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Sample records for viscous impeller pump

  1. A parametric study for improving the centrifugal pump impeller for use in viscous fluid pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaeefard, M. H.; Tahani, M.; Khalkhali, A.; Ehghaghi, M. B.; Fallah, H.; Beglari, M.

    2013-02-01

    Essentially, performance of centrifugal pumps is affected when pumping viscous fluids. In this paper a new idea is proposed to overcome the undesirable effects of viscosity on the pump performance parameters. This idea based on this matter that one specific impeller can be designed, made and installed on the pump for pumping of one fluid with specific viscosity. Therefore a specific pump can be used for pumping of different fluids with different viscosity, by replacement of pump impeller. Replacement of the impeller is more cost effective in comparison to the replacement of the whole of the pump. Passage width and outlet angle of impeller are considered as design variables and the effects of such variables investigated using experimentally validated numerical model. The H-Q, P-Q and ?-Q graphs are extracted experimentally for the improved impeller, which show good improvement in comparison with original impeller.

  2. Cavopulmonary assist for the univentricular Fontan circulation: von Kármán Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP™)

    PubMed Central

    Rodefeld, Mark D; Coats, Brandon; Fisher, Travis; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Chen, Jun; Brown, John W; Frankel, Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives In a univentricular Fontan circulation, modest augmentation of existing cavopulmonary pressure head (2–5 mmHg) would reduce systemic venous pressure, increase ventricular filling, and thus, substantially improve circulatory status. An ideal means of providing mechanical cavopulmonary support does not exist. We hypothesized that a viscous impeller pump, based on the von Kármán viscous pump principle, is optimal for this role. Methods A 3-dimensional computational model of the total cavopulmonary connection was created. The impeller was represented as a smooth 2-sided conical actuator disk with rotation in the vena caval axis. Flow was modeled under 3 conditions: 1) passive flow with no disc; 2) passive flow with a non-rotating disk, and 3) induced flow with disc rotation (0–5K rpm). Flow patterns and hydraulic performance were examined for each case. Hydraulic performance for a vaned impeller was assessed by measuring pressure rise and induced flow over 0–7K rpm in a laboratory mock loop. Results A nonrotating actuator disc stabilizes cavopulmonary flow, reducing power loss by 88%. Disk rotation (from baseline dynamic flow of 4.4 L/min) resulted in a pressure rise of 0.03 mmHg. A further increase of pressure of 5–20 mmHg and 0–5 L/min flow were obtained with a vaned impeller at 0–7K rpm in a laboratory mock loop. Conclusions A single viscous impeller pump stabilizes and augments cavopulmonary flow in 4 directions, in the desired pressure range, without venous pathway obstruction. It applies to the existing staged protocol as a temporary bridge-to-recovery or –transplant in established univentricular Fontan circulations. It may also enable compressed palliation of single ventricle without need for intermediary surgical staging or use of a systemic-to-pulmonary arterial shunt. PMID:20561640

  3. Performance evaluation of a pediatric viscous impeller pump for Fontan cavopulmonary assist

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, GA; Koenig, SC; Kennington, J; Sobieski, MA; Chen, J; Frankel, SH; Rodefeld, MD

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The anatomic and physiologic constraints for pediatric cavopulmonary assist differ markedly from adult Fontan circulations due to smaller vessel sizes and risk of elevated pulmonary resistance. In this study, hemodynamic and hemolysis performance capability of a catheter-based viscous impeller pump (VIP) to power the Fontan circulation is assessed at a pediatric scale (~15 kg) and performance range (0-30 mmHg). Methods Computer simulation and mock circulation studies were conducted to assess the hydraulic performance, acute hemodynamic response to different levels VIP support, and the potential for vena cavae collapse. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to estimate VIP hydraulic performance, shear rates, and potential for hemolysis. Hemolysis was quantified in a mock loop with fresh bovine blood. Results A VIP augmented 4-way total cavopulmonary connection flow at pediatric scales and restored systemic pressures and flows to biventricular values, without causing flow obstruction or suction. VIP generated flows up to 4.1 L/min and pressure heads of up to 38 mmHg at 11,000 rpm. Maximal shear rate was 160 Pa, predicting low hemolysis risk. Observed hemolysis was low with plasma free hemoglobin of 11.4 mg/dL/hr. Conclusions A VIP will augment Fontan cavopulmonary flow in the proper pressure and flow ranges, with low hemolysis risk under more stringent pediatric scale and physiology compared to adult scale. This technology may be developed to simultaneously reduce systemic venous pressure and improve cardiac output after stage-2 or -3 Fontan repair. It may serve to compress surgical staging, lessening the pathophysiologic burden of repair. PMID:22421403

  4. Centrifugal pump impeller

    SciTech Connect

    Lovisetto, P.

    1988-01-19

    An impeller for a centrifugal pump is described comprising: a rotatable impeller shaft; circumferentially spaced vanes mounted for rotation with the impeller shaft, the vanes extending outwardly relative to the impeller shaft and each including first and second axially-spaced edges; first and second axially-spaced cover members for vanes, the cover members being mounted for rotation with the impeller shaft and extending outwardly relative to the axial direction of the impeller shaft, the first cover member being disposed adjacent to the first edges of the vanes and the second cover member being disposed adjacent to the second edges of the vanes so as to provide an impeller chamber between the first and second cover members which is divided into subchambers by the vanes. One of the first and second cover members has a centrally disposed inlet opening therethrough for admitting fluid into the impeller chamber to then be conducted outwardly upon rotation of the impeller shaft; and the fist cover member being so constructed and mounted relative to the vanes that a portion thereof is free to flex axially away from respective portions of the first edges of the vanes in response to fluid pressure pulsations within the impeller chamber to temporarily increase the distance between the portion of the first cover and the respective portions of the first edges of the vanes.

  5. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  6. High Head Unshrouded Impeller Pump Stage Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Skelley, Stephen E.; Stewart, Eric T.; Droege, Alan R.; Prueger, George H.; Chen, Wei-Chung; Williams, Morgan; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Objective to develop an unshrouded impeller design, which a meets the performance requirements of a 3-stage fuel pump with a 2-stage pump design, has been accomplished. Performance of the baseline unshrouded impeller has been experimentally verified. Unshrouded impeller trade study and final 6+6 unshrouded impeller configuration has been presented. Structurally viable, 6+6-impeller design concept has been produced. Based on results presented in this study, at a nominal 10% tip-clearance, the 6+6 impeller design would increase payload to orbit by almost 625 lbs. per engine. The RLV vehicle requires 7 engines, therefore, application of high head unshrouded technology would increase payload capability by as much as 4,375 lbs. per vehicle.

  7. Trim or Replace Impellers on Oversized Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    One in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial pumping systems. As a result of conservative engineering practices, pumps are often substantially larger than they need to be for an industrial plant's process requirements. Centrifugal pumps can often be oversized because of ''rounding up'', trying to accommodate gradual increases in pipe surface roughness and flow resistance over time, or anticipating future plant capacity expansions. In addition, the plant's pumping requirements might not have been clearly defined during the design phase. Because of this conservative approach, pumps can have operating points completely different from their design points. The pump head is often less than expected, while the flow rate is greater. This can cause cavitation and waste energy as the flow rate typically must be regulated with bypass or throttle control. Oversized and throttled pumps that produce excess pressure are excellent candidates for impeller replacement or ''trimming'', to save energy and reduce costs. Trimming involves machining the impeller to reduce its diameter. Trimming should be limited to about 75% of a pump's maximum impeller diameter, because excessive trimming can result in a mismatched impeller and casing. As the impeller diameter decreases, added clearance between the impeller and the fixed pump casing increases internal flow recirculation, causes head loss, and lowers pumping efficiency. For manufacturing standardization purposes, pump casings and shafts are designed to accommodate impellers in a range of sizes. Many pump manufacturers provide pump performance curves that indicate how various models will perform with different impeller diameters or trims. The impeller should not be trimmed any smaller than the minimum diameter shown on the curve. Net positive suction head requirements (NPSHR) usually decrease at lower flow rates and can increase at the higher end of the pump head curve. The NPSHR at a given flow rate will normally be greater with a smaller impeller, but engineers should consult with the pump manufacturer to determine variations in NPSHR before trimming the impeller. Manufacturers can often provide trim correction charts based on historical test data.

  8. High Head Unshrouded Impeller Pump Stage Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Skelley, Stephen E.; Stewart, Eric T.; Droege, Alan R.; Prueger, George H.; Chen, Wei-Chung; Williams, Morgan; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A team of engineers at NASA/MSFC and Boeing, Rocketdyne division, are developing unshrouded impeller technologies that will increase payload and decrease cost of future reusable launch vehicles. Using the latest analytical techniques and experimental data, a two-stage unshrouded fuel pump is being designed that will meet the performance requirements of a three-stage shrouded pump. Benefits of the new pump include lower manufacturing costs, reduced weight, and increased payload to orbit.

