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Sample records for virtual petrological microscope

  1. A virtual petrological microscope for teaching and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Simon P.; Whalley, Peter; Tindle, Andrew G.; Anand, Mahesh

    2010-05-01

    Learning to use microscopes for geoscience or life science applications is a crucial part of the practical training offered in many science degrees, but the opportunities to study are often constrained by available laboratory space and time, and sometimes constrained by the number of high quality microscopes available. The alternative, although not replacing physical microscopes, offers the opportunity for enhancement and enrichment of laboratory experience in geoscience. An on-line microscope can also be used to engage the public with access to rare rocks such as meteorites and lunar samples. The focus of petrological microscope study in higher education is not primarily related to learning facts but is concerned with learning how to discriminate and classify within the paradigms of the discipline. In this case, the recognition and measurement of key features in rock samples in hand specimen and thin section. Whilst undertaking the practical exercise of recognition and naming of rock samples students are really being required to develop an understanding of the rock cycle as a model representing the relationship between rock categories and the process of their formation. The problems of teaching with complex visual materials, in effect of teaching learners 'how to see' from the scientific perspective of a particular discipline, are quite general. It could reasonably be expected that lessons learnt from the implementation and detailed evaluation of the proposed web-based system will generalise to many other topics in science education. Thus we focussed on the thin section images rather than reproducing a system that resembled a physical microscope. The virtual petrological microscope developed for a course at the Open University UK enables student acquisition of skills such as mineral and rock recognition using a browser window to explore thin sections of rocks as if they were using a laboratory microscope. The microscope allows students to pan around the thin

  2. A Virtual Petrological Microscope for All Apollo 11 Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillnger, C. T.; Tindle, A. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Quick, K.; Scott, P.; Gibson, E. K.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A means of viewing, over the Internet, polished thin sections of every rock in the Apollo lunar sample collections via software, duplicaing many of the functions of a petrological microscope, is described.

  3. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  4. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M.; Peterson, B.; Kesteron, J.

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  5. Inquiry based learning with a virtual microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.; Sharples, M.; Tindle, A.; Villasclaras-Fernández, E.

    2012-12-01

    As part of newly funded initiative, the Wolfson OpenScience Laboratory, we are linking a tool for inquiry based learning, nQuire (http://www.nquire.org.uk) with the virtual microscope for Earth science (http://www.virtualmicroscope.co.uk) to allow students to undertake projects and gain from inquiry based study thin sections of rocks without the need for a laboratory with expensive petrological microscopes. The Virtual Microscope (VM) was developed for undergraduate teaching of petrology and geoscience, allowing students to explore rock hand specimens and thin sections in a browser window. The system is based on HTML5 application and allows students to scan and zoom the rocks in a browser window, view in ppl and xpl conditions, and rotate specific areas to view birefringence and pleochroism. Importantly the VM allows students to gain access to rare specimens such as Moon rocks that might be too precious to suffer loss or damage. Experimentation with such specimens can inspire the learners' interest in science and allows them to investigate relevant science questions. Yet it is challenging for learners to engage in scientific processes, as they may lack scientific investigation skills or have problems in planning their activities; for teachers, managing inquiry activities is a demanding task (Quintana et al., 2004). To facilitate the realization of inquiry activities, the VM is being integrated with the nQuire tool. nQuire is a web tool that guides and supports students through the inquiry process (Mulholland et al., 2011). Learners are encouraged to construct their own personally relevant hypothesis, pose scientific questions, and plan the method to answer them. Then, the system enables users to collect and analyze data, and share their conclusions. Teachers can monitor their students' progress through inquiries, and give them access to new parts of inquiries as they advance. By means of the integration of nQuire and the VM, inquiries that involve collecting data

  6. Virtual petrological microscopy: web 2.0 technology for learning microscopy skills outside the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.; Whalley, P.; Tindle, A.

    2009-12-01

    Learning to use microscopes for geoscience or life science applications is a crucial part of the practical training offered in many science degrees, but the opportunities to study are often constrained by available laboratory space and time, and sometimes constrained by the number of high quality microscopes available. We will demonstrate a new based virtual petrological microscope which offers the opportunity for enhancement and enrichment of laboratory experience in geoscience. The focus of petrological microscope study is not primarily related to learning facts but is concerned with learning how to discriminate and classify within the paradigms of the discipline. In this case, the recognition and measurement of key features in rock samples in hand specimen and thin section. Whilst undertaking the practical exercise of recognition and naming of rock samples students are really being required to develop an understanding of the rock cycle as a model representing the relationship between rock categories and the process of their formation. The problems of teaching with complex visual materials, in effect of teaching learners 'how to see' from the scientific perspective of a particular discipline, are quite general. It could reasonably be expected that lessons learnt from the implementation and detailed evaluation of the proposed web-based system will generalise to many other topics in science education. Thus we focussed on the thin section images rather than reproducing a system that resembled a physical microscope. The virtual petrological microscope developed for a course at the Open University UK enables student acquisition of skills such as mineral and rock recognition using a browser window to explore thin sections of rocks as if they were using a laboratory microscope. The microscope allows students to pan around the thin sections (held as 1GB files on a remote server); zoom in and out, change from plane polarised light to cross polarised light conditions, and

  7. Flexible and modular virtual scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, John; Federici Canova, Filippo; Keisanen, Olli; Gao, David Z.; Spijker, Peter; Reischl, Bernhard; Foster, Adam S.

    2015-11-01

    Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (NC-AFM) is an experimental technique capable of imaging almost any surface with atomic resolution, in a wide variety of environments. Linking measured images to real understanding of system properties is often difficult, and many studies combine experiments with detailed modelling, in particular using virtual simulators to directly mimic experimental operation. In this work we present the PyVAFM, a flexible and modular based virtual atomic force microscope capable of simulating any operational mode or set-up. Furthermore, the PyVAFM is fully expandable to allow novel and unique set-ups to be simulated, finally the PyVAFM ships with fully developed documentation and tutorial to increase usability.

  8. Digital dynamic telepathology--the Virtual Microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Afework, A.; Beynon, M. D.; Bustamante, F.; Cho, S.; Demarzo, A.; Ferreira, R.; Miller, R.; Silberman, M.; Saltz, J.; Sussman, A.; Tsang, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Virtual Microscope is being designed as an integrated computer hardware and software system that generates a highly realistic digital simulation of analog, mechanical light microscopy. We present our work over the past year in meeting the challenges in building such a system. The enhancements we made are discussed, as well as the planned future improvements. Performance results are provided showing the system scales well, so that many users can be adequately serviced by an appropriately configured data server. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9929351

  9. Virtual Microscope Views of the Apollo 11 and 12 Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Tindle, A. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Pillinger, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Apollo virtual microscope is a means of viewing, over the Internet, polished thin sections of every rock in the Apollo lunar sample collections via software, duplicating many of the functions of a petrological microscope, is described. Images from the Apollo 11 and 12 missions may be viewed at: www.virtualmicroscope.org/content/apollo. Introduction: During the six NASA missions to the Moon from 1969-72 a total of 382 kilograms of rocks and soils, often referred to as "the legacy of Apollo", were collected and returned to Earth. A unique collection of polished thin sections (PTSs) was made from over 400 rocks by the Lunar Sample Curatorial Facility at the Johnson Spacecraft Center (JSC), Houston. These materials have been available for loan to approved PIs but of course they can't be simultaneously investigated by several researchers unless they are co-located or the sample is passed back and forward between them by mail/hand carrying which is inefficient and very risky for irreplaceable material. When The Open University (OU), the world's largest Distance Learning Higher Education Establishment found itself facing a comparable problem (how to supply thousands of undergraduate students with an interactive petrological microscope and a personal set of thin sections), it decided to develop a software tool called the Virtual Microscope (VM). As a result it is now able to make the unique and precious collection of Apollo specimens universally available as a resource for concurrent study by anybody in the world's Earth and Planetary Sciences community. Herein, we describe the first steps of a collaborative project between OU and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Curatorial Facility to record a PTS for every lunar rock, beginning with those collected by the Apollo 11 and 12 missions. Method: Production of a virtual microscope dedicated to a particular theme divides into four main parts - photography, image processing, building and assembly of virtual microscope

  10. Virtual Environment for Manipulating Microscopic Particles With Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W.; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, virtual reality techniques are used to define an intuitive interface to a nanoscale manipulation device. This device utilizes optical methods to focus laser light to trap and reposition nano-to-microscopic particles. The underlying physics are simulated by the use of Lagrange mechanics. A unique control method for the manipulation of the particles is also provided. The user can naturally grab and steer the particles. Behind the scene, a complex computation is performed to find the new location of the potential field induced by the laser beam that would move the particles accordingly. Haptic feedback is used to constrain the steering motion within the physical capability of the potential field.

  11. Virtual Petrography (ViP) - A virtual microscope for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Simon; Heup, Torsten; Urai, Janos L.; Berlage, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Virtual Microscopy has advanced in recent years to a powerful versatile tool in the life sciences with many applications in research and teaching. We present the first virtual microscopy platform especially designed for geoscience applications. It was developed in a collaboration between RWTH Aachen University and Fraunhofer FIT under consideration of the demands of modern petrography. The system consists of a fully automated polarisation microscope that can scan entire thin sections in very high resolution under various polarisation and illumination conditions to capture and digitise all information that could be extracted from the section with classical polarised microscopy. The data is processed to extract the polarisation behaviour of each pixel as continuous functions that are fitted for each pixel based on images taken under different polarisation angles. This information is stored in a newly developed format that allows fast access and offers a very good degree of compression. The datasets can be viewed with a virtual microscopy software (TileViewer) that is easy to operate and allows fluent zooming and browsing through the thin section as well as rotation of the polarisers and switching between illumination conditions. The viewer software is platform independent and requires no special hardware, rather it operates well on a standard laptop. Besides navigation and image adjustments the TileViewer Software offers the possibility to create annotations, visualise the data based on certain characteristics (for example extinction direction), and offers a basic module for image segmentation. For further analysis the data can be exported to Matlab, ArcGis or other image analysis environments. The information density of each dataset (including the extinction behaviour) and the high resolution over very large continuous areas allows for new methods of automated and semi-automated analysis that was not possible before with single image acquisition and analysis

  12. Construction of a Virtual Scanning Electron Microscope (VSEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, Glenn; Grosser, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    The Imaging Technology Group (ITG) proposed to develop a Virtual SEM (VSEM) application and supporting materials as the first installed instrument in NASA s Virtual Laboratory Project. The instrument was to be a simulator modeled after an existing SEM, and was to mimic that real instrument as closely as possible. Virtual samples would be developed and provided along with the instrument, which would be written in Java.

  13. The Role of the Virtual Microscope in Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalley, Peter; Kelley, Simon; Tindle, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Screen-based microscopes allow for a shared visualisation and task-directed conversations that offer significant pedagogic advantages for the science disciplines involving observation of natural samples such as the geosciences and biosciences, and particularly for distance education in these disciplines. The role and development of a virtual…

  14. Enhancing Learning Objectives by Use of Simple Virtual Microscopic Slides in Cellular Physiology and Histology: Impact and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Godson Emeka; Agu, Augustine Uchechukwu; Anyaehie, Ugochukwu Bond

    2012-01-01

    The impact and perception of students on the use of a simple, low technology-driven version of a virtual microscope in teaching and assessments in cellular physiology and histology were studied. Its impact on the time and resources of the faculty were also assessed. Simple virtual slides and conventional microscopes were used to conduct the same…

  15. An array microscope for ultrarapid virtual slide processing and telepathology. Design, fabrication, and validation study.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Ronald S; Descour, Michael R; Liang, Chen; Barker, Gail; Scott, Katherine M; Richter, Lynne; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Bhattacharyya, Achyut K; Davis, John R; Graham, Anna R; Rennels, Margaret; Russum, William C; Goodall, James F; Zhou, Pixuan; Olszak, Artur G; Williams, Bruce H; Wyant, James C; Bartels, Peter H

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a novel array microscope for the first ultrarapid virtual slide processor (DMetrix DX-40 digital slide scanner). The array microscope optics consists of a stack of three 80-element 10 x 8-lenslet arrays, constituting a "lenslet array ensemble." The lenslet array ensemble is positioned over a glass slide. Uniquely shaped lenses in each of the lenslet arrays, arranged perpendicular to the glass slide constitute a single "miniaturized microscope." A high-pixel-density image sensor is attached to the top of the lenslet array ensemble. In operation, the lenslet array ensemble is transported by a motorized mechanism relative to the long axis of a glass slide. Each of the 80 miniaturized microscopes has a lateral field of view of 250 microns. The microscopes of each row of the array are offset from the microscopes in other rows. Scanning a glass slide with the array microscope produces seamless two-dimensional image data of the entire slide, that is, a virtual slide. The optical system has a numerical aperture of N.A.= 0.65, scans slides at a rate of 3 mm per second, and accrues up to 3,000 images per second from each of the 80 miniaturized microscopes. In the ultrarapid virtual slide processing cycle, the time for image acquisition takes 58 seconds for a 2.25 cm2 tissue section. An automatic slide loader enables the scanner to process up to 40 slides per hour without operator intervention. Slide scanning and image processing are done concurrently so that post-scan processing is eliminated. A virtual slide can be viewed over the Internet immediately after the scanning is complete. A validation study compared the diagnostic accuracy of pathologist case readers using array microscopy (with images viewed as virtual slides) and conventional light microscopy. Four senior pathologists diagnosed 30 breast surgical pathology cases each using both imaging modes, but on separate occasions. Of 120 case reads by array microscopy

  16. Drift-insensitive distributed calibration of probe microscope scanner in nanometer range: Virtual mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V.

    2016-08-01

    A method of distributed calibration of a probe microscope scanner is suggested. The main idea consists in a search for a net of local calibration coefficients (LCCs) in the process of automatic measurement of a standard surface, whereby each point of the movement space of the scanner can be characterized by a unique set of scale factors. Feature-oriented scanning (FOS) methodology is used as a basis for implementation of the distributed calibration permitting to exclude in situ the negative influence of thermal drift, creep and hysteresis on the obtained results. Possessing the calibration database enables correcting in one procedure all the spatial systematic distortions caused by nonlinearity, nonorthogonality and spurious crosstalk couplings of the microscope scanner piezomanipulators. To provide high precision of spatial measurements in nanometer range, the calibration is carried out using natural standards - constants of crystal lattice. One of the useful modes of the developed calibration method is a virtual mode. In the virtual mode, instead of measurement of a real surface of the standard, the calibration program makes a surface image "measurement" of the standard, which was obtained earlier using conventional raster scanning. The application of the virtual mode permits simulation of the calibration process and detail analysis of raster distortions occurring in both conventional and counter surface scanning. Moreover, the mode allows to estimate the thermal drift and the creep velocities acting while surface scanning. Virtual calibration makes possible automatic characterization of a surface by the method of scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  17. Beagle I and II Voyages: Charles Darwin's rocks and the quest for Mars rock; the Open University's virtual microscope has both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Tindle, A. G.; Anand, M.; Gibson, E. K.; Pearson, V. K.; Pemberton, D.; Pillinger, C.; Smith, C. L.; Whalley, P.; Kelley, S. P.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration is in itself a fascinating subject, and a strong draw to engaging the public in understanding science. Nearly two hundred years ago Charles Darwin took part in an exploration of the Earth, and more recently we have begun to explore the solar system and in particular the surface of Mars. The engagement is made easier if an element of exploration is involved in the public engagement, using modern internet and even mobile technologies. The Open University combines all those aspects in a series of virtual microscopes for Earth science that are freely available on the web, installed in museums, or built into its teaching material. The basis of the virtual microscope is a mosaic of several hundred microscopic images of each thin section taken in plane polarised light, between crossed polars and in reflected light, which are then assembled into three high resolution images. Rotation movies for selected points in the thin section illustrate changing optical properties such as birefringence. The user is able to pan and zoom around to explore the section, studying the mineralogy and rock texture, and view the rotation movies linked to points in the section to see the changing birefringence colours. We have created several collections of terrestrial rocks, mainly for teaching purposes, and outreach directly linked to exploration: Charles Darwin returned from the Voyage of the Beagle with a large variety of rock samples, and although thin sections were not being made at that time, they were created from his rocks in the late 19th century. The historic material is part of the "Darwin the Geologist" exhibition at the Sedgwick Museum in Cambridge. Our Darwin virtual microscope includes hand specimen illustrations and thin sections together with documentation and an interactive map allow internet users and museum visitors alike to have a close look at Darwin's rocks and study the petrology of them. Charles Darwin explored distant horizons on Earth in the 19th century

  18. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  19. G12V Kras mutations in cervical cancer under virtual microscope of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, X P; Xu, W H; Xu, D F; Fu, S M; Ma, Z C

    2016-01-01

    Kras mutations and cancers are common and their role in the progression of cancer is well known and elucidated. The present work is searching for the most deleterious mutation of the four found at codon 12 and 13 of Kras in cervical cancers using prediction servers; different servers were used to look into different factors that govern the protein function. The in silico results predicted G12V to be the most devastating; this particular mutation was then subjected to molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) for further analysis. The authors' approach of MDSs helped them to place the native and mutant structure under virtual microscope and observe their dynamics over time. The results generated are enlightening the effect of G12V variation on the dynamics of Kras. The structural variation between the native and mutant Kras over 50 nanoseconds (ns) run varied at every parameter checked and the results are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. PMID:27048113

  20. Novel amplitude and frequency demodulation algorithm for a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokavecz, J.; Tóth, Z.; Horváth, Z. L.; Heszler, P.; Mechler, Á.

    2006-04-01

    Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM; also called non-contact atomic force microscopy) is the prevailing operation mode in (sub-)atomic resolution vacuum applications. A major obstacle that prohibits a wider application range is the low frame capture rate. The speed of FM-AFM is limited by the low bandwidth of the automatic gain control (AGC) and frequency demodulation loops. In this work we describe a novel algorithm that can be used to overcome these weaknesses. We analysed the settling times of the proposed loops and that of the complete system, and we found that an approximately 70-fold improvement can be achieved over the existing real and virtual atomic force microscopes. We show that proportional-integral-differential controllers perform better in the frequency demodulation loop than conventional proportional-integral controllers. We demonstrate that the signal to noise ratio of the proposed system is 5.7 × 10-5, which agrees with that of the conventional systems; thus, the new algorithm would improve the performance of FM-AFMs without compromising the resolution.

  1. A Digital Approach to Learning Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    In the undergraduate igneous and metamorphic petrology course at Northern Arizona University, we are employing petrographic microscopes equipped with relatively inexpensive ( $200) digital cameras that are linked to pen-tablet computers. The camera-tablet systems can assist student learning in a variety of ways. Images provided by the tablet computers can be used for helping students filter the visually complex specimens they examine. Instructors and students can simultaneously view the same petrographic features captured by the cameras and exchange information about them by pointing to salient features using the tablet pen. These images can become part of a virtual mineral/rock/texture portfolio tailored to individual student's needs. Captured digital illustrations can be annotated with digital ink or computer graphics tools; this activity emulates essential features of more traditional line drawings (visualizing an appropriate feature and selecting a representative image of it, internalizing the feature through studying and annotating it) while minimizing the frustration that many students feel about drawing. In these ways, we aim to help a student progress more efficiently from novice to expert. A number of our petrology laboratory exercises involve use of the camera-tablet systems for collaborative learning. Observational responsibilities are distributed among individual members of teams in order to increase interdependence and accountability, and to encourage efficiency. Annotated digital images are used to share students' findings and arrive at an understanding of an entire rock suite. This interdependence increases the individual's sense of responsibility for their work, and reporting out encourages students to practice use of technical vocabulary and to defend their observations. Pre- and post-course student interest in the camera-tablet systems has been assessed. In a post-course survey, the majority of students reported that, if available, they would use

  2. Concurrent access to a virtual microscope using a web service oriented architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Germán.; Iregui, Marcela; Arias, Viviana; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) facilitates visualization and deployment of histopathological virtual slides (VS), a useful tool for education, research and diagnosis. In recent years, it has become popular, yet its use is still limited basically because of the very large sizes of VS, typically of the order of gigabytes. Such volume of data requires efficacious and efficient strategies to access the VS content. In an educative or research scenario, several users may require to access and interact with VS at the same time, so, due to large data size, a very expensive and powerful infrastructure is usually required. This article introduces a novel JPEG2000-based service oriented architecture for streaming and visualizing very large images under scalable strategies, which in addition need not require very specialized infrastructure. Results suggest that the proposed architecture enables transmission and simultaneous visualization of large images, while it is efficient using resources and offering users proper response times.

