a host and avoidance or neutralization of the specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms of the host. The degree of success of a pathogen is dependent upon the status of the host. As pathogens pass through a host, they are exposed to new environments. Highly adapted pathogenic organisms have developed biochemical sensors exquisitely designed to measure and respond to such environmental stimuli and accordingly to regulate a cascade of virulence determinants essential for life within the host. The pathogenic state is the product of dynamic selective pressures on microbial populations. PMID:2569162

  12. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  13. Prevalence of enteric pathogen-associated community gastroenteritis among kindergarten children in Gaza

    PubMed Central

    Laham, Nahed Al; Elyazji, Mansour; Al-Haddad, Rohaifa; Ridwan, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastroenteritis is considered as one of the leading causes of illness and death in children under 5 years age, especially in developing countries. It is one of the major public health problems among childhood in Gaza strip, Palestine. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of enteric pathogen-associated community gastroenteritis among kindergarten children in Gaza. A total of 150 stool samples were collected and investigated for parasitic, viral and bacterial pathogens at Al Azhar microbiology laboratories by using standard microbiological and serological procedures. Out of the 150 study samples, the overall percentage of positive stool samples with a known enteric pathogen was 60.6%. The prevalence of different enteric pathogens causing community gastroenteritis among symptomatic cases (88.5%) was significantly higher than the prevalence in asymptomatic carriage (11.1%). The most prevalent isolated enteric pathogens were Entamoeba histolytica (28.0%) and Giardia lamblia (26.7%). Rotavirus was found in 3.1% of symptomatic cases but not detected in asymptomatic carriage. However, adenovirus type 40 and 41 were not detected in any of the study samples. The bacterial enteric pathogens Shigella and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) have comparable occurrence as rotavirus (3.1%), meanwhile, Salmonella was not isolated. Mixed infection with more than 1 pathogen was found (11.4%) only among symptomatic cases. Children aged 3-year-old showed the highest prevalence of community gastroenteritis. This study demonstrates a high prevalence of parasitic enteropathogens and a relatively low prevalence of bacterial and viral enteropathogens among kindergarten children living in Gaza city, moreover, children aged 3 years old showed the highest prevalence of isolated enteropathogens. PMID:25745477

  14. Persistent Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in wild cervids of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Colleen; Van Campen, Hana; Soto, Sonia; LeVan, Ivy K; Baeten, Laurie A; Miller, Michael W

    2008-09-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a significant viral pathogen of domestic cattle. Worldwide, there is evidence of BVDV exposure and infection in wild ungulates; however, the frequency and significance of such events are unknown. To determine the prevalence and distribution of Colorado deer, elk, and moose persistently infected (PI) with BVDV, a cross-sectional study was conducted using full-thickness ear tissue samples collected from animals presented to the Colorado Division of Wildlife for chronic wasting disease surveillance in the 2005-2006 hunting season. Tissue from 5,597 harvested animals (2,934 mule deer, 2,516 elk, 141 white-tailed deer, and 6 moose) was paraffin-embedded and stained for BVDV using immunohistochemistry. A single adult male mule deer had BVDV antigen in the skin; staining distribution was consistent with that seen in PI cattle. Skin and lymph node were also positive for viral RNA by polymerase chain reaction, and the virus was determined to be a type 1. The prevalence of BVDV PI cervids in Colorado is very low. However, the identification of a naturally infected adult PI animal in the wild suggests that the virus infects free-ranging populations. The source of the BVDV is unknown and is assumed to be spillover from cattle or maintenance within wildlife populations. Consideration of a potential wild animal reservoir is important in the design and implementation of BVDV management practices in cattle. PMID:18776103

  15. Characterization of viral siRNA populations in honey bee colony collapse disorder.

    PubMed

    Chejanovsky, Nor; Ophir, Ron; Schwager, Michal Sharabi; Slabezki, Yossi; Grossman, Smadar; Cox-Foster, Diana

    2014-04-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a special case of collapse of honey bee colonies, has resulted in significant losses for beekeepers. CCD-colonies show abundance of pathogens which suggests that they have a weakened immune system. Since honey bee viruses are major players in colony collapse and given the important role of viral RNA interference (RNAi) in combating viral infections we investigated if CCD-colonies elicit an RNAi response. Deep-sequencing analysis of samples from CCD-colonies from US and Israel revealed abundant small interfering RNAs (siRNA) of 21-22 nucleotides perfectly matching the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), Kashmir virus and Deformed wing virus genomes. Israeli colonies showed high titers of IAPV and a conserved RNAi-pattern of matching the viral genome. That was also observed in sample analysis from colonies experimentally infected with IAPV. Our results suggest that CCD-colonies set out a siRNA response that is specific against predominant viruses associated with colony losses. PMID:24725944

  16. Endogenous neosynthesis vs. cross-presentation of viral antigens for cytotoxic T cell priming

    PubMed Central

    Freigang, Stefan; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2003-01-01

    Induction of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) has been proposed to require cross-presentation of viral antigens derived from infected extralymphatic host cells by antigen-presenting cells (APC). This postulated mechanism of cross-priming is thought to be essential for CTL responses against viruses that do not infect professional APC, e.g., because of absence of the specific virus receptor. Here, we show for the human pathogen poliovirus that naturally nonpermissive murine APC acquire viral RNA in vivo independently of the cellular virus receptor. Uptake of poliovirus or polioviral RNA initiated neosynthesis of viral antigen to an extent sufficient to prime CTLs in vivo, which were detectable 2-3 wk after infection. Our results do not only indicate that experiments studying cross-presentation and cross-priming by using potentially amplifiable or translatable materials need careful examination, but they also question the general biological importance of cross-presentation and cross-priming in antiviral CTL responses. PMID:14595029

  17. Chronic and persistent viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus infections in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Cortney A.; Taylor, L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infections were established in a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii held in a large-volume tank supplied with pathogen-free seawater at temperatures ranging from 6.8 to 11.6°C. The infections were characterized by viral persistence for extended periods and near-background levels of host mortality. Infectious virus was recovered from mortalities occurring up to 167 d post-exposure and was detected in normal-appearing herring for as long as 224 d following initial challenge. Geometric mean viral titers were generally as high as or higher in brain tissues than in pools of kidney and spleen tissues, with overall prevalence of infection being higher in the brain. Upon re-exposure to VHSV in a standard laboratory challenge, negligible mortality occurred among groups of herring that were either chronically infected or fully recovered, indicating that survival from chronic manifestations conferred protection against future disease. However, some survivors of chronic VHS infections were capable of replicating virus upon re-exposure. Demonstration of a chronic manifestation of VHSV infection among Pacific herring maintained at ambient seawater temperatures provides insights into the mechanisms by which the virus is maintained among populations of endemic hosts.