  9. Some unsteady fluid forces on pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskovish, R. S.; Brennen, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Special analyses of all the forces and moments acting on a typical centrifugal pump impeller/volute combination are presented. These exhibit shaft frequencies, blade passing frequencies, and beat frequencies associated with a whirl motion imposed on the shaft in order to measure rotordynamic forces. Among other features the unsteady thrust was found to contain a surprisingly large blade passing harmonic. While previous studies have explored the magnitudes of the steady fluid-induced radial forces and the fluid-induced rotordynamic forces for this typical centrifugal pump impeller/volute combination, this paper presents information on the steady bending moments and rotordynamic moments due to the fluid flow. These imply certain axial locations for the lines of action of the radial and rotordynamic forces. Data on the lines of action are presented and allow inferences on the sources of the forces.

  10. Turbo-pump with isolated two stage impellers for future rocket engine (Trial to drive impellers independently)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemoto, Toshiaki; Shimojyo, Makoto; Kawashima, Ryunosuke; Tanaka, Daisuke; Inagaki, Akira; Oba, Shin

    2008-03-01

    To suppress the cavitation in the impellers and to make the turbo-pump lives longer, the inducer was separated from the main impeller and both impellers were driven independently. The performance of the pump and the flow conditions around the impellers were investigated experimentally and the following results were obtained. (1)The main impeller contributes to the flow interaction between the inducer and the main impeller. (2)The rotational speeds of both impellers can be controlled independently in order to suppress simultaneously the cavitation not only in the main impeller, but also in the inducer.

  11. Evaluation of floating impeller phenomena in a Gyro centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ikuya; Ichikawa, S; Mikami, M; Ishitoya, H; Motomura, T; Kawamura, M; Linneweber, J; Glueck, J; Shinohara, T; Nosé, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Gyro centrifugal pump developed as a totally implantable artificial heart was designed with a free impeller, in which the rotational shaft (male bearing) of the impeller was completely separated from the female bearing. For this type of pump, it is very important to keep the proper magnet balance (impeller-magnet and actuator-magnet) in order to prevent thrombus formation and/or bearing wear. When the magnet balance is not proper, the impeller is jerked down into the bottom bearing. On the other hand, if magnet balance is proper, the impeller lifted off the bottom of the pump housing within a certain range of pumping conditions. In this study, this floating phenomenon was investigated in detail. The floating phenomenon was proved by observation of the impeller behavior using a transparent acrylic pump. The impeller floating phenomenon was mapped on a pump performance curve. The impeller floating phenomenon is affected by the magnet-magnet coupling distance and rotational speed of the impeller. In order to keep the proper magnet balance and to maintain the impeller floating phenomenon at the driving condition of right and left pump, the magnet-magnet coupling distance was altered by a spacer which was installed between the pump and actuator. It became clear that the same pump could handle different conditions (right and left ventricular assist), by just changing the thickness of the spacer. When magnet balance is proper, the floating impeller phenomenon occurs automatically in response to the impeller rev. It is called "the dynamic RPM suspension". PMID:23442236

  12. Impeller for a moderate-flow centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ryazanov, S.D.

    1985-07-01

    The author explains the problems in design that cause the inefficiency of conventional low-discharge centrifugal pumps. He then describes the design and operation of an impeller with improved energy characteristics. He concludes that the new design, intermediate between an impeller with cylindrical channels and the conventional impellers with straight vanes, makes it possible to expand the recommended adjustment range of the pump's delivery and to increase the pressure and efficiency by approximately 9%.

  13. Origins of hydrodynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions that occur between a centrifugal pump impeller and volute are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The theoretical analysis considers the inability of the blades to perfectly guide the flow through the impeller, and also includes a quasi-one dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute. The disturbance at the impeller discharge and the resulting forces are determined by the theoretical model. The model is then extended to obtain the hydrodynamic force perturbations that are caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. Under many operating conditions, these force perturbations were found to be destablizing. Comparisons are made between the theoretical model and the experimental measurements of pressure distributions and radial forces on the impeller. The theoretical model yields fairly accurate predictions of the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. However, it was found that the pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller has a substantial effect on the destablizing hydrodynamic forces.

  14. Analyses of hydrodynamic radial forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, D. R.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the hydrodynamic interactions occurring between a centrifugal pump impeller and a volute is presented. The theoretical analysis provides a quasi-one-dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute, and it is extended to include the hydrodynamic force perturbations caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. It is noted that these perturbations are often destabilizing. The theoretical models were found to accurately predict the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. The pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller is shown to have a significant effect on the destabilizing hydrodyamic forces.

  15. Distinctive feature of self-oscillations (surging) of impeller pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2012-01-01

    It has been established experimentally and confirmed analytically that before the stall of a centrifugal impeller pump, self-oscillations (surging) of the pump are set up in the region of ascending cavitation branchings of its monotonically decreasing head characteristic. Beyond this region, the pumping mode of such a pump is absolutely stable. It has been established that changes in the nonstationary operation of a centrifugal impeller pump produced by variation of its wave resistance are diametrically opposite in character in cavitation and cavitation-free modes.

  16. Analysis on Turbulent Flow in the Impeller of Chemical Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M. G.; Liu, D.; Gu, H. F.; Kang, C.; Li, H.

    To study the phenomena of two-phase flow with salt crystallizing in the chemical pump, the 3-D turbulent flow in the impeller of chemical pump was simulated under the condition of rinsing. The internal flow between the impellers of 1H65 chemical pump was investigated. Based on the Reynoldsaveraging N-S equations and the standard k -? two equations turbulent model, the simulations of turbulent flow between the impellers are performed by using the flow computing software Fluent under different operating conditions. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Based on the analysis of the calculated results of velocity and pressure profiles in the chemical pump and experimentally observed phenomenon of flow impact, secondary flow and recirculation, some design improvements are proposed, which give suggestions on the optimal design and internal two-phase flow study of the chemical pump.

  17. Viscous pumping inspired by flexible propulsion.

    PubMed

    Arco, Roger M; Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Fluid-suspended microorganisms have evolved different swimming and feeding strategies in order to cope with an environment dominated by viscous effects. For instance, ciliated organisms rely on the collective motion of flexible appendages to move and feed. By performing a non-reciprocal motion, flexible filaments can produce a net propulsive force, or pump fluid, in the absence of inertia. Inspired by such a fundamental concept, we propose a strategy to produce macroscopic pumping and mixing in creeping flow. We measured experimentally the net motion of a Newtonian viscous fluid induced by the reciprocal motion of a flapper. When the flapper is rigid no net motion is induced. In contrast, when the flapper is made of a flexible material, a net fluid pumping is measured. We quantify the effectiveness of this pumping strategy and show that optimal pumping is achieved when the length of the flapper is on the same order as the elasto-hydrodynamic penetration length. We finally discuss the possible applications of flexible impellers in mixing operations at low Reynolds numbers. PMID:24667497

  18. The helical flow pump with a hydrodynamic levitation impeller.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yusuke; Ishii, Kohei; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Nakano, Emiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Ono, Minoru; Imachi, Kou

    2012-12-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) is a novel rotary blood pump invented for developing a total artificial heart (TAH). The HFP with a hydrodynamic levitation impeller, which consists of a multi-vane impeller involving rotor magnets, stator coils at the core position, and double helical-volute pump housing, was developed. Between the stator and impeller, a hydrodynamic bearing is formed. Since the helical volutes are formed at both sides of the impeller, blood flows with a helical flow pattern inside the pump. The developed HFP showed maximum output of 19 l/min against 100 mmHg of pressure head and 11 % maximum efficiency. The profile of the H-Q (pressure head vs. flow) curve was similar to that of the undulation pump. Hydrodynamic levitation of the impeller was possible with higher than 1,000 rpm rotation speed. The normalized index of the hemolysis ratio of the HFP to centrifugal pump (BPX-80) was from 2.61 to 8.07 depending on the design of the bearing. The HFP was implanted in two goats with a left ventricular bypass method. After surgery, hemolysis occurred in both goats. The hemolysis ceased on postoperative days 14 and 9, respectively. In the first experiment, no thrombus was found in the pump after 203 days of pumping. In the second experiment, a white thrombus was found in the pump after 23 days of pumping. While further research and development are necessary, we are expecting to develop an excellent TAH with the HFP. PMID:22926404

  19. Cavitating flow investigation inside centrifugal impellers for a condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Luo, X. W.; Ji, B.; Zhuang, B. T.; Xu, H. Y.

    2012-11-01

    In order to investigate the effect of blade inlet angle on centrifugal pump cavitation performance, numerical simulation of cavitating turbulent flow is conducted for a condensate pump with different impellers based on SST k-? turbulence model and a mixture cavitation model. The results indicate that for a condensate pump having meridional section with larger area at blade leading edge compared with conventional pumps, the reverse flows inside the blade-to-blade channels are not negligible. It is noted that large incidence at blade leading edge is helpful to improve the cavitation performance for the pump. The possible reason may be the growth of cavities inside the impeller has less influence on the flow in the channel between two neighboring blades. Further, uniform incidence angle along the blade leading edge is preferable for the improvement of cavitation performance.