  3. Development and preliminary evaluation of the VPS ReplaySuite: a virtual double-headed microscope for pathology

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Dan J; Costello, Sean P; Dervan, Peter A; O'Shea, Daniel G

    2005-01-01

    Background Advances in computing and telecommunications have resulted in the availability of a range of online tools for use in pathology training and quality assurance. The majority focus on either enabling pathologists to examine and diagnose cases, or providing image archives that serve as reference material. Limited emphasis has been placed on analysing the diagnostic process used by pathologists to reach a diagnosis and using this as a resource for improving diagnostic performance. Methods The ReplaySuite is an online pathology software tool that presents archived virtual slide examinations to pathologists in an accessible video-like format, similar to observing examinations with a double-headed microscope. Delivered through a customised web browser, it utilises PHP (Hypertext PreProcessor) to interact with a remote database and retrieve data describing virtual slide examinations, performed using the Virtual Pathology Slide (VPS). To demonstrate the technology and conduct a preliminary evaluation of pathologists opinions on its potential application in pathology training and quality assurance, 70 pathologists were invited to use the application to review their own and other pathologists examinations of 10 needle-core breast biopsies and complete an electronic survey. 9 pathologists participated, and all subsequently completed an exit survey. Results Of those who replayed an examination by another pathologist, 83.3% (5/6) agreed that replays provided an insight into the examining pathologists diagnosis and 33.3% (2/6) reconsidered their own diagnosis for at least one case. Of those who reconsidered their original diagnosis, all re-classified either concordant with group consensus or original glass slide diagnosis. 77.7% (7/9) of all participants, and all 3 participants who replayed more than 10 examinations stated the ReplaySuite to be of some or great benefit in pathology training and quality assurance. Conclusion Participants conclude the ReplaySuite to be of

  4. Review and update of the applications of organic petrology: Part 1, geological applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suárez-Ruiz, Isabel; Flores, Deolinda; Mendonça Filho, João Graciano; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic petrology developed as coal petrology at the beginning of the 20th century dedicated mainly to the study of coals because of their utilization in industry. Coal petrology was then considered a branch of coal science. Later, with the development of specialized nomenclature, classification of coal components, and the standardization and improvement of analytical (microscopical) methods, this discipline expanded in interests and name, becoming organic petrology. Organic petrology carries a broader context, being as well a tool applied in the study of dispersed organic matter in sedimentary rocks due to its importance in exploration for fossil fuel resources. At present, organic petrology is a discipline widely recognized for its role in fundamental and applied research with respect to both coal utilization and in geosciences. Throughout the 20th century several important monographs have been published on the discipline of organic petrology, including “Stach's textbook of coal petrology” (1st edition 1935, 2nd 1975, 3rd 1982), updated as the more general “Organic petrology” by Taylor et al. (1998). More recently, the text “Applied coal petrology: the role of petrology in coal utilization” was published by Suárez-Ruiz and Crelling (2008). This review is the first in a two-part review series that describes and updates the role of organic petrology in geosciences. A second part complementing this one and focused on the applications of organic petrology to other scientific fields will follow.

  5. The Beginnings of Experimental Petrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugster, Hans P.

    1971-01-01

    An account of Van't Hoff's change from theoretical chemistry to petrology provides data on the European intellectual climate of the early 1900's and shows how his work laid the foundation for experimental petrology of hard rocks." (AL)

  6. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  7. Carbon petrology in cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) are collected in the Earth's stratosphere. There exists an extensive database on major and minor element chemistry, stable isotopes, noble gas abundances and mineralogy of many CP IDP's, as well as infrared and Raman spectroscopic properties. For details on the mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties of IDP's, I refer to the reviews by Mackinnon and Rietmeijer (1987), Bradley et al. (1988) and Sandford (1987). Texture, mineralogy (Mackinnon and Rietmeijer, 1987) and chemistry (Schramm et al., 1989; Flynn and Sutton, 1991) support the notion that CP IDP's are a unique group of ultrafine-grained extraterrestiral materials that are distinct from any known meteorite class. Their fluffy, or porous, morphology suggests that CP IDP's probably endured minimal alteration by protoplanetary processes since their formation. It is generally accepted that CP IDP's are solid debris from short-period comets. The evidence is mostly circumstantial but this notion gained significant support based on the comet Halley dust data (Brownlee, 1990). In this paper, I will accept that CP IDP's are indeed cometary dust. The C/Si ratio in CP IDP's is 3.3 times higher than in CI carbonaceous chondrites (Schramm et al. 1989). The intraparticle carbon distribution is heteorogeneous (Rietmeijer and McKay, 1986). Carbon occurs both in oxidized and reduced forms. Analytical electron microscope (AEM) and Raman spectroscopic analyses have shown the presence of several carbon forms in CP IDP's but the data are scattered in the literature. Carbons in cometary CP IDP's are among the most pristine Solar System carbons available for laboratory study. Similar to a recently developed petrological model for the diversity of layer silicates in CP IDP's (Zolensky, 1991) that is useful to constrain in situ aqueous alteration in comets (Rietmeijer and Mackinnon, 1987a), I here present the first effort to develop a petrological concept of carbons

  8. Petrology of impactites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'Dman, Vilen I.

    The book reviews results from petrological studies of astroblemes and the astrobleme-forming structures, impactites. Consideration is given to the distribution of astroblemes on earth in time and space and to the morphology and internal structure of astroblemes, as well as to physical processes responsible for the formation of impactites. A catalog of all known astroblemes and their characteristics is constructed. Attention is given to the geochemical, petrographical, and geophysical characteristics of impactites, and a classification scheme is devised by which impactites are classified according to four characteristics: the source of energy in an impactite formation, the environment in which the impactite was formed, the mechanism of impactite formation, and the pressure/temperature parameters at the moment of impactite formation.

  9. Europa's petrological thermal history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransford, G. A.; Finnerty, A. A.; Collerson, K. D.

    1981-01-01

    A path of geophysical development which takes into account the petrological sequence is presented to describe the thermal evolution of Europa. On the basis of considerations of the likely temperature-pressure conditions in the Europa zone of the circumjovian nebula during the condensation of the satellite on the one hand and of the early thermal evolution on the other, it is argued that most of the water of Europa can be in the form of hydrated silicates in a thick convective boundary layer or throughout the body of the satellite. Such silicates would include the minerals chlorite and/or serpentine, and brucite, and could be maintained in hydrated states by solid state convection within the body. The model predicts that the ice layer on the surface of Europa is considerably thinner than the 150 km that had been estimated before the Voyager mission.

  10. Petrology at Princeton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology at Princeton has evolved from a course f or junior or senior majors to a course that targets sophomores who might major in geology. The prerequisite is one prior course in geology. The course is constructed around a one-week series of field exercises in the Rio Grand rift of New Mexico. These are taken during our fall break. During the field exercises they collect metamorphic or volcanic rocks that form the basis of a project that they work on in the second half of the semester. They make thin sections of their rocks, learn some microscopy and mineralogy as they examine them, and prepare a final paper with the structure of a research article. The students give oral reports in an "AGU like" session. Part of their grade is based on their questioning of their peers. Prior to the one-week trip, the students are taken on half or full-day field trips to central Atlantic rift features in the vicinity of Princeton. These trips and related labs prepare them for the trip to New Mexico. They must keep a notebook in which they record their field observations. The notebooks for the one-week trip are evaluated and the grade is a significant fraction of the final grade. This course began as an experiment, which was driven by a need to increase the number of majors in Geosciences. The course works best for class sizes of 6 to 10; one or two do not continue in geology, and one or two are already majoring in other sciences. Veterans of former classes come as assistants on the one week trip. Thus, the students considering majoring in Geosciences are mentored by the older students. And the veterans add to their petrology and mineralogy education through instruction of the younger students. The trip is expensive. Costs are covered by income from endowed funds set up to provide field experiences for undergraduates. This course helps tremendously in introducing eastern students to the geology that is so dramatically displayed in the west, and that is

  11. Petrology of metamorphic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, M.

    1983-01-01

    ''Petrology of Metamorphic Rocks'' reviews Central European opinions about the origin and formation of metamorphic rocks and their genetic systems, confronting the works of such distinguished European scientists as Rosenbusch, Becke, Niggli, Sander, Eskola, Barth and others with present-day knowledge and the results of Soviet and American investigations. The initial chapters discuss the processes that give rise to metamorphic rocks, and the main differences between regional metamorphism and other types of alterations, the emphasis being laid on the material characteristic of the processes of metamorphism, metasomatism and ultrametamorphism. Further chapters give a brief characterization of research methods, together with a detailed genetic classification based on the division of primary rocks into igneous rocks, sediments and ore materials. The effects of metamorphic alterations and those of the properties of the primary rocks are analyzed on the basis of examples taken chiefly from the Bohemian Massif, the West Carpathians, other parts of the European Variscides, from the crystalline Scandinavian Shelf in Norway and Finland, and from the Alps. Typical examples are documented by a number of charts, photographs and petrographical - particularly petrochemical - data.

  12. Semantically Enabling Knowledge Representation of Metamorphic Petrology Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, P.; Fox, P. A.; Spear, F. S.; Adali, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hallett, B. W.; Horkley, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    More and more metamorphic petrology data is being collected around the world, and is now being organized together into different virtual data portals by means of virtual organizations. For example, there is the virtual data portal Petrological Database (PetDB, http://www.petdb.org) of the Ocean Floor that is organizing scientific information about geochemical data of ocean floor igneous and metamorphic rocks; and also The Metamorphic Petrology Database (MetPetDB, http://metpetdb.rpi.edu) that is being created by a global community of metamorphic petrologists in collaboration with software engineers and data managers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The current focus is to provide the ability for scientists and researchers to register their data and search the databases for information regarding sample collections. What we present here is the next step in evolution of the MetPetDB portal, utilizing semantically enabled features such as discovery, data casting, faceted search, knowledge representation, and linked data as well as organizing information about the community and collaboration within the virtual community itself. We take the information that is currently represented in a relational database and make it available through web services, SPARQL endpoints, semantic and triple-stores where inferencing is enabled. We will be leveraging research that has taken place in virtual observatories, such as the Virtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO) and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO); vocabulary work done in various communities such as Observations and Measurements (ISO 19156), FOAF (Friend of a Friend), Bibo (Bibliography Ontology), and domain specific ontologies; enabling provenance traces of samples and subsamples using the different provenance ontologies; and providing the much needed linking of data from the various research organizations into a common, collaborative virtual observatory. In addition to better

  13. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  14. Petrology and classification of the Garraf, Spain chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, K.; Conrad, G. H.; King, E. A.; San Miguel, A.

    1986-03-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies indicate that the Garraf meteorite is a highly-recrystallized chondrite of petrologic type 6. Olivine (Fa24.7; PMD 1.1) and low-Ca pyroxene (Fs20.9; PMD 1.1) compositions indicate that it belongs to the L-group. Based on contents of noble gases, pervasive fracturing of silicates, common undulose extinction of olivine and plagioclase, and the lack of melt pockets and maskelynite, Garraf is placed into shock facies b. It is concluded that Garraf is a highly recrystallized L6b chondrite that, after recrystallization, was cataclased and comminuted by shock.

  15. Petrology and classification of the Garraf, Spain chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, K.; Conrad, G. H.; King, E. A.; San Miguel, A.

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies indicate that the Garraf meteorite is a highly-recrystallized chondrite of petrologic type 6. Olivine (Fa24.7; PMD 1.1) and low-Ca pyroxene (Fs20.9; PMD 1.1) compositions indicate that it belongs to the L-group. Based on contents of noble gases, pervasive fracturing of silicates, common undulose extinction of olivine and plagioclase, and the lack of melt pockets and maskelynite, Garraf is placed into shock facies b. It is concluded that Garraf is a highly recrystallized L6b chondrite that, after recrystallization, was cataclased and comminuted by shock.

  16. Theoretical petrology. [of igneous and metamorphic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolper, E.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, some areas of growing interest in the American efforts in petrology during the 1975-1978 quadrennium are reviewed. In igneous petrology, studies of structures and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and of kinetics of igneous processes are in a period of rapid growth. Plate tectonic concepts have had (and will no doubt continue to have) an important influence by focusing interest on specific problems and by providing a framework for the understanding of petrogenesis. An understanding of mantle processes and evolution through the integration of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical constraints has been developed over the past 20 years, and will undoubtedly provide direction for future petrological studies.

  17. Lunar breccias, petrology, and earth planetary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, W. I.

    1978-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) petrologic studies of poikiloblastic textured rocks; (2) petrology of aluminous mare basalts in breccia 14063; (3) petrology of Apollo 15 breccia 15459; (4) high-alumina mare basalts; (5) some petrological aspects of imbrium stratigraphy; (6) petrology of lunar rocks and implication to lunar evolution; (7) the crystallization trends of spinels in Tertiary basalts from Rhum and Muck and their petrogenetic significance; (8) the geology and evolution of the Cayman Trench; (9) The petrochemistry of igneous rocks from the Cayman Trench and the Captains Bay Pluton, Unalaska Island and their relation to tectonic processes at plate margins; and (10) the oxide and silicate mineral chemistry of a Kimberlite from the Premier Mine with implications for the evolution of kimberlitic magma.

  18. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  19. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrite QUE 94484

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites are broadly "eucritic", being composed of ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase, a silica phase, ilmenite and accessory phases. Their characteristics indicate that eucrite-like basalts formed on asteroids of similar composition under similar petrologic conditions (T, P, fO2). Some eucrite-like basalts have isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics consistent with formation on different parent asteroids (e.g., Ibitira, NWA 011). Others show small isotopic differences but no distinguishing petrological characteristics (e.g., Caldera, Pasamonte). We have begun a study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites in an effort to seek resolution to the issues: Did the eucrite parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? How many parent asteroids are represented by these basalts? Here we present preliminary petrologic information on anomalous basaltic eucrite QUE 94484.

  20. Studies of Brazilian meteorites. XIV - Mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry of the Conquista, Minas Gerais, chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, K.; Kirchner, E.; Gomes, C. B.; Jarosewich, E.; Murta, R. L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The Conquista chondrite is described and classified as an H4. The mineral composition is reported. H-group classification is based on described microscopic, electron microprobe, and bulk chemical studies. The evidence for petrologic type 4 classification includes the pronounced well-developed chondritic texture; the slight compositional variations in constituent phases; the high Ca contents of pyroxene and the presence of pigeonite; glassy to microcrystalline interstitial material rich in alkalis and SiO2; and twinned low-Ca clinopyroxene.

  1. APPLICATIONS OF CATHODOLUMINESCENCE OF QUARTZ AND FELDSPAR TO SEDIMENTARY PETROLOGY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.

    1987-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), the emission of visible light during electron bombardment, was first used in sandstone petrology in the mid-1960's. CL techniques are especially useful for determining the origin and source of quartz and feldspar, two of the most common constituents in clastic rocks. CL properties of both minerals are dependent on their temperature of crystallization, duration of cooling, and/or history of deformation. Detrital quartz and feldspar are typically derived from igneous and metamorphic sources and luminesce in the visible range whereas authigenic quartz and feldspar form at low temperatures and do not luminesce. Quantification of luminescent and non-luminescent quartz and feldspar with the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, or a commercial CL device can allow for the determination of origin, diagenesis, and source of clastic rocks when used in conjunction with field and other petrographic analyses.

  2. Petrologic implications of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Yoder, H S

    1971-07-30

    Petrologists can make significant contributions to the plate tectonic concept. Fixing the stability fields of the principal rock types involved will provide the limits of pressure and temperature of the various environments. Experimental determination of the partition coefficients of the trace elements will be helpful. Studies of the partial melting behavior of possible parental materials in the absence and presence of water, especially the undersaturated region, will contribute to the understanding of magma production. Experimental observations on the rheological properties of the peridotites below and just above the solidus will lead to a better evaluation of the convective mechanism. Measurement of the fundamental properties of rocks, such as the density of solids and liquids at high pressures and temperatures, would contribute to understanding the concepts of diapiric rise, magma segregation, and the low-velocity zone. Broader rock sampling of the oceanic areas of all environments will do much to define the petrologic provinces. The field petrologist specializing in the Paleozoic regions and Precambrian shields can contribute by examining those regions for old plate boundaries and devising new criteria for their recognition. PMID:17770454

  3. Petrology, geochemistry, and fluid regime of tectonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letnikov, Feliks Artem'evich; Savel'Eva, Valentina Borisovna; Balyshev, Sergei Olegovich

    The book discusses the petrology, geochemisry, and fluid regime of the tectonite formation in rocks that differ with respect to the composition of their granulitic, amphylitic, and green-shale metamorphic facies. Tectonites in magma and metamorphic rocks of different composition are described in terms of their petrological, geochemical, and fluid-regime characteristics, and the pressure/temperature conditions of their formation. Using chemical and physical parameters, tectonites are classified according to their type models. The ore-generating capacity of tectonites in various rocks is estimated using a large geochemical database.

  4. Petrologic and mineralogic investigation of some crystalline rocks returned by the Apollo 14 mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gancarz, A. J.; Albee, A. L.; Chodos, A. A.

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14 crystalline rocks (14053 and 14310) and crystalline rock fragments (14001,7,1; 14001,7,3; 14073; 14167,8,1 and 14321,191,X-1) on which Rb/Sr, Ar-40/Ar-39, or cosmic ray exposure ages have been determined by our colleagues were studied with the electron microprobe and the petrographic microscope. Rock samples 14053 and 14310 are mineralogically and petrologically distinct from each other. On the basis of mineralogic and petrologic characteristics all of the fragments, except 14001,7,1, are correlative with rock 14310. Sample 14073 is an orthopyroxene basalt with chemical and mineralogic affinities to ?KREEP,' the ?magic' and ?cryptic' components. Fragment 14001,7,1 is very similar to Luny Rock I.

  5. A detailed petrological analysis of hydrated, low-nickel, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed petrological analysis of three low-Ni, K-bearing, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles is performed, and these particles are compared to products of high-energy, explosive (Plinian-type) volcanic events. The analytical electron microscope (AEM) analyses show pervasive layer silicates, carbonate and goethite, and chemical fractionation in the matrix of these particles similar to hydrothermal alteration in volcanic ejecta. Along with low Ni content and the presence of potassium, the texture and mineralogy of particles L2001-18, L2001-20, and L2002 C2 are similar to at least two nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles of the igneous subgroup for which an extraterrestrial origin has been suggested based on their minor- and trace-element abundances. The petrological characteristics of some low-Ni, K-bearing nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles supports a probable terrestrial volcanic origin, but the AEM data alone cannot exclude an extraterrestrial origin for these particles.

  6. Microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Darrell S

    2014-02-01

    Microscopic colitis is a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea, especially in older persons. Common associated symptoms include abdominal pain, arthralgias, and weight loss. The incidence of microscopic colitis had been increasing, although more recent studies have shown a stabilization of incidence rates. The diagnosis is based on characteristic histologic findings in a patient with diarrhea. Microscopic colitis can occur at any age, including in children, but it is primarily seen in the elderly. Several treatment options exist to treat the symptoms of microscopic colitis, although only budesonide has been well studied in randomized clinical trials. PMID:24267602

  7. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-11-01

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface.

  8. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface. PMID:26611148

  9. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface. PMID:26611148

  10. Athena microscopic Imager investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J.F., III; Maki, J.N.; Arneson, H.M.; Bertelsen, P.; Brown, D.I.; Collins, S.A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliott, S.T.; Goetz, W.; Hagerott, E.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, M.J.; Kirk, R.L.; McLennan, S.; Morris, R.V.; Scherr, L.M.; Schwochert, M.A.; Shiraishi, L.R.; Smith, G.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Wadsworth, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI). The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400-700 nm). The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 ?? 31 mm across a 1024 ?? 1024 pixel CCD image. The MI acquires images using only solar or skylight illumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Coarse focusing (???2 mm precision) is achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor has been activated. The MI optics are protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm, allowing color information to be obtained by taking images with the dust cover open and closed. MI data will be used to place other MER instrument data in context and to aid in petrologic and geologic interpretations of rocks and soils on Mars. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Virtual colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Colonoscopy - virtual; CT colonography; Computed tomographic colonography; Colography - virtual ... Virtual colonoscopy is different from regular colonoscopy . Regular colonoscopy uses a long, lighted tool called a colonoscope that is ...

  12. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include purplish bumps and spots pictured below (palpable purpura). These areas range in size from several millimeters ... Syndrome (EGPA) Cryoglobulinemia Giant Cell Arteritis Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Microscopic Polyangiitis Polyarteritis Nodosa Rheumatoid Vasculitis Takayasu’s Arteritis ...

  13. A tutorial for sandstone petrology: architecture and development of an interactive program for teaching highly visual material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choh, Suk-Joo; Milliken, Kitty L.; McBride, Earle F.

    2003-11-01

    We have developed an interactive computer-based tutorial in sandstone petrology for undergraduate-level students. The goal of this tutorial is to provide students exposure to the highly visual subject matter of petrography outside the confines of organized laboratory exercises. This paper describes the architecture and development procedures of the current version of the sandstone petrography tutorial, and offers a possible model for similar development approaches in other fields of petrography or in any other field that utilizes large quantities of visual material such as remote sensing image interpretation or seismic interpretation. The tutorial is an interactive photomicrograph archive with sufficient content and flexible architecture that functions as a virtual laboratory instructor as well as a stand-alone reference. The current tutorial was programmed using Macromedia Authorware v.6.0 and supports both Windows-based and MacOS personal computers. The tutorial is constructed around the Folk sandstone classification scheme (quartzarenite, arkose, and litharenite), and an additional section addresses grains other than quartz, feldspar, and lithic fragments and sandstones dominated by these grains. The user interface is designed to take minimal portion of the screen area so that the screen can closely mimic the type of view seen by a student peering down a microscope. Each photomicrograph in the tutorial is basically unadorned until the user actively calls up information that is temporarily displayed over the image, inducing the user to search for information and actively "ask" to be informed with a mouse click. The structure of the tutorial permits multiple strategies of program use, as a linear tutorial, tutorial driven by thumbnail browser, and as a searchable reference.

  14. Petrological Mapping of the Crater Boguslawsky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhler, C.; Evdokimova, N. A.; Feoktistova, E. A.; Grumpe, A.; Kapoor, K.; Berezhnoy, A. A.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    An analysis of orbital spectral data of the crater Boguslawsky, the intended target region of the Russian Luna-Glob mission, is performed. We have constructed a high- resolution DEM of the crater Boguslawsky, based on which the temperature regime on the surface is investigated. The depth of the OH absorption feature is analysed.The content of the main elements is estimated, and a petrologic map is constructed accordingly.

  15. Magmas and magmatic rocks: An introduction to igneous petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemost, E.A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book melds traditional igneous petrology with the emerging science of planetary petrology to provide an account of current ideas on active magmatic and volcanic processes, drawing examples from all igneous provinces of the world as well as from the moon and planets. It reviews the history and development of concepts fundamental to modern igneous petrology and includes indepth sections on magmas, magnetic differentiation and volcanology.

