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Sample records for virgo stellar substructure

  1. THE ORIGIN OF THE VIRGO STELLAR SUBSTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yam, William; Willett, Benjamin A.; Newberg, Heidi J.; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2012-07-10

    We present three-dimensional space velocities of stars selected to be consistent with membership in the Virgo stellar substructure. Candidates were selected from SA 103, a single 40' Multiplication-Sign 40' field from our proper-motion (PM) survey in Kapteyn's Selected Areas (SAs), based on the PMs, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy of 215 stars. The signature of the Virgo substructure is clear in the SDSS color-magnitude diagram (CMD) centered on SA 103, and 16 stars are identified that have high Galactocentric-frame radial velocities (V{sub GSR} > 50 km s{sup -1}) and lie near the CMD locus of Virgo. The implied distance to the Virgo substructure from the candidates is 14 {+-} 3 kpc. We derive mean kinematics from these 16 stars, finding a radial velocity V{sub GSR} = 153 {+-} 22 km s{sup -1} and proper motions ({mu}{sub {alpha}}cos {delta}, {mu}{sub {delta}}) = (- 5.24, -0.91) {+-} (0.43, 0.46) mas yr{sup -1}. From the mean kinematics of these members, we determine that the Virgo progenitor was on an eccentric (e {approx} 0.8) orbit that recently passed near the Galactic center (pericentric distance R{sub p} {approx} 6 kpc). This destructive orbit is consistent with the idea that the substructure(s) in Virgo originated in the tidal disruption of a Milky Way satellite. N-body simulations suggest that the entire cloud-like Virgo substructure (encompassing the 'Virgo Overdensity' and the 'Virgo Stellar Stream') is likely the tidal debris remnant from a recently disrupted massive ({approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) dwarf galaxy. The model also suggests that some other known stellar overdensities in the Milky Way halo (e.g., the Pisces Overdensity and debris near NGC 2419 and SEGUE 1) are explained by the disruption of the Virgo progenitor.

  2. The Origin of the Virgo Stellar Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yam, William; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Willett, Benjamin A.; Newberg, Heidi J.; Majewski, Steven R.; Girard, Terrence M.

    2012-07-01

    We present three-dimensional space velocities of stars selected to be consistent with membership in the Virgo stellar substructure. Candidates were selected from SA 103, a single 40' × 40' field from our proper-motion (PM) survey in Kapteyn's Selected Areas (SAs), based on the PMs, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy of 215 stars. The signature of the Virgo substructure is clear in the SDSS color-magnitude diagram (CMD) centered on SA 103, and 16 stars are identified that have high Galactocentric-frame radial velocities (V GSR > 50 km s-1) and lie near the CMD locus of Virgo. The implied distance to the Virgo substructure from the candidates is 14 ± 3 kpc. We derive mean kinematics from these 16 stars, finding a radial velocity V GSR = 153 ± 22 km s-1 and proper motions (μαcos δ, μδ) = (- 5.24, -0.91) ± (0.43, 0.46) mas yr-1. From the mean kinematics of these members, we determine that the Virgo progenitor was on an eccentric (e ~ 0.8) orbit that recently passed near the Galactic center (pericentric distance Rp ~ 6 kpc). This destructive orbit is consistent with the idea that the substructure(s) in Virgo originated in the tidal disruption of a Milky Way satellite. N-body simulations suggest that the entire cloud-like Virgo substructure (encompassing the "Virgo Overdensity" and the "Virgo Stellar Stream") is likely the tidal debris remnant from a recently disrupted massive (~109 M ⊙) dwarf galaxy. The model also suggests that some other known stellar overdensities in the Milky Way halo (e.g., the Pisces Overdensity and debris near NGC 2419 and SEGUE 1) are explained by the disruption of the Virgo progenitor.

  3. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XIX. Tomography of Milky Way Substructures in the NGVS Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhorst, Deborah; Starkenburg, Else; McConnachie, Alan W.; Navarro, Julio F.; Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Peng, Eric W.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2016-03-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a deep u*giz survey targeting the Virgo Cluster of galaxies at 16.5 Mpc. This survey provides high-quality photometry over an ˜100 deg2 region straddling the constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices. This sightline through the Milky Way is noteworthy in that it intersects two of the most prominent substructures in the Galactic halo: the Virgo overdensity (VOD) and Sagittarius stellar stream (close to its bifurcation point). In this paper, we use deep u*gi imaging from the NGVS to perform tomography of the VOD and Sagittarius stream using main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars as a halo tracer population. The VOD, whose centroid is known to lie at somewhat lower declinations (α ˜ 190°, δ ˜ -5°) than is covered by the NGVS, is nevertheless clearly detected in the NGVS footprint at distances between ˜8 and 25 kpc. By contrast, the Sagittarius stream is found to slice directly across the NGVS field at distances between 25 and 40 kpc, with a density maximum at ≃35 kpc. No evidence is found for new substructures beyond the Sagittarius stream, at least out to a distance of ˜90 kpc—the largest distance to which we can reliably trace the halo using MSTO stars. We find clear evidence for a distance gradient in the Sagittarius stream across the ˜30° of sky covered by the NGVS and its flanking fields. We compare our distance measurements along the stream with those predicted by leading stream models.

  4. Probing Kinematic Substructures in the Virgo Overdensity using RR Lyrae from Recent Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, John; Vivas, A. Katherina

    2015-01-01

    The Virgo Overdensity is one of the most intriguing features of the galactic halo, as it covers a large portion of the sky and seems to contain several kinematic substructures. It has been suggested that the remnants of several merger events coexist in this region. RR Lyrae stars are an excellent tracer for disentangling the different components of this overdensity, since they are excellent standard candles; by using both positions and pulsation-corrected radial velocities, we can identify distinct groups in phase space. In the last year, several surveys for RR Lyraes covering the Virgo region have become publicly available. We present analysis of ~300 spectra for ~200 stars in the Virgo overdensity region. This is a significant increase in the known sample of these stars in the region, spanning a significantly larger area of the sky than previous studies. Photometry for these data are taken primarily from the La Silla and Venezuela QUEST variability surveys with spectra provided by SDSS Data Release 10. Radial velocities for type ab RR Lyrae stars are corrected using the new set of template radial velocity curves for Balmer and metallic lines given by Sesar (2012). We combine data from QUEST, the Catalina Sky Survey, LINEAR, and spectroscopic observations from Duffau (2014) to give our full sample. A preliminary analysis reveals confirmation for several known stellar streams.

  5. A comprehensive view of the Virgo stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffau, Sonia; Vivas, A. Katherina; Zinn, Robert; Méndez, René A.; Ruiz, María T.

    2014-06-01

    To explore the complex halo substructure that has been reported in the direction of the Virgo constellation, radial velocities and metallicities have been measured for 82 RR Lyrae stars (RRLS) that were identified by the QUEST survey. These stars are distributed over 90 square degrees of the sky, and lie from 4 to 23 kpc from the Sun. Using an algorithm for finding groups in phase space and modeling the smooth halo component in the region, we identified the 5 most significant RRLS groups, some of which were previously known or suspected. We have examined the SEKBO and the Catalina catalog of RRLS (with available spectroscopic measurements), as well as the bright QUEST RRLS sample, the catalog of Red Giant stars from the Spaghetti survey, and three recent catalogs of blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars, for stars that may be related to the QUEST RRLS groups. The most significant group of RRLS is the Virgo stellar stream (VSS) identified here as group A, which is composed of at least 10 RRLS and 3 BHB stars. It has a mean distance of 19.6 kpc and a mean radial velocity Vgsr = 128 km s-1, as estimated from its RRLS members. With the revised velocities reported here, there is no longer an offset in velocity between the RRLS in the VSS and the prominent peak in the velocities of main-sequence turnoff stars reported by other researchers in the same direction and at a similar distance (known as S297+63-20.5). The location in phase space of two other groups (F and H) suggests a possible connection with the VSS, which cannot be discarded at this point, although the turnoff colors of the VSS and group H, as identified from other works, suggest they might be composed of different populations. Two more groups, B and D, are found at mean distances of 19.0 and 5.7 kpc, and mean radial velocities of Vgsr = -94 and 32 km s-1. The latter is the more numerous in terms of total members, as well as the more extended in RA. A comparison with the latest model of the disruption of the

  6. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  7. Stellar Populations and Radial Migrations in Virgo Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane; Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia; McDonald, Michael

    2012-10-01

    We present new stellar age profiles, derived from well-resolved optical and near-infrared images of 64 Virgo cluster disk galaxies, whose analysis poses a challenge for current disk galaxy formation models. Our ability to break the age-metallicity degeneracy and the significant size of our sample represent key improvements over complementary studies of field disk galaxies. Our results can be summarized as follows: first, and contrary to observations of disk galaxies in the field, these cluster galaxies are distributed almost equally amongst the three main types of disk galaxy luminosity profiles (I/II/III), indicating that the formation and/or survival of Type II breaks is suppressed within the cluster environment. Second, we find examples of statistically significant inversions ("U-shapes") in the age profiles of all three disk galaxy types, reminiscent of predictions from high-resolution simulations of classically truncated Type II disks in the field. These features characterize the age profiles for only about a third (<=36%) of each disk galaxy type in our sample. An even smaller fraction of cluster disks (~11% of the total sample) exhibit age profiles that decrease outward (i.e., negative age gradients). Instead, flat and/or positive age gradients prevail (>=50%) within our Type I, II, and III subsamples. These observations thus suggest that while stellar migrations and inside-out growth can play a significant role in the evolution of all disk galaxy types, other factors contributing to the evolution of galaxies can overwhelm the predicted signatures of these processes. We interpret our observations through a scenario whereby Virgo cluster disk galaxies formed initially like their brethren in the field but which, upon falling into the cluster, were transformed into their present state through external processes linked to the environment (e.g., ram-pressure stripping and harassment). Current disk galaxy formation models, which have largely focused on field

  8. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND RADIAL MIGRATIONS IN VIRGO DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stephane; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; McDonald, Michael E-mail: courteau@astro.queensu.ca E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu

    2012-10-10

    We present new stellar age profiles, derived from well-resolved optical and near-infrared images of 64 Virgo cluster disk galaxies, whose analysis poses a challenge for current disk galaxy formation models. Our ability to break the age-metallicity degeneracy and the significant size of our sample represent key improvements over complementary studies of field disk galaxies. Our results can be summarized as follows: first, and contrary to observations of disk galaxies in the field, these cluster galaxies are distributed almost equally amongst the three main types of disk galaxy luminosity profiles (I/II/III), indicating that the formation and/or survival of Type II breaks is suppressed within the cluster environment. Second, we find examples of statistically significant inversions ({sup U}-shapes{sup )} in the age profiles of all three disk galaxy types, reminiscent of predictions from high-resolution simulations of classically truncated Type II disks in the field. These features characterize the age profiles for only about a third ({<=}36%) of each disk galaxy type in our sample. An even smaller fraction of cluster disks ({approx}11% of the total sample) exhibit age profiles that decrease outward (i.e., negative age gradients). Instead, flat and/or positive age gradients prevail ({>=}50%) within our Type I, II, and III subsamples. These observations thus suggest that while stellar migrations and inside-out growth can play a significant role in the evolution of all disk galaxy types, other factors contributing to the evolution of galaxies can overwhelm the predicted signatures of these processes. We interpret our observations through a scenario whereby Virgo cluster disk galaxies formed initially like their brethren in the field but which, upon falling into the cluster, were transformed into their present state through external processes linked to the environment (e.g., ram-pressure stripping and harassment). Current disk galaxy formation models, which have largely

  9. The stellar populations and evolution of Virgo cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.

    2009-11-01

    Using a combination of optical and near-infrared photometry, we have studied both the resolved and integrated stellar populations for a sample of Virgo cluster galaxies spanning the full range of galaxian parameters. The derived stellar population properties are compared against galaxy structural and environmental measures to gauge the importance of these factors in establishing galaxy star formation histories and chemical evolution. Although galaxy colours do not uniquely probe a galaxy's star formation history, meaningful results may be obtained if considered in a relative sense. We find that colour profiles reflect variations in both stellar age and metallicity within galaxies. We also uncover systematic variations in colour gradients, and thus age/metallicity gradients, along the Hubble sequence, such that age and metallicity gradients become increasingly negative toward later Hubble types. However, only weak correlations exist between galaxies' stellar populations and their structure and environment. The correlations we find suggest that the star formation histories of gas-rich galaxies are strongly influenced by gas removal within the cluster, while their chemical evolution is due to a combination of stellar mass-dependent enrichment and outflow retention. The assembly of gas-poor giant galaxies is consistent with a hierarchical scenario wherein gas-rich mergers dominate by number. Gas-poor dwarfs differ from the giants, however, appearing as the product of environmentally-driven evolution. Spiral galaxies bridge the dwarf-giant gap, whereby merging and gas-stripping signatures are imprinted in their stars. Early-type spirals seem to have fallen into the cluster sooner than the later types, thereby ceasing star formation in their disks at earlier epochs. The bulges of both types, however, appear to have grown via merging. The nature of this merging (minor versus major) remains unknown. Irregular galaxies exhibit signs of a recent gravitational encounter that

  10. QUANTIFYING KINEMATIC SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE MILKY WAY'S STELLAR HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Xiangxiang; Zhao Gang; Luo Ali; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Kang, Xi; Liu, Chao; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Bullock, James S.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Morrison, Heather; Rockosi, Constance

    2011-09-01

    We present and analyze the positions, distances, and radial velocities for over 4000 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the Milky Way's halo, drawn from SDSS DR8. We search for position-velocity substructure in these data, a signature of the hierarchical assembly of the stellar halo. Using a cumulative 'close pair distribution' as a statistic in the four-dimensional space of sky position, distance, and velocity, we quantify the presence of position-velocity substructure at high statistical significance among the BHB stars: pairs of BHB stars that are close in position on the sky tend to have more similar distances and radial velocities compared to a random sampling of these overall distributions. We make analogous mock observations of 11 numerical halo formation simulations, in which the stellar halo is entirely composed of disrupted satellite debris, and find a level of substructure comparable to that seen in the actually observed BHB star sample. This result quantitatively confirms the hierarchical build-up of the stellar halo through a signature in phase (position-velocity) space. In detail, the structure present in the BHB stars is somewhat less prominent than that seen in most simulated halos, quite possibly because BHB stars represent an older sub-population. BHB stars located beyond 20 kpc from the Galactic center exhibit stronger substructure than at r{sub gc} < 20 kpc.

  11. SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE STELLAR HALOS OF THE AQUARIUS SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Cooper, A. P.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; White, S. D. M.; Navarro, J. F.

    2011-05-20

    We characterize the substructure in the simulated stellar halos of Cooper et al. which were formed by the disruption of satellite galaxies within the cosmological N-body simulations of galactic halos of the Aquarius project. These stellar halos exhibit a wealth of tidal features: broad overdensities and very narrow faint streams akin to those observed around the Milky Way. The substructures are distributed anisotropically on the sky, a characteristic that should become apparent in the next generation of photometric surveys. The normalized RMS of the density of stars on the sky appears to be systematically larger for our halos compared with the value estimated for the Milky Way from main-sequence turnoff stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We show that this is likely to be due in part to contamination by faint QSOs and redder main-sequence stars, and might suggest that {approx}10% of the Milky Way halo stars have formed in situ.

  12. A PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATE OF THE VIRGO STELLAR OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Masseron, Thomas; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Delahaye, Franck

    2009-12-10

    We determine photometric metal abundance estimates for individual main-sequence stars in the Virgo Overdensity (VOD), which covers almost 1000 deg{sup 2} on the sky, based on a calibration of the metallicity sensitivity of stellar isochrones in the gri filter passbands using field stars with well-determined spectroscopic metal abundances. Despite the low precision of the method for individual stars, we derive [Fe/H] = -2.0 +- 0.1(internal) +- 0.5(systematic) for the metal abundance of the VOD from photometric measurements of 0.7 million stars in the northern Galactic hemisphere with heliocentric distances from approx10 kpc to approx20 kpc. The metallicity of the VOD is indistinguishable, within DELTA[Fe/H] <= 0.2, from that of field halo stars covering the same distance range. This initial application suggests that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri passbands can be used to probe the properties of main-sequence stars beyond approx10 kpc, complementing studies of nearby stars from more metallicity-sensitive color indices that involve the u passband.

  13. Detailed chemical abundances of distant RR Lyrae stars in the Virgo Stellar Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffau, S.; Sbordone, L.; Vivas, A. K.; Hansen, C. J.; Zoccali, M.; Catelan, M.; Minniti, D.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundances for distant RR Lyrae stars members of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS), derived from X- Shooter medium-resolution spectra. Sixteen elements from carbon to barium have been measured in six VSS RR Lyrae stars, sampling all main nucleosynthetic channels. For the first time we will be able to compare in detail the chemical evolution of the VSS progenitor with those of Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (LG dSph) as well as the one of the smooth halo.

  14. Planetary Nebulae and their parent stellar populations. Tracing the mass assembly of M87 and Intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, Magda; Longobardi, Alessia; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-08-01

    The diffuse extended outer regions of galaxies are hard to study because they are faint, with typical surface brightness of 1% of the dark night sky. We can tackle this problem by using resolved star tracers which remain visible at large distances from the galaxy centers. This article describes the use of Planetary Nebulae as tracers and the calibration of their properties as indicators of the star formation history, mean age and metallicity of the parent stars in the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies. We then report on the results from a deep, extended, planetary nebulae survey in a 0.5 deg2 region centered on the brightest cluster galaxy NGC 4486 (M87) in the Virgo cluster core, carried out with SuprimeCam@Subaru and FLAMES-GIRAFFE@VLT. Two planetary nebulae populations are identified out to 150 kpc distance from the center of M87. One population is associated with the M87 halo and the second one with the intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core. They have different line-of-sight velocity and spatial distributions, as well as different planetary nebulae specific frequencies and luminosity functions. The intracluster planetary nebulae in the surveyed region correspond to a luminosity of four times the luminosity of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The M87 halo planetary nebulae trace an older, more metal-rich, parent stellar population. A substructure detected in the projected phase-space of the line-of-sight velocity vs. major axis distance for the M87 halo planetary nebulae provides evidence for the recent accretion event of a satellite galaxy with luminosity twice that of M33. The satellite stars were tidally stripped about 1 Gyr ago, and reached apocenter at a major axis distance of 60-90 kpc from the center of M87. The M87 halo is still growing significantly at the distances where the substructure is detected.

  15. INTEGRAL-FIELD STELLAR AND IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS OF PECULIAR VIRGO CLUSTER SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cortés, Juan R.; Hardy, Eduardo; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P. E-mail: ehardy@nrao.cl

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar and ionized gas kinematics of 13 bright peculiar Virgo cluster galaxies observed with the DensePak Integral Field Unit at the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in order to look for kinematic evidence that these galaxies have experienced gravitational interactions or gas stripping. Two-dimensional maps of the stellar velocity V, stellar velocity dispersion σ, and the ionized gas velocity (Hβ and/or [O III]) are presented for the galaxies in the sample. The stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles are determined for 13 galaxies, and the ionized gas rotation curves are determined for 6 galaxies. Misalignments between the optical and kinematical major axes are found in several galaxies. While in some cases this is due to a bar, in other cases it seems to be associated with gravitational interaction or ongoing ram pressure stripping. Non-circular gas motions are found in nine galaxies, with various causes including bars, nuclear outflows, or gravitational disturbances. Several galaxies have signatures of kinematically distinct stellar components, which are likely signatures of accretion or mergers. For all of our galaxies, we compute the angular momentum parameter λ {sub R}. An evaluation of the galaxies in the λ {sub R} ellipticity plane shows that all but two of the galaxies have significant support from random stellar motions, and have likely experienced gravitational interactions. This includes some galaxies with very small bulges and truncated/compact Hα morphologies, indicating that such galaxies cannot be fully explained by simple ram pressure stripping, but must have had significant gravitational encounters. Most of the sample galaxies show evidence for ICM-ISM stripping as well as gravitational interactions, indicating that the evolution of a significant fraction of cluster galaxies is likely strongly impacted by both effects.

  16. Probing Stellar Populations in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters with Infrared Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph B.; Gibson, Zachary J; Lee, Hyun-chul; Blakeslee, John

    2014-06-01

    Surface brightness fluctuations (SBF) are a useful tool for measuring extragalactic distances. At infrared wavelengths, SBF break the age-metallicity degeneracy and are useful for probing the properties of the most luminous stars in a galaxy, even when individual stars are not resolved. We present a detailed comparison of F110W and F160W SBF measurements made using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR camera to a variety of stellar population models, including those with solar-scaled and alpha-enhanced compositions and models incorporating convective core overshoot for younger populations. We use these model comparisons to assess the star formation histories of 16 galaxies spanning a wide range in color and luminosity in the Virgo and Fornax clusters, measured as a function of distance from the galaxy center in elliptical apertures. We discuss the implications of population variations on the fluctuation magnitudes and distance measurements.

  17. Exploring the reality of density substructures in the Palomar 5 stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Guillaume F.; Ibata, R.; Famaey, B.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of the presence of substructures in the stellar stream of the Palomar 5 globular cluster, as derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. Using a matched filter technique, we recover the positions and sizes of overdensities reported in previous studies. To explore the reality of these structures, we also create an artificial model of the stream, in which we construct a realistic background on top of which we add a perfectly smooth stream structure, taking into account the effects of photometric completeness and interstellar extinction. We find that the smooth artificial stream then shows similarly-pronounced substructures as the real structure. Interestingly, our best-fit N-body simulation does display real projected density variations linked to stellar epicyclic motions, but these become less significant when taking into account the SDSS star-count constraints. The substructures found when applying our matched filter technique to the N-body particles converted into observable stars are thus mostly unrelated to these epicyclic motions. This analysis suggests that the majority of the previously-detected substructures along the tidal tail of Palomar 5 are artefacts of observational inhomogeneities.

  18. Exploring the reality of density substructures in the Palomar 5 stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Guillaume F.; Ibata, R.; Famaey, B.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of the presence of substructures in the stellar stream of the Palomar 5 globular cluster, as derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. Using a matched filter technique, we recover the positions and sizes of overdensities reported in previous studies. To explore the reality of these structures, we also create an artificial model of the stream, in which we construct a realistic background on top of which we add a perfectly smooth stream structure, taking into account the effects of photometric completeness and interstellar extinction. We find that the smooth artificial stream then shows similarly pronounced substructures as the real structure. Interestingly, our best-fitting N-body simulation does display real projected density variations linked to stellar epicyclic motions, but these become less significant when taking into account the SDSS star-count constraints. The substructures found when applying our matched filter technique to the N-body particles converted into observable stars are thus mostly unrelated to these epicyclic motions. This analysis suggests that the majority of the previously detected substructures along the tidal tail of Palomar 5 are artefacts of observational inhomogeneities.

  19. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the stellar density substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge. Wide-field near-infrared (JHK s ) imaging data were obtained from WFCAM of UKIRT telescope. Field stars contamination around the globular clusters was reduced by using a statistical weighted filtering algorithm. Tidal stripping stellar substructures in the form of tidal tail (NGC 6266 and NGC 6626) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) were found around the four globular clusters in the two-dimensional density contour maps. We also find the overdensity features, which deviate from the theoretical models, in the outer region of radial density profiles. The observed results imply that the four globular clusters have experienced a strong tidal force or the bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy.

  20. PROPER MOTIONS IN KAPTEYN SELECTED AREA 103: A PRELIMINARY ORBIT FOR THE VIRGO STELLAR STREAM

    SciTech Connect

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.; Van Altena, William F.; Majewski, Steven R.; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Wilhelm, Ronald; Beers, Timothy C.

    2009-08-10

    We present absolute proper motions in Kapteyn Selected Area (SA) 103. This field is located 7 deg. west of the center of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS), and has a well-defined main sequence representing the stream. In SA 103, we identify one RR Lyrae star as a member of the VSS, according to its metallicity, radial velocity, and distance. VSS candidate turnoff and subgiant stars have proper motions consistent with that of the RR Lyrae star. The three-dimensional velocity data imply an orbit with a pericenter of {approx}11 kpc and an apocenter of {approx}90 kpc. Thus, the VSS comprises tidal debris found near the pericenter of a highly destructive orbit. Examining the six globular clusters at distances larger than 50 kpc from the Galactic center, and the proposed orbit of the VSS, we find one tentative association, NGC 2419. We speculate that NGC 2419 is possibly the nucleus of a disrupted system of which the VSS is a part.

  1. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-08-01

    We investigated stellar spatial density distribution around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) in order to find extended stellar substructures. Wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data were taken using the WFCAM near-infrared array on United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The contamination of field stars around clusters was minimised by applying a statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color-magnitude diagram. In two-dimensional isodensity contour map, we find that all four of the globular clusters shows tidal stripping stellar features in the form of tidal tails (NGC 6266 and NGC 6723) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723). The stellar substructures extend toward the Galactic centre or anticancer, and the proper motion direction of the clusters. The radial density profiles of the clusters also depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and show overdensity feature with a break in a slope of profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results indicate that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge have experienced strong tidal force or bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy. These observational results provide us further constraints to understand the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  2. Extending the Virgo Stellar Stream with SEKBO Survey RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Sayuri L.; Da Costa, G. S.; Keller, Stefan C.; Murphy, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of the RR Lyrae (RRL) candidates identified from the Southern Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object (SEKBO) survey data have been followed up photometrically (n = 106) and spectroscopically (n = 51). Period and light curve fitting reveals a 24% ± 7% contamination of SEKBO survey data by non-RRLs. This paper focuses on the region of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS), particularly on its extension to the south of the declination limits of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and of the Quasar Equatorial Survey Team RRL survey. The distribution of radial velocities in the Galactic standard of rest frame (V GSR) for the 11 RRLs observed in the VSS region has two apparent peaks. The larger peak coincides with the four RRLs having langV GSRrang = 127 ± 10 km s-1 and dispersion σ = 27 km s-1, marginally larger than that expected from the errors alone. The two type ab RRLs in this group have lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.95 ± 0.1. Both the radial velocities and metal abundances are consistent with membership in the VSS. The second velocity peak, which occurs at langV GSRrang = -175 ± 10 km s-1 may indicate the presence of stars from the Sgr leading tidal tail, which is expected to have large negative velocities in this region. We explore the spatial extent of the VSS by constructing luminosity functions from the SEKBO data and comparing them to data synthesized with the Besançon Galactic model. Analysis of the excess over the model predictions reveals the VSS as a large (~760 deg2) overdensity centered at roughly (R.A., decl.) ~ (186°, -4°), spanning a length of ~15 kpc in projection, assuming a heliocentric distance of 19 kpc. The data reveal for the first time the more southern regions of the stream and trace it to decl. ≈-15° and Galactic latitudes as low as b ≈ 45°.

  3. Tidal stripping stellar substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color–magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  4. Stellar Kinematics and Structural Properties of Virgo Cluster Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies from the SMAKCED Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peletier, Reynier; Boselli, Alessandro; Lisker, Thorsten; Emsellem, Eric; Simon, Joshua D.; van de Ven, Glenn; Smakced Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster. This is the largest survey conducted so far on spatially resolved kinematics of dEs. This sample is representative of the early-type population in the absolute magnitude range -19.0 < M_r < -16.0. For each dE, we measure the rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile and fit an analytic function to the rotation curve. We study the significance of the departure of the rotation curve from the best fit analytic function (poorly fit) and of the difference between the approaching and receding sides of the rotation curve (asymmetry). We find that 62+/-8% (23 out of the 39) of the dEs have a significant anomaly in their rotation curve. Analysis of the images reveals photometric anomalies for most galaxies. However, there is no clear correlation between the significance of the photometric and kinematic anomalies. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner Mpc of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disky structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between the specific angular momentum and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram pressure stripping, although some of

  5. A Gemini/GMOS Study of Intermediate Luminosity Early-type Virgo Cluster Galaxies. I. Globular Cluster and Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biao; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hong-xin; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Puzia, Thomas H.; Takamiya, Marianne; Trancho, Gelys; West, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) systems and diffuse stellar light of four intermediate luminosity (sub-L*) early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster based on Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs (GMOS) data. Our galaxy sample is fainter (-23.8\\lt {{M}K}\\lt -22.7) than most previous studies, nearly doubling the number of galaxies in this magnitude range that now have GC kinematics. The data for the diffuse light extends to 4Re, and the data for the GCs reaches 8-12Re. We find that the kinematics in these outer regions are all different despite the fact that these four galaxies have similar photometric properties, and are uniformly classified as “fast rotators” from their stellar kinematics within 1Re. The GC systems exhibit a wide range of kinematic morphology. The rotation axis and amplitude can change between the inner and outer regions, including a case of counter-rotation. This difference shows the importance of wide-field kinematic studies, and shows that stellar and GC kinematics can change significantly as one moves beyond the inner regions of galaxies. Moreover, the kinematics of the GC systems can differ from that of the stars, suggesting that the formation of the two populations are also distinct.

  6. Exploring halo substructure with giant stars. XIV. The nature of the Triangulum-Andromeda stellar features

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Majewski, Steven R.; Damke, Guillermo; Richardson, Whitney; Beaton, Rachael; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J. E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu E-mail: gjd3r@virginia.edu E-mail: rlb9n@virginia.edu

    2014-09-20

    As large-scale stellar surveys have become available over the past decade, the ability to detect and characterize substructures in the Galaxy has increased dramatically. These surveys have revealed the Triangulum-Andromeda (TriAnd) region to be rich with substructures in the distance range 20-30 kpc, and the relation of these features to each other, if any, remains unclear. An exploration using Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry reveals not only the faint sequence in M giants detected by Rocha-Pinto et al. spanning the range 100° < l < 160° and –50° < b < –15°, but, in addition, a second, brighter and more densely populated sequence. These sequences are likely associated with the distinct main sequences (MSs) discovered (and labeled TriAnd1 and TriAnd2) by Martin et al. in an optical survey in the direction of M31, where TriAnd2 is the optical counterpart of the fainter red giant branch (RGB)/asymptotic giant branch sequence of Rocha-Pinto et al. Here, the age, distance, and metallicity ranges for TriAnd1 and TriAnd2 are estimated by simultaneously fitting isochrones to the 2MASS RGB tracks and the optical MS/MS turn-off features. The two populations are clearly distinct in age and distance: the brighter sequence (TriAnd1) is younger (6-10 Gyr) and closer (distance of ∼15-21 kpc), whereas the fainter sequence (TriAnd2) is older (10-12 Gyr) and at an estimated distance of ∼24-32 kpc. A comparison with simulations demonstrates that the differences and similarities between TriAnd1 and TriAnd2 can simultaneously be explained if they represent debris originating from the disruption of the same dwarf galaxy, but torn off during two distinct pericentric passages.

  7. The Photometric Properties of a Vast Stellar Substructure in the Outskirts of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, Michael J.; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dotter, Aaron; Ibata, Rodrigo; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-11-01

    We have surveyed approximately 40 deg2 surrounding M33 with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope MegaCam/MegaPrime in the g and i filters out to a maximum projected radius from this galaxy of 50 kpc, as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). Our observations are deep enough to resolve the top ~4 mag of the red giant branch population in this galaxy. We have previously shown that the disk of M33 is surrounded by a large, irregular, low surface brightness substructure. Here, we quantify the stellar populations and structure of this feature using the PAndAS data. We show that the stellar populations of this feature are consistent with an old population with lang[Fe/H]rang ~ -1.6 dex and an interquartile range in metallicity of ~0.5 dex. We construct a surface brightness map of M33 that traces this feature to μ V ~= 33 mag arcsec-2. At these low surface brightness levels, the structure extends to projected radii of ~40 kpc from the center of M33 in both the northwest and southeast quadrants of the galaxy. Overall, the structure has an "S-shaped" appearance that broadly aligns with the orientation of the H I disk warp. We calculate a lower limit to the integrated luminosity of the structure of -12.7 ± 0.5 mag, comparable to a bright dwarf galaxy such as Fornax or Andromeda II and slightly less than 1% of the total luminosity of M33. Further, we show that there is tentative evidence for a distortion in the distribution of young stars near the edge of the H I disk that occurs at similar azimuth to the warp in H I. The data also hint at a low-level, extended stellar component at larger radius that may be an M33 halo component. We revisit studies of M33 and its stellar populations in light of these new results and discuss possible formation scenarios for the vast stellar structure. Our favored model is that of the tidal disruption of M33 in its orbit around M31.

  8. THE PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF A VAST STELLAR SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, Michael J.; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dotter, Aaron; Ibata, Rodrigo; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-11-10

    We have surveyed approximately 40 deg{sup 2} surrounding M33 with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope MegaCam/MegaPrime in the g and i filters out to a maximum projected radius from this galaxy of 50 kpc, as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). Our observations are deep enough to resolve the top {approx}4 mag of the red giant branch population in this galaxy. We have previously shown that the disk of M33 is surrounded by a large, irregular, low surface brightness substructure. Here, we quantify the stellar populations and structure of this feature using the PAndAS data. We show that the stellar populations of this feature are consistent with an old population with ([Fe/H]) {approx} -1.6 dex and an interquartile range in metallicity of {approx}0.5 dex. We construct a surface brightness map of M33 that traces this feature to {mu}{sub V} {approx_equal} 33 mag arcsec{sup -2}. At these low surface brightness levels, the structure extends to projected radii of {approx}40 kpc from the center of M33 in both the northwest and southeast quadrants of the galaxy. Overall, the structure has an 'S-shaped' appearance that broadly aligns with the orientation of the H I disk warp. We calculate a lower limit to the integrated luminosity of the structure of -12.7 {+-} 0.5 mag, comparable to a bright dwarf galaxy such as Fornax or Andromeda II and slightly less than 1% of the total luminosity of M33. Further, we show that there is tentative evidence for a distortion in the distribution of young stars near the edge of the H I disk that occurs at similar azimuth to the warp in H I. The data also hint at a low-level, extended stellar component at larger radius that may be an M33 halo component. We revisit studies of M33 and its stellar populations in light of these new results and discuss possible formation scenarios for the vast stellar structure. Our favored model is that of the tidal disruption of M33 in its orbit around M31.

  9. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. Stellar Populations and Kinematics of Compact, Low-mass Early-type Galaxies from Gemini GMOS-IFU Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérou, Adrien; Emsellem, Eric; McDermid, Richard M.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Peng, Eric W.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We present Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph integral-field unit (GMOS-IFU) data of eight compact, low-mass early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Virgo cluster. We analyze their stellar kinematics and stellar population and present two-dimensional maps of these properties covering the central 5″ × 7″ region. We find a large variety of kinematics, from nonrotating to highly rotating objects, often associated with underlying disky isophotes revealed by deep images from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. In half of our objects, we find a centrally concentrated younger and more metal-rich stellar population. We analyze the specific stellar angular momentum through the λR parameter and find six fast rotators and two slow rotators, one having a thin counterrotating disk. We compare the local galaxy density and stellar populations of our objects with those of 39 more extended low-mass Virgo ETGs from the SMAKCED survey and 260 massive (M > 1010 {{M}⊙ }) ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample. The compact low-mass ETGs in our sample are located in high-density regions, often close to a massive galaxy, and have, on average, older and more metal-rich stellar populations than less compact low-mass galaxies. We find that the stellar population parameters follow lines of constant velocity dispersion in the mass-size plane, smoothly extending the comparable trends found for massive ETGs. Our study supports a scenario where low-mass compact ETGs have experienced long-lived interactions with their environment, including ram-pressure stripping and gravitational tidal forces, that may be responsible for their compact nature.

  10. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. III. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND CONSTRAINTS ON FORMATION SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Peletier, R. F.; Emsellem, E.; Lisker, T.; Van de Ven, G.; Simon, J. D.; Adams, J. J.; Benson, A. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Paudel, S.

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λ{sub Re} and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3° (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disk-like structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo Cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between λ{sub Re} and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram-pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.

  11. The outer regions of the giant Virgo galaxy M 87 Kinematic separation of stellar halo and intracluster light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardi, Alessia; Arnaboldi, Magda; Gerhard, Ortwin; Hanuschik, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic study of a sample of 287 planetary nebulas (PNs) around the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) M 87 in Virgo A, of which 211 are located between 40 kpc and 150 kpc from the galaxy centre. With these data we can distinguish the stellar halo from the co-spatial intracluster light (ICL) and study both components separately. Methods: We obtained PN velocities with a high resolution FLAMES/VLT survey targeting eight fields in a total area of ~0.4 deg2. We identified PNs from their narrow and symmetric redshifted λ5007 Å [OIII] emission line, the presence of the second λ4959 Å [OIII] emission line, and the absence of significant continuum. We implement a robust technique to measure the halo velocity dispersion from the projected phase-space to identify PNs associated with the M 87 halo and ICL. Using photometric magnitudes, we construct PN luminosity functions (PNLFs), which are complete down to m5007 = 28.8. Results: The velocity distribution of the spectroscopically confirmed PNs is bimodal, containing a narrow component centred on the systemic velocity of the BCG and an off-centred broader component, which we identify as halo and ICL, respectively. We find that 243 PNs are part of the velocity distribution of the M 87 halo, while the remaining subsample of 44 PNs are intracluster PNs (ICPNs). Halo and ICPNs have different spatial distributions: the number density of halo PNs follow the galaxy's surface brightness profile, whereas the ICPNs are characterised by a shallower power-law profile, IICL ∝ Rγ with γ in the range [-0.34, -0.04 ]. No evidence is found for an asymmetry in the halo and ICPN density distributions when the NW and SE fields are studied separately. A study of the composite PN number density profile confirms the superposition of different PN populations associated with the M 87 halo and the ICL, characterised by different PN specific numbers α. We derive αhalo = 1.06 × 10-8NPN L⊙,bol-1 and αICL = 2.72 × 10

  12. Virgo cluster and field dwarf ellipticals in 3D - III. Spatially and temporally resolved stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Koleva, Mina; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Lisker, Thorsten; Peletier, Reynier; van de Ven, Glenn

    2015-09-01

    We present the stellar population analysis of a sample of 12 dwarf elliptical galaxies, observed with the SAURON integral field unit, using the full-spectrum fitting method. We show that star formation histories (SFHs) resolved into two populations can be recovered even within a limited wavelength range, provided that high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) data are used. We confirm that dEs have had complex SFHs, with star formation extending to (more) recent epochs: for the majority of our galaxies star formation activity was either still strong a few (≲5) Gyr ago or they experienced a secondary burst of star formation roughly at that time. This latter possibility is in agreement with the proposed dE formation scenario where tidal harassment drives the gas remaining in their progenitors inwards and induces a star formation episode. For one of our field galaxies, ID 0918, we find a correlation between its stellar population and kinematic properties, pointing to a possible merger origin of its kinematically decoupled core. One of our cluster objects, VCC 1431, appears to be composed exclusively of an old population (≳10-12 Gyr). Combining this with our earlier dynamical results, we conclude that the galaxy was either ram-pressure stripped early on in its evolution in a group environment and subsequently tidally heated, or that it evolved in situ in the cluster's central parts, compact enough to avoid tidal disruption. These are only two of the examples illustrating the SFH richness of these objects confirmed with our data.

  13. Virgo cluster and field dwarf ellipticals in 3D - I. On the variety of stellar kinematic and line-strength properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-02-01

    We present the first large-scale stellar kinematic and line-strength maps for dwarf elliptical galaxies (nine in the Virgo cluster and three in the field environment) obtained with the SAURON (Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae) integral-field unit. No two galaxies in our sample are alike: we see that the level of rotation is not tied to flattening (we have, e.g., round rotators and flattened non-rotators); we observe kinematic twists in one Virgo and one field object; we discover large-scale kinematically decoupled components in two field galaxies; we see varying gradients in line-strength maps, from nearly flat to strongly peaked in the centre. The great variety of morphological, kinematic and stellar population parameters seen in our data points to a formation scenario in which properties are shaped stochastically. A combined effect of ram-pressure stripping and galaxy harassment is the most probable explanation. We show the need for a comprehensive analysis of kinematic, dynamical and stellar population properties which will enable us to place dwarf ellipticals and processes that govern their evolution in the wider context of galaxy formation.

  14. CLOSE STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN YOUNG, SUBSTRUCTURED, DISSOLVING STAR CLUSTERS: STATISTICS AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-06-01

    Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

  15. Local stellar kinematics from large astrometric surveys: mapping the Galactic phase-space substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepine, Sebastien

    2016-05-01

    The potential of future large astrometric catalogs for mapping the velocity-space distribution of local stars in the Galaxy is illustrated with a kinematic study of K and M dwarfs in the SUPERBLINK catalog of 2.5 million stars with large proper motions (mu>40 mas/yr). Low mass K and M dwarfs, found in abundance thanks to the faint magnitude limit of the catalog (V<20) provide the densest possible sampling of the [(X,Y,Z),(U,V,W)] phase-space, making them well-suited to map out substructure (so-called "streams") in the velocity-space distributions, as well as variations in said distribution over >100 parsec scale distances. The SUPERBLINK proper motion catalog thus provides kinematic data for ~1.5 million M dwarfs from the Galactic disk population, located within 200 parsecs of the Sun, and for ~180,000 K and M (sub)dwarfs from the Galactic halo population, all within 500 parsecs of the Sun. While the disk dwarfs show clear signs of velocity-space substructure, the distribution of halo subdwarf does appear to be relatively smooth ("streamless") in contrast. Evidence for spatial variations at the few hundred parsec scale is also discussed. The current and unfortunately "blurry" view of the local velocity-space distribution promises to be set in much sharper focus with the upcoming availability of data from the GAIA mission.

  16. Major substructure in the M31 outer halo: distances and metallicities along the giant stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, A. R.; McMonigal, B.; Bate, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Irwin, M. J.; Elahi, P. J.; Venn, K. A.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a renewed look at M31's giant stellar stream along with the nearby structures streams C and D, exploiting a new algorithm capable of fitting to the red giant branch (RGB) of a structure in both colour and magnitude space. Using this algorithm, we are able to generate probability distributions in distance, metallicity and RGB width for a series of subfields spanning these structures. Specifically, we confirm a distance gradient of approximately 20 kpc per degree along a 6 deg extension of the giant stellar stream, with the farthest subfields from M31 lying ˜120 kpc more distant than the innermost subfields. Further, we find a metallicity that steadily increases from -0.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} to -0.2^{+0.2}_{-0.1} dex along the inner half of the stream before steadily dropping to a value of -1.0^{+0.2}_{-0.2} dex at the farthest reaches of our coverage. The RGB width is found to increase rapidly from 0.4^{+0.1}_{-0.1} to 1.1^{+0.2}_{-0.1} dex in the inner portion of the stream before plateauing and decreasing marginally in the outer subfields of the stream. In addition, we estimate stream C to lie at a distance between 794 and 862 kpc and stream D between 758 and 868 kpc. We estimate the median metallicity of stream C to lie in the range -0.7 to -1.6 dex and a metallicity of -1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.2} dex for stream D. RGB widths for the two structures are estimated to lie in the range 0.4-1.2 dex and 0.3-0.7 dex, respectively. In total, measurements are obtained for 19 subfields along the giant stellar stream, four along stream C, five along stream D and three general M31 spheroid fields for comparison. We thus provide a higher resolution coverage of the structures in these parameters than has previously been available in the literature.

  17. The Stellar Populations of Nuclei, Globular Clusters, and Stars in dE Galaxies in Virgo and Fornax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield Miller, Bryan; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Kissler-Patig, Markus

    2015-08-01

    We present ages and metallicities for globular clusters, nuclei, and underlying stars in nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE,N) in the Virgo and Fornax Cluster based on Lick/IDS index measurements and SSP models. Gemini/GMOS spectroscopy shows that the globular clusters are mostly old and metal-poor, very similar to the globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. The nuclei and underlying stars tend to be more metal-rich than the globular clusters and have a wide range of ages. The [α/Fe] ratios for both the globular clusters and nuclei range between 0.0 and 0.3. Formation scenarios for globular clusters and nuclei will be discussed.

  18. Stellar kinematics and structural properties of virgo cluster dwarf early-type galaxies from the SMAKCED project. I. Kinematically decoupled cores and implications for infallen groups in clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Den Brok, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Janz, J.; Lisker, T.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Paudel, S.

    2014-03-10

    We present evidence for kinematically decoupled cores (KDCs) in two dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster, VCC 1183 and VCC 1453, studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. These KDCs have radii of 1.''8 (0.14 kpc) and 4.''2 (0.33 kpc), respectively. Each of these KDCs is distinct from the main body of its host galaxy in two ways: (1) inverted sense of rotation and (2) younger (and possibly more metal-rich) stellar population. The observed stellar population differences are probably associated with the KDC, although we cannot rule out the possibility of intrinsic radial gradients in the host galaxy. We describe a statistical analysis method to detect, quantify the significance of, and characterize KDCs in long-slit rotation curve data. We apply this method to the two dE galaxies presented in this paper and to five other dEs for which KDCs have been reported in the literature. Among these seven dEs, there are four significant KDC detections, two marginal KDC detections, and one dE with an unusual central kinematic anomaly that may be an asymmetric KDC. The frequency of occurrence of KDCs and their properties provide important constraints on the formation history of their host galaxies. We discuss different formation scenarios for these KDCs in cluster environments and find that dwarf-dwarf wet mergers or gas accretion can explain the properties of these KDCs. Both of these mechanisms require that the progenitor had a close companion with a low relative velocity. This suggests that KDCs were formed in galaxy pairs residing in a poor group environment or in isolation whose subsequent infall into the cluster quenched star formation.

  19. Stellar Kinematics and Structural Properties of Virgo Cluster Dwarf Early-type Galaxies from the SMAKCED Project. I. Kinematically Decoupled Cores and Implications for Infallen Groups in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; van de Ven, G.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; den Brok, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Lisker, T.; Paudel, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Ryś, A.; Salo, H.

    2014-03-01

    We present evidence for kinematically decoupled cores (KDCs) in two dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster, VCC 1183 and VCC 1453, studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. These KDCs have radii of 1.''8 (0.14 kpc) and 4.''2 (0.33 kpc), respectively. Each of these KDCs is distinct from the main body of its host galaxy in two ways: (1) inverted sense of rotation and (2) younger (and possibly more metal-rich) stellar population. The observed stellar population differences are probably associated with the KDC, although we cannot rule out the possibility of intrinsic radial gradients in the host galaxy. We describe a statistical analysis method to detect, quantify the significance of, and characterize KDCs in long-slit rotation curve data. We apply this method to the two dE galaxies presented in this paper and to five other dEs for which KDCs have been reported in the literature. Among these seven dEs, there are four significant KDC detections, two marginal KDC detections, and one dE with an unusual central kinematic anomaly that may be an asymmetric KDC. The frequency of occurrence of KDCs and their properties provide important constraints on the formation history of their host galaxies. We discuss different formation scenarios for these KDCs in cluster environments and find that dwarf-dwarf wet mergers or gas accretion can explain the properties of these KDCs. Both of these mechanisms require that the progenitor had a close companion with a low relative velocity. This suggests that KDCs were formed in galaxy pairs residing in a poor group environment or in isolation whose subsequent infall into the cluster quenched star formation.

  20. THE DOMINANCE OF METAL-RICH STREAMS IN STELLAR HALOS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN SUBSTRUCTURE IN M31 AND {lambda}CDM MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Font, Andreea S.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Guhathakurta, Puragra E-mail: andreea.font@durham.ac.uk E-mail: raja@ucolick.org

    2009-08-10

    Extensive photometric and spectroscopic surveys of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) have discovered tidal debris features throughout M31's stellar halo. We present stellar kinematics and metallicities in fields with identified substructure from our on-going SPLASH survey of M31 red giant branch stars with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Radial velocity criteria are used to isolate members of the kinematically cold substructures. The substructures are shown to be metal-rich relative to the rest of the dynamically hot stellar population in the fields in which they are found. We calculate the mean metallicity and average surface brightness of the various kinematical components in each field, and show that, on average, higher surface brightness features tend to be more metal-rich than lower surface brightness features. Simulations of stellar halo formation via accretion in a cosmological context are used to illustrate that the observed trend can be explained as a natural consequence of the observed dwarf galaxy mass-metallicity relation. A significant spread in metallicity at a given surface brightness is seen in the data; we show that this is due to time effects, namely, the variation in the time since accretion of the tidal streams' progenitor onto the host halo. We show that in this theoretical framework a relationship between the alpha-enhancement and surface brightness of tidal streams is expected, which arises from the varying times of accretion of the progenitor satellites onto the host halo. Thus, measurements of the alpha-enrichment, metallicity, and surface brightness of tidal debris can be used to reconstruct the luminosity and time of accretion onto the host halo of the progenitors of tidal streams.

  1. Keck spectroscopy and NGVS photometry in the direction of the Virgo cluster: Globular cluster satellites of dwarf ellipticals, Milky Way halo substructure, and large-scale structure in the background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Meredith; Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Yagati, S.; Chen, J.; Cote, P.; Dorman, C.; Ferrarese, L.; Peng, E. W.; Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Virgo cluster, the nearest large galaxy cluster, is a rich repository of dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies. The formation mechanism of dE galaxies remains the subject of much debate. Dwarf galaxies in general are believed to be building blocks in the hierarchical growth of galaxies as per the “cold dark matter” model of structure formation. Globular cluster (GC) satellites serve as important tracers of dark matter in the outer regions of dEs (beyond 1 half-light radius). This project presents new spectroscopic data from Keck's DEIMOS, which specifically targeted low-luminosity (-17 < Mv < -15) dEs and GC satellites, in the Virgo cluster. These data are among the deepest spectroscopic data ever taken in this region. Secondary science targets - Milky Way foreground stars and galaxies in the background - are also discussed. All targets were chosen based on photometric data from the Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS). Further, these two surveys were critical to the tomographic analysis of spectroscopic targets. From this analysis we were able to: identify 117 GCs associated with any one of the 21 dE targets in the Virgo cluster, identify Milky Way foreground stars as part of the Virgo Overdensity or Sagittarius streams, quantify the velocity structure of these ongoing cannibalism events, and identify two new superclusters of galaxies in the background using redshift distribution. This research was carried out under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program. We thank the National Science Foundation for funding support. ET was supported by a Fulbright fellowship.

  2. Intense look at Virgo Southern Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.

    2013-03-01

    We collected data on radial velocities and distances of galaxies to elucidate structure and kinematics of the filament attached to the Virgo cluster from south. In the region RA = [12{. ^{ {h}}}5{-}13{. ^{ {h}}}5], Dec. = [-20°,0°] there are 171 galaxies with radial velocities VLG < 2000 km s-1, and 98 of them have distance estimates. This galaxy cloud, called as `Virgo Southern Extension', is situated just on the edge of the Virgo `zero-velocity surface'. The mean distance to Virgo SEx, 17 ± 2 Mpc, and the average radial velocity, 1172 ± 23 km s-1, are very close to the Virgo cluster ones. In supergalactic coordinates the Virgo SEx dimensions are 15 × 7 × 2 Mpc, where the major axis is directed along the line of sight, the second major axis is directed towards the Virgo core and the minor one is perpendicular to the supergalactic plane. This flattened cloud consists of a dozen virialized groups with the total K-band luminosity of 1.7 × 1012 L⊙ and the total virial mass of 6.3 × 1013 M⊙, having a typical dark matter-to-stellar matter ratio of 37. The Hubble diagram for Virgo SEx galaxies exhibits a tendency of a Z-shaped wave with a velocity amplitude of ˜250 km s-1 that may be caused by a mass overdensity of ˜6 × 1013 M⊙, and in order of magnitude agrees with the sum of virial masses of the groups.

  3. Surviving gas expulsion with substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paweł L.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the reaction of clumpy stellar distributions to gas expulsion. We show that regions containing highly unbound substructures/subclusters after gas expulsion can produce a significant final bound cluster. The key quantity in determining if a region is able to form a bound cluster is the global virial ratio, and so regions must be looked at as a whole rather than by an individual substructure/subclusters, when determining if they might survive as a bound cluster.

  4. Stellar Kinematics and Structural Properties of Virgo Cluster Dwarf Early-type Galaxies from the SMAKCED Project. II. The Survey and a Systematic Analysis of Kinematic Anomalies and Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Peletier, R. F.; Boselli, A.; Lisker, T.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Simon, J. D.; van de Ven, G.; Paudel, S.; Emsellem, E.; Janz, J.; den Brok, M.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Laurikainen, E.; Niemi, S.-M.; Ryś, A.; Salo, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present spatially resolved kinematics and global stellar populations and mass-to-light ratios for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. This sample is representative of the early-type population in the Virgo cluster in the absolute magnitude range -19.0 < Mr < -16.0 and of all morphological subclasses found in this galaxy population. For each dE, we measure the rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile and fit an analytic function to the rotation curve. We study the significance of the departure of the rotation curve from the best-fit analytic function (poorly fit) and of the difference between the approaching and receding sides of the rotation curve (asymmetry). Our sample includes two dEs with kinematically decoupled cores that have been previously reported. We find that 62 ± 8% (23 out of the 39) of the dEs have a significant anomaly in their rotation curve. Analysis of the images reveals photometric anomalies for most galaxies. However, there is no clear correlation between the significance of the photometric and kinematic anomalies. We measure age-sensitive (Hβ and HγA ) and metallicity sensitive (Fe4668 and Mgb) Lick spectral indices in the LIS-5 Å system. This population of galaxies exhibits a wide range of ages and metallicities; we also find that 4 dEs show clear evidence of emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. Finally, we estimate the total masses and dark matter fractions of the dEs and plot them in the mass-size, the mass-velocity dispersion, and the fundamental plane scaling relations. The dEs seem to be the bridge between massive early-type galaxies and dSphs, and have a median total mass within the Re of log Me = 9.1 ± 0.2 and a median dark matter fraction within the Re of f DM = 46 ± 18%. Any formation model for the dE galaxy class must account for this diversity of kinematic and photometric

  5. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. II. THE SURVEY AND A SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS OF KINEMATIC ANOMALIES AND ASYMMETRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Boselli, A.; Lisker, T.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Van de Ven, G.; Paudel, S.; Emsellem, E.; Janz, J.; Den Brok, M.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Niemi, S.-M.