  18. New influenza A Virus Entry Inhibitors Derived from the Viral Fusion Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Li, Fangfang; Fang, Yuxin; Li, Kaiqun; Xun, Tianrong; Yang, Guang; Yang, Jie; Liu, Shuwen; He, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viral (IAV) fusion peptides are known for their important role in viral-cell fusion process and membrane destabilization potential which are compatible with those of antimicrobial peptides. Thus, by replacing the negatively or neutrally charged residues of FPs with positively charged lysines, we synthesized several potent antimicrobial peptides derived from the fusogenic peptides (FPs) of hemagglutinin glycoproteins (HAs) of IAV. The biological screening identified that in addition to the potent antibacterial activities, these positively charged fusion peptides (pFPs) effectively inhibited the replication of influenza A viruses including oseltamivir-resistant strain. By employing pseudovirus-based entry inhibition assays including H5N1 influenza A virus (IAV), and VSV-G, the mechanism study indicated that the antiviral activity may be associated with the interactions between the HA2 subunit and pFP, of which, the nascent pFP exerted a strong effect to interrupt the conformational changes of HA2, thereby blocking the entry of viruses into host cells. In addition to providing new peptide “entry blockers”, these data also demonstrate a useful strategy in designing potent antibacterial agents, as well as effective viral entry inhibitors. It would be meaningful in treatment of bacterial co-infection during influenza pandemic periods, as well as in our current war against those emerging pathogenic microorganisms such as IAV and HIV. PMID:26382764

  19. Host and Viral Factors Influencing the Pathogenesis of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) invades the central nervous system early in the course of infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. However, neurocognitive consequences of HIV infection, known collectively as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), develop in only a small portion of infected patients. The precise mechanisms of pathogenesis involved in HIV-induced central nervous system injury are still not completely understood. In particular, most theories of HAND pathogenesis cannot account for either the selective vulnerability of specific neuronal populations to HIV-induced neurodegeneration or why only a subset of patients develop clinically detectable nervous system disease. Epidemiological and virological studies have identified a variety of host and viral factors that are associated with increased risk of developing HAND. Some host factors that predispose HIV-infected patients to HAND overlap with those associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), suggesting the possibility that common pathogenic mechanisms may participate in both diseases. Here, we will review reports of host and viral factors associated with HAND and place these studies in the context of the data employed to support current theories regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to HIV-induced neurodegeneration with additional focus on mechanisms common to AD pathogenesis. PMID:19373562

  20. [KIL-d] Protein Element Confers Antiviral Activity via Catastrophic Viral Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Genjiro; Weissman, Jonathan S; Tanaka, Motomasa

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells are targeted by pathogenic viruses and have developed cell defense mechanisms against viral infection. In yeast, the cellular extrachromosomal genetic element [KIL-d] alters killer activity of M double-stranded RNA killer virus and confers cell resistance against the killer virus. However, its underlying mechanism and the molecular nature of [KIL-d] are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that [KIL-d] is a proteinaceous prion-like aggregate with non-Mendelian cytoplasmic transmission. Deep sequencing analyses revealed that [KIL-d] selectively increases the rate of de novo mutation in the killer toxin gene of the viral genome, producing yeast harboring a defective mutant killer virus with a selective growth advantage over those with WT killer virus. These results suggest that a prion-like [KIL-d] element reprograms the viral replication machinery to induce mutagenesis and genomic inactivation via the long-hypothesized mechanism of "error catastrophe." The findings also support a role for prion-like protein aggregates in cellular defense and adaptation. PMID:26590718

  1. [Application of molecular methods in the diagnosis and epidemiological study of viral respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Pozo, Francisco; Casas, Inmaculada; Ruiz, Guillermo; Falcón, Ana; Pérez-Breña, Pilar

    2008-07-01

    To date, more than two hundred viruses, belonging to six different taxonomic families, have been associated with human respiratory tract infection. The widespread incorporation of molecular methods into clinical microbiology laboratories has not only led to notable advances in the etiological diagnosis of viral respiratory infections but has also increased insight into the pathology and epidemiological profiles of the causative viruses. Because of their high sensitivity, molecular techniques markedly increase the efficiency of viral detection in respiratory specimens, particularly those that fail to propagate successfully in common cell cultures, thus allowing more rapid etiologic diagnosis. However, there are also some disadvantages in the use of these new technologies such as detection of viruses that merely colonize the respiratory tract of healthy people, or those found in the nasopharyngeal secretions of patients who have recovered from respiratory infections, due to longterm viral shedding, when the viruses are unlikely to act as pathogens. Additionally, sequencing of the amplification products allows further characterization of detected viruses, including molecular epidemiology, genotyping, or detection of antiviral resistance, to cite only a few examples. PMID:19195443

  2. Viral ion channels: structure and function Wolfgang B. Fischer a;

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Wolfgang

    Review Viral ion channels: structure and function Wolfgang B. Fischer a; *, Mark S.P. Sansom b Viral ion channels are short auxiliary membrane proteins with a length of ca. 100 amino acids, Phycodnaviridae), a Kþ selective ion channel has been discovered. The viral channels form homo oligomers to allow