  16. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A.; Seo, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a “microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa”, which was distinct from classical polyarteritis nodosa. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article will review the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA. PMID:20688249

  17. Martian Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  18. Rethinking how Undergraduate ``Hard Rock'' Petrology is Taught

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    A course in "hard rock" petrology forms a core component of undergraduate training in the geosciences. In most cases, the subjects of igneous and metamorphic petrology are combined in a single course and the course is traditionally structured so that the two subjects are covered in series. This approach enables students to focus on each subject separately, with knowledge of igneous rocks helping students to understand metamorphic rock protoliths. Student assessment shows, however, that this approach tends to compartmentalize learning and the two main subjects might just as well be taught in separate courses. In practical applications such as fieldwork, students must be able to access their understanding of igneous and metamorphic rocks virtually simultaneously. To better integrate student learning, I developed a spiral learning approach to teaching petrology (e.g., Bruner, 1990; Dyar et al., 2004) so that commonalities could be revisited several times over the course of a semester and, in so doing, students' grasp of the fundamental insights provided by igneous and metamorphic rocks could be scaffolded into greater understanding. The course initially focuses on the dynamics of the environments in which igneous and metamorphic rocks form: heat flow, fluid flow, and plate tectonics. Several subsequent weeks explore topics relevant to identifying and understanding igneous and metamorphic rocks in the field: crystal nucleation and growth, the roles of pressure and heat, and field classification. Laboratory exercises parallel this structure, also emphasizing observations that are valuable in the field: the relationship between minerals and rocks, textural observations, and general rock classification. The final portion of the course explores “hard rocks” in more detail with a greater emphasis on the interplay between chemistry and mineralogy. A variety of learner-centered activities in the course help students bridge the gap between novice and expert and include

  19. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  20. [Petrological Analysis of Astrophysical Dust Analog Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This project "Petrological analysis of astrophysical dust analog evolution" was initiated to try to understand the vapor phase condensation, and the nature of the reaction products, in circumstellar environments, such as the solar nebula 4,500 Myrs ago, and in the interstellar medium. Telescope-based infrared [IR] spectroscopy offers a broad-scale inventory of the various types of dust in these environments but no details on small-scale variations in terms of chemistry and morphology and petrological phase relationships. Vapor phase condensation in these environments is almost certainly a non-equilibrium process. The main challenge to this research was to document the nature of this process that, based on astrophysical observations, seems to yield compositionally consistent materials. This observation may suggest a predictable character during non-equilibrium condensation. These astrophysical environments include two chemically distinct, that is, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich environments. The former is characterized by silicates the latter by carbon-bearing solids. According to cosmological models of stellar evolution circumstellar dust accreted into protoplanets wherein thermal and/or aqueous processes will alter the dust under initially, non-equilibrium conditions.

  1. Virtual colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Colonoscopy - virtual; CT colonography; Computed tomographic colonography; Colography - virtual ... standards for gastroenterologists for performing and interpreting diagnostic computed tomography colonography: 2011 update. Gastroenterology . 2011;141:2240-2266. ...

  2. Microscope and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  3. Microscope and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1984-04-17

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers. 7 figs.

  4. Petrology and Composition of HED Polymict Breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Herrin, J. S.; Mertzman, S. A.; Mertzman, K. R.

    2010-01-01

    The howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) clan of meteorites forms the largest suite of achondrites with over 900 named members. The HEDs are igneous rocks and breccias of igneous rocks from a differentiated asteroid [1]. The consensus view is that these rocks hail from the asteroid 4 Vesta, which will be the first target of NASA's Dawn mission. When Dawn arrives at Vesta, she will begin remote imagery and spectroscopy of the surface. The surface she will observe will be dominated by rocks and soils mixed through impact gardening. To help with the interpretation of the remotely sensed data, we have begun a project on the petrologic and compositional study of a suite of HED polymict breccias. Here we report on the preliminary findings of this project.

  5. Petrology of brecciated ferroan noritic anorthosite 67215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, James J.

    1988-01-01

    A petrologic study of breccia 67215 is presented, showing that the rock has the bulk composition of a ferroan noritic anorthosite and is a polymict breccia containing several lithic clast types within a crushed, cataclastic matrix. The dominant lithic clasts contained in breccia 67215 are found to be igneous and metamorphic low- and high- Ca pyroxenes and olivine. Other clasts include granulated and sheared clasts, coarse-grained anorthosite with relatively Fe-rich augite, aphanitic, feldspathic microporphyritic melt breccias, and an impact-melt rock with strongly zoned relatively Mg-rich pyroxene. It is concluded that this rock type is relatively common in the highlands regolith excavated by the North Ray Crater.

  6. Petrology, Geochemistry and Genesis of Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Hudon, Pierre; Galindo, Charles, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Ureilites are enigmatic achondrites that have some characteristics resulting from high temperature igneous processing, yet retain other characteristics inherited from the solar nebula. They are basalt-depleted ultramafic rocks containing 7-66 mg/g elemental C. They are rich in noble gases and display a correlation between mg# and Delta (17)O. This mishmash of properties has engendered various models for ureilite genesis, from those in which nebular processes dominate to those in which parent body igneous processes dominate. Characterization of new ureilites, especially of new subtypes, is an important part of attempts to unravel the history of the ureilite parent body or bodies. Here we report on the petrology and geochemistry of a suite of ureilites, mostly from Antarctica, and use these data to discuss ureilite petrogenesis. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  7. Altering petrology through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Figueroa, I.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) takes advantage of various microbial metabolisms to increase hydrocarbon and energy yield by improving oil flow and flood water sweep in a reservoir during tertiary recovery. Wormholing at the injection well is believed to be the result of the large drop in pressure when water exits the injection well and enters the unconsolidated reservoir matrix. One possible means of prevent this event is to consolidate the rock matrix immediately around the injection well to create a permeable zone of stable petrology. Many microbial processes are known to result in the precipitation of ionic components into their environment creating solid-phase minerals. Such processes could be judiciously applied to bind unconsolidated matrices in order to form a permeable concreted rock matrix, which would minimize wormholing events and thus improve floodwater sweep. However, to date, apart from the application of urea oxidation creating calcium carbonate precipitation, there has been little investigation of the applicability of these precipitated bioconcretions to MEOR strategies and none to control wormholing events. Here we present a novel approach to altering rock petrology to concrete unconsolidated matrices in the near well environment by the biogenesis of authigenic minerals through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation. Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans, strain FiPS-3 is currently the only isolated organism capable of using phosphite (HPO32-) as an electron donor for growth. This process, known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO), can be coupled to either sulfate reduction or homoacetogenesis and leads to the accumulation of inorganic phosphate in the medium. The resulting insoluble mineral phases can coat the rock environment resulting in a concretion binding the unconsolidated matrix particles into a single phase. In this study we demonstrate that DPO can effectively produce calcium or magnesium phosphate minerals in packed glass

  8. Using quantitative phase petrology to understand metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative phase petrology has become one of the mainstay methods for interpreting metamorphic rocks and processes. Its increased utility has been driven by improvements to end-member thermodynamics, activity-composition relationships and computer programs to undertake calculations. Such improvements now allow us to undertake calculations in increasingly complex chemical systems that more closely reflect those of rocks. Recent progress in activity-composition (a-x) relationships is aimed at developing suites of a-x relationships in large chemical systems that are calibrated together, which will allow a more direct application of the method to metamorphic rocks. In addition, considerable progress has been made in how quantitative phase diagrams can be used to understand features, including chemical potential diagrams for reaction textures, methods for fractionating bulk compositions and methods for modelling open system processes. One feature of calculated phase diagrams is that they present us with a great amount of information, such as mineral assemblages, mineral proportions, phase compositions, volume or density etc. An important aspect to using this information is to understand the potential uncertainties associated with these, which are significant. These uncertainties require that calculated phase diagrams be used with caution to interpret observed features in rocks. Features such as mineral zoning and reaction textures should still be interpreted in a semi-quantitative way, even if based on a fully quantitative diagram. Exercises such as the interpretation of reaction overstepping based on relating phase diagrams to observed mineral core compositions are likely to give spurious results given the infelicities in existing a-x models. Despite these limitations, quantitative phase petrology remains the most useful approach to interpreting the metamorphic history of rocks in that it provides a theoretical framework in which to interpret observed features rather

  9. Petrology and Bulk Chemistry of R Chondrites: New Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, J.; Rubin, A. E.; Wasson, J. T.

    2010-03-01

    New INAA data show that R chondrites of all petrologic types are isochemical. R3 PRE 95411 contains numerous awaruite grains; R6 Y 980702 has a fine-grained granoblastic matrix; MET 01149 is reclassified as R3.

  10. Petrology in Action: Teaching Volcanology in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K. S.

    2003-12-01

    Most petrology classes include description of volcanic systems as part of igneous petrology. The field of volcanology presents an opportunity for students to apply petrologic principles to physical processes with which they are familiar and to exemplify active magmatic processes that occur on relatively short time scales. As an illustration of the pedagogical connections between physical volcanology and igneous petrology, several classroom and lab exercises are described, including: a) analog experiments to illustrate rheological properties of magmas and how they vary with differing magmatic compositions; b) guided inquiry explorations of the role of magma composition on eruptive style and frequency; c) a sequence of demonstrations to illustrate physical principles of volcanic eruptions; d) problem sets using data from recent eruptions; and e) simulation of a volcanic monitoring crisis. The activities and demonstrations presented here illustrate a variety of applications of petrologic concepts, with an emphasis on the relationship between magmatic composition and its physical properties and how these physical properties in turn dictate the behavior of volcanic systems. They can be easily modified to illustrate magma chamber processes. These exercises are designed primarily for sophomore-level undergraduates and can be carried out in classrooms with a minimum of resources. The emphasis on hands-on inquiry exercises, coupled with the dynamic nature of some of these demonstrations gives students a chance to visualize petrologic processes that drive some of Earth's most dramatic events.

  11. Petrology and radiogeology of the Stripa pluton

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, Harold; Flexser, Steve; Andersson, Lennart

    1980-12-01

    To better define the character of the rock encompassing the thermomechanical and hydrological experiments at the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and to help determine the size of the Stripa pluton, detailed studies were conducted of the petrology and radiogeology of the quartz monzonite and adjacent rocks. Petrologic studies emphasized optical petrography, with supplementary X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and microprobe analyses. Radiogeologic investigations were based primarily on surface and underground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of uranium, thorium and potassium, supplemented by laboratory gamma spectrometric analyses and fission-track radiographic determinations of the locations and abundance of uranium in the rock matrix. Both the quartz monzonite and the metavolcanic leptite which it intruded are strongly fractured. Two stages of fracture filling are evident; an earlier stage encompassing quartz, sericite, feldspar, epidote, and chlorite, and a later stage dominated by carbonate minerals. The Stripa quartz monzonite is chemically and mineralogically distinct from other plutons in the region. Muscovite is the predominant mica in the quartz monzonite; biotite has been altered to chlorite, hornblende is absent, and accessory minerals are scarce. In contrast, in other plutons in the Stripa region biotite and hornblende are prominent mafic minerals and accessory minerals are abundant. The Stripa quartz monzonite is also considerably more radioactive than the leptite and other plutons in the region. Uranium and thorium abundances are both- 30 ppm, considerably higher than in "normal" granitic rocks where the thorium-to-uranium ratio generally exceeds 2. Potassium-argon dating of muscovite from the Stripa quartz monzonite indicates that this rock may be older, at 1691 million years than granitic rock of the neighboring Gusselby and Kloten massifs, whose ages, based on K-Ar dating of biotite, are respectively 1604 and 1640 m.y. Heat flow and heat

  12. Magnetic petrology of eastern North America diabases. I - Olivine-normative dikes from western South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Richard D.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    The oxide mineralogy and the magnetic behavior of 15 olivine-normative samples obtained from South-Caroline diabase dikes were investigated using electron microprobe and SEM analyses and measurements of natural remanence magnetization (NRM), saturation isothermal remanence magnetization (SIRM), and anhysteritic remanence magnetization. It was found that chromite (which for these olivine-normative diabases is a sensitive petrologic indicator) constitutes up to 0.5 vol pct and that its abundance and composition correlate with bulk rock Cr. Microscopic analyses showed that titanomagnetite compositions were mostly between 0.4 and 0.55. The values of NRM and the NRM/SIRM ratios varied between 4 and 0.01 A sq m/kg and 0.0019 and 0.032, respectively. These properties inversely correlate with Cr content and demonstrably contrast Cr-rich and Cr-poor samples.

  13. SNC meteorites - Clues to Martian petrologic evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y.

    1985-11-01

    Shergottites, nakhlites and the Chassigny meteorites (SNC group) may have originated on Mars. The shergottites are medium-grained basalts, the nakhlites are pyroxenites and the Chassigny is a dunite. The SNC group is petrologically diverse but differs from all other known achondrites in terms of mineral chemistry, the redox state, the oxygen isotopic composition and the radiometric ages. The SNC stones are mafic and ultramafic cumulate rocks with mineralogies that indicate rapid cooling and crystallization from tholeiitic magmas which contained water and experienced a high degree of oxidation. The characteristics suggest formation from a large parent body, i.e., a planet, but not earth. The estimated ages for the rocks match the estimated ages for several mapped Martian volcanoes in the Tharsis region. Additionally, the elemental and isotopic abundances of atmospheric gases embedded in melts in the SNC stones match Viking Lander data for the Martian atmosphere. However, reasons are cited for discounting the possibility that a large meteorite(s) collided with Mars about 180 myr ago and served as the mechanism for ejecting the SNC stones to earth.

  14. Petrology and In Situ Trace Element Chemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Torrano, Z. A.

    2015-07-01

    Your eyes are not deceiving you: Duck has submitted an abstract to a chondrite session. We will present the results of our petrological and compositional studies of R chondrites of diverse petrological type.

  15. Thermal structure of the lithosphere: a petrologic model.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, I D; Basu, A R

    1974-09-20

    A preliminary evaluation of the thermal history of the upper mantle as determined by petrologic techniques indicates a general correspondence with theoretically derived models. The petrologic data supply direct information which may be used as an independent calibration of calculated models, serve as a base for evaluating the assumptions of the theoretical approach, and allow more careful selection of the variables describing mantle thermal properties and processes. Like the theoretical counterpart, the petrological approach indicates that the lithosphere is dominated by two thermal regimes: first, there is a continental regime which cools at rates of the order of 10(9) years and represents the longterm cooling of the earth. Secondly, superimposed on the continental evolution is the thermal event associated with the formation of an oceanic basin, and which may be thought of as a 10(8) year convective perturbation on the continental cycle. Of special interest is petrologic evidence for a sudden steepening of the thermal gradients across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary not seen in the theoretical models. The unexpected change of slope points to the need for a critical reevaluation of the thermal processes and properties extant in the asthenosphere. The potential of the petrologic contribution has yet to be fully realized. For a start, this article points to an important body of independent evidence critical to our understanding of the earth's thermal history. PMID:17738235

  16. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  17. Petrologic evolution of the Louisville seamount chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, James W.; Lonsdale, Peter F.; Batiza, Rodey

    mantle source for the LSC seamounts remained remarkably homogeneous through the ˜66 m.y. recorded history of the chain. This is also supported by Nd and Sr isotope data for these samples. The mantle source must have been enriched in elements such as K, Rb, Ba, Y, REE relative to the source for N-MORB or to "primitive" mantle. The LSC seamounts have evolved through a petrologic sequence like that of the Hawaiian and Samoan Chains, but the long term homogeneity of the mantle source of LSC mag mas is in marked contrast to the heterogeneous mantle implied by the petrology of Hawaiian and Samoan volcanoes. A hotspot origin for the LSC seems likely: there may be an active "Loihi counterpart" yet to be found at the southeastern end of the chain.

  18. On the Basic Principles of Igneous Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    How and why Differentiation occurs has dominated Igneous Petrology since its beginning (~1880) even though many of the problems associated with it have been thoroughly solved. Rediscovery of the proverbial wheel with new techniques impedes progress. As soon as thin section petrography was combined with rock and mineral chemistry, rock diversity, compositional suites, and petrographic provinces all became obvious. The masterful 1902 CIPW norm in a real sense solved the chemical mystery of differentiation: rocks are related by the addition and subtraction of minerals in the anciently appreciated process of fractional crystallization. Yet few believed this, even after phase equilibria arrived. Assimilation, gas transfer, magma mixing, Soret diffusion, immiscibility, and other processes had strong adherents, even though by 1897 Becker conclusively showed the ineffectiveness of molecular diffusion in large-scale processes. The enormity of heat to molecular diffusion (today's Lewis no.) should have been convincing; but few paid attention. Bowen did, and he refined and restated the result; few still paid attention. And in spite of his truly masterful command of experiment and field relations in promoting fractional crystallization, Fenner and others fought him with odd arguments. The beauty of phase equilibria eventually dominated at the expense of knowing the physical side of differentiation. Bowen himself saw and struggled with the connection between physical and chemical processes. Progress has come from new concepts in heat transfer, kinetics, and slurry dynamics. The key approach is understanding the dynamic competition between spatial rates of solidification and all other processes. The lesson is clear: Scholarship and combined field, laboratory and technical expertise are critical to understanding magmatic processes. Magma is a limitlessly enchanting and challenging material wherein physical processes buttressed by chemistry govern.

  19. Virtual Congresses

    PubMed Central

    Lecueder, Silvia; Manyari, Dante E.

    2000-01-01

    A new form of scientific medical meeting has emerged in the last few years—the virtual congress. This article describes the general role of computer technologies and the Internet in the development of this new means of scientific communication, by reviewing the history of “cyber sessions” in medical education and the rationale, methods, and initial results of the First Virtual Congress of Cardiology. Instructions on how to participate in this virtual congress, either actively or as an observer, are included. Current advantages and disadvantages of virtual congresses, their impact on the scientific community at large, and future developments and possibilities in this area are discussed. PMID:10641960

  20. The petrographic microscope: Evolution of a mineralogical research instrument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The petrographic microscope, designed to observe and measure the optical properties of minerals as a means of identifying them, has provided a foundation for mineralogical and petrological research for more than 120 years. Much of what is known today in these fields is attributable to this instrument, the development of which paralleled an evolution of fundamental optical theory and its correlation with mineral structure and composition. This instrument and its related accessories have evolved through a range of models and designs, which are in themselves distinctive for their scientific function and elegant construction, and are today prized by collectors of scientific instruments.

  1. Virtual Laboratories and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Piet

    2008-05-01

    Since we cannot put stars in a laboratory, astrophysicists had to wait till the invention of computers before becoming laboratory scientists. For half a century now, we have been conducting experiments in our virtual laboratories. However, we ourselves have remained behind the keyboard, with the screen of the monitor separating us from the world we are simulating. Recently, 3D on-line technology, developed first for games but now deployed in virtual worlds like Second Life, is beginning to make it possible for astrophysicists to enter their virtual labs themselves, in virtual form as avatars. This has several advantages, from new possibilities to explore the results of the simulations to a shared presence in a virtual lab with remote collaborators on different continents. I will report my experiences with the use of Qwaq Forums, a virtual world developed by a new company (see http://www.qwaq.com).

  2. Petrological cycles and caldera-forming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Deering, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Many caldera-forming events can be framed within broad petrological cycles; volcanic stratigraphy typically defines a trend from mafic to more silicic magmas with time, culminating in the catastrophic evacuation of an upper crustal reservoir filled with the silicic magma, followed by a return to the eruption of more mafic magmas shortly after caldera collapse. Understanding how such cycles develop has clear implications for characterizing the current state of an active system. Here, we focus on a detailed examination of the well-exposed Quaternary Kos-Nisyros eruptive sequence (eastern Aegean arc) to frame a potential model for such cycles. On the basis of zircon U/Th/Pb ages, building the upper crustal magma chamber large enough to induce caldera collapse required at least a few hundred thousand years. This timeframe is necessary not only for the accumulation of large amounts of viscous, gas-rich silicic magma, but also to heat the upper crust sufficiently to allow the developing reservoir to be maintained above the solidus. In the Kos-Nisyros volcanic center, small eruptions precede the caldera-forming event and mark this period of thermal maturation as the system transitions from intermediate to silicic magma, reaching the most-evolved state only shortly prior to the caldera-forming event, the Kos Plateau Tuff (> 60 km3 of volatile-rich, high-silica rhyolite). The Kos Plateau Tuff was then followed by small-volume eruptions of more mafic magma (basaltic andesite, andesite, and dacites) that are characterized by a drier mineral assemblage. With time, the system transitioned back to cold, wet, high-SiO2 rhyolite. We suggest that the changes in magma composition and mineralogy following the caldera-forming event are due to a near-complete crystallization of the non-erupted mush in the upper crustal reservoir as it is abruptly decompressed during eruption. This rapid crystallization (1) leads to the formation of a porphyritic texture in the crystalline residual - a

  3. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  4. Virtually Possible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Diane Lewis began building her popular virtual education program in a storage closet. The drab room, just big enough to squeeze in a tiny table, was her office at the headquarters of Seminole County (Florida) Public Schools. She had a computer and a small staff of temporary workers. Lewis, who managed to open two successful virtual schools for…

  5. The Mineralogy and Petrology of Anomalous Eucrite Emmaville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ross, D. K.; Greenwood, R. C.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Grady, M. M.; Charlier, B. L. A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that certain basaltic achondrites share similarities with eucrites. These eucrite-like achondrites have distinct isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics indicative of formation on a separate parent body from the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller isotopic variations but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The Emmaville eucrite has a delta O-17 value of -0.137 plus or minus 0.024 per mille (1 sigma), which is substantially different from the eucrite mean of -0.246 plus or minus 0.014 per mille (2 sigma), but similar to those of A-881394 and Bunburra Rockhole (BR). Currently little data exist for Emmaville in terms of petrology or bulk composition. Studying anomalous eucrites allows us to more completely understand the numbers of asteroids represented by eucrite- like basalts and thus constrain the heterogeneity of the HED suite. In this study, we present our preliminary petrological and mineral composition results for Emmaville.