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially resolved kinematics and global stellar populations and mass-to-light ratios for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. This sample is representative of the early-type population in the Virgo cluster in the absolute magnitude range –19.0 < M{sub r} < –16.0 and of all morphological subclasses found in this galaxy population. For each dE, we measure the rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile and fit an analytic function to the rotation curve. We study the significance of the departure of the rotation curve from the best-fit analytic function (poorly fit) and of the difference between the approaching and receding sides of the rotation curve (asymmetry). Our sample includes two dEs with kinematically decoupled cores that have been previously reported. We find that 62 ± 8% (23 out of the 39) of the dEs have a significant anomaly in their rotation curve. Analysis of the images reveals photometric anomalies for most galaxies. However, there is no clear correlation between the significance of the photometric and kinematic anomalies. We measure age-sensitive (H{sub β} and H{sub γA}) and metallicity sensitive (Fe4668 and Mgb) Lick spectral indices in the LIS-5 Å system. This population of galaxies exhibits a wide range of ages and metallicities; we also find that 4 dEs show clear evidence of emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. Finally, we estimate the total masses and dark matter fractions of the dEs and plot them in the mass-size, the mass-velocity dispersion, and the fundamental plane scaling relations. The dEs seem to be the bridge between massive early-type galaxies and dSphs, and have a median total mass within the R{sub e} of log M{sub e} = 9.1 ± 0.2 and a median dark matter fraction within the R{sub e} of f {sub DM} = 46 ± 18%. Any formation model for the dE galaxy class must account for this

  6. Status of VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo Collaboration; Acernese, F.; Amico, P.; Arnaud, N.; Babusci, D.; Ballardin, G.; Barillé, R.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Beauville, F.; Bellachia, F.; Bizouard, M. A.; Boccara, C.; Boget, D.; Bondu, F.; Bourgoin, C.; Bozzi, A.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Brocco, L.; Buskulic, D.; Cachenaut, J.; Calamai, G.; Calloni, E.; Campagna, E.; Casciano, C.; Cattuto, C.; Cavalier, F.; Cavaliere, S.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chollet, F.; Cleva, F.; Cokelaer, T.; Conforto, G.; Cortese, S.; Coulon, J. P.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Y Davíd, P.; Davier, M.; De Rosa, M.; De Rosa, R.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dujardin, B.; Dominici, P.; Eleuteri, A.; Enard, D.; Evangelista, G.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Forest, D.; Fournier, J. D.; Fournier, L.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganau, P.; Gennai, A.; Gennaro, G.; Giacobone, L.; Giazotto, A.; Giordano, G.; Girard, C.; Gougoulat, G.; Guidi, G. M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hermel, R.; Heusse, P.; Holloway, L.; Honglie, F.; Iannarelli, M.; Journet, L.; Krecklbergh, S.; Lagrange, B.; La Penna, P.; Leliboux, M.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Loupias, M.; Mackowski, J. M.; Majorana, E.; Man, C. N.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Martelli, F.; Masserot, A.; Massonnet, L.; Mataguez, S.; Menzinger, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Montorio, J. L.; Moreau, F.; Moreau, J.; Morgado, N.; Mornet, F.; Mours, B.; Mugnier, P.; Nenci, F.; Pacheco, J.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Paoli, L.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Perciballi, M.; Peruzzi, S.; Perniola, B.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E.; Puccinelli, S.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qipiani, K.; Ramonet, J.; Rapagnani, P.; Reita, V.; Remillieux, A.; Ricci, F.; Richard, F.; Roger, J. P.; Ruggi, P.; Russo, G.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Taddei, R.; Teuler, J. M.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Trinquet, H.; Turri, E.; Varvella, M.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Veziant, O.; Viceré, A.; Vilalte, S.; Y Vinet, J.; Vocca, H.; Yvert, M.; Zhang, Z.

    2003-09-01

    We report on the status of the VIRGO detector as of the beginning of 2003. In particular, we summarize the results obtained during the commissioning of the central portion of the detector, consisting of a power-recycled Michelson interferometer, and we outline the steps which will lead during 2003 and 2004 to the commissioning and operation of the full scale, 3 km long VIRGO detector.

  7. Advanced Virgo: AN Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafone, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Several km-scale interferometers have already operated at interesting sensitivity levels. In particular, the interferometric detector for gravitational waves Virgo completed its fourth science run in August 2011, when the upgrade toward the second-generation detector Advanced Virgo started. This major upgrade is planned to be completed by 2015. The expected final sensitivity of Advanced Virgo is about ten times better than the sensitivity reached by its predecessor. Many of the components of the detector will be changed to meet this goal, including new core optics, a more powerful laser, an improved vacuum system, the implementation of the signal-recycling technique. In this paper the description of the project and the expected schedule are presented.

  8. THE ONGOING ASSEMBLY OF A CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXY: PHASE-SPACE SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE HALO OF M87

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Strader, Jay; Mihos, J. Christopher; Spitler, Lee R.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Foster, Caroline

    2012-03-20

    The halos of galaxies preserve unique records of their formation histories. We carry out the first combined observational and theoretical study of phase-space halo substructure in an early-type galaxy: M87, the central galaxy in the Virgo cluster. We analyze an unprecedented wide-field, high-precision photometric and spectroscopic data set for 488 globular clusters (GCs), which includes new, large-radius Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS observations. We find signatures of two substructures in position-velocity phase space. One is a small, cold stream associated with a known stellar filament in the outer halo; the other is a large shell-like pattern in the inner halo that implies a massive, hitherto unrecognized accretion event. We perform extensive statistical tests and independent metallicity analyses to verify the presence and characterize the properties of these features, and to provide more general methodologies for future extragalactic studies of phase-space substructure. The cold outer stream is consistent with a dwarf galaxy accretion event, while for the inner shell there is tension between a low progenitor mass implied by the cold velocity dispersion, and a high mass from the large number of GCs, which might be resolved by a {approx}0.5 L* E/S0 progenitor. We also carry out proof-of-principle numerical simulations of the accretion of smaller galaxies in an M87-like gravitational potential. These produce analogous features to the observed substructures, which should have observable lifetimes of {approx}1 Gyr. The shell and stream GCs together support a scenario where the extended stellar envelope of M87 has been built up by a steady rain of material that continues until the present day. This phase-space method demonstrates unique potential for detailed tests of galaxy formation beyond the Local Group.

  9. Stellar Over-Densities in the Outer Halo of the MilkyWay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Stefan C.

    2010-03-01

    This study presents a tomographic survey of a subset of the outer halo (10-40 kpc) drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. Halo substructure on spatial scales of >3 degrees is revealed as an excess in the local density of sub-giant stars. With an appropriate assumption of a model stellar isochrone it is possible for us to then derive distances to the sub-giant population. We describe three new candidate halo substructures; the 160- and 180-degree over-densities (at distances of 17 and 19 kpc respectively and radii of 1.3 and 1.5 kpc respectively) and an extended feature at 28 kpc that covers at least 162 deg2, the Virgo Equatorial Stream. In addition, we recover the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr) leading-arm material and the Virgo Over-Density. The derived distances, together with the number of sub-giant stars associated with each substructure, enables us to derive the integrated luminosity for the features. The tenuous, low surface brightness of the features strongly suggests an origin from the tidal disruption of an accreted galaxy or galaxies. Given the dominance of the tidal debris of Sgr in this region of the sky we investigate if our observations can be accommodated by tidal disruption models for Sgr. The clear discordance between observations and model predictions for known Sgr features means it is difficult to tell unambiguously if the new substructures are related to Sgr or not. Radial velocities in the stellar over-densities will be critical in establishing their origins.

  10. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. NGC 4216: A BOMBARDED SPIRAL IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferriere, Etienne; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Mihos, J. Christopher; Vollmer, Bernd; Balogh, Michael L.; Carlberg, Ray G.; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R.; Emsellem, Eric; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Mei, Simona; Van Driel, Wim

    2013-04-20

    The final stages of mass assembly of present-day massive galaxies are expected to occur through the accretion of multiple satellites. Cosmological simulations thus predict a high frequency of stellar streams resulting from this mass accretion around the massive galaxies in the Local Volume. Such tidal streams are difficult to observe, especially in dense cluster environments, where they are readily destroyed. We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution, and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already cataloged Virgo Cluster Catalog dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g - i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf galaxies being born inside the filament from the debris of an original dwarf. The observed complex structures, including in particular a stream apparently emanating from a satellite of a satellite, point to a high rate of ongoing dwarf destruction/accretion in the region of the Virgo Cluster where NGC 4216 is located. We discuss the age of the interactions and whether they occurred in a group that is just falling into the cluster and shows signs of the so-called pre-processing before it gets affected by the cluster environment, or in a

  11. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  12. Stellar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation.' As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules.' The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly-ionized oxygen atoms.

  13. A 10 kpc stellar substructure at the edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud: perturbed outer disc or evidence for tidal stripping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, A. D.; Koposov, S. E.; Erkal, D.; Belokurov, V.; Da Costa, G. S.; Gómez, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report the discovery of a substantial stellar overdensity in the periphery of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), found using public imaging from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey. The structure appears to emanate from the edge of the outer LMC disc at a radius ≈13.5° due north of its centre, and stretches more than 10 kpc towards the east. It is roughly 1.5 kpc wide and has an integrated V-band luminosity of at least MV = -7.4. The stellar populations in the feature are indistinguishable from those in the outer LMC disc. We attempt to quantify the geometry of the outer disc using simple planar models, and find that only a disc with mild intrinsic ellipticity can simultaneously explain the observed stellar density on the sky and the azimuthal line-of-sight distance profile. We also see possible non-planar behaviour in the outer disc that may reflect a warp and/or flare, as well as deviations that resemble a ring-like structure between {˜ }9° and 12° from the LMC centre. Based on all these observations, we conclude that our remote, stream-like feature is likely comprised of material that has been stripped from the outskirts of the LMC disc, although we cannot rule out that it represents a transient overdensity in the disc itself. We conduct a simple N-body simulation to show that either type of structure could plausibly arise due to the tidal force of the Milky Way; however, we also recognize that a recent close interaction between the LMC and the Small Magellanic Cloud may be the source of the stripping or perturbation. Finally, we observe evidence for extremely diffuse LMC populations extending to radii of ˜18.5 kpc in the disc plane ({≈ } 20° on the sky), corroborating previous spectroscopic detections at comparable distances.

  14. Detection of a large-scale structure of intracluster globular clusters in the Virgo cluster.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Hong Soo; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2010-04-16

    Globular clusters are usually found in galaxies, and they are excellent tracers of dark matter. Long ago it was suggested that intracluster globular clusters (IGCs) may exist that are bound to a galaxy cluster rather than to any single galaxy. Here we present a map showing the large-scale distribution of globular clusters over the entire Virgo cluster. It shows that IGCs are found out to 5 million light years from the Virgo center and that they are concentrated in several substructures that are much larger than galaxies. These objects might have been mostly stripped off from low-mass dwarf galaxies. PMID:20223950

  15. Mapping the Galactic Halo. VIII. Quantifying Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; van Woerden, Hugo; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Frey, Lucy; Oravetz, Dan

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the amount of kinematic substructure in the Galactic halo using the final data set from the Spaghetti project, a pencil-beam high-latitude sky survey. Our sample contains 101 photometrically selected and spectroscopically confirmed giants with accurate distance, radial velocity, and metallicity information. We have developed a new clustering estimator: the "4distance" measure, which when applied to our data set leads to the identification of one group and seven pairs of clumped stars. The group, with six members, can confidently be matched to tidal debris of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. Two pairs match the properties of known Virgo structures. Using models of the disruption of Sagittarius in Galactic potentials with different degrees of dark halo flattening, we show that this favors a spherical or prolate halo shape, as demonstrated by Newberg et al. using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. One additional pair can be linked to older Sagittarius debris. We find that 20% of the stars in the Spaghetti data set are in substructures. From comparison with random data sets, we derive a very conservative lower limit of 10% to the amount of substructure in the halo. However, comparison to numerical simulations shows that our results are also consistent with a halo entirely built up from disrupted satellites, provided that the dominating features are relatively broad due to early merging or relatively heavy progenitor satellites.

  16. The Purple Rose of Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    Until now NGC 5584 was just one galaxy among many others, located to the West of the Virgo Cluster. Known only as a number in galaxy surveys, its sheer beauty is now revealed in all its glory in a new VLT image. Since 1 March, this purple cosmic rose also holds the brightest stellar explosion of the year, known as SN 2007af. Located about 75 million light years away towards the constellation Virgo ('the Virgin'), NGC 5584 is a galaxy slightly smaller than the Milky Way. It belongs, however, to the same category: both are barred spirals. ESO PR Photo 16/07 ESO PR Photo 16/07 The Purple Rose of Virgo Spiral galaxies are composed of a 'bulge' and a flat disc. The bulge hosts old stars and usually a central supermassive black hole. Younger stars reside in the disc, forming the characteristic spiral structures from which the galaxies get their name. Barred spirals are crossed by a bright band of stars. In 2000, using ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers discovered the smallest, faintest, and most massive spirals (see ESO PR 12/00 and 25/00). In this amazing new image of NGC 5584 two dominant spiral arms are clearly visible, while the others are deformed, probably due to interactions with other galaxies. Luminous patches are spread all over the disc, indicating that stars are being formed in this gigantic rose at a frantic pace. Something even brighter, however, catches the eye in this picture. Any image taken before the end of February would not have shown the luminous spot located at the lower right of the galaxy's centre. As can be seen, the newly found object is much brighter than the centre of the galaxy itself. Its name? SN 2007af, the 32nd supernova discovered this year. Its presence signals the dramatic death of a star with a mass comparable to that of the Sun. SN 2007af, the brightest supernova of the year (so far), was discovered on 1 March by the Japanese supernova hunter Koichi Itagaki. He pointed his 60-centimetre telescope towards the Virgo constellation

  17. Substructural controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A decentralized design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized controller design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the control design of flexible structures. The structure to be controlled is decomposed into several substructures, which are modeled by component mode synthesis methods. For each substructure, a subcontroller is designed by using the linear quadratic optimal control theory. Then, a controller synthesis scheme called Substructural Controller Synthesis (SCS) is used to assemble the subcontrollers into a system controller, which is to be used to control the whole structure.

  18. Predicting binary merger event rates for advanced LIGO/Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Daniel; Belczynski, Chris; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomek; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We discuss estimates of the rates of mergers of binary systems composed of neutron stars and/or stellar mass black holes. We use the StarTrack population synthesis code, and make predictions for the detection rate of compact binary coalescences with the advanced LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. Because these instruments are sensitive to massive (M > 20M⊙) stellar-mass binary black holes mergers out to high redshift (z > 1), we discuss the cosmological effects which must be taken into account when calculating LIGO detection rates, including a generalization of the calculation of the ``peanut factor'' and the sensitive time-volume.

  19. Defining Spatial Extent of Sagittarius Dwarf Tidal Stream and the Virgo Overdensity with MilkyWay@home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jake; Newby, Matthew; Arsenault, Matthew; Bechtel, Torrin; Desell, Travis; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Thompson, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    We refine and present tests of the statistical photometric parallax methods used to measure substructure of the halo stars with MilkyWay@home. This newer algorithm is showing promise for separating three substructure components, including the two parts of the bifurcated Sagittarius tidal stream and the Virgo Overdensity, while also fitting a smooth background component simultaneously. We show that the Sagittarius tidal streams and the Virgo Overdensity are much wider than previously imagined. We present the new results in the context of previous measurements of the properties of these halo substructures. This research was funded by NSF grant AST 10-09670, the Rensselaer Center for Open Source Software (RCOS), and crowd funding from the MilkyWay@home volunteers.

  20. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D˜ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ˜150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ˜1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0˜ 32 mag arcsec‑2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to ‑13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec‑2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D∼ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ∼150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ∼1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0∼ 32 mag arcsec‑2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to ‑13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec‑2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  2. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. IV. NGC 4216: A Bombarded Spiral in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Ferrarese, Laura; Ferriere, Etienne; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Vollmer, Bernd; Balogh, Michael L.; Carlberg, Ray G.; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R.; Emsellem, Eric; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Mei, Simona; Michel-Dansac, Leo; van Driel, Wim

    2013-04-01

    The final stages of mass assembly of present-day massive galaxies are expected to occur through the accretion of multiple satellites. Cosmological simulations thus predict a high frequency of stellar streams resulting from this mass accretion around the massive galaxies in the Local Volume. Such tidal streams are difficult to observe, especially in dense cluster environments, where they are readily destroyed. We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution, and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already cataloged Virgo Cluster Catalog dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g - i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf galaxies being born inside the filament from the debris of an original dwarf. The observed complex structures, including in particular a stream apparently emanating from a satellite of a satellite, point to a high rate of ongoing dwarf destruction/accretion in the region of the Virgo Cluster where NGC 4216 is located. We discuss the age of the interactions and whether they occurred in a group that is just falling into the cluster and shows signs of the so-called pre-processing before it gets affected by the cluster environment, or in a

  3. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong

    2014-12-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  4. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-08-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  5. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  6. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  7. WARM GAS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER. I. DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Joo Heon; Putman, Mary E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Thom, Christopher; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2012-08-01

    The first systematic study of the warm gas (T = 10{sup 4-5} K) distribution across a galaxy cluster is presented using multiple background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster. We detect 25 Ly{alpha} absorbers (N{sub HI} = 10{sup 13.1-15.4} cm{sup -2}) in the Virgo velocity range toward 9 of 12 QSO sightlines observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph, with a cluster impact parameter range of 0.36-1.65 Mpc (0.23-1.05 R{sub vir}). Including 18 Ly{alpha} absorbers previously detected by STIS or GHRS toward 7 of 11 background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster, we establish a sample of 43 absorbers toward a total of 23 background probes for studying the incidence of Ly{alpha} absorbers in and around the Virgo Cluster. With these absorbers, we find (1) warm gas is predominantly in the outskirts of the cluster and avoids the X-ray-detected hot intracluster medium (ICM). Also, Ly{alpha} absorption strength increases with cluster impact parameter. (2) Ly{alpha}-absorbing warm gas traces cold H I-emitting gas in the substructures of the Virgo Cluster. (3) Including the absorbers associated with the surrounding substructures, the warm gas covering fraction (100% for N{sub HI} > 10{sup 13.1} cm{sup -2}) is in agreement with cosmological simulations. We speculate that the observed warm gas is part of large-scale gas flows feeding the cluster both in the ICM and galaxies.

  8. Substructure system identification and synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the possibility of performing system identification at the substructure level and then synthesizing the results to obtain a mathematical model for the assembled structure. The study here shows that in order to enforce interface compatibility and equilibrium conditions to the substructure test data, it is necessary to place collocated actuator/sensor pair at every interface degree-of-freedom. Procedures for assembling substructure transfer function data, substructure state-space models, and substructure Markov parameters are presented. Testing difficulties and possible solutions are also discussed. A numerical simulation example is included to illustrate the proposed substructure synthesis methods.

  9. Distant Galactic Halo Substructures Observed by the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesar, Branimir

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of Galactic halo substructures is important as their kinematic and chemical properties help constrain the properties of the Galactic dark matter halo, the formation history of the Milky Way, and the galaxy formation process in general. The best practical choice for finding distant halo substructures are pulsating RR Lyrae stars, due to their intrinsic brightness (M_V = 0.6 mag) and distinct light curves. I will present kinematic and chemical properties of two distant halo substructures that were traced using RR Lyrae stars observed by the Palomar Transient Factory. One of these substructures, located at 90 kpc from the Sun in the Cancer constellation, consists of two groups of RR Lyrae stars moving away from the Galaxy at ~80 and ~20 km/s, respectively. The second substructure is located at ~65 kpc from the Sun in the Hercules constellation. The kinematics of RR Lyrae stars tracing this substructure suggest a presence of 2 or 3 stellar streams extending in the similar direction on the sky. Due to their spatial extent, both of these substructures are clearly disrupted and would be very difficult to detect using tradiitonal techniques such as the color-magnitude diagram filtering.

  10. The SEGUE K Giant Survey. III. Quantifying Galactic Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Rockosi, Constance; Starkenburg, Else; Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (˜33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.

  11. Galaxies at the Extremes: Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Durrell, Patrick R.; Ferrarese, Laura; Feldmeier, John J.; Côté, Patrick; Peng, Eric W.; Harding, Paul; Liu, Chengze; Gwyn, Stephen; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of three large ({R}29 ≳ 1‧) extremely low surface brightness (LSB; {μ }V,0≈ 27.0) galaxies identified using our deep, wide-field imaging of the Virgo Cluster from the Burrell Schmidt telescope. Complementary data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey do not resolve red giant branch stars in these objects down to i = 24, yielding a lower distance limit of 2.5 Mpc. At the Virgo distance, these objects have half-light radii 3-10 kpc and luminosities {L}{{V}} = 2-9 × 107 {L}⊙ . These galaxies are comparable in size but lower in surface brightness than the large ultradiffuse LSB galaxies recently identified in the Coma cluster, and are located well within Virgo’s virial radius; two are projected directly on the cluster core. One object appears to be a nucleated LSB in the process of being tidally stripped to form a new Virgo ultracompact dwarf galaxy. The others show no sign of tidal disruption, despite the fact that such objects should be most vulnerable to tidal destruction in the cluster environment. The relative proximity of Virgo makes these objects amenable to detailed studies of their structural properties and resolved stellar populations. They thus provide an important new window onto the connection between cluster environment and galaxy evolution at the extremes.

  12. Rigid substructure search

    PubMed Central

    Shirvanyants, David; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the location of binding sites on proteins is of fundamental importance for a wide range of applications, including molecular docking, de novo drug design, structure identification and comparison of functional sites. Here we present Erebus, a web server that searches the entire Protein Data Bank for a given substructure defined by a set of atoms of interest, such as the binding scaffolds for small molecules. The identified substructure contains atoms having the same names, belonging to same amino acids and separated by the same distances (within a given tolerance) as the atoms of the query structure. The accuracy of a match is measured by the root-mean-square deviation or by the normal weight with a given variance. Tests show that our approach can reliably locate rigid binding scaffolds of drugs and metal ions. Availability and Implementation: We provide this service through a web server at http://erebus.dokhlab.org. Contact: dokh@unc.edu PMID:21460026

  13. How did the Virgo cluster form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hoffman, Yehuda; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    While the Virgo cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster and therefore the best observed one, little is known about its formation history. In this paper, a set of cosmological simulations that resemble the Local Universe is used to shed the first light on this mystery. The initial conditions for these simulations are constrained with galaxy peculiar velocities of the second catalogue of the Cosmicflows project using algorithms developed within the Constrained Local UniversE Simulation project. Boxes of 500 h-1 Mpc on a side are set to run a series of dark matter only constrained simulations. In each simulation, a unique dark matter halo can be reliably identified as Virgo's counterpart. The properties of these Virgo haloes are in agreement at a 10-20 per cent level with the global properties of the observed Virgo cluster. Their zero-velocity masses agree at 1σ with the observational mass estimate. In all the simulations, the matter falls on to the Virgo objects along a preferential direction that corresponds to the observational filament and the slowest direction of collapse. A study of the mass accretion history of the Virgo candidates reveals the most likely formation history of the Virgo cluster, namely a quiet accretion over the last 7 Gyr.

  14. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. II. HALO STRUCTURE AND SUBSTRUCTURE TRACED BY RR LYRAE STARS TO 30 kpc

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan M.; Becker, Andrew C.; Stuart, J. Scott; Sharma, Sanjib; Palaversa, Lovro; Juric, Mario; Wozniak, Przemyslaw; Oluseyi, Hakeem

    2013-08-01

    We present a sample of {approx}5000 RR Lyrae stars selected from the recalibrated LINEAR data set and detected at heliocentric distances between 5 kpc and 30 kpc over {approx}8000 deg{sup 2} of sky. The coordinates and light curve properties, such as period and Oosterhoff type, are made publicly available. We analyze in detail the light curve properties and Galactic distribution of the subset of {approx}4000 type ab RR Lyrae (RRab) stars, including a search for new halo substructures and the number density distribution as a function of Oosterhoff type. We find evidence for the Oosterhoff dichotomy among field RR Lyrae stars, with the ratio of the type II and I subsamples of about 1:4, but with a weaker separation than for globular cluster stars. The wide sky coverage and depth of this sample allow unique constraints for the number density distribution of halo RRab stars as a function of galactocentric distance: it can be described as an oblate ellipsoid with an axis ratio q = 0.63 and with either a single or a double power law with a power-law index in the range -2 to -3. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the Oosterhoff type II subsample has a steeper number density profile than the Oosterhoff type I subsample. Using the group-finding algorithm EnLink, we detected seven candidate halo groups, only one of which is statistically spurious. Three of these groups are near globular clusters (M53/NGC 5053, M3, M13), and one is near a known halo substructure (Virgo Stellar Stream); the remaining three groups do not seem to be near any known halo substructures or globular clusters and seem to have a higher ratio of Oosterhoff type II to Oosterhoff type I RRab stars than what is found in the halo. The extended morphology and the position (outside the tidal radius) of some of the groups near globular clusters are suggestive of tidal streams possibly originating from globular clusters. Spectroscopic follow-up of detected halo groups is encouraged.

  15. Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Virgin; abbrev. Vir, gen. Virginis; area 1294 sq. deg.) an equatorial zodiacal constellation which lies between Leo and Libra, and culminates at midnight in mid-April. Its origin dates back to Babylonian times and it has been associated with numerous female deities, including Ishtar (Babylonia), Isis (ancient Egypt), Demeter (ancient Greece) and Astraea (ancient Rome). Its brightest st...

  16. Transients by substructuring with DMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Automated substructuring in level 16 of NASTRAN was employed as a preface to the solution of a direct transient analysis. The DMAP ALTER statements written to adapt the substructuring for transient purposes are explained. Data recovery was accomplished with transfer functions. Proof of the success of the method is presented with an application to a missile structure.

  17. Proposed definition of crystal substructure and substructural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lusann; Dacek, Stephen; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2014-08-01

    There is a clear need for a practical and mathematically rigorous description of local structure in inorganic compounds so that structures and chemistries can be easily compared across large data sets. Here a method for decomposing crystal structures into substructures is given, and a similarity function between those substructures is defined. The similarity function is based on both geometric and chemical similarity. This construction allows for large-scale data mining of substructural properties, and the analysis of substructures and void spaces within crystal structures. The method is validated via the prediction of Li-ion intercalation sites for the oxides. Tested on databases of known Li-ion-containing oxides, the method reproduces all Li-ion sites in an oxide with a maximum of 4 incorrect guesses 80% of the time.

  18. SED Fitting of Virgo Cluster Galaxies and Evidence for Enhanced Star Formation due to Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulmer, Leah; Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Edwards, Louise O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using UV through FIR data in matched apertures, we modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) of 49 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies with the modeling program Magphys (daCunha+ 2008). We used the results from these models to explore the relationships between the stellar masses (M*), specific star formation rates (sSFR), and HI properties in our sample. The poster highlights one initial result from these comparisons: supportive evidence for gas accretion in the outskirts of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies with the highest sSFRs in the mass range 10^9-10^10 M_sun are all HI-rich, have extended irregular HI envelopes, and lie in the outskirts of the cluster. We propose that these galaxies are accreting gas onto their disks, a process which enhances their SFRs.

  19. The Quest for the astrophysical background with Advanced LIGO/Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regimbau, Tania; LIGO Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the cosmological background, an astrophysical background may have resulted from the superposition of a large number of unresolved sources since the beginning of stellar activity. This astrophysical contribution could be a foreground masking the cosmological background but it can also provide very interesting informations, not only about the physical properties of the respective astrophysical populations, complementing individual GW detections, but also about the evolution of these objects with redshift, the star formation history or the metallicity. In this talk, predictions of the gravitational wave background formed by all the compact binary coalescences at cosmological distances will be given, as well as a discussion of their accessibility with the network of Advanced LIGO/Virgo detectors. Finally, the expected astrophysical and cosmological constraints to be made by Advanced LIGO/Virgo will be presented.

  20. The Effect of the Transformation of Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster on Broadband Color Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl, Hugh H.; Chung, A.; Blanton, M. R.; Kenney, J. D. P.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, D.

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy evolution and the effect of environment on that evolution is one of the central questions of modern extragalactic astronomy. The nearby Virgo Cluster provides us with an ideal laboratory to study galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-cluster interactions at a level of detail impossible at higher redshift. In detailed, pan-chromatic surveys of Virgo, we have seen galaxies transformed by their interaction with the intra-cluster medium, with star-forming gas stripped from spiral galaxies. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we present the results of a study of the global broadband optical properties of 44 Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies from the VIVA galaxy survey. These results show that spiral galaxies actively being stripped maintain blue colors while stripping is ongoing. However, a comparison between the colors of stripped spirals and their HI content suggests that more completely stripped galaxies are, indeed, redder than those that are only modestly HI deficient. This suggests that, as galaxies become more completely stripped, their global colors become redder and that in a cluster more massive than Virgo, such stripping could effectively transform galaxies from blue to red. By comparing broadband colors to the stripping timescales derived from optical spectroscopy and stellar population synthesis, we determine that the broadband color evolution is complex, with dust and the age of the stellar population both playing a role. By comparing detailed studies of a nearby cluster with statistical results from the much larger SDSS sample, we are able to gain insights into the details of how environmentally-driven galaxy evolution affects global broadband colors.

  1. Mass and Substructure in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.

    2006-12-01

    I present results from a large spectroscopic survey of individual stars in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, conducted using the Michigan/MIKE Fiber System (MMFS) at the Magellan Telescopes. dSph galaxies have come under intense scrutiny because they represent the lower extreme of the galaxy mass function, and thereby provide important constraints on models of structure formation. The proximity of the Milky Way's (MW's) dSph satellites allows us to study the resolved stellar populations of these systems in detail. Toward this end I have acquired MMFS spectra (5140-5180 Angstroms at resolution 20000) for more than 5000 stars in the MW dSphs Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans. The spectra yield measurements of both radial velocity (median precision ± 1.8 km/s) and [Fe/H] metallicity (± 0.2 dex). I present radial velocity dispersion profiles for each dSph, as well as halo mass profiles derived using a variety of models and nonparametric estimation techniques. In some cases, the bulk stellar component is separable into populations following distinct distributions in position, kinematics, and chemistry, indicating a surprising level of complexity in these diminutive galaxies. Taking advantage of the fine spatial sampling of the MMFS data, I identify regions showing tentative evidence of localized chemo-dynamical substructure. This work is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the University of Michigan.

  2. Fatigue of fiberglass beam substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Combs, D.W.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Composite material beams representative of wind turbine blade substructure have been designed, fabricated, and tested under constant amplitude flexural fatigue loading. Beam stiffness, strength, and fatigue life are predicted based on detailed finite element analysis and the materials fatigue database developed using standard test coupons and special high frequency minicoupons.Beam results are in good agreement with predictions when premature adhesive and delamination failures are avoided in the load transfer areas. The results show that fiberglass substructures can be designed and fabricated to withstand maximum strain levels on the order of 8,000 microstrain for about 10{sup 6} cycles with proper structural detail design and the use of fatigue resistant laminate constructions. The study also demonstrates that the materials fatigue database and accurate analysis can be used to predict the fatigue life of composite substructures typical of blades.

  3. Exploring Milky Way Halo Substructures with Large-Area Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, large-area photometric surveys have provided deep photometric catalogs of stars in the Milky Way. As a result, our understanding of the formation of the Galactic halo has evolved from a simple monolitic collapse model to a much more complex and dynamic structure. The stellar halo is now known to be inhabited by a variety of spatial and kinematic stellar substructures, ranging from stellar clouds and streams to dwarf galaxies, predicted by hierarchical Lambda-CDM models of galaxy formation. In my talk, I will present the latest discoveries of the halo substructures found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). I will also discuss the spectroscopic follow-up observations of the stellar cloud candidates found in the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the dwarf galaxy candidates found in DES. These newly discovered features can provide a more complete census of our Galaxy's formation history.

  4. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XIII. The Luminosity and Mass Function of Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster and the Contribution from Disrupted Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben; Roediger, Joel; McConnachie, Alan W.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Boissier, S.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Emsellem, Eric; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Mihos, J. Christopher; Navarro, Julio F.; Peng, Eric W.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Taylor, James E.; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg2 (0.3 Mpc2) area in the core of the Virgo Cluster, based on {u}\\ast griz data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample—which consists of 352 objects brighter than M g = ‑9.13 mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey—reaches 2.2 mag deeper than the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog and at least 1.2 mag deeper than any sample previously used to measure the luminosity function in Virgo. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint-end slope of α = ‑1.33 ± 0.02 for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function and the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs)—previously compiled by the NGVS in this region—to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, M g = ‑9.6 mag) increases dramatically, up to α = ‑1.60 ± 0.06 when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo owing to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ˜150 objects with M g ≲ ‑9.6 mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the Virgo core might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ˜40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group

  5. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XIII. The Luminosity and Mass Function of Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster and the Contribution from Disrupted Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben; Roediger, Joel; McConnachie, Alan W.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Boissier, S.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Emsellem, Eric; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Mihos, J. Christopher; Navarro, Julio F.; Peng, Eric W.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Taylor, James E.; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg2 (0.3 Mpc2) area in the core of the Virgo Cluster, based on {u}\\ast griz data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample—which consists of 352 objects brighter than M g = ‑9.13 mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey—reaches 2.2 mag deeper than the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog and at least 1.2 mag deeper than any sample previously used to measure the luminosity function in Virgo. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint-end slope of α = ‑1.33 ± 0.02 for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function and the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs)—previously compiled by the NGVS in this region—to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, M g = ‑9.6 mag) increases dramatically, up to α = ‑1.60 ± 0.06 when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo owing to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ∼150 objects with M g ≲ ‑9.6 mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the Virgo core might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ∼40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group

  6. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  7. Substructure Search by Set Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueras, John

    1972-01-01

    The set reduction algorithm is based on set theory and Boolean algebra rather than the graph-theoretic approach. Time trials with a small file of organic chemical structures indicate that the algorithm can be economically used for substructure (or complete structure) sequential searches on a file containing 30,000-50,000 computer-coded structures.…

  8. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S. C.; Hughes, T. M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of a total 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than mB = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by β = 1.5, with a median dust temperature Td = 22.4 K. Assuming β = 1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 μm in excess of the modified black-body model. The fraction of galaxies with a submillimetre excess decreases for lower values of β, while a similarly high fraction (54%) is found if a β-free SED modelling is applied. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample that come from environmental effects, we compare the Virgo dwarfs to other Herschel surveys,such as the Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and Hi fraction, specific star formation rate, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses (from 107 to 1011 M⊙) for both dwarfs and spirals. Highly Hi-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, to explain the

  9. Compact Binary Merger Rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo Upper Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-01

    We compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH-BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ˜2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH-BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z ≃ 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (\\lt 150 {M}⊙ ) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to {M}{{tot,z}}≃ 400 {M}⊙ . (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH-BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS-NS, BH-NS, BH-BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH-BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.

  10. Compact binary merger rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo upper limits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaugnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-03

    Here, we compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH–BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ~2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH–BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z sime 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (more » $$\\lt 150\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to $${M}_{{\\rm{tot,z}}}\\simeq 400\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$. (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH–BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS–NS, BH–NS, BH–BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH–BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.« less

  11. Spitzer IR Colors and ISM Distributions of Virgo Cluster Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Wong, I.; Kenney, Z.; Murphy, E.; Helou, G.; Howell, J.

    2012-01-01

    IRAC infrared images of 44 spiral and peculiar galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of the Virgo Cluster help reveal the interactions which transform galaxies in clusters. We explore how the location of galaxies in the IR 3.6-8μm color-magnitude diagram is related to the spatial distributions of ISM/star formation, as traced by PAH emission in the 8μm band. Based on their 8μm/PAH radial distributions, we divide the galaxies into 4 groups: normal, truncated, truncated/compact, and anemic. Normal galaxies have relatively normal PAH distributions. They are the "bluest" galaxies, with the largest 8/3.6μm ratios. They are relatively unaffected by the cluster environment, and have probably never passed through the cluster core. Truncated galaxies have a relatively normal 8μm/PAH surface brightness in the inner disk, but are abruptly truncated with little or no emission in the outer disk. They have intermediate ("green") colors, while those which are more severely truncated are "redder". Most truncated galaxies have undisturbed stellar disks and many show direct evidence of active ram pressure stripping. Truncated/compact galaxies have high 8μm/PAH surface brightness in the very inner disk (central 1 kpc) but are abruptly truncated close to center with little or no emission in the outer disk. They have intermediate global colors, similar to the other truncated galaxies. While they have the most extreme ISM truncation, they have vigorous circumnuclear star formation. Most of these have disturbed stellar disks, and they are probably produced by a combination of gravitational interaction plus ram pressure stripping. Anemic galaxies have a low 8μm/PAH surface brightness even in the inner disk. These are the "reddest" galaxies, with the smallest 8/3.6μm ratios. The origin of the anemics seems to a combination of starvation, gravitational interactions, and long-ago ram pressure stripping.

  12. The environmental impact of the Virgo Cluster on the evolution of dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Henry

    Dwarf galaxies are the greatest contributor to the total number of galaxies and most are believed to be systems consisting of matter in a near-primordial state. Containing H I gas and H II regions, dwarf irregular galaxies (dIs) can be used as test bodies to evaluate the impact of the environment on their evolution. Oxygen abundances relative to hydrogen within H II regions are a measure of how far the conversion of gas in the interstellar medium into stars has proceeded as a whole, as abundances do not vary significantly with galactocentric radius in dIs. Measurements of the [O III]λ4363 emission line from H II region spectroscopy provide accurate probes of the electron temperature from which oxygen abundances are directly computed. The impact of the Virgo Cluster environment is investigated by comparing the properties of a set of Virgo dIs with those of a set of dIs in the field. To ensure accurate measures of luminosity and abundance, dIs in the field are chosen to have distance determinations from well-calibrated techniques and oxygen abundances derived from [O III]λ4363 measurements. Spectroscopic data are obtained for H II regions in 11 dIs distributed in the central and outer regions of the Virgo Cluster. There is no systematic difference in oxygen abundance between field dIs and Virgo dIs at a given luminosity, showing that there is no detectable difference in their stellar populations. Oxygen abundances for field dIs are well correlated with the gas fraction in a way which shows definitively that evolution has been isolated, i.e., consistent with the “closed-box” model of chemical evolution. For the gas-poor dI UGC 7636 (VCC 1249), the oxygen abundance of a newly discovered intergalactic H II region is combined with the optical luminosity of the dI and the gas mass of the adjacent H I cloud (STET) to show that STET must have once been the interstellar medium of the dI. Tidal interactions of the dI with the elliptical NGC 4472 combined with ram

  13. The edge of the M 87 halo and the kinematics of the diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, M.; Arnaboldi, M.; Das, P.; Gerhard, O.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Ciardullo, R.; Feldmeier, J. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Jacoby, G. H.; Murante, G.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: We study the kinematics and dynamics of the extreme outer halo of M 87, the central galaxy in the Virgo cluster, and its transition to the intracluster light (ICL). Methods: We present high resolution FLAMES/VLT spectroscopy of intracluster planetary nebula (PN) candidates, targeting three new fields in the Virgo cluster core with surface brightness down to μB = 28.5. Based on the projected phase space information (sky positions and line-of-sight velocities) we separate galaxy and cluster components in the confirmed PN sample. We then use the spherical Jeans equation and the total gravitational potential as traced by the X-ray emission to derive the orbital distribution in the outer stellar halo of M 87. We determine the luminosity-specific PN number for the M 87 halo and the ICL from the photometric PN catalogs and sampled luminosities, and discuss the origin of the ICL in Virgo based on its measured PN velocities. Results: We confirm a further 12 PNs in Virgo, five of which are bound to the halo of M 87, and the remainder are true intracluster planetary nebulas (ICPNs). The M 87 PNs are confined to the extended stellar envelope of M 87, within a projected radius of ~160 kpc, while the ICPNs are scattered across the whole surveyed region between M 87 and M 86, supporting a truncation of M 87's luminous outer halo at a 2σ level. The line-of-sight velocity distribution of the M 87 PNs at projected radii of 60 kpc and 144 kpc shows (i) no evidence for rotation of the halo along the photometric major axis; and (ii) that the velocity dispersion decreases in the outer halo, down to σ_last = 78±25 km s-1 at 144 kpc. The Jeans model for the M 87 halo stars fits the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile only if the stellar orbits are strongly radially anisotropic (β ≃ 0.4 at r ≃ 10 kpc increasing to 0.8 at the outer edge), and if additionally the stellar halo is truncated at ≃ 150 kpc average elliptical radius. The α-parameters for the M 87

  14. A comparison of the near-infrared spectral features of early-type galaxies in the Coma Cluster, the Virgo cluster and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdashelt, Mark L.; Frogel, Jay A.

    1993-01-01

    Earlier researchers derived the relative distance between the Coma and Virgo clusters from color-magnitude relations of the early-type galaxies in each cluster. They found that the derived distance was color-dependent and concluded that the galaxies of similar luminosity in the two clusters differ in their red stellar populations. More recently, the color-dependence of the Coma-Virgo distance modulus has been called into question. However, because these two clusters differ so dramatically in their morphologies and kinematics, it is plausible that the star formation histories of the member galaxies also differed. If the conclusions of earlier researchers are indeed correct, then some signature of the resulting stellar population differences should appear in the near-infrared and/or infrared light of the respective galaxies. We have collected near-infrared spectra of 17 Virgo and 10 Coma early-type galaxies; this sample spans about four magnitudes in luminosity in each cluster. Seven field E/S0 galaxies have been observed for comparison. Pseudo-equivalent widths have been measured for all of the field galaxies, all but one of the Virgo members, and five of the Coma galaxies. The features examined are sensitive to the temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity of the reddest stars. A preliminary analysis of these spectral features has been performed, and, with a few notable exceptions, the measured pseudo-equivalent widths agree well with previously published values.

  15. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  16. The integrated radio spectrum of Virgo A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinyaikin, E. N.

    2016-08-01

    The flux density of the radio galaxy Virgo A has been measured at 38 and 151.5 MHz. These measurements and published flux densities at 59 other frequencies from 5.6 MHz to 857 GHz are used to obtain a fit to the frequency dependence of the logarithm of the flux density in the form of a second-order polynomial of the logarithm of the frequency, S_ν ^{Vir A} [Jy] = 1224.4(ν [MHz]/150)^{ - 0.817 + 0.007 log (ν [MHz]/150)} . This spectrum, which has a small positive curvature, agrees slightly better with the observed flux densities than a purely power-lawspectrumwith the spectral index 0.793±0.003 and S 150 [MHz] Vir A = 1187±23 Jy. The relative errors in using the power-law spectrum instead of this spectrum with its small, positive curvature lie in the range (-5.2-1.6)% for frequencies from 70 MHz to 857 GHz. The expected peak frequency of the spectrum of Virgo A is estimated.

  17. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  18. Some approaches to substructure coupling with damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Bachmeyer, R. C.; Howsman, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    Time-domain and frequency-domain methods for coupling substructures with general linear damping are discussed. A time-domain method is presented which employs a state variable representation of each substructure. Also presented is a method which employs frequency-domain coupling together with DFT and FFT transformations to obtain transient response solutions.

  19. Prospects for stochastic background searches using Virgo and LSC interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cella, Giancarlo; Colacino, Carlo Nicola; Cuoco, Elena; Di Virgilio, Angela; Regimbau, Tania; Robinson, Emma L.; Whelan, John T.

    2007-10-01

    We consider the question of cross-correlation measurements using Virgo and the LSC Interferometers (LIGO Livingston, LIGO Hanford and GEO600) to search for a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We find that inclusion of Virgo into the network will substantially improve the sensitivity to correlations above 200 Hz if all detectors are operating at their design sensitivity. This is illustrated using a simulated isotropic stochastic background signal, generated with an astrophysically-motivated spectral shape, injected into 24 h of simulated noise for the LIGO and Virgo interferometers.

  20. MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR POPULATIONS IN THE VIRGO OVERDENSITY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Tisserand, P.; Willman, B.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.; Mateo, M.; Saviane, I.; Walsh, S.; Geha, M.; Jordan, A.; Zoccali, M.; Olszewski, E.; Walker, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-05-20

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g Almost-Equal-To 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1{sup +1.0}{sub -1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70{sup +0.15}{sub -0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 {+-} 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields ({Lambda}{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 265 Degree-Sign , B{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 13 Degree-Sign ) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 {+-} 1.6 kpc and have an age of {approx}8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67{sup +0.16}{sub -0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 {+-} 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law and Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at {approx}9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best

  1. Discovery of Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J; Drinkwater, M; Jurek, R; Phillips, S; Gregg, M; Bekki, K; Couch, W; Karick, A; Parker, Q; Smith, R M

    2006-01-05

    The authors have discovered nine ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in the Virgo Cluster, extending samples of these objects outside the Fornax Cluster. Using the 2dF multi-fiber spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, the new Virgo members were found among 1500 color-selected, star-like targets with 16.0 < b{sub j} < 20.2 in a two-degree diameter field centered on M87 (NGC4486). The newly-found UCDs are comparable to the UCDs in the Fornax Cluster, with sizes {approx} 100 pc, -12.9 < M{sub B} < -10.7, and exhibiting red, absorption-line spectra, indicative of an older stellar population. The properties of these objects remain consistent with the tidal threshing model for the origin of UCDs from the surviving nuclei of nucleated dwarf ellipticals disrupted in the cluster core. The discovery that UCDs exist in Virgo shows that this galaxy type is probably a ubiquitous phenomenon in clusters of galaxies; coupled with their possible origin by tidal threshing, the UCD population is a potential indicator and probe of the formation history of a given cluster. They also describe one additional bright UCD with M{sub B} = -12.0 in the core of the Fornax Cluster. They find no further UCDs in our Fornax Cluster Spectroscopic Survey down to b{sub j} = 19.5 in two additional 2dF fields extending as far as 3{sup o} from the center of the cluster. All six Fornax bright UCDs identified with 2dF lie within 0.5{sup o} (projected distance of 170 kpc) of the central elliptical galaxy NGC1399.

  2. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY (NGVS). I. INTRODUCTION TO THE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrarese, Laura; Cote, Patrick; Gwyn, S. D. J.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Mei, Simona; Erben, Thomas; Durrell, Patrick R.; Christopher Mihos, J.; Jordan, Andres; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lancon, Ariane; Emsellem, Eric; Balogh, Michael L.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; and others

    2012-05-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a program that uses the 1 deg{sup 2} MegaCam instrument on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to carry out a comprehensive optical imaging survey of the Virgo cluster, from its core to its virial radius-covering a total area of 104 deg{sup 2}-in the u*griz bandpasses. Thanks to a dedicated data acquisition strategy and processing pipeline, the NGVS reaches a point-source depth of g Almost-Equal-To 25.9 mag (10{sigma}) and a surface brightness limit of {mu}{sub g} {approx} 29 mag arcsec{sup -2} (2{sigma} above the mean sky level), thus superseding all previous optical studies of this benchmark galaxy cluster. In this paper, we give an overview of the technical aspects of the survey, such as areal coverage, field placement, choice of filters, limiting magnitudes, observing strategies, data processing and calibration pipelines, survey timeline, and data products. We also describe the primary scientific topics of the NGVS, which include: the galaxy luminosity and mass functions; the color-magnitude relation; galaxy scaling relations; compact stellar systems; galactic nuclei; the extragalactic distance scale; the large-scale environment of the cluster and its relationship to the Local Supercluster; diffuse light and the intracluster medium; galaxy interactions and evolutionary processes; and extragalactic star clusters. In addition, we describe a number of ancillary programs dealing with 'foreground' and 'background' science topics, including the study of high-inclination trans-Neptunian objects; the structure of the Galactic halo in the direction of the Virgo Overdensity and Sagittarius Stream; the measurement of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy, and cluster lensing; and the identification of distant galaxy clusters, and strong-lensing events.

  3. Search for Extended Gamma-Ray Emission from the Virgo Galaxy Cluster with FERMI-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jeltema, T. E.; Jogler, T.; Johnson, A. S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Malyshev, D.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainó, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgró, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Storm, E.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are one of the prime sites to search for dark matter (DM) annihilation signals. Depending on the substructure of the DM halo of a galaxy cluster and the cross sections for DM annihilation channels, these signals might be detectable by the latest generation of γ-ray telescopes. Here we use three years of Fermi-Large Area Telescope data, which are the most suitable for searching for very extended emission in the vicinity of the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. Our analysis reveals statistically significant extended emission which can be well characterized by a uniformly emitting disk profile with a radius of 3° that moreover is offset from the cluster center. We demonstrate that the significance of this extended emission strongly depends on the adopted interstellar emission model (IEM) and is most likely an artifact of our incomplete description of the IEM in this region. We also search for and find new point source candidates in the region. We then derive conservative upper limits on the velocity-averaged DM pair annihilation cross section from Virgo. We take into account the potential γ-ray flux enhancement due to DM sub-halos and its complex morphology as a merging cluster. For DM annihilating into b\\bar{b}, assuming a conservative sub-halo model setup, we find limits that are between 1 and 1.5 orders of magnitude above the expectation from the thermal cross section for mDM ≲ 100 GeV. In a more optimistic scenario, we exclude < σ v> ˜ 3× {10}-26 {{cm}}3 {{{s}}}-1 for mDM ≲ 40 GeV for the same channel. Finally, we derive upper limits on the γ-ray-flux produced by hadronic cosmic-ray interactions in the inter cluster medium. We find that the volume-averaged cosmic-ray-to-thermal pressure ratio is less than ˜6%.

  4. More evidence of substructure in the motions of nearby halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re Fiorentin, P.; Helmi, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Spagna, A.

    2004-07-01

    We explore the stellar halo of the Milky Way to search for fossil signatures of past mergers. We use the Beers et al. (2000) catalog of non-kinematically selected metal poor stars in the solar neighborhood to select subsets of halo stars within 1-2 kpc of the Sun. Motivated by the results of high resolution CDM simulations, we look for substructure in the kinematics of the fastest stars. When a two-point velocity correlation function is applied to these subsets, statistical evidence of substructure is found. This appears to be due to a small moving group with dynamical properties similar to the stellar "stream" previously discovered by Helmi et al. (1999).

  5. An Introduction to the Virgo Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasconi, Franco; Rapagnani, Piero

    Suspending the mirrors is one of the most crucial tasks in gravitational wave interferometer technology. The performance of the suspensions must provide the required attenuation of seismic noise and reduction of thermal noise, two fundamental limits to the sensitivity of any gravitational wave detector. Moreover, the suspension system must be equipped with sensors and actuators which are used to actively control some relevant degrees of freedom, so to be able to keep the interferometer at its working point (i.e., "locked"). In the first part of this chapter, we deal with the basic principles behind the Superattenuator chains developed in Virgo to reduce the seismic noise. In the second part, we illustrate the techniques to reduce the thermal noise in the detection bandwidth, according to the theory illustrated in Chap. 8, 10.1007/978-3-319-03792-9_8.

  6. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Farnesini, L.; Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F.; Montani, M.; Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Piluso, A.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Travasso, F.; Vicerè, A.; Vocca, H.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV.

  7. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  8. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  9. Origin of Non-axisymmetric Features of dEs in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, SungWon; Kim, Woong-Tae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Kim, Suk

    2016-06-01

    A fraction of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster have a disk component and even possess disk features such as bar, lens, and spiral arms. Using N-body simulations, we propose formation scenarios of these non-axisymmetric features in the disky dwarf galaxies. By adopting VCC 856 as our progenitor, a bulgeless dwarf disk galaxy with embedded faint spiral arms, we construct 11 initial conditions with slight dynamical variations based on observational error range. After 10 Gyrs of evolution in isolation, our standard model slowly forms a bar at ~3 Gyr and then undergoes buckling instability that temporarily weakens the bar, although the bar strength continues to grow afterward. Nine of our isolated models are also unstable to bar formation and undergo buckling instability. This suggests that the disky dwarf galaxies are intrinsically unstable to form bars, accounting for a population of barred dwarf galaxies in the outskirts of the Virgo cluster. We also find that both the concentration of dark matter halo and the degree of random motions within stellar disk affect the vigor of buckling instability. To understand the origin of the faint grand-design spiral arms, we additionally construct 6 sets of tidal models by differing pericenter distances. We reveal that its formation mechanism is rather more complicated: the faint spiral arms consistent with the observations could develop on marginally unstable disk by relatively weak tidal force. We discuss our results in light of dynamical evolution of disky dwarf galaxies including mergers.

  10. KINEMATIC PROPERTIES AS PROBES OF THE EVOLUTION OF DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Gorgas, J.; De Paz, A. Gil; Boselli, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Yildiz, U.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gadotti, D. A.; Pedraz, S.