  3. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  4. Anxiety and Depression: Linkages with Viral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and mood disorders are common in the general population in countries around the world. This article provides a review of the recent literature on anxiety and depressive disorders with a focus on linkages with several important viral diseases. Although the majority of studies have been conducted in developed countries such as the United States and Great Britain, some studies have been carried out in less developed nations where only a small percentage of persons with mental illness receive treatment for their condition. The studies summarized in this review indicate that there are important linkages between anxiety and depression and viral diseases such as influenza A (H1N1) and other influenza viruses, varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and hepatitis C. Additional studies are needed to further clarify the mechanisms for interactions between mental health and communicable diseases, in order to assist patients and further prevention and control efforts. PMID:25264396

  5. Multiplexing Short Primers for Viral Family PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Hiddessen, A L; Hara, C A; Williams, P L; Wagner, M; Colston, B W

    2008-06-26

    We describe a Multiplex Primer Prediction (MPP) algorithm to build multiplex compatible primer sets for large, diverse, and unalignable sets of target sequences. The MPP algorithm is scalable to larger target sets than other available software, and it does not require a multiple sequence alignment. We applied it to questions in viral detection, and demonstrated that there are no universally conserved priming sequences among viruses and that it could require an unfeasibly large number of primers ({approx}3700 18-mers or {approx}2000 10-mers) to generate amplicons from all sequenced viruses. We then designed primer sets separately for each viral family, and for several diverse species such as foot-and-mouth disease virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase segments of influenza A virus, Norwalk virus, and HIV-1.

  6. Polymerase Chain Reaction on a Viral Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Carr-Smith, James; Pacheco-Gómez, Raúl; Little, Haydn A; Hicks, Matthew R; Sandhu, Sandeep; Steinke, Nadja; Smith, David J; Rodger, Alison; Goodchild, Sarah A; Lukaszewski, Roman A; Tucker, James H R; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2015-12-18

    The field of synthetic biology includes studies that aim to develop new materials and devices from biomolecules. In recent years, much work has been carried out using a range of biomolecular chassis including ?-helical coiled coils, ?-sheet amyloids and even viral particles. In this work, we show how hybrid bionanoparticles can be produced from a viral M13 bacteriophage scaffold through conjugation with DNA primers that can template a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This unprecedented example of a PCR on a virus particle has been studied by flow aligned linear dichroism spectroscopy, which gives information on the structure of the product as well as a new protototype methodology for DNA detection. We propose that this demonstration of PCR on the surface of a bionanoparticle is a useful addition to ways in which hybrid assemblies may be constructed using synthetic biology. PMID:26046486

  7. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  8. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Tenorio, Alberto; Casas, Inmaculada; Pozo, Francisco; Ruiz, Guillermo; Pérez-Breña, Pilar

    2009-03-01

    Acute respiratory infection is the most common disease occurring over a person's lifetime, with etiological variations determined mainly by age, environmental circumstances, the healthcare setting, and the underlying pathology. More than 200 different viruses distributed in six viral families have been implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory tract infection. These facts are generating an increasing diagnostic demand that should be incorporated into the healthcare setting without delay. To meet this demand, the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology has updated its Standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of viral respiratory infection. This document contains an update primarily of infections caused by influenza viruses, and secondarily, infections due to other conventional and emerging respiratory viruses. In all cases, the methods for direct virological diagnosis (cell culture, and detection of antigens and nucleic acid) are reviewed, with special reference to techniques for molecular detection and genetic characterization. PMID:19306718

  9. Lipid composition of viral envelope of three strains of influenza virus – not all viruses are created equal

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Milne, Stephen B.; McClaren, Jennifer L.; Thomas, Paul G.; Brown, H. Alex

    2015-01-01

    While differences in the rate of virus fusion and budding from the host cell membrane have been correlated with pathogenicity, no systematic study of the contribution of differences in viral envelope composition has previously been attempted. Using rigorous virus purification, marked differences between virions and host were observed. Over 125 phospholipid species have been quantitated for three strains of influenza (HKx31- H3N2, PR8- H1N1, and VN1203- H5N1) grown in eggs. The glycerophospholipid composition of purified virions differs from that of the host or that of typical mammalian cells. Phosphatidylcholine is the major component in most mammalian cell membranes, while in purified virions phosphatidylethanolamine dominates. Due to its effects on membrane curvature, it is likely that the variations in its content are important to viral processing during infection. This integrated method of virion isolation with systematic analysis of glycerophospholipids provides a tool for the assessment of species specific biomarkers of viral pathogenicity. PMID:26448476

  10. The impact of the interferon-lambda family on the innate and adaptive immune response to viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Adrian; Santer, Deanna M; O'Shea, Daire; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Type-III interferons (IFN-?, IFNL) are the most recently described family of IFNs. This family of innate cytokines are increasingly being ascribed pivotal roles in host–pathogen interactions. Herein, we will review the accumulating evidence detailing the immune biology of IFNL during viral infection, and the implications of this novel information on means to advance the development of therapies and vaccines against existing and emerging pathogens. IFNLs exert antiviral effects via induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IFNL3, IFNL4 and the IFNL receptor ?-subunit genes have been strongly associated with IFN-?-based treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The clinical impact of these SNPs may be dependent on the status of viral infection (acute or chronic) and the potential to develop viral resistance. Another important function of IFNLs is macrophage and dendritic cell polarization, which prime helper T-cell activation and proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IFNL increase Th1- and reduce Th2-cytokines. Therefore, can such SNPs affect the IFNL signaling and thereby modulate the Th1/Th2 balance during infection? In turn, this may influence the subsequent priming of cytotoxic T cells versus antibody-secreting B cells, with implications for the breadth and durability of the host response. PMID:26038748