  20. Investigation on impeller radial force for double-suction centrifugal pump with staggered blade arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. C.; Wang, F. J.; Yao, Z. F.; Leng, H. F.; Zhou, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to find the effects of blade arrangement on impeller radial force, a double-suction centrifugal pump with two impeller configurations is investigated by using CFD approach. The two impeller have same geometry, same blade number, and different blade arrangement. One is staggered impeller in which the blades are arranged with half of blade phase angle staggered in circular direction, another is traditional symmetrical impeller with symmetrical blade arrangement. Results show that the radial force vector diagram for symmetrical impeller is a hexagonal, while it is nearly a circle for staggered impeller. The staggered impeller results no radial force saltation which exists in symmetrical impeller. The blade passing frequency dominates the radial force fluctuation in symmetrical impeller, while this frequency is almost not existed in staggered impeller. The results indicate that staggered blade arrangement can significantly reduce radial force fluctuation in double-suction centrifugal pump.

  1. Proposal of Unique Process Pump with Floating Type Centrifugal Impeller (Preliminarily Report : Axial Thrust of Impeller with Driving Shaft)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Ryunosuke; Kanemoto, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Kengo; Uno, Mitsuo

    2010-06-01

    The authors have proposed the unique centrifugal pump, in which the impeller dose not have the driving shaft but is driven by the magnetic induction, namely Lorentz force, without the stay. Then, the rotating posture of the impeller is not stable, just like UFO. To make the rotating posture of the impeller stable irrespective of the operating condition, the pressure in the impeller casing was investigated experimentally while the impeller rotates at the steady state, as the preliminarily stage. The pressure, as well known, fluctuates periodically in response to the blade number. Besides, the pressure on the impeller shrouds decreases with the increase of the gap between the front shroud and the suction cover where the water leaks to the suction pipe, and is distorted in the peripheral direction. Such pressure conditions contribute directly to the hydraulic force acting on the impeller. The unstable behaviors of the impeller are induced from the above hydraulic forces, which change unsteadily in the radial and the peripheral directions in the impeller casing. The forces are affected by not only the operating condition but also the rotating posture of the impeller.

  2. Research on performance of centrifugal pump with different-type open impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Chen, Desheng; Wang, Canfei; Zhu, Zuchao; Jin, Yingzi; Jin, Yuzhen

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the influence of impeller type on the performance and inner flow of centrifugal pump, the numerical simulation and experimental research were carried out on the same centrifugal pump with straight-blade and curved-blade open impeller. Based on SIMPLEC algorithm, time-averaged N-S equation and the standard k-? turbulence model, the numerical results are obtained. The pressure distribution in the different type impellers is uniform, while the low pressure area in straight-blade inlet is larger. The vortexes in the passage of impeller exist in both cases. Relative to curved-blade impeller, there are larger vortexes in most of the flow passages except the passage near the tongue in straight-blade impeller. Also some small backflow regions are found at the blade inlet of two impellers. The characteristic curves achieved by numerical simulation basically agree with those by experiment, and straight-blade open impeller centrifugal pump has a better hydraulic performance.

  3. Erosion predictions of stock pump impellers based on liquid-solid two-phase fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y. X.; Fang, B.; Zeng, C. J.; Yang, L. B.; Wang, F.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    Stock pumps cost 25 percent of total power consumption in a modern paper mill. Owing to the severe erosion of pump casing and impeller during operation, stock pump often results in efficiency drop and rising power consumption. A favourable prediction of the impeller wearing character can effective guide optimization design of stock pump impeller. Thereby it can reduce impeller wear and extend stock pump performance life. We simulated the three-dimensional unsteady solid-liquid two-phase flow characteristic in the hydraulic channel of a low specific speed stock pump with open and three blades impeller. The standard k- ? turbulent model and the pseudo-fluid model were adopted in simulation. Clearance between covers and impeller is taken into consideration in modelling, and pulp is simplified into mixtures of solid particles and water. The Finnie prediction model is applied to predict impeller erosion character. The simulation results of different solid particle size are compared with practical impeller erosion character, and the effects of solid particle size on impeller erosion character are obtained. Thus, numerical method to simulate impeller erosion characteristics of fibered pulp is investigated.

  4. Impeller behavior and displacement of the VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael K H; Zhang, Nong; Tansley, Geoff D; Woodard, John C

    2004-03-01

    The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump, intended for long-term ventricular assist, is under development and is currently being tested for its rotor-dynamic stability. The pump is of the centrifugal type and consists of a shaftless impeller, also acting as the rotor of the brushless DC motor. The impeller remains passively suspended in the pump cavity by hydrodynamic forces, resulting from the small clearances between the impeller outside surfaces and the pump cavity. In the older version of the pump tested, these small clearances range from approximately 50 microm to 230 microm; the displacement of the impeller relative to the pump cavity is unknown in use. This article presents two experiments: the first measured displacement of the impeller using eddy-current proximity sensors and laser proximity sensors. The second experiment used Hall-effect proximity sensors to measure the displacement of the impeller relative to the pump cavity. All transducers were calibrated prior to commencement of the experiments. Voltage output from the transducers was converted into impeller movement in five degrees of freedom (x, y, z, theta(x), and theta(y)). The sixth degree of freedom, the rotation about the impeller axis (theta(z)), was determined by the commutation performed by the motor controller. The impeller displacement was found to be within the acceptable range of 8 micro m to 222 microm, avoiding blood damage and contact between the impeller and cavity walls. Thus the impeller was hydrodynamically suspended within the pump cavity and results were typical of centrifugal pump behavior. This research will be the basis for further investigation into the stiffness and damping coefficient of the pump's hydrodynamic bearing. PMID:15046628

  5. Interaction of impeller and guide vane in a series-designed axial-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the interaction of the impeller and guide vane in a series-designed axial-flow pump was examined through the implementation of a commercial CFD code. The impeller series design refers to the general design procedure of the base impeller shape which must satisfy the various flow rate and head requirements by changing the impeller setting angle and number of blades of the base impeller. An arc type meridional shape was used to keep the meridional shape of the hub and shroud with various impeller setting angles. The blade angle and the thickness distribution of the impeller were designed as an NACA airfoil type. In the design of the guide vane, it was necessary to consider the outlet flow condition of the impeller with the given setting angle. The meridional shape of the guide vane were designed taking into consideration the setting angle of the impeller, and the blade angle distribution of the guide vane was determined with a traditional design method using vane plane development. In order to achieve the optimum impeller design and guide vane, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and the DOE method were applied. The interaction between the impeller and guide vane with different combination set of impeller setting angles and number of impeller blades was addressed by analyzing the flow field of the computational results.

  6. Design optimization of a centrifugal pump impeller and volute using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Oh, K. T.; Pyun, K. B.; Kim, C. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Yoon, J. Y.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, optimization of the impeller and design of volute were carried out in order to improve the performance of a centrifugal pump. Design parameters from vane plane development for impeller design were selected and effect of the design parameters on the performance of the pump was analyzed using CFD and Response Surface Method to optimized impeller. This study also proposed the optimization geometry of pump impeller for performance improvement through the results from numerical analysis that was obtained optimum design pump; efficiency 98.2% and head 64.5m. In addition, the pump design method was suggested by designing volute which was suitable for the optimized impeller through volute design where Stepanoff theory was applied and numerical analysis.

  7. Evaluation of subgrid-scale models in large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengjun; Wang, Fujun; Zhou, Peijian

    2012-09-01

    The current research of large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow in pumps mainly concentrates in applying conventional subgrid-scale (SGS) model to simulate turbulent flow, which aims at obtaining the flow field in pump. The selection of SGS model is usually not considered seriously, so the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation cannot be ensured. Three SGS models including Smagorinsky-Lilly model, dynamic Smagorinsky model and dynamic mixed model are comparably studied by using the commercial CFD code Fluent combined with its user define function. The simulations are performed for the turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump impeller. The simulation results indicate that the mean flows predicted by the three SGS models agree well with the experimental data obtained from the test that detailed measurements of the flow inside the rotating passages of a six-bladed shrouded centrifugal pump impeller performed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The comparable results show that dynamic mixed model gives the most accurate results for mean flow in the centrifugal pump impeller. The SGS stress of dynamic mixed model is decompose into the scale similar part and the eddy viscous part. The scale similar part of SGS stress plays a significant role in high curvature regions, such as the leading edge and training edge of pump blade. It is also found that the dynamic mixed model is more adaptive to compute turbulence in the pump impeller. The research results presented is useful to improve the computational accuracy and efficiency of LES for centrifugal pumps, and provide important reference for carrying out simulation in similar fluid machineries.

  8. Numerical Study of a Fuel Centrifugal Pump with Variable Impeller Width for Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Guan, Huasheng; Ye, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    As typical pump with large flow rate and high reliability, centrifugal pumps in fuel system of aero-engines mostly regulate flow rate by flow bypass, which leads to low efficiency and large fuel temperature rise especially at low flow rate. An innovative fuel centrifugal pump with variable impeller width is a more effective way to regulate flow rate than flow bypass. To find external characteristics of the centrifugal pump with variable impeller width proposed in this paper, flow domain within the pump is simulated numerically and some primary performance parameters and their correlation are analyzed. Results show that flow rate of the pump can be regulated by variable impeller width and that efficiency for this scheme is higher than that for flow bypass. The higher outlet static pressure the pump runs at, the wider range of flow rates can be obtained with stronger nonlinear relationship between flow rate and impeller width.