    2009-12-10

    We present new observational results on the kinematical, morphological, and stellar population properties of a sample of 21 dEs located both in the Virgo Cluster and in the field, which show that 52% of the dEs (1) are rotationally supported, (2) exhibit structural signs of typical rotating systems such as disks, bars, or spiral arms, (3) are younger (approx3 Gyr) than non-rotating dEs, and (4) are preferentially located either in the outskirts of Virgo or in the field. This evidence is consistent with the idea that rotationally supported dwarfs are late-type spirals or irregulars that recently entered the cluster and lost their gas through a ram pressure stripping event, quenching their star formation and becoming dEs through passive evolution. We also find that all, but one, galaxies without photometric hints for hosting disks are pressure supported and are all situated in the inner regions of the cluster. This suggests a different evolution from the rotationally supported systems. Three different scenarios for these non-rotating galaxies are discussed (in situ formation, harassment, and ram pressure stripping).

  11. Kinematic Properties as Probes of the Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.; Boselli, A.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gadotti, D. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Pedraz, S.; Yildiz, U.

    2009-12-01

    We present new observational results on the kinematical, morphological, and stellar population properties of a sample of 21 dEs located both in the Virgo Cluster and in the field, which show that 52% of the dEs (1) are rotationally supported, (2) exhibit structural signs of typical rotating systems such as disks, bars, or spiral arms, (3) are younger (~3 Gyr) than non-rotating dEs, and (4) are preferentially located either in the outskirts of Virgo or in the field. This evidence is consistent with the idea that rotationally supported dwarfs are late-type spirals or irregulars that recently entered the cluster and lost their gas through a ram pressure stripping event, quenching their star formation and becoming dEs through passive evolution. We also find that all, but one, galaxies without photometric hints for hosting disks are pressure supported and are all situated in the inner regions of the cluster. This suggests a different evolution from the rotationally supported systems. Three different scenarios for these non-rotating galaxies are discussed (in situ formation, harassment, and ram pressure stripping).

  12. Parallel Computational Environment for Substructure Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendy, Atef S.; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Berke, Laszlo

    1995-01-01

    Design optimization of large structural systems can be attempted through a substructure strategy when convergence difficulties are encountered. When this strategy is used, the large structure is divided into several smaller substructures and a subproblem is defined for each substructure. The solution of the large optimization problem can be obtained iteratively through repeated solutions of the modest subproblems. Substructure strategies, in sequential as well as in parallel computational modes on a Cray YMP multiprocessor computer, have been incorporated in the optimization test bed CometBoards. CometBoards is an acronym for Comparative Evaluation Test Bed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for Design of Structures. Three issues, intensive computation, convergence of the iterative process, and analytically superior optimum, were addressed in the implementation of substructure optimization into CometBoards. Coupling between subproblems as well as local and global constraint grouping are essential for convergence of the iterative process. The substructure strategy can produce an analytically superior optimum different from what can be obtained by regular optimization. For the problems solved, substructure optimization in a parallel computational mode made effective use of all assigned processors.

  13. A state observer for the Virgo inverted pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Astone, P.; Ballardin, G.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Basti, A.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belletoile, A.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blom, M.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Boschi, V.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Branchesi, M.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Canuel, B.; Carbognani, F.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Corsi, A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Cuoco, E.; D'Antonio, S.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; Day, R.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Del Pozzo, W.; del Prete, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Virgilio, A. Di; Dietz, A.; Drago, M.; Endrőczi, G.; Fafone, V.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Forte, L. A.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Giazotto, A.; Gouaty, R.; Granata, M.; Greverie, C.; Guidi, G. M.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heidmann, A.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Jaranowski, P.; Kowalska, I.; Królak, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Masserot, A.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Minenkov, Y.; Mohan, M.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mours, B.; Naticchioni, L.; Nocera, F.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Persichetti, G.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Prato, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Rapagnani, P.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Ricci, F.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Romano, R.; Rosińska, D.; Ruggi, P.; Sassolas, B.; Sentenac, D.; Sperandio, L.; Sturani, R.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vedovato, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Yvert, M.; Zadroźny, A.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2011-09-01

    We report an application of Kalman filtering to the inverted pendulum (IP) of the Virgo gravitational wave interferometer. Using subspace method system identification techniques, we calculated a linear mechanical model of Virgo IP from experimental transfer functions. We then developed a Kalman filter, based on the obtained state space representation, that estimates from open loop time domain data, the state variables of the system. This allows the observation (and eventually control) of every resonance mode of the IP mechanical structure independently.

  14. Substructure Main Bridge, River Piers A & V ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure - Main Bridge, River Piers A & V - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  15. Algebraic Sub-Structuring for Electromagnetic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.G.; Bai, Z.J.; Li, X.Y.S.; Lee, L.Q.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Davis /SLAC

    2006-06-30

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, they show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  16. Algebraic sub-structuring for electromagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Gao, Weiguo; Bai, Zhaojun; Li, Xiaoye; Lee, Lie-Quan; Husbands, Parry; Ng, Esmond G.

    2004-09-14

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, we show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  17. SEXTANS' COLD SUBSTRUCTURES AS A DYNAMICAL JUDGE: CORE, CUSP, OR MOND?

    SciTech Connect

    Lora, V.; Grebel, E. K.; Just, A.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The cold dark matter model predicts cuspy dark matter (DM) halos. However, it has been found that in some low-mass galaxies, cored dark halos provide a better description of their internal dynamics. Here we give constraints on the dark halo profile in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy by studying the longevity of two cold kinematic substructures detected in this galaxy. We perform N-body simulations of a stellar clump in the Sextans dwarf galaxy, including a live DM halo and the main stellar component. We find that if the dark halo is cuspy, stellar clumps orbiting with semi-major axis ≈400 pc are disrupted in ∼5 Gyr, even if the clump is initially as compact stellar cluster with a radius of r{sub c} = 5 pc. Stellar clusters in an initial orbit with semi-major axis ≤250 pc may survive to dissolution, but their orbits decay toward the center by dynamical friction. In contrast, the stellar clumps can persist for a Hubble time within a cored DM halo, even if the initial clump's radius is as extended as r{sub c} = 80 pc. We also study the evolution of the clump in the MONDian context. In this scenario, we find that even an extended stellar clump with radius r{sub c} = 80 pc survives for a Hubble time, but an unrealistic value for the stellar mass-to-light ratio of 9.2 is needed.

  18. A structural design decomposition method utilizing substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A new method of design decomposition for structural analysis and optimization is described. For this method, the structure is divided into substructures where each substructure has its structural response described by a structural-response subproblem, and its structural sizing determined from a structural-sizing subproblem. The structural responses of substructures that have rigid body modes when separated from the remainder of the structure are further decomposed into displacements that have no rigid body components, and a set of rigid body modes. The structural-response subproblems are linked together through forces determined within a structural-sizing coordination subproblem which also determines the magnitude of any rigid body displacements. Structural-sizing subproblems having constraints local to the substructures are linked together through penalty terms that are determined by a structural-sizing coordination subproblem. All the substructure structural-response subproblems are totally decoupled from each other, as are all the substructure structural-sizing subproblems, thus there is significant potential for use of parallel solution methods for these subproblems.

  19. The next generation Virgo cluster survey. VIII. The spatial distribution of globular clusters in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Durrell, Patrick R.; Accetta, Katharine; Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan; Gwyn, Stephen; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hongxin; Mihos, J. Christopher; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Liu, Chengze; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Duc, Pierre-Alain; and others

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters (Virgo A = M87 and Virgo B = M49) out to their virial radii. Using the g{sub o}{sup ′}, (g' – i') {sub o} color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally resolved sources within the NGVS, we have constructed two-dimensional maps of the (irregular) GC distribution over 100 deg{sup 2} to a depth of g{sub o}{sup ′} = 24. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the full extent of the cluster, where the red (more metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies in Virgo, while the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a much more extended spatial distribution with significant populations still present beyond 83' (∼215 kpc) along the major axes of both M49 and M87. A comparison of our GC maps to the diffuse light in the outermost regions of M49 and M87 show remarkable agreement in the shape, ellipticity, and boxiness of both luminous systems. We also find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to that of the locations of Virgo galaxies and the X-ray intracluster gas, and find generally good agreement between these various baryonic structures. We calculate the Virgo cluster contains a total population of N {sub GC} = 67, 300 ± 14, 400, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. For the first time, we compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S {sub N,} {sub CL} = 2.8 ± 0.7, after correcting for Virgo's diffuse light. We also find a GC-to-baryonic mass fraction ε {sub b} = 5.7 ± 1.1 × 10{sup –4} and a GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency ε {sub t} = 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10{sup –5}, the latter values

  20. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; van Beuzekom, Martin; van der Schaaf, Laura; van den Brand, Jo

    2016-07-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO2 lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance.

  1. Ram pressure stripping in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo, C.; Combes, F.; Dasyra, K.; Salomé, P.; Braine, J.

    2015-10-01

    Gas can be violently stripped from their galaxy disks in rich clusters, and be dispersed over 100 kpc-scale tails or plumes. Young stars have been observed in these tails, suggesting they are formed in situ. This will contribute to the intracluster light, in addition to tidal stripping of old stars. We want to quantify the efficiency of intracluster star formation. We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) observations, made with the IRAM-30 m telescope, towards the ram-pressure stripped tail northeast of NGC 4388 in Virgo. We selected HII regions found all along the tails, together with dust patches, as observing targets. We detect molecular gas in 4 positions along the tail, with masses between 7 × 105 to 2 × 106M⊙. Given the large distance from the NGC 4388 galaxy, the molecular clouds must have formed in situ, from the HI gas plume. We compute the relation between surface densities of star formation and molecular gas in these regions, and find that the star formation has very low efficiency. The corresponding depletion time of the molecular gas can be up to 500 Gyr and more. Since this value exceeds a by far Hubble time, this gas will not be converted into stars, and will stay in a gaseous phase to join the intracluster medium.

  2. STELLAR POPULATION VARIATIONS IN THE MILKY WAY's STELLAR HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Eric F.; Xue Xiangxiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ruhland, Christine; Hogg, David W.

    2010-12-15

    If the stellar halos of disk galaxies are built up from the disruption of dwarf galaxies, models predict highly structured variations in the stellar populations within these halos. We test this prediction by studying the ratio of blue horizontal branch stars (BHB stars; more abundant in old, metal-poor populations) to main-sequence turn-off stars (MSTO stars; a feature of all populations) in the stellar halo of the Milky Way using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We develop and apply an improved technique to select BHB stars using ugr color information alone, yielding a sample of {approx}9000 g < 18 candidates where {approx}70% of them are BHB stars. We map the BHB/MSTO ratio across {approx}1/4 of the sky at the distance resolution permitted by the absolute magnitude distribution of MSTO stars. We find large variations of the BHB/MSTO star ratio in the stellar halo. Previously identified, stream-like halo structures have distinctive BHB/MSTO ratios, indicating different ages/metallicities. Some halo features, e.g., the low-latitude structure, appear to be almost completely devoid of BHB stars, whereas other structures appear to be rich in BHB stars. The Sagittarius tidal stream shows an apparent variation in the BHB/MSTO ratio along its extent, which we interpret in terms of population gradients within the progenitor dwarf galaxy. Our detection of coherent stellar population variations between different stellar halo substructures provides yet more support to cosmologically motivated models for stellar halo growth.

  3. Major substructure in the M31 Outer Halo: the East Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMonigal, B.; Bate, N. F.; Conn, A. R.; Mackey, A. D.; Lewis, G. F.; Irwin, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Ibata, R. A.; Huxor, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first detailed analysis of the East Cloud, a highly disrupted diffuse stellar substructure in the outer halo of M31. The core of the substructure lies at a projected distance of ˜100 kpc from the centre of M31 in the outer halo, with possible extensions reaching right into the inner halo. Using Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey photometry of red giant branch stars, we measure the distance, metallicity and brightness of the cloud. Using Hubble Space Telescope data, we independently measure the distance and metallicity to the two globular clusters coincident with the East Cloud core, PA-57 and PA-58, and find their distances to be consistent with the cloud. Four further globular clusters coincident with the substructure extensions are identified as potentially associated. Combining the analyses, we determine a distance to the cloud of 814^{+20}_{-9} kpc, a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.2 ± 0.1, and a brightness of MV = -10.7 ± 0.4 mag. Even allowing for the inclusion of the potential extensions, this accounts for less than 20 per cent of the progenitor luminosity implied by the luminosity-metallicity relation. Using the updated techniques developed for this analysis, we also refine our estimates of the distance and brightness of the South-West Cloud, a separate substructure analysed in the previous work in this series.

  4. Singular behavior of jet substructure observables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian

    2016-01-20

    Jet substructure observables play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider for identifying the boosted hadronic decay products of electroweak scale resonances. The complete description of these observables requires understanding both the limit in which hard substructure is resolved, as well as the limit of a jet with a single hard core. In this paper we study in detail the perturbative structure of two prominent jet substructure observables, N-subjettiness and the energy correlation functions, as measured on background QCD jets. In particular, we focus on the distinction between the limits in which two-prong structure is resolved or unresolved. Dependingmore » on the choice of subjet axes, we demonstrate that at fixed order, N-subjettiness can manifest myriad behaviors in the unresolved region: smooth tails, end-point singularities, or singularities in the physical region. The energy correlation functions, by contrast, only have non-singular perturbative tails extending to the end point. We discuss the effect of hadronization on the various observables with Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate that the modeling of these effects with non-perturbative shape functions is highly dependent on the N-subjettiness axes definitions. Lastly, our study illustrates those regions of phase space that must be controlled for high-precision jet substructure calculations, and emphasizes how such calculations can be facilitated by designing substructure observables with simple singular structures.« less

  5. Singular behavior of jet substructure observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Jet substructure observables play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider for identifying the boosted hadronic decay products of electroweak scale resonances. The complete description of these observables requires understanding both the limit in which hard substructure is resolved, as well as the limit of a jet with a single hard core. In this paper we study in detail the perturbative structure of two prominent jet substructure observables, N -subjettiness and the energy correlation functions, as measured on background QCD jets. In particular, we focus on the distinction between the limits in which two-prong structure is resolved or unresolved. Depending on the choice of subjet axes, we demonstrate that at fixed order, N -subjettiness can manifest myriad behaviors in the unresolved region: smooth tails, end point singularities, or singularities in the physical region. The energy correlation functions, by contrast, only have nonsingular perturbative tails extending to the end point. We discuss the effect of hadronization on the various observables with Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate that the modeling of these effects with nonperturbative shape functions is highly dependent on the N -subjettiness axes definitions. Our study illustrates those regions of phase space that must be controlled for high-precision jet substructure calculations, and emphasizes how such calculations can be facilitated by designing substructure observables with simple singular structures.

  6. Kinematic Disturbances in Rotation Curves among 89 Virgo Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, V. C.; Waterman, A. H.; Kenney, J. D. P.

    1999-05-01

    For 89 (mostly) spirals in the Virgo cluster, we have obtained optical long-slit spectra of the ionized gas. We find: (1) 50% of the Virgo galaxies we observed have regular rotation patterns; 50% exhibit kinematic disturbances ranging from mild to major. Velocity complexities are consistent with those resulting from tidal encounters or accretion. Since kinematic disturbances will to fade within ~ 1Gyr, many Virgo galaxies have experienced several significant kinematic disturbances during their lifetimes. (2) There is no strong correlation of rotation curve complexity with Hubble type, galaxy luminosity, local galaxy density, or HI deficiency. (3) There is a remarkable difference in the distribution of galaxy systemic velocity for galaxies in the two classes. Galaxies with regular rotation patterns show a flat distribution with velocities ranging from V = -300 km/sec to V = +2500 km/sec; galaxies with disturbed kinematics have a Gaussian distribution which peaks at V = +1172+/-100 km/sec, near the cluster mean velocity. This distribution is virtually identical to the distribution of systemic velocities for elliptical galaxies in Virgo. However, disturbed spirals are less centrally concentrated than the ellipticals and those near the periphery are more likely to have the mean cluster velocity. We suggest that spirals with disturbed kinematics are preferentially on radial orbits, which bring them to the denser core, where tidal interactions are strong and/or more common. However, because they spend most of their time near apocenter, we observe them near the periphery of the cluster. Some may be falling into the core for the first time. For a non-virialized cluster like Virgo, galaxies may encounter either local (nearby galaxies) or global (cluster related) interactions. These interactions may alter the galaxy morphology, and may play a role in driving the Virgo cluster toward dynamical equilibrium.

  7. Quantification of Substructure in Nearby Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.; Beers, T. C.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1995-05-01

    Theory, as well as numerical simulations, suggests that Omega_o may be observationally constrained by the amount of substructure observed in present-day clusters of galaxies. We have therefore begun a study of the 116 Abell clusters with richness class greater than or equal to 1 and distance class less than or equal to 4, the so-called ``volume-limited'' sample of Hoessel, Gunn, & Thuan 1980 (ApJ 241, 486) to determine the prevalence of substructure in the clusters' projected galaxy positions. We use positions of galaxies identified by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner to obtain contour plots of the available clusters using an adaptive kernel routine. Significance of substructure is evaluated using the 2-D Lee test as well as a likelihood-ratio test on fits made with mixtures of two-dimensional gaussians. We also present nonparametric density profile estimates obtained with the program MAPEL (Merritt and Tremblay 1994, AJ 108, 514).

  8. Inverse substructure method for model updating of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shun; Xia, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Qing; Xu, You-Lin; Zhu, Hong-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Traditional model updating of large-scale structures is usually time-consuming because the global structural model needs to be repeatedly re-analyzed as a whole to match global measurements. This paper proposes a new substructural model updating method. The modal data measured on the global structure are disassembled to obtain the independent substructural dynamic flexibility matrices under force and displacement compatibility conditions. The method is extended to the case when the measurement is carried out at partial degrees-of-freedom of the structure. The extracted substructural flexibility matrices are then used as references for updating the corresponding substructural models. An orthogonal projector is employed on both the extracted substructural measurements and the substructural models to remove the rigid body modes of the free-free substructures. Compared with the traditional model updating at the global structure level, only the sub-models at the substructural level are re-analyzed in the proposed substructure-based model updating process, resulting in a rapid convergence of optimization. Moreover, only measurement on the local area corresponding to the concerned substructures is required, and those on other components can be avoided. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed substructuring method are verified through applications to a laboratory-tested frame structure and a large-scale 600 m tall Guangzhou New TV Tower. The present technique is referred to as the inverse substructuring model updating method as the measured global modal data are disassembled into the substructure level and then the updating is conducted on the substructures only. This differs from the substructuring model updating method previously proposed by the authors, in which the model updating is still conducted in the global level and the numerical global modal data are assembled from those of substructures. That can be referred to as the forward substructuring model

  9. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster: the link between molecular gas, atomic gas, and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; De Looze, I.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log (O / H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 μm emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses ≲ 109 M⊙, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, MHI/M∗, which increases inversely with M∗. The flattening of the MH2/M∗ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both Hi-deficient and Hi-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, τdep, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between Hi deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany

  10. Virgo Cluster and field dwarf ellipticals in 3D - II. Internal dynamics points to tidal harassment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, A.; van de Ven, G.; Falcón-Barroso, J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the dynamical analysis of a sample of 12 dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies for which we have obtained SAURON large-scale two-dimensional spectroscopic data. We construct Jeans axisymmetric models and obtain total dynamical masses enclosed within one effective radius. We use the obtained values to show that the validity of the dynamical scaling relations of massive early-type galaxies can be extended to these low-mass systems, except that dEs seem to contain relatively larger fraction of dark matter in their inner parts. We then demonstrate that dE galaxies have lower angular momenta than the present-day analogues of their presumed late-type progenitors, and we show that dE circular velocity curves are steeper than the rotation curves of galaxies with equal and up to an order of magnitude higher luminosity. This requires a transformation mechanism that is not only able to lower the angular momentum but also one that needs to account for increased stellar concentration. Additionally, we match the dark matter fraction of our galaxies to their location in the Virgo Cluster and see that galaxies in the cluster outskirts tend to have a higher dark-to-stellar matter ratio. Transformation due to tidal harassment is able to explain all of the above, unless the dE progenitors were already compact and had lower angular momenta at higher redshifts.

  11. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2008-10-01

    We continue development of a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. For each CCD frame we fit a WCS (world coordinate system), remove bright cosmic rays, and extract sources using ``SExtractor.'' We create software for merging source catalogs in such a way as to reject residual cosmic rays and other invalid sources, and to combine redundant measurements without double counting. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We compare our data to those of the HST (Hubble Space Telescope) and SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) archives to examine the accuracy of our star/galaxy separation and our color measurements. For our substructure investigation, we draw several subsamples of galaxies based on stellarity index, color (the color-magnitude relation), magnitude and velocity. The smallest subsample of spectroscopically confirmed members produces significant substructure signals from 1D (velocity) and 3D (x,y,velocity) diagnostics - a small, offset group may be the culprit. The 2D (x,y) diagnostics applied to the larger samples produce some significant statistics, the cause does not seem to be a large-scale merger, but perhaps several small groups. This is consistent with previous X-ray data showing X-ray emitting gas clumped around small groupings of galaxies.

  12. Deep UV Imaging of Stripped Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl, Hugh

    We propose moderately deep GALEX observations (6 ksec) of eighteen gas-stripped Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies. These observations will give a complete sample of strongly stripped, highly inclined (i>70 degrees) Virgo spirals brighter than magnitude 16. Optical imaging and HI mapping show that these spirals all lack dust and gas in their outer disks, presumably due to ICM-ISM interactions. GALEX UV observations will provide critical information on how these interactions have affected recent star formation in the galaxies. The GALEX FUV and NUV data, particularly when combined with our existing multi-wavelength data set including broadband optical, H-alpha, and Spitzer IR imaging, and optical spectroscopy, will strongly constrain when a galaxy was stripped, how rapidly it was stripped, and the strength of any starburst at the time of stripping. The UV light changes dramatically over timescales of 0-500 Myr, which are the same timescales over which ICM-ISM interactions take place, making it possible to constrain the most recent effects of the cluster environment on galaxy evolution and if these effects can effectively drive the transformation of spirals into S0s. The deep imaging we propose will enable us to detect age gradients in the stellar populations of the outer disks, which will tell us how rapidly the galaxies are stripped. The cluster locations of recently stripped galaxies and the timescales over which the galaxies are stripped will allow us to constrain the relative importance of stripping that occurs during cluster core passages and stripping which occurs when galaxies encounter an ICM shock outside the core. Ten of these galaxies have already been imaged with GALEX, and we are requesting deep observations of these galaxies, in addition to time to image the remaining eight to the same depth.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Atlas of Virgo galaxies (McDonald+ 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Courteau, S.; Tully, R. B.; Roediger, J.

    2011-04-01

    This database contains surface brightness profiles in the optical g, r, i, z bands and near-IR H-band for 286 Virgo cluster galaxies. This morphologically-complete sample spans a huge range in galaxy size, luminosity, surface brightness and stellar populations. These data have been used to study the luminosity and surface brightness distribution of Virgo cluster galaxies, in McDonald et al. (2009MNRAS.394.2022M). We find compelling evidence for bimodal populations in surface brightness, with both early- and late-type galaxies having a dearth of intermediate surface brightness galaxies. Most convincing is our confirmation of the result by Tully and Verheijen that the surface brightness of galaxy disks are strongly bimodal (1997ApJ...484..145T) The near-IR H-band data have been obtained from a variety of telescopes. We downloaded archival images for 31/286 and 84/286 bright galaxies from the 2MASS and GOLDMine online databases, respectively. The remaining 171 galaxies have new observations from the UH 2.2-m (130/286), CFHT (20/286) and UKIRT (21/286) telescopes. These data were all reduced in a homogeneous way, as outlined in our data paper. The optical g, r, i, z data were all obtained from the SDSS archives. Surface brightness profiles were extracted homogeneously from the optical and near-IR data following similar procedures, as outlined in our paper (2011MNRAS.414.2055M) The parametric and non-parametric parameters from bulge-disk decompositions of 285 optical griz and near-IR H-band surface brightness (SB) profiles are given in the bdd_* files in this directory. The profiles are stored in the "profg", "profr", "profi", "profz" and "prof_h" subdirectories, one for each color. (12 data files).

  14. Studying Stellar Halos with Future Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Falomo, Renato; Uslenghi, Michela

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos around galaxies retain fundamental evidence of the processes which lead to their build up. Sophisticated models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context yield quantitative predictions about various observable characteristics, including the amount of substructure, the slope of radial mass profiles and three dimensional shapes, and the properties of the stellar populations in the galaxies halos. The comparison of such models with the observations leads to constraints on the general picture of galaxy formation in the hierarchical Universe, as well as on the physical processes taking place in the halos formation. With the current observing facilities, stellar halos can be effectively probed only for a limited number of nearby galaxies. In this contribution we illustrate the progress which we expect in this field with the future large aperture ground based telescopes (E-ELT and TNT), and with JWST. In particular we adress the following issues: (I) the characterization of the stellar populations in the halos innermost regions and substructures, (ii) the measurement of the halos profiles and shapes , and the halos mass content, (iii) the study of Globular Clusters inhabiting the halos of distant galaxies. In order to assess the expected capabilities of future facilities we present the results of a set of simulated images to evaluate to which level of accuracy it will be possible to probe the halos of distant galaxies.

  15. Stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the understanding and use of chromospheric diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) trends emerging from semiempirical models of single stars; (2) the validity of claims that theoretical models of chromospheres are becoming realistic; (3) the correlation between the widths of Ca 2 H and K line emission cores and stellar absolute luminosity extending over 15 magnitudes (Wilson-Bappu relation); and (4) the existence of systematic flow patterns in stellar chromospheres.

  16. A Synoptic Map of Halo Substructures from the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Goldman, Bertrand; Martínez-Delgado, David; Sesar, Branimir; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We present a panoramic map of the entire Milky Way halo north of δ ˜ -30° (˜ 30,000 deg2), constructed by applying the matched-filter technique to the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey dataset. Using single-epoch photometry reaching to g ˜22, we are sensitive to stellar substructures with heliocentric distances between 3.5 and ˜35 kpc. We recover almost all previously-reported streams in this volume and demonstrate that several of these are significantly more extended than earlier datasets have indicated. In addition, we also report five new candidate stellar streams. One of these features appears significantly broader and more luminous than the others and is likely the remnant of a dwarf galaxy. The other four streams are consistent with a globular cluster origin, and three of these are rather short in projection (≲ 10°), suggesting that streams like Ophiuchus may not be that rare. Finally, a significant number of more marginal substructures are also revealed by our analysis; many of these features can also be discerned in matched-filter maps produced by other authors from SDSS data, and hence they are very likely to be genuine. However, the extant 3π data is currently too shallow to determine their properties or produce convincing CMDs. The global view of the Milky Way provided by Pan-STARRS1 provides further evidence for the important role of both globular cluster disruption and dwarf galaxy accretion in building the Milky Way's stellar halo.

  17. SEEKING COUNTERPARTS TO ADVANCED LIGO/Virgo TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, Jonah; Camp, Jordan; Racusin, Judith; Gehrels, Neil; White, Darren

    2012-11-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational wave (GW) emission for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, expected to be operational in 2015. Finding electromagnetic counterparts to these signals will be essential to placing them in an astronomical context. The Swift satellite carries a sensitive X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and can respond to target-of-opportunity requests within one to two hours, and so is uniquely poised to find the X-ray counterparts to LIGO/Virgo triggers. Assuming that NS mergers are the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), some percentage of LIGO/Virgo triggers will be accompanied by X-ray band afterglows that are brighter than 10{sup -12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in the XRT band one day after the trigger time. We find that a soft X-ray transient of this flux is bright enough to be extremely rare, and so could be confidently associated with even a moderately localized GW signal. We examine two possible search strategies with the Swift XRT to find bright transients in LIGO/Virgo error boxes. In the first strategy, XRT could search a volume of space with a {approx}100 Mpc radius by observing {approx}30 galaxies over the course of a day, with sufficient depth to observe the expected X-ray afterglow. For an extended LIGO/Virgo horizon distance, the XRT could employ 100 s exposures to cover an area of {approx}35 deg{sup 2} in about a day and remain sensitive enough to image GW-discovered GRB afterglows. These strategies demonstrate that discovery of X-ray band counterparts to GW triggers will be possible, though challenging, with current facilities.

  18. Seeking Counterparts to Advanced LIGO/Virgo Transients with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Jonah; Camp, Jordan; Racusin, Judith; Gehrels, Neil; White, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational wave emission for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, expected to be operational in 2015 . Finding electromagnetic counterparts to these signals will be essential to placing them in an astronomical context. The Swift satellite carries a sensitive X-ray telescope (XRT), and can respond to target-of-opportunity requests within 1-2 hours, and so is uniquely poised to find the X-ray counterparts to LIGO / Virgo triggers. Assuming NS mergers are the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), some percentage of LIGO/Virgo triggers will be accompanied by X-ray band afterglows that are brighter than 10(exp -12) ergs/s/sq cm in the XRT band one day after the trigger time. We find that a soft X-ray transient of this flux is bright enough to be extremely rare, and so could be confidently associated with even a moderately localized GW signal. We examine two possible search strategies with the Swift XRT to find bright transients in LIGO/Virgo error boxes. In the first strategy, XRT could search a volume of space with a approx.100 Mpc radius by observing approx 30 galaxies over the course of a day, with sufficient depth to observe the expected X-ray afterglow. For an extended LIGO / Virgo horizon distance, the XRT could employ very short 100 s exposures to cover an area of approx 35 square degrees in about a day, and still be sensitive enough to image GW discovered GRB afterglows. These strategies demonstrate that the high X-ray luminosity of short GRBs and the relatively low X-ray transient background combine to make high confidence discoveries of X-ray band counterparts to GW triggers possible, though challenging, with current satellite facilities.

  19. Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-10-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on nearby galaxies, which are best suited to study this theme. Of course, the understanding of stellar populations is intimately connected to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, one of the great outstanding problems of astronomy. We are currently in a situation where very large observational advances have been made in recent years. Galaxies have been detected up to a redshift of ten. A huge effort has to be made so that stellar population theory can catch up with observations. Since most galaxies are far away, information about them has to come from stellar population synthesis of integrated light. Here I will discuss how stellar evolution theory, together with observations in our Milky Way and Local Group, are used as building blocks to analyse these integrated stellar populations.

  20. Statistics of substructures in dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, E.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.

    2012-03-01

    We study the amount and distribution of dark matter substructures within dark matter haloes, using a large set of high-resolution simulations ranging from group-size to cluster-size haloes, and carried out within a cosmological model consistent with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 7-year data. In particular, we study how the measured properties of subhaloes vary as a function of the parent halo mass, the physical properties of the parent halo and redshift. The fraction of halo mass in substructures increases with increasing mass: it is of the order of 5 per cent for haloes with M200˜ 1013 M⊙ and of the order of 10 per cent for the most massive haloes in our sample, with M200˜ 1015 M⊙. There is, however, a very large halo-to-halo scatter that can be explained only in part by a range of halo physical properties, e.g. concentration. At a given halo mass, less concentrated haloes contain significantly larger fractions of mass in substructures because of the reduced strength of tidal disruption. Most of the substructure mass is located at the outskirts of the parent haloes, in relatively few massive subhaloes. This mass segregation appears to become stronger at increasing redshift, and should reflect into a more significant mass segregation of the galaxy population at different cosmic epochs. When haloes are accreted on to larger structures, their mass is significantly reduced by tidal stripping. Haloes that are more massive at the time of accretion (these should host more luminous galaxies) are brought closer to the centre on shorter time-scales by dynamical friction, and therefore suffer a more significant stripping. The halo merger rate depends strongly on the environment with substructure in more massive haloes suffering more important mergers than their counterparts residing in less massive systems. This should translate into a different morphological mix for haloes of different mass.

  1. Dark Halos and Substructure from Arcs & Einstein Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Leon

    2006-07-01

    The surface brightness distribution of extended gravitationally lensed arcs and Einstein rings contains super-resolved information about the lensed object, and, more excitingly, about the smooth and clumpy mass distribution of the lens galaxies. The source and lens information can non-parametrically be separated, resulting in a direct "gravitational image" of the inner mass-distribution of cosmologically-distant galaxies {Koopmans 2005; Koopmans et al. 2006 [astro-ph/0601628]}. With this goal in mind, we propose deep HST ACS-F555W/F814W and NICMOS-F160W WFC imaging of 20 new gravitational-lens systems with spatially resolved lensed sources, of the 35 new lens systems discovered by the Sloan Lens ACS Survey {Bolton et al. 2005} so far, 15 of which are being imaged in Cycle-14. Each system has been selected from the SDSS and confirmed in two time-efficient HST-ACS snapshot programs {cycle 13&14}. High-fidelity multi-color HST images are required {not delivered by the 420s snapshots} to isolate these lensed images {properly cleaned, dithered and extinction-corrected} from the lens galaxy surface brightness distribution, and apply our "gravitational maging" technique. Our sample of 35 early-type lens galaxies to date is by far the largest, still growing, and most uniformly selected. This minimizes selection biases and small-number statistics, compared to smaller, often serendipitously discovered, samples. Moreover, using the WFC provides information on the field around the lens, higher S/N and a better understood PSF, compared with the HRC, and one retains high spatial resolution through drizzling. The sample of galaxy mass distributions - determined through this method from the arcs and Einstein ring HST images - will be studied to: {i} measure the smooth mass distribution of the lens galaxies {dark and luminous mass are separated using the HST images and the stellar M/L values derived from a joint stellar-dynamical analysis of each system}; {ii} quantify

  2. Evidence for the Disky Origin of Luminous Virgo Dwarf Ellipticals from the Kinematics of Their Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Cenarro, A. Javier; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.

    2009-06-01

    We report evidence for dynamically significant rotation in the globular cluster systems of two luminous Virgo dwarf ellipticals, VCC1261 and VCC1528. Including previous results for VCC1087, the globular cluster systems of all three Virgo dwarf ellipticals studied in detail to date exhibit v rot/σlos>1. Taking the rotation seen in the globular clusters as a maximal disk rotation, and accounting for the possible fading of any hypothetical progenitor galaxy, we find all three dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) lie on the r-band Tully-Fisher relation. We argue that these data support the hypothesis that luminous dEs are the remnants of transformed disk galaxies. We also obtained deep, longslit data for the stars in VCC1261 and VCC1528. Both these galaxies show rapid rotation in their inner regions, with spatial scales of ~0.5 kpc. These rotation velocities are surprisingly similar to those seen in the globular cluster systems. At larger radii, we see little rotation in the dEs themselves. Since our longslit data for Virgo dEs extend out to 1-2 effective radii (typical of deep observations), whereas the globular clusters extend out to 4-7 effective radii, we conclude that nondetections of rotation in many luminous dEs may simply be due to a lack of radial coverage in the stellar data, and that globular clusters represent singularly sensitive probes of the dynamics of dEs. Based on these data, we suggest that gas disks are significant sites of globular cluster formation in the early universe. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATIONS OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER: AN ULTRAVIOLET PERSPECTIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lisker, Thorsten; Sohn, Sangmo Tony E-mail: screy@cnu.ac.k

    2010-09-20

    We present ultraviolet (UV) color-magnitude relations (CMRs) of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster, based on Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optical imaging data. We find that dwarf lenticular galaxies (dS0s), including peculiar dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) with disk substructures and blue centers, show a surprisingly distinct and tight locus separated from that of ordinary dEs, which is not clearly seen in previous CMRs. The dS0s in UV CMRs follow a steeper sequence than dEs and show bluer UV-optical color at a given magnitude. We also find that the UV CMRs of dEs in the outer cluster region are slightly steeper than that of their counterparts in the inner region, due to the existence of faint, blue dEs in the outer region. We explore the observed CMRs with population models of a luminosity-dependent delayed exponential star formation history. We confirm that the feature of delayed star formation of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster is strongly correlated with their morphology and environment. The observed CMR of dS0s is well matched by models with relatively long delayed star formation. Our results suggest that dS0s are most likely transitional objects at the stage of subsequent transformation of late-type progenitors to ordinary red dEs in the cluster environment. In any case, UV photometry provides a powerful tool to disentangle the diverse subpopulations of early-type dwarf galaxies and uncover their evolutionary histories.

  4. The gamma-ray-flux PDF from galactic halo substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Samuel K.; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-07-01

    One of the targets of the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a diffuse gamma-ray background from dark-matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. N-body simulations and theoretical arguments suggest that the dark matter in the Galactic halo may be clumped into substructure, rather than smoothly distributed. Here we propose the gamma-ray-flux probability distribution function (PDF) as a probe of substructure in the Galactic halo. We calculate this PDF for a phenomenological model of halo substructure and determine the regions of the substructure parameter space in which the PDF may be distinguished from the PDF for a smooth distribution of dark matter. In principle, the PDF allows a statistical detection of substructure, even if individual halos cannot be detected. It may also allow detection of substructure on the smallest microhalo mass scales, ~ M⊕, for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Furthermore, it may also provide a method to measure the substructure mass function. However, an analysis that assumes a typical halo substructure model and a conservative estimate of the diffuse background suggests that the substructure PDF may not be detectable in the lifespan of Fermi in the specific case that the WIMP is a neutralino. Nevertheless, for a large range of substructure, WIMP annihilation, and diffuse background models, PDF analysis may provide a clear signature of substructure.

  5. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  6. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  7. Practical applications of substructuring in shell dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sane, A.D.; Bitner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transient dynamic stress analysis of large shell structures is often required in many industrial designs. The asymmetry features of the structure often require a full three dimensional analysis. The difficulties experienced in performing the dynamic analysis of such large and complex structures result from economic feasibility and limitations on the available computer core memory. Substructuring techniques provide a way of overcoming these difficulties. The advantages and features associated with substructuring methods are discussed in general terms. The technique is then applied to perform a transient dynamic analysis of a typical shell structure. The discussion of the example problem focused to highlight the economy, flexibility and the data handling aspects of this method. The example problem demonstrates that this method can be applied with success to a wide range of structural dynamic problems and results in significant cost savings.

  8. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  9. Composite Octet Searches with Jet Substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Shelton, Jessie; /Yale U.

    2012-02-14

    Many new physics models with strongly interacting sectors predict a mass hierarchy between the lightest vector meson and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons. We examine the power of jet substructure tools to extend the 7 TeV LHC sensitivity to these new states for the case of QCD octet mesons, considering both two gluon and two b-jet decay modes for the pseudoscalar mesons. We develop both a simple dijet search using only the jet mass and a more sophisticated jet substructure analysis, both of which can discover the composite octets in a dijet-like signature. The reach depends on the mass hierarchy between the vector and pseudoscalar mesons. We find that for the pseudoscalar-to-vector meson mass ratio below approximately 0.2 the simple jet mass analysis provides the best discovery limit; for a ratio between 0.2 and the QCD-like value of 0.3, the sophisticated jet substructure analysis has the best discovery potential; for a ratio above approximately 0.3, the standard four-jet analysis is more suitable.

  10. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  11. A NEW CHANNEL FOR DETECTING DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALAXIES: GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, Charles R.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2009-07-10

    We show that dark matter substructure in galaxy-scale halos perturbs the time delays between images in strong gravitational lens systems. The variance of the effect depends on the subhalo mass function, scaling as the product of the substructure mass fraction, and a characteristic mass of subhalos (namely (m {sup 2})/(m)). Time delay perturbations therefore complement gravitational lens flux ratio anomalies and astrometric perturbations by measuring a different moment of the subhalo mass function. Unlike flux ratio anomalies, 'time delay millilensing' is unaffected by dust extinction or stellar microlensing in the lens galaxy. Furthermore, we show that time delay ratios are immune to the radial profile degeneracy that usually plagues lens modeling. We lay out a mathematical theory of time delay perturbations and find it to be tractable and attractive. We predict that in 'cusp' lenses with close triplets of images, substructure may change the arrival-time order of the images (compared with smooth models). We discuss the possibility that this effect has already been observed in RX J1131-1231.

  12. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color–color slope significance S ˜ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}˜ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ˜ 1.75σ and {cc}˜ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ˜ 1.59σ and {cc}˜ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  13. NASA EM Followup of LIGO-Virgo Candidate Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Lindy L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a strategy for a follow-up of LIGO-Virgo candidate events using offline survey data from several NASA high-energy photon instruments aboard RXTE, Swift, and Fermi. Time and sky-location information provided by the GW trigger allows for a targeted search for prompt and afterglow EM signals. In doing so, we expect to be sensitive to signals which are too weak to be publicly reported as astrophysical EM events.

  14. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color–color slope significance S ∼ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}∼ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ∼ 1.75σ and {cc}∼ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ∼ 1.59σ and {cc}∼ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  15. The Dynamical Properties of Virgo Cluster Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, N. N. Q.; Courteau, S.; Holtzman, J. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; McDonald, M.; Zhu, Y.

    2014-03-01

    By virtue of its proximity, the Virgo Cluster is an ideal laboratory for testing our understanding of structure formation in the Universe. In this spirit, we present a dynamical study of Virgo galaxies as part of the Spectroscopic and H-band Imaging of Virgo (SHIVir) survey. Hα rotation curves (RC) for our gas-rich galaxies were modeled with a multi-parameter fit function from which various velocity measurements were inferred. Our study takes advantage of archival and our own new data as we aim to compile the largest Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) for a cluster to date. Extended velocity dispersion profiles (VDP) are integrated over varying aperture sizes to extract representative velocity dispersions (VDs) for gas-poor galaxies. Considering the lack of a common standard for the measurement of a fiducial galaxy VD in the literature, we rectify this situation by determining the radius at which the measured VD yields the tightest Fundamental Plane (FP). We found that radius to be at least 1 Re, which exceeds the extent of most dispersion profiles in other works.

  16. OPTICAL COLORS OF INTRACLUSTER LIGHT IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Rudick, Craig S.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Morrison, Heather L.; Feldmeier, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven

    2010-09-01

    We continue our deep optical imaging survey of the Virgo cluster using the CWRU Burrell Schmidt telescope by presenting B-band surface photometry of the core of the Virgo cluster in order to study the cluster's intracluster light (ICL). We find ICL features down to {mu}{sub B} {approx}29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, confirming the results of Mihos et al., who saw a vast web of low surface brightness streams, arcs, plumes, and diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core using V-band imaging. By combining these two data sets, we are able to measure the optical colors of many of the cluster's low surface brightness features. While much of our imaging area is contaminated by galactic cirrus, the cluster core near the cD galaxy, M87, is unobscured. We trace the color profile of M87 out to over 2000'', and find a blueing trend with radius, continuing out to the largest radii. Moreover, we have measured the colors of several ICL features which extend beyond M87's outermost reaches and find that they have similar colors to the M87's halo itself, B - V {approx}0.8. The common colors of these features suggest that the extended outer envelopes of cD galaxies, such as M87, may be formed from similar streams, created by tidal interactions within the cluster, that have since dissolved into a smooth background in the cluster potential.

  17. Extraction of Substructural Flexibility from Global Frequencies and Mode Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, K.F.; Park, K.C.

    1999-07-16

    A computational procedure for extracting substructure-by-substructure flexibility properties from global modal parameters is presented. The present procedure consists of two key features: an element-based direct flexibility method which uniquely determines the global flexibility without resorting to case-dependent redundancy selections; and, the projection of cinematically inadmissible modes that are contained in the iterated substructural matrices. The direct flexibility method is used as the basis of an inverse problem, whose goal is to determine substructural flexibilities given the global flexibility, geometrically-determined substructural rigid-body modes, and the local-to-global assembly operators. The resulting procedure, given accurate global flexibility, extracts the exact element-by-element substructural flexibilities for determinate structures. For indeterminate structures, the accuracy depends on the iteration tolerance limits. The procedure is illustrated using both simple and complex numerical examples, and appears to be effective for structural applications such as damage localization and finite element model reconciliation.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope photometry of the central regions of Virgo cluster elliptical galaxies. 2: Isophote shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosch, Frank C. Van Den; Ferrarese, Laura; Jaffe, Walter; Ford, Holland C.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    The isophotal shapes of a magnitude limited sample of Virgo ellipticals are presented. These are derived from high resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry. The absence of atmospheric seeing and accurate knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF) allows us to perform an accurate deconvolution. Model galaxies were constructed to test the deconvolution algorithms used, and showed that we can accurately recover isophotal shape parameters down to 0.5 sec. From the isophotal parameters we can classify the galaxies in two subsamples: disky and non-disky galaxies. In three of these disky galaxies we found evidence for a nuclear stellar disk in the inner 1.5 sec. In addition these galaxies also have an outer disk, that seems to break up inside 2 sec - 3 sec. In the two galaxies for which there is kinematic evidence from the literature of a decoupled core, we found no indication for such subsystem from the isophotal shape analysis. In 80% of these early type galaxies there are indications for dust. For eight of these galaxies the dust has not been detected before.

  19. Stellar mass and population diagnostics of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.

    2013-12-01

    We conduct a broad investigation about stellar mass and population diagnostics in order to formulate novel constraints related to the formation and evolution of galaxies from a nearby cluster environment. Our work is powered by the use of stellar population models which transform galaxy colours and/or absorption line strengths into estimates of its stellar properties. As input to such models, we assemble an extensive compilation of age and chemical abundance information for Galactic globular clusters. This compilation allows a confident expansion of these models into new regions of parameter space that promise to refine our knowledge of galactic chemical evolution. We then draw upon a state-of-the-art spectroscopic and photometric survey of the Virgo galaxy cluster in order to constrain spatial variations of the stellar ages, metallicities, and masses within its member galaxies, and their dynamical masses. We interpret these data in the context of the histories of star formation, chemical enrichment, and stellar mass assembly to formulate a broad picture of the build-up of this cluster's content over time. In it, the giant early-type galaxies formed through highly dissipational processes at early times that built up most of their stellar mass and drew significant amounts of dark matter within their optical radii. Conversely, dwarf early-types experienced environmental processes that quenched their star formation during either the early stages of cluster assembly or upon infall at later times. Somewhat perplexing is our finding that the internal dynamics of these galaxies are largely explained by their stellar masses. Lastly, Virgo spirals also suffer from their dense environment, through ram pressure stripping and/or tidal harrassment. In addition to quenching, these effects leave an imprint on their internal dynamical evolution too. Late-type spirals exhibit evidence of having ejected significant amounts of baryons from their inner regions, likely via energetic

  20. 5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter pole); VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Auwaiakeakua Bridge, Spanning Auwaiakekua Gulch at Mamalahoa Highway, Waikoloa, Hawaii County, HI

  1. Damage detection using the eigenparameter decomposition of substructural flexibility matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shun; Zhu, Hong-Ping; Xia, Yong; Mao, Ling

    2013-01-01

    The crack or local damage on a structure reduces the stiffness of the structure, and thus leads to the modification of the dynamic properties. Damage detection is widely performed by comparing the initial modal data of the intact structure with those of the damaged structure. For a large-scale structure, the local damage usually introduces slight change to the global modal data, which makes the local damage difficult to be detected. This paper proposes a new substructuring method for the damage detection of a structure. The global structure is divided into manageable substructures. The modal data measured on the global structure are disassembled for obtaining the independent substructural dynamic flexibility matrices, under the force and displacement compatibility constraints. Thereafter, the substructural flexibility matrix is decomposed into its eigenvalues and eigenvectors to be used as the indicators for damage detection. Since the substructuring method concerns the local area by treating it as an independent structure, the substructural eigenparameters are more sensitive to the local damage than the global eigenparameters. The proposed substructuring method is firstly verified by a laboratory-tested portal frame structure. The location of the artificial cuts can be detected successfully by comparing the change of substructural eigenparameters. The proposed method is then applied to the 600 m tall Guangzhou New TV Tower. As compared with the global eigenparameters, the substructural eigenparameters bear larger changes caused by the local damage and thus are more sensitive to the local damage.

  2. CHEMTRAN and the Interconversion of Chemical Substructure Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granito, Charles E.

    1973-01-01

    The need for the interconversion of chemical substructure systems is discussed and CHEMTRAN, a new service, designed especially for creating interconversion programs, is introduced. (7 references) (Author)

  3. Robustness analysis applied to substructure controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Oberdoerffer, Marcelo F.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The stability and robustness of the controlled system obtained via the substructure control synthesis (SCS) method of Su et al. (1990) were examined using a six-bay truss model, and employing an LQG control design method to obtain controllers for two separate structures. It is found that the assembled controller provides a stability in this instance. A qualitative assessment of the stability robustness of the system with controller designed with the SCS method is provided by obtaining a controller using the complete truss model and comparing the robustness of the corresponding closed-loop systems.

  4. Substructurability: the effect of interface location on a real-time dynamic substructuring test

    PubMed Central

    Neild, S. A.; Lowenberg, M.; Szalai, R.; Krauskopf, B.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale experimental test for large and complex structures is not always achievable. This can be due to many reasons, the most prominent one being the size limitations of the test. Real-time dynamic substructuring is a hybrid testing method where part of the system is modelled numerically and the rest of the system is kept as the physical test specimen. The numerical–physical parts are connected via actuators and sensors and the interface is controlled by advanced algorithms to ensure that the tested structure replicates the emulated system with sufficient accuracy. The main challenge in such a test is to overcome the dynamic effects of the actuator and associated controller, that inevitably introduce delay into the substructured system which, in turn, can destabilize the experiment. To date, most research concentrates on developing control strategies for stable recreation of the full system when the interface location is given a priori. Therefore, substructurability is mostly studied in terms of control. Here, we consider the interface location as a parameter and study its effect on the stability of the system in the presence of delay due to actuator dynamics and define substructurability as the system’s tolerance to delay in terms of the different interface locations. It is shown that the interface location has a major effect on the tolerable delays in an experiment and, therefore, careful selection of it is necessary. PMID:27616930

  5. Substructural QSAR approaches and topological pharmacophores.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, R; Huebel, S; Streich, W J

    1985-01-01

    For large and diverse data sets, simple QSAR methods based on linear and additive models can no longer be applied. In such cases topological methods using descriptors directly derivable from two-dimensional chemical structures provide a useful alternative. The results of such analyses can be used for lead optimization, to guide biological testing and even aid in the design of novel compounds. Various types of topological descriptors and algorithms are briefly discussed. Which of those is to be selected depends on the objective of the investigation and the properties of the data set. Two new methods, LOGANA and LOCON, are discussed in some more detail. With the help of these methods, substructural patterns ("topological pharmacophores") characteristic of compounds possessing a certain biological property can be evaluated. Both methods are designed in such a way that full use can be made of the data handling capacity of computers while maintaining an optimal impact of the experience of the researcher. They are model-free and do not require any mathematical knowledge. While LOGANA deals with semiquantitative or even qualitative biological data, LOCON can be applied to activity data on a continuous scale. The basic procedure in both cases consists in the stepwise combination of substructural descriptors by the logical operations "and," "or" and "not." With a simple example the utility of the methods is demonstrated. PMID:3905376

  6. Investigation of dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Bothun, G.D.; Mould, J.R.; Wirth, A.; Caldwell, N.

    1985-05-01

    We have obtained 21-cm H I observations of a sample of 32 dwarf irregular (dI) and 12 dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies that are located in the Virgo cluster. Altogether, 18 of 32 DIs were detected in H I, but none of the dEs were detected at a sensitivity level of M/sub Htsi/ = 2--3 x 10/sup 6/ M/sub sun/. The detected dIs have M/sub Htsi/>3 x 10/sup 7/ M/sub sun/. This disparity in H I content between dIs and dEs effectively dispels the possibility that the dEs are presently in a stage of quiescence (hibernation), between bursts of star formation. In order to supplement the 21-cm data, we have acquired optical spectroscopy, CCD images, and infrared photometry for a limited subsample of these dwarfs. The most significant result provided by this additional data is that the dEs, although very H I poor, nevertheless have observed (J-K) colors which indicate somewhat high metallicity, implying some degree of enrichment due to multiple generations of star formation. In contrast, most of the dIs are quite H I rich (with some having fractional H I contents that exceed 30% by mass), yet they are apparently in a quiescent phase, judging by their low central surface brightnesses (<10% of sky) and lack of resolution into obvious regions of star formation. A small gas-poor contingent of dIs have been found but there is no apparent correlation between dI gas content and either their velocity with respect to the Virgo ICM or their position in the cluster. In general, the velocity distribution of the dIs is flat with only a weak peak that corresponds to the mean velocity of the brighter galaxies in Virgo.

  7. Halo Substructure and the Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.

    2003-11-01

    We present a semianalytic model to investigate the merger history, destruction rate, and survival probability of substructure in hierarchically formed dark matter halos and use it to study the substructure content of halos as a function of input primordial power spectrum. For a standard cold dark matter ``concordance'' cosmology (ΛCDM n=1, σ8=0.95) we successfully reproduce the subhalo velocity function and radial distribution profile seen in N-body simulations and determine that the rate of merging and disruption peaks ~10-12 Gyr in the past for Milky Way-like halos, while surviving substructures are typically accreted within the last ~0-8 Gyr. We explore power spectra with normalizations and spectral ``tilts'' spanning the ranges σ8~=1-0.65 and n~=1-0.8, and include a ``running-index'' model with dn/dlnk=-0.03 similar to the best-fit model discussed in the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) report. We investigate spectra with truncated small-scale power, including a broken-scale inflation model and three warm dark matter cases with mW=0.75-3.0 keV. We find that the mass fraction in substructure is relatively insensitive to the tilt and overall normalization of the primordial power spectrum. All of the CDM-type models yield projected substructure mass fractions that are consistent with, but on the low side, of published estimates from strong lens systems: f9=0.4%-1.5% (64th percentile) for subhalos smaller than 109 Msolar within projected cylinders of radius r<10 kpc. Truncated models produce significantly smaller fractions, f9=0.02%-0.2% for mW~=1 keV, and are disfavored by lensing estimates. This suggests that lensing and similar probes can provide a robust test of the CDM paradigm and a powerful constraint on broken-scale inflation/warm particle masses, including masses larger than the ~1 keV upper limits of previous studies. We compare our predicted subhalo velocity functions with the dwarf satellite population of the Milky Way. Assuming

  8. Stellar halos and the link to galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-08-01

    I present a brief overview of how stellar halos may be used to constrain the process of galaxy formation. In particular, streams and substructure in stellar halos trace merger events but can also be used to determine the mass distribution of the host galaxy and hence put constraints on the nature of dark matter. Much of the focus of this contribution is on the Milky Way, but I also present an attempt to understand the kinematics of the globular cluster system of M31.