  11. The impact of the interferon-lambda family on the innate and adaptive immune response to viral infections.

    PubMed

    Egli, Adrian; Santer, Deanna M; O'Shea, Daire; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Type-III interferons (IFN-?, IFNL) are the most recently described family of IFNs. This family of innate cytokines are increasingly being ascribed pivotal roles in host-pathogen interactions. Herein, we will review the accumulating evidence detailing the immune biology of IFNL during viral infection, and the implications of this novel information on means to advance the development of therapies and vaccines against existing and emerging pathogens. IFNLs exert antiviral effects via induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IFNL3, IFNL4 and the IFNL receptor ?-subunit genes have been strongly associated with IFN-?-based treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The clinical impact of these SNPs may be dependent on the status of viral infection (acute or chronic) and the potential to develop viral resistance. Another important function of IFNLs is macrophage and dendritic cell polarization, which prime helper T-cell activation and proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IFNL increase Th1- and reduce Th2-cytokines. Therefore, can such SNPs affect the IFNL signaling and thereby modulate the Th1/Th2 balance during infection? In turn, this may influence the subsequent priming of cytotoxic T cells versus antibody-secreting B cells, with implications for the breadth and durability of the host response. PMID:26038748

  12. Gene flow and pathogen transmission among bobcats (Lynx rufus) in a fragmented urban landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Justin S.; Ruell, Emily W.; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Alonso, Robert S.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Urbanization can result in the fragmentation of once contiguous natural landscapes into a patchy habitat interspersed within a growing urban matrix. Animals living in fragmented landscapes often have reduced movement among habitat patches because of avoidance of intervening human development, which potentially leads to both reduced gene flow and pathogen transmission between patches. Mammalian carnivores with large home ranges, such as bobcats (Lynx rufus), may be particularly sensitive to habitat fragmentation. We performed genetic analyses on bobcats and their directly transmitted viral pathogen, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), to investigate the effects of urbanization on bobcat movement. We predicted that urban development, including major freeways, would limit bobcat movement and result in genetically structured host and pathogen populations. We analysed molecular markers from 106 bobcats and 19 FIV isolates from seropositive animals in urban southern California. Our findings indicate that reduced gene flow between two primary habitat patches has resulted in genetically distinct bobcat subpopulations separated by urban development including a major highway. However, the distribution of genetic diversity among FIV isolates determined through phylogenetic analyses indicates that pathogen genotypes are less spatially structured--exhibiting a more even distribution between habitat fragments. We conclude that the types of movement and contact sufficient for disease transmission occur with enough frequency to preclude structuring among the viral population, but that the bobcat population is structured owing to low levels of effective bobcat migration resulting in gene flow. We illustrate the utility in using multiple molecular markers that differentially detect movement and gene flow between subpopulations when assessing connectivity.

  13. Serial infection of diverse host (Mus) genotypes rapidly impedes pathogen fitness and virulence.

    PubMed

    Kubinak, Jason L; Cornwall, Douglas H; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Adler, Frederick R; Potts, Wayne K

    2015-01-01

    Reduced genetic variation among hosts may favour the emergence of virulent infectious diseases by enhancing pathogen replication and its associated virulence due to adaptation to a limited set of host genotypes. Here, we test this hypothesis using experimental evolution of a mouse-specific retroviral pathogen, Friend virus (FV) complex. We demonstrate rapid fitness (i.e. viral titre) and virulence increases when FV complex serially infects a series of inbred mice representing the same genotype, but not when infecting a diverse array of inbred mouse strains modelling the diversity in natural host populations. Additionally, a single infection of a different host genotype was sufficient to constrain the emergence of a high fitness/high virulence FV complex phenotype in these experiments. The potent inhibition of viral fitness and virulence was associated with an observed loss of the defective retroviral genome (spleen focus-forming virus), whose presence exacerbates infection and drives disease in susceptible mice. Results from our experiments provide an important first step in understanding how genetic variation among vertebrate hosts influences pathogen evolution and suggests that serial exposure to different genotypes within a single host species may act as a constraint on pathogen adaptation that prohibits the emergence of more virulent infections. From a practical perspective, these results have implications for low-diversity host populations such as endangered species and domestic animals. PMID:25392466

  14. MRI-Guided Delivery of Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Salegio, Ernesto A; Bringas, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a potential avenue of treatment for many neurological disorders. Technological advances in imaging techniques allow for the monitoring of real-time infusions into the brain of rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. Here, we discuss the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in the delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) particles into brain of nonhuman primates. PMID:26611589

  15. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  16. Evidence of infection by H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in healthy wild waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaidet, N.; Cattoli, G.; Hammoumi, S.; Newman, S.H.; Hagemeijer, W.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Cappelle, J.; Dodman, T.; Joannis, T.; Gil, P.; Monne, I.; Fusaro, A.; Capua, I.; Manu, S.; Micheloni, P.; Ottosson, U.; Mshelbwala, J.H.; Lubroth, J.; Domenech, J.; Monicat, F.

    2008-01-01

    The potential existence of a wild bird reservoir for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) has been recently questioned by the spread and the persisting circulation of H5N1 HPAI viruses, responsible for concurrent outbreaks in migratory and domestic birds over Asia, Europe, and Africa. During a large-scale surveillance programme over Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, we detected avian influenza viruses of H5N2 subtype with a highly pathogenic (HP) viral genotype in healthy birds of two wild waterfowl species sampled in Nigeria. We monitored the survival and regional movements of one of the infected birds through satellite telemetry, providing a rare evidence of a non-lethal natural infection by an HP viral genotype in wild birds. Phylogenetic analysis of the H5N2 viruses revealed close genetic relationships with H5 viruses of low pathogenicity circulating in Eurasian wild and domestic ducks. In addition, genetic analysis did not reveal known gallinaceous poultry adaptive mutations, suggesting that the emergence of HP strains could have taken place in either wild or domestic ducks or in non-gallinaceous species. The presence of coexisting but genetically distinguishable avian influenza viruses with an HP viral genotype in two cohabiting species of wild waterfowl, with evidence of non-lethal infection at least in one species and without evidence of prior extensive circulation of the virus in domestic poultry, suggest that some strains with a potential high pathogenicity for poultry could be maintained in a community of wild waterfowl.