  9. Static and Dynamics of a Pump Impeller with a Balancing Device Part II: Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martsinkovsky, V. A.; Zhulyov, A.; Kundera, C.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical study of the system comprising an impeller and a balancing device. It deals with the dynamic analysis of the system, i.e., the axial vibrations of the impeller, and the system stability. The dynamic analysis took into account linearized hydrodynamic forces and moments generated in the longitudinal clearances of the seals of the impeller. The theoretical analysis was supplemented with a numerical example with characteristics determined for a real single-stage centrifugal pump

  10. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic radial forces and stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump-impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the steady-state hydrodynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller are presented as a function of position within two geometrically different volutes. These correspond to the forces experienced by the impeller at zero whirl frequency. The hydrodynamic force matrices derived from these measurements exhibit both diagonal and off-diagonal terms of substantial magnitude. These terms are of the form which would tend to excite a whirl motion in a rotordynamic analysis of the pump; this may be the cause of 'rough running' reported in many pumps. Static pressure measurements in the impeller discharge flow show that the hydrodynamic force on the impeller contains a substantial component due to the nonisotropy of the net momentum flux leaving the impeller. A similar breakdown of the contributions to the stiffness matrices reveals that the major component of these matrices results from the nonisotropy of the momentum flux.

  11. Unsteady diffuser vane pressure and impeller wake measurements in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, N.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a vaned diffuser of a centrifugal pump, and wake measurements of the flow exiting a centrifugal impeller into a vaneless diffuser are presented. Frequency spectra and ensemble averages are given for the unsteady measurements. Two different impellers were used, the pump impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) and a two-dimensional impeller. The magnitude of the unsteady total pressure measured in the stationary frame at the impeller exit was found to be of the same order of magnitude as the total pressure rise across the pump. The magnitude of the unsteady diffuser vane pressures was observed to be significantly different on suction and pressure side of the vane, attaining its largest value on the suction side the leading edge while decreasing along the vane.

  12. Numerical study of a centrifugal blood pump with different impeller profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with 16 forward-bending blades (16FB), 16 straight blades (16SB), and eight backward-bending blades (8BB) impellers were performed in this study. Commercial CFD software package FLUENT were used as the solver. The purpose of this study is to find out how the impeller blade profiles affect the inner flow and the performance of the centrifugal blood pump. The simulations were carried out with the same impeller rotating speed of 2,000 rpm and pump flow rate of 5 L/min to compare the three pump models. It was found that the 16SB impeller can produce higher pressure head than the 16FB and 8BB impellers under the same impeller rotating speed and pump flow rate. The flow particle tracing was carried out to estimate the blood damage level caused by the three different impeller profiles. It was found that the 16FB and 8BB models have caused the highest and lowest blood damage, respectively. The 16SB is recommended among the three pumps because it can generate the highest pressure head and induce mild blood damage index, although it was higher than that of the 8BB model. PMID:20019595

  13. Numerical identification of blade exit angle effect on the performance for a multistage centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, Osman; Kocaaslan, Osman; Hilmi Aksoy, Muharrem; Melih Guleren, Kursad; Ozgoren, Muammer

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, single and multistage centrifugal pumps are widely used in industrial and mining enterprises. One of the most important components of a centrifugal pump is the impeller. The performance characteristics are related to the pump comprising the head and the overall efficiency rely a great deal on the impeller geometry. In this work, effects of blade exit angle change on hydraulic efficiency of a multi stage pump impeller are investigated via Ansys-Fluent computational fluid dynamics software for constant width impeller entrance and exit gates, blade numbers and blade thickness. Firstly, the flow volume of a centrifugal pump impeller is generated and then mesh structure is formed for the full impeller flow volume. Secondly, rotational periodic flow model are adopted in order to examine the effect of periodic flow assumption on the performance predictions. Corresponding to the available experimental data, inlet mass flow rate, outlet static pressure and rotation of impeller are taken as 0.02m3s-1, 450 kPa and 2950 rpm, respectively for the water fluid. No slip boundary condition is exposed to all solid of surface in the flow volume. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations with the k-? turbulence model and the standard wall functions are used. During the study, numerical analyses are conducted for the blade exit angle values of 18°, 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°. In consequence of the performed analyses, it is determined that hydraulic efficiency of the pump impeller value is changed between 81.0-84.6%. The most convenient blade exit angle that yields 84.6% hydraulic efficiency at is 18°. The obtained results show that the blade exit angle range has an impact on the centrifugal pump performance describing the pump head and the hydraulic efficiency.

  14. Centrifugal blood pump with a hydraulically-levitated impeller for a permanently implantable biventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kuniyoshi; Ichikawa, Seiji; Asai, Toshimasa; Motomura, Tadashi; Hata, Atsushi; Ito, Seiichi; Shinohara, Toshiyuki; Tsujimura, Shinichi; Glueck, Julia A; Oestmann, Daniel J; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2004-06-01

    A permanently implantable biventricular assist device (BVAD) system has been developed with a centrifugal pump which is activated by a hydraulically-levitated impeller. The pump impeller floats hydraulically into the top contact position; this position prevents thrombus formation by creating a washout effect at the bottom bearing area, a common stagnant region. The pump was subjected to in vitro studies using a pulsatile mock circulation loop to confirm the impeller's top contact position and the swinging motion produced by the pulsation. Eleven in vivo BVAD studies confirmed that this swinging motion eliminated blood clot formation. Twenty-one pumps im-planted for up to three months did not reveal any thrombosis in the pumps or downstream organs. One exception was a right pump which was exposed to severe low flow due to the kinking of the outflow graft by the accidental pulling of the flow meter cable. Three ninety-day BVAD studies were achieved without thrombus formation. PMID:15153148

  15. Investigation of the flow in the impeller side clearances of a centrifugal pump with volute casing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Björn-Christian; Benra, Friedrich-Karl; Dohmen, Hans-Josef

    2012-06-01

    The paper is concerned with the fluid flow in the impeller side clearances of a centrifugal pump with volute casing. The flow conditions in these small axial gaps are of significant importance for a number of effects such as disk friction, leakage losses or hydraulic axial thrust to name but a few. In the investigated single stage pump, the flow pattern in the volute turns out to be asymmetric even at design flow rate. To gain a detailed insight into the flow structure, numerical simulations of the complete pump including the impeller side clearances are accomplished. Additionally, the hydraulic head and the radial pressure distributions in the impeller side clearances are measured and compared with the numerical results. Two configurations of the impeller, either with or without balancing holes, are examined. Moreover, three different operating points, i.e.: design point, part load or overload conditions are considered. In addition, analytical calculations are accomplished to determine the pressure distributions in the impeller side clearances. If accurate boundary conditions are available, the 1D flow models used in this paper can provide reasonable results for the radial static pressure distribution in the impeller side clearances. Furthermore, a counter rotating wake region develops in the rear impeller side clearances in absence of balancing holes which severely affects the inflow and outflow conditions of the cavity in circumferential direction.

  16. Dynamic characteristics of a magnetically levitated impeller in a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2007-04-01

    Centrifugal blood pumps that employ hybrid active/passive magnetic bearings to support noncontact impellers have been developed in order to reduce bearing wear, pump size, the power consumption of the active magnetic bearing, and blood trauma. However, estimates made at the design stage of the vibration of the impeller in the direction of passive suspension during pump operation were inaccurate, because the influence of both the pumping fluid and the rotation of the impeller on the dynamic characteristics was not fully recognized. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dynamic characteristics in a fluid of a magnetically levitated rotating impeller by measuring both the frequency response to sinusoidal excitation of the housing over a wide frequency range and the displacement due to input of a pulsatile flow during left ventricular (LV) assist. The excitation tests were conducted under conditions in which the impeller was levitated in either air or water, and with or without rotation. The experimental and analytical results indicate that vibration of the impeller due to the external force in water was decreased, compared with that in air due to the hydraulic force of water. The axial resonant frequency rose quadratically with rotational speed, and the tilt mode had two resonant frequencies while rotating due to the gyroscopic effect. With the pump inserted into a mock systemic circulatory loop, the dynamic stability of the impeller when pulsatile pressure was applied during LV assist was verified experimentally. The amplitudes of vibration in response to the pulsatile flow in the passively constrained directions were considerably smaller in size than the dimensions of initial gaps between the impeller and the pump housing. PMID:17437499

  17. Experimental study on the flow of a mixed flow pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. L.; Guo, P. C.; Feng, J. J.; Luo, X. Q.

    2012-11-01

    Mixed flow pump is wildly used in many field, the performance of the whole pump is affected by the flow in the impeller to a great extend. To make clear the flow phenomena in the mixed flow impeller at design and off-design flow rate condition, a mixed flow unshrouded impeller was manufactured and the flow in the impeller at design and off-design flow rate was experimental measured by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in this paper. In the experiment test device, the volute was specially design and manufactured by transparent material. According to the experimental result, the distribution of time-average relatively velocity showed the velocity near blade pressure surface at design flow rate decreases and then increases from inlet to outlet of the impeller, and that near blade suction surface increase and then decreases. The velocity near the suction surface decrease from hub to casing, and the minimal velocity appears near the casing and suction surface. Near the impeller outlet, the relative velocity near blade pressure surface varies a little alone the span direction; Back-flow phenomena were found at passages outlet near casing and mid-span sections at partial flow rate. To clarify the effect of volute geometry on the velocity distribution, the flow in different impeller passages relatively to the volute tongue was test and the result showed that the velocity distribution in different passages was similar.