  9. Substructuring and poroelastic modelling of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Swider, P; Pédrono, A; Ambard, D; Accadbled, F; Sales de Gauzy, J

    2010-05-01

    We proposed a substructure technique to predict the time-dependant response of biological tissue within the framework of a finite element resolution. Theoretical considerations in poroelasticity preceded the calculation of the sub-structured poroelastic matrix. The transient response was obtained using an exponential fitting method. We computed the creep response of an MRI 3D reconstructed L(5)-S(1) intervertebral disc of a scoliotic spine. The FE model was reduced from 10,000 degrees of freedom for the full 3D disc to only 40 degrees of freedom for the sub-structured model defined by 10 nodes attached to junction nodes located on both lower and upper surfaces of the disc. Comparisons of displacement fields were made between the full poroelastic FE model and the sub-structured model in three different loading conditions: compression, offset compression and torsion. Discrepancies in displacement were lower than 10% for the first time steps when time-dependant events were significant. The substructuring technique provided an exact solution in quasi-static behavior after pressure relaxation. Couplings between vertical and transversal displacements predicted by the reference FE model were well stored by the sub-structured model despite the drastic reduction of degrees of freedom. Finally, we demonstrated that substructuring was very efficient to reduce the size of numerical models while respecting the time-dependant behavior of the structure. This result highlighted the potential interest of substructure techniques in large-scale models of musculoskeletal structures. PMID:20170917

  10. Substructure synthesis method for simulating large molecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Dengming; Kong, Yifei; Wu, Yinghao; Ma, Jianpeng

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a computational method for describing the conformational flexibility of very large biomolecular complexes using a reduced number of degrees of freedom. It is called the substructure synthesis method, and the basic concept is to treat the motions of a given structure as a collection of those of an assemblage of substructures. The choice of substructures is arbitrary and sometimes quite natural, such as domains, subunits, or even large segments of biomolecular complexes. To start, a group of low-frequency substructure modes is determined, for instance by normal mode analysis, to represent the motions of the substructure. Next, a desired number of substructures are joined together by a set of constraints to enforce geometric compatibility at the interface of adjacent substructures, and the modes for the assembled structure can then be synthesized from the substructure modes by applying the Rayleigh–Ritz principle. Such a procedure is computationally much more desirable than solving the full eigenvalue problem for the whole assembled structure. Furthermore, to show the applicability to biomolecular complexes, the method is used to study F-actin, a large filamentous molecular complex involved in many cellular functions. The results demonstrate that the method is capable of studying the motions of very large molecular complexes that are otherwise completely beyond the reach of any conventional methods. PMID:12518058

  11. 8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically west side of arch and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  12. Support Substructures: Support-Induced Part-Level Structural Representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Sheng; Fu, Hongbo; Wei, Ling-Yu; Hu, Shi-Min

    2016-08-01

    In this work we explore a support-induced structural organization of object parts. We introduce the concept of support substructures, which are special subsets of object parts with support and stability. A bottom-up approach is proposed to identify such substructures in a support relation graph. We apply the derived high-level substructures to part-based shape reshuffling between models, resulting in nontrivial functionally plausible model variations that are difficult to achieve with symmetry-induced substructures by the state-of-the-art methods. We also show how to automatically or interactively turn a single input model to new functionally plausible shapes by structure rearrangement and synthesis, enabled by support substructures. To the best of our knowledge no single existing method has been designed for all these applications. PMID:26336128

  13. Characterization of T-Even Bacteriophage Substructures

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Kusy, A. R.; Chapman, V. A.; DeLong, S. S.; Stone, K. R.

    1970-01-01

    T-even bacteriophages were grown and purified in bulk quantities. The protein coats were disrupted into their component substructures by treatment with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Tail fibers and tubes were purified on glycerol-CsCl-D2O gradients and examined with respect to sedimentation properties, subunit molecular weights, amino acid composition, isoelectric points, and morphology. It was found that intact tail fibers had a sedimentation coefficient of 12 to 13S and that dissociated fibers consisted of three classes of proteins having molecular weights of 150 K ± 10, 42 K ± 4, and 28 K ± 3 daltons. A model was constructed in which the 150-K subunit folded back on itself twice to give a three-stranded rope. Each 150-K subunit then represented a half-fiber and it was proposed that the role of the 42- and 28-K subunits was to hold each half-fiber together as well as serve as a possible link with other substructures. Isoelectric point studies also indicated that there were three different proteins with pI values of 3.5, 5.7, and 8.0. Amino acid analyses indicated that fibers had a composition distinct from other phage substructures. In addition, a striking difference was noted in the content of tryptophan among the phages examined. T4B had three to five times more tryptophan than did T2L, T2H, T4D, and T6. Intact tail tubes had an S20,w of 31 to 38S and dissociated tubes consisted of three proteins of molecular weights 57 K ± 5, 38 K ± 4, and 25 K ± 3 daltons. Based on degradation studies with DMSO, it was proposed that these three proteins were arranged in a helical array yielding the tube structure. Isoelectric point studies indicated that there were three major proteins in the tube whose pI values were 5.1, 5.7, and 8.5. No significant differences were observed in the amino acid content of tubes obtained from all the T-even bacteriophages. Images PMID:5497900

  14. Seismic Attenuation Technology for the Advanced Virgo Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beker, M. G.; Blom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Bulten, H. J.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S.

    The current interferometric gravitational wave detectors are being upgraded to what are termed 'second generation' devices. Sensitivities will be increased by an order of magnitude and these new instruments are expected to uncover the field of gravitational astronomy. A main challenge in this endeavor is the mitigation of noise induced by seismic motion. Detailed studies with Virgo show that seismic noise can be reinjected into the dark fringe signal. For example, laser beam jitter and backscattered light limit the sensitivity of the interferometer. Here, we focus on seismic attenuators based on compact inverted pendulums in combination with geometric anti-prings to obtain 40 dB of attenuation above 4 Hz in six degrees of freedom. Low frequency resonances (< 0.5 Hz) are damped by using a control system based on input from LVDTs and geophones. Such systems are under development for the seismic attenuation of optical benches operated both in air and vacuum. The design and realization of the seismic attenuation system for the Virgo external injection bench, including its control scheme, will be discussed and stand-alone performance presented.

  15. A case of poor substructure diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1992-01-01

    The NASTRAN Manuals in the substructuring area are all geared toward instant success, but the solution paths are fraught with many traps for human error. Thus, the probability of suffering a fatal abort is high. In such circumstances, the necessity for diagnostics that are user friendly is paramount. This paper is written in the spirit of improving the diagnostics as well as the documentation in one area where the author felt he was backed into a blind corner as a result of his having committed a data oversight. This topic is aired by referring to an analysis of a particular structure. The structure, under discussion, used a number of local coordinate systems that simplified the preparation of input data. The principle features of this problem are introduced by reference to a series of figures.

  16. Exploring dark matter with Milky Way substructure.

    PubMed

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Silk, Joseph

    2009-08-21

    The unambiguous detection of dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy would unravel one of the most outstanding puzzles in particle physics and cosmology. Recent observations have motivated models in which the annihilation rate is boosted by the Sommerfeld effect, a nonperturbative enhancement arising from a long-range attractive force. We applied the Sommerfeld correction to Via Lactea II, a high-resolution N-body simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy, to investigate the phase-space structure of the galactic halo. We found that the annihilation luminosity from kinematically cold substructure could be enhanced by orders of magnitude relative to previous calculations, leading to the prediction of gamma-ray fluxes from as many as several hundred dark clumps that should be detectable by the Fermi satellite. PMID:19608862

  17. Star-forming Substructure within Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, James

    2013-03-01

    Wide-field far-infrared/submillimeter continuum maps of molecular clouds by the Herschel Space Observatory GBS and HOBYS surveys are revealing the star-forming substructures that lead to star formation in dense gas. In particular, these maps have revealed the central role in clouds of filaments, likely formed through turbulent motions. These filaments appear to be non-isothermal and fragment into cores only when their column densities exceed a stability threshold. Organizations of filament networks suggest the relative role of turbulence and gravity can be traced in different parts of a cloud, and filament intersections may lead to larger amounts of mass flow that form the precursors of high-mass stars or clusters.

  18. Probabilistic Component Mode Synthesis of Nondeterministic Substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ferri, Aldo A.

    1996-01-01

    Standard methods of structural dynamic analysis assume that the structural characteristics are deterministic. Recognizing that these characteristics are actually statistical in nature researchers have recently developed a variety of methods that use this information to determine probabilities of a desired response characteristic, such as natural frequency, without using expensive Monte Carlo simulations. One of the problems in these methods is correctly identifying the statistical properties of primitive variables such as geometry, stiffness, and mass. We present a method where the measured dynamic properties of substructures are used instead as the random variables. The residual flexibility method of component mode synthesis is combined with the probabilistic methods to determine the cumulative distribution function of the system eigenvalues. A simple cantilever beam test problem is presented that illustrates the theory.

  19. The Properties Of The Stellar Nuclei With The Host Galaxy Morphology In The ACSVCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-chul

    2012-01-01

    We have revisited the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS), a Hubble Space Telescope program to obtain ACS/WFC g and z bands imaging for a sample of 100 early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. In this study, we examine 51 nucleated early-type galaxies in the ACSVCS in order to look into the relationship between the photometric and structural properties of stellar nuclei and their host galaxies. We morphologically dissect galaxies into five classes. We note that (1) the stellar nuclei of dwarf early-type galaxies (dS0, dE, and dE,N) are generally fainter and bluer with g > 18.95 and (g-z) < 1.40 compared to some brighter and redder counterparts of the ellipticals (E) and lenticular galaxies (S0), (2) the g-band half-light radii of stellar nuclei of all dwarf early-type galaxies (dS0, dE, and dE,N) are smaller than 20 pc and their average is about 4 pc, and (3) the colors of red stellar nuclei with (g-z) > 1.40 in bright ellipticals and lenticular galaxies are bluer than their host galaxies colors. We also show that most of the unusually RED stellar nuclei with (g-z) > 1.54 in the ACSVCS are the central parts of bright ellipticals and lenticular galaxies.

  20. STELLARATOR INJECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1962-09-01

    A method and means are described for injecting energetic neutral atoms or molecular ions into dense magnetically collimated plasma columns of stellarators and the like in such a manner that the atoms or ions are able to significantly penetrate the column before being ionized by collision with the plasma constituent particles. Penetration of the plasma column by the neutral atoms or molecular ions is facilitated by superposition of two closely spaced magnetic mirrors on the plasma confinement field. The mirrors are moved apart to magnetically sweep plasma from a region between the mirrors and establish a relatively low plasma density therein. By virture of the low density, neutral atoms or molecular ions injected into the region significantly penetrate the plasma column before being ionized. Thereafter, the mirrors are diminished to permit the injected material to admix with the plasma in the remainder of the column. (AEC)

  1. Introduction to stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scilla, Degl’Innocenti

    2016-04-01

    This contribution is meant as a first brief introduction to stellar physics. First I shortly describe the main physical processes active in stellar structures then I summarize the most important features during the stellar life-cycle.

  2. Flexible substructure online hybrid test system using conventional testing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a substructure online hybrid test system that is extensible for geographically distributed tests. This system consists of a set of devices conventionally used for cyclic tests to load the tested substructures onto the target displacement or the target force. Due to their robustness and portability, individual sets of conventional loading devices can be transported and reconfigured to realize physical loading in geographically remote laboratories. Another appealing feature is the flexible displacement-force mixed control that is particularly suitable for specimens having large disparities in stiffness during various performance stages. To conduct a substructure online hybrid test, an extensible framework is developed, which is equipped with a generalized interface to encapsulate each substructure. Multiple tested substructures and analyzed substructures using various structural program codes can be accommodated within the single framework, simply interfaced with the boundary displacements and forces. A coordinator program is developed to keep the boundaries among all substructures compatible and equilibrated. An Internet-based data exchange scheme is also devised to transfer data among computers equipped with different software environments. A series of online hybrid tests are introduced, and the portability, flexibility, and extensibility of the online hybrid test system are demonstrated.

  3. Stellar streams around the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.

    2016-02-01

    Using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars identified in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 data, we report the detection of an extended and lumpy stellar debris distribution around the Magellanic Clouds. At the heliocentric distance of the Clouds, overdensities of BHBs are seen to reach at least to ˜30°, and perhaps as far as ˜50° from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In 3D, the stellar halo is traceable to between 25 and 50 kpc from the LMC. We catalogue the most significant of the stellar substructures revealed, and announce the discovery of a number of narrow streams and diffuse debris clouds. Two narrow streams appear approximately aligned with the Magellanic Clouds' proper motion. Moreover, one of these overlaps with the gaseous Magellanic Stream on the sky. Curiously, two diffuse BHB agglomerations seem coincident with several of the recently discovered DES satellites. Given the enormous size and the conspicuous lumpiness of the LMC's stellar halo, we speculate that the dwarf could easily have been more massive than previously had been assumed.

  4. The history of stellar metallicity in a simulated disc galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snaith, O. N.; Bailin, J.; Gibson, B. K.; Bell, E. F.; Stinson, G.; Valluri, M.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the chemical distribution of stars in a simulated galaxy. Using simulations of the same initial conditions but with two different feedback schemes (McMaster Unbiased Galaxy Simulations - MUGS - and Making Galaxies in a Cosmological Context - MaGICC), we examine the features of the age-metallicity relation (AMR), and the three-dimensional age-[Fe/H]-[O/Fe] distribution, both for the galaxy as a whole and decomposed into disc, bulge, halo and satellites. The MUGS simulation, which uses traditional supernova feedback, is replete with chemical substructure. This substructure is absent from the MaGICC simulation, which includes early feedback from stellar winds, a modified initial mass function and more efficient feedback. The reduced amount of substructure is due to the almost complete lack of satellites in MaGICC. We identify a significant separation between the bulge and disc AMRs, where the bulge is considerably more metal-rich with a smaller spread in metallicity at any given time than the disc. Our results suggest, however, that identifying the substructure in observations will require exquisite age resolution, of the order of 0.25 Gyr. Certain satellites show exotic features in the AMR, even forming a `sawtooth' shape of increasing metallicity followed by sharp declines which correspond to pericentric passages. This fact, along with the large spread in stellar age at a given metallicity, compromises the use of metallicity as an age indicator, although alpha abundance provides a more robust clock at early times. This may also impact algorithms that are used to reconstruct star formation histories from resolved stellar populations, which frequently assume a monotonically increasing AMR.

  5. The magnetic fields of large Virgo cluster spirals. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weżgowiec, M.; Urbanik, M.; Beck, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Soida, M.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The Virgo cluster of galaxies provides excellent conditions for studying interactions of galaxies with the cluster environment. Both the high-velocity tidal interactions and effects of ram pressure stripping by the intracluster gas can be investigated in detail. Aims: We extend our systematic search for possible anomalies in the magnetic field structures of Virgo cluster spirals in order to characterize a variety of effects and attribute them to different disturbing agents. Methods: Six angularly large Virgo cluster spiral galaxies (NGC 4192, NGC 4302, NGC 4303, NGC 4321, NGC 4388, and NGC 4535) were targets of a sensitive total power and polarization study using the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg at 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz (except for NGC 4388 observed only at 4.85 GHz, and NGC 4535 observed only at 8.35 GHz). The presented two-frequency studies allow Faraday rotation analysis. Results: Magnetic field structures distorted to various extent are found in all galaxies. Three galaxies (NGC 4302, NGC 4303, and NGC 4321) show some signs of possible tidal interactions, while NGC 4388 and NGC 4535 have very likely experienced strong ram-pressure and shearing effects, respectively, visible as distortions and asymmetries of polarized intensity distributions. As in our previous study, even strongly perturbed galaxies closely follow the radio-far-infrared correlation. In NGC 4303 and NGC 4321, we observe symmetric spiral patterns of the magnetic field and in NGC 4535 an asymmetric pattern. Conclusions: The cluster environment clearly affects the evolution of its member galaxies via various effects. Magnetic fields allow us to trace even weak interactions that are difficult to detect with other observations. Our results show that the degree of distortions of a galaxy is not a simple function of the distance to the cluster center but reflects also the history of its interactions. The angle Θ between the velocity vector v and the rotation vector Ω of a galaxy may

  6. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  7. Substructuring by Lagrange multipliers for solids and plates

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, J.; Tezaur, R.; Farhat, C.

    1996-12-31

    We present principles and theoreretical foundation of a substructuring method for large structural problems. The algorithm is preconditioned conjugate gradients on a subspace for the dual problem. The preconditioning is proved asymptotically optimal and the method is shown to be parallel scalable, i.e., the condition number is bounded independently of the number of substructures. For plate problems, a special modification is needed that retains continuity of the displacement solution at substructure crosspoints, resulting in an asymptically optimal method. The results are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  8. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  9. A 3D view of the Hydra I galaxy cluster core - I. Kinematic substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilker, Michael; Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Richtler, Tom; Coccato, Lodovico; Arnaboldi, Magda; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    We used FORS2 in MXU mode to mimic a coarse `IFU' in order to measure the 3D large-scale kinematics around the central Hydra I cluster galaxy NGC 3311. Our data show that the velocity dispersion field varies as a function of radius and azimuthal angle and violates point symmetry. Also, the velocity field shows similar dependence, hence the stellar halo of NGC 3311 is a dynamically young structure. The kinematic irregularities coincide in position with a displaced diffuse halo North-East of NGC 3311 and with tidal features of a group of disrupting dwarf galaxies. This suggests that the superposition of different velocity components is responsible for the kinematic substructure in the Hydra I cluster core.

  10. Discovery of a Nova in the Virgo Galaxy M100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Livio, Mario; Freedman, Wendy; Saha, Abhijit; Stetson, Peter B.; Ford, Holland C.; Hill, Robert J.; Madore, Barry F.

    1996-09-01

    We present the V and I light curves of a nova discovered in the disk of the spiral galaxy M100, located in the Virgo Cluster. In spite of the fact that the light curve is not well sampled around maximum light and the reddening to the nova is not accurately known, by adopting the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation by Della Valle & Livio we derive a distance modulus to M100 of mu 0 ~31.0 +/- 0.3 mag, fully consistent with the Cepheid distance modulus of 31.04 +/- 0.17 mag found by Ferrarese et al. from the same set of HST/WFPC2 data.

  11. Two Isolated H I Clouds in the Virgo Cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, W.; Davies, J.; Minchin, R.; Sabatini, S.; Baes, M.; Boyce, P.; de Blok, E.; Disney, M.; Evans, R.; Kilborn, V.; Lang, R.; Linder, S.; Roberts, S.; Smith, R.

    Seventy years after the start of radio astronomical observations and over 50 years after the first observations of the 21 cm H I line, a seemingly 'routine' H I survey at Jodrell Bank of an already thoroughly studied part of the local Universe -- the Virgo Cluster -- has yielded a surprising result: the detection of what appear to be two isolated H I clouds in the cluster, without optical counterparts, with H I masses of about 108 Msun (for an assumed distance of 16 Mpc) and angular sizes of about 4' to 6 arcmin, or 20--30 kpc, estimated from follow-up Arecibo H I observations. Their estimated peak H I column density of 4×1019 atoms/cm2 may be too low for star formation. H I synthesis observations and deep CCD imaging are planned of these objects.

  12. Creep induced substructures in titanium aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Ellen Kathleen

    Many investigations have examined the creep properties of titanium aluminides. Attempts to classify observed behaviors with existing models for high temperature deformation have been met with limited success. Several researchers have shown that an understanding of substructural evolution in the early stages of the creep curve may offer insight into the mechanisms, which control the rate of deformation. Creep deformation has been shown to include twinning, recrystallization, grain boundary sliding, ordinary and super dislocation activity, and faulting depending on the microstructure of the alloy and testing conditions. However, the environments that these alloys are likely to be exposed to are not similar to the test conditions in the literature. Furthermore the emphasis of much of the research into this group of alloys has been on the effects of microstructure particularly, the volume fraction of lamellar phase and ternary elemental additions. With all of these studies little information is available on the deformation behavior of the gamma phase. The alloys in these studies are mostly composed of the gamma phase and yet its creep behavior is not well understood. For this reason single phase binary gamma titanium aluminides were investigated in this study. To understand the effects of aluminum, interstitial oxygen content, and stress on creep, five alloys of varying Al concentrations and interstitial oxygen contents were deformed at temperatures ranging from 700--800°C and at stresses of 150, 200, and 250MPa. Full creep curves were developed under these conditions and phenomenological parameters for creep were calculated from these data. Additional tests were interrupted during primary and secondary creep at 760°C. Specimens from the interrupted tests as well as from the as-processed materials were examined optically and by TEM. Creep data and the microscopy were analyzed in concert to determine rate-controlling mechanisms for creep. Evolution of the substructure

  13. The spatial evolution of stellar structures in the LMC/SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Nate; Gieles, Mark; Ercolano, Barbara; Gutermuth, Robert

    2009-03-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of various stellar populations within the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We use optically selected stellar samples with mean ages between ~9 and ~1000 Myr, and existing stellar cluster catalogues to investigate how stellar structures form and evolve within the LMC/SMC. We use two statistical techniques to study the evolution of structure within these galaxies, the Q-parameter and the two-point correlation function (TPCF). In both galaxies we find the stars are born with a high degree of substructure (i.e. are highly fractal) and that the stellar distribution approaches that of the “background” population on timescales similar to the crossing times of the galaxy (~ 80 Myr & ~ 150 Myr for the SMC/LMC respectively). By comparing our observations to simple models of structural evolution we find that “popping star clusters” do not significantly influence structural evolution in these galaxies. Instead we argue that general galactic dynamics are the main drivers, and that substructure will be erased in approximately the crossing time, regardless of spatial scale, from small clusters to whole galaxies. This can explain why many young Galactic clusters have high degrees of substructure, while others are smooth and centrally concentrated. We conclude with a general discussion on cluster “infant mortality”, in an attempt to clarify the time/spatial scales involved.

  14. Substructure Main Bridge, Pier A Huey P. Long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure - Main Bridge, Pier A - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  15. 98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST SIDE OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING WEST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  16. 10. DETAIL OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING ORIGINAL CONNECTION WITH IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING ORIGINAL CONNECTION WITH IRON PINS. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM FACE OF EAST ABUTMENT. - Annisquam Bridge, Spanning Lobster Cove between Washington & River Streets, Gloucester, Essex County, MA

  17. Substructure view of the Young's Bay Bridge, view looking east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure view of the Young's Bay Bridge, view looking east, north side of the bascule trusswork - Old Young's Bay Bridge, Spanning Young's Bay at Milepoint 6.89 on Warrenton-Astoria Highway (Highway No. 9), Astoria, Clatsop County, OR

  18. EAGLE CREEK BRIDGE, EAST ELEVATION, SUBSTRUCTURE DETAIL LOOKING 333 DEGREES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAGLE CREEK BRIDGE, EAST ELEVATION, SUBSTRUCTURE DETAIL LOOKING 333 DEGREES NORTH-NORTHWEST - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Bridge, Spanning Eagle Creek on Historic Columbia River Highway, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  19. Detail view of Fanno Creek trestle, showing trestle substructure, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of Fanno Creek trestle, showing trestle substructure, view looking north - Oregon Electric Railroad, Fanno Creek Trestle, Garden Home to Wilsonville Segment, Milepost 34.7, Garden Home, Washington County, OR

  20. 22. VIEW OF FIXED SPAN SUBSTRUCTURE, EAST SPAN, SHOWING CANTILEVEREDBEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF FIXED SPAN SUBSTRUCTURE, EAST SPAN, SHOWING CANTILEVERED-BEAM SIDEWALK SUPPORTS, LONGITUDINAL GIRDER AND TRANSVERSE ROADBED BEAMS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Congress Street Bascule Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at Congress Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. Substructure view illustrating the continuous concrete Tbeams, piers, sidewalk brackets ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure view illustrating the continuous concrete T-beams, piers, sidewalk brackets and arched longitudinal beams - A Canal Bridge, Spanning the A Canal on Wall Street, Klamath Falls, Klamath County, OR

  2. 8. View of substructure showing the lower chord of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of substructure showing the lower chord of the Howe truss, flared board-and-batten siding, and pier configuration - Drift Creek Bridge, Spanning Drift Creek on Drift Creek County Road, Lincoln City, Lincoln County, OR

  3. 65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT COMPANY'S NEISSON CREEK SAWMILL. Print No. 177, November 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  4. Substructure Main Bridge, River Pier IV Huey P. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure - Main Bridge, River Pier IV - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  5. Substructure Main Bridge, River Piers I, II, III & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure - Main Bridge, River Piers I, II, III & IV - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  6. 3. VIEW OF SOUTH FACE AND CONSTRUCTION DETAIL OF SUBSTRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF SOUTH FACE AND CONSTRUCTION DETAIL OF SUBSTRUCTURE FROM NORTH BANK. RETAINING WALL OF GAUGING STATION IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND UNDER BRIDGE. - Old Happy Isles Bridge, Spanning Merced River on service road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  7. C II 158 ??bservations of a Sample of Late-type Galaxies from the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leech, K.; Volk, H.; Heinrichsen, I.; Hippelein, H.; Metcalfe, L.; Pierini, D.; Popescu, C.; Tuffs, R.; Xu, C.

    1999-01-01

    We have observed 19 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) obtaining spectra around the [CII] 157.741 ??ine structure line.

  8. Dark matter and IMF normalization in Virgo dwarf early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; La Barbera, F.; Napolitano, N. R.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analyse the dark matter (DM) fraction, fDM, and mass-to-light ratio mismatch parameter, δIMF (computed with respect to a Milky Way-like initial mass function), for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster. Both fDM and δIMF are estimated within the central (one effective radius) galaxy regions, with a Jeans dynamical analysis that relies on galaxy velocity dispersions, structural parameters, and stellar mass-to-light ratios from the SMAKCED survey. In this first attempt to constrain, simultaneously, the initial mass function (IMF) normalization and the DM content, we explore the impact of different assumptions on the DM model profile. On average, for an Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile, the δIMF is consistent with a Chabrier-like normalization ({δ _IMF}˜ 1), with {f_DM}˜ 0.35. One of the main results of this work is that for at least a few systems the δIMF are heavier than the Milky Way-like value (i.e. either top- or bottom-heavy). When introducing tangential anisotropy, larger δIMF and smaller fDM are derived. Adopting a steeper concentration-mass relation than that from simulations, we find lower δIMF ( ≲ 1) and larger fDM. A constant M/L profile with null fDM gives the heaviest δIMF (˜2). In the MONDian framework, we find consistent results to those for our reference NFW model. If confirmed, the large scatter of δIMF for dEs would provide (further) evidence for a non-universal IMF in early-type systems. On average, our reference fDM estimates are consistent with those found for low-σe (˜ 100 km s^{-1}) early-type galaxies (ETGs). Furthermore, we find fDM consistent with values from the SMAKCED survey, and find a double-value behaviour of fDM with stellar mass, which mirrors the trend of dynamical M/L and global star formation efficiency (from abundance matching estimates) with mass.

  9. A VERY LARGE ARRAY RADIO SURVEY OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Capetti, Alessandro; Kharb, Preeti; Axon, David J.; Merritt, David; Baldi, Ranieri D.

    2009-12-15

    We present the results of an 8.4 GHz Very Large Array radio survey of early-type galaxies extracted from the sample selected by Cote and collaborators for the Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey. The aim of this survey is to investigate the origin of radio emission in early-type galaxies and its link with the host properties in an unexplored territory toward the lowest levels of both radio and optical luminosities. Radio images, available for all 63 galaxies with B {sub T} < 14.4, show the presence of a compact radio source in 12 objects, with fluxes spanning from 0.13 mJy to 2700 mJy. The remaining 51 galaxies, undetected at a flux limit of {approx}0.1 mJy, have radio luminosities L {approx}< 4 x 10{sup 18} W Hz{sup -1}. The fraction of radio-detected galaxies are a strong function of stellar mass, in agreement with previous results: none of the 30 galaxies with M {sub *} < 1.7 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} is detected, while 8 of the 11 most massive galaxies have radio cores. There appears to be no simple relation between the presence of a stellar nucleus and radio emission. In fact, we find radio sources associated with two nucleated galaxies, but the majority of nucleated objects are not a radio emitter above our detection threshold. A multiwavelength analysis of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission, combining radio and X-ray data, confirms the link between optical surface brightness profile and radio loudness in the sense that the bright core galaxies are associated with radio-loud AGNs, while non-core galaxies host radio-quiet AGNs. Not all radio-detected galaxies have an X-ray nuclear counterpart (and vice versa). A complete census of AGNs (and supermassive black holes, SMBHs) thus requires observations, at least, in both bands. Nonetheless, there are massive galaxies in the sample, expected to host a large SMBH (M {sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}), whose nuclear emission eludes detection despite their proximity and the depth and the

  10. Using Network Methodology to Infer Population Substructure

    PubMed Central

    Prokopenko, Dmitry; Hecker, Julian; Silverman, Edwin; Nöthen, Markus M.; Schmid, Matthias; Lange, Christoph; Loehlein Fier, Heide

    2015-01-01

    One of the main caveats of association studies is the possible affection by bias due to population stratification. Existing methods rely on model-based approaches like structure and ADMIXTURE or on principal component analysis like EIGENSTRAT. Here we provide a novel visualization technique and describe the problem of population substructure from a graph-theoretical point of view. We group the sequenced individuals into triads, which depict the relational structure, on the basis of a predefined pairwise similarity measure. We then merge the triads into a network and apply community detection algorithms in order to identify homogeneous subgroups or communities, which can further be incorporated as covariates into logistic regression. We apply our method to populations from different continents in the 1000 Genomes Project and evaluate the type 1 error based on the empirical p-values. The application to 1000 Genomes data suggests that the network approach provides a very fine resolution of the underlying ancestral population structure. Besides we show in simulations, that in the presence of discrete population structures, our developed approach maintains the type 1 error more precisely than existing approaches. PMID:26098940

  11. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  12. Search for Gravitational Waves from Low Mass Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO's Sixth Science Run and Virgo's Science Runs 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries using LIGO and Virgo observations between July 7, 2009, and October 20. 2010. We searched for signals from binaries with total mass between 2 and 25 Stellar Mass; this includes binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a black hole and neutron star. The detectors were sensitive to systems up to 40 Mpc distant for binary neutron stars, and further for higher mass systems. No gravitational-wave signals were detected. We report upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence as a function of total mass. including the results from previous LIGO and Virgo observations. The cumulative 90% confidence rate upper limits of the binary coalescence of binary neutron star, neutron star-black hole, and binary black hole systems are 1.3 x 10(exp -4), 3.1 x 10(exp -5), and 6.4 x 10(exp -6)/cu Mpc/yr, respectively. These upper limits are up to a factor 1.4 lower than previously derived limits. We also report on results from a blind injection challenge.

  13. Data analysis methods for non-Gaussian, nonstationary and nonlinear features and their application to VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo Collaboration; Acernese, F.; Amico, P.; Arnaud, N.; Babusci, D.; Ballardin, G.; Barillé, R.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Beauville, F.; Bellachia, F.; Bizouard, M. A.; Boccara, C.; Boget, D.; Bondu, F.; Bourgoin, C.; Bozzi, A.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Brocco, L.; Buskulic, D.; Cachenaut, J.; Calamai, G.; Calloni, E.; Campagna, E.; Casciano, C.; Cattuto, C.; Cavalier, F.; Cavaliere, S.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chollet, F.; Cleva, F.; Cokelaer, T.; Conforto, G.; Cortese, S.; Coulon, J. P.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Y Davíd, P.; Davier, M.; De Rosa, M.; De Rosa, R.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dujardin, B.; Dominici, P.; Eleuteri, A.; Enard, D.; Evangelista, G.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Forest, D.; Fournier, J. D.; Fournier, L.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganau, P.; Gennai, A.; Gennaro, G.; Giacobone, L.; Giazotto, A.; Giordano, G.; Girard, C.; Gougoulat, G.; Guidi, G. M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hermel, R.; Heusse, P.; Holloway, L.; Honglie, F.; Iannarelli, M.; Journet, L.; Krecklbergh, S.; Lagrange, B.; La Penna, P.; Leliboux, M.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Loupias, M.; Mackowski, J. M.; Majorana, E.; Man, C. N.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Martelli, F.; Masserot, A.; Massonnet, L.; Mataguez, S.; Menzinger, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Montorio, J. L.; Moreau, F.; Moreau, J.; Morgado, N.; Mornet, F.; Mours, B.; Mugnier, P.; Nenci, F.; Pacheco, J.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Paoli, L.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Perciballi, M.; Peruzzi, S.; Perniola, B.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E.; Puccinelli, S.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qipiani, K.; Ramonet, J.; Rapagnani, P.; Reita, V.; Remillieux, A.; Ricci, F.; Richard, F.; Roger, J. P.; Ruggi, P.; Russo, G.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Taddei, R.; Teuler, J. M.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Trinquet, H.; Turri, E.; Varvella, M.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Veziant, O.; Viceré, A.; Vilalte, S.; Y Vinet, J.; Vocca, H.; Yvert, M.; Zhang, Z.

    2003-09-01

    The commissioning of the VIRGO central interferometer occasioned the implementation and tests of various algorithms for the characterization of the non-Gaussianity, non-stationarity and non-linearity of the dark fringe data. This library of prototypes will serve as groundwork for the near commissioning of VIRGO (full scale). We make a summary of the activities on that subject including the description of the selected algorithms and some results obtained with the data of the engineering runs.

  14. Hubble space telescope imaging of decoupled dust clouds in the ram pressure stripped Virgo spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Anne; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P. E-mail: jeff.kenney@yale.edu

    2014-03-01

    We present the highest-resolution study to date of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies undergoing ram pressure stripping, using Hubble Space Telescope BVI imaging of NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, Virgo Cluster spirals that are well known to be experiencing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure. We find that throughout most of both galaxies, the main dust lane has a fairly well-defined edge, with a population of giant molecular cloud (GMC) sized (tens- to hundreds-of-pc scale), isolated, highly extincting dust clouds located up to ∼1.5 kpc radially beyond it. Outside of these dense clouds, the area has little or no diffuse dust extinction, indicating that the clouds have decoupled from the lower-density ISM material that has already been stripped. Several of the dust clouds have elongated morphologies that indicate active ram pressure, including two large (kpc scale) filaments in NGC 4402 that are elongated in the projected ICM wind direction. We calculate a lower limit on the H I + H{sub 2} masses of these clouds based on their dust extinctions and find that a correction factor of ∼10 gives cloud masses consistent with those measured in CO for clouds of similar diameters, probably due to the complicating factors of foreground light, cloud substructure, and resolution limitations. Assuming that the clouds' actual masses are consistent with those of GMCs of similar diameters (∼10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), we estimate that only a small fraction (∼1%-10%) of the original H I + H{sub 2} remains in the parts of the disks with decoupled clouds. Based on Hα images, a similar fraction of star formation persists in these regions, 2%-3% of the estimated pre-stripping star formation rate. We find that the decoupled cloud lifetimes may be up to 150-200 Myr.

  15. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks I: Morphological Signatures of Hierarchical SatelliteAccretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-12-03

    We conduct a series of high-resolution, fully self-consistent dissipation less N-body simulations to investigate the cumulative effect of substructure mergers onto thin disk galaxies in the context of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of structure formation. Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. Substructure mass functions, orbital distributions, internal structures, and accretion times are culled directly from cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized cold dark matter (CDM) halos. We demonstrate that accretions of massive subhalos onto the central regions of host halos, where the galactic disk resides, since z {approx} 1 should be common occurrences. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. This is due to the fact that massive subhalos with small orbital pericenters that are most capable of strongly perturbing the disk become either tidally disrupted or suffer substantial mass loss prior to z = 0. One host halo merger history is subsequently used to seed controlled N-body experiments of repeated satellite impacts on an initially-thin Milky Way-type disk galaxy. These simulations track the effects of six dark matter substructures, with initial masses in the range {approx} (0.7-2) x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 20-60% of the disk mass), crossing the disk in the past {approx} 8 Gyr. We show that these accretion events produce several distinctive observational signatures in the stellar disk including: a long-lived, low-surface brightness, ring-like feature in the outskirts; a significant flare; a central bar; and faint filamentary structures that (spuriously) resemble tidal streams in configuration space. The final distribution of disk stars exhibits a complex vertical structure that is well-described by a standard 'thin-thick' disk decomposition, where the 'thick' disk component has emerged

  16. Alignments of the Galaxies in and around the Virgo Cluster with the Local Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-01

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  17. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-10

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  18. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  19. Substructure and Dynamics of the Fornax Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, Michael J.; Gregg, Michael D.; Colless, Matthew

    2001-02-01

    We present the first dynamical analysis of a galaxy cluster to include a large fraction of dwarf galaxies. Our sample of 108 Fornax Cluster members measured with the UK Schmidt Telescope FLAIR-II spectrograph contains 55 dwarf galaxies (15.5>bJ>18.0 or -16>MB>-13.5). Hα emission shows that 36%+/-8% of the dwarfs are star forming, twice the fraction implied by morphological classifications. The total sample has a mean velocity of 1493+/-36 km s-1 and a velocity dispersion of 374+/-26 km s-1. The dwarf galaxies form a distinct population: their velocity dispersion (429+/-41 km s-1) is larger than that of the giants (308+/-30 km s-1) at the 98% confidence level. This suggests that the dwarf population is dominated by infalling objects whereas the giants are virialized. The Fornax system has two components, the main Fornax Cluster centered on NGC 1399 with cz=1478 km s-1 and σcz=370 km s-1 and a subcluster centered 3° to the southwest including NGC 1316 with cz=1583 km s-1 and σcz=377 km s-1. This partition is preferred over a single cluster at the 99% confidence level. The subcluster, a site of intense star formation, is bound to Fornax and probably infalling toward the cluster core for the first time. We discuss the implications of this substructure for distance estimates of the Fornax Cluster. We determine the cluster mass profile using the method of Diaferio, which does not assume a virialized sample. The mass within a projected radius of 1.4 Mpc is (7+/-2)×1013 Msolar, and the mass-to-light ratio is 300+/-100 Msolar/Lsolar. The mass is consistent with values derived from the projected mass virial estimator and X-ray measurements at smaller radii.

  20. SUBSTRUCTURE DEPLETION IN THE MILKY WAY HALO BY THE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onghia, Elena; Hernquist, Lars; Keres, Dusan; Springel, Volker

    2010-02-01

    We employ numerical simulations and simple analytical estimates to argue that dark matter substructures orbiting in the inner regions of the Galaxy can be efficiently destroyed by disk shocking, a dynamical process known to affect globular star clusters. We carry out a set of fiducial high-resolution collisionless simulations in which we adiabatically grow a disk, allowing us to examine the impact of the disk on the substructure abundance. We also track the orbits of dark matter satellites in high-resolution Aquarius simulations and analytically estimate the cumulative halo and disk-shocking effect. Our calculations indicate that the presence of a disk with only 10% of the total Milky Way mass can significantly alter the mass function of substructures in the inner parts of halos. This has important implications especially for the relatively small number of satellites seen within approx30 kpc of the Milky Way center, where disk shocking is expected to reduce the substructure abundance by a factor of 2 at 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} and a factor of 3 at 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}. The most massive subhalos with 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} survive even in the presence of the disk. This suggests that there is no inner missing satellite problem and calls into question whether these substructures can produce transient features in disks, like multi-armed spiral patterns. Also, the depletion of dark matter substructures through shocking on the baryonic structures of the disk and central bulge may aggravate the problem to fully account for the observed flux anomalies in gravitational lens systems, and significantly reduces the dark matter annihilation signal expected from nearby substructures in the inner halo.

  1. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. X. Properties of Ultra-compact Dwarfs in the M87, M49, and M60 Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengze; Peng, Eric W.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Mihos, J. Christopher; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Gwyn, Stephen; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Blakeslee, John P.; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Guhathakurta, Puragra; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Mei, Simona; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Xu, Haiguang

    2015-10-01

    We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive red-sequence galaxies M87, M49, and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color-color diagrams (u*iKs or u*gz). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ˜3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters (GCs), and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ˜85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.

  2. The WSRT Virgo Hi filament survey. II. Cross correlation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, A.; Braun, R.

    2011-04-01

    Context. The extended environment of galaxies contains a wealth of information about the formation and life cycle of galaxies which are regulated by accretion and feedback processes. Observations of neutral hydrogen are routinely used to image the high brightness disks of galaxies and to study their kinematics. Deeper observations will give more insight into the distribution of diffuse gas in the extended halo of the galaxies and the inter-galactic medium, where numerical simulations predict a cosmic web of extended structures and gaseous filaments. Aims: To observe the extended environment of galaxies, column density sensitivities have to be achieved that probe the regime of Lyman limit systems. H i observations are typically limited to a brightness sensitivity of NHI ~ 1019 cm-2, but this must be improved upon by ~2 orders of magnitude. Methods: In this paper we present the interferometric data of the Westerbork Virgo H i Filament Survey (WVFS) - the total power product of this survey has been published in an earlier paper. By observing at extreme hour angles, a filled aperture is simulated of 300 × 25 m in size, that has the typical collecting power and sensitivity of a single dish telescope, but the well defined bandpass characteristics of an interferometer. With the very good surface brightness sensitivity of the data, we hope to make new H i detections of diffuse systems with moderate angular resolution. Results: The survey maps 135 degrees in Right Ascension between 8 and 17 h and 11 degrees in Declination between - 1 and 10 degrees, including the galaxy filament connecting the Local Group with the Virgo Cluster. Only positive declinations could be completely processed and analysed due to projection effects. A typical flux sensitivity of 6 mJy beam-1 over 16 km s-1 is achieved, that corresponds to a brightness sensitivity of NHI ~ 1018 cm-2. An unbiased search has been done with a high significance threshold as well a search with a lower significance limit

  3. Stellar substructures in the solar neighbourhood. I. Kinematic group 3 in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonkutė, E.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Nordström, B.; Ženovienė, R.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Galactic archeology is a powerful tool for investigating the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. We use this technique to study kinematic groups of F- and G-stars in the solar neighbourhood. From correlations between orbital parameters, three new coherent groups of stars were recently identified and suggested to correspond to remnants of disrupted satellites. Aims: We determine detailed elemental abundances in stars belonging to one of these groups and compare their chemical composition with Galactic disc stars. The aim is to look for possible chemical signatures that might give information about the history of this kinematic group of stars. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma, and analysed with a differential model atmosphere method. Comparison stars were observed and analysed with the same method. Results: The average value of [Fe/H] for the 20 stars investigated in this study is -0.69 ± 0.05 dex. Elemental abundances of oxygen and α-elements are overabundant in comparison with Galactic thin-disc dwarfs and thin-disc chemical evolution models. This abundance pattern has similar characteristics as the Galactic thick-disc. Conclusions: The homogeneous chemical composition together with the kinematic properties and ages of stars in the investigated Group 3 of the Geneva-Copenhagen survey provides evidence of their common origin and possible relation to an ancient merging event. The similar chemical composition of stars in the investigated group and the thick-disc stars might suggest that their formation histories are linked. Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. The stability of stellar discs in Milky Way-sized dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurin, Denis; Springel, Volker

    2015-09-01

    We employ an improved methodology to insert live stellar discs into high-resolution dark matter simulations of Milky Way-sized haloes, allowing us to investigate the fate of thin stellar discs in the tumultuous environment of cold dark matter structures. We study a set of eight different haloes, drawn from the Aquarius simulation project, in which stellar discs are adiabatically grown with a prescribed structure, and then allowed to self-consistently evolve. The initial velocity distribution is set-up in very good equilibrium with the help of the GALIC code. We find that the residual triaxiality of the haloes leads to significant disc tumbling, qualitatively confirming earlier work. We show that the disc turning motion is unaffected by structural properties of the galaxies such as the presence or absence of a bulge or bar. In typical Milky Way-sized dark matter haloes, we expect an average turning of the discs by about 40°between z = 1 and 0, over the course of 7.6 Gyr. We also investigate the impact of the discs on substructures, and conversely, the disc heating rate caused by the dark matter halo substructures. The presence of discs reduces the central subhalo abundance by a about a factor of 2, due to an increased evaporation rate by gravitational shocks from disc passages. We find that substructures are important for heating the outer parts of stellar discs but do not appear to significantly affect their inner parts.

  5. Gamma-ray probes of dark matter substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Sheldon

    2014-06-24

    The substructure content of dark matter halos is interesting because it can be affected by complex galaxy physics and dark matter particle physics. However, observing the small scale structure of dark matter is a challenge. The subhalo abundance (mass function, minimum mass) and morphology (density profile, subhalo shape, subsubstructure) contain information about complex astrophysics (halo formation processes) and new exotic fundamental physics (dark matter interactions). Indirect detection of dark matter annihilation radiation (DMAR) in gamma rays may be the most direct method for observing small scale structure. I outline the ways in which gamma rays may probe halo substructure. If substructure is bountiful, it may be responsible for the eventual discovery of DMAR, for instance in galaxy clusters or the diffuse gamma-ray background. Otherwise, the observation of DMAR in places without much substructure, such as the Galactic center, would lead to strict limits on the properties of small scale structure. Properties of the gamma-ray angular power spectrum will also provide information or constraints on Milky Way halo substructure.

  6. Substructure location and size effects on decentralized model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xinjun; Zhu, Dapeng; Wang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    To improve the simulation accuracy of the finite-element (FE) model of an as-built structure, measurement data from the actual structure can be utilized for updating the model parameters, which is termed as FE model updating. During the past few decades, most efforts on FE model updating intend to update the entire structure model altogether, while using measurement data from sensors installed throughout the structure. When applied on large and complex structural models, the typical model updating approaches may fail due to computational challenges and convergence issues. In order to reduce the computational difficulty, this paper studies a decentralized FE model updating approach that intends to update one substructure at a time. The approach divides the entire structure into a substructure (currently being instrumented and updated) and the residual structure. The Craig-Bampton transform is adopted to condense the overall structural model. The optimization objective is formulated to minimize the modal dynamic residuals from the eigenvalue equations in structural dynamics involving natural frequencies and mode shapes. This paper investigates the effects of different substructure locations and sizes on updating performance. A space frame example, which is based on an actual pedestrian bridge on Georgia Tech campus, is used to study the substructure location and size effects. Keywords: substructure

  7. Quantifying the Significance of Substructure in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, K. B. D.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2014-12-01

    A method to infer the presence of small-scale substructure in SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory) images of coronal loops is developed. We can classify visible loop structure based on this propensity to show substructure which puts constraints on contemporary solutions to the coronal heating problem. The method uses the Bayesian algorithm Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) to infer the multi-scale component of the loops which describes deviations from a smooth model. The increase in contrast of features in this multi-scale component is determined using a statistic that estimates the sharpness across the image. Regions with significant substructure are determined using p-value upper bounds. We are able to locate substructure visible in Hi-C (High-Resolution Coronal Imager) data that are not salient features in the corresponding AIA image. Looking at coronal loops at different regions of the Sun (e.g., low-lying structure and loops in the upper corona) we are able to map where detectable substructure exists and thus the influence of the nanoflare heating process. We acknowledge support from AIA under contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed-Martin to SAO.

  8. History of Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of stellar interferometry from the suggestion of Fizeau that stellar interferometry was possible,to the use of the Mark I, II and III for astrometry. Photographs, and parts of original articles are presented.

  9. First Hubble Space Telescope observations of the brightest stars in the Virgo galaxy M100 = NGC 4321

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Stetson, Peter B.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Trauger, John T.; Gallagher, John S., III; Ballester, Gilda E.; Burrows, Christopher J.

    1994-01-01

    As part of both the Early Release Observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, we have obtained multiwavelength BVR Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) images for the face-on Virgo cluster spiral galaxy M100 = NGC 4321. We report here preliminary results from those observations, in the form of a color-magnitude diagram for approximately 11,500 stars down to V approximately 27 mag and a luminosity function for the brightest blue stars which is found to have a slope of 0.7, in excellent agreement with previous results obtained for significantly nearer galaxies. With the increased resolution now available using WFPC2, the number of galaxies in which we can directly measure Population I stars and thereby quantify the recent evolution, as well as test stellar evolution theory, has dramatically increased by at least a factor of 100. Finally, we find that the stars are present in M100 at the colors and luminosities expected for the brightest Cepheid variables in galaxies.

  10. THE ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XVII. THE SPATIAL ALIGNMENT OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS WITH EARLY-TYPE HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiushi; Peng, Eric W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordan, Andres; Mei, Simona; West, Michael J.

    2013-06-01

    We study the azimuthal distribution of globular clusters (GCs) in early-type galaxies and compare them to their host galaxies using data from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We find that in host galaxies with visible elongation ({epsilon} > 0.2) and intermediate to high luminosities (M{sub z} < -19), the GCs are preferentially aligned along the major axis of the stellar light. The red (metal-rich) GC subpopulations show strong alignment with the major axis of the host galaxy, which supports the notion that these GCs are associated with metal-rich field stars. The metal-rich GCs in lenticular galaxies show signs of being more strongly associated with disks rather than bulges. Surprisingly, we also find that the blue (metal-poor) GCs can also show the same correlation. If the metal-poor GCs are part of the early formation of the halo and built up through mergers, then our results support a picture where halo formation and merging occur anisotropically, and that the present-day major axis is an indicator of the preferred merging axis.

  11. Kinematic and Spatial Substructure in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Fűrész, Gabor; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario

    2015-04-01

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular (13CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  12. Comparative properties of Virgo Cluster dwarf irregulars and spirals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle; Helou, George; Salpeter, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    The optical and neutral hydrogen data for all spiral and late-type dwarf irregular galaxies in the Virgo Cluster catalog are analyzed. In particular, the continuity of optical properties, hydrogen masses, and dynamical properties are examined as functions of morphology and luminosity from the largest spirals through the faintest dwarfs (omitting blue compact dwarf galaxies); the effects of environment on H I content; mass segregation; and the Tully-Fisher relations. The spiral plus dwarf sample forms a continuous but nonhomologous sequence. Indicative dynamical mass-to-light ratios are relatively constant throughout; hydrogen mass-to-light ratios show only a slight increase with decreasing luminosity. The Tully-Fisher relations extend with continuous slope from spirals through dwarfs. The dwarfs show some evidence of ram-pressure stripping by the intracluster medium, but as a group do not seem to be stripped more heavily than spirals. There is no evidence of mass segregation even for the very low mass dwarfs versus giant spirals.

  13. A Dark Hydrogen Cloud in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, Robert; Davies, Jonathan; Disney, Michael; Boyce, Peter; Garcia, Diego; Jordan, Christine; Kilborn, Virginia; Lang, Robert; Roberts, Sarah; Sabatini, Sabina; van Driel, Wim

    2005-03-01

    VIRGOHI 21 is an H I source detected in the Virgo Cluster survey of Davies et al. that has a neutral hydrogen mass of 108 Msolar and a velocity width of ΔV20=220 km s-1. From the Tully-Fisher relation, a galaxy with this velocity width would be expected to be 12 mag or brighter; however, deep CCD imaging has failed to turn up a counterpart down to a surface brightness level of 27.5 B mag arcsec-2. The H I observations show that it is extended over at least 16 kpc, which, if the system is bound, gives it a minimum dynamical mass of ~1011 Msolar and a mass-to-light ratio of Mdyn/LB>500 Msolar/Lsolar. If it is tidal debris, then the putative parents have vanished; the remaining viable explanation is that VIRGOHI 21 is a dark halo that does not contain the expected bright galaxy. This object was found because of the low column density limit of our survey, a limit much lower than that achieved by all sky H I surveys such as those carried out at Parkes and Jodrell Bank. Further such sensitive surveys might turn up a significant number of the dark matter halos predicted by galaxy formation models.

  14. A Full Census of Intracluster Light in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Jessica; Desai, V.; Murphy, E.; Bridge, C.; Mihos, C.; Rudick, C.; Neill, J.; Surace, J.; Kenney, J.; van Gorkom, J.; Carlberg, R.