  17. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Involved in Rabies Virus Infection through Its Interaction with Viral Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Baptiste; Nikolic, Jovan; Larrous, Florence; Bourhy, Hervé; Wirblich, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rabies virus (RABV) phosphoprotein P is a multifunctional protein: it plays an essential role in viral transcription and replication, and in addition, RABV P has been identified as an interferon antagonist. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen revealed that RABV P interacts with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The binding involved the 106-to-131 domain, corresponding to the dimerization domain of P and the C-terminal domain of FAK containing the proline-rich domains PRR2 and PRR3. The P-FAK interaction was confirmed in infected cells by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of FAK with P in Negri bodies. By alanine scanning, we identified a single mutation in the P protein that abolishes this interaction. The mutant virus containing a substitution of Ala for Arg in position 109 in P (P.R109A), which did not interact with FAK, is affected at a posttranscriptional step involving protein synthesis and viral RNA replication. Furthermore, FAK depletion inhibited viral protein expression in infected cells. This provides the first evidence of an interaction of RABV with FAK that positively regulates infection. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus exhibits a small genome that encodes a limited number of viral proteins. To maintain efficient virus replication, some of them are multifunctional, such as the phosphoprotein P. We and others have shown that P establishes complex networks of interactions with host cell components. These interactions have revealed much about the role of P and about host-pathogen interactions in infected cells. Here, we identified another cellular partner of P, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Our data shed light on the implication of FAK in RABV infection and provide evidence that P-FAK interaction has a proviral function. PMID:25410852

  18. OsHV-1 countermeasures to the Pacific oyster's anti-viral response.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Rolland, Jean-Luc; Vergnes, Agnes; Raftos, David; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    The host-pathogen interactions between the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1) are poorly characterised. Herpesviruses are a group of large, DNA viruses that are known to encode gene products that subvert their host's antiviral response. It is likely that OsHV-1 has also evolved similar strategies as its genome encodes genes with high homology to C. gigas inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) and an interferon-stimulated gene (termed CH25H). The first objective of this study was to simultaneously investigate the expression of C. gigas and OsHV-1 genes that share high sequence homology during an acute infection. Comparison of apoptosis-related genes revealed that components of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway (TNF) were induced in response to OsHV-1 infection, but we failed to observe evidence of apoptosis using a combination of biochemical and molecular assays. IAPs encoded by OsHV-1 were highly expressed during the acute stage of infection and may explain why we didn't observe evidence of apoptosis. However, C. gigas must have an alternative mechanism to apoptosis for clearing OsHV-1 from infected gill cells as we observed a reduction in viral DNA between 27 and 54 h post-infection. The reduction of viral DNA in C. gigas gill cells occurred after the up-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes (viperin, PKR, ADAR). In a second objective, we manipulated the host's anti-viral response by injecting C. gigas with a small dose of poly I:C at the time of OsHV-1 infection. This small dose of poly I:C was unable to induce transcription of known antiviral effectors (ISGs), but these oysters were still capable of inhibiting OsHV-1 replication. This result suggests dsRNA induces an anti-viral response that is additional to the IFN-like pathway. PMID:26384844

  19. Ocean plankton. Patterns and ecological drivers of ocean viral communities.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Roux, Simon; Doulcier, Guilhem; Acinas, Silvia G; Alberti, Adriana; Chaffron, Samuel; Cruaud, Corinne; de Vargas, Colomban; Gasol, Josep M; Gorsky, Gabriel; Gregory, Ann C; Guidi, Lionel; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stéphane; Poulos, Bonnie T; Schwenck, Sarah M; Speich, Sabrina; Dimier, Celine; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Bork, Peer; Bowler, Chris; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2015-05-22

    Viruses influence ecosystems by modulating microbial population size, diversity, metabolic outputs, and gene flow. Here, we use quantitative double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viral-fraction metagenomes (viromes) and whole viral community morphological data sets from 43 Tara Oceans expedition samples to assess viral community patterns and structure in the upper ocean. Protein cluster cataloging defined pelagic upper-ocean viral community pan and core gene sets and suggested that this sequence space is well-sampled. Analyses of viral protein clusters, populations, and morphology revealed biogeographic patterns whereby viral communities were passively transported on oceanic currents and locally structured by environmental conditions that affect host community structure. Together, these investigations establish a global ocean dsDNA viromic data set with analyses supporting the seed-bank hypothesis to explain how oceanic viral communities maintain high local diversity. PMID:25999515

  20. [Kunjin virus replicon--a novel viral vector].

    PubMed

    Li, Shihua; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, E'de; Qin, Chengfeng

    2011-02-01

    Viral replicon is a kind of self-replicating viral RNA sourced from viral genome, which contains viral non-structural genes that are critical for viral genome replication with structural proteins deleted or replaced by foreign genes. Kunjin virus is a member of the Flavivirida family, Flavivirus genus, and Kunjin virus replicon is the first and the clearly defined flavivirus replicon. Kunjun virus replicon has been regarded as an excellent viral vector on account of its high expression, lower cytotoxicity and genetic stability. These unique characteristics of kunjin virus replicons make them suitable for the study of viral genome replication, recombinant proteins production, vaccine development and gene therapy. In this article, recent progress in the development, properties and applications of kunjin virus replicon system was briefly reviewed. PMID:21650037

  1. Viral Depuration of the Northern Quahaug1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Oscar C.; Seraichekas, Helen R.; Murphy, Bert L.

    1967-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate critically the feasibility of using the self-cleansing mechanism as a practical means to obtain virus-free shellfish. Two systems supplied with fresh running seawater, three strains of human enterovirus and the Northern quahaug, were used as working models. Preliminary experiments in the experimental system under arbitrarily selected conditions showed that depuration of poliovirus-polluted quahaugs could be achieved by the method used for the Eastern oyster. The factors affecting viral depuration studied so far included: (i) initial concentration of shellfish pollution; (ii) temperature of seawater; and (iii) salinity of seawater. It was shown that purification of the lightly polluted shellfish was achieved sooner than of the heavily polluted ones. The efficiency of viral depuration was roughly a function of the water temperature within the range tested (5 to 20 C). Reduction of salinity to 50 to 60% of the original level stopped this process completely, but 25% reduction in salinity did not affect significantly the rate of depuration. Preliminary study in the pilot system showed that viral depuration in the large tank appeared to be equally as efficient as that in the small experimental tanks under the particular conditions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:4291510