  6. A Simulated Research Problem for Undergraduate Metamorphic Petrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenta, Roddy V.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a laboratory problem in metamorphic petrology designed to simulate a research experience. The problem deals with data on scales ranging from a geologic map to hand specimens to thin sections. Student analysis includes identifying metamorphic index minerals, locating their isograds on the map, and determining the folding sequence. (BC)

  7. Mesosiderites: A Chronologic and Petrologic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    1992-07-01

    Recent petrologic, chemical, and isotopic analyses of mesosiderite clasts and whole rocks allow construction of the evolutionary history of the mesosiderite parent body (MPB) as shown in the figure. I. Initial Melting ~4.56 Ga Ago. Numerous chronologic measurements indicate that initial melting of the MPB occurred shortly after accretion, at about the same time that the eucrites and angrites formed. For example, a zircon grain from a basaltic clast in Vaca Muerta yielded a Pb-Pb age of 4.563 Ga (Ireland and Wlotzka, 1992). The 4.56-Ga event on the MPB is probably responsible for forming the monogenic basaltic clasts that compositionally resemble typical eucrites (Rubin and Mittlefehldt, 1992). II. Crustal Remelting ~4.47 Ga Ago. Internal Sm-Nd isochron ages of 4.47 Ga have been determined for gabbroic pebble 12 from Vaca Muerta and a basaltic clast from Mt. Padbury (Stewart et al., 1991). Pebble 12 is one of many clasts in mesosiderites that are highly depleted in incompatible elements and probably represent remelted crustal rocks (Rubin and Mittlefehldt, 1992). Because variation of Fe/Mn with Fe/Mg in pyroxenes from these clasts follows a trend defined by FeO reduction from a melt (Mittlefehldt, 1990), and because the reducing agents (e.g., P) were likely to have been introduced during metal-silicate mixing, the age of pebble 12 indicates that metal-silicate mixing had to have occurred >=4.47 Ga ago. III. Localized Impact Melting 4.5-3.9 Ga Ago. Localized impact melting and metamorphism were widespread on the eucrite parent body as indicated by many ages that were partially or totally reset <4.56 Ga ago. Impact melt material is common in mesosiderites of all petrologic types, and ages between 4.5-3.9 Ga are preserved. Quench-textured pebble 5 from Vaca Muerta, which is likely to have formed from a localized impact melt of material resembling a cumulate eucrite (Rubin and Jerde, 1987), has an internal isochron age of 4.42 Ga (Stewart et al., 1992). The high

  8. Petrology and Geochemistry of LEW 88663 and PAT 91501: High Petrologic L Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Field, S. W.

    1993-07-01

    Primitive achondrites (e.g., Acapulco, Lodran) are believed to be highly metamorphosed chondritic materials, perhaps up to the point of anatexis in some types. Low petrologic grade equivalents of these achondrites are unknown, so the petrologic transition from chondritic to achondritic material cannot be documented. However, there are rare L chondrites of petrologic grade 7 that may have experienced igneous processes, and study of these may yield information relevant to the formation of primitive achondrites, and perhaps basaltic achondrites, from chondritic precursors. We have begun the study of the L7 chondrites LEW 88663 and PAT 91501 as part of our broader study of primitive achondrites. Here, we present our preliminary petrologic and geochemical data on these meteorites. Petrology and Mineral Compositions: LEW 88663 is a granular achondrite composed of equant, subhedral to anhedral olivine grains poikilitically enclosed in networks of orthopyroxene and plagioclase. Small grains of clinopyroxene are spatially associated with orthopyroxene. Troilite occurs as large anhedral and small rounded grains. The smaller troilite grains are associated with the orthopyroxene-plagioclase networks. PAT 91501 is a vesicular stone containing centimeter-sized troilite +/- metal nodules. Its texture consists of anhedral to euhedral olivine grains, anhedral orthopyroxene grains (some with euhedral clinopyroxene overgrowths), anhedral to euhedral clinopyroxene, and interstitial plagioclase and SiO2-Al2O3-K2O- rich glass. In some areas, olivine is poikilitically enclosed in orthopyroxene. Fine-grained troilite, metal, and euhedral chromite occur interstitial to the silicates. Average mineral compositions for LEW 88663 are olivine Fo(sub)75.8, orthopyroxene Wo(sub)3.4En(sub)76.2Fs(sub)20.4, clinopyroxene Wo(sub)42.6En(sub)47.8Fs(sub)9.6, plagioclase Ab(sub)75.0An(sub)21.6Or(sub)3.4. Mineral compositions for PAT 91501 are olivine Fo(sub)73.8, orthopyroxene Wo(sub)4.5En(sub)74.8Fs

  9. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  10. Virtual seminars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, H. Roice

    1997-06-01

    A virtual seminar (SM) is an economic and effective instructional tool for teaching students who are at a distance from their instructor. Like conventional class room teaching, a virtual seminar requires an instructor, a student, and a method of communication. Teleconferencing, video conferencing, intranets and the Internet give learners in a Virtual Seminar the ability to interact immediately with their mentors and receive real and relevant answers. This paper shows how industry and academia can benefit from using methods developed and experience gained in presenting the first virtual seminars to academic and petroleum industry participants in mid-1996. The information explosion in industry means that business or technical information is worthless until it is assimilated into a corporate knowledge management system. A search for specific information often turns into a filtering exercise or an attempt to find patterns and classify retrieved material. In the setting of an interactive corporate information system, virtual seminars meet the need for a productive new relationship between creative people and the flux of corporate knowledge. Experience shows that it is more efficient to circulate timesensitive and confidential information electronically through a virtual seminar. Automating the classification of information and removing that task from the usual work load creates an electronic corporate memory and enhances the value of the knowledge to both users and a corporation. Catalogued benchmarks, best-practice standards, and Knowledge Maps (SM) of experience serve as key aids to communicating knowledge through virtual seminars and converting that knowledge into a profit-making asset.

  11. A Virtual Tour of Virtual Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Lottie L.

    2002-01-01

    Briefly describes the eight virtual schools in the United States: Kentucky Virtual High School; Illinois Virtual High School; Florida Virtual School; CCS Web Academy in Fayetteville, North Carolina; The Virtual High School in Hudson, Massachusetts; Basehor-Linwood Virtual Charter School in Kansas; Monte Vista Online Academy in Colorado; and…

  12. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  13. Virtual Colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... virtual colonoscopy include exposure to radiation perforation—a hole or tear in the lining of the colon ... colonoscopy include exposure to radiation and perforation—a hole or tear in the lining of the colon. [ ...

  14. Virtual Worlds for Virtual Organizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoten, Diana; Lutters, Wayne

    The members and resources of a virtual organization are dispersed across time and space, yet they function as a coherent entity through the use of technologies, networks, and alliances. As virtual organizations proliferate and become increasingly important in society, many may exploit the technical architecture s of virtual worlds, which are the confluence of computer-mediated communication, telepresence, and virtual reality originally created for gaming. A brief socio-technical history describes their early origins and the waves of progress followed by stasis that brought us to the current period of renewed enthusiasm. Examination of contemporary examples demonstrates how three genres of virtual worlds have enabled new arenas for virtual organizing: developer-defined closed worlds, user-modifiable quasi-open worlds, and user-generated open worlds. Among expected future trends are an increase in collaboration born virtually rather than imported from existing organizations, a tension between high-fidelity recreations of the physical world and hyper-stylized imaginations of fantasy worlds, and the growth of specialized worlds optimized for particular sectors, companies, or cultures.

  15. Virtual memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Virtual memory was conceived as a way to automate overlaying of program segments. Modern computers have very large main memories, but need automatic solutions to the relocation and protection problems. Virtual memory serves this need as well and is thus useful in computers of all sizes. The history of the idea is traced, showing how it has become a widespread, little noticed feature of computers today.

  16. Virtual polytopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panina, G. Yu; Streinu, I.

    2015-12-01

    Originating in diverse branches of mathematics, from polytope algebra and toric varieties to the theory of stressed graphs, virtual polytopes represent a natural algebraic generalization of convex polytopes. Introduced as elements of the Grothendieck group associated to the semigroup of convex polytopes, they admit a variety of geometrizations. The present survey connects the theory of virtual polytopes with other geometrical subjects, describes a series of geometrizations together with relations between them, and gives a selection of applications. Bibliography: 50 titles.

  17. Data-driven Science in Geochemistry & Petrology: Vision & Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Spear, F. S.

    2013-12-01

    measurements, experiments, and models, both from past and from present studies, and their poor discoverability, interoperability, and standardization. Other deficiencies include the lack of widespread sample curation and online sample catalogs, and broad community support and enforcement of open data sharing policies and a strategy for sustained funding and operation of the cyberinfrastructure. In order to achieve true data-driven science in geochemistry and petrology, one of the primary requirements is to change the way data and models are managed and shared to dramatically improve their access and re-usability. Adoption of new data publication practices, new ways of citing data that ensure attribution and credit to authors, tools that help investigators to seamlessly manage their data throughout the data life cycle, from the point of acquisition to upload to repositories, and population of databases with historical data are among the most urgent needs. The community, especially early career scientists, must work together to produce the cultural shift within the discipline toward sharing of data and knowledge, virtual collaboration, and social networking. Dziewonski, A M, & Anderson, D L: Physics of the Earth and Planet Interiors 25 (4), 297 (1981) Hey, T, Tansley, S, Tolle, K (Eds.): Redmond, VA: Microsoft Research (2009) Zindler, A, & Hart, S R: Ann. Rev. Earth Plan. Sci. 14, 493 (1986)

  18. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  19. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Martian Meteorites: Petrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Martian Meteorites: Petrology: included the following reports:Volatile Behavior in Lunar and Terrestrial Basalts During Shock: Implications for Martian Magmas; Problems with a Low-Pressure Tholeiitic Magmatic History for the Chassigny Dunite; Fast Cooling History of the Chassigny Martian Meteorite; Rehomogenized Interstitial and Inclusion Melts in Lherzolitic Shergottite ALH 77005: Petrologic Significance; Compositional Controls on the Formation of Kaersutite Amphibole in Shergottite Meteorites; Chemical Characteristics of an Olivine-Phyric Shergottite, Yamato 980459; Pb-Hf-Sr-Nd Isotopic Systematics and Age of Nakhlite NWA 998; Noble Gases in Two Samples of EETA 79001 (Lith. A); Experimental Constraints on the Iron Content of the Martian Mantle; and Mars as the Parent Body for the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites: New Data.

  20. Petrologic and Chemical Characterization of a Suite of Antarctic Diogenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Mertzman, S. A.; Peng, Z. X.; Mertzman, K. R.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of diogenites, ultramafic cumulates related to eucrites, is an unresolved problem [1]. Most diogenites are orthopyroxenites, a few are harzburgites [2], and some are transitional to cumulate eucrites [1, 3]. Cumulate eucrites are gabbros formed by crystal fractionation from basaltic eucrites [4]. The consensus view is that basaltic eucrites are residual melts from global-magma-ocean crystallization on their parent asteroid [4] which is plausibly Vesta [5]. However, the petrologic and compositional characteristics of diogenites seem to preclude a magma ocean origin [1, 4]. We are doing a petrologic and chemical study of new or unusual diogenites with the ultimate goals of constraining their genesis, and the geologic evolution of Vesta.

  1. Exploration petrology of Sunoco Felda trend of south Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.

    1986-09-01

    The Sunoco Felda oil trend of the South Florida basin has been a prolific oil producer. All the oil is produced from the Cretaceous Sunniland formation, a leached limestone bioherm. Although the producing section has been considered reefal in the literature, petrographic and biostratigraphic analyses of various cores in producing fields have determined that these deposits are composed of particles of fragmented rudist and other fauna deposited in a tidal shoal. Atop this debris an algae and gastropod section has been deposited, typical of a mound deposited on a tidal mud flat. This model is exemplified in the Sunoco Felda and West Sunoco fields and was used in exploring the Sunoco Felda trend. From the petrological analysis of these two fields and from knowledge of other wells in the basin, biostratigraphic and lithologic trends can be determined and extended offshore into the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The author stresses petrology in exploring the Sunniland formation because correlating like responses on electric logs does not always result in correlating the same depositional facies - in fact, correlating like electric log responses in the Sunniland formation often results in correlating different facies. This study endeavors to analyze the Felda trend based on the petrological and petrophysical information obtained from the cores and logs. The author will show that the potential of the Sunniland formation may be greater than expected and that it may be the site of future major discoveries.

  2. Petrological evidence for secular cooling in mantle plumes.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Claude; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-04-01

    Geological mapping and geochronological studies have shown much lower eruption rates for ocean island basalts (OIBs) in comparison with those of lavas from large igneous provinces (LIPs) such as oceanic plateaux and continental flood provinces. However, a quantitative petrological comparison has never been made between mantle source temperature and the extent of melting for OIB and LIP sources. Here we show that the MgO and FeO contents of Galapagos-related lavas and their primary magmas have decreased since the Cretaceous period. From petrological modelling, we infer that these changes reflect a cooling of the Galapagos mantle plume from a potential temperature of 1,560-1,620 degrees C in the Cretaceous to 1,500 degrees C at present. Iceland also exhibits secular cooling, in agreement with previous studies. Our work provides quantitative petrological evidence that, in general, mantle plumes for LIPs with Palaeocene-Permian ages were hotter and melted more extensively than plumes of more modern ocean islands. We interpret this to reflect episodic flow from lower-mantle domains that are lithologically and geochemically heterogeneous. PMID:19340079

  3. Operating microscope, microsurgical instruments and microsutures.

    PubMed

    Chacha, P B

    1979-10-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of operating microscope, microsurgical instruments and microsutures is most essential for any beginner in this field. Magnification provided by an operation microscope is higher and variable to suit microsurgical procedures. Although zoom magnification and focussing are preferable for convenience, microscopes with manual controls can be used for clinical and experimental work. A beam splitter and camera equipment are essential accessories. Microsurgical instruments are delicate and expensive and must be bought with discretion and carefully protected. Fine dissecting forceps, needle holder, microscissors, microvascular clamps and clips and fine haemostats are the only essential instruments. Others are optional. Microsutures form the most expensive part of the microsurgical setup. 10-0polyamide suture mounted on a curved round bodied needle of 4 or 5 mm length is adequate for virtually all clinical and experimental microsurgical work. PMID:539800

  4. Virtual Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, R.A.

    1997-08-01

    The primary responsibility of an intrusion detection system (IDS) operator is to monitor the system, assess alarms, and summon and coordinate the response team when a threat is acknowledged. The tools currently provided to the operator are somewhat limited: monitors must be switched, keystrokes must be entered to call up intrusion sensor data, and communication with the response force must be maintained. The Virtual tower is an operator interface assembled from low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and software; it enables large amounts of data to be displayed in a virtual manner that provides instant recognition for the operator and increases assessment accuracy in alarm annunciator and control systems. This is accomplished by correlating and fusing the data into a 360-degree visual representation that employs color, auxiliary attributes, video, and directional audio to prompt the operator. The Virtual Tower would be a valuable low-cost enhancement to existing systems.

  5. Virtual Violence.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, exposure to media violence is becoming an inescapable component of children's lives. With the rise in new technologies, such as tablets and new gaming platforms, children and adolescents increasingly are exposed to what is known as "virtual violence." This form of violence is not experienced physically; rather, it is experienced in realistic ways via new technology and ever more intense and realistic games. The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to be concerned about children's exposure to virtual violence and the effect it has on their overall health and well-being. This policy statement aims to summarize the current state of scientific knowledge regarding the effects of virtual violence on children's attitudes and behaviors and to make specific recommendations for pediatricians, parents, industry, and policy makers. PMID:27432848

  6. The Athena Microscopic Imager Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Aquyres, S. W.; Bell, J. F., III; Maki, J. N.; Arneson, H. M.; Brown, D. I.; Collins, S. A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliot, S. T.; Geotz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI) [1]. The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD; see Figure 1).The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400 - 700 nm; see Table 1). Technically, the microscopic imager is not a microscope: it has a fixed magnification of 0.4 and is intended to produce images that simulate a geologist s view through a common hand lens. In photographers parlance, the system makes use of a macro lens. The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras [2, 3] but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 31 mm across a 1024 1024 pixel CCD image (Figure 2). The MI acquires images using only solar or skylightillumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Because the MI has a relatively small depth of field (3 mm), a single MI image of a rough surface will contain both focused and unfocused areas. Coarse focusing will be achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor is activated. Multiple images taken at various distances will be acquired to ensure good focus on all parts of rough surfaces. By combining a set of images acquired in this way, a completely focused image can be assembled. Stereoscopic observations can be obtained by moving the MI laterally relative to its boresight. Estimates of the position and orientation of the MI for each acquired image will be stored in the rover computer and returned to Earth with the image data. The MI optics will be protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm

  7. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  8. Application of Automated SEM-EDS Based Mineral Identification Systems to Problems in Metamorphic Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, Robert; Barrow, Wendy; Rollinson, Gavyn

    2010-05-01

    Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) based mineral identification systems such as QEMSCAN have been in development for over 20 years, primarily as a tool to understand mineral liberation and element distribution in metal mining industry. This powerful technique is now being used in non mining applications such as metamorphic petrology where accurate mineral identification and metamorphic fabrics are key to deciphering the metamorphic history of samples. The QEMSCAN was developed by CSIRO for application in the mining industry where it is used to understand mineralogy, texture, mineral associations, the presence of gangue minerals and deleterious elements that may potentially interfere with mineral processing and planning, and the overall impact of mineralogy on grinding and flotation processes. It is capable of identifying most rock-forming minerals in milliseconds from their characteristic x-ray spectra. The collected x-ray spectra are compared to entries in a database containing the species identification profiles (SIPs) and are assigned a label accordingly. QEMSCAN is capable of searching large sample areas at high resolution resulting in the accurate and precise determination of all minerals present. Reports that were originally developed for the mining geologist can be equally useful to the petrologist, e.g. phase/mineral maps, modal mineral abundances and mineral association reports. Identification of key minerals is of great importance to determining the petrologic history of a sample. These key minerals may be few in number and present as small microinclusions (less than 100 μm) making them difficult to identify, if at all, with the petrographic microscope. Therefore, imaging by electron-microprobe or scanning electron microscope are the methods traditionally used. However, because of the small field of view available on these instruments at a magnification necessary to resolve micron sized relicts and

  9. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. ||; Papp, A.L. III |

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one`s application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  10. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Cancer Center, Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Davis, CA ); Papp, A.L. III Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one's application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  11. Recurrence tracking microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Saif, Farhan

    2006-03-15

    In order to probe nanostructures on a surface we present a microscope based on the quantum recurrence phenomena. A cloud of atoms bounces off an atomic mirror connected to a cantilever and exhibits quantum recurrences. The times at which the recurrences occur depend on the initial height of the bouncing atoms above the atomic mirror, and vary following the structures on the surface under investigation. The microscope has inherent advantages over existing techniques of scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope. Presently available experimental technology makes it possible to develop the device in the laboratory.

  12. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  13. Virtualize Me!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2009-01-01

    John Abdelmalak, director of technology for the School District of the Chathams, was pretty sure it was time to jump on the virtualization bandwagon last year when he invited Dell to conduct a readiness assessment of his district's servers. When he saw just how little of their capacity was being used, he lost all doubt. Abdelmalak is one of many…

  14. Virtual Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the potential of computers in teaching laboratories to spare the lives of animals; however, it is felt that in areas of physiology education, virtual labs are not as desirable a learning experience for advanced students as live animal labs. (Author/AIM)

  15. Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the current state of the art in virtual reality (VR), its historical background, and future possibilities. Highlights include applications in medicine, art and entertainment, science, business, and telerobotics; and VR for information science, including graphical display of bibliographic data, libraries and books, and cyberspace.…

  16. The Light Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the function of the various parts of the microscope and their integration in the formation of an optical image. Presents a procedure for setting up a microscope to obtain maximum resolution and contrast for each objective lens at all magnifications. (JRH)

  17. Photography through the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how to illuminate and optically stain slides for microscope use and how to interface a 35mm camera with a microscope using an adaptor. Provides equipment descriptions and sources, details about illumination, image formation, darkfield adaptors, centerable filter adaptors, darkfield stops, rheinburg filters, and choosing specimens to…

  18. Mailing microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  19. Surface imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  20. The Homemade Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Roger C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Directions for the building of a pocket microscope that will make visible the details of insect structure and living bacteria are described. Background information on the history of microscopes and lenses is provided. The procedures for producing various types of lenses are included. (KR)

  1. Petrological Investigations of CAIs from Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Lorenz, C. A.; Korochantseva, E. V.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2010-03-01

    Several new big CAIs were extracted from the Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 chondrites to analyze petrology, chemistry and isotopic compositions. Here we report preliminary results on mineralogy, petrology and bulk chemistry of two CAIs, of Type B1 and of Type A.

  2. Petrologic and oxygen isotopic study of ALH 85085-like chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, M.; Weisberg, M. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Ebihara, M.

    1994-07-01

    Four meteorites (PAT 91546, PCA 91328, PCA 91452, PCA 91467) petrologically similar to ALH 85085 chondrite have now been found. Previous studies of ALH 85085 showed it be a new kind of CR-related microchondrule-bearing chondrite, although one called it a sub-chondrite. The purpose of this study is to learn more about ALH 85085-like meteorites and their relationship to CR and CR-related (LEW 85332, Acfer 182, Bencubbin) chondrites. The methods used included petrology, INA bulk chemical analysis (PAT 91546, PCA 91467), and O isotopic analyses of the whole rocks and separated chondrules and dark inclusions (DIs) from PAT 91546. Since microchondrules and fragments are approximately 20 microns it was necessary to analyze composite samples for O; one was of approximately 100 chondrules, and another was of 5 DIs. Petrologically, the four meteorites are similar to ALH 85085, and there is no basis for determining if all of them, or any combinations, are paired. Mineralogically, olivine and pyroxene are highly magnesian FeNi metal generally has 3-10% Ni, and has a positive Ni-Co correlation similar to that in CR and CR-related chondrites. Refractory inclusions are similar in size to the chondrules and have the following assemblages: (1) hibonite-perovskite, (2) melilite-fassaite-forsterite, (3) grossite (Ca-dialuminate)-melilite-perovskite, (4) spinel-melilite, and (5) spinel-pyroxene aggregates. Chemically, INA analyses indicate that PAT 91546 and PCA 91467 are generally similar to ALH 85085. Oxygen isotopic analyses of the four whole-rock compositions fall along the CR mixing line as does ALH 85085; they are also close to LEW 85332, Acfer 182, and Bencubbin. This supports the concept that these are all CR-related chondrites. Even stronger support is found in the compositions of the chondrules and DIs in PAT 91546, which also plot on or near the CR line.