    2010-01-01

    We have begun a new multi-wavelength project to explore the interaction history and evolution of galaxies in clusters. As a cluster hierarchically grows, gravitational and gas dynamical effects (e.g. galaxy-galaxy interactions, harassment, ram pressure stripping, starvation) are capable of removing stars, gas, and dust from galaxies. The intracluster light (ICL) therefore holds a record of the growth history of the cluster. We intend to explore a full mass census of the intracluster light in the central degree of the Virgo cluster by looking at the stars, dust, and gas components. We have recently been awarded Spitzer Warm IRAC 3.6 and 4.5micron data to compare with the published V-band imaging of Mihos et al. 2005. In addition we have discovered the first ever detected ICL feature in the UV with GALEX. This feature is ˜50 kpc long, ˜40 kpc from the interacting galaxy pair NGC4438/4435, and is spatially coincident with a tidal plume detected in deep V -band imaging. The presence of this feature in the UV is extremely surpising because previous optical analyses indicate that IC stars are old, and should therefore be undetected in the FUV. Spectral energy distribution(SED) fitting of the GALEX and optical data of this plume reveal not only a population of young IC stars but also significant amounts of IC dust.

  15. Warp Characteristics of Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Chung, A.; Kim, S. S.; Jozsa, G. I. G.; Yoon, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the warp characteristics of 22 spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster based on their VLA HI datacubes with unprecedented precision. The tilted-ring modeling method is used to examine kinematic properties of the HI disks including the inclination and position angle. The main results are as follows. First, 17 out of the 19 (89.5 %) successfully-modeled galaxies exhibit either weak or strong warps, indicating that the warps are very common not only galaxies in isolation but ones in dense environments. Second, the warp strength decreases with increasing dynamical mass, supporting the notion that the warps are primarily controlled by dark matter halos. Last, the warp characteristics in our sample are distinct from those of isolated galaxies, in that the warps in our sample varies a great deal in inclination, but little in position angle. This implies that in dense environments, the main driver of the disk warps is most likely the galactic tidal interaction, rather than other explanations such as the cosmic infall scenario.

  16. HUNDRED THOUSAND DEGREE GAS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Martin, R.; Cracraft, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Donahue, M.; Voit, M.; Manset, N.; Hough, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    The physical relationship between low-excitation gas filaments at {approx}10{sup 4} K, seen in optical line emission, and diffuse X-ray emitting coronal gas at {approx}10{sup 7} K in the centers of many galaxy clusters is not understood. It is unclear whether the {approx}10{sup 4} K filaments have cooled and condensed from the ambient hot ({approx}10{sup 7} K) medium or have some other origin such as the infall of cold gas in a merger, or the disturbance of an internal cool reservoir of gas by nuclear activity. Observations of gas at intermediate temperatures ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} K) can potentially reveal whether the central massive galaxies are gaining cool gas through condensation or losing it through conductive evaporation and hence identify plausible scenarios for transport processes in galaxy cluster gas. Here we present spectroscopic detection of {approx}10{sup 5} K gas spatially associated with the H{alpha} filaments in a central cluster galaxy, M87, in the Virgo Cluster. The measured emission-line fluxes from triply ionized carbon (C IV 1549 A) and singly ionized helium (He II 1640 A) are consistent with a model in which thermal conduction determines the interaction between hot and cold phases.

  17. Solar-stellar connection: the frequency of maximum oscillation power from solar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barban, C.; Beuret, M.; Baudin, F.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.; Samadi, R.

    2013-06-01

    Stellar oscillations provide powerful tools to derive stellar fundamental parameters such as the mass and radius. These global quantities are derived from scaling relations linking seismic quantities [νmax and Δν to global stellar parameters. These relations use the Sun as a reference. In this work, we used VIRGO and GOLF data to study how the solar frequency at the maximum oscillation power (νmax) varies with time along the solar cycle. We show that these variations imply differences of about 4% in radius and 12% in mass. We showed also that the observational method based on intensity or velocity data has also an impact, implying differences in mass of about 22% and 7% in radius.

  18. Shock induced deformation substructures in a copper bicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Fang; Beyerlein, Irene J; Cerreta, Ellen K; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray Ill, George T; Sencer, Bulent H

    2008-01-01

    Controlled shock recovery experiments have been conducted to assess the role of shock pressure and orientation dependence on the substructure evolution of a [100]/[01{ovr 1}] copper bicrystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize orientation variation and substructure evolution of the post-shock specimens. Well defined dislocation cell structures were displayed in both grains and the average cell size was observed to decrease with increasing shock pressure. Twinning was occasionally observed in the 5 GPa shocked [100] grain and became the dominant substructure at higher shock pressure. The stress and directional dependence of twinning in the bicrystal was analyzed with consideration of the energetically favorable dissociation of dislocations into Shockley partials and the stress-orientation effect on the partial width. Moreover, a critical 'tear apart' stress is proposed and a good agreement is obtained between the calculated value and the experimental observations.

  19. EFFECT OF DARK MATTER HALO SUBSTRUCTURES ON GALAXY ROTATION CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Nirupam

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of halo substructures on galaxy rotation curves is investigated using a simple model of dark matter clustering. A dark matter halo density profile is developed based only on the scale-free nature of clustering that leads to a statistically self-similar distribution of the substructures at the galactic scale. A semi-analytical method is used to derive rotation curves for such a clumpy dark matter density profile. It is found that the halo substructures significantly affect the galaxy velocity field. Based on the fractal geometry of the halo, this self-consistent model predicts a Navarro-Frenk-White-like rotation curve and a scale-free power spectrum of the rotation velocity fluctuations.

  20. Functional Group and Substructure Searching as a Tool in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Kotera, Masaaki; McDonald, Andrew G.; Boyce, Sinéad; Tipton, Keith F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A direct link between the names and structures of compounds and the functional groups contained within them is important, not only because biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups, but also because metabolic models depend upon the connections between enzymes and substrates being known and appropriately stored in databases. Methodology We have developed a database named “Biochemical Substructure Search Catalogue” (BiSSCat), which contains 489 functional groups, >200,000 compounds and >1,000,000 different computationally constructed substructures, to allow identification of chemical compounds of biological interest. Conclusions This database and its associated web-based search program (http://bisscat.org/) can be used to find compounds containing selected combinations of substructures and functional groups. It can be used to determine possible additional substrates for known enzymes and for putative enzymes found in genome projects. Its applications to enzyme inhibitor design are also discussed. PMID:18253485

  1. Infall of nearby galaxies into the Virgo cluster as traced with Hubble space telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Tully, R. Brent; Wu, Po-Feng; Shaya, Edward J.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2014-02-10

    We measured the tip of the red giant branch distances to nine galaxies in the direction to the Virgo cluster using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. These distances put seven galaxies (GR 34, UGC 7512, NGC 4517, IC 3583, NGC 4600, VCC 2037, and KDG 215) in front of Virgo and two galaxies (IC 3023 and KDG 177) likely inside the cluster. Distances and radial velocities of the galaxies situated between us and the Virgo core clearly exhibit the infall phenomenon toward the cluster. In the case of spherically symmetric radial infall, we estimate the radius of the 'zero-velocity surface' to be (7.2 ± 0.7) Mpc, which yields a total mass of the Virgo cluster of (8.0 ± 2.3) × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}, in good agreement with its virial mass estimates. We conclude that the Virgo outskirts do not contain significant amounts of dark matter beyond their virial radius.

  2. The first two years of electromagnetic follow-up with advanced LIGO and Virgo

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Leo P.; Price, Larry R.; Farr, Ben; Urban, Alex L.; Pankow, Chris; Downes, Tom; Vitale, Salvatore; Veitch, John; Farr, Will M.; Haster, Carl-Johan; Mandel, Ilya; Sidery, Trevor; Vecchio, Alberto; Hanna, Chad; Cannon, Kipp; Graff, Philip

    2014-11-10

    We anticipate the first direct detections of gravitational waves (GWs) with Advanced LIGO and Virgo later this decade. Though this groundbreaking technical achievement will be its own reward, a still greater prize could be observations of compact binary mergers in both gravitational and electromagnetic channels simultaneously. During Advanced LIGO and Virgo's first two years of operation, 2015 through 2016, we expect the global GW detector array to improve in sensitivity and livetime and expand from two to three detectors. We model the detection rate and the sky localization accuracy for binary neutron star (BNS) mergers across this transition. We have analyzed a large, astrophysically motivated source population using real-time detection and sky localization codes and higher-latency parameter estimation codes that have been expressly built for operation in the Advanced LIGO/Virgo era. We show that for most BNS events, the rapid sky localization, available about a minute after a detection, is as accurate as the full parameter estimation. We demonstrate that Advanced Virgo will play an important role in sky localization, even though it is anticipated to come online with only one-third as much sensitivity as the Advanced LIGO detectors. We find that the median 90% confidence region shrinks from ∼500 deg{sup 2} in 2015 to ∼200 deg{sup 2} in 2016. A few distinct scenarios for the first LIGO/Virgo detections emerge from our simulations.

  3. The characterization of Virgo data and its impact on gravitational-wave searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballinger, T.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Y Chua, S. S.; Y Chung, C. T.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardt, A.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Y Khalili, F.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow–Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tucker, E.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-08-01

    Between 2007 and 2010 Virgo collected data in coincidence with the LIGO and GEO gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. These data have been searched for GWs emitted by cataclysmic phenomena in the universe, by non-axisymmetric rotating neutron stars or from a stochastic background in the frequency band of the detectors. The sensitivity of GW searches is limited by noise produced by the detector or its environment. It is therefore crucial to characterize the various noise sources in a GW detector. This paper reviews the Virgo detector noise sources, noise propagation, and conversion mechanisms which were identified in the three first Virgo observing runs. In many cases, these investigations allowed us to mitigate noise sources in the detector, or to selectively flag noise events and discard them from the data. We present examples from the joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo GW searches to show how well noise transients and narrow spectral lines have been identified and excluded from the Virgo data. We also discuss how detector characterization can improve the astrophysical reach of GW searches.

  4. The Characterization of Virgo Data and Its Impact on Gravitational-Wave Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Blackburn, L.; Buonanno, A.; Camp, J. B.; Capano, C.D.; Kanner, J. B.; Pan, Y.; Shawhan, P.; Yancey, C. C.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2010 Virgo collected data in coincidence with the LIGO and GEO gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. These data have been searched for GWs emitted by cataclysmic phenomena in the universe, by non-axisymmetric rotating neutron stars or from a stochastic background in the frequency band of the detectors. The sensitivity of GW searches is limited by noise produced by the detector or its environment. It is therefore crucial to characterize the various noise sources in a GW detector. This paper reviews the Virgo detector noise sources, noise propagation, and conversion mechanisms which were identified in the three first Virgo observing runs. In many cases, these investigations allowed us to mitigate noise sources in the detector, or to selectively flag noise events and discard them from the data. We present examples from the joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo GW searches to show how well noise transients and narrow spectral lines have been identified and excluded from the Virgo data. We also discuss how detector characterization can improve the astrophysical reach of gravitational wave searches.

  5. Estimation of ADME properties with substructure pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cheng, Feixiong; Xu, You; Li, Weihua; Tang, Yun

    2010-06-28

    Over the past decade, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) property evaluation has become one of the most important issues in the process of drug discovery and development. Since in vivo and in vitro evaluations are costly and laborious, in silico techniques had been widely used to estimate ADME properties of chemical compounds. Traditional prediction methods usually try to build a functional relationship between a set of molecular descriptors and a given ADME property. Although traditional methods have been successfully used in many cases, the accuracy and efficiency of molecular descriptors must be concerned. Herein, we report a new classification method based on substructure pattern recognition, in which each molecule is represented as a substructure pattern fingerprint based on a predefined substructure dictionary, and then a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied to build the prediction model. Therefore, a direct connection between substructures and molecular properties is built. The most important substructure patterns can be identified via the information gain analysis, which could help to interpret the models from a medicinal chemistry perspective. Afterward, this method was verified with two data sets, one for blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration and the other for human intestinal absorption (HIA). The results demonstrated that the overall predictive accuracies of the best HIA model for the training and test sets were 98.5 and 98.8%, and the overall predictive accuracies of the best BBB model for the training and test sets were 98.8 and 98.4%, which confirmed the reliability of our method. In the additional validations, the predictive accuracies were 94 and 69.5% for the HIA and the BBB models, respectively. Moreover, some of the representative key substructure patterns which significantly correlated with the HIA and BBB penetration properties were also presented. PMID:20578727

  6. System for detecting substructure microfractures and method therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Narasimhan, K. Y. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Bursts of signals at different frequencies are induced into substructure, adjacent to a borehole. The return signals from each burst of signals are normalized to compensate for the attenuation, experienced by more distant return signals. The peak amplitudes of return signals, above a selected level, are cut off, and an average signal is produced from the normalized amplitude-limited return signals of each burst. The averaged signals of the return signals of all the signal bursts at the different frequencies are processed to provide a combined signal, whose amplitude is related to the microfracture density of the substructure adjacent to the borehole.

  7. A Robust Control Design Framework for Substructure Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.

    1994-01-01

    A framework for designing control systems directly from substructure models and uncertainties is proposed. The technique is based on combining a set of substructure robust control problems by an interface stiffness matrix which appears as a constant gain feedback. Variations of uncertainties in the interface stiffness are treated as a parametric uncertainty. It is shown that multivariable robust control can be applied to generate centralized or decentralized controllers that guarantee performance with respect to uncertainties in the interface stiffness, reduced component modes and external disturbances. The technique is particularly suited for large, complex, and weakly coupled flexible structures.

  8. A substructure coupling procedure applicable to general linear time-invariant dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, T. G.; Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A substructure synthesis procedure applicable to structural systems containing general nonconservative terms is presented. In their final form, the nonself-adjoint substructure equations of motion are cast in state vector form through the use of a variational principle. A reduced-order mode for each substructure is implemented by representing the substructure as a combination of a small number of Ritz vectors. For the method presented, the substructure Ritz vectors are identified as a truncated set of substructure eigenmodes, which are typically complex, along with a set of generalized real attachment modes. The formation of the generalized attachment modes does not require any knowledge of the substructure flexible modes; hence, only the eigenmodes used explicitly as Ritz vectors need to be extracted from the substructure eigenproblem. An example problem is presented to illustrate the method.

  9. A substructure coupling procedure applicable to general linear time-invariant dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, T. G.; Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A substructure synthesis procedure applicable to structural systems containing general nonconservative terms is presented. In their final form, the non-self-adjoint substructure equations of motion are cast in state vector form through the use of a variational principle. A reduced-order model for each substructure is implemented by representing the substructure as a combination of a small number of Ritz vectors. For the method presented, the substructure Ritz vectors are identified as a truncated set of substructure eigenmodes, which are typically complex, along with a set of generalized real attachment modes. The formation of the generalized attachment modes does not require any knowledge of the substructure flexible modes; hence, only the eigenmodes used explicitly as Ritz vectors need to be extracted from the substructure eigenproblem. An example problem is presented to illustrate the method.

  10. Galaxy Strategy for LIGO-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Kanner, Jonah; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nissanke, Samaya; Singer, Leo P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravitational wave (GW) triggers from LIGO/Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce ˜50% of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range was small and the error boxes were large, and will apply in the later years when the error boxes will be small and the range will be large. This strategy has the beneficial property of reducing the number of telescope pointings by a factor of 10-100 compared with tiling the entire error box. Additional galaxy count reduction will come from a GW rapid distance estimate which will restrict the radial slice in search volume. Combining the bright galaxy strategy with a convolution based on anticipated GW localizations, we find that the searches can be restricted to about 18 ± 5 galaxies for 2015, about 23 ± 4 for 2017, and about 11 ± 2 for 2020. This assumes a distance localization at the putative neutron star-neutron star merger range μ for each target year, and these totals are integrated out to the range. Integrating out to the horizon would roughly double the totals. For localizations with r\\ll μ the totals would decrease. The galaxy strategy we present in this work will enable numerous sensitive optical and XRTs with small fields of view to participate meaningfully in searches wherein the prospects for rapidly fading afterglow place a premium on a fast response time.

  11. Galaxy Strategy for Ligo-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Kanner, Jonah; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nissanke, Samaya; Singer, Leo P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravity wave (GW) triggers from LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) / Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce 50 percent of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range is small and the error boxes large, and in the later years when the error boxes will be small and the range large. This strategy has the beneficial property of reducing the number of telescope pointings by a factor 10 to 100 compared with tiling the entire error box. Additional galaxy count reduction will come from a GW rapid distance estimate which will restrict the radial slice in search volume. Combining the bright galaxy strategy with a convolution based on anticipated GW localizations, we find that the searches can be restricted to about 18 plus or minus 5 galaxies for 2015, about 23 plus or minus 4 for 2017, and about 11 plus or minus for 2020. This assumes a distance localization at the putative neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) merger range mu for each target year, and these totals are integrated out to the range. Integrating out to the horizon would roughly double the totals. For localizations with r (rotation) greatly less than mu the totals would decrease. The galaxy strategy we present in this work will enable numerous sensitive optical and X-ray telescopes with small fields of view to participate meaningfully in searches wherein the prospects for rapidly fading afterglow place a premium on a fast response time.

  12. Education and Public Outreach at EGO/Virgo: past experiences and future projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzano, Massimiliano

    2015-08-01

    We are approaching the new generation Gravitational Wave (GW) detector Era and in the next months a new exiting period for GW scientists will start enforcing collaboration and interactions among different scientific communities. We aim to reach a wider audience to spread this enthusiasm in the general public about our every day activities and let them know how it will change our understanding of the Universe, once revealed the Gravitational waves. In this talk, we will report about the activities of the last years and about the EGO/Virgo outreach plans for the future. The main goal of the Virgo/EGO outreach activity is to raise awareness and curiosity about the GW research projects. In the past years we informed the general public about science we do at EGO/Virgo site, trying to attract students in doing research, letting them know about the Virgo detector and involving them in small research activities. We run a regular program of site visits, and we often organized astronomical observations and science cafe' events which attracted a large number of people. Efforts were made also to involve kids in understanding our scientific job. We started a series of regular events in which art and science were fused.We are strengthening our outreach activities with common efforts in the Virgo laboratories which are spread all over in Europe.We plan to make available a scientific path within Virgo, where the public can do little experiences of science or for example tile, for a day, the activity of our researchers.

  13. Experimentally implementable criteria revealing substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Marcus; Schimpf, Hans; Gabriel, Andreas; Spengler, Christoph; Bruss, Dagmar; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-02-15

    We present a general framework that reveals substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement. Via simple inequalities it is possible to discriminate different sets of multipartite qubit states. These inequalities are beneficial regarding experimental examinations as only local measurements are required. Furthermore, the number of observables scales favorably with system size. In exemplary cases we demonstrate the noise resistance and discuss implementations.

  14. A Frequency-Domain Substructure System Identification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, Eric L.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A new frequency-domain system identification algorithm is presented for system identification of substructures, such as payloads to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. In the vibration test, all interface degrees of freedom where the substructure is connected to the carrier structure are either subjected to active excitation or are supported by a test stand with the reaction forces measured. The measured frequency-response data is used to obtain a linear, viscous-damped model with all interface-degree of freedom entries included. This model can then be used to validate analytical substructure models. This procedure makes it possible to obtain not only the fixed-interface modal data associated with a Craig-Bampton substructure model, but also the data associated with constraint modes. With this proposed algorithm, multiple-boundary-condition tests are not required, and test-stand dynamics is accounted for without requiring a separate modal test or finite element modeling of the test stand. Numerical simulations are used in examining the algorithm's ability to estimate valid reduced-order structural models. The algorithm's performance when frequency-response data covering narrow and broad frequency bandwidths is used as input is explored. Its performance when noise is added to the frequency-response data and the use of different least squares solution techniques are also examined. The identified reduced-order models are also compared for accuracy with other test-analysis models and a formulation for a Craig-Bampton test-analysis model is also presented.

  15. View of substructure of Sixth Street Bridge overcrossing of Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of substructure of Sixth Street Bridge overcrossing of Los Angeles River. Looking west. Note dark hole at lower with is access ramp to river channel seen in HAER CA-176-56 - Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning 101 Freeway at Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Dynamic substructuring for shock spectrum analysis using component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpheeters, Barton W.; Lev, Avivi; Bogert, Philip B.; Scavuzzo, Rudolph J.

    1988-01-01

    Component mode synthesis was used to analyze different types of structures with MSC NASTRAN. The theory and technique of using Multipoint Constraint Equations (MPCs) to connect substructures to each other or to a common foundation is presented. Computation of the dynamic response of the system from shack spectrum inputs was automated using the DMAP programming language of the MSC NASTRAN finite element code.

  17. 7. General view of substructure of bridge, taken from hills ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. General view of substructure of bridge, taken from hills to northeast of bridge. Note old stone abutment under existing bridge, detailing of arch and abutments. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  18. Chemical Substructure Searching: Comparing Three Commercially Available Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, A. Ben

    1986-01-01

    Compares the differences in coverage and utility of three substructure databases--Chemical Abstracts, Index Chemicus, and Chemical Information System's Nomenclature Search System. The differences between Chemical Abstracts with two different vendors--STN International and Questel--are described and a summary guide for choosing between databases is…

  19. An Integral View on Virgo and Field Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies: Late-Type Origin and Environmental Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rys, Agnieszka; Falcon-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.

    2013-01-01

    Dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) are the most common galaxy class in dense environments. They are also a surprisingly inhomogenous class, which has made it challenging both to relate different dE subtypes to each other, as well as place the whole class in the larger context of galaxy assembly and (trans)formation processes. Here we will show the effects of environmental evolution on Virgo Cluster and field dEs, presenting the first large-scale integral-field spectroscopic (SAURON) data for this galaxy class. Our sample consists of 12 galaxies and no two of them are alike. We find that the level of rotation is not tied to flattening; we observe kinematic twists; we discover large-scale kinematically-decoupled components; we see varying gradients in line-strength maps. This great variety of morphological, kinematic, and stellar population parameters supports the claim that dEs are defunct dwarf spiral/irregular galaxies and points to a formation scenario that allows for a stochastic shaping of galaxy properties. The combined influence of ram-pressure stripping and harassment fulfils this requirement, still, their exact impact is not yet understood. We thus further investigate the properties of our sample by performing a detailed comprehensive analysis of its kinematic, dynamical, and stellar population properties. We infer the total (dark and baryonic) matter distribution by fitting the observed stellar velocity and velocity dispersion with the solutions of the Jeans equations. We obtain 2D age, metallicity, and enrichment information from line-strength analysis. We then tie these results to the galaxies' intrinsic (i.e. deprojected) locations in the cluster with the use of surface-brightness fluctuation distances. This step is essential to providing unbiased correlations with the local environment density. We show that the dark matter fraction, unlike the level of rotational support, appears to correlate with the clustrocentric distance, and that our dwarfs have

  20. A 3D view of the Hydra I cluster core- II. Stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Arnaboldi, Magda; Hilker, Michael; Coccato, Lodovico; Richtler, Tom; Mendes de Oliveira, Cláudia

    2015-02-01

    Several observations of the central region of the Hydra I galaxy cluster point to a multi-epoch assembly history. Using our novel FORS2/VLT spectroscopic data set, we were able to map the luminosity-weighted age, [Fe/H] and [α/Fe] distributions for the stellar populations around the cD galaxy NGC 3311. Our results indicate that the stellar populations follow the trends of the photometric substructures, with distinct properties that may aid to constrain the evolutionary scenarios for the formation of the cluster core.

  1. Resolving the stellar halos of six massive disk galaxies beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne; Streich, David

    2016-08-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a hierarchical universe predict substantial scatter in the halo-to-halo stellar properties, owing to stochasticity in galaxies' merger histories. Currently, only few detailed observations of stellar halos are available, mainly for the Milky Way and M31. We present the stellar halo color/metallicity and density profiles of red giant branch stars out to ~60 kpc along the minor axis of six massive nearby Milky Way-like galaxies beyond the Local Group from the Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks and Star clusters (GHOSTS) HST survey. This enlargement of the sample of galaxies with observations of stellar halo properties is needed to understand the range of possible halo properties, i.e. not only the mean properties but also the halo-to-halo scatter, what a `typical' halo looks like, and how similar the Milky Way halo is to other halos beyond the Local Group.

  2. Predicted Sizes of Pressure-supported HI Clouds in the Outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Using data from the ALFALFA AGES Arecibo HI survey of galaxies and the Virgo cluster X-ray pressure profiles from XMM-Newton, we investigate the possibility that starless dark HI clumps, also known as “dark galaxies,” are supported by external pressure in the surrounding intercluster medium. We find that the starless HI clump masses, velocity dispersions, and positions allow these clumps to be in pressure equilibrium with the X-ray gas near the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We predict the sizes of these clumps to range from 1 to 10 kpc, in agreement with the range of sizes found for spatially resolved HI starless clumps outside of Virgo. Based on the predicted HI surface density of the Virgo sources, as well as a sample of other similar resolved ALFALFA HI dark clumps with follow-up optical/radio observations, we predict that most of the HI dark clumps are on the cusp of forming stars. These HI sources therefore mark the transition between starless HI clouds and dwarf galaxies with stars.

  3. Next Generation Virgo Survey Photometry and Keck/DEIMOS Spectroscopy of Globular Cluster Satellites of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Toloba, Elisa; Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao; Gwyn, Stephen; Ferrarese, Laura; Cote, Patrick; Chu, Jason; Sparkman, Lea; Chen, Stephanie; Yagati, Samyukta; Muller, Meredith; Next Generation Virgo Survey Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present results from an ongoing study of globular cluster (GC) satellites of low-luminosity dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster. Our 21 dE targets and candidate GC satellites around them in the apparent magnitude range g ~ 20-24 were selected from the Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) and followed up with medium-resolution Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy (resolving power: R ~ 2000; wavelength coverage: 4800-9500 Angstrom). In addition, the remaining space available on the nine DEIMOS multi-slit masks were populated with "filler" targets in the form of distant Milky Way halo star candidates in a comparable apparent magnitude range. A combination of radial velocity information (measured from the Keck/DEIMOS spectra), color-color information (from four-band NGVS photometry), and sky position information was used to sort the sample into the following categories: (1) GC satellites of dEs, (2) other non-satellite GCs in the Virgo cluster (we dub them "orphan" GCs), (3) foreground Milky Way stars that are members of the Sagittarius stream, the Virgo overdensity, or the field halo population, and (4) distant background galaxies. We stack the GC satellite population across all 21 host dEs and carry out dynamical modeling of the stacked sample in order to constrain the average mass of dark matter halos that these dEs are embedded in. We study rotation in the system of GC satellites of dEs in the handful of more populated systems in our sample - i.e., those that contain 10 or more GC satellites per dE. A companion AAS poster presented at this meeting (Chu, J. et al. 2015) presents chemical composition and age constraints for these GC satellites relative to the nuclei of the host dEs based on absorption line strengths in co-added spectra. The orphan GCs are likely to be intergalactic GCs within the Virgo cluster (or, equivalently, GCs in the remote outer envelope of the cluster's central galaxy, the giant elliptical M87).This project is funded in part by the

  4. M31AGES: Studying the intermediate-aged populations in the satellites, smooth halo, and substructure of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Majewski, Steven R.; M31AGES Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    Recent large-scale surveys of M31 have enabled the study of its satellites, smooth halo, and substructure in exquisite detail. In particular, the Spectroscopic Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey has obtained moderate resolution optical spectra with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II/10-m telescope, and optical photometry from various ground-based telescopes. These data have been used to map the kinematics and metallicity distributions in the dSphs and dEs, detect and characterize substructure, and study the large-scale radial surface brightness and metallicity profiles of the "smooth" halo. Notwithstanding this progress [or] In spite of these advances, there are a number of outstanding questions that cannot be answered with these data alone, including the fraction of the halo that was formed in situ vs by accretion, and the degeneracy between massive early accretion events and less massiverecent accretion events. The M31 Asymptotic Giant Extended Survey (M31AGES) aims to address these questions by using NIR photometry to identify intermediate-age AGB stars in the satellites, streams, and smoothhalo of M31. We present the details of the observations (now completed), the plan for public release of data products, and preliminary results.

  5. Kinematic Disturbances in Optical Rotation Curves among 89 Virgo Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera C.; Waterman, Andrew H.; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    1999-07-01

    For 89 galaxies, mostly spirals, in the Virgo Cluster region, we have obtained optical long-slit major-axis spectra of the ionized gas. We find the following: (1) One-half of the Virgo galaxies we observed have regular rotation patterns, while the other half exhibit kinematic disturbances ranging from mild to major. Velocity complexities are generally consistent with those resulting from tidal encounters or accretion events. Since kinematic disturbances are expected to fade within ~10^9 yr, many Virgo galaxies have experienced several significant kinematic disturbances during their lifetimes. (2) There is no strong correlation of rotation curve complexity with Hubble type, with galaxy luminosity, with local galaxy density, or with H I deficiency. (3) A few Virgo galaxies have ionized gas of limited extent, with velocities exceptionally low for their luminosities. In these galaxies the gas must be not rotationally supported. (4) There is a remarkable difference in the distribution of galaxy systemic velocity for galaxies with regular rotation curves and galaxies with disturbed rotation curves. Galaxies with regular rotation patterns show a flat distribution with velocities ranging from V_0=-300 km s^-1 to V_0=+2500 km s^-1 galaxies with disturbed kinematics have a Gaussian distribution that peaks at V_0=+1172+/-100 km s^-1, close to the cluster mean velocity. This latter distribution is virtually identical to the distribution of systemic velocity for elliptical galaxies in Virgo. However, disturbed galaxies are less concentrated to the cluster core than are the ellipticals; those near the periphery have velocities closer to the mean cluster velocity. Thus, spirals with disturbed kinematics are preferentially on radial orbits, which bring them to the denser core, where tidal interactions are strong and/or more common. Because they spend much time near apocenter, we observe them near the cluster periphery. Some may be falling into the core for the first time. These

  6. PAndAS in the Mist: The Stellar and Gaseous Mass within the Halos of M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Geraint F.; Braun, Robert; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Michael J.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Fardal, Mark; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Larry; Mackey, A. Dougal; Babul, Arif; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

  7. PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Geraint F.; Braun, Robert; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Fardal, Mark; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Larry; Mackey, A. Dougal; Babul, Arif; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, Michael

    2013-01-20

    Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

  8. Synthesis of shuttle vehicle damping using substructure test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kana, D. D.; Huzar, S.

    1972-01-01

    An empirical method is developed for predicting the modal damping of a combined parallel-stage shuttle model by means of damping measurements performed on the individual substructures. Correlations are first determined for each component in terms of damping energy as a function of peak kinetic energy and modal amplitude. The results are then used to predict component damping energies corresponding to the respective kinetic energies and amplitudes that occur for the new modes of the combined system. Modal characteristics for the system, other than damping, are obtained by a real eigenvalue solution of dynamic equations developed by Hurty's procedure of substructures. System equations, which include component modal damping, are also solved by a complex eigenvalue approach for comparison with results of the empirical method.

  9. Fold Recognition Using Sequence Fingerprints of Protein Local Substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kryshtafovych, A A; Hvidsten, T; Komorowski, J; Fidelis, K

    2003-06-04

    A protein local substructure (descriptor) is a set of several short non-overlapping fragments of the polypeptide chain. Each descriptor describes local environment of a particular residue and includes only those segments that are located in the proximity of this residue. Similar descriptors from the representative set of proteins were analyzed to reveal links between the substructures and sequences of their segments. Using detected sequence-based fingerprints specific geometrical conformations are assigned to new sequences. The ability of the approach to recognize correct SCOP folds was tested on 273 sequences from the 49 most popular folds. Good predictions were obtained in 85% of cases. No performance drop was observed with decreasing sequence similarity between target sequences and sequences from the training set of proteins.

  10. Fossil group origins. VII. Galaxy substructures in fossil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarattini, S.; Girardi, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Boschin, W.; Barrena, R.; del Burgo, C.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Corsini, E. M.; D'Onghia, E.; Kundert, A.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Fossil groups (FG) are expected to be the final product of galaxy merging within galaxy groups. In simulations, they are predicted to assemble their mass at high redshift. This early formation allows for the innermost M∗ galaxies to merge into a massive central galaxy. Then, they are expected to maintain their fossil status because of the few interactions with the large-scale structure. In this context, the magnitude gap between the two brightest galaxies of the system is considered a good indicator of its dynamical status. As a consequence, the systems with the largest gaps should be dynamically relaxed. Aims: In order to examine the dynamical status of these systems, we systematically analyze, for the first time, the presence of galaxy substructures in a sample of 12 spectroscopically-confirmed fossil systems with redshift z ≤ 0.25. Methods: We apply a number of tests to investigate the substructure in fossil systems in the two-dimensional space of projected positions out to R200. Moreover, for a subsample of five systems with at least 30 spectroscopically-confirmed members we also analyze the substructure in the velocity and in the three-dimensional velocity-position spaces. Additionally, we look for signs of recent mergers in the regions around the central galaxies. Results: We find that an important fraction of fossil systems show substructure. The fraction depends critically on the adopted test, since each test is more sensitive to a particular type of substructure. Conclusions: Our interpretation of the results is that fossil systems are not, in general, as relaxed as expected from simulations. Our sample of 12 spectroscopically-confirmed fossil systems need to be extended to compute an accurate fraction, but our conclusion is that this fraction is similar to the fraction of substructure detected in nonfossil clusters. This result points out that the magnitude gap alone is not a good indicator of the dynamical status of a system. However, the

  11. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Camacho Toro, R.  C.; et al

    2015-09-09

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. Thismore » is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging.« less

  12. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Camacho Toro, R.  C.; Caudron, J.; Chien, Y. -T.; Cogan, J.; Cooper, B.; Curtin, D.; Debenedetti, C.; Dolen, J.; Eklund, M.; El Hedri, S.; Ellis, S.  D.; Embry, T.; Ferencek, D.; Ferrando, J.; Fleischmann, S.; Freytsis, M.; Giulini, M.; Han, Z.; Hare, D.; Harris, P.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoing, R.; Hornig, A.; Jankowiak, M.; Johns, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kogler, R.; Lampl, W.; Larkoski, A.  J.; Lee, C.; Leone, R.; Loch, P.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lou, H. K.; Low, M.; Maksimovic, P.; Marchesini, I.; Marzani, S.; Masetti, L.; McCarthy, R.; Menke, S.; Miller, D.  W.; Mishra, K.; Nachman, B.; Nef, P.; O’Grady, F.  T.; Ovcharova, A.; Picazio, A.; Pollard, C.; Potter-Landua, B.; Potter, C.; Rappoccio, S.; Rojo, J.; Rutherfoord, J.; Salam, G.  P.; Schabinger, R.  M.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwartz, M.  D.; Shuve, B.; Sinervo, P.; Soper, D.; Sosa Corral, D.  E.; Spannowsky, M.; Strauss, E.; Swiatlowski, M.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, C.; Thompson, E.; Tran, N.  V.; Tseng, J.; Usai, E.; Valery, L.; Veatch, J.; Vos, M.; Waalewijn, W.; Wacker, J.; Young, C.

    2015-09-09

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. This is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging.

  13. The Resolved Stellar Halo and Dwarf Satellite Population of NGC 3109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargis, Jonathan R.; Crnojevic, Denija; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Spekkens, Kristine; Grillmair, Carl J.; Strader, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The stellar halo and halo substructure of dwarf galaxies provides an important window into both LCDM cosmology and galaxy formation theory on the smallest scales. We are undertaking a deep, wide-field imaging survey of nearby, isolated sub-Milky Way mass galaxies in order to (1) map the substructure, spatial extent, and metallicity of their stellar halos in resolved stars, and (2) search for faint dwarf satellite companions (i.e., the ``dwarfs of dwarfs"). These studies will allow us to explore the role of in-situ versus accretion processes in forming stellar halos in dwarfs, as well as constrain the faint end of the satellite galaxy luminosity function. This work presents a preliminary analysis of the pilot galaxy in our survey: NGC 3109 (Mv = -15 mag), a nearby (d = 1.3 Mpc) dwarf irregular, approximately 1/6th the stellar mass of the SMC. We imaged ~40 sq. deg around NGC 3109 (projected radius of ~100 kpc) using CTIO 4m/DECam to depths ~2 mag below the TRGB. We disovered a new gas-rich dwarf satellite of NGC 3109, dubbed Antlia B (Mv = -9.7 mag), similar to the recently-discovered Leo P. We also discovered five candidate dwarf satellites, with sizes (~100 pc) and luminosities (Mv ~ -6 mag) consistent with being ultra-faint dwarfs at the distance of NGC 3109. Lastly, we present stellar halo maps of resolved RGB stars on both large and small scales. We discuss the various substructures found in these maps and the future directions of our survey. This work was supported by NSF AST-1151462.

  14. Transformation of a Virgo Cluster dwarf irregular galaxy by ram pressure stripping: IC3418 and its fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Geha, Marla; Jáchym, Pavel; Dague, William; Crowl, Hugh H.; Chung, Aeree; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Vollmer, Bernd

    2014-01-10

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopy and H I imaging of the Virgo Cluster galaxy IC 3418, which is likely a 'smoking gun' example of the transformation of a dwarf irregular into a dwarf elliptical galaxy by ram pressure stripping. IC 3418 has a spectacular 17 kpc length UV-bright tail comprised of knots, head-tail, and linear stellar features. The only Hα emission arises from a few H II regions in the tail, the brightest of which are at the heads of head-tail UV sources whose tails point toward the galaxy ('fireballs'). Several of the elongated tail sources have Hα peaks outwardly offset by ∼80-150 pc from the UV peaks, suggesting that gas clumps continue to accelerate through ram pressure, leaving behind streams of newly formed stars which have decoupled from the gas. Absorption line strengths, measured from Keck DEIMOS spectra, together with UV colors, show star formation stopped 300 ± 100 Myr ago in the main body, and a strong starburst occurred prior to quenching. While neither Hα nor H I emission are detected in the main body of the galaxy, we have detected 4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} of H I from the tail with the Very Large Array. The velocities of tail H II regions, measured from Keck LRIS spectra, extend only a small fraction of the way to the cluster velocity, suggesting that star formation does not happen in more distant parts of the tail. Stars in the outer tail have velocities exceeding the escape speed, but some in the inner tail should fall back into the galaxy, forming halo streams.

  15. Substructure of the inner core of the Earth.

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, J M

    1996-01-01

    The rationale is disclosed for a substructure within the Earth's inner core, consisting of an actinide subcore at the center of the Earth, surrounded by a subshell composed of the products of nuclear fission and radioactive decay. Estimates are made as to possible densities, physical dimensions, and chemical compositions. The feasibility for self-sustaining nuclear fission within the subcore is demonstrated, and implications bearing on the structure and geodynamic activity of the inner core are discussed. PMID:11607625

  16. Major substructure in the M31 outer halo: the South-West Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, N. F.; Conn, A. R.; McMonigal, B.; Lewis, G. F.; Martin, N. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Veljanoski, J.; Mackey, A. D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Ibata, R. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Fardal, M.; Huxor, A. P.; Babul, A.

    2014-02-01

    We undertake the first detailed analysis of the stellar population and spatial properties of a diffuse substructure in the outer halo of M31. The South-West Cloud lies at a projected distance of ˜100 kpc from the centre of M31 and extends for at least ˜50 kpc in projection. We use Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey photometry of red giant branch stars to determine a distance to the South-West Cloud of 793^{+45}_{-45} kpc. The metallicity of the cloud is found to be [Fe/H] = -1.3 ± 0.1. This is consistent with the coincident globular clusters PAndAS-7 and PAndAS-8, which have metallicities determined using an independent technique of [Fe/H] = -1.35 ± 0.15. We measure a brightness for the Cloud of MV = -12.1 mag; this is ˜75 per cent of the luminosity implied by the luminosity-metallicity relation. Under the assumption that the South-West Cloud is the visible remnant of an accreted dwarf satellite, this suggests that the progenitor object was amongst M31's brightest dwarf galaxies prior to disruption.

  17. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and redshifts exist for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fitted a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools,'' then used ``Source Extractor'' to extract sources from the images. We have created software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The software also corrects magnitude differences by comparing the mean difference and adding this to each individual catalog before merging it to a master catalog. The measured properties included in this study were magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We divide our master catalog into several subsamples for substructure analysis. For one subsample, we attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. We compare the results of substructure diagnostics for the subsamples. In future work, we will examine correlation of substructure with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  18. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  19. Volume of hippocampal substructures in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kreisel, Stefan Henner; Labudda, Kirsten; Kurlandchikov, Oleg; Beblo, Thomas; Mertens, Markus; Thomas, Christine; Rullkötter, Nina; Wingenfeld, Katja; Mensebach, Christoph; Woermann, Friedrich G; Driessen, Martin

    2015-03-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) may be associated with smaller hippocampi in comparison to hippocampal size in controls. However, specific pathology in hippocampal substructures (i.e., head, body and tail) has not been sufficiently investigated. To address hippocampal structure in greater detail, we studied 39 psychiatric inpatients and outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD and 39 healthy controls. The hippocampus and its substructures were segmented manually on magnetic resonance imaging scans. The volumes of hippocampal substructures (and total hippocampal volume) did not differ between BPD patients and controls. Exploratory analysis suggests that patients with a lifetime history of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have a significantly smaller hippocampus - affecting both the hippocampal head and body - in comparison to BPD patients without comorbid PTSD (difference in total hippocampal volume: -10.5%, 95%CI -2.6 to -18.5, significant). Also, patients fulfilling seven or more DSM-IV BPD criteria showed a hippocampal volume reduction, limited to the hippocampal head (difference in volume of the hippocampal head: -16.5%, 95%CI -6.1 to -26.8, significant). Disease heterogeneity in respect to, for example, symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidities may limit direct comparability between studies; the results presented here may reflect hippocampal volumes in patients who are "less" affected or they may simply be a chance finding. However, there is also the possibility that global effects of BPD on the hippocampus may have previously been overestimated. PMID:25624067

  20. Stellar feedback efficiencies: supernovae versus stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierlinger, Katharina M.; Burkert, Andreas; Ntormousi, Evangelia; Fierlinger, Peter; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro; Krause, Martin G. H.; Diehl, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions of massive stars (`stellar feedback') create bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM) and insert newly produced heavy elements and kinetic energy into their surroundings, possibly driving turbulence. Most of this energy is thermalized and immediately removed from the ISM by radiative cooling. The rest is available for driving ISM dynamics. In this work we estimate the amount of feedback energy retained as kinetic energy when the bubble walls have decelerated to the sound speed of the ambient medium. We show that the feedback of the most massive star outweighs the feedback from less massive stars. For a giant molecular cloud (GMC) mass of 105 M⊙ (as e.g. found in the Orion GMCs) and a star formation efficiency of 8 per cent the initial mass function predicts a most massive star of approximately 60 M⊙. For this stellar evolution model we test the dependence of the retained kinetic energy of the cold GMC gas on the inclusion of stellar winds. In our model winds insert 2.34 times the energy of an SN and create stellar wind bubbles serving as pressure reservoirs. We find that during the pressure-driven phases of the bubble evolution radiative losses peak near the contact discontinuity (CD), and thus the retained energy depends critically on the scales of the mixing processes across the CD. Taking into account the winds of massive stars increases the amount of kinetic energy deposited in the cold ISM from 0.1 per cent to a few per cent of the feedback energy.

  1. Stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide-field/Planetary camera - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Hunter, Deidre; Groth, Edward J.; Light, Robert M.; Faber, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    The prospects for the use of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WFPC) for stellar photometry are described. The large halos of the point-spread function (PSF) resulting from spherical aberration and from spatial, temporal, and color variations of the PSF are the main limitations to accurate photometry. Degradations caused by crowding are exacerbated by the halos of the PSF. An attempt is made to quantify these effects and determine the current accuracy of stellar photometry with the WFPC. In realistic cases, the brighter stars in crowded fields have 0.09 mag errors; fainter stars have larger errors depending on the degree of crowding. It is shown that measuring Cepheids in Virgo Cluster galaxies is not currently possible without inordinate increases in exposure times.

  2. Atomic data for stellar spectroscopy: recent successes and remaining needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Wood, Michael P.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.

    2014-11-01

    Stellar chemical composition analyses provide vital insights into galactic nucleosynthesis. Atomic line data are critical inputs to stellar abundance computations. Recent lab studies have made significant progress in refining and extending knowledge of transition probabilities, isotopic wavelength shifts, and hyperfine substructure patterns for the absorption lines that are of most interest to stellar spectroscopists. The observable neutron-capture (n-capture) element species (Z \\gt 30) have been scrutinized in lab studies by several groups. For many species the uncertainties in experimental oscillator strengths are ≤slant 10%, which permits detailed assessment of rapid and slow n-capture nucleosynthesis contributions. In this review, extreme examples of r-process-enriched stars in the galactic halo will be shown, which suggest that the description of observable n-capture abundances in these stars is nearly complete. Unfortunately, there are serious remaining concerns about the reliability of observed abundances of lighter elements. In particular, it is not clear that line formation in real stellar atmospheres is being modeled correctly. But for many elements with Z \\lt 30 the atomic transition data are not yet settled. Highlights will be given of some recent large improvements, with suggestions for the most important needs for the near future.

  3. On the uncertainties of stellar mass estimates via colour measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    Mass-to-light versus colour relations (MLCRs), derived from stellar population synthesis models, are widely used to estimate galaxy stellar masses (M*), yet a detailed investigation of their inherent biases and limitations is still lacking. We quantify several potential sources of uncertainty, using optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for a representative sample of nearby galaxies from the Virgo cluster. Our method for combining multiband photometry with MLCRs yields robust stellar masses, while errors in M* decrease as more bands are simultaneously considered. The prior assumptions in one's stellar population modelling dominate the error budget, creating a colour-dependent bias of up to 0.6 dex if NIR fluxes are used (0.3 dex otherwise). This matches the systematic errors associated with the method of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, indicating that MLCRs do not suffer from much additional bias. Moreover, MLCRs and SED fitting yield similar degrees of random error (˜0.1-0.14 dex) when applied to mock galaxies and, on average, equivalent masses for real galaxies with M* ˜ 108-11 M⊙. The use of integrated photometry introduces additional uncertainty in M* measurements, at the level of 0.05-0.07 dex. We argue that using MLCRs, instead of time-consuming SED fits, is justified in cases with complex model parameter spaces (involving, for instance, multiparameter star formation histories) and/or for large data sets. Spatially resolved methods for measuring M* should be applied for small sample sizes and/or when accuracies less than 0.1 dex are required. An appendix provides our MLCR transformations for 10 colour permutations of the grizH filter set.

  4. Frontiers of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses theoretical and observational views of star formation, spectroscopic constraints on the evolution of massive stars, very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, asteroseismology, globular clusters as tests of stellar evolution, observational tests of stellar evolution, and mass loss from cool evolved giant stars. Also discussed are white dwarfs and hot subdwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, supernovae from single stars, close binaries with evolved components, accretion disks in interacting binaries, supernovae in binary systems, stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution, and interacting binaries containing compact components.

  5. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  6. Stellarator-Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-03-01

    A novel concept for magnetic plasma confinement, Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP), is proposed. Numerical analysis with the classical-stellarator-type outboard stellarator windings demonstrates a number of potential advantages of SSP for controlled nuclear fusion. Among the main ones are: simple and compact magnet coil configuration, absence of material structures (e.g. magnet coils or conducting walls) in the center of the torus, high rotational transform, and a possibility of MHD equilibria with very high {beta} (pressure/magnetic pressure) of the confined plasma.

  7. HST Imaging of Dust Structures and Stars in the Ram Pressure Stripped Virgo Spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522: Stripped from the Outside In with Dense Cloud Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, A.; Kenney, J.; Crowl, H.; Tal, T.

    2016-08-01

    We describe and constrain the origins of interstellar medium (ISM) structures likely created by ongoing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure stripping in two Virgo Cluster spirals, NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) BVI images of dust extinction and stars, as well as supplementary H i, Hα, and radio continuum images. With a spatial resolution of ∼10 pc in the HST images, this is the highest-resolution study to date of the physical processes that occur during an ICM–ISM ram pressure stripping interaction, ram pressure stripping's effects on the multi-phase, multi-density ISM, and the formation and evolution of ram-pressure-stripped tails. In dust extinction, we view the leading side of NGC 4402 and the trailing side of NGC 4522, and so we see distinct types of features in both. In both galaxies, we identify some regions where dense clouds are decoupling or have decoupled and others where it appears that kiloparsec-sized sections of the ISM are moving coherently. NGC 4522 has experienced stronger, more recent pressure and has the “jellyfish” morphology characteristic of some ram-pressure-stripped galaxies. Its stripped tail extends up from the disk plane in continuous upturns of dust and stars curving up to ∼2 kpc above the disk plane. On the other side of the galaxy, there is a kinematically and morphologically distinct extraplanar arm of young, blue stars and ISM above a mostly stripped portion of the disk, and between it and the disk plane are decoupled dust clouds that have not been completely stripped. The leading side of NGC 4402 contains two kiloparsec-scale linear dust filaments with complex substructure that have partially decoupled from the surrounding ISM. NGC 4402 also contains long dust ridges, suggesting that large parts of the ISM are being pushed out at once. Both galaxies contain long ridges of polarized radio continuum emission indicating the presence of large-scale, ordered magnetic fields. We propose that

  8. HST Imaging of Dust Structures and Stars in the Ram Pressure Stripped Virgo Spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522: Stripped from the Outside In with Dense Cloud Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, A.; Kenney, J.; Crowl, H.; Tal, T.

    2016-08-01

    We describe and constrain the origins of interstellar medium (ISM) structures likely created by ongoing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure stripping in two Virgo Cluster spirals, NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) BVI images of dust extinction and stars, as well as supplementary H i, Hα, and radio continuum images. With a spatial resolution of ˜10 pc in the HST images, this is the highest-resolution study to date of the physical processes that occur during an ICM–ISM ram pressure stripping interaction, ram pressure stripping's effects on the multi-phase, multi-density ISM, and the formation and evolution of ram-pressure-stripped tails. In dust extinction, we view the leading side of NGC 4402 and the trailing side of NGC 4522, and so we see distinct types of features in both. In both galaxies, we identify some regions where dense clouds are decoupling or have decoupled and others where it appears that kiloparsec-sized sections of the ISM are moving coherently. NGC 4522 has experienced stronger, more recent pressure and has the “jellyfish” morphology characteristic of some ram-pressure-stripped galaxies. Its stripped tail extends up from the disk plane in continuous upturns of dust and stars curving up to ˜2 kpc above the disk plane. On the other side of the galaxy, there is a kinematically and morphologically distinct extraplanar arm of young, blue stars and ISM above a mostly stripped portion of the disk, and between it and the disk plane are decoupled dust clouds that have not been completely stripped. The leading side of NGC 4402 contains two kiloparsec-scale linear dust filaments with complex substructure that have partially decoupled from the surrounding ISM. NGC 4402 also contains long dust ridges, suggesting that large parts of the ISM are being pushed out at once. Both galaxies contain long ridges of polarized radio continuum emission indicating the presence of large-scale, ordered magnetic fields. We propose that magnetic

  9. [C II] 158-micrometer Observations of a Sample of Late-type Galaxies from the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leech, K. J.; Volk, H. J.; Heinrichsen, I.; Hippelein, H.; Metcalfe, L.; Pierini, D.; Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Xu, C.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed 19 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) obtaining spectral around the (C II) 157.741-micrometer fine structure line.

  10. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  11. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF THE VIRGO GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4636. II. KINEMATICS OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Hong Soo; Hwang, Ho Seong; Arimoto, Nobuo; Tamura, Naoyuki; Onodera, Masato E-mail: hspark@astro.snu.ac.k E-mail: masato.onodera@cea.f E-mail: naoyuki@subaru.naoj.or

    2010-02-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system in the giant elliptical galaxy (gE) NGC 4636 in the Virgo cluster. Using the photometric and spectroscopic database of 238 GCs (108 blue GCs and 130 red GCs) at the galactocentric radius 0.'39 < R < 15.'43, we have investigated the kinematics of the GC system. The NGC 4636 GC system shows weak overall rotation, which is dominated by the red GCs. However, both the blue GCs and red GCs show some rotation in the inner region at R < 4.'3 (=2.9R{sub eff} = 18.5 kpc). The velocity dispersion for all the GCs is derived to be sigma{sub p} = 225{sup +12}{sub -9} km s{sup -1}. The velocity dispersion for the blue GCs (sigma{sub p} = 251{sup +18}{sub -12} km s{sup -1}) is slightly larger than that for the red GCs (sigma{sub p} = 205{sup +11}{sub -13} km s{sup -1}). The velocity dispersions for the blue GCs about the mean velocity and about the best-fit rotation curve have a significant variation depending on the galactocentric radius. Comparison of observed stellar and GC velocity dispersion profiles (VDPs) with the VDPs calculated from the stellar mass profile shows that the mass-to-light ratio should increase as the galactocentric distance increases, indicating the existence of an extended dark matter halo. From the comparison of the observed GC VDPs and the VDPs calculated for the X-ray mass profiles in the literature, we find that the orbit of the GC system is tangential, and that the orbit of the red GCs is slightly more tangential than that of the blue GCs. We compare the GC kinematics of NGC 4636 with those of other six gEs, finding that the kinematic properties of the GCs are diverse among gEs. We find several correlations between the kinematics of the GCs and the global parameters of their host galaxies. We discuss the implication of the results for the formation models of the GC system in gEs, and suggest a mixture scenario for the origin of the GCs in gEs.