  18. Numerical prediction and experimental evaluation of cavitation inception on centrifugal pump impellers

    SciTech Connect

    Ardizzon, G.; Pavesi, G.

    1994-12-31

    A procedure, based on a simplified Quasi 3-D flow analysis, is proposed to predict the cavitation inception on centrifugal pump impellers. The effects due to the impeller geometry and the incidence angle are described and discussed. The merits of the present formulation are demonstrated by comparison with measured values as well as with other published relations. Design and off-design NPSH values predicted with the procedure here proposed appears to be in close agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Experimental research and numerical simulation on impeller exit flow field of bulb tubular pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Liu, C.; Zhou, J. R.

    2012-11-01

    Three dimensional Laser Doppler Velocimetry (3D-LDV) technique was used to measure the impeller exit flow field of bulb tubular pump, the average velocity distribution of the exit section was obtained, and the energy performance of bulb tubular pump was obtained by model test. The flow field of tubular pump also simulated by CFD based on Navier-Stokes equations and RNG k-epsilon model. The calculated performance curve was consistent with the model test results, and the calculated velocities of impeller exit compared with the LDV measurement results, it was shown that the distribution of circumferential velocity and axial velocity were close to each other, but the radial velocity deviation between the LDV results and the CFD ones was obviously, the reasons of deviation were analyzed. The experimental results can provide the references for the impeller and diffuser design of tubular pumps, it also can improve the accuracy of calculation and perfect simulation.

  20. Laser velocimetry study of the flow field in a centrifugal pump with a shrouded impeller 

    E-print Network

    Moran, Michael Kevin

    1994-01-01

    This study provides laser velocimetry measurements of the flow field within a centrifugal pump. The pump had a shrouded impeller of 254 mm diameter with five blades of backswept design. Measurements were made using a laser-two-focus (L2F...

  1. Internal hydraulic analysis of impeller rounding in centrifugal pumps as turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz

    2011-01-15

    The use of pumps as turbines in different applications has been gaining importance in the recent years, but the subject of hydraulic optimization still remains an open research problem. One of these optimization techniques that include rounding of the sharp edges at the impeller periphery (or turbine inlet) has shown tendencies of performance enhancement. In order to understand the effect of this hydraulic optimization, the paper introduces an analytical model in the pump as turbine control volume and brings out the functionalities of the internal variables classified under control variables consisting of the system loss coefficient and exit relative flow direction and under dependent variables consisting of net tangential flow velocity, net head and efficiency. The paper studies the effects of impeller rounding on a combination of radial flow and mixed flow pumps as turbines using experimental data. The impeller rounding is seen to have positive impact on the overall efficiency in different operating regions with an improvement in the range of 1-3%. The behaviour of the two control variables have been elaborately studied in which it is found that the system loss coefficient has reduced drastically due to rounding effects, while the extent of changes to the exit relative flow direction seems to be limited in comparison. The reasons for changes to these control variables have been physically interpreted and attributed to the behaviour of the wake zone at the turbine inlet and circulation within the impeller control volume. The larger picture of impeller rounding has been discussed in comparison with performance prediction models in pumps as turbines. The possible limitations of the analytical model as well as the test setup are also presented. The paper concludes that the impeller rounding technique is very important for performance optimization and recommends its application on all pump as turbine projects. It also recommends the standardization of the rounding effects over wide range of pump shapes including axial pumps. (author)

  2. [Numerical assessment of impeller features of centrifugal blood pump based on fast hemolysis approximation model].

    PubMed

    Shou, Chen; Guo, Yongjun; Su, Lei; Li, Yongqian

    2014-12-01

    The impeller profile, which is one of the most important factors, determines the creation of shear stress which leads to blood hemolysis in the internal flow of centrifugal blood pump. The investigation of the internal flow field in centrifugal blood pump and the estimation of the hemolysis within different impeller profiles will provide information to improve the performance of centrifugal blood pump. The SST kappa-omega with low Reynolds correction was used in our laboratory to study the internal flow fields for four kinds of impellers of centrifugal blood pump. The flow fields included distributions of pressure field, velocity field and shear stress field. In addition, a fast numerical hemolysis approximation was adopted to calculate the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH). The results indicated that the pressure field distribution in all kinds of blood pump were reasonable, but for the log spiral impeller pump, the vortex and backflow were much lower than those of the other pumps, and the high shear stress zone was just about 0.004%, and the NIH was 0.0089. PMID:25868241

  3. Fracture control of H-O engine components. [titanium tin alloy fuel pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made to obtain the material characterization and fatigue crack propagation data necessary to establish the salient characteristics of a Ti-6Al-2.5Sn(ELI) alloy fuel pump impeller to be used in a cryogenic service environment. Testing variables considered were: coupon orientation, frequency, load range ratio, and temperature. Data analysis correlated crack propagation data from conventional laboratory coupons with data from a parallel sided rotating disk used to model rotor stresses. Four major design recommendations when bore regions of fuel pump impellers to be operated in cryogenic environments are to be relatively highly stressed are discussed.

  4. 3D Particle image velocimetry test of inner flow in a double blade pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Ru, Weimin

    2012-05-01

    The double blade pump is widely used in sewage treatment industry, however, the research on the internal flow characteristics of the double blade pump with particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology is very little at present. To reveal inner flow characteristics in double blade pump impeller under off-design and design conditions, inner flows in a double blade pump impeller, whose specific speed is 111, are measured under the five off-design conditions and design condition by using 3D PIV test technology. In order to ensure the accuracy of the 3D PIV test, the external trigger synchronization system which makes use of fiber optic and equivalent calibration method are applied. The 3D PIV relative velocity synthesis procedure is compiled by using Visual C++ 2005. Then absolute velocity distribution and relative velocity distribution in the double blade pump impeller are obtained. Test results show that vortex exists in each condition, but the location, size and velocity of vortex core are different. Average absolute velocity value of impeller outlet increases at first, then decreases, and then increases again with increase of flow rate. Again average relative velocity values under 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 design condition are higher than that under 1.0 design condition, while under 0.6 and 1.4 design condition it is lower. Under low flow rate conditions, radial vectors of absolute velocities at impeller outlet and blade inlet near the pump shaft decrease with increase of flow rate, while that of relative velocities at the suction side near the pump shaft decreases. Radial vectors of absolute velocities and relative velocities change slightly under the two large flow rate conditions. The research results can be applied to instruct the hydraulic optimization design of double blade pumps.

  5. Numerical study of a bio-centrifugal blood pump with straight impeller blade profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the flow in the Kyoto-NTN (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a 16-straight-bladed impeller were performed in the present study. The flow in the pump was assumed as unsteady and turbulent, and blood was treated as a Newtonian fluid. At the impeller rotating speed of 2000 rpm and flow rate of 5 L/min, the pump produces a pressure head of 113.5 mm Hg according to the simulation. It was found that the double volute of the pump has caused symmetrical pressure distribution in the volute passages and subsequently caused symmetrical flow patterns in the blade channels. Due to the tangentially increasing pressure in the volute passages, the flow through the blade channels initially increases at the low-pressure region and then decreases due to the increased pressure. The reverse flow and vortices have been identified in the impeller blade channels. The high shear stress of the flow in the pump mainly occurred at the inlet and outlet of the blade channels, the beginning of the volute passages and the regions around the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate. Higher shear stress is obtained when the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate are located at the impeller blade trailing edges than when they are located at the middle of the impeller blade channel. It was found that the blood damage index assessed based on the blood corpuscle path tracing of the present pump was about 0.94%, which has the same order of magnitude as those of the clinical centrifugal pumps reported in the literature. PMID:19817732

  6. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  7. Permanent magnetic-levitation of rotating impeller: a decisive breakthrough in the centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y; Feng, Z G; Li, L

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have no mechanical contact between the rotor and stator, and a rotary pump with magnetic bearings therefore has no mechanical wear and thrombosis. The magnetic bearings available, however, contain electromagnets, are complicated to control and have high energy consumption. Therefore, it is difficult to apply an electromagnetic bearing to a rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, reliability and ability to be implanted. The authors have developed a levitated impeller pump using only permanent magnets. The rotor is supported by permanent radial magnetic forces. The impeller is fixed on one side of the rotor; on the other side the rotor magnets are mounted. Opposite these rotor magents, a driving magnet is fastened to the motor axis. Thereafter, the motor drives the rotor via magnetic coupling. In laboratory tests with saline, where the rotor is still or rotates at under 4,000 rpm, the rotor magnets have one point in contact axially with a spacer between the rotor magnets and the driving magnets. The contacting point is located in the center of the rotor. As the rotating speed increases gradually to more than 4000 rpm, the rotor will disaffiliate from the stator axially, and become fully levitated. Since the axial levitation is produced by hydraulic force and the rotor magnets have a giro-effect, the rotor rotates very stably during levitation. As a left ventricular assist device, the pump works in a rotating speed range of 5,000-8,000 rpm, and the levitation of the impeller is assured by use of the pump. The permanent maglev impeller pump retains the advantages of the rotary pump but overcomes the disadvantages of the leviated pump with electromagnetic-bearing, and has met with most requirements of artificial heart blood pumps, thus promising to have more applications than previously. PMID:11924845