  3. Linking petrology and seismology of the southwest Greenland lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesher, C. E.; Vestergaard, C.; Brown, E.; Schutt, D.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths from late-Proterozoic diamond-bearing kimberlitic dikes in the Kangerlussuaq, Sarfartoq and Maniitsoq areas of southwestern Greenland provide constraints on the composition and thermal state of lithospheric mantle beneath Greenland to depths of ~200 km [1]. Similarly, surface wave tomography studies carried out as part of the GLATIS project use a range of Rayleigh wave periods sensitive to structures at a similar depth interval within southwestern Greenland lithospheric mantle [2]. Here we link petrologic and seismologic constraints on the mantle lithosphere beneath Greenland utilizing methods of [3] that show that inferred chemical and mineralogical stratification inferred from petrology, showing mantle peridotite transitioning from garnet-free harzburgite to garnet lherzolite between ~70 and 180 km, cannot readily be resolved with fundamental mode Rayleigh waves. On the other hand, comparing phase velocities predicted from xenolith compositions, mineralogy and last equilibration temperatures and pressures, defining the continental geotherm during late-Proterozoic time, with those for the present-day mantle lithosphere suggest significant cooling of the cratonic mantle to a modern geotherm characterized by a heat flux of 30 mW/m2 and average crustal heat production of 0.3 mW/m3 [4]. These preliminary findings point to the weak dependence of shear wave velocities on mantle peridotite composition and mineralogy, and further illustrate its strong temperature dependence. Comparison of ancient and modern continental geotherms made possible by combining petrologic and seismological data, as shown here for southwest Greenland, provide additional constraints on secular cooling of cratonic regions linked to large-scale tectonic processes. [1] Bizzarro et al., 2003, CMP, 146; Sand et al., Lithos, 112. [2] Darbyshire et al., 2004, GJI, 158. [3] Schutt and Lesher, 2006, JGR, 111. [4] Meirerbachtol et al., 2015, JGR/ES, 120.

  4. Geochemical and petrological observations of gas transport at arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Herd, R. A.; Humphreys, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Guida, R.; Moretti, R.; Christopher, T. E.; Rawson, H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the abundance and composition of vapour in magma chambers and the mechanisms of vapour transport in volcanic systems is of immense importance. Exsolved vapour in a magma storage area affects eruption style and duration, and influences ground deformation and other geophysical manifestations owing to its compressibility. Ultimately, we wish to understand how much pre-eruptive exsolved vapour exists and what role mafic magma supply at depth plays in supplying it. Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, has become an exceptionally well-monitored volcanic system and there is now an abundance of detailed geochemical and petrological information regarding magma degassing and gas transport processes. The eruption provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of open system mafic magma injection, mingling and degassing, which is occurring on the same time scale as eruption. We examine the geochemical and petrological evidence for magma mingling, degassing and gas fluxing at Soufriere Hills Volcano. We use measurements of gas flux and composition, using DOAS and a multigas sensor. We examine petrological and textural evidence for mafic magma supplying volatiles to the system, including evidence from phenocryst zoning and composition. We show that the mafic magma supplies volatiles as well as heat to the overlying resident andesite. Due to the strong partitioning of sulphur into a vapour phase at depth under oxidising conditions, the sulphur dissolved in the intruding mafic magma becomes segregated into vapour, along with carbon dioxide and water. The vapour is transported to the surface during both eruptive and non-eruptive periods, implying either that significant permeability exists within the system, or that magma convection operates. There is some evidence for gas fluxing, which suggests that gas may be transported through the magma. We draw comparisons with other recent studies of volatile transport in arc systems to show that some observations may be

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy: A promising tool for carbonate petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Vice, M.A.; Bensley, D.F.; Utgaard, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Responses of depositional and diagenetic components in samples of the Mission Canyon Limestone to blue-light excitation vary most noticeably with mineralogy and crystal size. The finely crystalline micrites, dolomicrites and argillaceous carbonates fluoresce more intensely than the more coarsely crystalline sparry calcite cements, dolospar cements and coarsely crystalline dolomites. Low intensity spectral analysis of cherts, anhydrites, and the carbonate phases provides an objective manner for quantifying fluorescence responses and for comparing them statistically. Nineteen of the optical parameters used in organic petrology are evaluated for their utility in carbonate petrology. Results of the discriminant function analysis suggest that red-weighted fluorescence chromaticity indices and yellow-weighted ones are more useful for mineral identification than the blue-weighted or equal-energy chromaticity indices. Statistical analysis of the optical data, mineralogy, and minor element compositions suggests correlations between the fluorescence responses and major minerals, carbonate diagenetic components, and the minor element geochemistry of carbonate components. Although no single element is identified as an activator of fluorescence in this study, the complex correlations of optical indices with Fe suggest that it does act to quench fluorescence. The four fluorescence cy chromaticity indices correlate significantly and positively with mineralogy and negatively with MgCo[sub 3]. In organic petrology, these indices are related to maceral content. The positive correlations of the four fluorescence cx chromaticity indices with Fe and Mn likely reflect fluorescence response to changes in compositions of pore fluids during diagenesis. This trend parallels the increase in cx indices with increasing maturation of organic materials.

  6. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Chen, Bean T.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Newton, George J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency.

  7. Virtual anthropology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  8. Petrology of Two Itokawa Particles: Comparison with Equilibrated LL Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Arai, T.; Fagan, T. J.; Zolensky, M.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K.; Karouji, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A strong link between Itokawa particles and LL chondrites was confirmed by preliminary examinations of Hayabusa particles [e.g., 1, 2]. Both poorly equilibrated and highly equilibrated particles have been found among the grains returned from Itokawa [1], and it is suggested that they correspond to LL4 and LL5-6, respectively. Here we report the petrography of two Itokawa particles and TEM study of one, and compare them to Antarctic LL chondrites with variable petrologic types (LL4-LL7) in order to understand the metamorphic history of asteroid Itokawa.

  9. The mineralogy and petrology of the Luna 20 soil sample.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kridelbaugh, S. J.; Weill, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    The lithologic types found in the soil at the Luna site are characterized, and their mineralogical and petrological significance is discussed. Chemically, the Luna 20 and Apollo 16 soil samples are similar, but the Luna 20 soil is slightly depleted in aluminum and calcium and enriched in iron and magnesium relative to the Apollo 16 soils. This slight difference may be a result of the presence of a minor amount of mare material in the Luna 20 soil and its apparent absence in the Apollo 16 soils.

  10. Mineralogy and Petrology of COMET WILD2 Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Bland, Phil; Bradley, John; Brearley, Adrian; Brennan, Sean; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald; Butterworth, Anna; Dai, Zurong; Ebel, Denton

    2006-01-01

    The sample return capsule of the Stardust spacecraft will be recovered in northern Utah on January 15, 2006, and under nominal conditions it will be delivered to the new Stardust Curation Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center two days later. Within the first week we plan to begin the harvesting of aerogel cells, and the comet nucleus samples they contain for detailed analysis. By the time of the LPSC meeting we will have been analyzing selected removed grains for more than one month. This presentation will present the first results from the mineralogical and petrological analyses that will have been performed.

  11. Optical microscopic imaging based on VRML language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuedian; Zhang, Zhenyi; Sun, Jun

    2009-11-01

    As so-called VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language), is a kind of language used to establish a model of the real world or a colorful world made by people. As in international standard, VRML is the main kind of program language based on the "www" net building, which is defined by ISO, the kind of MIME is x-world or x-VRML. The most important is that it has no relationship with the operating system. Otherwise, because of the birth of VRML 2.0, its ability of describing the dynamic condition gets better, and the interaction of the internet evolved too. The use of VRML will bring a revolutionary change of confocal microscope. For example, we could send different kinds of swatch in virtual 3D style to the net. On the other hand, scientists in different countries could use the same microscope in the same time to watch the same samples by the internet. The mode of sending original data in the model of text has many advantages, such as: the faster transporting, the fewer data, the more convenient updating and fewer errors. In the following words we shall discuss the basic elements of using VRML in the field of Optical Microscopic imaging.

  12. Stereoscopic Video Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, James F.

    1980-11-01

    The new electronic technology of three-dimensional video combined with the established. science of microscopy has created. a new instrument. the Stereoscopic Video Microscope. The specimen is illuminated so the stereoscopic objective lens focuses the stereo-pair of images side-by-side on the video camera's pick-up, tube. The resulting electronic signal can be enhanced, digitized, colorized, quantified, its polarity reverse., and its gray scale expanJed non-linearally. The signal can be transmitted over distances and can be stored on video. tape for later playback. The electronic signal is converted to a stereo-pair of visual images on the video monitor's cathode-ray-tube. A stereo-hood is used to fuse the two images for three-dimensional viewing. The conventional optical microscope has definite limitations, many of which can be eliminated by converting the optical image to an electronic signal in the video microscope. The principal aHvantages of the Stereoscopic Video Microscope compared to the conventional optical microscope are: great ease of viewing; group viewing; ability to easily recohd; and, the capability of processing the electronic signal for video. enhancement. The applications cover nearly all fields of microscopy. These include: microelectronics assembly, inspection, and research; biological, metallurgical, and che.illical research; and other industrial and medical uses. The Stereo-scopic Video Microscope is particularly useful for instructional and recordkeeping purposes. The video microscope can be monoscopic or three dimensional.

  13. [Microscopic colitis: update 2014].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Fraga, Montserrat; Schoepfer, Alain M; Yun, Pu

    2014-09-01

    Microscopic colitis, which includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, represents a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea especially in the elderly population. Several medications, such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors or antidepressants, as well as cigarette smoking have been recognized as risk factors for microscopic colitis. The diagnosis of microscopic colitis is based on a macroscopically normal ileo-colonoscopy and several biopsies from the entire colon, which demonstrate the pathognomonic histopathologic findings. Therapy is mainly based on the use of budesonide. Other medications, such as mesalazine, cholestyramine and bismuth, have been evaluated as well but the evidence is less solid. PMID:25276996

  14. Mars Life? - Microscopic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the center of this electron microscope image of a small chip from a meteorite are several tiny structures that are possible microscopic fossils of primitive, bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  15. [Virtual microscopy systems: analysis and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Marín, Diana; Romero, Eduardo

    2011-03-01

    Microscopy has been constantly evolving since the end of the Twentieth Century, with the introduction of new resources which have improved its practice. For example, the use of the virtual microscope has reached a high level of maturity; it is a synergy among disciplines such as pathology, histology, medical informatics and image analysis. This technology has moved forward many paradigms in research, diagnosis, education and medical training. The virtual microscopy systems require the digitalization of a physical slide, using motorized microscopes, pre and post image processing, compression, transmission and visualization. This article provides an extensive analysis of each of these processes. The main characteristics of virtual microscopy are presented as well as the impact of these systems in image interpretation and in diagnostic activities. PMID:22159493

  16. Hyperspectral confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Haaland, David M.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a new, high performance, hyperspectral microscope for biological and other applications. For each voxel within a three-dimensional specimen, the microscope simultaneously records the emission spectrum from 500 nm to 800 nm, with better than 3 nm spectral resolution. The microscope features a fully confocal design to ensure high spatial resolution and high quality optical sectioning. Optical throughput and detection efficiency are maximized through the use of a custom prism spectrometer and a backside thinned electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) array. A custom readout mode and synchronization scheme enable 512-point spectra to be recorded at a rate of 8300 spectra per second. In addition, the EMCCD readout mode eliminates curvature and keystone artifacts that often plague spectral imaging systems. The architecture of the new microscope is described in detail, and hyperspectral images from several specimens are presented.

  17. Hyperspectral confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael B; Haaland, David M; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Jones, Howland D T

    2006-08-20

    We have developed a new, high performance, hyperspectral microscope for biological and other applications. For each voxel within a three-dimensional specimen, the microscope simultaneously records the emission spectrum from 500 nm to 800 nm, with better than 3 nm spectral resolution. The microscope features a fully confocal design to ensure high spatial resolution and high quality optical sectioning. Optical throughput and detection efficiency are maximized through the use of a custom prism spectrometer and a backside thinned electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) array. A custom readout mode and synchronization scheme enable 512-point spectra to be recorded at a rate of 8300 spectra per second. In addition, the EMCCD readout mode eliminates curvature and keystone artifacts that often plague spectral imaging systems. The architecture of the new microscope is described in detail, and hyperspectral images from several specimens are presented. PMID:16892134

  18. Computerized Measuring Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Thomas D.

    1980-05-01

    In the manufacturing of printed circuit boards, microscopic analysis is an essential process control activity. An inspector microscopically analyzes board samples to deter-mine board lot quality and process conditions. Prior to computerizing, this sustained measurement-taking involved the tedious process of recording raw data, converting microscope filar readings, calculating averages, logging information in a job notebook, and completing detailed final lab reports. It is evident from this brief task description that this time-consuming repetitious data recording routine was an added burden to the already fatiguing visual inspection method and therefore was a prime candidate for automatic data capture and printout. Secondly, the creation of a permanent and easily accessible data base would improve process feedback and provide for a system with quick identification of any suspect boards if further assembly/testing exhibited board-related failures. This paper describes the evolution and implementation of a computer-aided microscopic inspection operation.

  19. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  20. Geochemistry of Martian Meteorites and the Petrologic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    Mafic igneous rocks serve as probes of the interiors of their parent bodies - the compositions of the magmas contain an imprint of the source region composition and mineralogy, the melting and crystallization processes, and mixing and assimilation. Although complicated by their multifarious history, it is possible to constrain the petrologic evolution of an igneous province through compositional study of the rocks. Incompatible trace elements provide one means of doing this. I will use incompatible element ratios of martian meteorites to constrain the early petrologic evolution of Mars. Incompatible elements are strongly partitioned into the melt phase during igneous processes. The degree of incompatibility will differ depending on the mineral phases in equilibrium with the melt. Most martian meteorites contain some cumulus grains, but nevertheless, incompatible element ratios of bulk meteorites will be close to those of their parent magmas. ALH 84001 is an exception, and it will not be discussed. The martian meteorites will be considered in two groups; a 1.3 Ga group composed of the clinopyroxenites and dunite, and a younger group composed of all others.

  1. Silicate-melt inclusions in magmatic rocks: applications to petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria-Luce

    2001-01-01

    Silicate-melt inclusions in igneous rocks provide important information on the composition and evolution of magmatic systems. Such inclusions represent accidentally trapped silicate melt (±immiscible H 2O and/or CO 2 fluids) that allow one to follow the evolution of magmas through snapshots, corresponding to specific evolution steps. This information is available on condition that they remained isolated from the enclosing magma after their entrapment. The following steps of investigation are discussed: (a) detailed petrographic studies to characterise silicate-melt inclusion primary characters and posttrapping evolution, including melt crystallisation; (b) high temperature studies to rehomogenise the inclusion content and select chemically representative inclusions: chemical compositions should be compared to relevant phase diagrams. Silicate-melt inclusion studies allow us to concentrate on specific topics; inclusion studies in early crystallising phases allow the characterisation of primary magmas, while in more differentiated rocks, they unravel the subsequent chemical evolution. The distribution of volatile species (i.e., H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) in inclusion glass can provide information on the degassing processes and on recycling of subducted material. In intrusive rocks, silicate melt inclusions may preserve direct evidence of magmatic stage evolution (e.g., immiscibility phenomena). Melt inclusions in mantle xenoliths indicate that high-silica melts can coexist with mantle peridotites and give information on the presence of carbonate melt within the upper mantle. Thus, combining silicate-melt inclusion data with conventional petrological and geochemical information and experimental petrology can increase our ability to model magmatic processes.

  2. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  3. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  4. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  5. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  6. Virtual reflected-light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A P; Wong, C M; Joseph, D

    2011-12-01

    Research on better methods to digitally represent microscopic specimens has increased over recent decades. Opaque specimens, such as microfossils and metallurgic specimens, are often viewed using reflected light microscopy. Existing 3D surface estimation techniques for reflected light microscopy do not model reflectance, restricting the representation to only one illumination condition and making them an imperfect recreation of the experience of using an actual microscope. This paper introduces a virtual reflected-light microscopy (VRLM) system that estimates both shape and reflectance from a set of specimen images. When coupled with anaglyph creation, the system can depict both depth information and illumination cues under any desired lighting configuration. Digital representations are compact and easily viewed in an online setting. A prototype used to construct VRLM representations is comprised only of a microscope, a digital camera, a motorized stage and software. Such a system automatically acquires VRLM representations of large batches of specimens. VRLM representations are then disseminated in an interactive online environment, which allows users to change the virtual light source direction and type. Experiments demonstrate high quality VRLM representations of 500 microfossils. PMID:21919903

  7. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Chen, B.T.; Cheng, Y.S.; Newton, G.J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor is described having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent to the inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency. 4 figs.

  8. Virtual Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Françoise

    2011-06-01

    Astronomy has been at the forefront among scientific disciplines for the sharing of data, and the advent of the World Wide Web has produced a revolution in the way astronomers do science. The recent development of the concept of Virtual Observatory builds on these foundations. This is one of the truly global endeavours of astronomy, aiming at providing astronomers with seamless access to data and tools, including theoretical data. Astronomy on-line resources provide a rare example of a world-wide, discipline-wide knowledge infrastructure, based on internationally agreed interoperability standards.

  9. A portable laser photostimulation and imaging microscope

    PubMed Central

    Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a compact microscope that uses a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) to control the excitation laser light. The flexibility of SLMs, which can mimic virtually any optical transfer function, enables the experimenter to create, in software, arbitrary spatio-temporal light patterns, including focusing and beam scanning, simply by calculating the appropriate phase mask. Our prototype, a scan-less device with no moving parts, can be used for laser imaging or photostimulation, supplanting the need for an elaborate optical setup. As a proof of principle, we generate complex excitation patterns on fluorescent samples and also perform functional imaging of neuronal activity in living brain slices. PMID:20644244

  10. Optical versus virtual: teaching assistant perceptions of the use of virtual microscopy in an undergraduate human anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Collier, Larissa; Dunham, Stacey; Braun, Mark W; O'Loughlin, Valerie Dean

    2012-01-01

    Many studies that evaluate the introduction of technology in the classroom focus on student performance and student evaluations. This study focuses on instructor evaluation of the introduction of virtual microscopy into an undergraduate anatomy class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with graduate teaching assistants (TA) and analyzed through qualitative methods. This analysis showed that the teaching assistants found the virtual microscope to be an advantageous change in the classroom. They cite the ease of use of the virtual microscope, access to histology outside of designated laboratory time, and increasing student collaboration in class as the primary advantages. The teaching assistants also discuss principal areas where the use of the virtual microscope can be improved from a pedagogical standpoint, including requiring students to spend more time working on histology in class. PMID:22069298

  11. A Virtual Microscope for Academic Medical Education: The Pate Project

    PubMed Central

    Hundt, Christian; Schmitt, Volker H; Schömer, Elmar; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole-slide imaging (WSI) has become more prominent and continues to gain in importance in student teaching. Applications with different scope have been developed. Many of these applications have either technical or design shortcomings. Objective To design a survey to determine student expectations of WSI applications for teaching histological and pathological diagnosis. To develop a new WSI application based on the findings of the survey. Methods A total of 216 students were questioned about their experiences and expectations of WSI applications, as well as favorable and undesired features. The survey included 14 multiple choice and two essay questions. Based on the survey, we developed a new WSI application called Pate utilizing open source technologies. Results The survey sample included 216 students—62.0% (134) women and 36.1% (78) men. Out of 216 students, 4 (1.9%) did not disclose their gender. The best-known preexisting WSI applications included Mainzer Histo Maps (199/216, 92.1%), Histoweb Tübingen (16/216, 7.4%), and Histonet Ulm (8/216, 3.7%). Desired features for the students were latitude in the slides (190/216, 88.0%), histological (191/216, 88.4%) and pathological (186/216, 86.1%) annotations, points of interest (181/216, 83.8%), background information (146/216, 67.6%), and auxiliary informational texts (113/216, 52.3%). By contrast, a discussion forum was far less important (9/216, 4.2%) for the students. Conclusions The survey revealed that the students appreciate a rich feature set, including WSI functionality, points of interest, auxiliary informational texts, and annotations. The development of Pate was significantly influenced by the findings of the survey. Although Pate currently has some issues with the Zoomify file format, it could be shown that Web technologies are capable of providing a high-performance WSI experience, as well as a rich feature set. PMID:25963527

  12. Teaching Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Through Guided Inquiry Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate Petrology at New Mexico State University (GEOL 399) has been taught using three, 5-6 week long projects in place of lectures, lab, and exams for the last six years. Reasons for changing from the traditional format include: 1) to move the focus from identification and memorization to petrologic thinking; 2) the need for undergraduate students to apply basic chemical, structural, and field concepts to igneous and metamorphic rocks; 3) student boredom in the traditional mode by the topic that has captivated my professional life, in spite of my best efforts to offer thrilling lectures, problems, and labs. The course has three guided inquiry projects: volcanic, plutonic, and pelitic dynamothermal. Two of the rock suites are investigated during field trips. Each project provides hand samples and thin sections; the igneous projects also include whole-rock major and trace element data. Students write a scientific paper that classifies and describes the rocks, describes the data (mineralogical and geochemical), and uses data to interpret parameters such as tectonic setting, igneous processes, relationship to phase diagrams, geologic history, metamorphic grade, metamorphic facies, and polymetamorphic history. Students use the text as a major resource for self-learning; mini-lectures on pertinent topics are presented when needed by the majority of students. Project scores include evaluation of small parts of the paper due each Friday and participation in peer review as well as the final report. I have found that petrology is much more fun, although more difficult, to teach using this method. It is challenging to be totally prepared for class because students are working at different speeds on different levels on different aspects of the project. Students enjoy the course, especially the opportunity to engage in scientific investigation and debate. A significant flaw in this course is that students see fewer rocks and have less experience in rock classification

  13. A Magnetic Petrology Database for Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, K.; Wasilewski, P.; Didenko, A.; Genshaft, Y.; Pashkevich, I.