  2. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E. helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  3. Comparison of Five Bacteriophages as Models for Viral Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), ?6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ?X174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ?X174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and ?6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this experimental setup, the behavior of the influenza virus resembled that of phages PR772 and ?6, while the behavior of NDV was closer to that of phages MS2 and ?X174. These results provide critical information for the selection of appropriate phage models to mimic the behavior of specific human and animal viruses in aerosols. PMID:24795379

  4. Aetiology of acute paediatric gastroenteritis in Bulgaria during summer months: prevalence of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela Fratnik; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Petrov, Petar; Tchervenjakova, Tanja; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2015-03-01

    Paediatric acute gastroenteritis is a global public health problem. Comprehensive laboratory investigation for viral, bacterial and parasitic agents is helpful for improving management of acute gastroenteritis in health care settings and for monitoring and controlling the spread of these infections. Our study aimed to investigate the role of various pathogens in infantile diarrhoea in Bulgaria outside the classical winter epidemics of rotavirus and norovirus. Stool samples from 115 hospitalized children aged 0-3 years collected during summer months were tested for presence of 14 infectious agents - group A rotavirus, astrovirus, Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba using ELISAs; norovirus by real-time RT-PCR; picobirnavirus and sapovirus by RT-PCR; adenovirus using PCR, and Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia and Campylobacter using standard bacterial cultures. Infectious origin was established in a total of 92 cases and 23 samples remained negative. A single pathogen was found in 67 stools, of which rotaviruses were the most prevalent (56.7?%), followed by noroviruses (19.4?%), enteric adenoviruses (7.5?%), astroviruses (6.0?%), bacteria and parasites (4.5?% each) and sapoviruses (1.4?%). Rotavirus predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (46.3?%) and G2P[4] (21.4?%); for astroviruses, type 1a was the most common, while the GII.4/2006b variant was the most prevalent among noroviruses. Bacteria were observed in five cases, with Salmonella sp. as the most prevalent, while parasites were found in ten stool samples, with Giardia intestinalis in five cases. The results demonstrated high morbidity associated with viral infections and that rotavirus and norovirus remain the most common pathogens associated with severe gastroenteritis during summer months in Bulgaria, a country with a temperate climate, and significant molecular diversity among circulating virus strains. PMID:25596126

  5. PARP9-DTX3L ubiquitin ligase targets host histone H2BJ and viral 3C protease to enhance interferon signaling and control viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Mao, Dailing; Roswit, William T; Jin, Xiaohua; Patel, Anand C; Patel, Dhara A; Agapov, Eugene; Wang, Zhepeng; Tidwell, Rose M; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Huang, Guangming; McCarthy, Ronald; Yu, Jinsheng; Yun, Nadezhda E; Paessler, Slobodan; Lawson, T Glen; Omattage, Natalie S; Brett, Tom J; Holtzman, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing the response to interferon could offer an immunological advantage to the host. In support of this concept, we used a modified form of the transcription factor STAT1 to achieve hyper-responsiveness to interferon without toxicity and markedly improve antiviral function in transgenic mice and transduced human cells. We found that the improvement depended on expression of a PARP9-DTX3L complex with distinct domains for interaction with STAT1 and for activity as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acted on host histone H2BJ to promote interferon-stimulated gene expression and on viral 3C proteases to degrade these proteases via the immunoproteasome. Thus, PARP9-DTX3L acted on host and pathogen to achieve a double layer of immunity within a safe reserve in the interferon signaling pathway. PMID:26479788

  6. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gershwin, Laurel J.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Anderson, Mark L.; McEligot, Heather A.; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Neibergs, Holly L.; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described. PMID:26571015

  7. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the review [2].) For this reason, it is mainly viral vectors that are used for gene transfer in animals and humans.

  8. What is the Risk for Exposure to Vector-Borne Pathogens in United States National Parks?

    PubMed Central

    EISEN, LARS; WONG, DAVID; SHELUS, VICTORIA; EISEN, REBECCA J.

    2015-01-01

    United States national parks attract >275 million visitors annually and collectively present risk of exposure for staff and visitors to a wide range of arthropod vector species (most notably fleas, mosquitoes, and ticks) and their associated bacterial, protozoan, or viral pathogens. We assessed the current state of knowledge for risk of exposure to vector-borne pathogens in national parks through a review of relevant literature, including internal National Park Service documents and organismal databases. We conclude that, because of lack of systematic surveillance for vector-borne pathogens in national parks, the risk of pathogen exposure for staff and visitors is unclear. Existing data for vectors within national parks were not based on systematic collections and rarely include evaluation for pathogen infection. Extrapolation of human-based surveillance data from neighboring communities likely provides inaccurate estimates for national parks because landscape differences impact transmission of vector-borne pathogens and human-vector contact rates likely differ inside versus outside the parks because of differences in activities or behaviors. Vector-based pathogen surveillance holds promise to define when and where within national parks the risk of exposure to infected vectors is elevated. A pilot effort, including 5–10 strategic national parks, would greatly improve our understanding of the scope and magnitude of vector-borne pathogen transmission in these high-use public settings. Such efforts also will support messaging to promote personal protection measures and inform park visitors and staff of their responsibility for personal protection, which the National Park Service preservation mission dictates as the core strategy to reduce exposure to vector-borne pathogens in national parks. PMID:23540107