  8. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of the prototype MagLev BP. PMID:20528854

  9. Investigation of CFD calculation method of a centrifugal pump with unshrouded impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dazhuan; Yang, Shuai; Xu, Binjie; Liu, Qiaoling; Wu, Peng; Wang, Leqin

    2014-03-01

    Currently, relatively large errors are found in numerical results in some low-specific-speed centrifugal pumps with unshrouded impeller because the effect of clearances and holes are not accurately modeled. Establishing an accurate analytical model to improve performance prediction accuracy is therefore necessary. In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical simulation is conducted to predict the performance of a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, and the modeling, numerical scheme, and turbulent selection methods are discussed. The pump performance is tested in a model pump test bench, and flow rate, head, power and efficiency of the pump are obtained. The effect of taking into consideration the back-out vane passage, clearance, and balance holes is analyzed by comparing it with experimental results, and the performance prediction methods are validated by experiments. The analysis results show that the pump performance can be accurately predicted by the improved method. Ignoring the back-out vane passage in the calculation model of unshrouded impeller is found to generate better numerical results. Further, the calculation model with the clearances and balance holes can obviously enhance the numerical accuracy. The application of disconnect interface can reduce meshing difficulty but increase the calculation error at the off-design operating point at the same time. Compared with the standard k-?, renormalization group k-?, and Spalart-Allmars models, the Realizable k-? model demonstrates the fastest convergent speed and the highest precision for the unshrouded impeller flow simulation. The proposed modeling and numerical simulation methods can improve the performance prediction accuracy of the low-specific-speed centrifugal pumps, and the modeling method is especially suitable for the centrifugal pump with unshrouded impeller.

  10. Analysis on the influence of the pump start transient performance with different inertia impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Cheng, J.; Liu, E. H.; Tang, L. D.

    2012-11-01

    Centrifugal pump start-up time is very short, in the boot process, the instantaneous head and flow will have an impact role to the pipeline, and however the moment of inertia is one of the main factors affecting centrifugal pump boot acceleration. We analyzed the pump start-up transient characteristics with the different moment of inertia of the impeller corresponding to the different materials, there are three different moment of inertia of the impeller have been selected. At first, we use the "Flowmaster" fluid system simulation software do the outer characteristics simulation to the selected-model, get the time - flow and the time - speed curve. Then, do the experiments research in the process when pump start-up, and compare with the simulation result. At last use the outer characteristics simulation result as the boundary, using the ANASYS CFX software do the transient simulation to the three groups with different inertia pump impeller, and draw the pressure distribution picture. In according to the analysis, we can confirm that the impact of inertia is one of the factors in the stability during the pump star, and we can get that the greater moment of inertia, the longer the boot stable. We also can get that combined Flowmaster with ANSYS can solved engineering practice problem in fluid system conveniently, and take it easy to solve the similar problem.

  11. Experimental study of unsteady hydrodynamic force matrices on whirling centrifugal pump impellers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belgacem, Jery

    1986-01-01

    An experimental facility was constructed and instrumented. A set of centrifugal flow pumps whose impellers were made to follow a controlled circular whirl motion were studied. The aim was to characterize the steady and unsteady fluid forces measured on the impeller under various pump operating conditions. The postulation was that the unsteady lateral forces result from interactions between the impeller and the surrounding diffuser and/or volute (via the working fluid), and that under certain flow regimes these forces can drive unstable lateral motions of the pump rotor. The lateral hydrodynamic forces were decomposed into their steady and unsteady parts, the latter being further expressed in terms of a generalized fluid stiffness matrix. Conclusions regarding the effect of impeller geometry could not be reached given the similarity of the tested designs. However, other results on phenomena such as skin friction and leakage flow are presented. Some of the findings are compared to experimental and theoretical data from other sources. Finally, the rotordynamic consequences of the results are discussed as the present data were applied to the case of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP).

  12. Improvement of hemolysis in a centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yada, Toru; Saito, Sakae; Hirai, Shusaku

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller, and evaluated the levitation performance test and the hemolysis test. This pump is operated without any complicated control circuit and displacement-sensing module. The casing diameter is 74 mm and the height is 38 mm including flanges for volts. The weight is 251 g and the volume is 159 cm3. By changing the stator relative position against the rotor, the levitation characteristics of the impeller can be adjusted. The diameter of impeller is 36 mm and the height is 25 mm. The impeller is levitated by the thrust bearing of spiral groove type and a radial bearing of herringbone type. The pump performance was evaluated through the levitation performance test and the hemolysis test. As a result, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) was reduced from 0.72 g/100 L to 0.024 g/100 L corresponding to the changes of the groove direction of the hydrodynamic bearing and the expansion of the bearing gap. During these studies, we confirmed that the hemolytic property was improved by balancing the fluid dynamic force and the magnetic force. PMID:18002872

  13. Investigations of turbulent flows in a tubular pump and structural stresses of its impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. L.; Jia, Y. X.; Wang, F. J.; Zhou, D. Q.; Xiao, R. F.; Yang, W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-11-01

    Based on Navier-Stokes equations and RNG k-epsilon turbulence model, numerical simulation was carried out to investigate turbulent flows in tubular pumps and structural stresses of its impeller using commercial software of ANSYS Workbench. Firstly, the calculated velocity and pressure distributions in tubular pumps show that the whole flow pattern is uniform except for that in the region in the front of the pier in the discharge passage. The predicted spiral streamlines in the front of the discharge passage indicate that there exists an unrecovered velocity circulation. The computed reasonable distributions of the static pressure show the minimum happens at inlet edges on the suction surfaces of the blades which probably causes cavitations. One-way fluid-structure interaction method was then employed to make a further static structural analysis of the impeller, and the predicted stresses and deformations of the blades show that the maximal equivalent stress exists in the joint between the blades and the hub on pressure surfaces of the impeller, the maximum of total deformations of the blades increases as the radius increases. The maximal exists near the impeller rim at the inlet and outlet edges. The calculated results will provide references for further design and research of tubular pumps.

  14. Effects of volute geometry and impeller orbit on the hydraulic performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flack, R. D.; Lanes, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Overall performance data was taken for a Plexiglas water pump with a logarithmic spiral volute and rectangular cross sectioned flow channels. Parametric studies were made in which the center of the impeller was offset from the design center of the volute. The rig was also designed such that the impeller was allowed to synchronously orbit by a fixed amount about any center. The studies indicate that decreasing the tongue clearance decreases the head at low flowrates and increases the head at high flowrates. Also, decreasing the volute area in the first half of the volute and holding the tongue clearance the same, resulted in a decreased head for low flowrates but performance at high flowrates was not affected. Finally, the overall hydraulic performance was not affected by the impeller orbitting about the volute center.

  15. Visualization study of the transient flow in the centrifugal blood pump impeller.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Takano, Hisateru

    2002-01-01

    Rotary blood pumps as a left ventricular assist device have several advantages over the use of existing pulsatile devices used for this purpose. The relative velocity distribution to the rotating impeller was observed by high-speed videography and particle image velocimetry (PIV) with the purpose of characterizing the unsteady fluid motion in the impeller and assessing antithrombogenicity based on the fluid dynamic properties within the flow path. Flow visualization in the present study has clearly shown the existence of drastic transient motion of flows in the impeller. The secondary flows developed in the passage, which are adverse in terms of hydrodynamic efficiency, contributed to the washout conditions on the blood contacting surface. PMID:12141476

  16. Tiny magnetic wireless pump: Fabrication of magnetic impeller and magnetic wireless manipulation for blood circulation in legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Yu, Chang Ho; Ishiyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a wireless pump that uses magnetic wireless manipulation to pump blood in the legs. A compact size and sufficient hydrodynamic performance were the most important requirements. Because the bonded magnet technique allows for a complex shape and various magnetization orientations, we fabricated a magnetic impeller from magnetic SmFeN powder. The impellers demonstrated a magnetic moment of 2772.64 emu and coercive force of 7.55 kOe. Using the impeller, we developed a tiny blood pump with a diameter of 22 mm and height of 6 mm. The pump allows for a maximum flow rate of 2.7 l/min and maximum pump head of approximately 170 mm Hg at a rotating speed of 6000 rpm. This level of hydrodynamic performance is sufficient to circulate blood in the legs. In this paper, we present the magnetic properties of the magnetic impeller and the hydrodynamic performance with wireless operation.