    2002-05-01

    A Magnetic Petrology Database (MPDB) is now being compiled at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in cooperation with Russian and Ukrainian Institutions. The purpose of this database is to provide the geomagnetic community with a comprehensive and user-friendly method of accessing magnetic petrology data via Internet for more realistic interpretation of satellite magnetic anomalies. Magnetic Petrology Data had been accumulated in NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, United Institute of Physics of the Earth (Russia) and Institute of Geophysics (Ukraine) over several decades and now consists of many thousands of records of data in our archives. The MPDB was, and continues to be in big demand especially since recent launching in near Earth orbit of the mini-constellation of three satellites - Oersted (in 1999), Champ (in 2000), and SAC-C (in 2000) which will provide lithospheric magnetic maps with better spatial and amplitude resolution (about 1 nT). The MPDB is focused on lower crustal and upper mantle rocks and will include data on mantle xenoliths, serpentinized ultramafic rocks, granulites, iron quartzites and rocks from Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic sequences from all around the world. A substantial amount of data is coming from the area of unique Kursk Magnetic Anomaly and Kola Deep Borehole (which recovered 12 km of continental crust). A prototype MPDB can be found on the Geodynamics Branch web server of Goddard Space Flight Center at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/magnpetr.html. The MPDB employs a searchable relational design and consists of 7 interrelated tables. The schema of database is shown at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/doc.html. MySQL database server was utilized to implement MPDB. The SQL (Structured Query Language) is used to query the database. To present the results of queries on WEB and for WEB programming we utilized PHP scripting language and CGI scripts. The prototype MPDB is designed to search database by major satellite magnetic

  14. Petrology and Geochemistry of D'Orbigny, Geochemistry of Sahara 99555, and the Origin of Angrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Killgore, Marvin; Lee, Michael T.

    2001-01-01

    We have done detailed petrologic study of the angrite, D'Orbigny, and geochemical study of it and Sahara 99555. D'Orbigny is an igneous-textured rock composed of Ca-rich olivine, Al-Ti-diopside-hedenbergite, subcalcic kirschsteinite, two generations of hercynitic spinel and anorthite, with the mesostasis phases ulv6spinel, Ca-phosphate, a silicophosphate phase and Fe-sulfide. We report an unknown Fe-Ca-Al-Ti-silicate phase in the mesostasis not previously found in angrites. One hercynitic spinel is a large, rounded homogeneous grain of a different composition than the euhedral and zoned grains. We believe the former is a xenocryst, the first such described from angrites. The mafic phases are highly zoned; mg# of cores for olivine are approx.64, and for clinopyroxene approx.58, and both are zoned to Mg-free rims. The Ca content of olivine increases with decreasing mg#, until olivine with approx.20 mole% Ca is overgrown by subcalcic kirschsteinite with Ca approx.30-35 mole%. Detailed zoning sequences in olivine-subcalcic kirschsteinite and clinopyroxene show slight compositional reversals. There is no mineralogic control that can explain these reversals, and we believe they were likely caused by local additions of more primitive melt during crystallization of D'Orbigny. D'Orbigny is the most ferroan angrite with a bulk rock mg# of 32. Compositionally, it is virtually identical to Sahara 99555; the first set of compositionally identical angrites. Comparison with the other angrites shows that there is no simple petrogenetic sequence, partial melting with or without fractional crystallization, that can explain the angrite suite. Angra dos Reis remains a very anomalous angrite. Angrites show no evidence for the brecciation, shock, or impact or thermal metamorphism that affected the HED suite and ordinary chondrites. This suggests the angrite parent body may have followed a fundamentally different evolutionary path than did these other parent bodies.

  15. Integrated elastic microscope device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. M.; Wright, D.; Watkins, R.; Cen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    The growing power of imaging and computing power of smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscopy system. High quality miniature microscopy lenses attached to smartphone are typically made with glass or plastics that can only be produce at low cost with high volume. To revise the paradigm of microscope lenses, we devised a simple droplet lens fabrication technique that which produces low cost and high performance lens. Each lens is integrated into thin 3-D printed holder with complimentary light emitted diode (LEDs) that clips onto majority of smartphones. The integrated device converts a smartphone into a high power optical microscope/dermatoscope at around $2. This low cost device has wide application in a multitude of practical uses such as material inspection, dermascope and educational microscope.

  16. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  17. Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses: Chemistry, petrology, and exotic origin

    SciTech Connect

    Delano, J.W.; Lindsley, D.H.; Ma, M.; Schmitt, R.A.

    1982-11-15

    The Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses are characterized by moderate TiO/sub 2/ (approx.4.8%) and high abundances of the large ion lithophile elements (e.g., K, P, Hf, Th, REE). Since the chemistry of these glasses cannot be duplicated by any combination of local components presently known to occur at the Apollo 15 landing site, these yellow glasses seem to be exotic to that area. Chemical and petrologic constraints suggest that these samples were produced by impact melting of an immature mare regolith developed upon an unusual variety of mare basalt. We speculate that the target basalt were the youngest lava flows known to exist on the moon (i.e., Eratosphenian-age lavas in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium). Specific tests are proposed for evaluating this provocative hypothesis.

  18. Petrological Explanations for the Magnetic Anomalies Detected on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery of crustal magnetization in some locations on Mars, particularly the southern highlands, has major implications for the early evolution of Mars. The east-west-trending linear features in the southern highlands with alternating polarity may be the result of an early seafloor spreading process similar to that seen on Earth today. The larger magnetization of the martian crust compared to the Earth can be attributed to its higher Fe content and the proposed minerals associated with this magnetization are multidomain hematite and pyrrhotite. In this study, we discuss the petrological evolution of basalts on Earth and Mars and suggest processes that may enhance crystallization of magnetic minerals in the martian rocks, thereby accounting for their intense magnetic properties.

  19. Lunar basalt meteorite EET 87521: Petrology of the clast population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenova, A. S.; Nazarov, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Elephant Moraine meteorite EET 87521 was classified as a lunar mare basalt breccia which is composed mainly of VLT basalt clasts. Here we report on our petrological study of lithic clasts and monomineralic fragments in the thin sections EET 87521,54 and EET 87521,47,1, which were prepared from the meteorite. The results of the study show that EET 87521 consists mainly of Al-rich ferrobasalt clasts and olivine pyroxenite clasts. The bulk composition of the meteorite can be well modelled by the mixing of these lithic components which appear to be differentiates of the Luna 25 basalt melt. KREEP and Mg-rich gabbro components are minor constituents of EET 87521.

  20. Lunar ferroan anorthosite 60025 - Petrology and chemistry of mafic lithologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.; Mcgee, J. J.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven splits from the mafic-mineral-rich part of anorthosite 60025 were studied in order to establish the exact nature and causes of compositional variations in the minerals of lunar ferroan anorthosites. All splits were analyzed by INAA, and five were studied intensively by petrologic techniques. All splits were found to have similar cataclastic textures and show textural evidence of at least two episodes of deformation. The whole-rock split contains mafic minerals having a wide range of compositions and is probably polymict. It is suggested that the rare-earth patterns for all splits can be duplicated safactorily, assuming that the equilibrium liquids had flat, or nearly flat, chondrite-normalized rare-earth patterns. The plagioclases in all splits were found to be identical. Data obtained indicate that in ferroan anorthosites An content in plagioclase and mg' of associated mafic minerals are not strongly correlated.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Odette B.; Flohr, Marta K.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed results of petrologic and compositional studies of three clasts found in thin sections of the Apollo 16 lunar breccia 67975 and of four clasts extracted from the breccia (for instrumental neutron activation analysis) prior to thin sectioning are reported. The alkali gabbronorites of the breccia form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. The magnesian gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase, hypersthene, augite, a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase, pigeonite, augite, Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent REE-rich magmas.

  2. Linking petrology and seismology at an active volcano.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate; Blundy, Jon; Dohmen, Ralf; Cashman, Kathy

    2012-05-25

    Many active volcanoes exhibit changes in seismicity, ground deformation, and gas emissions, which in some instances arise from magma movement in the crust before eruption. An enduring challenge in volcano monitoring is interpreting signs of unrest in terms of the causal subterranean magmatic processes. We examined over 300 zoned orthopyroxene crystals from the 1980-1986 eruption of Mount St. Helens that record pulsatory intrusions of new magma and volatiles into an existing larger reservoir before the eruption occurred. Diffusion chronometry applied to orthopyroxene crystal rims shows that episodes of magma intrusion correlate temporally with recorded seismicity, providing evidence that some seismic events are related to magma intrusion. These time scales are commensurate with monitoring signals at restless volcanoes, thus improving our ability to forecast volcanic eruptions by using petrology. PMID:22628652

  3. Petrology, chemistry, age and irradiation history of Luna 24 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Mcculloch, M. T.; Huneke, J. C.; Dymek, R. F.; Depaolo, D. J.; Chodos, A. A.; Albee, A. L.; Radicati Di Brozolo, F.

    1978-01-01

    The results of petrological, chemical, isotopic age determination and irradiation studies of sample 24170 from the 170 cm depth of the regolith core returned from Mare Crisium by Luna 24 are presented. The sample is found to be comprised of fragments from a single igneous rock, with mineralogical evidence indicating it to be a mare basalt. The crystallization age is determined by Sm-Nd and Ar(40)-Ar(39) ages to be 3.30 AE, establishing the presence of relatively young flows. All soil samples show low trace element compositions with minimum contamination by KREEPUTh-rich materials. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd relations reflect the absence of significant fractionation at ages younger than 4.5 AE. One soil sample shows extremely large neutron capture effects, imposing a new lower limit to the neutron production rate in the regolith and requiring the addition of irradiated materials from depth.

  4. Petrology of crystalline matrix breccias from Apollo 17 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    The petrology, mineralogy, and composition of 13 crystalline matrix breccias from the Apollo 17 rake samples are described. The breccias have matrices of uniform modal mineralogy (plagioclase, 50-54%; olivine and pyroxene, 41-46%) but diverse textures. Clast characteristics, including the proportion of plagioclase, the composition in comparison with matrix, and the textures of different clast types, are reported. The majority of bulk matrix compositions plot on or very near the plagioclase-olivine cotectic in the system olivine-anorthite-silica. If the matrix compositions represent impact total melts, the inferred cotectic control requires that the source material was itself an igneous differentiate with compositions along the plagioclase-olivine cotectic. Alternatively, the proximity of the matrix compositions to the plagioclase-olivine cotectic could be accounted for if the breccia matrices represent a suite of impact-generated partial melts.

  5. Virtual Reality and the Virtual Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheim, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Explains virtual reality, including proper and improper uses of the term, and suggests ways that libraries might be affected by it. Highlights include elements of virtual reality systems; possible virtual reality applications, including architecture, the chemical industry, transport planning, armed forces, and entertainment; and the virtual…

  6. Petrologic and In Situ Geochemical Constraints on Diogenite Genesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2013-01-01

    Diogenites, members of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) clan, are orthopyroxenite, harzburgite and dunite meteorites [1-3]. Most are breccias, but remnant textures indicate they were originally coarse-grained rocks, with grain sizes of order of cm. Their petrography and compositions support an origin as crustal cumulates from a differentiated asteroid. Astronomical observations, and surface mineralogy and composition of Vesta determined by the Dawn spacecraft suggest that asteroid (4) Vesta is the parent object for HED meteorites [4-6]. The origin of diogenites is an unsettled issue. It is difficult to fit their bulk compositional characteristics into global magma ocean models that successfully describe the compositions of basaltic and cumulate eucrites [7]. Compositional analyses of acid-leached bulk samples have led to the hypothesis that many diogenites were formed late by interaction of their parent melts with a eucritic crust [8]. Those observations may alternatively be explained by subsolidus equilibration of trace elements between orthopyroxene and minor/ accessory phases in the rocks such as plagioclase and phosphate [7]. These competing hypotheses can be tested through in situ measurements of trace and minor elements in orthopyroxene. Our new petrologic observations and in situ minor and trace element data for a suite of diogenites are used to discuss the petrologic evolution of diogenites. Our preliminary data on two diogenites are consistent with the hypothesis that subsolidus element mobilization processes caused unusual trace element signatures seen in some diogenites [7]. We cannot stress strongly enough, however, that the sample set is too small and that additional data are required before definitive conclusions can be made.

  7. Morphotectonic and petrological variations along the southern Central Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranadhir; Iyer, Sridhar D.; Ray, Dwijesh; Karisiddaiah, S. M.; Drolia, Rajendra K.

    2016-04-01

    In order to ascertain the effect of geomorphic and tectonic domains on the formation, enrichment, and ascension of the ridge axis melt, structural and petrological data from a nearly 300-km-long axial stretch along the slow-to-intermediate-spreading (40-60 mm/year) southern Central Indian Ridge (SCIR) were studied. The stretch, approximately between 20°30'S and 23°07'S, was disturbed by two major tectonic features—Egeria transform fault in the north and the Gemino Fracture Zone in the south—besides eight other discontinuities of variable dimensions. This stretch was chosen to test the petrological variations and mechanisms of magma supply in four distinct geomorphic and tectonic regimes: a Ridge-Crest-Flank-Valley (RCFV), a Neo-Volcanic Zone (NVZ), a large transform discontinuity (LTD), and an overlapping spreading centre (OSC). The major and trace element geochemistry of 44 glass and 47 whole rocks, extent and depth of melting (Na8 and Fe8, respectively), and melt pristinity (Mg#) of the magma indicate that rocks along this stretch were probably sourced from a reasonably primitive melt generated at a relatively greater depth and later got accumulated in pockets at a shallower level before eruption. Petrochemical analysis, and isotopic composition and ratios suggest that in contrast to largely N-MORB type of rocks at RCFV and OSC areas, the rocks from LTD and NVZ locations show signatures of enrichment to transitional (T) and enriched (E) basalts. A model explaining possible processes of enrichment and ascending framework of the melt at different tectonic regimes along SCIR are discussed.

  8. Learning Activities for an Undergraduate Mineralogy/Petrology Course-"I Am/We Are."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodell, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an entry level mineralogy/igneous petrology course designed for undergraduate students and presents a series of learning activities based on individual and cooperative learning. Includes 18 references. (Author/YDS)

  9. Petrologic constraints on the pressure, temperature, time and composition of the Martian interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Petrologic analysis of surface samples has been used to deduce pressure and temperature conditions existing in the crust and upper mantle at specific times in the Earth's history, as well as to estimate the chemical and mineralogical composition of the crust and upper mantle. The same techniques can be applied to samples of the Martian surface to provide P, T, time and composition constraints of the Martian interior. Estimates of P and T conditions existing at a given time would, in turn, provide strong constraints on the thermal evolution of Mars. Knowledge of the chemical and mineralogical composition of the Martian interior is of fundamental importance in assessing the early history of the solar system. A general petrological approach is outlined, describing the kinds of sample required, summarizing current understanding of the Martian interior based on experimental petrology, and outlining some of the important experiments needed to allow a full petrologic interpretation of Martian samples.

  10. Making Art with Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedis-Grab, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaching is a great way to focus on overarching concepts and help students make connections across disciplines. Historically, art and science have been connected disciplines. The botanical prints of the 18th and 19th centuries and early work with microscopes are two examples of a need for strong artistic skills in the science…

  11. Microscope on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  12. Microscopic plasma Hamiltonian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Y.-K. M.

    1974-01-01

    A Hamiltonian for the microscopic plasma model is derived from the Low Lagrangian after the dual roles of the generalized variables are taken into account. The resulting Hamilton equations are shown to agree with the Euler-Lagrange equations of the Low Lagrangian.

  13. Confocal stereology: an efficient tool for measurement of microscopic structures.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative measurements of geometric forms or counting of objects in microscopic specimens is an essential tool in studies of microstructure. Confocal stereology represents a contemporary approach to the evaluation of microscopic structures by using a combination of stereological methods and confocal microscopy. 3-D images acquired by confocal microscopy can be used for the estimation of geometrical characteristics of microscopic structures by stereological methods, based on the evaluation of optical sections within a thick slice and using computer-generated virtual test probes. Such methods can be used for estimating volume, number, surface area and length using relevant spatial probes, which are generated by specific software. The interactions of the probes with the structure under study are interactively evaluated. An overview of the methods of confocal stereology developed during the past 30 years is presented. Their advantages and pitfalls in comparison with other methods for measurement of geometrical characteristics of microscopic structures are discussed. PMID:25743691

  14. Virtual Worlds, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Many children between the ages of four and twelve log in to Web-based virtual play spaces each day, and these virtual worlds are quickly becoming an important aspect of their out-of-school lives. Consequently, educators' challenge is to see how they can leverage virtual spaces, such as the virtual play spaces, for learning and literacy. Over the…

  15. Rethinking Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Gary; Rippeth, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Virtual schooling has been touted as one of the best ways to meet the needs of at-risk students, but what happens when a district's virtual education program is unsuccessful? That was the problem in Eastern Local School District, a small rural district in Beaver, Ohio. The district contracted virtual school services and used the virtual school for…

  16. Virtual courseware for geoscience education: Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gary A.

    1999-05-01

    Virtual courseware developed for introductory-level, on-line geology labs is an interactive teaching/learning model that has an enormous pedagogical potential for making Web sites places where students learn by doing. Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating are modest examples of the `virtual courseware' paradigm. Virtual Earthquake helps students explore the techniques of how an earthquake's epicenter is located and how its Richter magnitude is determined. Virtual Dating models the theory and techniques of the radiometric age determination of rocks and minerals. Virtual courseware applications offer several advantages over traditional floppy disk or CD ROM-based courseware, the most significant being the ease of dissemination. The author's experience with bringing these two virtual applications on-line suggests that there is a need for interactive geology labs on-line and that the approach will be received with enthusiasm by the educational community. The widespread implementation and adoption of virtual courseware can bring meaningful educational content and interactivity for the geosciences that goes beyond multimedia on the World-Wide-Web.

  17. Teaching Petrology in the 21st Century: A Workshop Report and Call to Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogk, D.; Davidson, C.; Manduca, C.; Braday, J.

    2003-12-01

    Petrology plays an important role in the upper division geology curriculum, introducing students to the skills needed to investigate and interpret igneous and metamorphic rocks that form the bulk of the earth's interior. Central concepts in petrology courses typically include chemical differentiation of Earth, the role of igneous and metamorphic processes in the Earth system, and the occurrences and distribution of rocks and in a variety of tectonic settings. Seventy-nine geoscientists who teach (or plan to teach) petrology in the undergraduate curriculum gathered for a week at Montana State University this past summer to discuss best practices and how petrology should be integrated into the geology curriculum of the 21st century. The first three days of the workshop were devoted to visiting some of the classic geological field locations in Montana and Wyoming to discuss the role of fieldwork in teaching petrologic concepts. The following four days were spent on the MSU campus in a mixture of large group discussions, smaller topical working group meetings, and demonstration sessions where faculty presented exercises, laboratory activities, or moderated small group discussions on pedagogy and assessment. One of the main outcomes of the workshop was the development of a web site for sharing teaching materials (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/petrology03). This site contains a complete record of workshop activities. A collection of over 200 digital resources that support teaching petrology is now available, including over 30 new instructional activities contributed by workshop participants. Each activity contains 1) a brief introduction to the activity; 2) the activity itself along with supporting documents such as teaching notes and an answer key; and 3) a place for comments by users to give feedback to the author and to those who might be interested in using the activity. A formal review process of these resources will be initiated in the coming year. Another

  18. Magnetic petrology of ultramafic rocks and metabasites along the Lanterman-Mariner suture (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, Eleonora; Lurcock, Pontus Conrad; Palmeri, Rosaria; Florindo, Fabio; Talarico, Franco Maria

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the integration between rock magnetism and metamorphic petrology of ultramafic rocks and metabasites, variably metamorphosed under UHP, eclogite or HP amphibolite facies peak conditions, and cropping out along the Lanterman-Mariner suture (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica) in three different areas: the Lanterman Range, the Salamander Range and the Dessent Ridge. The outcrops along the Lanterman-Mariner suture provide a unique opportunity to define the relationships between magnetic properties and metamorphic evolution, in a wide P-T range, of ultramafic rocks and metabasites in the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana, an area which is well-studied from a petrological and structural point of view but lacking a rock magnetic study. To characterize the magnetic properties of these rocks, we performed a set of rock magnetic analyses (low-field magnetic susceptibility, natural remanence, thermomagnetic curves and hysteresis loops). We then characterized the minero-petrographical and compositional features of opaque minerals on selected samples using both the optical microscope and the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The samples display a remarkable heterogeneity in the studied magnetic properties depending on both type and abundance of the carriers of magnetization (Fe-Ti oxides and sulphides). Independently of the degree of retrogression and lithology (eclogites, retrogressed eclogites, pirossenites and amphibolites), several samples contain variable amounts of both magnetite and pyrrhotite, while others show only magnetite as the main ferromagnetic mineral. The remaining samples mainly consist of paramagnetic minerals and may display small amounts of magnetite. Based on the microstructural evidence, more than one generation of ferromagnetic minerals may occur in retrogressed UHP ultramafic rocks and eclogites. These new data and interpretations are essential 1) to characterize and to verify primary and secondary oxide and sulphide

  19. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jake S.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  20. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  1. Virtual Goods Recommendations in Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods. PMID:25834837

  2. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  3. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  4. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  5. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  6. Microscopic and macroscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.; De Groot, A.J.; Pierce, T.G. |

    1993-06-01

    Atomistic Molecular Dynamics and Lagrangian Continuum Mechanics can be very similarly adapted to massively-parallel computers. Millions of degrees of freedom can be treated. The two complementary approaches, microscopic and macroscopic, are being applied to increasingly realistic flows of fluids and solids. The two approaches can also be combined in a hybrid simulation scheme. Hybrids combine the fundamental constitutive advantage of atoms with the size advantage of the continuum picture.