  12. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. V. modeling the dynamics of M87 with the made-to-measure method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ling; Long, R. J.; Mao, Shude; Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao; Liu, Chengze; Caldwell, Nelson; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Durrell, Patrick; Emsellem, Eric; Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto; Puzia, Thomas; Lançon, Ariane; Mei, Simona

    2014-09-01

    We study the dynamics of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 from the central to the outermost regions with the made-to-measure (M2M) method. We use a new catalog of 922 globular cluster line-of-sight velocities extending to a projected radius of 180 kpc (equivalent to 25 M87 effective radii), and SAURON integral field unit data within the central 2.4 kpc. There are 263 globular clusters, mainly located beyond 40 kpc, newly observed by the Next Generation Virgo Survey. For the M2M modeling, the gravitational potential is taken as a combination of a luminous matter potential with a constant stellar mass-to-light ratio and a dark matter potential modeled as a logarithmic potential. Our best-fit dynamical model returns a stellar mass-to-light ratio in the I band of M/L{sub I} = 6.0 ± 0.3 M{sub ⊙} L{sub ⊙}{sup −1} with a dark matter potential scale velocity of 591 ± 50 km s{sup –1} and scale radius of 42 ± 10 kpc. We determine the total mass of M87 within 180 kpc to be (1.5 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}. The mass within 40 kpc is smaller than previous estimates determined using globular cluster kinematics that did not extend beyond ∼45 kpc. With our new globular cluster velocities at much larger radii, we see that globular clusters around 40 kpc show an anomalously large velocity dispersion which affected previous results. The mass we derive is in good agreement with that inferred from ROSAT X-ray observation out to 180 kpc. Within 30 kpc our mass is also consistent with that inferred from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations, while within 120 kpc it is about 20% smaller. The model velocity dispersion anisotropy β parameter for the globular clusters in M87 is small, varying from –0.2 at the center to 0.2 at ∼40 kpc, and gradually decreasing to zero at ∼120 kpc.

  13. Spectacular tails of ionized gas in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Fossati, M.; Boissier, S.; Bomans, D.; Consolandi, G.; Anselmi, G.; Cortese, L.; Côté, P.; Durrell, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Fumagalli, M.; Gavazzi, G.; Gwyn, S.; Hensler, G.; Sun, M.; Toloba, E.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Using MegaCam at the CFHT, we obtained a deep narrow band Hα+[NII] wide-field image of NGC 4569 (M90), the brightest late-type galaxy in the Virgo cluster. The image reveals the presence of long tails of diffuse ionized gas, without any associated stellar component extending from the disc of the galaxy up to ≃80 kpc (projected distance) and with a typical surface brightness of a few 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. These features provide direct evidence that NGC 4569 is undergoing a ram-presure stripping event. The image also shows a prominent 8 kpc spur of ionized gas that is associated with the nucleus that spectroscopic data identify as an outflow. With some assumptions on the 3D distribution of the gas, we use the Hα surface brightness of these extended low-surface brightness features to derive the density and the mass of the gas that has been stripped during the interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. The comparison with ad hoc chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution indicates that the mass of the Hα emitting gas in the tail is a large fraction of that of the cold phase that has been stripped from the disc, suggesting that the gas is ionized within the tail during the stripping process. The lack of star-forming regions suggests that mechanisms other than photoionization are responsible for the excitation of the gas (shocks, heat conduction, magneto hydrodynamic waves). This analysis indicates that ram pressure stripping is efficient in massive (Mstar ≃ 1010.5 M⊙) galaxies located in intermediate-mass (≃1014 M⊙) clusters under formation. It also shows that the mass of gas expelled by the nuclear outflow is only ~1% than that removed during the ram pressure stripping event.Together these results indicate that ram pressure stripping, rather than starvation through nuclear feedback, can be the dominant mechanism that is responsible for the quenching of the star formation activity of galaxies in high density

  14. The GALEX Ultraviolet Virgo Cluster Survey (GUViCS). V. Ultraviolet diffuse emission and cirrus properties in the Virgo cluster direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Voyer, E.; Bianchi, S.; Pappalardo, C.; Guhathakurta, P.; Heinis, S.; Cortese, L.; Duc, P.-A.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Davies, J. I.; Smith, M. W. L.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The Virgo direction has been observed at many wavelengths in recent years, in particular in the ultraviolet with GALEX. The far ultraviolet (FUV) diffuse light detected by GALEX offers interesting information on the large scale distribution of Galactic dust, owing to the GALEX FUV band sensitivity and resolution. Aims: We aim to characterise the ultraviolet large scale distribution of diffuse emission in the Virgo direction. A map of this emission may become useful for various studies by identifying regions where dust affects observations by either scattering light or absorbing radiation. Methods: We constructed mosaics of the FUV and near ultraviolet (NUV) diffuse emission over a large sky region (RA 12 to 13 h, Dec 0 to 20 deg) surrounding the Virgo cluster, using all the GALEX available data in the area. We tested for the first time the utilisation of the FUV diffuse light as a Galactic extinction E(B - V) tracer. Results: The FUV diffuse light scattered on cirrus reveals details about their geometry. Despite large dispersion, the FUV diffuse light correlates roughly with other Galactic dust tracers (coming from IRAS, Herschel, Planck), offering an opportunity to use the FUV emission to locate them in future studies with a better resolution (about 5 arcsec native resolution, 20 arcsec pixels maps presented in this paper) than for several usual tracers. Estimating the Galactic dust extinction on the basis of this emission allows us to find a smaller dispersion in the NUV - i colour of background galaxies at a given E(B - V) than with other tracers. The diffuse light mosaics obtained in this work are made publicly available. The diffuse light mosaics as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A29

  15. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  16. Evolution of stellar entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. A.; de Avellar, M. G. B.; Horvath, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    An appraisal of the behavior of stellar entropy along stellar evolution is made. It is shown that the entropy per baryon of a star of a fixed baryon number decreases monotonically with increasing compactness of the star. The same entropy per baryon increases only whenever an irreversible collapse of the star happens. The recent proposals for a gravitational entropy related to curvature may justify the huge increase of the entropy in the ultimate collapse to a black hole.

  17. GHOSTS | Bulges, Halos, and the Resolved Stellar Outskirts of Massive Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, R. S.; Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Sick, J. N.

    2008-10-01

    In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos of galaxies are formed by the accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. Our GHOSTS survey measures the stellar envelope properties of 14 nearby disk galaxies by imaging their resolved stellar populations with HST/ACS and WFPC2. Most of the massive galaxies in the sample (V_{rot}>200 km s^{-1}) have very extended stellar envelopes with μ(r) ˜ r^{-2.5} power law profiles in the outer regions. For these massive galaxies there is some evidence that the stellar surface density of the profiles correlates with Hubble type and bulge-to-disk ratio, begging the question whether these envelopes are more related to bulges than to a Milky Way-type stellar halo. Smaller galaxies (V_{rot}˜100 km s^{-1}) have much smaller stellar envelopes, but depending on geometry, they could still be more luminous than expected from satellite remnants in hierarchical galaxy formation models. Alternatively, they could be created by disk heating through the bombardment of small dark matter sub-halos. We find that galaxies show varying amounts of halo substructure.

  18. H I properties of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. L.; Helou, G.; Salpeter, E. E.; Sandage, A.

    1985-01-01

    A neutral hydrogen survey was carried out at Arecibo on 91 dwarf irregular galaxies, with morphological types Sdm through Im, in and around the direction of the Virgo Cluster. Only nine of these were found to be background galaxies, and 19 remain undetected, i.e., most of the candidate galaxies are indeed members of the Virgo Cluster or Supercluster. The distribution of positions and systemic velocities (compared with large spirals) shows no evidence for mass segregation. The H I depletion for dwarfs in the cluster core is only moderate, no more than for spirals. The magnitude-velocity width correlation is continous from spirls to dwarfs. Satistics on H I masses agree only partially with a simple stochastic star formation model.

  19. Collisional removal of HI from the inner disks of Virgo cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluri, Monica; Jog, Chanda J.

    1990-01-01

    There is sufficient observational evidence to show that many Virgo Cluster spirals are HI deficient in their inner disks (in addition to being HI deficient globally, as previously established). It is shown here that collisions between galaxies in a cluster can lead to the removal of HI gas from these galaxies while leaving the H2 gas, undisturbed. This follows directly from the application of the Spitzer-Baade collisional gas removal mechanism to galaxies consisting of stars and a two-component interstellar medium (ISM) consisting of HI and H2, with HI having the largest filling factor. This can account for both the observed HI deficiency in the inner regions and the normal H2 content of these galaxies. The frequency of galaxy collisions in the Virgo Cluster is shown to be large enough to make collisional gas removal a viable mechanism.

  20. Selecting Gravitational Wave Candidates for Electromagnetic Follow-up: Advanced LIGO/Virgo's Decision Making Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min-A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most violent events in the universe are bright in both their gravitational wave (GW) emission and electromagnetic (EM). This means that prospects for multi-messenger astronomy increase as more and more detectors join the search for gravitational waves. Here I present the protocol created by members of Advanced LIGO/Virgo's EM Follow-up Program which ultimately results in alerting its astronomy partners or not. I discuss the series of checks and questions performed by humans (follow-up advocates and control room personnel) and automated online software (Approval Processor). This talk will follow the fate of the gravitational wave candidate event after it first enters Advanced LIGO/Virgo's online candidate event database. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant PHY-1404121.

  1. Molecular gas and star formation in HI-deficient Virgo cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Young, Judith S.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping of the CO emission line in 42 Virgo cluster galaxies reveals that the molecular gas contents and distributions are roughly normal in severaly HI-deficient Virgo spirals. The survival of the molecular component mitigates the impact of the HI-stripping on star formation and subsequent galactic evolution. For spirals which are deficient in HI by a factor of 10, far-infrared, H alpha line, and nonthermal radio continuum luminosities are lower by no more than a factor of 2. The fact that the inner galactic disks are stripped of HI, while CO is normal, suggests that the lifetime of the molecular phase is approximately one billion years in the inner regions of luminous spirals.

  2. Distribution of Spiral Galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters and Their Dynamic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoshvili, N. G.; Borchkhadze, T. M.; Kalloghlian, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamic characteristics of spiral galaxies with absolute magnitudes M ≥ -20m.6 in the Virgo and Fornax clusters are studied using data from the Merged Catalog of Galaxies MERCG. The galactic diameters from MERCG are used to determine the radius RD that defines the region of possible concentration of dark matter, and the dynamic parameters Mdyn and Mdyn/LB of the spiral galaxies are calculated based on the centrifugal equilibrium condition. Results from the theory of angular momentum transfer are used to estimate the central surface density m0 and angular momentum K of stars in these galaxies. A comparison of the dynamic parameters of the spiral galaxies with M ≥ -20.6 and M ≤ -20.6 reveals a statistically significant higher fraction of dark matter in the spiral galaxies with M ≤ -20.6, at 26.3% in Virgo and 27% in Fornax.

  3. On the use of attachment modes in substructure coupling for dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chang, C.-J.

    1977-01-01

    Substructure coupling or component-mode synthesis may be employed in the solution of dynamics problems for complex structures. Although numerous substructure-coupling methods have been devised, little attention has been devoted to methods employing attachment modes. In the present paper the various mode sets (normal modes, constraint modes, attachment modes) are defined. A generalized substructure-coupling procedure is described. Those substructure-coupling methods which employ attachment modes are described in detail. One of these methods is shown to lead to results (e.g., system natural frequencies) comparable to or better than those obtained by the Hurty (1965) method.

  4. Stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Hui; Li, Li-Fang; Han, Zhan-Wen

    In this paper we review the study of stellar population synthesis. So far there exist three methods in the study of the integrated light of stellar population-trail-and error, automated, and evolutionary population synthesis (EPS). We have discussed advantages and disadvantages for these methods. Among the three methods the EPS is the most direct approach to model galaxies. In this scheme, the model builder starts with knowledge of stellar evolution and attempts to build a model galaxy with physical input parameters such as star formation rate (SFR) and the initial mass function (IMF) slope. Therefore we have discussed emphatically the EPS method. First we have described and given the often used grids of several key ingredients in the EPS studies: (1) the library of evolutionary tracks used to calculate isochrones in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD), (2) the libraries of spectra adopted, which include empirical and theoretical stellar spectral libraries, star cluster library, active galactic nuclear (AGN) library and galaxy library, to derive the integrated spectral energy distributions (ISED) or magnitudes and colors in the suitable passbands, (3) the IMF used to evaluate the relative proportions of stars in the various evolutionary phases, and (4) the assumption for the underlying star formation rate (SFR) and chemical enrichment. Then we have listed several population synthesis criterions, i.e. broadband color indices, the integrated spectral energy distribution (ISED) and narrow band color indices, given the basic method of calculating broadband colors and flux-distribution for a simple stellar population (SSP). At last we have discussed simply the existed limitations, which are caused by some uncertainties in its two principal building blocks: stellar evolution models and spectral libraries in the studies of the EPS. Stellar evolution models are often subject to limitations in the following areas: the atomic data (radiative opacities, heavy element mixture

  5. The sagittarius tidal stream and the shape of the galactic stellar halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Matthew T.

    The stellar halo that surrounds our Galaxy contains clues to understanding galaxy formation, cosmology, stellar evolution, and the nature of dark matter. Gravitationally disrupted dwarf galaxies form tidal streams, which roughly trace orbits through the Galactic halo. The Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf tidal debris is the most dominant of these streams, and its properties place important constraints on the distribution of mass (including dark matter) in the Galaxy. Stars not associated with substructures form the "smooth" component of the stellar halo, the origin of which is still under investigation. Characterizing halo substructures such as the Sgr stream and the smooth halo provides valuable information on the formation history and evolution of our galaxy, and places constraints on cosmological models. This thesis is primarily concerned with characterizing the 3-dimensional stellar densities of the Sgr tidal debris system and the smooth stellar halo, using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). F turnoff stars are used to infer distances, as they are relatively bright, numerous, and distributed about a single intrinsic brightness (magnitude). The inherent spread in brightnesses of these stars is overcome through the use of the recently-developed technique of statistical photometric parallax, in which the bulk properties of a stellar population are used to create a probability distribution for a given star's distance. This was used to build a spatial density model for the smooth stellar halo and tidal streams. The free parameters in this model are then fit to SDSS data with a maximum likelihood technique, and the parameters are optimized by advanced computational methods. Several computing platforms are used in this study, including the RPI SUR Bluegene and the Milkyway home volunteer computing project. Fits to the Sgr stream in 18 SDSS data stripes were performed, and a continuous density profile is found for the major Sgr stream. The stellar halo is found to

  6. Probing the scale of new physics by Advanced LIGO/VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mazumdar, A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that if the new physics beyond the standard model is associated with a first-order phase transition around 107- 108 GeV , the energy density stored in the resulting stochastic gravitational waves and the corresponding peak frequency are within the projected final sensitivity of the advanced LIGO/VIRGO detectors. We discuss some possible new physics scenarios that could arise at such energies, and in particular, the consequences for Peccei-Quinn and supersymmetry breaking scales.

  7. Searches for Gravitational Waves Bursts in the first joint run of LIGO, GEO600 and Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, M.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    Gravitational wave burst analysis targets short (< 1 unite{sec}), generic or poorly modeled gravitational wave events. Such events could be caused by a wide range of sources like core-collapse of massive stars, neutron star excitations, black-hole mergers or gamma-ray bursts. We present the status of the searches for gravitational wave bursts in the first joint data from the global network of LIGO, GEO600 and Virgo interferometers, and the prospects for the upcoming data taking run.

  8. Helioseismic inferences of the solar cycles 23 and 24: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Sun-as-a star helioseismic spectrophotometer GOLF and photometer VIRGO instruments onboard the SoHO spacecraft are collecting high-quality, continuous data since April 1996. We analyze here these unique datasets in order to investigate the peculiar and weak on-going solar cycle 24. As this cycle 24 is reaching its maximum, we compare its rising phase with the rising phase of the previous solar cycle 23.

  9. Kinematic properties and dark matter fraction of Virgo dwarf early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.; Boselli, A.; Peletier, R.; Gorgas, J.

    2015-03-01

    What happens to dwarf galaxies as they enter the cluster potential well is one of the main unknowns in studies of galaxy evolution. Several evidence suggests that late-type galaxies enter the cluster and are transformed to dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs). We study the Virgo cluster to understand which mechanisms are involved in this transformation. We find that the dEs in the outer parts of Virgo have rotation curves with shapes and amplitudes similar to late-type galaxies of the same luminosity (Fig. 1). These dEs are rotationally supported, have disky isophotes, and younger ages than those dEs in the center of Virgo, which are pressure supported, often have boxy isophotes and are older (Fig. 1). Ram pressure stripping, thus, explains the properties of the dEs located in the outskirts of Virgo. However, the dEs in the central cluster regions, which have lost their angular momentum, must have suffered a more violent transformation. A combination of ram pressure stripping and harassment is not enough to remove the rotation and the spiral/disky structures of these galaxies. We find that on the the Faber-Jackson and the Fundamental Plane relations dEs deviate from the trends of massive elliptical galaxies towards the position of dark matter dominated systems such as the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way and M31. Both, rotationally and pressure supported dEs, however, populate the same region in these diagrams. This indicates that dEs have a non-negligible dark matter fraction within their half light radius.

  10. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Jurg; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

    2011-11-29

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

  11. Tides, Interactions, and Fine-Scale Substructures in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; Gallagher, John S., III

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a study on galaxy interactions, tides, and other processes that produce luminous fine-scale substructures in the galaxy clusters: Coma, Perseus, Abell 2199, AWM 3, and AWM 5. All unusual structures in these clusters can be categorized into seven morphologies: interacting galaxies, multiple galaxies (noninteracting), distorted galaxies, tailed galaxies, line galaxies, dwarf galaxy groups, and galaxy aggregates. The various morphologies are described, and a catalog is presented, of 248 objects in these five clusters along with color, and positional information obtained from CCD images taken with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in broadband B and R filters. Distorted, interacting, and fine-scale substructures have a range of colors extending from blue objects with B-R~0 to redder colors at B-R~2.5. We also find that the structures with the most disturbed morphology have the bluest colors. In addition, the relative number distributions of these structures suggest that two separate classes of galaxy clusters exist: one dominated by distorted structures and the other dominated by galaxy associations. The Coma and Perseus clusters, respectively, are proposed as models for these types of clusters. These structures avoid the deep potentials of the dominant D or cD galaxies in the Coma and Perseus clusters, and tend to clump together. Possible mechanisms for the production of fine-scale substructure are reviewed and compared with observations of z~0.4 Butcher-Oemler clusters. We conclude, based on color, positional, and statistical data, that the most likely mechanism for the creation of these structures is through an interaction with the gravitational potential of the cluster, possibly coupled with effects of weak interactions with cluster ellipticals.

  12. GLAST and Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Juerg; Madau, Piero

    2007-07-12

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used ''Via Lactea'', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos.

  13. Hierarchically Parallelized Constrained Nonlinear Solvers with Automated Substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Kwang, Abel

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops a parallelizable multilevel multiple constrained nonlinear equation solver. The substructuring process is automated to yield appropriately balanced partitioning of each succeeding level. Due to the generality of the procedure,_sequential, as well as partially and fully parallel environments can be handled. This includes both single and multiprocessor assignment per individual partition. Several benchmark examples are presented. These illustrate the robustness of the procedure as well as its capability to yield significant reductions in memory utilization and calculational effort due both to updating and inversion.

  14. Aligning graphs and finding substructures by a cavity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, S.; Braunstein, A.; Mahmoudi, H.; Tria, F.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a new distributed algorithm for aligning graphs or finding substructures within a given graph. It is based on the cavity method and is used to study the maximum-clique and the graph-alignment problems in random graphs. The algorithm allows to analyze large graphs and may find applications in fields such as computational biology. As a proof of concept we use our algorithm to align the similarity graphs of two interacting protein families involved in bacterial signal transduction, and to predict actually interacting protein partners between these families.

  15. Unexpected relationships of substructured populations in Chinese Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, De-Xing; Yan, Lu-Na; Ji, Ya-Jie; Hewitt, Godfrey M; Huang, Zu-Shi

    2009-01-01

    Background Highly migratory species are usually expected to have minimal population substructure because strong gene flow has the effect of homogenizing genetic variation over geographical populations, counteracting random drift, selection and mutation. The migratory locust Locusta migratoria belongs to a monotypic genus, and is an infamous pest insect with exceptional migratory ability – with dispersal documented over a thousand kilometers. Its distributional area is greater than that of any other locust or grasshopper, occurring in practically all the temperate and tropical regions of the eastern hemisphere. Consequently, minimal population substructuring is expected. However, in marked contrast to its high dispersal ability, three geographical subspecies have been distinguished in China, with more than nine being biologically and morphologically identified in the world. Such subspecies status has been under considerable debate. Results By multilocus microsatellite genotyping analysis, we provide ample genetic evidence for strong population substructure in this highly migratory insect that conforms to geography. More importantly, our genetic data identified an unexpected cryptic subdivision and demonstrated a strong affiliation of the East China locusts to those in Northwest/Northern China. The migratory locusts in China formed three distinct groups, viz. (1) the Tibetan group, comprising locusts from Tibet and nearby West China high mountain regions; this is congruent with the previously recognized Tibetan subspecies, L. m. tibetensis; (2) the South China group, containing locusts from the Hainan islands; this corresponds to the Southeast Asia oriental tropical subspecies L. m. manilensis; (3) the North China group, including locusts from the Northwest and Northern China (the Asiatic subspecies L. m. migratoria), Central China and Eastern China regions. Therefore, the traditional concept on Locusta subspecies status established from Uvarov in 1930s needs to be

  16. Convergence of a Substructuring Method with LaGrange Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Jan; Tezaur, Radek

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the convergence of a substructuring iterative method with Lagrange multipliers, proposed recently by Farhat and Roux. The method decomposes finite element discretization of an elliptic boundary value problem into Neumann problems on the subdomains and a coarse problem for the subdomain nullspace components. For linear conforming elements and preconditioning by the Dirichlet problems on the subdomains, we prove the asymptotic bound on the condition number C(1 + log(H/h))(sup gamma), gamma = 2 or 3, where h is the characteristic element size and H is the subdomain size.

  17. Simulating and Synthesizing Substructures Using Neural Network and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.; VanLandingham, Hugh F.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of simulating and synthesizing substructures by computational neural network models is illustrated by investigating a statically indeterminate beam, using both a 1-D and a 2-D plane stress modelling. The beam can be decomposed into two cantilevers with free-end loads. By training neural networks to simulate the cantilever responses to different loads, the original beam problem can be solved as a match-up between two subsystems under compatible interface conditions. The genetic algorithms are successfully used to solve the match-up problem. Simulated results are found in good agreement with the analytical or FEM solutions.

  18. The construction of preconditioners for elliptic problems by substructuring, IV

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1987-06-01

    We consider the problem of solving the algebraic system of equations which result from the discretization of elliptic boundary value problems defined on three dimensional Euclidean space. We develop preconditioners for such systems based on substructuring (also known as domain decomposition). The resulting algorithms are well suited to emerging parallel computing architectures. We describe two techniques for developing these precondictioners. A theory for the analysis of the condition number for the resulting preconditioned system is given and the results of supporting numerical experiments are presented. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. The construction of preconditioners for elliptic problems by substructuring, IV

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1989-07-01

    We consider the problem of solving the algebraic system of equations which result from the discretization of elliptic boundary value problems defined on three-dimensional Euclidean space. We develop preconditioners for such systems based on substructuring (also known as domain decomposition). The resulting algorithms are well suited to emerging parallel computing architectures. We describe two techniques for developing these preconditioners. A theory for the analysis of the condition number for the resulting preconditioned system is given and the results of supporting numerical experiments are presented.

  20. Spatial Structures in the Globular Cluster Distribution of the 10 Brightest Virgo Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Abrusco, R.; Fabbiano, G.; Zezas, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report the discovery of significant localized structures in the projected two-dimensional spatial distributions of the Globular Cluster (GC) systems of the 10 brightest galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. We use catalogs of GCs extracted from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) imaging data, complemented, when available, by additional archival ACS data. These structures have projected sizes ranging from ˜5″ to a few arcminutes (˜1 to ˜25 kpc). Their morphologies range from localized, circular to coherent, complex shapes resembling arcs and streams. The largest structures are preferentially aligned with the major axis of the host galaxy. A few relatively smaller structures follow the minor axis. Differences in the shape and significance of the GC structures can be noticed by investigating the spatial distribution of GCs grouped by color and luminosity. The largest coherent GC structures are located in low-density regions within the Virgo cluster. This trend is more evident in the red GC population, which is believed to form in mergers involving late-type galaxies. We suggest that GC over-densities may be driven by either accretion of satellite galaxies, major dissipationless mergers, or wet dissipation mergers. We discuss caveats to these scenarios, and estimate the masses of the potential progenitors galaxies. These masses range in the interval {{10}8.5}-{{10}9.5} {{M}⊙ }, larger than those of the Local Group dwarf galaxies.

  1. LIGO-VIRGO Triggered Follow-Up with NASA High Energy Photon Survey Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the proposed use of LIGO-VIRGO S6 triggers from comparatively loud events to search for both prompt and afterglow EM counterparts with RXTE, SWIFT and FERMI. Using a 2 or 3-fold coincident trigger from the two LIGO and one VIRGO detectors to provide sky position information, we can search the data from these missions within a limited time window and a constrained portion of their respective FOVs, allowing us to look at a level below the threshold normally used to publicly indicate an event. Since we propose to use these missions in their survey mode, no re-pointing of the missions is envisioned. The search for a coincidence between the data from LIGO-VIRGO and the EM survey missions can then be analyzed off-line; if a coincident EM signal is found it would have a significant effect in establishing the validity of the GW trigger. We discuss some relevant aspects of the NASA missions and give some preliminary estimates of thresholds and coincident background rates.

  2. HEAO 1 high energy X-ray observations of the Virgo cluster and A2142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, S. M.; Reichert, G.; Mushotzky, R.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Rothschild, R.; Primini, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations are reported of the Virgo cluster and Abell 2142 in the energy range of 15-150 keV, detected by using hard X-ray and low energy gamma-ray instruments on board the HEAO-1 spacecraft, during 1977 and 1978. The Virgo cluster was detected at a mean flux of (1.3 + or - 0.3) x 10 to the 0.001 photons/sq cm-s in the 20-100 keV band, and A2142 was detected marginally at a flux of (2 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the 0.001 photons/sq cm-s in the 15-40 keV band. Inverse Compton emission was not observed in these clusters. Results are used to derive limits to the intracluster magnetic field of B approximately greater than 5 x 10 to the -7th gauss and B approximately 5 x 10 to the -8th gauss in the Virgo cluster and A1242, respectively. There is some evidence for variability in these sources, which implies that the hard X-ray emission originates in a relatively compact object or region rather than from the cluster as a whole.

  3. Vertical and Horizontal Seismic Isolation Performance of the Advanced Virgo External Injection Bench Seismic Attenuation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, M. R.; Beker, M. G.; Bertolini, A.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Bulten, H. J.; Doets, M.; Hennes, E.; Mul, F. A.; Rabeling, D. S.; Schimmel, A.

    During the combined commissioning and science run of Virgo in 2010, an extensive noise study revealed that vibrations of some of the injection/detection optics on the external injection bench (EIB) made a significant contribution to the interferometer's noise budget. Several resonances were identified between 10 and 100 Hz of the EIB support structure and between 200 and 300 Hz of the optics mounts. These resonances introduced a significant amount of beam jitter that would limit the sensitivity of Advanced Virgo. This beam jitter needed to be reduced for Advanced Virgo to reach its full potential. To eliminate this noise source we developed a seismic attenuation system to isolate the EIB from ground vibrations: EIB-SAS. It employs vertical and horizontal passive seismic filters based on negative stiffness technology to attenuate seismic noise by 40 dB above 10 Hz. The isolation capabilities of the system have been characterized up to 400 Hz with the aid of a custom designed piezoelectric actuated shaking platform. The results of the vertical and horizontal transfer function measurements are presented.

  4. X-ray Transients in the Advanced LIGO/Virgo Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Jonah; Baker, John G.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, Jordan B.; Mooley, Kunal; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Ptak, Andrew Francis

    2013-01-01

    Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will be all-sky monitors for merging compact objects within a few hundred megaparsecs. Finding the electromagnetic counterparts to these events will require an understanding of the transient sky at low redshift (z < 0.1). We performed a systematic search for extragalactic, low redshift, transient events in the XMM-Newton Slew Survey. In a flux limited sample, we found that highly variable objects comprised 10% of the sample, and that of these, 10% were spatially coincident with cataloged optical galaxies. This led to 4 × 10(exp -4) transients per square degree above a flux threshold of 3×10(exp -12) erg/sq cm/s (0.2-2 keV) which might be confused with LIGO/Virgo counterparts. This represents the first extragalactic measurement of the soft X-ray transient rate within the Advanced LIGO/Virgo horizon. Our search revealed six objects that were spatially coincident with previously cataloged galaxies, lacked evidence for optical active galactic nuclei, displayed high luminosities approx. 10(exp 43) erg/s, and varied in flux by more than a factor of 10 when compared with the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. At least four of these displayed properties consistent with previously observed tidal disruption events.

  5. Recent Results from the SPLASH Survey: Chemical Abundances and Kinematics of Andromeda's Stellar Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline

    2015-08-01

    Large scale surveys of Andromeda's resolved stellar populations have revolutionized our view of this galaxy over the past decade. The combination of large-scale, contiguous photometric surveys and pointed spectroscopic surveys has been particularly powerful for discovering and following up new substructures and disentangling the structural components of Andromeda. The SPLASH (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo) survey consists of broad- and narrow-band imaging and spectroscopy of red giant branch stars in lines of sight throughout the M31 system, ranging in distance from 3 kpc to more than 200 kpc from Andromeda's center. I will present recent results from the SPLASH survey on the structure of Andromeda's stellar halo and the origin of tidal debris features, including measurements of the kinematics and chemical abundances of Andromeda's halo stars.

  6. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  7. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83<λ<2.5μm) for a sample of 1200 stars in the Southern sky using the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph at the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope. We developed a dedicated observing strategy and customized the telescope control software in order to achieve the highest possible level of data homogeniety. As of 2015, we observed about 600 stars of all spectral types and luminosity classes making our library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  8. Stellar population in LLAGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2004-11-01

    LLAGN that include low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), and transition-type objects (TOs) represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, a study of the central stellar population of LLAGN is presented. Our goal is to search for spectroscopic signatures of young and intermediate age stars, and to investigate their relationship with the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the UV-optical continuum of the innermost (20-100 pc) regions in these galaxies. Half of the LINERs and TOs of the Palomar catalogue are analysed. It is found that weak-[OI] ([OI]/Hα≤0.25) LLAGN have an intermediate age stellar population that dominates the optical light. But young stellar clusters dominate the UV continuum in these objects. These clusters can co-exist with a black-hole in spatial scales of a few pc. Most of the strong-[OI] LLAGN have a predominantly old stellar population. These results suggest that young and intermediate age stars do not play a significant role in the ionization of LLAGN with strong [OI].

  9. Unlocking Dark Matter Physics out of Galactic Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Keeton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being ubiquitous throughout the Universe, the fundamental properties of dark matter remain a mystery. While dark matter physics plays little role in the current evolution of large-scale cosmic structures, it does have a major impact on small causal length scales. Studying the astrophysical structures that resulted from the gravitational collapse of fluctuations on these small scales can thus yield important clues about the physics of dark matter. Today, most of these structures are locked in deep inside the potential wells of galaxies, making the study of their properties difficult. Fortunately, due to fortuitous alignments between high-redshift bright sources and us, some of these galaxies act as spectacular strong gravitational lenses, allowing us to probe their inner structure. In this talk, we present a unified framework to extract information about the power spectrum of mass substructures inside lens galaxies. We determine which properties of mass substructures are most readily constrained by lensing data and forecast the constraining power of current and future observations.

  10. Jet substructures of boosted polarized hadronic top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2016-03-01

    We study jet substructures of a boosted polarized top quark, which undergoes the hadronic decay t →b u d ¯, in the perturbative QCD framework, focusing on the energy profile and the differential energy profile. These substructures are factorized into the convolution of a hard top-quark decay kernel with a bottom-quark jet function and a W -boson jet function, where the latter is further factorized into the convolution of a hard W -boson decay kernel with two light-quark jet functions. Computing the hard kernels to leading order in QCD and including the resummation effect in the jet functions, we show that the differential jet energy profile is a useful observable for differentiating the helicity of a boosted hadronic top quark: a right-handed top jet exhibits quick descent of the differential energy profile with the inner test cone radius r , which is attributed to the V -A structure of weak interaction and the dead-cone effect associated with the W -boson jet. The above helicity differentiation may help reveal the chiral structure of physics beyond the standard model at high energies.

  11. An Efficient Crankshaft Dynamic Analysis Using Substructuring with Ritz Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MOURELATOS, Z. P.

    2000-11-01

    A structural analysis using dynamic substructuring with Ritz vectors is presented for predicting the dynamic response of an engine crankshaft, based on the finite-element method. A two-level dynamic substructuring is performed using a set of load-dependent Ritz vectors. The rotating crankshaft is properly coupled with the non-rotating, compliant engine block. The block compliance is represented by a distributed linear elastic foundation at each main bearing location. The stiffness of the elastic foundation can be different in the vertical and horizontal planes, thereby considering the anisotropy of the engine block compliance with respect to the crankshaft rotation. The analysis accounts for the kinematic non-linearity resulting from the crankangle-dependent circumferential contact location between each journal and the corresponding bore of the engine block. Crankshaft “bent” and block “misboring” effects due to manufacturing imperfections are considered in the analysis. The superior accuracy and reduced computational effort of the present method as compared with the equivalent superelement analysis in MSC/NASTRAN, are demonstrated using the free and forced vibrations of a slender cylindrical beam and free vibrations of a four-cylinder engine crankshaft. Subsequently, the accuracy of the present method in calculating the dynamic response of engine crankshafts is shown through comparisons between the analytical predictions and experimental results for the torsional vibrations of an in-line five cylinder engine and the bending vibrations of the crankshaft-flywheel assembly of a V6 engine.

  12. Toward quantitative proteomics of organ substructures: implications for renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Velic, Ana; Macek, Boris; Wagner, Carsten A

    2010-09-01

    Organs are complex structures that consist of multiple tissues with different levels of gene expression. To achieve comprehensive coverage and accurate quantitation data, organs ideally should be separated into morphologic and/or functional substructures before gene or protein expression analysis. However, because of complex morphology and elaborate isolation protocols, to date this often has been difficult to achieve. Kidneys are organs in which functional and morphologic subdivision is especially important. Each subunit of the kidney, the nephron, consists of more than 10 subsegments with distinct morphologic and functional characteristics. For a full understanding of kidney physiology, global gene and protein expression analyses have to be performed at the level of the nephron subsegments; however, such studies have been extremely rare to date. Here we describe the latest approaches in quantitative high-accuracy mass spectrometry-based proteomics and their application to quantitative proteomics studies of the whole kidney and nephron subsegments, both in human beings and in animal models. We compare these studies with similar studies performed on other organ substructures. We argue that the newest technologies used for preparation, processing, and measurement of small amounts of starting material are finally enabling global and subsegment-specific quantitative measurement of protein levels in the kidney and other organs. These new technologies and approaches are making a decisive impact on our understanding of the (patho)physiological processes at the molecular level. PMID:21044760

  13. Resolving the chemical substructure of Orion-KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.; Semenov, D.; Palau, A.; Mills, E. A. C.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion (Orion-KL) is the nearest example of a high-mass star-forming environment. Studying the resolved chemical substructures of this complex region provides important insight into the chemistry of high-mass star-forming regions (HMSFRs), as it relates to their evolutionary states. Aims: The goal of this work is to resolve the molecular line emission from individual substructures of Orion-KL at high spectral and spatial resolution and to infer the chemical properties of the associated gas. Methods: We present a line survey of Orion-KL obtained from combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometric and IRAM 30 m single-dish observations. Covering a 4 GHz bandwidth in total, this survey contains over 160 emission lines from 20 species (25 isotopologues), including 11 complex organic molecules (COMs). Spectra are extracted from individual substructures and the intensity-integrated distribution map for each species is provided. We then estimate the rotation temperature for each substructure, along with their molecular column densities and abundances. Results: For the first time, we complement 1.3 mm interferometric data with single-dish observations of the Orion-KL region and study small-scale chemical variations in this region. (1) We resolve continuum substructures on ~3'' angular scale. (2) We identify lines from the low-abundance COMs CH3COCH3 and CH3CH2OH, as well as tentatively detect CH3CHO and long carbon-chain molecules C6H and HC7N. (3) We find that while most COMs are segregated by type, peaking either towards the hotcore (e.g., nitrogen-bearing species) or the compact ridge (e.g., oxygen-bearing species like HCOOCH3 and CH3OCH3), the distributions of others do not follow this segregated structure (e.g., CH3CH2OH, CH3OH, CH3COCH3). (4) We find a second velocity component of HNCO, SO2, 34SO2, and SO lines, which may be associated with a strong shock event in the low-velocity outflow. (5) Temperatures and molecular

  14. The rising stellar velocity dispersion of M87 from integrated starlight

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jeremy D.; Gebhardt, Karl; Cradit, Mason

    2014-04-20

    We have measured the line-of-sight velocity distribution from integrated stellar light at two points in the outer halo of M87 (NGC 4486), the second-rank galaxy in the Virgo Cluster. The data were taken at R = 480'' (∼41.5 kpc) and R = 526'' (∼45.5 kpc) along the SE major axis. The second moment for a non-parametric estimate of the full velocity distribution is 420 ± 23 km s{sup –1} and 577 ± 35 km s{sup –1}, respectively. There is intriguing evidence in the velocity profiles for two kinematically distinct stellar components at the position of our pointing. Under this assumption, we employ a two-Gaussian decomposition and find the primary Gaussian having rest velocities equal to M87 (consistent with zero rotation) and second moments of 383 ± 32 km s{sup –1} and 446 ± 43 km s{sup –1}, respectively. The asymmetry seen in the velocity profiles suggests that the stellar halo of M87 is not in a relaxed state and confuses a clean dynamical interpretation. That said, either measurement (full or two component model) shows a rising velocity dispersion at large radii, consistent with previous integrated light measurements, yet significantly higher than globular cluster measurements at comparable radial positions. These integrated light measurements at large radii, and the stark contrast they make to the measurements of other kinematic tracers, highlight the rich kinematic complexity of environments like the center of the Virgo Cluster and the need for caution when interpreting kinematic measurements from various dynamical tracers.

  15. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  16. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  17. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE OUTER HALO OF THE MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL M49

    SciTech Connect

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Rudick, Craig S.; Feldmeier, John J. E-mail: paul.harding@case.edu E-mail: jjfeldmeier@ysu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use deep surface photometry of the giant elliptical M49 (NGC 4472), obtained as part of our survey for diffuse light in the Virgo Cluster, to study the stellar populations in its outer halo. Our data trace M49's stellar halo out to {approx}100 kpc (7r{sub e}), where we find that the shallow color gradient seen in the inner regions becomes dramatically steeper. The outer regions of the galaxy are quite blue (B - V {approx} 0.7); if this is purely a metallicity effect, it argues for extremely metal-poor stellar populations with [Fe/H] < -1. We also find that the extended accretion shells around M49 are distinctly redder than the galaxy's surrounding halo, suggesting that we are likely witnessing the buildup of both the stellar mass and metallicity in M49's outer halo due to late time accretion. While such growth of galaxy halos is predicted by models of hierarchical accretion, this growth is thought to be driven by more massive accretion events which have correspondingly higher mean metallicity than inferred for M49's halo. Thus the extremely metal-poor nature of M49's extended halo provides some tension against current models for elliptical galaxy formation.

  18. MAPPING THE STELLAR STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY THICK DISK AND HALO USING SEGUE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, Jelte T. A.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martin, Nicolas F.; Yanny, Brian; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Beers, Timothy C.

    2010-05-01

    We map the stellar structure of the Galactic thick disk and halo by applying color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting to photometric data from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) survey. The SEGUE imaging scans allow, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of Milky Way structure at both high and low latitudes using uniform Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry. Incorporating photometry of all relevant stars simultaneously, CMD fitting bypasses the need to choose single tracer populations. Using old stellar populations of differing metallicities as templates, we obtain a sparse three-dimensional map of the stellar mass distribution at |Z|>1 kpc. Fitting a smooth Milky Way model comprising exponential thin and thick disks and an axisymmetric power-law halo allows us to constrain the structural parameters of the thick disk and halo. The thick-disk scale height and length are well constrained at 0.75 {+-} 0.07 kpc and 4.1 {+-} 0.4 kpc, respectively. We find a stellar halo flattening within {approx}25 kpc of c/a = 0.88 {+-} 0.03 and a power-law index of 2.75 {+-} 0.07 (for 7 kpc {approx_lt}R{sub GC} {approx_lt} 30 kpc). The model fits yield thick-disk and stellar halo densities at the solar location of {rho}{sub thick,sun} = 10{sup -2.3{+-}0.1} M{sub sun} pc{sup -3} and {rho}{sub halo,sun} = 10{sup -4.20{+-}0.05} M{sub sun} pc{sup -3}, averaging over any substructures. Our analysis provides the first clear in situ evidence for a radial metallicity gradient in the Milky Way's stellar halo: within R {approx_lt} 15 kpc the stellar halo has a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.6, which shifts to [Fe/H] {approx_equal} -2.2 at larger radii, in line with the two-component halo deduced by Carollo et al. from a local kinematic analysis. Subtraction of the best-fit smooth and symmetric model from the overall density maps reveals a wealth of substructures at all latitudes, some attributable to known streams and overdensities, and some

  19. The Tension between Organisational Sub-structures in Secondary Schools and Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imants, Jeroen; Sleegers, Peter; Witziers, Bob

    2001-01-01

    Explores how Dutch secondary schools can provide supportive working contexts that promote teacher learning, focusing on integration of two substructures (subject departments and student guidance units). Analyzes tensions between the substructures, summarizes insights into teacher learning communities, and discusses integrated teacher teams'…

  20. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  1. KINEMATIC DISCOVERY OF A STELLAR STREAM LOCATED IN PISCES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Charles; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Grillmair, Carl

    2013-03-10

    We report the kinematic discovery of the Pisces Stellar Stream (PSS), at Galactic longitude l Almost-Equal-To 135 Degree-Sign and -39 Degree-Sign < b < -36 Degree-Sign . We originally identified this halo substructure from velocities of red giant branch stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, and confirmed its presence in turnoff stars from SDSS photometric data. The PSS is a narrow, kinematically cold tidal stream, with {sigma}{sub v,0} Almost-Equal-To 8 km s{sup -1}. Its metallicity is [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -2.2, with {approx}0.3 dex dispersion. The color-magnitude signature of the stream turnoff, combined with our measured metallicity, places the PSS at a distance of 35 {+-} 3 kpc. The PSS is the same as the previously announced ''Triangulum stream'' and part of the proposed ''stream a''. We rule out an association of the PSS with other previously known Milky Way substructures in the same region of the sky.

  2. INSIGHT INTO THE FORMATION OF THE MILKY WAY THROUGH COLD HALO SUBSTRUCTURE. II. THE ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES OF ECHOS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Allende Prieto, Carlos E-mail: crockosi@ucolick.org E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu

    2011-06-10

    We determine the average metallicities of the elements of cold halo substructure (ECHOS) that we previously identified in the inner halo of the Milky Way within 17.5 kpc of the Sun. As a population, we find that stars kinematically associated with ECHOS are chemically distinct from the background kinematically smooth inner halo stellar population along the same Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) line of sight. ECHOS are systematically more iron-rich, but less {alpha}-enhanced than the kinematically smooth component of the inner halo. ECHOS are also chemically distinct from other Milky Way components: more iron-poor than typical thick-disk stars and both more iron-poor and {alpha}-enhanced than typical thin-disk stars. In addition, the radial velocity dispersion distribution of ECHOS extends beyond {sigma} {approx} 20 km s{sup -1}. Globular clusters are unlikely ECHOS progenitors, as ECHOS have large velocity dispersions and are found in a region of the Galaxy in which iron-rich globular clusters are very rare. Likewise, the chemical composition of stars in ECHOS does not match predictions for stars formed in the Milky Way and subsequently scattered into the inner halo. Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are possible ECHOS progenitors, and if ECHOS are formed through the tidal disruption of one or more dSph galaxies, the typical ECHOS [Fe/H] {approx} - 1.0 and radial velocity dispersion {sigma} {approx} 20 km s{sup -1} implies a dSph with M{sub tot} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. Our observations confirm the predictions of theoretical models of Milky Way halo formation that suggest that prominent substructures are likely to be metal-rich, and our result implies that the most likely metallicity for a recently accreted star currently in the inner halo is [Fe/H] {approx} - 1.0.

  3. DISSECTING GALAXY FORMATION. II. COMPARING SUBSTRUCTURE IN PURE DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2010-06-20

    We compare the substructure evolution in pure dark matter (DM) halos with those in the presence of baryons, hereafter PDM and BDM models, respectively. The prime halos have been analyzed in the previous work. Models have been evolved from identical initial conditions which have been constructed by means of the constrained realization method. The BDM model includes star formation and feedback from stellar evolution onto the gas. A comprehensive catalog of subhalo populations has been compiled and individual and statistical properties of subhalos analyzed, including their orbital differences. We find that subhalo population mass functions in PDM and BDM are consistent with a single power law, M {sup {alpha}}{sub sbh}, for each of the models in the mass range of {approx}2 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}-2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. However, we detect a nonnegligible shift between these functions, the time-averaged {alpha} {approx} -0.86 for the PDM and -0.98 for the BDM models. Overall, {alpha} appears to be a nearly constant in time, with variations of {+-}15%. Second, we find that the radial mass distribution of subhalo populations can be approximated by a power law, R{sup {gamma}{sub sbh}} with a steepening that occurs at the radius of a maximal circular velocity, R{sub vmax}, in the prime halos. Here we find that {gamma}{sub sbh} {approx} -1.5 for the PDM and -1 for the BDM models, when averaged over time inside R{sub vmax}. The slope is steeper outside this region and approaches -3. We detect little spatial bias (less than 10%) between the subhalo populations and the DM distribution of the main halos. Also, the subhalo population exhibits much less triaxiality in the presence of baryons, in tandem with the shape of the prime halo. Finally, we find that, counter-intuitively, the BDM population is depleted at a faster rate than the PDM one within the central 30 kpc of the prime halo. The reason for this is that although the baryons provide a substantial glue to the subhalos

  4. Opacity of stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  5. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, G H; Brown, T G; Gates, D A; Lu, K P; Zarnstorff, M C; Boozer, A H; Harris, J H; Meneghini, O; Mynick, H E; Pomphrey, N; Reiman, A H; Xanthopoulos, P

    2011-01-05

    The quasi-axisymmetric stellarator (QAS) concept offers a promising path to a more compact stellarator reactor, closer in linear dimensions to tokamak reactors than previous stellarator designs. Concept improvements are needed, however, to make it more maintainable and more compatible with high plant availability. Using the ARIES-CS design as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. While the ARIES-CS features a through-the-port maintenance scheme, we have investigated configuration changes to enable a sector-maintenance approach, as envisioned for example in ARIES AT. Three approaches are reported. The first is to make tradeoffs within the QAS design space, giving greater emphasis to maintainability criteria. The second approach is to improve the optimization tools to more accurately and efficiently target the physics properties of importance. The third is to employ a hybrid coil topology, so that the plasma shaping functions of the main coils are shared more optimally, either with passive conductors made of high-temperature superconductor or with local compensation coils, allowing the main coils to become simpler. Optimization tools are being improved to test these approaches.

  6. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  7. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  8. Trends of stellar entropy along stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Guilherme Bronzato, Marcio; Alvares de Souza, Rodrigo; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to discussing the difference in the thermodynamic entropy budget per baryon in each type of stellar object found in the Universe. We track and discuss the actual decrease of the stored baryonic thermodynamic entropy from the most primitive molecular cloud up to the final fate of matter in black holes, passing through evolved states of matter as found in white dwarfs and neutron stars. We then discuss the case of actual stars with different masses throughout their evolution, clarifying the role of the virial equilibrium condition for the decrease in entropy and related issues. Finally, we discuss the role of gravity in driving the composition and the structural changes of stars with different Main Sequence masses during their evolution up to the final product. Particularly, we discuss the entropy of a black hole in this context arguing that the dramatic increase in its entropy, differently from the other cases, is due to the gravitational field itself.

  9. The Origins of the Ultra Compact Dwarfs in the halos of the central cluster galaxies in Fornax and Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voggel, Karina Theresia

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies (UCDs) have filled the size gap (10-100pc) in the scaling relations of early-type stellar systems. Before their discovery, no objects were known in the parameter space between globular clusters (GCs) and dwarf galaxies. The nature of UCDs is widely debated. Two formation channels have been suggested: either UCDs are surviving nuclei of tidally stripped dwarf galaxies, or they constitute the high mass end of the GC population. In this work we establish new strategies to constrain the formation channel of UCDs, looking for the observational signatures of stripped nuclei.Before falling into a galaxy cluster dwarf galaxies initially host their own GC system. Through tidal interaction the GCs outside of the shrinking tidal radius are lost and disperse in the general GC population of the cluster, whereas GCs inside the tidal radius remain bound to the dwarf galaxy. Therefore, we expect to find some GCs close to the stripped nuclei that have not been removed yet, but dragged towards the nucleus via dynamical friction.We tested this prediction in the halo of NGC 1399, the central Fornax cluster galaxy, where we find a local overabundance of GCs on scales of 0.5 to 1 kpc around UCDs. A similar analysis of GC overdensities around UCDs in the halo of M87, the central Virgo cluster galaxy, is ongoing. Such a clustering signal of GCs around UCDs could be a hint that these UCDs formed as nuclei, and what we see is the remnant GC population of the ancestor galaxy.We also have studied the detailed structural composition of ~100 UCDs in the halo of NGC 1399 by analyzing their surface brightness profiles. We present new evidence for faint asymmetric structures and tidal tails around several UCDs, possible tracers for the assembly history of the central cluster galaxy. With new numbers on the abundance of tidal features and close GC companions within large UCD samples, the contribution of each formation channel to the GC/UCD populations in galaxy halos

  10. Kinematically-Decoupled Cores in Dwarf Ellipticals in the Virgo Cluster: Implications for Infallen Groups in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, P.; van de Ven, G.; Boselli, A.; Lisker, T.; Peletier, R.; SMAKCED Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    A small fraction 8%) of elliptical galaxies contain kinematically-decoupled cores (KDCs), where the kinematical properties of the central region of the galaxy are distinct from those of the main body of the galaxy. KDCs are difficult to detect in dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies because of their low central surface brightnesses. There was only one statistically robust detection of a KDC in a dE prior to our study. We present spectroscopic evidence for KDCs in two Virgo cluster dEs, VCC 1183 and VCC 1453, that were studied as part of the SMAKCED project. These KDCs have radii of 1.8$''$ (0.14 kpc) and 4.2$''$ (0.33 kpc), respectively. They are distinct from the main body of the galaxy is three ways: (1) inverted sense of rotation; (2) younger and more metal-rich stellar population; and (3) rounder isophotal shape. The frequency of occurence of KDCs and their properties provide important constraints on the formation history of their host galaxies. We discuss different formation scenarios for these KDCs and for dEs in general. The fact that dEs represent the most common galaxy class in clusters and have never been seen in isolation suggests that they are products of environmental processes that transformed their progenitors. However, it is unclear which types of galaxies are dE progenitors and which environmental processes are the most important. These KDCs provide new clues. Dwarf-dwarf wet mergers and gas accretion are argued to be the only mechanisms that can simultaneously explain all of the properties of these KDCs. Both of these mechanisms require that the progenitor had a close companion with a small relative velocity. Thus, we conclude that KDCs in cluster dEs were formed in galaxy pairs residing in poor groups or in isolation whose subsequent infall into the cluster quenched their star formation. This research was supported by a Fulbright fellowship and by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

  11. Stellar dynamic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Dulk, G. A.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    The dynamic spectrum, a three dimensional record of the radio intensity as a function both of time and frequency, has long been used as a probe of plasma processes in the solar corona. Beginning with the work of Wild and McCready (1950) dynamic spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between the multitude of radio wave emitting phenomena which occur in the solar corona and to infer the physical mechanisms responsible. Stellar dynamic spectroscopy has always been a tantalizing prospect. The vast body of experience with solar dynamic spectroscopy would prove invaluable in interpreting stellar dynamic spectra. Further, the new parameter regimes presented by stellar coronas would allow further insight to be gained in the physical processes at work in stellar coronas. Recently, Bastian and Bookbinder (1987) used the Very Large Array The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is operated by Associated Universities, Inc. under contract with the National Science Foundation. in spectral line mode at 1.4 GHz with a bandwidth of 50 MHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of nearby flare stars. The spectral resolution was 3.125 MHz and the temporal resolution was 5 s. While the relative bandwidth was less than ideal (δν/ν ˜ 5%), the spectra so obtained were sufficient to show the presence of narrowband structure in a radio outburst from the well-known dMe flare star UV Ceti. Several efforts are now underway to obtain stellar dynamic spectra, of both RS CVn binaries and dMe flare stars, with higher degrees of spectral and temporal resolution. Among these are use of a 1024 channel correlator with the 1000' telescope at Arecibo and use of the Berkeley Fast Pulsar Search Machine (Kulkarni et al. 1984) with the Green Bank 140' telescope.