  17. Axial reciprocation of rotating impeller: a novel approach to preventing thrombosis in centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2002-01-01

    For long-term application, rotary pumps have to solve the problems of bearing wear and thrombosis along the bearing. Some investigators choose the magnetic bearing for zero friction and to provide no contact between the rotor and stator; the former avoids the mechanical wear and the latter eliminates the possibility of thrombus formation. The authors have tried and have found, however, that it is difficult to apply a magnetic bearing to the rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, reliability, and implantability, and have therefore developed a much simpler approach to achieve the same results. Instead of using a sliding bearing, a rolling bearing has been devised, and its friction is about 1/15 that of the sliding bearing. Furthermore, a wearproof material of ultra high molecular weight polythene has been adopted to make the rollers, and its antiwear property is eight times better than metal. The service life of the bearing has thus been prolonged. To prevent thrombus formation along the bearing, the impeller reciprocates axially as the impeller changes its rotating speed periodically to produce a pulsatile flow. The reciprocation is the result of the effects of a magnetic force between the motor rotor and stator and a hydraulic force between the blood flow and the impeller. Similar to a piston pump, the oscillating impeller can make the blood flow in and out of the bearing, resulting in washout with fresh blood once a cycle. This obviously helps to prevent thrombosis along the bearing and in the pump. Endurance tests with saline of this novel pump demonstrated device durability, promising long-term assisted circulation. PMID:12296579

  18. Performance analysis of axial flow pump on gap changing between impeller and guide vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. J.; Liang, Q. H.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yin, G.; Shi, X. X.

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the influence on gap changing of the static and dynamic components in axial flow pump, the axial flow pump model (TJ04-ZL-06) that used in the eastern of south-to-north water diversion project was selected. Steady turbulence field with different gaps was simulated by standard ?-? turbulence model and double-time stepping methods. Information on the pressure distribution and velocity distribution of impeller surfaces were obtained. Then, calculated results were compared with the test results and analyzed. The results show that the performance of pump is not sensitive with the axial gap width under design conditions and the large flow rate condition. With increasing gap width, it will be improved in low flow rate condition. The attack angle of impeller inlet in small flow rate condition become small and the flow separation phenomenon can be observed in this condition. The axial velocity distribution of impeller outlet is nonlinear and to increase the axial gap is to improve the flow pattern near the hub effectively. The trend of calculating results is identical with test. It will play a guiding role to the axial pump operation and design in south-to-north water diversion project.

  19. J-2X Fuel Pump Impeller Seal Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmauch, Preston B.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The J-2X engine was originally designed for the upper stage of the previously cancelled Crew Launch Vehicle. Although the Crew Launch Vehicle was cancelled the J-2X engine, which is currently undergoing hot-fire testing, may be used on future programs. The J-2X engine is a direct descendent of the J-2 engine which powered the upper stage during the Apollo program. Many changes including a thrust increase from 230K to 294K lbf have been implemented in this engine. The rotor-dynamic stability of the fuel turbopump is highly dependent on the tangential velocity of the fluid as it enters the the front face impeller seal. Rotor-dynamic analysis predicts that a much lower tangential velocity will be required for stability than was needed for previous engines. The geometry at the seal entrance for this engine is very complex and vastly different than previous engines. In order to better determine the fluid dynamics and tangential velocity in this seal several CFD simulations were performed. The results of these simulations show that for this seal geometry a great reduction in the tangential velocity is to be expected. The simulations also provided insight into methods that could be employed to drive the swirl velocity to near zero. Unsteady and time-averaged results of several simulations will be presented.

  20. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Cavitating Characteristics in Centrifugal Pump with Gap Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing; Chen, Hongxun; Wei, Qun

    2014-06-01

    This paper is to study the cavitating characteristics in a low specific speed centrifugal pump with gap structure impeller experimentally and numerically. A scalable DES numerical method is proposed and developed by introducing the von Karman scale instead of the local grid scale, which can switch at the RANS and LES region interface smoothly and reasonably. The SDES method can detect and grasp unsteady scale flow structures, which were proved by the flow around a triangular prism and the cavitation flow in a centrifugal pump. Through numerical and experimental research, it's shown that the simulated results match qualitatively with tested cavitation performances and visualization patterns, and we can conclude that the gap structure impeller has a superior feature of cavitation suppression. Its mechanism may be the guiding flow feature of the small vice blade and the pressure auto-balance effect of the gap tunnel.

  1. Static stress and modal analysis on the impeller of screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, S. Q.; Li, T.; Yuan, J. P.; Zhou, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    The modeling of the screw centrifugal pump was set up with Pro/E, the meshing of the fluid domain and the impeller were completed with ICEM, CFD and Workbench respectively. The 3-D steady turbulence flow in the pump was simulated by using ANSYS CFX under the design condition to get the pressure distribution on the surface of the blades. The static pressure and modal analysis were set using sequential coupling technique based on the simulation result. The results show that the maximum equivalent stress which is far less than the permissible stress occurs at the blade connected with the hub; the maximum deformation of the impeller occurs at the edge of the blade inlet; the deformation domain increase with the frequency ascended.

  2. Added-mass computation for impellers in nuclear power pumps. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Lam, D.; Belytschko, T.

    1983-07-01

    In this investigation, a method has been developed for determining the hydrodynamic mass of the impeller stage of the rotor which accounts for the three-dimensional geometry of the impellers and the effects of the fluid velocity. By using this method, more-accurate calculations of resonant frequencies of the rotor and hence the seal forces can be made. In comparison with previous approaches, two main features have been included: 1) an accurate representation of the shape of the impeller and the pump geometry; and 2) the effects of the velocity of the fluid. Results have been obtained for a prototypical centrifugal nuclear pump. The hydrodynamic masses which are obtained are significantly larger than predicted by commonly-used formulas based on the mass of the entrained fluid or computed by the Fritz formulas. Furthermore, the magnitude of the hydrodynamic mass has been found to depend strongly on the velocity of the working fluid, which indicates that its effects on critical frequencies will depend on the operational speed of the pump.

  3. On the use of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver for rocket engine pump impeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Solver and a Fast Grid Generator (FGG), developed specially for centrifugal impeller design, were incorporated into the pump impeller design process. The impeller performance from the CFD analysis was compared to one-dimensional prediction. Both analyses showed good agreement of the impeller hydraulic efficiency, 94.5 percent, but with an 8 percent discrepancy of Euler head prediction. The impeller blade angle, discharge hub to shroud width, axial length and blade stacking were systematically changed to achieve an optimum impeller design. Impeller overall efficiency, loss distribution, hub-to-tip flow angle distortion and blade-to-blade flow angle change are among those criteria used to evaluate impeller performance. Two grid sizes, one with 10 K grid points and one with 80 K grid points were used to evaluate grid dependency issues. The effects of grid resolution on the accuracy and turnaround time are discussed. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used for design and optimization of rocket engine pump components.

  4. The pivot wash in two impeller modes for the Baylor/Miwatec centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Kodama, Takayuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamamoto, Yoshiro; Shinohara, Toshiyuki; Motomura, Tadashi; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2006-01-01

    A centrifugal blood pump with a double pivot impeller and an eccentric inlet port is being developed as an implantable artificial heart by the Baylor College of Medicine and Miwatec Co. Ltd. Flow visualization measurements were conducted to compare the flow around the pivot for two impeller operational modes: the top and the bottom contact modes. In the top contact mode, one-way flow in the pivot gap due to the eccentric vortex was observed, and sufficient wall shear rate to prevent thrombus formation was attained around the bottom pivot for over 1,400 rpm. Computational fluid dynamic analyses confirmed that the causes of the eccentric vortex were the inlet eccentricity and the pressure imbalance in the volute. PMID:16409400

  5. Evaluation of hydraulic radial forces on the impeller by the volute in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Boehning, Fiete; Timms, Daniel L; Amaral, Felipe; Oliveira, Leonardo; Graefe, Roland; Hsu, Po-Lin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-08-01

    In many state-of-the-art rotary blood pumps for long-term ventricular assistance, the impeller is suspended within the casing by magnetic or hydrodynamic means. For the design of such suspension systems, profound knowledge of the acting forces on the impeller is crucial. Hydrodynamic bearings running at low clearance gaps can yield increased blood damage and magnetic bearings counteracting high forces consume excessive power. Most current rotary blood pump devices with contactless bearings are centrifugal pumps that incorporate a radial diffuser volute where hydraulic forces on the impeller develop. The yielding radial forces are highly dependent on impeller design, operating point and volute design. There are three basic types of volute design--singular, circular, and double volute. In this study, the hydraulic radial forces on the impeller created by the volute in an investigational centrifugal blood pump are evaluated and discussed with regard to the choice of contactless suspension systems. Each volute type was tested experimentally in a centrifugal pump test setup at various rotational speeds and flow rates. For the pump's design point at 5 L/min and 2500 rpm, the single volute had the lowest radial force (?0 N), the circular volute yielded the highest force (?2 N), and the double volute possessed a force of approx. 0.5 N. Results of radial force magnitude and direction were obtained and compared with a previously performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. PMID:21843297

  6. Numerical prediction and performance experiment in a deep-well centrifugal pump with different impeller outlet width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Weidong; Zhou, Ling; Lu, Weigang; Pei, Bing; Lang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The existing research of the deep-well centrifugal pump mainly focuses on reduce the manufacturing cost and improve the pump performance, and how to combine above two aspects together is the most difficult and important topic. In this study, the performances of the deep-well centrifugal pump with four different impeller outlet widths are studied by the numerical, theoretical and experimental methods in this paper. Two stages deep-well centrifugal pump equipped with different impellers are simulated employing the commercial CFD software to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional incompressible steady flow. The sensitivity analyses of the grid size and turbulence model have been performed to improve numerical accuracy. The flow field distributions are acquired and compared under the design operating conditions, including the static pressure, turbulence kinetic energy and velocity. The prototype is manufactured and tested to certify the numerical predicted performance. The numerical results of pump performance are higher than the test results, but their change trends have an acceptable agreement with each other. The performance results indicted that the oversize impeller outlet width leads to poor pump performances and increasing shaft power. Changing the performance of deep-well centrifugal pump by alter impeller outlet width is practicable and convenient, which is worth popularizing in the engineering application. The proposed research enhances the theoretical basis of pump design to improve the performance and reduce the manufacturing cost of deep-well centrifugal pump.