  7. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy. PMID:25759526

  8. Focusing the surgical microscope.

    PubMed

    Socea, Sergiu D; Barak, Yoreh; Blumenthal, Eytan Z

    2015-01-01

    A well-focused operating microscope addresses several needs that are all secondary to the surgeon's need to see clearly at all times. These needs include: the assistant; the sharpness of the video and monitor; as well as field of view, asthenopia, and focusing issues related to zoom, accommodation, and presbyopia. We provide a practical approach to achieve optimal focus that we call the sloping paper calibration method. PMID:25891029

  9. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5th International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy. PMID:25759526

  10. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  11. From static to dynamic provenance analysis-Sedimentary petrology upgraded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    The classical approach to sandstone petrology, established in the golden years of plate tectonics and based on the axiom that "detrital modes of sandstone suites primarily reflect the different tectonic settings of provenance terranes," has represented a benchmark for decades. The composition of sand and sandstone, however, simply provides us with a distorted image of the lithological structure of source terranes and gives us little clue whether they are allochthonous or autochthonous, orogenic or anorogenic, young or old. What we may able to see reflected in detrital modes is the nature of source terranes (continental, arc, oceanic) and the tectonostratigraphic level reached by erosion in space and time. The proposed new approach to the petrology of sand and sandstone (1) starts with a simple classification scheme circulated since the 1960s, which is purely descriptive, objective, and free of ill-defined ambiguous terms and (2) focuses on the nature and tectonostratigraphic level of source terranes. Further steps are essential to upgrade provenance analysis. Acquiring knowledge from modern settings is needed to properly identify and wherever possible correct for physical and chemical processes introducing environmental and diagenetic bias and thus address nature's complexities with adequate conceptual tools. Equally important is the integration of multiple techniques, ideally including bulk-sediment, multi-mineral, and single-mineral methods. Bulk-sediment petrography remains the fundamental approach that allows us to capture the most precious source of direct provenance information, represented by the mineralogy and texture of rock fragments. Bulk-sediment geochemistry, applicable also to silt and clay carried in suspension, is a superior method to check for hydraulic sorting, chemical weathering, and fertility of detrital minerals in different sediment sources. Detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and isotope geochemistry reveal the diverse time structures

  12. Q: How do Microscopes Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimov, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This brief article describes the many types of microscopes and how they are used in different scientific venues.

  13. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  14. Mineralogical-petrological characterization of near-earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, L. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; McCord, T. B.

    1984-07-01

    The mineralogy and petrology of 17 near-earth asteroids are characterized using reflectance spectroscopy with ground-based telescopes. Assuming the surfaces are composed of cosmically abundant materials, the presence of certain mineralogical species can be determined from diagnostic absorption features and spectral characteristics which have been studied under known laboratory conditions and understood in terms of crystal-field theory. With one possible exception, the surface composition of near-earth asteroids consists of common rock-forming minerals such as olivine, pyroxene, and phyllosilicates. Opaque components are present but cannot be mineralogically identified with existing experimental data. The spectrum of 2201 Oljato cannot be interpreted in terms of common rock-forming minerals and is examined for cometary features because its high orbital eccentricity suggests a possible relation to comets, but no common cometary features are identified. The predominance of mafic silicate absorption features in spectra of near-earth asteroids (compared to the majority of main-belt asteroids) may be a primary compositional feature or may be the signature of relatively fresher asteroid material.

  15. Petrology of four clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.; Hammarstrom, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    One felsite ('granite') and three ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro clasts extracted from breccia 73215 are described. The felsite clast has two components - fragments of crystalline felsite and veins and patches of felsic glass. The crystalline felsite, which consists largely of a vermicular intergrowth of quartz and Ba-K-feldspar, crystallized from a highly differentiated melt between 3.90 and 4.05 b.y. The felsic glass component consists of crystallized brown and colorless glasses and uncrystallized colorless glass which are all K and Si rich. The relation of glass features to past heating and the breccia-forming event is considered. In the three anorthositic gabbros, which have similar mineralogies and gradational textures, plagioclase is dominant, and olivine and orthopyroxene are the major mafic minerals. The petrologic data suggest that the gabbros formed as heated, partly melted, and/or recrystallized polymict breccias. It is possible that the approximately 4.25 b.y. age obtained for the three rocks is the date of the melting/recrystallization event.

  16. Isotopic, petrologic and biogeochemical investigations of banded iron-formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Kaufman, A. J.; Klein, C.; Studley, S. A.; Baur, M. E.; Walter, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    It is recognized that the first occurrence of banded iron-formations (BIFs) clearly predates biological oxygenation of the atmosphere-hydrosphere system and that their last occurrences extend beyond plausible dates of pervasive biological oxygenation. For this reason, and because enormous quantities of oxidizing power have been sequestered in them, it is widely thought that these massive, but enigmatic, sediments must encode information about the mechanism and timing of the rise of atmospheric O2. By coupling isotopic analyses of iron-formation carbonates with biogeochemical and petrologic investigations, we are studying (1) the mechanism of initial sedimentation of iron; (2) the role of iron in microbially mediated diagenetic processes in fresh iron-formation sediments; and (3) the logical integration of mechanisms of deposition with observed levels of banding. Thus far, it has been shown that (1) carbonates in BIFs of the Hamersley Group of Western Australia are isotopically inhomogenous; (2) the nature and pattern of isotopic ordering is not consistent with a metamorphic origin for the overall depletion of C-13 observed in the carbonates; (3) if biological, the origin of the C-13 depleted carbonate could be either respiratory or fermentative; (4) iron may have been precipitate d as Fe(3+), then reduced to Fe(2+) within the sediment; and (5) sedimentary biogeochemical systems may have been at least partially closed to mass transport of carbonate species.

  17. Photography with a Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Fred; Oldfield, Ron

    2000-03-01

    This beautifully illustrated book describes the methods used to record images viewed through a microscope. The text describes the principles and practices of photomicrography, and is written for all who take photomicrographs, beginners and/or experienced practitioners. The authors describe techniques that may be applied to many disciplines for teaching, research, archives, or pleasure. The book includes chapters on standard photography, modern digital techniques, methods for improving contrast, and a short chapter on drawing. In addition to its value as a work of reference, the authors' clear, didactic style makes this book suitable as a textbook for courses in photomicrography and/or elementary light microscopy.

  18. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  19. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  20. Adirondack Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday, Jan. 15, 2004. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists have begun using the microscopic imager instrument at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  1. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  2. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  3. The virtual space exploration education portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, C. A.

    2007-06-01

    New information technologies have evolved from space exploration—3-D visualisation ‘lenses’ and a growing suite of tools that allow access to exploration, analysis and interpretation of often complex information by a range of end users including the public, communicators, and policy makers. These tools have only become viable in the past year or two with the combination of the availability of inexpensive, but powerful, personal computers and widespread use of the Internet. A new study group under Commission 6 has been established, entitled ‘Future Directions of Space Exploration Education’, to build a Virtual Global Space Exploration Education Portal (VGSEEP) to open this revolution to all audiences, not just students. This paper describes the initial stages of VGSEEP. The NASA Learning Technologies suite of ‘lenses’ and tools will be demonstrated: World Wind, a 3-D globe that provides insights into our planet from space and almost down to ground level; the Virtual Field Trip that explores at ground level in 3-D; the Virtual Lab, which allows a range of samples to be examined via a virtual light microscope and/or a Scanning Electron Microscope and What’s the Difference?, which allows users to manipulate information in a multi-graphical interface.

  4. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  5. Microscopic Rayleigh Droplet Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, R. B.

    2005-11-01

    A periodically triggered Rayleigh Droplet Beam (RDB) delivers a perfectly linear and periodic stream of identical, monoenergetic droplets that are phase-locked to the trigger signal. The droplet diameter and spacing are easily adjusted of choice of nozzle diameter and trigger frequency. Any liquid of low viscosity may be emloyed as the beam fluid. Although the field of nanofluidics is expanding rapidly, little effort has yet been devoted to ``external flows'' such as RDB's. At ASU we have generated RDB's of water and methanol down to 2 microns in droplet diameter. Nozzle clogging is the sole impediment to smaller droplets. Microscopic Rayleigh droplet beams offer tremendous potential for fundamental physical measurements, fluid dynamics research, and nanofabrication. This talk will describe the apparatus and techniques used at ASU to generate RDB's (surprisingly simple and inexpensive), discuss the triboelectric phenomena that play a role (surprisingly significant), present some initial experimental fluid dynamics measurements, and briefly survey RDB applications. Our particular interest in RDB's is as microscopic transport systems to deliver hydrated, undenatured proteins into vacuum for structure determination via serial diffraction of x-rays or electrons. This may offer the first general method for structure determination of non-crystallizable proteins.

  6. Microscopic Tribotactic Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    The translational motion of a rotating object near a surface is strongly dependent on the friction between the object and the surface. The process of friction is inherently directional and the friction coefficient can be anisotropic even in the absence of a net friction coefficient gradient. This is macroscopically observed in the ordering motif of some animal hair or scales and a microscopic analog can be imagined where the friction coefficient is determined by the strength and density of reversible bonds between a rotating object and the substrate. For high friction coefficients most of the rotational motion is converted into translational motion; conversely for low friction coefficients the object primarily rotates in place. We exploited this property to design and test a new class of motile system that displays tribotaxis, which is the process by which an object detects differences in the local friction coefficient and moves accordingly either to regions of higher or lower friction. These synthetic tribotactic microscopic walkers, composed of a pair of functionalized superparamagnetic beads, detect gradients in the spatial friction coefficient and migrate towards high friction areas when actuated in a random fashion. The effective friction between the walkers and the substrate is controlled by the local density of active receptors in the substrate. The tribotactic walkers also displayed trapping in high friction areas where the density of free receptors is higher.

  7. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  8. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  9. Virtual Reality as Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozzi, Raymond, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that virtual reality technology has become popular because it is a miniaturization, a model, of something that already exists. Compares virtual reality to the news media, which centers on the gory, the sensational, and the distorted. (PA)

  10. Virtual Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Sally

    2003-01-01

    As the need to access information increases, school librarians must create virtual libraries. Linked to reliable reference resources, the virtual library extends the physical collection and library hours and lets students learn to use Web-based resources in a protected learning environment. The growing number of virtual schools increases the need…

  11. Virtual trackballs revisited.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Knud; Sporring, Jon; Hornbaek, Kasper

    2004-01-01

    Rotation of three-dimensional objects by a two-dimensional mouse is a typical task in computer-aided design, operation simulations, and desktop virtual reality. The most commonly used rotation technique is a virtual trackball surrounding the object and operated by the mouse pointer. This article reviews and provides a mathematical foundation for virtual trackballs. The first, but still popular, virtual trackball was described by Chen et al. We show that the virtual trackball by Chen et al. does not rotate the object along the intended great circular arc on the virtual trackball and we give a correction. Another popular virtual trackball is Shoemake's quaternion implementation, which we show to be a special case of the virtual trackball by Chen et al.. Shoemake extends the scope of the virtual trackball to the full screen. Unfortunately, Shoemake's virtual trackball is inhomogeneous and discontinuous with consequences for usability. Finally, we review Bell's virtual trackball and discuss studies of the usability of virtual trackballs. PMID:15384645

  12. Virtual Worlds? "Outlook Good"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelton, AJ

    2008-01-01

    Many people believed that virtual worlds would end up like the eight-track audiotape: a memory of something no longer used (or useful). Yet today there are hundreds of higher education institutions represented in three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds such as Active Worlds and Second Life. The movement toward the virtual realm as a viable teaching…

  13. Virtual Reality: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchi, Jorge

    1994-01-01

    Highlights of this overview of virtual reality include optics; interface devices; virtual worlds; potential applications, including medicine and archaeology; problems, including costs; current research and development; future possibilities; and a listing of vendors and suppliers of virtual reality products. (Contains 11 references.) (LRW)

  14. THz wave emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao

    Sensing and imaging using Terahertz (THz) radiation has attracted more and more interest in the last two decades thanks to the abundant material 'finger prints' in the THz frequency range. The low photon energy also makes THz radiation an attractive tool for nondestructive evaluation of materials and devices, biomedical applications, security checks and explosive screening. Due to the long wavelength, the far-field THz wave optical systems have relatively low spatial resolution. This physical limitation confines THz wave sensing and imaging to mostly macro-size samples. To investigate local material properties or micro-size structures and devices, near-field technology has to be employed. In this dissertation, the Electro-Optical THz wave emission microscope is investigated. The basic principle is to focus the femtosecond laser to a tight spot on a thin THz emitter layer to produce a THz wave source with a similar size as the focus spot. The apparatus provides a method for placing a THz source with sub-wavelength dimension in the near-field range of the investigated sample. Spatial resolution to the order of one tenth of the THz wavelength is demonstrated by this method. The properties of some widely used THz wave emission materials under tight focused pump light are studied. As an important branch of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), THz wave emission spectroscopy has been widely used as a tool to investigate the material physics, such as energy band structure, carrier dynamics, material nonlinear properties and dynamics. As the main work of this dissertation, we propose to combine the THz wave emission spectroscopy with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to build a tip-assisted THz wave emission microscope (TATEM), which is a valuable extension to current SPM science and technology. Illuminated by a femtosecond laser, the biased SPM tip forms a THz wave source inside the sample beneath the tip. The source size is proportional to the apex size of the tip so

  15. Petrological variability in recent magmatism at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount is known for its compositional homogeneity. We report on petrological variability in lavas from the summit caldera and rims of Axial Seamount during the last ~1.2ka and its implications for shallow crustal magma dynamics. AUVs have mapped the summit at ~1 m resolution, and ROVs have collected numerous lavas and volcaniclastic cores. Geospatial, superpositional, compositional, and age constraint data were used to outline flow units and construct geologic maps. Nearly 200 glasses from summit lavas were analyzed for major elements. A subset of ~20 samples were analyzed for selected trace elements, Pb-, U-, and Th- isotope ratios, and 226Ra and 210Pb. The results a) confirm a high degree compositional homogeneity, b) demonstrate a more restricted range in Pb-isotope ratios than previous data, c) indicate uniform compositional source component(s) genetically linked to that of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, and d) expand the dataset of distinctly-low 230Th/232Th lavas and subdivide them into geospatial groups. Hundreds of volcaniclastic grains collected from subsurface depths of up to several tens of cm analyzed for major elements extend the record of summit magmatism beyond what is exposed. Summit lava glasses are compositionally N-MORB. Summit volcaniclastics range to higher MgO (+1%); thus, magmatism likely included more mafic episodes than is recorded in the flows as yet sampled or that volcaniclastics preferentially sample higher temperature lavas. Negative correlation of CaO/Al2O3 with MgO in all glasses suggests fractionation from parental melt(s) of plag ± ol but not cpx. K2O/TiO2 ranges are typical for much of the JdFR. Summit lavas range from aphyric to ~35% plag phyric ± a few % ol. Plag-phyric summit lavas tend to have greater MgO (>7.5%), lower CaO/Al2O3 (<0.80), and lower K2O/TiO2 (<0.10) compared to aphyric lavas. For ~18 caldera flows with absolute or relative age control, plag-phyric lavas are older than aphyric lavas, the oldest of

  16. Petrologic Insights into Magma System Response to Edifice Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Izbekov, P. E.; Gavrilenko, M.

    2011-12-01

    In order to understand eruptive behavior at volcanic centers and to improve models for monitoring and prediction of volcanic eruptions, it is important to constrain magma storage conditions and transport in the system. Here the post-collapse eruptive behavior at Bezymianny and Shiveluch volcanoes, (Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia) are each compared to the well-known sequence at Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA (from 1956, 1964, and 1980, respectively). The magma system responds to rapid unloading of overburden pressure, due to edifice collapse, with a violent large-scale paroxysmal eruption. This reflects the amplitude of the triggering decompression event with later dome-building and explosive activity due to the reduction of vent elevation. The massive unloading events and post-collapse eruptive chronologies, provides a unique opportunity for comparison of the sources driving the catastrophic eruptions and eruptive style transitions. Analytical techniques employed included X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, electron probe micro-analyses, Fe-Ti oxide and two-pyroxene geothermometry, X-ray elemental mapping, and a novel image processing technique. Presented here are results from petrological investigations into the temporal variations of whole-rock geochemistry, geothermometry, mineral modal abundances and textures. Bezymianny is becoming more mafic over time from 61.0 to 57.3 wt.% SiO2 (1956 and 2010). Pre-eruptive magma temperatures increased from 950oC to 1050oC from 1956 to 2006. Plagioclase and amphibole disequilibrium textures are observed throughout the time series and rare mafic enclaves exist. The whole-rock chemical trend at Shiveluch shows a subtle, yet reversed trend from 60.6 to 64.2 wt.% SiO2 (1964 and 2007). Two-pyroxene geothermometry yields ~950oC+30oC (2001-2007) and is consistent with data from the 2001 -2004 eruption, of 834-978oC+60oC. Mafic enclaves occurred throughout the entire period of eruptive activity at Shiveluch. In contrast to both

  17. Petrology of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, L.; Tegner, C.; Jakobsen, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    Layered Series are similar in the early stages of differentiation until after FeTi-oxides appear as primocrysts. In the more evolved rocks the Upper Border Series is gradually enriched in SiO2, K2O and incompatible trace elements relative to the Layered Series as shown by Naslund (1984). This is expressed by abundant interstitial granophyre pockets between the cumulus crystals in the Upper Border Series. However, we find that it is possible to explain the Upper Border Series as a mixture of cumulus minerals and reasonable liquid estimates. Thus the Upper Border Series appears to trap a higher fraction of residual liquid than is the case in the Layered Series. We conclude that the Upper Border Series crystallized from the same liquid as the Layered Series and mainly differs in a high amount of trapped liquid. This implies that the Skaergaard chamber had only one convecting magma body. References: Naslund, H.R.; Petrology of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion, Journal of Petrology, Vol. 25, Part 1, pp 185-212, 1984

  18. Petrologic evidence for collisional heating of chondritic asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    The identification of the mechanism(s) responsible for heating asteroids is among the major problems in planetary science. Because of difficulties with models of electromagnetic induction and the decay of short-lived radionuclides, it is worthwhile to evaluate the evidence for collisional heating. New evidence for localized impact heating comes from the high proportion of relict type-6 material among impact-melt-bearing ordinary chondrites (OC). This relict material was probably metamorphosed by residual heat within large craters. Olivine aggregates composed of faceted crystals with 120 deg triple junctions occur within the melted regions of the Chico and Rose City OC melt rocks; the olivine aggregates formed from shocked, mosaicized olivine grains that underwent contact metamorphism. Large-scale collisional heating is supoorted by the correlation in OC between petrologic type and shock stage; no other heating mechanism can readily account for this correlation. The occurrence of impact-melt-rock clasts in OC that have been metamorphosed along with their whole rocks indicates that some impact events preceded or accompanied thermal metamorphism. Such impacts events, occurring during or shortly after accretion, are probably responsible for substantially melting approximately 0.5% of OC. These events must have heated a larger percentage of OC to subsolidus temperatures sufficient to have caused significant metamorphism. If collisional heating is viable, then OC parent asteroids must have been large; large OC asteroids in the main belt may include those of the S(IV) spectral subtype. Collisional heating is inconsistent with layered ('onion-shell') structures in OC asteroids (wherein the degree of metamorphism increases with depth), but the evidence for such structures is weak. It seems likely that collisional heating played an important role in metamorphosing chondritic asteroids.

  19. Petrology and Cosmochemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrano, Z. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites are among the most primitive surviving materials from the early solar system. They are divided into groups based on chemical types defined by mineralogy, bulk composition, and oxygen isotope compositions. Chondrites range in petrographic grade from type 1 to type 7. Type 3 chondrites are the most primitive and are little changed from the nebular solids accreted to form asteroids. They are composed of chondrules, fine-grained matrix, metal and sulfide, plus or minus Ca-Al-rich inclusions. With increasing aqueous alteration at low temperatures, members of some chondrite classes transformed from type 3 towards type 1. With increasing thermal metamorphism and low fluid content, members of other classes changed from type 3 towards type 7. Rumuruti (R) chondrites are a rare group (0.1% of falls) similar to ordinary chondrites in some properties but different in others. They are characterized by low chondrule/matrix modal abundance ratios, high oxidation state, small mean chondrule size, abundant sulfides and low metal contents. R chondrites vary in petrologic type from 3 to 6. They are important objects to study because some of them have undergone metamorphism at high temperatures in the presence of aqueous fluids. In contrast, CM and CI chondrites were heated to low temperatures in the presence of aqueous fluids leading to alteration; they contain low-T hydrous phases (phyllosilicates) and little or no remaining metal. Ordinary chondrites were heated to high temperatures in a low-fluid environment resulting in anhydrous metamorphic rocks. R6 chondrites are highly metamorphosed and some contain the high-T hydrous phases mica and amphibole. R chondrites are thus unique and give us an opportunity to examine whether there are compositional effects caused by high-T, highfluid metamorphism of nebular materials.