  12. Stellar Pulsations and Stellar Evolution: Conflict, Cohabitation, or Symbiosis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Achim

    While the analysis of stellar pulsations allows the determination of current properties of a star, stellar evolution models connect it with its previous history. In many cases results from both methods do not agree. In this review some classical and current cases of disagreement are presented. In some cases these conflicts led to an improvement of the theory of stellar evolution, while in others they still remain unsolved. Some well-known problems of stellar physics are pointed out as well, for which it is hoped that seismology—or in general the analysis of stellar pulsations—will help to resolve them. The limits of this symbiosis will be discussed as well.

  13. Modeling of ion complexation and extraction using substructural molecular fragments

    PubMed

    Solov'ev; Varnek; Wipff

    2000-05-01

    A substructural molecular fragment (SMF) method has been developed to model the relationships between the structure of organic molecules and their thermodynamic parameters of complexation or extraction. The method is based on the splitting of a molecule into fragments, and on calculations of their contributions to a given property. It uses two types of fragments: atom/bond sequences and "augmented atoms" (atoms with their nearest neighbors). The SMF approach is tested on physical properties of C2-C9 alkanes (boiling point, molar volume, molar refraction, heat of vaporization, surface tension, melting point, critical temperature, and critical pressures) and on octanol/water partition coefficients. Then, it is applied to the assessment of (i) complexation stability constants of alkali cations with crown ethers and phosphoryl-containing podands, and of beta-cyclodextrins with mono- and 1,4-disubstituted benzenes, and (ii) solvent extraction constants for the complexes of uranyl cation by phosphoryl-containing ligands. PMID:10850791

  14. Effects of Magnetic Fields on Bar Substructures in Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-03-01

    To study the effects of magnetic fields on the properties of bar substructures, we run two-dimensional, ideal MHD simulations of barred galaxies under the influence of a non-axisymmetric bar potential. In the bar regions, magnetic fields reduce density compression in the dust-lane shocks, while removing angular momentum further from the gas at the shocks. This evidently results in a smaller and more distributed ring, and a larger mass inflows rate to the galaxy center in models with stronger magnetic fields. In the outer regions, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates, amplifying magnetic fields near the corotation resonance. In the absence of spiral arms, the amplified fields naturally shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The reader is refereed to Kim & Stone (2012) for a detailed presentation of the simulation outcomes.

  15. Potent Oxazolidinone Antibacterials with Heteroaromatic C-Ring Substructure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Novel oxazolidinone analogues bearing a condensed heteroaromatic ring as the C-ring substructure were synthesized as candidate antibacterial agents. Analogues 16 and 21 bearing imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine and 18 and 23 bearing [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine as the C-ring had excellent in vitro antibacterial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). They also showed promising therapeutic effects in a mouse model of lethal infection. Preliminary safety data (inhibitory effects on cytochrome P450 isoforms and monoamine oxidases) were satisfactory. Further evaluation of 18 and 23 is ongoing. PMID:24900607

  16. Resolving the Chemical Substructure of Orion-KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Siyi; Beuther, Henrik; Semenov, Dmitry; Henning, Thomas; Palau, Aina

    2013-07-01

    Context. The Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion (Orion-KL) is the closest example of a high-mass star forming environment. Studying the resolved chemical structure of this complex region can provide important insight for relating the chemistry of high mass star forming regions with their evolutionary state. We present a line survey of Orion-KL obtained from the combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) and IRAM 30 m single-dish data. Covering 4 GHz bandwidth in total, this survey contains at least 160 emission lines from 27 chemical species. Aims. The goal of this work is to resolve the molecular line emission from individual substructure in Orion-KL at high spectral and spatial resolution, inferring the chemical properties of the associated gas. Methods. The spectra from different substructures are extracted and the intensity-integrated distribution maps for different molecules are imaged. We then calculate column densities, and abundances for each molecule in each identified substructure, assuming local thermal equilibrium (LTE), and that the lines are both optically thin and have uniform widths for all species. Results. By complementing interferometric data of the Orion-KL region with single-dish data to recover the short spacing information, we are able to study spatial abundance variations in this region for the first time. On one hand, at the spatial resolution of 4 arcsec, several substructures appear on the continuum map. The strongest emission from nitrogen-bearing molecules comes from the main hot core, which has chemistry typical of an active region, while sulfur-bearing and carbon monoxides have extended emission covering the cooler southern ridge and outflow regions. In contrast, the distribution of saturated complex organics is more complicated. Most of them peak at either the hot core (e.g., CH3OH) or the compact ridge (e.g., HCOOCH3), while others peak at intermediate positions between the hot core and the compact ridge (e.g., CH3CH2OH). But nevertheless, no

  17. Substructure drag effects and recrystallization textures in aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, R.; Bate, P.

    1999-03-10

    Many important recrystallization texture components in metals such as aluminium originate from nuclei in which the mobile high-angle boundary exists prior to, or is formed in the early stages of, annealing. Nucleation can then occur by a process known as strain-induced boundary migration (SIBM). It is possible that this process will involve several growing subgrains, and the drag from that substructure can then have a significant effect. A simple model is used to demonstrate how changes in the overall driving force for recrystallization and Zener drag can affect recrystallization textures when SIBM is involved. This is discussed in relation to experimental observations and the evidence for this process is reviewed.

  18. Construction of preconditioners for elliptic problems by substructuring. I

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1986-07-01

    We consider the problem of solving the algebraic system of equations which arise from the discretization of symmetric elliptic boundary value problems via finite element methods. A new class of preconditioners for the discrete system is developed based on substructuring (also known as domain decomposition). The resulting preconditioned algorithms are well suited to emerging parallel computing architectures. The proposed methods are applicable to problems on general domains involving differential operators with rather general coefficients. A basic theory for the analysis of the condition number of the preconditioned system (which determines the iterative convergence rate of the algorithm) is given. Techniques for applying the theory and algorithms to problems with irregular geometry are discussed and the results of extensive numerical experiments are reported.

  19. Population substructure in Cache County, Utah: the Cache County study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Population stratification is a key concern for genetic association analyses. In addition, extreme homogeneity of ethnic origins of a population can make it difficult to interpret how genetic associations in that population may translate into other populations. Here we have evaluated the genetic substructure of samples from the Cache County study relative to the HapMap Reference populations and data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Results Our findings show that the Cache County study is similar in ethnic diversity to the self-reported "Whites" in the ADNI sample and less homogenous than the HapMap CEU population. Conclusions We conclude that the Cache County study is genetically representative of the general European American population in the USA and is an appropriate population for conducting broadly applicable genetic studies. PMID:25078123

  20. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}ȯ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}ȯ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}ȯ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (˜5–10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}ȯ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  1. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}ȯ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}ȯ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}ȯ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (∼5–10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}ȯ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  2. Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, Judith H.; Lorenze, Nancy P.; D’Onofrio, Gail; Spertus, John A.; Lindau, Stacy T.; Morgan, Thomas M.; Herrin, Jeph; Bueno, Héctor; Mattera, Jennifer A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Among individuals with ischemic heart disease, young women with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) represent an extreme phenotype associated with an excess mortality risk. While women younger than 55 years of age account for less than 5% of hospitalized AMI events, almost 16,000 deaths are reported annually in this group, making heart disease a leading killer of young women. Despite a higher risk of mortality compared with similarly aged men, young women have been the subject of few studies. Methods Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) is a large, observational study of the presentation, treatment and outcomes of young women and men with AMI. VIRGO will enroll 2,000 women, 18–55 years of age, with AMI and a comparison cohort of 1,000 men with AMI from more than 100 participating hospitals. The aims of the study are: to determine sex differences in the distribution and prognostic importance of biological, demographic, clinical, and psychosocial risk factors; determine whether there are sex differences in the quality of care received by young AMI patients; and determine how these factors contribute to sex differences in outcomes (including mortality, hospitalization and health status). Blood serum and DNA for consenting participants will be stored for future studies. Conclusions VIRGO will seek to identify novel and prognostic factors that contribute to outcomes in this young AMI population. Results from the study will be used to develop clinically useful risk-stratification models for young AMI patients, explain sex differences in outcomes and identify targets for intervention. PMID:21081748

  3. Chandra Observations of Gas Stripping in the Elliptical Galaxy NGC 4552 in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, M.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Nulsen, P.

    2006-06-01

    We use a 54.4 ks Chandra observation to study ram pressure stripping in NGC 4552 (M89), an elliptical galaxy in the Virgo Cluster. Chandra images in the 0.5-2 keV band show a sharp leading edge in the surface brightness 3.1 kpc north of the galaxy center, a cool (kT=0.51+0.09-0.06 keV) tail with mean density ne~(5.4+/-1.7)×10-3 cm-3 extending ~10 kpc to the south of the galaxy, and two 3-4 kpc horns of emission extending southward away from the leading edge. These are all features characteristic of supersonic ram pressure stripping of galaxy gas, due to NGC 4552's motion through the surrounding Virgo ICM. Fitting the surface brightness profile and spectra across the leading edge, we find the galaxy gas inside the edge is cooler (kT=0.43+0.03-0.02 keV) and denser (ne~0.010 cm-3) than the surrounding Virgo ICM [kT=2.2+0.7-0.4 keV and ne=(3.0+/-0.3)×10-4 cm-3]. The resulting pressure ratio between the free-streaming ICM and cluster gas at the stagnation point is ~7.6+3.4-2.0 for galaxy gas metallicities of 0.5+0.5-0.3 Zsolar, which suggests that NGC 4552 is moving supersonically through the cluster with a velocity v~1680+390-220 km s-1 (Mach 2.2+0.5-0.3) at an angle ξ~35deg+/-7deg toward us with respect to the plane of the sky.

  4. Measurement of the Total Solar Irradiance over cycle 23: results from DIARAD/VIRGO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitte, S.; Mekaoui, S.; Crommelynck, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is measured from space since 29 years, covering 2.6 11 year solar cycles. Over the last 12 years, covering solar cycle 23, TSI measurements are available from the VIRGO experiment on the SOHO satellite. SOHO is located at the L1 Lagrange point, offering continuous sun observation and a stable thermal environment. VIRGO contains two independent radiometers, DIARAD and PMO, each with their own ageing monitoring capabilities. From these two radiometers, DIARAD is the only one with a nominal operation over the entire mission, and DIARAD has the lowest ageing. We present the ageing correction of DIARAD and PMO by the DIARAD team, and discuss the differences with the versions available from the PMO team. In addition to the normal exposure dependent ageing corrections applied by both the DIARAD and PMO teams, the PMO team applies additional 'exposure independent corrections' or 'sensitivity changes' which create an artificial downward trend of about 0.4 W/m2 for both DIARAD and PMO. Besides the two independent measurements of the TSI variation over cycle 23 from DIARAD and PMO, two more independent measurements over the complete cycle are available, on the one hand from a combination of ACRIM 2 and ACRIM 3, on the other hand from a combination of ERBS and TIM. All together, these measurements allow to measure the decadal trend of the TSI variation over cycle 23 with an unprecedented accuracy. All instruments show a similar long term behaviour except ACRIM 3 which shows a faster decline. We construct a composite time series using DIARAD/VIRGO as a reference instrument to put all instruments at the same absolute level. From the composite time series we can conclude there is no significant decadal trend during cycle 23. This is in contradiction with the ACRIM composite which shows a decreasing trend due to the ACRIM 3 decline, and with the PMO composite which shows a decreasing trend due to the 'exposure independent corrections' applied to

  5. A new estimate of the Hubble constant using the Virgo cluster distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visvanathan, N.

    The Hubble constant, which defines the size and age of the universe, remains substantially uncertain. Attention is presently given to an improved distance to the Virgo Cluster obtained by means of the 1.05-micron luminosity-H I width relation of spirals. In order to improve the absolute calibration of the relation, accurate distances to the nearby SMC, LMC, N6822, SEX A and N300 galaxies have also been obtained, on the basis of the near-IR P-L relation of the Cepheids. A value for the global Hubble constant of 67 + or 4 km/sec per Mpc is obtained.

  6. Transient Gravitational-wave Astronomy With LIGO, Virgo And GEO600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    Most of our astronomical knowledge comes from light. Gravitational waves present a new and fundamentally different spectrum in which to observe the universe. The first generation international network of ground based laser interferometeric detectors (LIGO, Virgo, and GEO600) recently completed several years of joint observation. This data has been searched for signatures of gravitational radiation from various sources including stochastic sources, spinning isolated neutron stars, burst sources such as supernovae, and coalescence of compact binary systems. I will present the results from the latest searches for burst and compact binary coalescence sources. I will also present prospects for detection in the advanced detector era to begin around 2015.

  7. Towards solar activity maximum 24 as seen by GOLF and VIRGO/SPM instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Mathur, S.; Régulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Davies, G. R.; Jiménez, A.; Simoniello, R.

    2013-06-01

    All p-mode parameters vary with time as a response to the changes induced by the cyclic behavior of solar magnetic activity. After the unusual long solar-activity minimum between cycles 23 and 24 -where the p-mode parameters have shown a different behavior than the surface magnetic proxies- we analyze the temporal variation of low-degree p-mode parameters measured by GOLF (in velocity) and VIRGO (in intensity) Sun-as-a-star instruments on board SoHO. We compare our results with other activity proxies.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGES sources in Virgo cluster (Taylor+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.

    2013-04-01

    Two areas of the Virgo cluster have been selected for study with AGES, VC1 and VC2. This paper examines the VC1 area while Paper II (2013MNRAS.428..459T) will consider VC2 and compare the results of the two areas. Observations were taken in 2008 January-June, 2009 February-June, 2010 January-June and 2011 January, using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) instrument on the Arecibo telescope in spectral line mode. (4 data files).

  9. THE EFFECTS OF HALO-TO-HALO VARIATION ON SUBSTRUCTURE LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Zentner, Andrew R. E-mail: koushiappas@brown.edu

    2011-11-10

    We explore the halo-to-halo variation of dark matter (DM) substructure in galaxy-sized DM halos, focusing on its implications for strongly gravitational lensed systems. We find that the median value for projected substructure mass fractions within projected radii of 3% of the host halo virial radius is approximately f{sub sub} Almost-Equal-To 0.25%, but that the variance is large with a 95 percentile range of 0 {<=} f{sub sub} {<=} 1%. We quantify possible effects of substructure on quadruply imaged lens systems using the cusp relation and the simple statistic, R{sub cusp}. We estimate that the probability of obtaining the large values of the R{sub cusp} which have been observed from substructure effects is roughly {approx}10{sup -3} to {approx}10{sup -2}. We consider a variety of possible correlations between host halo properties and substructure properties in order to probe possible sample biases. In particular, low-concentration host DM halos have more large substructures and give rise to large values of R{sub cusp} more often. However, there is no known observational bias that would drive observed quadruply imaged quasars to be produced by low-concentration lens halos. Finally, we show that the substructure mass fraction is a relatively reliable predictor of the value of R{sub cusp}.

  10. Stellar radio emission (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelezniakov, V. V.

    The current understanding of the radio-emission characteristics of 'ordinary' main sequence stars as well as giants and supergiants is examined. Particular consideration is given to radio emission from supergiants, Young T Tauri stars, magnetic Ap stars, flare stars of UV Ceti type, Alpha Sco, and RS CVn objects. It is noted that the study of stellar radio emission is in its initial stage. Further progress in this area depends on successes in finding new radio sources, associated, for example, with magnetic stars, and on an intensified investigation of the frequency spectra and polarization of already-discovered radio stars. It is also noted that, although the current knowledge of solar physics can help in understanding stellar radio emission, models and ideas developed for solar conditions should not be mechanically transferred to other stars by a simple change in scale.

  11. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Johnson, B.; Swaminathan, N.

    1989-01-01

    Software and hardware assembled to support specific engineering activities. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation (SINW) is integrated computer workstation providing systems and engineering support functions for Space Shuttle guidance and navigation-system logistics, repair, and procurement activities. Consists of personal-computer hardware, packaged software, and custom software integrated together into user-friendly, menu-driven system. Designed to operate on IBM PC XT. Applied in business and industry to develop similar workstations.

  12. Chaos and stellar streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Valluri, Monica; Pearson, Sarah; Kupper, Andreas Hans Wilhelm; Hogg, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological simulations predict that dark matter halos around galaxies should be triaxial in shape with universal density profiles. A significant number of orbits in such systems are chaotic, though it is commonly assumed that chaos is not dynamically relevant for galaxy halos because the timescales over which chaos is computed to be important are generally long relative to the dynamical time. In recent work, we showed that even when chaos is not important for restructuring the global structure of a galaxy, chaos can greatly enhance the density evolution and alter the morphologies of stellar streams over just a few orbital times by causing streams to 'fan out.' This occurs because the orbits of the stars in stellar streams have small distributions of fundamental frequencies and are therefore sensitive to mild chaos that modulates the frequencies on small-scales over much faster timescales. This suggests that the morphology of tidal streams alone can be used to estimate the significance of chaos along the orbits of the progenitor systems, thereby placing constraints on the global properties of the gravitational potential. I will explain our theoretical understanding of this phenomenon and discuss implications for a recently discovered stellar stream (the Ophiuchus stream) that may be on a chaotic orbit in the inner Milky Way due to the influence of the time-dependent, triaxial potential of the Galactic bar.

  13. Massive Stars: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2007-07-01

    Massive stars dominate the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM, and ultimately of their parent galaxy and the universe, because of their fast evolution and intense supersonic winds. Four decades ago, the first rocket UV spectra of massive stars revealed the importance of mass loss and began to change our understanding of their evolution. Recently, advances in stellar modeling, and the observation of crucial ions in the far-UV spectral range, led to the resolution of long-standing issues in our understanding of massive star atmospheres. A revised (downwards) calibration of Teff for early spectral types is emerging as a result. Meanwhile, HST imaging, and large ground-based telescopes with multislit spectroscopic capabilities, had opened the possibility of resolved studies of stellar populations in Local Group galaxies, which sample a variety of metallicity and environment conditions. More recently, GALEX is providing a global, deep view of the young stellar populations for hundreds of nearby galaxies, revealing their recent star-formation history and modalities. The wide-field coverage and sensitivity of the GALEX UV imaging, easily detecting extremely low levels of star formation, is again changing some of our views on massive star formation in galaxies.

  14. Three-dimensional deformation analysis of two-phase dislocation substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, Kevin P.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional deformation analysis of two-phase dislocation substructures was carried out, extending the Qian and Fan (1991) approach to 3D stress-strain fields by using the Budiansky and Wu (1962) criterion for strain compatibility between the 'hard' and 'soft' regions. The result is a rate-dependent viscoplastic theory, named the dislocation substructure viscoplasticity (DSV), which incorporates a self-consistent effect of dislocation substructure on material response. An algorithm developed for numerical implementation of the DSV theory is presented.

  15. Effect of load eccentricity and substructure deformation on ultimate strength of shuttle orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of load eccentricity and substructure deformation on the ultimate strength and stress displacement properties of the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) was determined. The LI-900 Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) tiles mounted on the .41 cm thick Strain Isolator Pad (SIP) were investigated. Substructure deformations reduce the ultimate strength of the SIP/tile TPS and increase the scatter in the ultimate strength data. Substructure deformations that occur unsymmetric to the tile can cause the tile to rotate when subjected to a uniform applied load. Load eccentricity reduces SIP/tile TPS ultimate strength and causes tile rotation.

  16. Jet Substructure: Boosting the Search for New Physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse

    2016-03-01

    Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are dominated by jets, collimated sprays of particles that are proxies for underlying quarks and gluons. With the remarkable performance of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, jets can now be characterized not just by their overall direction and energy but also by their substructure. In this talk, I highlight the ways that jet substructure has enhanced the search for new physics at the LHC, including recent excitement over a possible diboson excess. I also explain how theoretical studies of jet substructure have taught us surprising lessons about the nature of the strong force.

  17. Stellar Vampires Unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    Astronomers have found possible proofs of stellar vampirism in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, they found that some hot, bright, and apparently young stars in the cluster present less carbon and oxygen than the majority of their sisters. This indicates that these few stars likely formed by taking their material from another star. "This is the first detection of a chemical signature clearly pointing to a specific scenario to form so-called 'Blue straggler stars' in a globular cluster", said Francesco Ferraro, from the Astronomy Department of Bologna University (Italy) and lead-author of the paper presenting the results. Blue stragglers are unexpectedly young-looking stars found in stellar aggregates, such as globular clusters, which are known to be made up of old stars. These enigmatic objects are thought to be created in either direct stellar collisions or through the evolution and coalescence of a binary star system in which one star 'sucks' material off the other, rejuvenating itself. As such, they provide interesting constraints on both binary stellar evolution and star cluster dynamics. To date, the unambiguous signatures of either stellar traffic accidents or stellar vampirism have not been observed, and the formation mechanisms of Blue stragglers are still a mystery. The astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope to measure the abundance of chemical elements at the surface of 43 Blue straggler stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae [1]. They discovered that six of these Blue straggler stars contain less carbon and oxygen than the majority of these peculiar objects. Such an anomaly indicates that the material at the surface of the blue stragglers comes from the deep interiors of a parent star [2]. Such deep material can reach the surface of the blue straggler only during the mass transfer process occurring between two stars in a binary system. Numerical simulations indeed show that the coalescence of stars should not

  18. First low-latency LIGO+Virgo search for binary inspirals and their electromagnetic counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Del Pozzo, W.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kranz, O.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sainathan, P.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: The detection and measurement of gravitational-waves from coalescing neutron-star binary systems is an important science goal for ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. In addition to emitting gravitational-waves at frequencies that span the most sensitive bands of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, these sources are also amongst the most likely to produce an electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational-wave emission. A joint detection of the gravitational-wave and electromagnetic signals would provide a powerful new probe for astronomy. Methods: During the period between September 19 and October 20, 2010, the first low-latency search for gravitational-waves from binary inspirals in LIGO and Virgo data was conducted. The resulting triggers were sent to electromagnetic observatories for followup. We describe the generation and processing of the low-latency gravitational-wave triggers. The results of the electromagnetic image analysis will be described elsewhere. Results: Over the course of the science run, three gravitational-wave triggers passed all of the low-latency selection cuts. Of these, one was followed up by several of our observational partners. Analysis of the gravitational-wave data leads to an estimated false alarm rate of once every 6.4 days, falling far short of the requirement for a detection based solely on gravitational-wave data.

  19. Measuring the Dust Stripping of Galaxies by the Hot Intracluster Gas in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Lee, Joon Hyeop; French, K. Decker; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    Ram pressure stripping, the removal of gas from galaxies interacting with the hot intracluster medium, has been proposed as a mechanism for quenching star formation in cluster galaxies. While much effort has been made to identify gas stripped from the interstellar medium (ISM) of cluster galaxies, the ISM also includes dust, another potential tracer of stripping. Previous studies using radio and infra-red wavelengths have suggested gas and dust stripping in several cluster galaxies. In our study, we try a different approach: searching for optical extinction and reddening of background galaxies by dust stripped from foreground cluster members. As the first step, using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12) and the VLA Imaging of Virgo in Atomic gas (VIVA) HI survey, we map the magnitudes and colors of galaxies behind Virgo cluster galaxies whose HI morphologies are disrupted. We discuss how efficiently dust stripping can be measured with this method and the connection to gas stripping.

  20. A Catalog of [O III] 5007 Photometric Standards In The Virgo Cluster Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Frances; Ganguly, R.; Feldmeier, J.; Barlow, R.

    2009-01-01

    The number of sources that can be used for the calibration of narrow band photometry is small compared to that of broadband photometry.Narrowband photometry of point sources is important for a variety of reasons, from the search for intracluster planetary nebulae to understanding the star-formation history of the universe (e.g.,through Lyman alpha-emitting galaxies). There will be a need in the next several years for more photometric narrow-band standard stars with the next generation of surveys (e.g., with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope,or the One-Degree Imager). Thus, more standard stars (both primary and secondary) for narrow band need to be identified and cataloged. Over the last three years, we have been collecting narrow-band [OIII]5007 images of portions of the Virgo Cluster, along with broad-band V and R. The data were collected at the 2.3m Wyoming Infrared Observatory and the Kitt Peak 0.9m.We present our [OIII]5007 photometry calibration of point sources in the Virgo Cluster region, most of which are intracluster planetary nebula. For greater utility of this catalog, we also cross-calibrate our photometry with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz system. In addition, we take advantage of the long basline of our observatios to find time-variable sources (rejected from the standard star catalog) such as background quasars, supernovae, novae, and micro-lensing events.

  1. An RXTE Study of M87 and the Core of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Heinz, Sebastian; Fabian, Andrew C.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present hard X-ray observations of the nearby radio galaxy M87 and the core of the Virgo cluster using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. These are the first hard X-ray observations of M87 not affected by contamination from the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4388. Thermal emission from Virgo's intracluster medium is clearly detected and has a spectrum indicative of kT approx. = 2.5 keV plasma with approximately 25% cosmic abundances. No non-thermal (power-law) emission from M87 is detected in the hard X-ray band, with fluctuations in the Cosmic X-ray Background being the limiting factor. Combining with ROSAT data, we infer that the X-ray spectrum of the M87 core and jet must be steep (Gamma(sub core) greater than 1.90 and Gamma(sub jet) greater than 1.75), and we discuss the implications of this result. In particular, these results are consistent with M87 being a mis-aligned BL-Lac object.

  2. An RXTE Study of M87 and the Core of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Heinz, Sebastian; Fabian, Andrew C.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present hard X-ray observations of the nearby radio galaxy M87 and the core of the Virgo cluster using the Rossi X-ray 7Tming Explorer. These are the first hard X-ray observations of M87 not affected by contamination from the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4388. Thermal emission from Virgo's intracluster medium is clearly detected and has a spectrum indicative of kT is approximately equal to 2.5 keV plasma with approximately 25% cosmic abundances. No non-thermal (power-law) emission from M87 is detected in the hard X-ray band, with fluctuations in the Cosmic X-ray Background being the limiting factor. Combining with ROSAT data, we infer that the X-ray spectrum of the M87 core and jet must be steep (Gamma (sub core) > 1.90 and Gamma (sub jet) > 1.75), and we discuss the implications of this result. In particular, these results are consistent with M87 being a mis-aligned BL-Lac object.

  3. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey . VII. Dust in cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, I.; Baes, M.; Zibetti, S.; Fritz, J.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; Verstappen, J.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Clemens, M.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Corbelli, E.; Dariush, A.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2010-07-01

    We use the science demonstration phase data of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey to search for dust emission of early-type dwarf galaxies in the central regions of the Virgo cluster as an alternative way of identifying the interstellar medium. We present the first possible far-infrared detection of cluster early-type dwarf galaxies: VCC 781 and VCC 951 are detected at the 10σ level in the SPIRE 250 μm image. Both detected galaxies have dust masses of the order of 105 M_⊙ and average dust temperatures ≈20 K. The detection rate (less than 1%) is quite high compared to the 1.7% detection rate for Hi emission, considering that dwarfs in the central regions are more Hi deficient. We conclude that the removal of interstellar dust from dwarf galaxies resulting from ram pressure stripping, harassment, or tidal effects must be as efficient as the removal of interstellar gas. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. Stellar Spectroscopy during Exoplanet Transits: Revealing structures across stellar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Dahlén, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Exoplanet transits permit to study stellar surface portions that successively become hidden behind the planet. Differential spectroscopy between various transit phases reveals spectra of those stellar surface segments that were hidden. The deduced center-to-limb behavior of stellar spectral line shapes, asymmetries and wavelength shifts enables detailed tests of 3-dimensional hydrodynamic models of stellar atmospheres, such that are required for any precise determination of abundances or seismic properties. Such models can now be computed for widely different classes of stars (including metal-poor ones and white dwarfs), but have been feasible to test and verify only for the Sun with its resolved surface structure. Exoplanet transits may also occur across features such as starspots, whose magnetic signatures will be retrieved from spectra of sufficient fidelity.Knowing the precise background stellar spectra, also properties of exoplanet atmospheres are better constrained: e.g., the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect becomes resolved as not only a simple change of stellar wavelength, but as a variation of the full line profiles and their asymmetries.Such studies are challenging since exoplanets cover only a tiny fraction of the stellar disk. Current work, analyzing sequences of high-fidelity ESO UVES spectra, demonstrate that such spatially resolved stellar spectra can already be (marginally) retrieved in a few cases with the brightest host stars. Already in a near future, ongoing exoplanet surveys are likely to find further bright hosts that will enable such studies for various stellar types. http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.1402

  5. INSIGHT INTO THE FORMATION OF THE MILKY WAY THROUGH COLD HALO SUBSTRUCTURE. III. STATISTICAL CHEMICAL TAGGING IN THE SMOOTH HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rashkov, Valery; Madau, Piero; Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Bizyaev, Dmitry E-mail: crockosi@ucolick.org E-mail: pmadau@ucolick.org E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: dmbiz@apo.nmsu.edu

    2012-04-10

    We find that the relative contribution of satellite galaxies accreted at high redshift to the stellar population of the Milky Way's smooth halo increases with distance, becoming observable relative to the classical smooth halo about 15 kpc from the Galactic center. In particular, we determine line-of-sight-averaged [Fe/H] and [{alpha}/Fe] in the metal-poor main-sequence turnoff (MPMSTO) population along every Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) spectroscopic line of sight. Restricting our sample to those lines of sight along which we do not detect elements of cold halo substructure (ECHOS), we compile the largest spectroscopic sample of stars in the smooth component of the halo ever observed in situ beyond 10 kpc. We find significant spatial autocorrelation in [Fe/H] in the MPMSTO population in the distant half of our sample beyond about 15 kpc from the Galactic center. Inside of 15 kpc however, we find no significant spatial autocorrelation in [Fe/H]. At the same time, we perform SEGUE-like observations of N-body simulations of Milky Way analog formation. While we find that halos formed entirely by accreted satellite galaxies provide a poor match to our observations of the halo within 15 kpc of the Galactic center, we do observe spatial autocorrelation in [Fe/H] in the simulations at larger distances. This observation is an example of statistical chemical tagging and indicates that spatial autocorrelation in metallicity is a generic feature of stellar halos formed from accreted satellite galaxies.

  6. Investigation of defect copper substructure disrupted in creep condition under the action of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, S. V.; Yaropolova, N. G.; Zaguyliaev1, D. V.; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Komissarova, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    The defect substructure of M00b copper samples loaded up to disruption in creep condition both under and without the action of 0.35 T magnetic field is investigated in the paper. Material near the disrupted surface and at certain distances from it received the serious study. It has been ascertained that when copper disrupting without magnetic action on creep process the main type of dislocation substructure is the cellular one irrespectively of the distance to disruption surface. As the result of magnetic field influence on creep process the main type of dislocation substructure is replaced by the stripe-like one. The distinctive quantitative characteristics of dislocation substructures are observed. Moreover, a gradient behavior of the number of stress raisers has been revealed when moving away from disruption surface both in deformation conditions with and without a magnetic field.

  7. COLUMN DETAIL WITH SUBSTRUCTURE/STEEL BEAM/CONCRETE BEAM AT FIRST AVENUE ONRAMP. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COLUMN DETAIL WITH SUBSTRUCTURE/STEEL BEAM/CONCRETE BEAM AT FIRST AVENUE ON-RAMP. TRIANGLE BUILDING AT RIGHT SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  8. 20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. Wyoming ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  9. Using modern stellar observables to constrain stellar parameters and the physics of the stellar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.

    2014-05-01

    The current state and future evolution of a star is, in principle, specified by a only a few physical quantities: the mass, age, hydrogen, helium, and metal abundance. These same fundamental quantities are crucial for reconstructing the history of stellar systems ranging in scale from planetary systems to galaxies. However, the fundamental parameters are rarely directly observable, and we are forced to use proxies that are not always sensitive or unique functions of the stellar parameters we wish to determine. Imprecise or inaccurate determinations of the fundamental parameters often limit our ability to draw inferences about a given system. As new technologies, instruments, and observing techniques become available, the list of viable stellar observables increases, and we can explore new links between the observables and fundamental quantities in an effort to better characterize stellar systems. In the era of missions such as Kepler, time-domain observables such as the stellar rotation period and stellar oscillations are now available for an unprecedented number of stars, and future missions promise to further expand the sample. Furthermore, despite the successes of stellar evolution models, the processes and detailed structure of the deep stellar interior remains uncertain. Even in the case of well-measured, well understood stellar observables, the link to the underlying parameters contains uncertainties due to our imperfect understanding of stellar interiors. Model uncertainties arise from sources such as the treatment of turbulent convection, transport of angular momentum and mixing, and assumptions about the physical conditions of stellar matter. By carefully examining the sensitivity of stellar observables to physical processes operating within the star and model assumptions, we can design observational tests for the theory of stellar interiors. I propose a series of tools based on new or revisited stellar observables that can be used both to constrain

  10. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  11. Statistics of magnification perturbations by substructure in the cold dark matter cosmological model

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bertone, Gianfranco; Chen, Jacqueline; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2005-06-01

    We study the statistical properties of magnification perturbations by substructures in strong lensed systems using linear perturbation theory and an analytical substructure model including tidal truncation and a continuous substructure mass spectrum. We demonstrate that magnification perturbations are dominated by perturbers found within a tidal radius of an image, and that sizable magnification perturbations may arise from small, coherent contributions from several substructures within the lens halo. We find that the root-mean-square (rms) fluctuation of the magnification perturbation is {approx}10% to {approx}20% and both the average and rms perturbations are sensitive to the mass spectrum and density profile of the perturbers. Interestingly,we find that relative to a smooth model of the same mass, the average magnification in clumpy models is lower (higher) than that in smooth models for positive (negative) parity images. This is opposite from what is observed if one assumes that the image magnification predicted by the best-fit smooth model of a lens is a good proxy for what the observed magnification would have been if substructures were absent. While it is possible for this discrepancy to be resolved via nonlinear perturbers, we argue that a more likely explanation is that the assumption that the best-fit lens model is a good proxy for the magnification in the absence of substructure is not correct. We conclude that a better theoretical understanding of the predicted statistical properties of magnification perturbations by CDM substructure is needed in order to affirm that CDM substructures have been unambiguously detected.

  12. Application of Resin Transfer Molding to the Manufacture of Wind Turbine Blade Substructures. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hedley, C. W.; Ritter, W. J.; Ashwill, T.

    2001-07-26

    The U.S. has generally lacked the capability for an iterative process of detailed structural design, manufacturing, and testing at the full blade level to achieve specific structural performance, cost, and weight targets. This project examined the effects that different composites processing methods had on the performance of representative blade substructures. In addition, the results of the testing of these substructures was used to validate NuMAD, the design tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Gravitational focusing and substructure effects on the rate modulation in direct dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Witte, Samuel J.

    2015-08-21

    We study how gravitational focusing (GF) of dark matter by the Sun affects the annual and biannual modulation of the expected signal in non-directional direct dark matter searches, in the presence of dark matter substructure in the local dark halo. We consider the Sagittarius stream and a possible dark disk, and show that GF suppresses some, but not all, of the distinguishing features that would characterize substructure of the dark halo were GF neglected.

  14. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY X-RAY SUBSTRUCTURES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Lima Neto, Gastao B.; Lagana, Tatiana F.

    2012-02-20

    We present a new method to quantify substructures in clusters of galaxies, based on the analysis of the intensity of structures. This analysis is done in a residual image that is the result of the subtraction of a surface brightness model, obtained by fitting a two-dimensional analytical model ({beta}-model or Sersic profile) with elliptical symmetry, from the X-ray image. Our method is applied to 34 clusters observed by the Chandra Space Telescope that are in the redshift range z in [0.02, 0.2] and have a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) greater than 100. We present the calibration of the method and the relations between the substructure level with physical quantities, such as the mass, X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cluster redshift. We use our method to separate the clusters in two sub-samples of high- and low-substructure levels. We conclude, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the method recuperates very well the true amount of substructure for small angular core radii clusters (with respect to the whole image size) and good S/N observations. We find no evidence of correlation between the substructure level and physical properties of the clusters such as gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, and redshift; however, analysis suggest a trend between the substructure level and cluster mass. The scaling relations for the two sub-samples (high- and low-substructure level clusters) are different (they present an offset, i.e., given a fixed mass or temperature, low-substructure clusters tend to be more X-ray luminous), which is an important result for cosmological tests using the mass-luminosity relation to obtain the cluster mass function, since they rely on the assumption that clusters do not present different scaling relations according to their dynamical state.

  15. Gap comparison between single crown and three-unit bridge zirconia substructures

    PubMed Central

    Charoenchitt, Masnisa; Asvanund, Chanavut

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare marginal and internal gaps of zirconia substructure of single crowns with those of three-unit fixed dental prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS Standardized Co-Cr alloy simulated second premolar and second molar abutments were fabricated and subsequently duplicated into type-III dental stone for working casts. After that, all zirconia substructures were made using Lava™ system. Marginal and internal gaps were measured in 2 planes (mesial-distal plane and buccal-palatal plane) at 5 locations: marginal opening (MO), chamfer area (CA), axial wall (AW), cusp tip (CT) and mid-occlusal (OA) using Replica technique. RESULTS There were significant differences between gaps at all locations. The mean ± SD of marginal gap in premolar was 43.6 ± 0.4 µm and 46.5 ± 0.5 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge substructure respectively. For molar substructure the mean ± SD of marginal gap was 48.5 ± 0.4 µm and 52.6 ± 0.4 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge respectively. The largest gaps were found at the occlusal area, which was 150.5 ± 0.5 µm and 154.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge premolar substructures respectively and 146.5 ± 0.4 µm and 211.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge molar substructure respectively. CONCLUSION Independent-samples t-test showed significant differences of gap in zirconia substructure between single crowns and three-unit bridge (P<.001). Therefore, the span length has the effect on the fit of zirconia substructure that is fabricated using CAD/CAM technique especially at the occlusal area. PMID:25177467

  16. Probing the substructure of f0(1370 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariborz, Amir H.; Azizi, Azizollah; Asrar, Abdorreza

    2015-04-01

    Within an effective nonlinear chiral Lagrangian framework, the substructure of f0(1370 ) is studied. The investigation is conducted in the context of a global picture of scalar mesons in which the importance of the underlying connections among scalar mesons below and above 1 GeV is recognized and implemented. These connections are due to the mixings among various quark-antiquarks, four-quarks, and glue components and play a central role in understanding the properties of scalar mesons. Iterative Monte Carlo simulations are first performed on the 14-dimensional parameter space of the model and sets of points in this parameter space (the global sets) that give an overall agreement with all experimental data on mass spectrum, various decay widths, and decay ratios of all isosinglet scalar states below 2 GeV are determined. Then within each global set, subsets that give closest agreement for the properties of f0(1370 ) are studied. Unlike the properties of other isosinglet states that show a range of variation within each global set, it is found that there is a clear signal for f0(1370 ) to be predominantly a quark-antiquark state with a substantial s s ¯ component, together with small remnants of four-quark and glue components.

  17. Stellar structure of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, JianMin; Zuo, Wei; Gu, JianZhong; Shang, XinLe

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars are strong magnetized neutron stars which could emit quiescent X-ray, repeating burst of soft gamma ray, and even the giant flares. We investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the structure of isolated magnetars. The stellar structure together with the magnetic field configuration can be obtained at the same time within a self-consistent procedure. The magnetar mass and radius are found to be weakly enhanced by the strong magnetic fields. Unlike other previous investigations, the magnetic field is unable to violate the mass limit of the neutron stars.

  18. Stellar figure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. N.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of analytical and experimental data is presented concerning the stellar figure sensor. The sensor is an interferometric device which is located in the focal plane of an orbiting large space telescope (LST). The device was designed to perform interferometry on the optical wavefront of a single star after it has propagated through the LST. An analytical model of the device was developed and its accuracy was verified by an operating laboratory breadboard. A series of linear independent control equations were derived which define the operations required for utilizing a focal plane figure sensor in the control loop for the secondary mirror position and for active control of the primary mirror.

  19. A Stellar Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, Case

    2015-10-01

    Thomas Henderson, at the Royal Observatory of the Cape, was the first person to measure the distance to a star in 1834. Robert Innes, at the Union Observatory in Johannesburg, discovered that Proxima Centauri was the nearest star to the Sun in 1915. The idea of marking the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Proxima Centauri in 2015 led to the development of a Stellar Highway, similar to the well-known scale models of the Solar System or Planetary Highways, but showing the scaled distance between stars.

  20. Physics of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  1. Extreme Brightness Temperatures and Refractive Substructure in 3C273 with RadioAstron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Gwinn, Carl R.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Narayan, Ramesh; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Jauncey, David L.; Voitsik, Peter A.; Anderson, James M.; Sokolovsky, Kirill V.; Lisakov, Mikhail M.

    2016-03-01

    Earth-space interferometry with RadioAstron provides the highest direct angular resolution ever achieved in astronomy at any wavelength. RadioAstron detections of the classic quasar 3C 273 on interferometric baselines up to 171,000 km suggest brightness temperatures exceeding expected limits from the “inverse-Compton catastrophe” by two orders of magnitude. We show that at 18 cm, these estimates most likely arise from refractive substructure introduced by scattering in the interstellar medium. We use the scattering properties to estimate an intrinsic brightness temperature of 7× {10}12 {{K}}, which is consistent with expected theoretical limits, but which is ˜15 times lower than estimates that neglect substructure. At 6.2 cm, the substructure influences the measured values appreciably but gives an estimated brightness temperature that is comparable to models that do not account for the substructure. At 1.35 {{cm}}, the substructure does not affect the extremely high inferred brightness temperatures, in excess of {10}13 {{K}}. We also demonstrate that for a source having a Gaussian surface brightness profile, a single long-baseline estimate of refractive substructure determines an absolute minimum brightness temperature, if the scattering properties along a given line of sight are known, and that this minimum accurately approximates the apparent brightness temperature over a wide range of total flux densities.

  2. Theoretical and software considerations for general dynamic analysis using multilevel substructured models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. J.; Dodds, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of complex structural systems using the finite element method and multilevel substructured models is presented. The fixed-interface method is selected for substructure reduction because of its efficiency, accuracy, and adaptability to restart and reanalysis. This method is extended to reduction of substructures which are themselves composed of reduced substructures. The implementation and performance of the method in a general purpose software system is emphasized. Solution algorithms consistent with the chosen data structures are presented. It is demonstrated that successful finite element software requires the use of software executives to supplement the algorithmic language. The complexity of the implementation of restart and reanalysis porcedures illustrates the need for executive systems to support the noncomputational aspects of the software. It is shown that significant computational efficiencies can be achieved through proper use of substructuring and reduction technbiques without sacrificing solution accuracy. The restart and reanalysis capabilities and the flexible procedures for multilevel substructured modeling gives economical yet accurate analyses of complex structural systems.

  3. HI content and other structural properties of galaxies in the Virgo cluster from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.; Fabello, S.; Fumagalli, M.; Kent, B. R.; Koopmann, R. A.; Brosch, N.; Hoffman, G. L.; Salzer, J. J.; Boselli, A.

    2008-04-01

    We report the results of an HI blind survey of 80 deg2 of the Virgo cluster, based on the 08° ≤ δ ≤ 16° strip of ALFALFA, the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey. 187 HI sources of high significance are found providing a complete census of HI sources in this region of the Virgo cluster (-1000Virgo Cluster Catalogue (Binggeli et al. 1985, AJ, 90, 1681), all but 8 with late-type galaxies. Ten sources are not associated with optical galaxies and were found to correspond to tidally-disrupted systems (see Kent et al. 2007, ApJ, 665, L15; and Haynes et al. 2007, ApJ, 665, L19). The remaining 21 (11%) are associated with galaxies that are not listed in the Virgo Cluster Catalogue. For all sources with an optical counterpart in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we analyzed i-band SDSS plates to measure optical structural parameters. We find that in the Virgo cluster: i) HI inhabits galaxies that are structurally similar to ordinary late-type galaxies; ii) their HI content can be predicted from their optical luminosity; iii) low surface brightness galaxies have low optical luminosity and contain small quantities of neutral hydrogen; iv) low surface brightness, massive Malin1 type galaxies are comfortably rare objects (less than 0.5%); v) there are no “dark-galaxies” with HI masses M_HI ≥ 107.5 ˜ 8~M_⊙; vi) less than 1% of early-type galaxies contain neutral hydrogen with M_HI ≥ 107.5 ˜ 8~M_⊙ (di Serego Alighieri et al. 2007, A&A, 474, 851).

  4. Are Stellar Over-Densities in Dwarf Galaxies the ``Smoking Gun'' of Triaxial Dark Matter Haloes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge; Walker, Matthew G.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2010-06-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the tidal evolution of globular clusters (GCs) in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Our models adopt a cosmologically motivated scenario in which the dSph is approximated by a static NFW halo with a triaxial shape. For a large set of orbits and projection angles we examine the spatial and velocity distribution of stellar debris deposited during the complete disruption of stellar clusters. Our simulations show that such debris appears as shells, isolated clumps and elongated over-densities at low surface brightness (>=26 mag/arcsec2), reminiscent of substructure observed in several MW dSphs. Such features arise from the triaxiality of the galaxy potential and do not dissolve in time. Stellar over-densities reported in several MW dSphs may thus be the telltale evidence of dark matter haloes being triaxial in shape. We explore a number of kinematical signatures that would help to validate (or falsify) this scenario. The mean angular momentum of the cluster debris associated with box and resonant orbits, which are absent in spherical potentials, is null. As a result, we show that the line-of-sight velocity distribution may exhibit a characteristic ``double-peak'' depending on the oriention of the viewing angle with respect to the progenitor's orbital plane. Kinematic surveys of dSphs may help to detect and identify substructures associated with the disruption of stellar clusters, as well as to address the shape of the dark matter haloes in which dSphs are embedded.

  5. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bullock, James; Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2012-11-20

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 {+-} 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least {approx}175 kpc ({approx}2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

  6. A multibeam HI survey of the Virgo cluster - two isolated HI clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J.; Minchin, R.; Sabatini, S.; van Driel, W.; Baes, M.; Boyce, P.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Disney, M.; Evans, Rh.; Kilborn, V.; Lang, R.; Linder, S.; Roberts, S.; Smith, R.

    2004-04-01

    We have carried out a fully sampled large area (4°× 8°) 21-cm HI line survey of part of the Virgo cluster using the Jodrell Bank multibeam instrument. The survey has a sensitivity some three times better than the standard HIJASS (HI Jodrell All Sky Survey) and HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey) surveys. We detect 31 galaxies, 27 of which are well-known cluster members. The four new detections have been confirmed in the HIPASS data and by follow-up Jodrell Bank pointed observations. One object lies behind M86, but the other three have no obvious optical counterparts upon inspection of the digital sky survey fields. These three objects were mapped at Arecibo with a smaller 3.6-arcmin half power beam width (HPBW) and a four times better sensitivity than the Jodrell Bank data, which allow an improved determination of the dimensions and location of two of the objects, but surprisingly failed to detect the third. The two objects are resolved by the Arecibo beam, giving them a size far larger than any optical images in the nearby field. To our mass limit of 5 × 107(Δv/50 km s-1) Msolar and column density limit of 3 × 1018(Δv/50 km s-1) atom cm-2, these new detections represent only about 2 per cent of the cluster atomic hydrogen mass. Our observations indicate that the HI mass function of the cluster turns down at the low-mass end, making it very different to the field galaxy HI mass function. This is quite different to the Virgo cluster optical luminosity function, which is much steeper than that in the general field. Many of the sample galaxies are relatively gas-poor compared with HI selected samples of field galaxies, confirming the `anaemic spirals' view of Virgo cluster late-type galaxies. The velocity distribution of the HI detected galaxies is also very different to that of the cluster as a whole. There are relatively more high-velocity galaxies in the HI sample, suggesting that they form part of a currently infalling population. The HI sample with optical

  7. Starspots and Stellar Rotation: Stellar Activity with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, L. M.; Basri, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    While the telescopic study of starspots dates back to Galileos observations of our own Sun, recent space-borne photometric missions (such as MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler) are opening a new window into understanding these ubiquitous manifestations of stellar activity. Because of the intimate link between stellar rotation and the generation of the magnetic field, starspots cause a modulation in the lightcurve at the rate of stellar rotation. To complicate matters, stars rotate differentially, so the stellar rotation rate is not really best characterized by a single value but rather by a range of rotation rates. Through high-precision, long-term photometric monitoring of stars of different spectral types and activity strengths, it is possible to determine stellar rotation rates and differential rotation measures. In addition, modeling these lightcurves can tell us about the properties of stellar spots, such as location, areal coverage, and lifetime. New observations provide precision photometry for a large cohort of stars, ranging from Sun-like to rather different stellar properties, at a spread of ages, making these lightcurves a powerful tool for understanding magnetic activity for stars of all activity levels. Here, I will discuss how Kepler can provide new insight into the continuum of stellar activity and our own Suns place amongst the stars.

  8. STRUCTURE AND POPULATION OF THE ANDROMEDA STELLAR HALO FROM A SUBARU/SUPRIME-CAM SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Iye, Masanori; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2010-01-10

    We present a photometric survey of the stellar halo of the nearest giant spiral galaxy, Andromeda (M31), using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. A detailed analysis of VI color-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar population is used to measure properties such as line-of-sight distance, surface brightness, metallicity, and age. These are used to isolate and characterize different components of the M31 halo: (1) the giant southern stream (GSS); (2) several other substructures; and (3) the smooth halo. First, the GSS is characterized by a broad red giant branch (RGB) and a metal-rich/intermediate-age red clump (RC). The I magnitude of the well-defined tip of the RGB suggests that the distance to the observed GSS field is (m - M){sub 0} = 24.73 +- 0.11 (883 +- 45 kpc) at a projected radius of R approx 30 kpc from M31's center. The GSS shows a high metallicity peaked at [Fe/H]approx>-0.5 with a mean (median) of -0.7 (-0.6), estimated via comparison with theoretical isochrones. Combined with the luminosity of the RC, we estimate the mean age of its stellar population to be approx8 Gyr. The mass of its progenitor galaxy is likely in the range of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. Second, we study M31's halo substructure along the northwest/southeast minor axis out to R approx 100 kpc and the southwest major-axis region at R approx 60 kpc. We confirm two substructures in the southeast halo reported by Ibata et al. and discover two overdense substructures in the northwest halo. We investigate the properties of these four substructures as well as other structures including the western shelf and find that differences in stellar populations among these systems, thereby suggesting each has a different origin. Our statistical analysis implies that the M31 halo as a whole may contain at least 16 substructures, each with a different origin, so its outer halo has experienced at least this many accretion events involving dwarf satellites with mass 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} M{sub sun

  9. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  10. Structure and Population of the NGC 55 Stellar Halo from A Subaru/Suprime-Cam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kalirai, Jason S.

    2011-09-01

    As part of our survey of galactic stellar halos, we investigate the structure and stellar populations of the northern outer part of the stellar halo in NGC 55, a member galaxy of the Sculptor Group, using deep and wide-field V- and I-band images taken with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. Based on the analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams for red giant branch (RGB) stars, we derive a tip of RGB based distance modulus to the galaxy of (m - M)0 = 26.58 ± 0.11(d = 2.1 ± 0.1 Mpc). From the stellar density maps, we detect the asymmetrically disturbed, thick disk structure and two metal-poor overdense substructures in the north region of NGC 55, which may correspond to merger remnants associated with hierarchical formation of NGC 55's halo. In addition, we identify a diffuse metal-poor halo extended out to at least z ~ 16 kpc from the galactic plane. The surface brightness profiles toward the z-direction perpendicular to the galactic plane suggest that the stellar density distribution in the northern outer part of NGC 55 is described by a locally isothermal disk at z <~ 6 kpc and a likely diffuse metal-poor halo with V-band surface brightness of μV >~ 32 mag arcsec-2, where old RGB stars dominate. We derive the metallicity distributions (MDs) of these structures on the basis of the photometric comparison of RGB stars with the theoretical stellar evolutionary models. The MDs of the thick disk structures show the peak and mean metallicity of [Fe/H]peak ~ -1.4 and [Fe/H]mean ~ -1.7, respectively, while the outer substructures show more metal-poor features than the thick disk structure. Combined with the current results with our previous study for M31's halo, we discuss the possible difference in the formation process of stellar halos among different Hubble types. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) (Kim+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Rey, S.-C.; Jerjen, H.; Lisker, T.; Sung, E.-C.; Lee, Y.; Chung, J.; Pak, M.; Yi, W.; Lee, W.

    2015-02-01

    The construction of the EVCC is based on the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al. 2009, II/294). The SDSS-DR7 images have pixel scale of 0.396" and the average seeing of 1.4" correspond to a physical size of 32pc and 112pc, respectively, at a Virgo cluster distance of 16.5Mpc. We took advantage of the SDSS spectroscopic data for the determination of galaxy membership and classification of spectroscopic morphology. The SDSS spectroscopic data were searched in the window of 175°

  12. Identification of long-duration noise transients in LIGO and Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Michael W.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LIGO and Virgo detectors are sensitive to a variety of noise sources, such as instrumental artifacts and environmental disturbances. The Stochastic Transient Analysis Multi-detector Pipeline has been developed to search for long-duration (t ≳ 1 s) gravitational-wave (GW) signals. This pipeline can also be used to identify environmental noise transients. Here, we present an algorithm to determine when long-duration noise sources couple into the interferometers, as well as identify what these noise sources are. We analyze the cross-power between a GW strain channel and an environmental sensor, using pattern recognition tools to identify statistically significant structure in cross-power time-frequency maps. We identify interferometer noise from airplanes, helicopters, thunderstorms and other sources. Examples from LIGO’s sixth science run, S6, and Virgo’s third scientific run, VSR3, are presented.