  9. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses: a review of viral genomes, viral induced host immune responses, genotypic distributions and worldwide epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Umar; Waheed, Yasir; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses (HCV) are frequently propagating blood borne pathogens in global community. Viral hepatitis is primarily associated with severe health complications, such as liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic fibrosis and steatosis. A literature review was conducted on hepatitis B virus (HBV), HBV genome, genotypic distribution and global epidemiology of HBV, HCV, HCV genome, HCV and host immune responses, HCV genotypic distribution and global epidemiology. The valued information was subjected for review. HBV has strict tissue tropism to liver. The virus infecting hepatocytes produces large amount of hepatitis B surface antigen particles which lack the DNA. It has capability to integrate into host genome. It has been found that genotype C is most emerging genotype associated with more severe liver diseases (cirrhosis). The approximate prevalence rate of genotype C is 27.7% which represents a major threat to future generations. Approximately 8% of population is chronic carrier of HBV in developing countries. The chronic carrier rate of HBV is 2%-7% in Middle East, Eastern and Southern Europe, South America and Japan. Among HCV infected individuals, 15% usually have natural tendency to overcome acute viral infection, where as 85% of individuals were unable to control HCV infection. The internal ribosomal entry site contains highly conserved structures important for binding and appropriate positioning of viral genome inside the host cell. HCV infects only in 1%-10% of hepatocytes, but production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (from CD8+ cells) and interferon-gamma cause destruction of both infected cells and non-infected surrounding cells. Almost 11 genotypes and above 100 subtypes of HCV exists worldwide with different geographical distribution. Many efforts are still needed to minimize global burden of these infections. For the complete eradication of HBV (just like small pox and polio) via vaccination strategies, sincere efforts would be required from government and nongovernmental organizations.

  10. Additional Evidence That the Polymerase Subunits Contribute to the Viral Replication and the Virulence of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Isolates in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiao; Ding, Longfei; Qin, Zhenqiao; Wu, Jianguo; Pan, Zishu

    2015-01-01

    Genetically similar H5N1 viruses circulating in the avian reservoir exhibit different levels of pathogenicity in mice. In this study, we characterized two highly pathogenic H5N1 avian isolates—A/Hunan/316/2005 (HN05), which is highly pathogenic in mice, and A/Hubei/489/2004 (HB04), which is nonpathogenic. In mammalian cells, HN05 replicates more efficiently than HB04, although both viruses have similar growth kinetics in avian cells. We used reverse genetics to generate recombinant H5N1 strains containing genes from HN05 and HB04 and examined their virulence. HN05 genes encoding the polymerase complex determine pathogenicity and viral replication ability both in vitro and in vivo. The PB2 subunit plays an important role in enhancing viral replication, and the PB1 and PA subunits contribute mainly to pathogenicity in mice. These results can be used to elucidate host-range expansion and the molecular basis of the high virulence of H5N1 viruses in mammalian species. PMID:25938456

  11. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens. PMID:22567321

  12. Colloqium on Pathogenes, to be held November 6-9, 2003 in Key Largo, FL

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J Roberts, PI; Karen C. Cone, Program Director and Report Preparer

    2004-01-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium November 6-7, 2003, in Key Largo, Florida, to discuss the application of genomic methods to the study of pathogenesis. Professionals in the fields of genomics, bacteriology, virology, eukaryotic microbiology, medicine, clinical diagnostics, bioinformatics, and forensics contributed their expertise to discussions on the recent advancements in the field and the outlook for future research. A number of recommendations were made for ensuring that progress in the field continues. The availability of genome sequences from pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi and other eukaryotes has opened new horizons for the field of pathogenesis. The genomes of over 100 bacterial pathogens have been fully sequenced, and scientists are busy investigating the mechanisms that regulate the diversity of bacterial pathogens and their myriad abilities to evade host defenses. Close to 1,200 viral genomes have been sequenced, and virologists are now beginning to examine the genomes of those viruses that cause undetected, cryptic infections. These virus-host interactions can serve as a reservoir of viral genes that later emerge in novel pathogens with the potential to infect humans, economically important animals, or crops. A number of eukaryotic microbes, including several pathogenic fungi, have also been sequenced, revealing unimagined diversity among these important pathogens. Certain themes have emerged from analyses of pathogen genome sequences, and the possibility exists that a sequence-based “common thread” may be found linking pathogens from different taxa. The results of genome sequencing efforts have also informed the study of pathogenesis, helping to identify the ways in which pathogens bring about disease. The advances of the past several years have been great, and we are closer than ever to a comprehensive understanding of pathogenesis, but much work lies ahead. If the science is to move forward, the genome sequences of many more organisms are needed. The sequences of many hosts, pathogens, their nonpathogenic relatives, commensals, as well as a diverse array of microorganisms, are all needed to complete the picture of pathogenesis and provide a phylogenetic framework for understanding the phenomenon. Moreover, improvements are needed in the two most important tools of genomics: annotation methodologies and sequence databases.

  13. Reinvestigation of the role of the rabies virus glycoprotein in viral pathogenesis using a reverse genetics approach.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Foley, H D; McGettigan, J P; Schnell, M J; Dietzschold, B

    2000-10-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein (G) gene of the highly neuroinvasive and neurotropic strains SHBRV-18, CVS-N2c, and CVS-B2c was introduced into the non-neuroinvasive and less neurotropic SN-10 strain to provide further insight into the role of G in the pathogenesis of rabies. Phenotypic analyses of the recombinant viruses revealed, as expected, that the neurotropism of a particular rabies virus strain was a function of its G. Nevertheless, the pathogenicity of the recombinant viruses was, in every case, markedly lower than that of the wild-type viruses suggesting that while the G dictates neurotropism, other viral attributes are also important in pathogenesis. The low pathogenicity of the recombinant viruses is at least in part due to a strong increase in transcription activity. On the other hand, the production of infectious virus by the R-SHB18 recombinant virus-infected cells was significantly delayed by comparison with SHBRV-18 wild-type virus infected-cells. Replacement of the R-SHB18 G cytoplasmic domain, transmembrane domain, and stem region with its SN-10 G counterparts neither results in a significant increase in budding efficiency nor an increase in pathogenicity. These results suggest that an optimal match of the cytoplasmic domain of G with the matrix protein may not be sufficient for maximal virus budding efficiency, which is evidently a major factor of virus pathogenicity. Our studies indicate that to maintain pathogenicity, the interactions between various structural elements of rabies virus must be highly conserved and the expression of viral proteins, in particular the G protein, must be strictly controlled. PMID:11031690