  20. Petrologic Regime Diagrams: Parameterizing Kinetic Controls on Vesiculation and Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.

    2014-12-01

    Regime diagrams are commonly employed in geophysical fluid dynamics to classify experimental results and, ideally, to define non-dimensional parameters that allow those results to be applied to natural systems. Petrologic experiments, in contrast, are typically run to mimic a specific natural system, and to infer conditions of magma storage, cooling or decompression. This approach has produced important insight into specific volcanoes, but the results are difficult to generalize. Additionally, very few experimental studies evaluate the vesiculation, crystallization and degassing histories of the same sample suite, an omission that is understandable given the time-consuming nature of the experiments and analysis, but which leaves important gaps in our general understanding of the interplay between gas exsolution, crystal formation and eruption dynamics. One way to bridge these gaps is to construct a regime diagram for conditions of vesiculation and crystallization. As both are controlled by the effective supercooling experienced by the magma during cooling or decompression, one key parameter is supersaturation, although in practice, decompression rate (cooling rate) are commonly used as proxies for supersaturation. Vesiculation and crystallization are also modulated by diffusion (dependent on individual species and melt viscosity), which can be simply approximated by melt composition. Using these parameters and published data for water-saturated decompression experiments, the following fields can be (partially) defined: (1) non-equilibrium volatile exsolution, (2) equilibrium volatile exsolution, and (3) exsolution accompanied by crystallization. Melt compositions, volatile contents and crystal textures of natural samples can be measured, and thus related (crudely) to the regime diagram. Additional information required for fully linking experiments and volcanic pyroclasts includes phase proportions (crystallization efficiency), pyroclast textures (phase change

  1. Petrology and In Situ Trace Element Chemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Torrano, Z. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rumuruti (R) chondrites are characterized by low chondrule/matrix modal ratios, high oxidation state, small mean chondrule size, abundant sulfides and low metal contents, and are of petrologic types 3 to 6 [1, 2]. LAP 04840 (R5, [3]) and MIL 11207 (R6), contain the high-T hydrous phases amphibole and mica [3, 4]; not all equilibrated R chondrites contain these [2]. R chondrites thus can provide evidence on whether there are compositional effects caused by high-T, high-fluid metamorphism of nebular materials. We are investigating a suite of R chondrites of diverse petrologic grades to further understand the nature of the metamorphic processes that engendered them [5]. We report on our petrological studies, plus preliminary in situ analyses of trace elements in amphibole-bearing R chondrites.

  2. Review and update of the applications of organic petrology: Part 2, geological and multidisciplinary applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Flores, Deolinda; Mendonça Filho, João Graciano; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is focused on organic petrology applied to unconventional and multidisciplinary investigations and is the second part of a two part review that describes the geological applications and uses of this branch of earth sciences. Therefore, this paper reviews the use of organic petrology in investigations of: (i) ore genesis when organic matter occurs associated with mineralization; (ii) the behavior of organic matter in coal fires (self-heating and self-combustion); (iii) environmental and anthropogenic impacts associated with the management and industrial utilization of coal; (iv) archeology and the nature and geographical provenance of objects of organic nature such as jet, amber, other artifacts and coal from archeological sites; and (v) forensic science connected with criminal behavior or disasters. This second part of the review outlines the most recent research and applications of organic petrology in those fields.

  3. Petrology of the Crystalline Rocks Hosting the Santa Fe Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Cohen, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    We collected samples from within the area of shatter cone occurrence and for approximately 8 kilometers (map distance) along the roadway. Our primary goal is to date the impact. Our secondary goal is to use the petrology and Ar systematics to provide further insight into size and scale of the impact. Our approach is to: Conduct a detailed petrology study to identify lithologies that share petrologic characteristics and tectonic histories but with differing degrees of shock. Obtain micro-cores of K-bearing minerals from multiple samples for Ar-40/Ar-39 analysis. Examine the Ar diffusion patterns for multiple minerals in multiple shocked and control samples. This will help us to better understand outcrop and regional scale relationships among rocks and their responses to the impact event.

  4. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    DOEpatents

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  5. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    PubMed

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence. PMID:26996410

  6. Mars Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

  7. Geophysical, petrological and mineral physics constraints on Earth's surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-04-01

    Earth's surface topography is controlled by isostatically compensated density variations within the lithosphere, but dynamic topography - i.e. the topography due to adjustment of surface to mantle convection - is an important component, specially at a global scale. In order to separate these two components it is fundamental to estimate crustal and mantle density structure and rheological properties. Usually, crustal density is constrained from interpretation of available seismic data (mostly VP profiles) based on empirical relationships such those in Brocher [2005]. Mantle density structure is inferred from seismic tomography models. Constant coefficients are used to interpret seismic velocity anomalies in density anomalies. These simplified methods are unable to model the effects that pressure and temperature variations have on mineralogical assemblage and physical properties. Our approach is based on a multidisciplinary method that involves geophysical observables, mineral physics constraints, and petrological data. Mantle density is based on the thermal interpretation of global seismic tomography models assuming various compositional structures, as in Cammarano et al. [2011]. We further constrain the top 150 km by including heat-flow data and considering the thermal evolution of the oceanic lithosphere. Crustal density is calculated as in Guerri and Cammarano [2015] performing thermodynamic modeling of various average chemical compositions proposed for the crust. The modeling, performed with the code PerpleX [Connolly, 2005], relies on the thermodynamic dataset from Holland and Powell [1998]. Compressional waves velocity and crustal layers thickness from the model CRUST 1.0 [Laske et al., 2013] offer additional constrains. The resulting lithospheric density models are tested against gravity (GOCE) data. Various crustal and mantle density models have been tested in order to ascertain the effects that uncertainties in the estimate of those features have on the

  8. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Constraints on chondrule origin from petrology of isotopically characterized chondrules in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    1985-09-01

    The petrologic and chemical properties of the ferromagnesian chondrules in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite were examined in terms of the isotopic composition and the correlations between isotopic patterns. Areas of thin sections were studied with a SEM and bulk chemical fractions of 12 constituents were quantified to calculate correlations with petrologic features. A possible correlation between (CaO + Al2O2)/MgO and oxygen isotopes imply the formation of oxygen isotopic compositions in the chondrules by exchanges between isotopically heavy nebular gases and O-16 enriched solids. Different rates of gaseous exchange occurred with the various types of chondrules. Factors which may have controlled the exchanges are discussed.

  10. Constraints on chondrule origin from petrology of isotopically characterized chondrules in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The petrologic and chemical properties of the ferromagnesian chondrules in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite were examined in terms of the isotopic composition and the correlations between isotopic patterns. Areas of thin sections were studied with a SEM and bulk chemical fractions of 12 constituents were quantified to calculate correlations with petrologic features. A possible correlation between (CaO + Al2O2)/MgO and oxygen isotopes imply the formation of oxygen isotopic compositions in the chondrules by exchanges between isotopically heavy nebular gases and O-16 enriched solids. Different rates of gaseous exchange occurred with the various types of chondrules. Factors which may have controlled the exchanges are discussed.

  11. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  12. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    PubMed

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3. PMID:23931502

  13. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  14. Virtual Laboratory in the Role of Dynamic Visualisation for Better Understanding of Chemistry in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herga, Nataša Rizman; Cagran, Branka; Dinevski, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding chemistry includes the ability to think on three levels: the macroscopic level, the symbolic level, and the level of particles--sub-microscopic level. Pupils have the most difficulty when trying to understand the sub-microscopic level because it is outside their range of experience. A virtual laboratory enables a simultaneous…

  15. Microscopic Chondritic Chemical Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurette, Michel

    Maurette (1998a and 1998b) gives a more detailed discussion of previous works supporting the role of unmelted micrometeorites in prebiotic chemistry. Krueger and Kissel (1987) quoted thermodynamic computations suggesting that the μm-size C-rich grains that they discovered in the tail of Halley’s comet with their time-of-flight mass spectrometer on board the Vega spacecraft, when added to a prebiotic soup of organics, could trigger the formation of nucleic acids. Anders (1989) relied on the characteristics of the tiny stratospheric micrometeorites with sizes of about 5 15 μm, which amount to less than about 1% of the micrometeorite mass flux, to argue that micrometeorites played a major role in the delivery of organics to the Earth. As first quoted by Ponchelet (1989), we proposed in 1989 that much larger micrometeorites, similar to Antarctic micrometeorites, might have been functioning as individual microscopic chemical reactors on the early Earth during their interactions with gases and waters (Maurette et al., 1990, 1991b, 1998a, 1998b). Subsequently, Chyba and Sagan (1992) ceased fully supporting the role of the direct impact of comets in the delivery of such organics, and started to refer that of micrometeorites.

  16. The microscope mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, Pierre; Foulon, Bernard; Lafargue, Laurent; Metris, Gilles

    2002-04-01

    The MICROSCOPE mission had been selected at the end of 1999 by the French space agency Cnes for a launch scheduled in 2004. The scientific objective of the mission is the test of the Equivalence Principle (EP) up to an accuracy of 10 -15 with its well-known manifestation, the universality of free fall. This principle, at the origin of general relativity, is only consolidated by experimental results and presently with an accuracy of several 10 -13. The micro-satellite developed by Cnes weighs less than 120 kg and is compatible with a low-cost launch like ASAP ARIANE V. The instrument is composed of two differential electrostatic accelerometers operating at finely stabilised room temperature. Each accelerometer includes two cylindrical and concentric test masses, made of platinum or titanium alloys. The experiment consists in controlling the two masses in the same orbital motion. Because of the drag compensation system of the satellite including field effect electrical thrusters, this motion is quite purely gravitational. The electrostatic control forces used in the differential accelerometers are finely measured. The principle of the experiment is presented, the configuration of the instrument and of the satellite is detailed with regard to the present development status. The specifications for the major parameters of the experiment are detailed.

  17. An experimental study of pathologist's navigation patterns in virtual microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In virtual microscopy, a sequential process of captures of microscopical fields, allows to construct a virtual slide which is visualized using a specialized software, called the virtual microscopy viewer. This tool allows useful exploration of images, composed of thousands of microscopical fields of view at different levels of magnification, emulating an actual microscopical examination. The aim of this study was to establish the main pathologist's navigation patterns when exploring virtual microscopy slides, using a graphical user interface, adapted to the pathologist's workflow. Four pathologists with a similar level of experience, graduated from the same pathology program, navigated six virtual slides. Different issues were evaluated, namely, the percentage of common visited image regions, the time spent at each and its coincidence level, that is to say, the region of interest location. In addition, navigation patterns were also assessed, i.e., mouse movement velocities and linearity of the diagnostic paths. Results suggest that regions of interest are determined by a complex combination of the visited area, the time spent at each visit and the coincidence level among pathologists. Additionally, linear trajectories and particular velocity patterns were found for the registered diagnostic paths. PMID:21087502

  18. An experimental study of pathologist's navigation patterns in virtual microscopy.

    PubMed

    Roa-Peña, Lucia; Gómez, Francisco; Romero, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    In virtual microscopy, a sequential process of captures of microscopical fields, allows to construct a virtual slide which is visualized using a specialized software, called the virtual microscopy viewer. This tool allows useful exploration of images, composed of thousands of microscopical fields of view at different levels of magnification, emulating an actual microscopical examination. The aim of this study was to establish the main pathologist's navigation patterns when exploring virtual microscopy slides, using a graphical user interface, adapted to the pathologist's workflow. Four pathologists with a similar level of experience, graduated from the same pathology program, navigated six virtual slides. Different issues were evaluated, namely, the percentage of common visited image regions, the time spent at each and its coincidence level, that is to say, the region of interest location. In addition, navigation patterns were also assessed, i.e., mouse movement velocities and linearity of the diagnostic paths. Results suggest that regions of interest are determined by a complex combination of the visited area, the time spent at each visit and the coincidence level among pathologists. Additionally, linear trajectories and particular velocity patterns were found for the registered diagnostic paths. PMID:21087502

  19. Petrology of enstatite chondrites and anomalous enstatite achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Niekerk, Deon

    2012-01-01

    . The broad importance of these studies lies in documenting the petrology of extraterrestrial materials that reveal the geological history of the young solar system prior to the existence of planets. Furthermore, they serve to identify which mineral assemblages record nebular processes and which record processes on asteroids, so that future studies may select the correct material to address particular questions.

  20. Aragats stratovolcano in Armenia - volcano-stratigraphy and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Savov, Ivan; Connor, Charles; Halama, Ralf; Jrbashyan, Ruben; Navasardyan, Gevorg; Ghukasyan, Yura; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Manucharyan, Davit; Ishizuka, Osamu; Quidelleur, Xavier; Germa, Aurélie

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution we discuss the geological structure and volcano-stratigraphy of the Quaternary Aragats stratovolcano in Armenia based on recent age determinations as well as petrological and geochemical features of magma generation processes specific for collision zones. Armenia is situated in the NE part of the Anatolian-Armenian-Iranian plateau, an intensely deformed segment of the Alpine-Himalayan belt. The complex geological structure of the region is represented by a mosaic of tectonic blocks comprising fragments of volcanic arcs, continental crust and exhumed oceanic crust. Collision of the Arabian plate with the Eurasian margin in early Miocene resulted in orogenic uplift associated with intense volcanism. Aragats (4090m) is one the largest volcanoes in the entire region and produced central vent (inc. Plinian VEI>4) and monogenetic type flank eruptions and periphery plateaus within a total area greater than 5000 km2, known as Aragats volcanic province (AVP). The Aragats volcanic province (AVP) comprises the composite cone of Aragats volcano, the peak of which is built on a summit plateau, ~45 km in diameter shield structure with dozens of flank vents, scattered monogenetic cinder cones on the adjacent volcanic plateaus as well as the neighboring stratovolcano Arailer. New K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations of groundmass and separated plagioclase samples indicate that volcanism at AVP began ~2.5 Ma, while most recent volcanic activity is 0.49 Ma for Plinian eruption of dacites from Irind flank vent and basaltic trachyandesite lava flows from Tirinkatar (0.48-0.61 Ma), Kakavasar, (0.52-0.54 Ma) and Ashtarak (0.58 Ma) monogenetic flank centers, as well as trachyandesites of Jrbazhan volcano on the summit plateau of Aragats (0.52 Ma). Based on bulk rock geochemical data (major, minor and low abundance trace elements, Sr and Nd isotopes) and mineral chemistry, we conclude that volcanic rocks of AVP are largely recording a complex mixing between deep

  1. Petrology of the Betulia Igneous Complex, Cauca, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-12-01

    The Betulia Igneous Complex (BIC) is a group of Late-Miocene (11.8 ± 0.2 Ma) hypabyssal intrusions of intermediate to felsic composition located in the SW of the Colombian Andes. These bodies have a calc-alkaline tendency and are related to the subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American plate. Diorites, quartz diorites and tonalities have porphyritic and phaneritic textures and are composed of plagioclase, amphibole, quartz, biotite, and orthoclase. Plagioclase is mainly of andesine-type and the amphiboles were classified mainly as magnesiohornblendes, actinolites, and tschermakites. BIC rocks have a narrow range of SiO2 content (59-67wt%) and exhibit an enrichment of LILE and LREE relative to HFSE and HREE, respectively. These features are attributed to enrichment of LILE from the source and retention of HFSE (mainly Nb, Ta, and Ti) by refractory phases within the same source. The depletion of HREE is explained by fractionation of mineral phases that have a high partition coefficients for these elements, especially amphiboles, the major mafic phase in the rocks. Nevertheless, the fractionation of garnet in early stages of crystallization is not unlikely. Probably all BIC units were generated by the same magma chamber or at least by the same petrologic mechanism as shown by the similar patterns in spider and REE diagrams; fractional crystallization and differentiation processes controlled the final composition of the rocks, and crystallization stages determined the texture. Isotopic compositions of BIC rocks (87Sr/86Sr: 0.70435-0.70511; 143Nd/144Nd: 0.51258-0.51280; 206Pb/204Pb: 19.13-19.31; 207Pb/204Pb: 15.67-15.76; 208Pb/204Pb: 38.93-39.20) indicate a source derived from the mantle with crustal contamination. The model proposed for the BIC consists of fluids from the dehydration of the subducted slab (Nazca plate) and subducted sediments that generated partial melting of the mantle wedge. These basaltic melts ascended to the mantle-crust boundary

  2. Virtual Campus in the Context of an Educational Virtual City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fominykh, Mikhail; Prasolova-Forland, Ekaterina; Morozov, Mikhail; Gerasimov, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    This paper is focused on virtual campuses, i.e. virtual worlds representing real educational institutions that are based on the metaphor of a university and provide users with different learning tools. More specifically, the idea of integrating a virtual campus into the context of a virtual city is suggested. Such a virtual city, where students…

  3. The Latest in Handheld Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Around 1590, Zacharias Jansenn of Holland invented the microscope. Jansenn, an eyeglass maker by trade, experimented with lenses and discovered that things appeared closer with combinations of lenses. Over the past 400 years, several refinements to microscopes have occurred, making it possible to magnify objects between 200 and 1,500 times their…

  4. Scientists View Battery Under Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-10

    PNNL researchers use a special microscope setup that shows the inside of a battery as it charges and discharges. This battery-watching microscope is located at EMSL, DOE's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory that resides at PNNL. Researchers the world over can visit EMSL and use special instruments like this, many of which are the only one of their kind available to scientists.

  5. Unmixing the SNCs: Chemical, Isotopic, and Petrologic Components of the Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the conference on Unmixing the SNCs: Chemical, Isotopic, and Petrologic Components of Martian Meteorites, September 11-12, 2002, in Houston, Texas. Administration and publications support for this meeting were provided by the staff of the Publications and Program Services Department at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  6. A Petrologic and bulk Chemical Characterization of the Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrite Northwest Africa 5717

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigolski, J. N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Weisberg, M. K.; O'Keefe, M.-C.

    2014-09-01

    We examine the chemical group affinities of Northwest Africa 5717 (Type 3.05) in terms of its petrologic and bulk chemical characteristics and test its apparent dual lithology. Preliminary data suggest it to be related to L- and LL-chondrites.

  7. Petrology and Geochemistry of Lunar Meteorite Abar al'Uj 012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, M.; Hofmann, B. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Gnos, E.; Greber, N.; Greenwood, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The petrology and geochemistry of Abar al’Uj 012, a feldspathic lunar meteorite found in Saudi Arabia is described. The meteorite is a vesicular crystalline impact-melt breccia, which lacks a fusion crust and has a ferroan anorthosite affinity.

  8. Mineralogy and petrology of complex breccia 14063,14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    Breccia 14063,14 is a complex, probably pre-Imbrian, unmetamorphosed breccia dominated almost entirely by mineral clasts. Electron-probe and microscope examination showed at least four distinct lithologies in a centimeter-sized thin-section. Examination of each lithology showed or suggested the following contributing rock types or mineralogies: (1) dunite with minor chromite, very high-Mg ilmenite and bronzite; (2) spinel troctolite with olivine and Mg-Al spinel; (3) high-Ti mare-like basalt with high-Mg ilmenite and coarse pyroxene; (4) low-KREEP noritic breccia; (5) anorthosite; (6) very Ni-rich Fe metal.

  9. A Microscopic Information System (MIS) to assist in petrographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, S.; Favalli, M.

    2009-04-01

    Rock texture results from all the petrological processes that have affected the rock system. The interpretation of a rock texture relies on the analysis of the morphometric parameters of the constituting components (e.g. crystals or grains). A consistent and statistically sound quantification of components size and shape is crucial to adequately unravel the petrology of a rock, but the gathering of these measurements may be time-consuming or difficult to achieve using low-cost facilities. The basic technique for texture analysis of rocks is the observation of thin sections in transmitted light by using a petrographic microscope. To automate and speed-up textural measurements from thin section in transmitted light, several image processing procedures have been published in the last two decades. Nevertheless, the complexity of the optical properties of crystals hampered the determination of a method that is completely satisfactory, especially for complex polymineralic plutonic rocks. This work provides a contribution to solve this problem. We present a novel composite procedure based on four approaches: i) the use of a slide scanner to acquire the input imagery in transmitted light from thin sections without using the petrographic microscope; ii) the storage of the resulting images in a GIS-like database structure that is extremely useful to retrieve, browse and analyze a large archive of images from a high number of thin sections; iii) the application of a custom image analysis procedure based on two region growing functions; iv) the refinement of the regions after raster to vector conversion using GIS software. We call the obtained analysis system a Microscopic Information System (MIS), because it relies on GIS software but it is not a geographic system. In this study we apply this technique to analyze 137 thin sections obtained from 49 samples of 8 different granitoid rocks that are commonly used in the decorative stone industry. For each thin section 5 collimated

  10. Petrology and stratigraphy of Paleogene nonmarine sandstones, Cascade Range, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frizzell, Virgil A.

    1979-01-01

    are important constituents of the Puget Group, the Chumstick and Naches Formations, and the isolated arkosic bodies. The three older units, however, contain relatively less volcanic lithics to total lithics than do younger units, indicating perhaps the initiation of more widespread volcanic activity in middle Eocene time. Ratios of framework grain parameters show that the terrestrial sandstone units were derived from a mixed plutonic and tectonic source terrane of continental block tectonic provenance with an overprint of magmatic arc provenance. Modal analysis was performed on samples from the various sedimentary units to establish petrologic compositions, and to provide data with which to compare the different units and discuss clast provenance and tectonic regimen. Although the arkosic sandstones have generally uniform framework clast compositions, minor yet significant differences do exist between the units. Basal or basement-onlap portions of the units in particular are locally derived and differ markedly from the overall compositions of the individual units. Many coincidences of composition, age, structure, and bedrock indicate that the Chuckanut and Swauk may have originally been deposited as a single unit that since has been offset approximately 160 kilometers by right lateral strike slip motion starting about 48 Ma. If this hypothetical offset did occur, then major movement on the Straight Creek Fault is bracketed between about 48 Ma and Oligocene time.