  13. Predictions for Swift Follow-up Observations of Advanced LIGO/Virgo Gravitational Wave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, Judith; Evans, Phil; Connaughton, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    The likely detection of gravitational waves associated with the inspiral of neutron star binaries by the upcoming advanced LIGO/Virgo observatories will be complemented by searches for electromagnetic counterparts over large areas of the sky by Swift and other observatories. As short gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are the most likely electromagnetic counterpart candidates to these sources, we can make predictions based upon the last decade of GRB observations by Swift and Fermi. Swift is uniquely capable of accurately localizing new transients rapidly over large areas of the sky in single and tiled pointings, enabling ground-based follow-up. We describe simulations of the detectability of short GRB afterglows by Swift given existing and hypothetical tiling schemes with realistic observing conditions and delays, which guide the optimal observing strategy and improvements provided by coincident detection with observatories such as Fermi-GBM.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CO spectra of Virgo cluster galaxies (Grossi,+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; de Looze, I.; Goncalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Reduced IRAM 30m telescope spectra of 20 star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster, that are presented in Figure B.1 and Figure B.2 of the paper. The spectra were observed with the EMIR receiver using the FTS spectrometer. The nomenclature of the files is: ObjectName_10.dat and ObjectName_21.dat, for the 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) transition, respectively. Multiple pointings for the same target are indicated with letters (a,b,c,d,e). All spectra have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 8.1km/s for both lines, with the exception of VCC032410.dat and VCC1686c_10.dat which have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 16.2km/s. The observed sources and the list of files are given below. The files are created by GILDAS/Class. (2 data files).

  15. Constraints on Cosmic Strings from the LIGO-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kucharczyk, C.; Kudla, S.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lloyd, D.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Mokler, F.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega Larcher, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Ou, J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pindor, B.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poole, V.; Poux, C.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Roever, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Soden, K.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Sperandio, L.; Staley, A.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stevens, D.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vlcek, B.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vrinceanu, D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wibowo, S.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yum, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints on cosmic string parameters, which complement and improve existing limits from previous searches for a stochastic background of GWs from cosmic microwave background measurements and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by the gravitational backreaction scale, we place upper limits on the string tension Gμ below 10-8 in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space.

  16. Probing the Association of Gravitational-Wave and Gamma-Ray Bursts with LIGO and Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadonati, Laura

    2010-02-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), intense flashes of γ-rays routinely detected by satellite-based detectors, have been a target of gravitational wave searches since the early days of laser interferometer data acquisition. A measured correlation between GRBs and gravitational wave transients would provide not only a smoking-gun evidence for the detection of gravitational waves, but also new insights in the physics of GRB progenitors. This talk presents the results of a search for gravitational wave bursts associated with 137 GRBs detected during the fifth LIGO Science run and the first Virgo science run. We discuss the astrophysical interpretation and implication of these results for future investigations of GRBs and gravitational wave bursts. )

  17. X-rays from the radio halo of Virgo A = M87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate in more detail the associated X-ray and radio emission in the Virgo A halo discovered by SGF. Improved Einstein HRI data and new radio maps obtained with the Very Large Array are described and the relation between the X-ray and radio structures is carefully examined. Several possible explanations are presented for the X-ray emission. The inverse compton model is found to be viable only if the magnetic field is variable and substantially weaker than the equipartition value. The principal alternative is excess thermal X-rays due to compression of the intracluster medium by the radio lobe. In either case, the association of such prominent radio and X-ray structures is unique among known radio galaxies.

  18. Constraints on cosmic strings from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Aasi, J; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amador Ceron, E; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calderón Bustillo, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Dal Canton, T; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J-C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M-K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Le Roux, A; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C-H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nanda Kumar, D; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Ortega Larcher, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2014-04-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints on cosmic string parameters, which complement and improve existing limits from previous searches for a stochastic background of GWs from cosmic microwave background measurements and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by the gravitational backreaction scale, we place upper limits on the string tension Gμ below 10(-8) in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space. PMID:24745400

  19. First joint gravitational wave search by the AURIGA EXPLORER NAUTILUS Virgo Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Alshourbagy, M.; Amico, P.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Astone, P.; Avino, S.; Babusci, D.; Baggio, L.; Ballardin, G.; Barone, F.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bassan, M.; Bauer, Th S.; Bignotto, M.; Bigotta, S.; Birindelli, S.; Bizouard, M. A.; Boccara, C.; Bonaldi, M.; Bondu, F.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Buskulic, D.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camarda, M.; Campagna, E.; Carbognani, F.; Carelli, P.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cavallari, G.; Cella, G.; Cerdonio, M.; Cesarini, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chincarini, A.; Clapson, A.-C.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Conti, L.; Corda, C.; Corsi, A.; Cottone, F.; Coulon, J.-P.; Cuoco, E.; D'Antonio, S.; Dari, A.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; De Rosa, R.; DelPrete, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Drago, M.; Dubath, F.; Evans, M.; Fafone, V.; Falferi, P.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Foffa, S.; Fortini, P.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Giazotto, A.; Giordano, G.; Giordano, L.; Granata, V.; Greverie, C.; Grosjean, D.; Guidi, G.; Hamdani, S.; Hebri, S.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Kreckelbergh, S.; La Penna, P.; Laval, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Liguori, N.; Longo, S.; Lopez, B.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Mackowski, J.-M.; Maggiore, M.; Majorana, E.; Man, C. N.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marini, A.; Marion, F.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Masserot, A.; Menzinger, F.; Mezzena, R.; Milano, L.; Minenkov, Y.; Mion, A.; Modena, I.; Modestino, G.; Moins, C.; Moleti, A.; Moreau, J.; Morgado, N.; Mosca, S.; Mours, B.; Neri, I.; Nocera, F.; Ortolan, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Pallottino, G. V.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Pardi, S.; Parodi, R.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Piano Mortari, G.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pinard, L.; Pizzella, G.; Poggi, S.; Poggiani, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quintieri, L.; Rapagnani, P.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Remillieux, A.; Ricci, F.; Ricciardi, I.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Romano, R.; Ronga, F.; Ruggi, P.; Russo, G.; Salemi, F.; Solimeno, S.; Spallicci, A.; Sturani, R.; Taffarello, L.; Tarallo, M.; Terenzi, R.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torrioli, G.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Tremola, C.; Vaccarone, R.; Vajente, G.; Vandoni, G.; Vedovato, G.; van der Brand, J. F. J.; van der Putten, S.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinante, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Visco, M.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Yvert, M.; Zendri, J. P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a methodology of network data analysis applied to the search for coincident burst excitations over a 24 h long data set collected by AURIGA, EXPLORER, NAUTILUS and Virgo detectors during September 2005. The search of candidate triggers was performed independently on each of the data sets from single detectors. We looked for two-fold time coincidences between these candidates using an algorithm optimized for a given population of sources and we calculated the efficiency of detection through injections of templated signal waveforms into the streams of data. To this end we have considered the case of signals shaped as damped sinusoids coming from the galactic center direction. Our method targets an optimal balance between high efficiency and low false alarm rate, aiming at setting confidence intervals as stringent as possible in terms of the rate of the selected source models.

  20. Constraints on Cosmic Strings from the LIGO-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.R.; Accadia, T.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R.X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E.A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S.B.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P.B.; Kanner, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints on cosmic string parameters, which complement and improve existing limits from previous searches for a stochastic background of GWs from cosmic microwave background measurements and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by the gravitational backreaction scale, we place upper limits on the string tension (Newton's Constant x mass per unit length) below 10(exp -8) in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space.

  1. Morphology parameters: substructure identification in X-ray galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Viral; van der Heyden, Kurt; Ferrari, Chiara; Angus, Garry; Holwerda, Benne

    2015-03-01

    Context. In recent years multi-wavelength observations have shown the presence of substructures related to merging events in a large proportion of galaxy clusters. Clusters can be roughly grouped into two categories - relaxed and non-relaxed - and a proper characterisation of the dynamical state of these systems is crucial for both astrophysical and cosmological studies. Aims: In this paper we investigate the use of a number of morphological parameters (Gini, M20, concentration, asymmetry, smoothness, ellipticity, and Gini of the second-order moment, GM) introduced to automatically classify clusters as relaxed or dynamically disturbed systems. Methods: We apply our method to a sample of clusters at different redshifts extracted from the Chandra archive and investigate possible correlations between morphological parameters and other X-ray gas properties. Results: We conclude that a combination of the adopted parameters is a very useful tool for properly characterising the X-ray cluster morphology. According to our results, three parameters - Gini, M20, and concentration - are very promising for identifying cluster mergers. The Gini coefficient is a particularly powerful tool, especially at high redshift, because it is independent of the choice of the position of the cluster centre. We find that high Gini (>0.65), high concentration (>1.55), and low M20 (<-2.0) values are associated with relaxed clusters, while low Gini (<0.4), low concentration (<1.0), and high M20 (>-1.4) characterise dynamically perturbed systems. We also estimate the X-ray cluster morphological parameters in the case of radio loud clusters. Since they are in excellent agreement with previous analyses we confirm that diffuse intracluster radio sources are associated with major mergers. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. The Effects of Varying Cosmological Parameters on Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Gregory A.; Griffen, Brendan F.; Zukin, Phillip; Ji, Alexander P.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars E.; Frebel, Anna

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how different cosmological parameters, such as those delivered by the WMAP and Planck missions, affect the nature and evolution of the dark matter halo substructure. We use a series of flat Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of structure formation, each with a different power spectrum but with the same initial white noise field. Our fiducial simulation is based on parameters from the WMAP seventh year cosmology. We then systematically vary the spectral index, ns ; matter density, Ω M ; and normalization of the power spectrum, σ8, for seven unique simulations. Across these, we study variations in the subhalo mass function, mass fraction, maximum circular velocity function, spatial distribution, concentration, formation times, accretion times, and peak mass. We eliminate dependence of subhalo properties on host halo mass and average the values over many hosts to reduce variance. While the "same" subhalos from identical initial overdensity peaks in higher σ8, ns , and Ω m simulations accrete earlier and end up less massive and closer to the halo center at z = 0, the process of continuous subhalo accretion and destruction leads to a steady state distribution of these properties across all subhalos in a given host. This steady state mechanism eliminates cosmological dependence on all of the properties listed above except for subhalo concentration and V max, which remain greater for higher σ8, ns , and Ω m simulations, and subhalo formation time, which remains earlier. We also find that the numerical technique for computing the scale radius and the halo finder that were used can significantly affect the concentration-mass relationship as computed for a simulation.

  3. The effects of varying cosmological parameters on halo substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, Gregory A.; Griffen, Brendan F.; Ji, Alexander P.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Frebel, Anna; Zukin, Phillip; Hernquist, Lars E.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how different cosmological parameters, such as those delivered by the WMAP and Planck missions, affect the nature and evolution of the dark matter halo substructure. We use a series of flat Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of structure formation, each with a different power spectrum but with the same initial white noise field. Our fiducial simulation is based on parameters from the WMAP seventh year cosmology. We then systematically vary the spectral index, n{sub s} ; matter density, Ω {sub M}; and normalization of the power spectrum, σ{sub 8}, for seven unique simulations. Across these, we study variations in the subhalo mass function, mass fraction, maximum circular velocity function, spatial distribution, concentration, formation times, accretion times, and peak mass. We eliminate dependence of subhalo properties on host halo mass and average the values over many hosts to reduce variance. While the 'same' subhalos from identical initial overdensity peaks in higher σ{sub 8}, n{sub s} , and Ω {sub m} simulations accrete earlier and end up less massive and closer to the halo center at z = 0, the process of continuous subhalo accretion and destruction leads to a steady state distribution of these properties across all subhalos in a given host. This steady state mechanism eliminates cosmological dependence on all of the properties listed above except for subhalo concentration and V {sub max}, which remain greater for higher σ{sub 8}, n{sub s} , and Ω {sub m} simulations, and subhalo formation time, which remains earlier. We also find that the numerical technique for computing the scale radius and the halo finder that were used can significantly affect the concentration-mass relationship as computed for a simulation.

  4. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  5. Chromospheric activity and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippenhahn, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study of stellar chromospheres based on the internal structure of particular stars is presented. Used are complex flow diagrams of the linkage paths between mass loss, angular momentum loss, magnetic field from the turbulent dynamo and its relations to differential rotations and the convection zone, and stellar evolution.

  6. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  7. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  8. Early-type dwarf galaxies with multicomponent stellar structure: Are they remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by their environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The surface brightness distribution of ~30-40% of the early-type dwarf galaxies with - 18 ≤ MB ≤ -15 in the Virgo and the Coma clusters is fitted by models that include two structural components (Sérsic + exponential) as for bright disc galaxies. Aims: The goal of the present study is to determine whether early-type dwarf galaxies with a two-component stellar structure in the Virgo and the Coma clusters are low-luminosity copies of bright disc galaxies or are the remnants of bright galaxies strongly transformed by cluster environmental effects. Methods: I analysed the location of bright disc galaxies and early-type dwarfs in the rb,e/h- n plane. The location in this plane of the two-component dwarf galaxies was compared with the remnants of tidally disrupted disc galaxies reported by numerical simulations. Results: Bright unbarred disc galaxies show a strong correlation in the rb,e/h-n plane. Galaxies with larger Sérsic shape parameters show a higher rb,e/h ratio. In contrast, two-component early-type dwarf galaxies do not follow the same correlation. A fraction (~55%) of them are located outside the locus defined in this plane by having 95% of bright disc galaxies. This distribution indicates that they are not a low-mass replica of bright disc galaxies. The different location in the rb,e/h- n plane of two-component early-type dwarfs and bright galaxies can be qualitatively explain whether the former are remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by tidal processes. Conclusions: The progenitors of ~20-25% of early-type dwarf galaxies with - 18 ≤ MB ≤ -15 in the Virgo and Coma clusters could be bright disc galaxies transformed by effects of the environment. These tidally transformed galaxies can be selected according to their location in the rb,e/h-n plane.

  9. LOCALIZATION OF SHORT DURATION GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENTS WITH THE EARLY ADVANCED LIGO AND VIRGO DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-20

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg{sup 2} in 2015 and 60-110 deg{sup 2} in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg{sup 2}. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  10. Probing the low surface brightness dwarf galaxy population of the virgo cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Davies, L. J. M.; Keenan, O. C.

    2016-02-01

    We have used data from the Next Generation Virgo Survey to investigate the dwarf galaxy population of the Virgo cluster. We mask and smooth the data, and then use the object detection algorithm SEXTRACTOR to make our initial dwarf galaxy selection. All candidates are then visually inspected to remove artefacts and duplicates. We derive parameters to best select low surface brightness galaxies using central surface brightness values of 22.5 ≤ μ g0 ≤ 26.0 μg and exponential scale lengths of 3.0 ≤ h ≤ 10.0 arcsec to identify 443 cluster dwarf galaxies - 303 of which are new detections, with a surface density that decreases with radius from the cluster centre. We also apply our selection algorithm to `background', non-cluster, fields and find zero detections. In combination, this leads us to believe that we have isolated a cluster dwarf galaxy population. The range of objects we detect is limited because smaller scale sized galaxies are confused with the background, while larger galaxies are split into numerous smaller objects by the detection algorithm. Combining our data with that from other surveys, we find a faint-end slope to the luminosity function of -1.35 ± 0.03, which is not significantly different to what has previously been found, but is a little steeper than the slope for field galaxies. There is no evidence for a faint-end slope steep enough to correspond with galaxy formation models, unless those models invoke either strong feedback processes or use warm dark matter.

  11. Modeling the Formation of Globular Cluster Systems in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2014-11-01

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 1012 to 7 × 1013 M ⊙ and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 1010 and 3 × 1011 L ⊙. To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  12. SPITZER/IRAC LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OBSERVATIONS OF THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, J. E.; Desai, V.; Murphy, E.; Surace, J.; Bridge, C.; Neill, J.; Mihos, J. C.; Rudick, C.

    2011-07-10

    We present 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging over 0.77 deg{sup 2} at the Virgo cluster core for the purpose of understanding the formation mechanisms of the low surface brightness intracluster light (ICL) features. Instrumental and astrophysical backgrounds that are hundreds of times higher than the signal were carefully characterized and removed. We examine ICL plumes as well as the outer halo of the giant elliptical M87. For two ICL plumes, we use optical colors to constrain their ages to be greater than 3 and 5 Gyr, respectively. Upper limits on the IRAC fluxes constrain the upper limits to the masses, and optical detections constrain the lower limits to the masses. In this first measurement of mass of ICL plumes we find masses in the range of 5.5 x 10{sup 8} - 4.5 x 10{sup 9} and 2.1 x 10{sup 8}-1.5 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} for the two plumes for which we have coverage. Given their expected short lifetimes, and a constant production rate for these types of streams, integrated over Virgo's lifetime, they can account for the total ICL content of the cluster, implying that we do not need to invoke ICL formation mechanisms other than gravitational mechanisms leading to bright plumes. We also examined the outer halo of the giant elliptical M87. The color profile from the inner to outer halo of M87 (160 kpc) is consistent with either a flat or optically blue gradient, where a blue gradient could be due to younger or lower metallicity stars at larger radii. The similarity of the age predicted by both the infrared and optical colors (> a few gigayears) indicates that the optical measurements are not strongly affected by dust extinction.

  13. Modeling the formation of globular cluster systems in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y. E-mail: ognedin@umich.edu

    2014-11-20

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 10{sup 12} to 7 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 10{sup 10} and 3 × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}. To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  14. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Chen, Y.-T.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; and others

    2014-12-20

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg{sup 2} centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i {sub AB} = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z {sub phot} ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ{sub outl.rej.}, and an individual error on z {sub phot} that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z {sub phot} ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ{sub outl.rej} ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z {sub phot.err.} ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  15. X-ray sources in dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster and the nearby field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, Marina; Phillipps, S.; Young, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which dwarf galaxies represent essentially scaled down versions of giant galaxies is an important question with regards the formation and evolution of the galaxy population as a whole. Here, we address the specific question of whether dwarf galaxies behave like smaller versions of giants in terms of their X-ray properties. We discuss two samples of around 100 objects each, dwarfs in the Virgo cluster and dwarfs in a large Northern hemisphere area. We find nine dwarfs in each sample with Chandra detections. For the Virgo sample, these are in dwarf elliptical (or dwarf lenticular) galaxies and we assume that these are (mostly) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) [some may be nuclear sources]. We find a detection rate entirely consistent with scaling down from massive ellipticals, viz. about one bright (i.e. LX > 1038 erg s-1) LMXB per 5 × 109 M⊙ of stars. For the field sample, we find one (known) Seyfert nucleus, in a galaxy which appears to be the lowest mass dwarf with a confirmed X-ray emitting nucleus. The other detections are in star-forming dwarf irregular or blue compact dwarf galaxies and are presumably high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB). This time, we find a very similar detection rate to that in large late-type galaxies if we scale down by star formation rate, roughly one HMXB for a rate of 0.3 M⊙ per year. Nevertheless, there does seem to be one clear difference, in that the dwarf late-type galaxies with X-ray sources appear strongly biased to very low metallicity systems.

  16. All Sky Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts in the Second Joint LIGO-Virgo Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aylott, B. E.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration approx. < 1 s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal wa.veform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are c.onsistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGOVirgo search on the data collected "between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravita.tional-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per yea.r and Mpc3 for sample popula.tions of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range approx 5 x 10(exp -22 Hz(exp-1/2) approx 1 X 10(exp -20) Hz(exp -1/2) . The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

  17. The Solar-Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, A. S.; García, R. A.; Houdek, G.; Nandy, D.; Pinsonneault, M.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how recent advances in observations, theory and numerical simulations have allowed the stellar community to progress in its understanding of stellar convection, rotation and magnetism and to assess the degree to which the Sun and other stars share similar dynamical properties. Ensemble asteroseismology has become a reality with the advent of large time domain studies, especially from space missions. This new capability has provided improved constraints on stellar rotation and activity, over and above that obtained via traditional techniques such as spectropolarimetry or CaII H&K observations. New data and surveys covering large mass and age ranges have provided a wide parameter space to confront theories of stellar magnetism. These new empirical databases are complemented by theoretical advances and improved multi-D simulations of stellar dynamos. We trace these pathways through which a lucid and more detailed picture of magnetohydrodynamics of solar-like stars is beginning to emerge and discuss future prospects.

  18. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  19. Stellar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the various radiation mechanisms believed to play a role in stellar radio emission. The radio emission from most stars is nonthermal and is generally due to mildly relativistic electrons with energies from a few keV to over 10 MeV. Magnetic fields play a crucial role both in accelerating the electrons to the requisite energies and in mediating the emission mechanism. They also play a fundamental role in creating the velocity anisotropies that are necessary for the operation of some of the coherent emission mechanisms. Coherent emission is seen most commonly on the M dwarfs, rarely on the RS CVns, and has yet to be detected for any other class of star. These coherent processes are best studied by means of their dynamic spectra; such studies are now just getting underway.

  20. The stellar opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Gilles, D.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    Opacities are fundamental ingredients of stellar physics. Helioseismology and asteroseismology have put in evidence anomalies that could be attributed to an insufficient knowledge of the photon-plasma interactions. We work on a revision of this plasma physics in the conditions where the anomalies have been found: the region of the iron opacity peak near log T= 5.2 and the inner radiative region of Sun and solar-like stars. The international OPAC consortium performs new calculations, compares them and looks for the origin of their differences. In parallel, experimental campaigns are realized, others are in preparation to validate some conclusions on the reliability of the new proposed calculations. New tables for astrophysics will be performed in the framework of the ANR OPACITY and their influence on seismic observables will be studied. We explicit here the difficulty of the computations together with some computation resources.

  1. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  2. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  3. VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey. I. Presentation, wide-field surface photometry, and substructures in NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, Massimo; Spavone, Marilena; Grado, Aniello; Iodice, Enrichetta; Limatola, Luca; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Cantiello, Michele; Paolillo, Maurizio; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Context. We present the VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (VEGAS), which is designed to obtain deep multiband photometry in g,r,i, of about one hundred nearby galaxies down to 27.3, 26.8, and 26 mag/arcsec2 respectively, using the ESO facility VST/OmegaCAM. Aims: The goals of the survey are 1) to map the light distribution up to ten effective radii, re; 2) to trace color gradients and surface brightness fluctuation gradients out to a few re for stellar population characterization; and 3) to obtain a full census of the satellite systems (globular clusters and dwarf galaxies) out to 20% of the galaxy virial radius. The external regions of galaxies retain signatures of the formation and evolution mechanisms that shaped them, and the study of nearby objects enables a detailed analysis of their morphology and interaction features. To clarify the complex variety of formation mechanisms of early-type galaxies (ETGs), wide and deep photometry is the primary observational step, which at the moment has been pursued with only a few dedicated programs. The VEGAS survey has been designated to provide these data for a volume-limited sample with exceptional image quality. Methods: In this commissioning photometric paper we illustrate the capabilities of the survey using g- and i-band VST/OmegaCAM images of the nearby galaxy NGC 4472 and of smaller ETGs in the surrounding field. Results: Our surface brightness profiles reach rather faint levels and agree excellently well with previous literature. Genuine new results concern the detection of an intracluster light tail in NGC 4472 and of various substructures at increasing scales. We have also produced extended (g - i) color profiles. Conclusions: The VST/OmegaCAM data that we acquire in the context of the VEGAS survey provide a detailed view of substructures in the optical emission from extended galaxies, which can be as faint as a hundred times below the sky level. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Matthew S.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-09-26

    An experimental–analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinatesmore » to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig–Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. Moreover, these modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.« less

  5. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Matthew S.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-09-26

    An experimental–analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig–Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. Moreover, these modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  6. An algebraic sub-structuring method for large-scale eigenvaluecalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.; Bai, Z.; Li, X.; Lee, L.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.

    2004-05-26

    We examine sub-structuring methods for solving large-scalegeneralized eigenvalue problems from a purely algebraic point of view. Weuse the term "algebraic sub-structuring" to refer to the process ofapplying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a largesparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectralcomponents are extracted and combined to provide approximate solutions tothe original problem. We are interested in the question of which spectralcomponentsone should extract from each sub-structure in order to producean approximate solution to the original problem with a desired level ofaccuracy. Error estimate for the approximation to the small esteigen pairis developed. The estimate leads to a simple heuristic for choosingspectral components (modes) from each sub-structure. The effectiveness ofsuch a heuristic is demonstrated with numerical examples. We show thatalgebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve a generalizedeigenvalue problem arising from the simulation of an acceleratorstructure. One interesting characteristic of this application is that thestiffness matrix produced by a hierarchical vector finite elements schemecontains a null space of large dimension. We present an efficient schemeto deflate this null space in the algebraic sub-structuringprocess.

  7. Metrics for diagnosing negative mass and stiffness when uncoupling experimental and analytical substructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Matthew S.; Kammer, Daniel C.; Mayes, Randall Lee

    2010-10-01

    Recently, a new substructure coupling/uncoupling approach has been introduced, called Modal Constraints for Fixture and Subsystem (MCFS) [Allen, Mayes, & Bergman, Journal of Sound and Vibration, vol. 329, 2010]. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing constraints on substructure modal coordinates instead of the physical interface coordinates. The experimental substructure is tested in a free-free configuration, and the interface is exercised by attaching a flexible fixture. An analytical representation of the fixture is then used to subtract its effects in order to create an experimental model for the subcomponent of interest. However, it has been observed that indefinite mass and stiffness matrices can be obtained for the experimental substructure in some situations. This paper presents two simple metrics that can be used by the analyst to determine the cause of indefinite mass or stiffness matrices after substructure uncoupling. The metrics rank the experimental and fixture modes based upon their contribution to offending negative eigenvalues. Once the troublesome modes have been identified, they can be inspected and often reveal why the mass has become negative. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the metrics and to illustrate the physical phenomena that they reveal.

  8. Efficient substructure searching of large chemical libraries: the ABCD chemical cartridge.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Lobanov, Victor S; Shemanarev, Maxim; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Izrailev, Sergei; Jaeger, Edward P; Alex, Simson; Farnum, Michael

    2011-12-27

    Efficient substructure searching is a key requirement for any chemical information management system. In this paper, we describe the substructure search capabilities of ABCD, an integrated drug discovery informatics platform developed at Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C. The solution consists of several algorithmic components: 1) a pattern mapping algorithm for solving the subgraph isomorphism problem, 2) an indexing scheme that enables very fast substructure searches on large structure files, 3) the incorporation of that indexing scheme into an Oracle cartridge to enable querying large relational databases through SQL, and 4) a cost estimation scheme that allows the Oracle cost-based optimizer to generate a good execution plan when a substructure search is combined with additional constraints in a single SQL query. The algorithm was tested on a public database comprising nearly 1 million molecules using 4,629 substructure queries, the vast majority of which were submitted by discovery scientists over the last 2.5 years of user acceptance testing of ABCD. 80.7% of these queries were completed in less than a second and 96.8% in less than ten seconds on a single CPU, while on eight processing cores these numbers increased to 93.2% and 99.7%, respectively. The slower queries involved extremely generic patterns that returned the entire database as screening hits and required extensive atom-by-atom verification. PMID:22035187

  9. Hadronic calorimeter shower size: Challenges and opportunities for jet substructure in the superboosted regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressler, Shikma; Flacke, Thomas; Kats, Yevgeny; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad

    2016-05-01

    Hadrons have finite interaction size with dense material, a basic feature common to known forms of hadronic calorimeters (HCAL). We argue that substructure variables cannot use HCAL information to access the microscopic nature of jets much narrower than the hadronic shower size, which we call superboosted massive jets. It implies that roughly 15% of their transverse energy profile remains inaccessible due to the presence of long-lived neutral hadrons. This part of the jet substructure is also subject to order-one fluctuations. We demonstrate that the effects of the fluctuations are not reduced when a global correction to jet variables is applied. The above leads to fundamental limitations in the ability to extract intrinsic information from jets in the superboosted regime. The neutral fraction of a jet is correlated with its flavor. This leads to an interesting and possibly useful difference between superboosted W / Z / h / t jets and their corresponding backgrounds. The QCD jets that form the background to the signal superboosted jets might also be qualitatively different in their substructure as their mass might lie at or below the Sudakov mass peak. Finally, we introduce a set of zero-cone longitudinal jet substructure variables and show that while they carry information that might be useful in certain situations, they are not in general sensitive to the jet substructure.

  10. DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE DETECTION USING SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF LENSED DUSTY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert; Dalal, Neal; Kuhlen, Michael; Marrone, Daniel; Murray, Norman; Vieira, Joaquin

    2013-04-10

    We investigate how strong lensing of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) by foreground galaxies can be used as a probe of dark matter halo substructure. We find that spatially resolved spectroscopy of lensed sources allows dramatic improvements to measurements of lens parameters. In particular, we find that modeling of the full, three-dimensional (angular position and radial velocity) data can significantly facilitate substructure detection, increasing the sensitivity of observables to lower mass subhalos. We carry out simulations of lensed dusty sources observed by early ALMA (Cycle 1) and use a Fisher matrix analysis to study the parameter degeneracies and mass detection limits of this method. We find that even with conservative assumptions, it is possible to detect galactic dark matter subhalos of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with high significance in most lensed DSFGs. Specifically, we find that in typical DSFG lenses, there is a {approx}55% probability of detecting a substructure with M > 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with more than 5{sigma} detection significance in each lens, if the abundance of substructure is consistent with previous lensing results. The full ALMA array, with its significantly enhanced sensitivity and resolution, should improve these estimates considerably. Given the sample of {approx}100 lenses provided by surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, our understanding of dark matter substructure in typical galaxy halos is poised to improve dramatically over the next few years.

  11. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  12. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Mathew S.; Mayes, Randy L.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental-analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. The method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig-Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. These modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  13. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  14. Extreme Low Aspect Ratio Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul

    1997-11-01

    Recently proposed Spherical Stellarator (SS) concept [1] includes the devices with stellarator features and low aspect ratio, A <= 3.5, which is very unusual for stellarators (typical stellarators have A ≈ 7-10 or above). Strong bootstrap current and high-β equilibria are two distinguished elements of the SS concept leading to compact, steady-state, and efficient fusion reactor. Different coil configurations advantageous for the SS have been identified and analyzed [1-6]. In this report, we will present results on novel stellarator configurations which are unusual even for the SS approach. These are the extreme-low-aspect-ratio-stellarators (ELARS), with the aspect ratio A ≈ 1. We succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform (ι ≈ 0.1 - 0.15), large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics. [1] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 651 (1996); [2] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3055 (1996); [3] P.E. Moroz, D.B. Batchelor et al., Fusion Tech. 30, 1347 (1996); [4] P.E. Moroz, Stellarator News 48, 2 (1996); [5] P.E. Moroz, Plasma Phys. Reports 23, 502 (1997); [6] P.E. Moroz, Nucl. Fusion 37, No. 8 (1997). *Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER54395.

  15. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  16. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  17. The Hibernating Stellar Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Optically Active Magnetar-Candidate Discovered Astronomers have discovered a most bizarre celestial object that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again. It is most likely to be a missing link in the family of neutron stars, the first case of an object with an amazingly powerful magnetic field that showed some brief, strong visible-light activity. Hibernating Stellar Magnet ESO PR Photo 31/08 The Hibernating Stellar Magnet This weird object initially misled its discoverers as it showed up as a gamma-ray burst, suggesting the death of a star in the distant Universe. But soon afterwards, it exhibited some unique behaviour that indicates its origin is much closer to us. After the initial gamma-ray pulse, there was a three-day period of activity during which 40 visible-light flares were observed, followed by a brief near-infrared flaring episode 11 days later, which was recorded by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Then the source became dormant again. "We are dealing with an object that has been hibernating for decades before entering a brief period of activity", explains Alberto J. Castro-Tirado, lead author of a paper in this week's issue of Nature. The most likely candidate for this mystery object is a 'magnetar' located in our own Milky Way galaxy, about 15 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox. Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion billion times stronger than that of the Earth. "A magnetar would wipe the information from all credit cards on Earth from a distance halfway to the Moon," says co-author Antonio de Ugarte Postigo. "Magnetars remain quiescent for decades. It is likely that there is a considerable population in the Milky Way, although only about a dozen have been identified." Some scientists have noted that magnetars should be evolving towards a pleasant retirement as their magnetic fields decay, but no suitable source had been identified up to now as evidence for

  18. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Biagi, S.; and others

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  19. H I detection survey of a complete magnitude-limited sample of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Virgo Cluster area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle; Glosson, John; Helou, George; Salpeter, E. E.; Sandage, A.

    1987-01-01

    New single-beam Arecibo H I observations of 298 late-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster drawn mostly from the new catalog of Binggeli, Sandage, and Tammann (1985) are presented. Two hundred seventeen of these constitute a magnitude-limited 'complete sample' of such galaxies, types Sdm through Im and BCD. Sixty-one percent of this 'complete sample' was detected, greatly enhancing the store of redshifts and H I masses for such galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. For detected galaxies, heliocentric velocities, 50 percent profile widths, and single-beam fluxes are presented. For those that escaped detection, upper limits are computed to the flux appropriate to the redshift range (-600 to +3000 km/s).

  20. A First Search for Coincident Gravitational Waves and High Energy Neutrinos Using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES Data from 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Samarai, Al; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bowhuis, M. C.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  1. Stellar populations of stellar halos: Results from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. A.; Conroy, C.; Pillepich, A.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of both major and minor mergers is expected to significantly affect gradients of stellar ages and metallicities in the outskirts of galaxies. Measurements of observed gradients are beginning to reach large radii in galaxies, but a theoretical framework for connecting the findings to a picture of galactic build-up is still in its infancy. We analyze stellar populations of a statistically representative sample of quiescent galaxies over a wide mass range from the Illustris simulation. We measure metallicity and age profiles in the stellar halos of quiescent Illustris galaxies ranging in stellar mass from 1010 to 1012 M ⊙, accounting for observational projection and luminosity-weighting effects. We find wide variance in stellar population gradients between galaxies of similar mass, with typical gradients agreeing with observed galaxies. We show that, at fixed mass, the fraction of stars born in-situ within galaxies is correlated with the metallicity gradient in the halo, confirming that stellar halos contain unique information about the build-up and merger histories of galaxies.

  2. The spatial evolution of stellar structures in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Nate; Gieles, Mark; Ercolano, Barbara; Gutermuth, Rob

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of various stellar populations within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We combine mid-infrared selected young stellar objects, optically selected samples with mean ages between ~9 and ~1000 Myr and existing stellar cluster catalogues to investigate how stellar structures form and evolve within the LMC. For the analysis we use Fractured Minimum Spanning Trees, the statistical Q parameter and the two-point correlation function. Restricting our analysis to young massive (OB) stars, we confirm our results obtained for M33, namely that the luminosity function of the groups is well described by a power law with index -2, and that there is no characteristic length-scale of star-forming regions. We find that stars in the LMC are born with a large amount of substructure, consistent with a two-dimensional fractal distribution with dimension and evolve towards a uniform distribution on a time-scale of ~175 Myr. This is comparable to the crossing time of the galaxy, and we suggest that stellar structure, regardless of spatial scale, will be eliminated in a crossing time. This may explain the smooth distribution of stars in massive/dense young clusters in the Galaxy, while other, less massive, clusters still display large amounts of structure at similar ages. By comparing the stellar and star cluster distributions and evolving time-scales, we show that infant mortality of clusters (or `popping clusters') has a negligible influence on the galactic structure. Finally, we quantify the influence of the elongation, differential extinction and contamination of a population on the measured Q value.

  3. Stellar duplicity and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Half or more of all stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by one (or more) companion stars. Many companions are close enough that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by the transfer of mass and angular momentum from one star to the other. Such mass transfer is highly likely during the late stages of evolution, such as on the giant branches, which are quite coincidentally also when stars undergo interesting nucleosynthesis. Direct mass transfer truncates the (A)GB prematurely compared to single stars and the ensuing stellar envelope is ejected perhaps to form a (chemically peculiar?) planetary nebula. In wider binaries, where one star has captured material from a long-dead companion, we can probe the nucleosynthesis that happened in ancient stars as well as fundamental astrophysical phenomena like wind accretion and circumbinary disc formation. I will focus on recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in mass-transfer systems, such as carbon-enhanced metal-poor and barium stars, and highlight some of the key open questions - and opportunities - that will dominate the next decade of duplicitous nucleosynthesis.

  4. Devastated Stellar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the nasty effects of living near a group of massive stars: radiation and winds from the massive stars (white spot in center) are blasting planet-making material away from stars like our sun. The planetary material can be seen as comet-like tails behind three stars near the center of the picture. The tails are pointing away from the massive stellar furnaces that are blowing them outward.

    The picture is the best example yet of multiple sun-like stars being stripped of their planet-making dust by massive stars.

    The sun-like stars are about two to three million years old, an age when planets are thought to be growing out of surrounding disks of dust and gas. Astronomers say the dust being blown from the stars is from their outer disks. This means that any Earth-like planets forming around the sun-like stars would be safe, while outer planets like Uranus might be nothing more than dust in the wind.

    This image shows a portion of the W5 star-forming region, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. It is a composite of infrared data from Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer. Light with a wavelength of 3.5 microns is blue, while light from the dust of 24 microns is orange-red.

  5. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  6. Ultraviolet stellar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.; Kondo, Y.; Ocallaghan, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During all three Skylab missions, prism-on observations were obtained in 188 starfields and prism-off observations in 31 starfields. In general, the fields are concentrated in the Milky Way where the frequency of hot stars is highest. These fields cover an area approximately 3660 degrees and include roughly 24 percent of a band 30 deg wide centered on the plane of the Milky Way. A census of stars in the prism-on fields shows that nearly 6,000 stars have measurable flux data at a wavelength of 2600A, that 1,600 have measurable data at 2000A, and that 400 show useful data at 1500A. Obvious absorption or emission features shortward of 2000A are visible in approximately 120 stars. This represents a bonanza of data useful for statistical studies of stellar classification and of interstellar reddening as well as for studies of various types of peculiar stars.

  7. SI: The Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager (SI) will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 milliarcsec resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and simple snapshots into spellbinding evolving views. SI s science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI s prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era by imaging a sample of magnetically active stars with enough resolution to map their evolving dynamo patterns and their internal flows. By exploring the Universe at ultra-high resolution, SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magnetohydrodynamically controlled structures and processes in the Universe.

  8. Initial test results from FHWA project Dynamic Bridge Substructure Evaluation and Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouad, Marwan F.; Olson, Larry D.; Liu, Ming

    1998-03-01

    The FHWA project 'Dynamic Bridge Substructure Evaluation and Monitoring System' was conceived to use dynamic characteristics of the bridge substructure to determine the condition of the foundation and to identify the type of the underground substructure (deep or shallow foundation). The determination of the foundation condition will be used to quantify losses in foundation stiffness caused by seismic and scour events. The dynamic characteristics of natural frequencies and mode shapes are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the computer simulation results. The computer simulations are based on a 3-D finite element modeling with Super-Soil-Structural (SSS) elements. The stiffness and mass of these Super-Soil-Structural elements are indicative of the foundation conditions which may be quantified by structural parameter identification techniques. Discussed in this paper are experimental test setups and initial test results for three kinds of foundation conditions at the Trinity River Bridge in Liberty County, Texas.

  9. Theory and Simulations of Refractive Substructure in Resolved Scatter-broadened Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Gwinn, Carl R.

    2015-06-01

    At radio wavelengths, scattering in the interstellar medium distorts the appearance of astronomical sources. Averaged over a scattering ensemble, the result is a blurred image of the source. However, Narayan & Goodman and Goodman & Narayan showed that for an incomplete average, scattering introduces refractive substructure in the image of a point source that is both persistent and wideband. We show that this substructure is quenched but not smoothed by an extended source. As a result, when the scatter-broadening is comparable to or exceeds the unscattered source size, the scattering can introduce spurious compact features into images. In addition, we derive efficient strategies to numerically compute realistic scattered images, and we present characteristic examples from simulations. Our results show that refractive substructure is an important consideration for ongoing missions at the highest angular resolutions, and we discuss specific implications for RadioAstron and the Event Horizon Telescope.

  10. Design studies for the transmission simulator method of experimental dynamic substructuring.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Randall Lee; Arviso, Michael

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, a successful method for generating experimental dynamic substructures has been developed using an instrumented fixture, the transmission simulator. The transmission simulator method solves many of the problems associated with experimental substructuring. These solutions effectively address: (1) rotation and moment estimation at connection points; (2) providing substructure Ritz vectors that adequately span the connection motion space; and (3) adequately addressing multiple and continuous attachment locations. However, the transmission simulator method may fail if the transmission simulator is poorly designed. Four areas of the design addressed here are: (1) designating response sensor locations; (2) designating force input locations; (3) physical design of the transmission simulator; and (4) modal test design. In addition to the transmission simulator design investigations, a review of the theory with an example problem is presented.

  11. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  12. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  13. ABOUT THE LINEARITY OF THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Smith Castelli, Analia V.; Faifer, Favio R.

    2013-07-20

    We revisit the color-magnitude relation of Virgo Cluster early-type galaxies in order to explore its alleged nonlinearity. To this aim, we reanalyze the relation already published from data obtained within the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey of the Hubble Space Telescope and perform our own photometry and analysis of the images of 100 early-type galaxies observed as part of this survey. In addition, we compare our results with those reported in the literature from data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have found that when the brightest galaxies and untypical systems are excluded from the sample, a linear relation arises in agreement with what is observed in other groups and clusters. The central regions of the brightest galaxies also follow this relation. In addition, we notice that Virgo contains at least four compact elliptical galaxies besides the well-known object VCC 1297 (NGC 4486B). Their locations in the ({mu}{sub eff})-luminosity diagram define a trend different from that followed by normal early-type dwarf galaxies, setting an upper limit in effective surface brightness and a lower limit in the effective radius for their luminosities. Based on the distribution of different galaxy sub-samples in the color-magnitude and ({mu}{sub eff})-luminosity diagrams, we draw some conclusions on their formation and the history of their evolution.

  14. All-Sky Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts in the First Joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, J. B.; Camizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an aU-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed. by three different analysis algorithms over the frequency band 50 - 6000 Hz. Data are analyzed for times with at least two of the four LIGO-Virgo detectors in coincident operation, with a total live time of 266 days, No events produced by the search algorithms survive the selection cuts. We set a frequentist upper limit on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts impinging on our network of detectors. When combined with the previous LIGO search of the data collected between November 2005 and November 2006, the upper limit on the rate of detectable gra.vitational. wave bursts in the 64-2048 Hz band is 2,0 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present event rate versus strength exclusion plots for several types of plausible burst waveforms. The sensitivity of the combined search is expressed in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for a variety of simulated waveforms and lies in the range 6 X 10(exp -22) Hz(exp - 1/2) to 2 X 10(exp -20) Hz(exp -l/2). This is the first untriggered burst search to use data from the LIGO and Virgo detectors together, and the most sensitive untriggered burst search performed so far.

  15. Substructure decoupling without using rotational DoFs: Fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D`Ambrogio, Walter; Fregolent, Annalisa

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of experimental dynamic substructuring, substructure decoupling consists in the identification of the dynamic behaviour of a structural subsystem, starting from the dynamic behaviour of both the assembled system and the residual subsystem (the known portion of the assembled system). On the contrary, substructure coupling identifies an assembled system starting from the component subsystems. The degrees of freedom (DoFs) of the assembled system can be partitioned into internal DoFs (not belonging to the couplings) and coupling DoFs. In substructure coupling, whenever coupling DoFs include rotational DoFs, the related rotational FRFs must be obtained experimentally. Does this requirement holds for substructure decoupling too, as it is commonly believed? Decoupling can be ideally accomplished by adding the negative of the residual subsystem to the assembled system (direct decoupling) and by enforcing compatibility and equilibrium at enough interface DoFs. Ideally, every DoF of the residual subsystem belongs to the interface between the assembled system and the residual subsystem. Hopefully, not all the coupling DoFs are necessary to enforce compatibility and equilibrium. This may allow us to skip coupling DoFs and specifically rotational DoFs. The goal of the paper is indeed to establish if rotational FRFs at coupling DoFs can be neglected in substructure decoupling. To this aim, after highlighting the possibility of avoiding the use of coupling DoFs from a theoretical standpoint, a test bed coupled through flexural and torsional DoFs is considered. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  16. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. VII. The Intrinsic Shapes of Low-luminosity Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster, and a Comparison with the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Ferrarese, Laura; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Gwyn, Stephen; McConnacchie, Alan W.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Emsellem, Eric; Mei, Simona; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Roediger, Joel; Simard, Luc; Boyer, Fred; Santos, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the intrinsic shapes of low-luminosity galaxies in the central 300 kpc of the Virgo Cluster using deep imaging obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). We build a sample of nearly 300 red-sequence cluster members in the yet-unexplored -14 < Mg < -8 mag range, and we measure their apparent axis ratios, q, through Sérsic fits to their two-dimensional light distribution, which is well described by a constant ellipticity parameter. The resulting distribution of apparent axis ratios is then fit by families of triaxial models with normally distributed intrinsic ellipticities, E = 1 - C/A, and triaxialities, T = (A2 - B2)/(A2 - C2). We develop a Bayesian framework to explore the posterior distribution of the model parameters, which allows us to work directly on discrete data, and to account for individual, surface-brightness-dependent axis ratio uncertainties. For this population we infer a mean intrinsic ellipticity \\bar{E} = {0.43}-0.02+0.02 and a mean triaxiality \\bar{T} = {0.16}-0.06+0.07. This implies that faint Virgo galaxies are best described as a family of thick, nearly oblate spheroids with mean intrinsic axis ratios 1:0.94:0.57. The core of Virgo lacks highly elongated low-luminosity galaxies, with 95% of the population having q > 0.45. We additionally attempt a study of the intrinsic shapes of Local Group (LG) satellites of similar luminosities. For the LG population we infer a slightly larger mean intrinsic ellipticity \\bar{E} = {0.51}-0.06+0.07, and the paucity of objects with round apparent shapes translates into more triaxial mean shapes, 1:0.76:0.49. Numerical studies that follow the tidal evolution of satellites within LG-sized halos are in good agreement with the inferred shape distributions, but the mismatch for faint galaxies in Virgo highlights the need for more adequate simulations of this population in the cluster environment. We finally compare the intrinsic shapes of NGVS low-mass galaxies with

  17. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  18. Discovery of a Stellar Overdensity in Eridanus-Phoenix in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; Balbinot, E.; Mondrik, N.; Marshall, J. L.; Yanny, B.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Oscar, D.; Santiago, B.; Simon, J. D.; Vivas, A. K.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, M. Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of an excess of main-sequence turnoff stars in the direction of the constellations of Eridanus and Phoenix from the first-year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The Eridanus-Phoenix (EriPhe) overdensity is centered around l˜ 285^\\circ and b˜ -60^\\circ and spans at least 30° in longitude and 10° in latitude. The Poisson significance of the detection is at least 9σ . The stellar population in the overdense region is similar in brightness and color to that of the nearby globular cluster NGC 1261, indicating that the heliocentric distance of EriPhe is about d˜ 16 {{kpc}}. The extent of EriPhe in projection is therefore at least ˜4 kpc by ˜3 kpc. On the sky, this overdensity is located between NGC 1261 and a new stellar stream discovered by DES at a similar heliocentric distance, the so-called Phoenix Stream. Given their similar distance and proximity to each other, it is possible that these three structures may be kinematically associated. Alternatively, the EriPhe overdensity is morphologically similar to the Virgo overdensity and the Hercules-Aquila cloud, which also lie at a similar Galactocentric distance. These three overdensities lie along a polar plane separated by ˜120° and may share a common origin. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of the stars in EriPhe are required to fully understand the nature of this overdensity.

  19. Discovery of a stellar overdensity in Eridanus-Phoenix in the dark energy survey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, T. S.; Balbinot, E.; Mondrik, N.; Marshall, J. L.; Yanny, B.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Oscar, D.; Santiago, B.; Simon, J. D.; et al

    2016-01-27

    We report the discovery of an excess of main sequence turn-off stars in the direction of the constellations of Eridanus and Phoenix from the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The Eridanus-Phoenix (EriPhe) overdensity is centered around l~285 deg and b~-60 deg and spans at least 30 deg in longitude and 10 deg in latitude. The Poisson significance of the detection is at least 9 sigma. The stellar population in the overdense region is similar in brightness and color to that of the nearby globular cluster NGC 1261, indicating that the heliocentric distance of EriPhe is aboutmore » d~16 kpc. The extent of EriPhe in projection is therefore at least ~4 kpc by ~3 kpc. On the sky, this overdensity is located between NGC 1261 and a new stellar stream discovered by DES at a similar heliocentric distance, the so-called Phoenix Stream. Given their similar distance and proximity to each other, it is possible that these three structures may be kinematically associated. Alternatively, the EriPhe overdensity is morphologically similar to the Virgo overdensity and the Hercules-Aquila cloud, which also lie at a similar Galactocentric distance. These three overdensities lie along a polar plane separated by ~120 deg and may share a common origin. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of the stars in EriPhe are required to fully understand the nature of this overdensity.« less

  20. Substructure based modeling of nickel single crystals cycled at low plastic strain amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong

    In this dissertation a meso-scale, substructure-based, composite single crystal model is fully developed from the simple uniaxial model to the 3-D finite element method (FEM) model with explicit substructures and further with substructure evolution parameters, to simulate the completely reversed, strain controlled, low plastic strain amplitude cyclic deformation of nickel single crystals. Rate-dependent viscoplasticity and Armstrong-Frederick type kinematic hardening rules are applied to substructures on slip systems in the model to describe the kinematic hardening behavior of crystals. Three explicit substructure components are assumed in the composite single crystal model, namely "loop patches" and "channels" which are aligned in parallel in a "vein matrix," and persistent slip bands (PSBs) connected in series with the vein matrix. A magnetic domain rotation model is presented to describe the reverse magnetostriction of single crystal nickel. Kinematic hardening parameters are obtained by fitting responses to experimental data in the uniaxial model, and the validity of uniaxial assumption is verified in the 3-D FEM model with explicit substructures. With information gathered from experiments, all control parameters in the model including hardening parameters, volume fraction of loop patches and PSBs, and variation of Young's modulus etc. are correlated to cumulative plastic strain and/or plastic strain amplitude; and the whole cyclic deformation history of single crystal nickel at low plastic strain amplitudes is simulated in the uniaxial model. Then these parameters are implanted in the 3-D FEM model to simulate the formation of PSB bands. A resolved shear stress criterion is set to trigger the formation of PSBs, and stress perturbation in the specimen is obtained by several elements assigned with PSB material properties a priori. Displacement increment, plastic strain amplitude control and overall stress-strain monitor and output are carried out in the user

  1. The usage of substructuring analyses in the Get Away Special (GAS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    The use of automatic multi-stage substructing analysis is demonstrated for a hypothetical case of a GAS container supported by structural channels with a simulated experimental package inside the container. The GAS program purpose is stated and potential candidate structures to support experimental packages are discussed. The GAS container model and the substructuring analysis capabilities of NASTRAN make it possible to study the experiments inside the container as well as the design constraints resulting from the support structures holding the containers. The use of substructuring in the GAS program could be an important factor in increasing the number of flight opportunities.

  2. Substructure procedure for including tile flexibility in stress analysis of shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    A substructure procedure to include the flexibility of the tile in the stress analysis of the shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is described. In this procedure, the TPS is divided into substructures of (1) the tile which is modeled by linear finite elements and (2) the SIP which is modeled as a nonlinear continuum. This procedure was applied for loading cases of uniform pressure, uniform moment, and an aerodynamic shock on various tile thicknesses. The ratios of through-the-thickness stresses in the SIP which were calculated using a flexible tile compared to using a rigid tile were found to be less than 1.05 for the cases considered.

  3. Dislocation substructure in NiAl single crystals deformed at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X.; Pollock, T.M.; Mahajan, S.; Arunachalam, V.S.

    1997-12-31

    Dislocation substructure in NiAl single crystals oriented for single slip and deformed at ambient temperature has been studied using weak-beam transmission electron microscopy. Deformation is localized in bands that consists mostly of near-edge dislocations, with an interspersion of a high density of elongated prismatic loops. Pure screw dislocations are not observed, but dislocations having zigzag configurations that are near-screw in orientation are present. A high density of jogs is observed on both near-edge and zigzag dislocation segments. The mechanisms for the development of this substructure are discussed, emphasizing the role of double cross slip and resulting glissile and sessile jogs of varying heights.

  4. Effect of temperature on the formation of creep substructure in sodium chloride single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Pharr, George M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the substructure morphology and the cell and subgrain size was investigated experimentally in NaCl single crystals under creep in the temperature range 573-873 K. It is found that the effect of temperature on the cell and subgrain sizes is weak in comparison with the effect of stress. However, there was a qualitative change in the substructure morphology with temperature, with the cells and subgrains better defined at higher temperatures. The volume fraction of the cell boundaries decreased with increasing temperature, thereby indicating a refinement of the microstructure at higher temperatures.

  5. The influence of the cluster environment on the star formation efficiency of 12 Virgo spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Wong, O. I.; Braine, J.; Chung, A.; Kenney, J. D. P.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of the environment on gas surface density and star formation efficiency of cluster spiral galaxies is investigated. We extend previous work on radial profiles by a pixel-to pixel analysis looking for asymmetries due to environmental interactions. The star formation rate is derived from GALEX UV and Spitzer total infrared data based on the 8, 2