  14. The contribution of PA-X to the virulence of pandemic 2009 H1N1 and highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huijie; Sun, Yipeng; Hu, Jiao; Qi, Lu; Wang, Jinliang; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Yu; He, Qiming; Lin, Yang; Kong, Weili; Seng, Lai-Giea; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Xiufan; Liu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    PA-X is a novel protein encoded by PA mRNA and is found to decrease the pathogenicity of pandemic 1918 H1N1 virus in mice. However, the importance of PA-X proteins in current epidemiologically important influenza A virus strains is not known. In this study, we report on the pathogenicity and pathological effects of PA-X deficient 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. We found that loss of PA-X expression in pH1N1 and H5N1 viruses increased viral replication and apoptosis in A549 cells and increased virulence and host inflammatory response in mice. In addition, PA-X deficient pH1N1 and H5N1 viruses up-regulated PA mRNA and protein synthesis and increased viral polymerase activity. Loss of PA-X was also accompanied by accelerated nuclear accumulation of PA protein and reduced suppression of PA on non-viral protein expression. Our study highlights the effects of PA-X on the moderation of viral pathogenesis and pathogenicity. PMID:25652161

  15. Comparative metagenomic analysis of the enteric viromes from specific-pathogen free (SPF) chickens placed on broiler farms with enteric disease signs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metagenomics approaches have identified novel viruses in the poultry gastrointestinal tract, but these viruses and viral communities and their roles in general gut health have not been fully characterized. This study investigates the colonization of specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens by enteric v...

  16. Viral exploitation of actin: force-generation and scaffolding functions in viral infection.

    PubMed

    Spear, Mark; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-06-01

    As a fundamental component of the host cellular cytoskeleton, actin is routinely engaged by infecting viruses. Furthermore, viruses from diverse groups, and infecting diverse hosts, have convergently evolved an array of mechanisms for manipulating the actin cytoskeleton for efficacious infection. An ongoing chorus of research now indicates that the actin cytoskeleton is critical for viral replication at many stages of the viral life cycle, including binding, entry, nuclear localization, genomic transcription and reverse transcription, assembly, and egress/dissemination. Specifically, viruses subvert the force-generating and macromolecular scaffolding properties of the actin cytoskeleton to propel viral surfing, internalization, and migration within the cell. Additionally, viruses utilize the actin cytoskeleton to support and organize assembly sites, and eject budding virions for cell-to-cell transmission. It is the purpose of this review to provide an overview of current research, focusing on the various mechanisms and themes of virus-mediated actin modulation described therein. PMID:24938714

  17. Compartmentalization, Viral Evolution, and Viral Latency of HIV in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Maria M; Sturdevant, Christa Buckheit; Tompkins, Lauren A; Arrildt, Kathryn Twigg; Dukhovlinova, Elena; Kincer, Laura P; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection occurs throughout the body and can have dramatic physical effects, such as neurocognitive impairment in the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, examining the virus that resides in the CNS is challenging due to its location and can only be done using samples collected either at autopsy, indirectly form the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), or through the use of animal models. The unique milieu of the CNS fosters viral compartmentalization as well as evolution of viral sequences, allowing for new cell types, such as macrophages and microglia, to be infected. Treatment must also cross the blood-brain barrier adding additional obstacles in eliminating viral populations in the CNS. These long-lived infected cell types and treatment barriers may affect functional cure strategies in people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). PMID:25914150

  18. Waterborne pathogens in urban watersheds.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Russell D; Walling, Joyce Perdek

    2007-03-01

    A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combined sewer overflows and sanitary sewer overflows. Pathogens in US ambient water bodies are regulated under the Clean Water Act (CWA), while pathogens in drinking water supplies are regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) are developed in accordance with CWA regulations for ambient water bodies with bacterial concentrations exceeding the water quality standard, which generally is a measure of a bacterial indicator organism. However, developing a TMDL for a supplementary indicator or pathogen is also required if a use impairment would still exist even after the water body is in compliance with the standard. This occurs because indicator organisms do not reflect the presence of pathogen contamination with complete certainty. The evaluation of pathogen indicators and summary of epidemiological studies presented are resources for those developing TMDLs to achieve water quality standards and restore water bodies to their intended uses. PMID:17402286

  19. Pathogenesis and transmissibility of highly (H7N1) and low (H7N9) pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) and low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) was carried out in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) in order to study clinical signs, gross and microscopic lesions, and viral distribution in tissues and viral shedding. Birds were infected with a HPAIV subtype H7N1 (A/Chicken/Italy/5093/1999) and a LPAIV subtype H7N9 (A/Anas crecca/Spain/1460/2008). Uninoculated birds were included as contacts in both groups. In HPAIV infected birds, the first clinical signs were observed at 3 dpi, and mortality started at 4 dpi, reaching 100% at 8 dpi. The presence of viral antigen in tissues and viral shedding were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRRT-PCR), respectively, in all birds infected with HPAIV. However, neither clinical signs nor histopathological findings were observed in LPAIV infected partridges. In addition, only short-term viral shedding together with seroconversion was detected in some LPAIV inoculated animals. The present study demonstrates that the red-legged partridge is highly susceptible to the H7N1 HPAIV strain, causing severe disease, mortality and abundant viral shedding and thus contributing to the spread of a potential local outbreak of this virus. In contrast, our results concerning H7N9 LPAIV suggest that the red-legged partridge is not a reservoir species for this virus. PMID:21314907

  20. Rapid Determination of HIV-1 Mutant Frequencies and Mutation Spectra Using an mCherry/EGFP Dual-Reporter Viral Vector.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Clouser, Christine L; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    The high mutation rate of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) has been a pivotal factor in its evolutionary success as a human pathogen, driving the emergence of drug resistance, immune system escape, and invasion of distinct anatomical compartments. Extensive research has focused on understanding how various cellular and viral factors alter the rates and types of mutations produced during viral replication. Here, we describe a single-cycle dual-reporter vector assay that relies upon the detection of mutations that eliminate either expression of mCherry or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The reporter-based method can be used to efficiently quantify changes in mutant frequencies and mutation spectra that arise due to a variety of factors, including viral mutagens, drug resistance mutations, cellular physiology, and APOBEC3 proteins. PMID:26714706