  7. Multicondition Optimization and Experimental Measurements of a Double-Blade Centrifugal Pump Impeller.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Dong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve internal unsteady flow in a double-blade centrifugal pump (DBCP), this study used major geometric parameters of the original design as the initial values, heads at three conditions (i.e., 80% design flow rate, 100% design flow rate, and 120% design flow rate) as the constraints conditions, and the maximum of weighted average efficiency at the three conditions as the objective function. An adaptive simulated annealing algorithm was selected to solve the energy performance calculation model and the supertransitive approximation method was applied to fix optimal weight factors of individual objectives. On the basis of hydraulic performance optimization, three-condition automatic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) optimization of impeller meridional plane for the DBCP was realized by means of Isight software integrated Pro/E, Gambit, and Fluent software. The shroud arc radii R0 and R1, shroud angle T1, hub arc radius R2, and hub angle T2 on the meridional plane were selected as the design variables and the maximum of weighted average hydraulic efficiency at the three conditions was chosen as the objective function. Performance characteristic test and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of internal flow in the DBCP were conducted. Performance characteristic test results show that the weighted average efficiency of the impeller after the three-condition optimization has increased by 1.46% than that of original design. PIV measurements results show that vortex or recirculation phenomena in the impeller are distinctly improved under the three conditions. PMID:23917426

  8. Computational modelling and evaluation of cardiovascular response under pulsatile impeller pump support

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yubing; Brown, Alistair G.; Lawford, Patricia V.; Arndt, Andreas; Nuesser, Peter; Hose, D. Rodney

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a numerical simulation of cardiovascular response in the heart failure condition under the support of a Berlin Heart INCOR impeller pump-type ventricular assist device (VAD). The model is implemented using the CellML modelling language. To investigate the potential of using the Berlin Heart INCOR impeller pump to produce physiologically meaningful arterial pulse pressure within the various physiological constraints, a series of VAD-assisted cardiovascular cases are studied, in which the pulsation ratio and the phase shift of the VAD motion profile are systematically changed to observe the cardiovascular responses in each of the studied cases. An optimization process is proposed, including the introduction of a cost function to balance the importance of the characteristic cardiovascular variables. Based on this cost function it is found that a pulsation ratio of 0.35 combined with a phase shift of 200° produces the optimal cardiovascular response, giving rise to a maximal arterial pulse pressure of 12.6 mm Hg without inducing regurgitant pump flow while keeping other characteristic cardiovascular variables within appropriate physiological ranges. PMID:22670203

  9. The rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller in the presence of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid-induced rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller whirling along a trajectory eccentric to its undeflected position in the presence of cavitation were measured using the experimental facility described by Jery (1987). The force measured is a combination of a steady radial force due to the volute asymmetries and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the rotor. It was found that, compared to the noncavitation condition, a cavitation corresponding to a head loss of 3 percent had little effect upon the unsteady force. However, a lesser degree of cavitation at the design point, was found to increase the destabilizing force for a particular set of whirl ratios.

  10. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads. PMID:22320054

  11. Numerical study of 3-D inducer and impeller for pump model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G. C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, R.; Williams, R. W.

    1993-07-01

    Current design of high-performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design information in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective CFD pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes an extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving zonal interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. In the present study, two key components of the turbopump, the inducer and impeller, were investigated by the proposed pump model, and the numerical results were benchmarked by the experimental data provided by Rocketdyne.

  12. Study on stable equilibrium of levitated impeller in rotary pump with passive magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Wan, F K; Ru, W M; Zeng, P; Yuan, H Y

    2006-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the permanent maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium; the authors have developed, however, a stable permanent maglev centrifugal blood pump. Permanent maglev needs no position detection and feedback control of the rotor, nevertheless the eccentric distance (ED) and vibration amplitude (VA) of the levitator have been measured to demonstrate the levitation and to investigate the factors affecting levitation. Permanent maglev centrifugal impeller pump has a rotor and a stator. The rotor is driven by stator coil and levitated by two passive magnetic bearings. The rotor position is measured by four Hall sensors, which are distributed evenly and peripherally on the end of the stator against the magnetic ring of the bearing on the rotor. The voltage differences of the sensors due to different distances between the sensors and the magnetic ring are converted into ED. The results verify that the rotor can be disaffiliated from the stator if the rotating speed and the flow rate of the pump are large enough, that is, the maximal ED will reduce to about half of the gap between the rotor and the stator. In addition, the gap between rotor and stator and the viscosity of the fluid to be pumped also affect levitation. The former has an optimal value of approximately 2% of the radius of the rotor. For the latter, levitation stability is better with higher viscosity, meaning smaller ED and VA. The pressure to be pumped has no effect on levitation. PMID:16531346

  13. Numerical research on the effects of impeller pump-out vanes on axial force in a solid-liquid screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X. R.; Li, R. N.; Gao, Y.; Guo, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    A commercial CFD code has been used to predict the performance of a screw centrifugal pump with pump-out vanes, especially when changing regularity of impeller axial force based on the solid-liquid two-phase flow. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach has been applied to solve the unsteady, incompressible, three-dimensional turbulent. The SIMPLEC algorithm, standard wall functions and mix two-phase flow model were applied. The RNG k ?-model was used to account the turbulence effects. By changing the number of impeller pump-out vanes and width, six different screw centrifugal pump numerical simulation projects were given, and each scheme in the different solid volume fraction were calculated respectively. The change rules of axial force, velocity and pressure distribution of flow field were obtained on the different condition and different volume fraction. The results showed that the axial forces values based solid-fluid two-phase greater than based single-phase clear water, but both changing regularity of the axial force were consistent; as same condition, the same solid-phase volume concentration, with the increase of pump-out vanes number or width, the impeller axial force increased as well. Meanwhile the number of the pump-out vanes and the width of pump-out vanes in balancing the impeller axial force, there are the most optimal value.

  14. Simulation and experiment of the effect of clearance of impeller wear-rings on the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. X.; Pan, Z. Y.; Wu, Y. L.; Zhang, D. Q.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of clearance of impeller wear-rings on the performance of a centrifugal pump was investigated numerically and experimentally. The whole flow field model including front and back shrouds of pump was designed so as to accurately calculate the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump. Based on RNG k-? turbulence model, three wear-rings schemes were established, and the effects of clearance of impeller wear-rings on the hydraulic efficiency and mechanical efficiency of the centrifugal pump was analyzed, chiefly from the turbulent kinetic energy, vorticity and radial force angles. According to the results, it can be drawn that the head and total efficiency of the centrifugal pump increase as the clearance value of wear-rings narrows. The following reasons may account for it: firstly, as the clearance value of wear-rings declines, the turbulent kinetic energy and energy dissipation decrease within the impeller, and the impact of secondary flow at the inlet of impeller on the mainstream weakens slowly, which leads to a lower hydraulic loss, thus a higher hydraulic efficiency; secondly, radial force decreases with the clearance value of wear-rings, so the eccentric whirl of centrifugal pump is dampened, which results in a lower mechanical loss and a higher mechanical efficiency; thirdly, the front shroud leakage diminishes with the clearance value of wear-rings, therefore, the volume loss is reduced and volume efficiency improved. Finally, the first wear-ring scheme of impeller is adopted after comprehensive comparison of these three wear-ring schemes, because its efficiency is highest and it satisfies the requirements of the engineering application.

  15. Generating an indicator for pump impeller damage using half and full spectra, fuzzy preference-based rough sets and PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaomin; Zuo, Ming J.; Patel, Tejas H.

    2012-04-01

    Parameters that vary monotonically with damage propagation are useful in condition monitoring. However, it is not easy to find such parameters especially for complex systems like pumps. A method using half and full spectra, fuzzy preference-based rough sets and principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to generate such an indicator for tracking impeller damage in a centrifugal slurry pump. Half and full spectra are used for extracting features related to pump health status. A fuzzy preference-based rough set model is employed in the process of selecting features reflecting the damage propagation monotonically. PCA is used to condense the features and generate an indicator which represents the damage propagation. The effectiveness of the proposed method is tested using laboratory experimental data. Results show that the indicator generated by the proposed method can clearly and monotonically distinguish the health status of the pump impeller.

  16. Dynamic stress analysis of sewage centrifugal pump impeller based on two-way coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ji; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping

    2014-03-01

    Current research on the operational reliability of centrifugal pumps has mainly focused on hydrodynamic instability. However, the interaction between the fluid and structure has not been sufficiently considered; this interaction can cause vibration and dynamic stress, which can affect the reliability. In this study, the dynamic stresses in a single-blade centrifugal pump impeller are analysed under different operating conditions; the two-way coupling method is used to calculate the fluid-structure interaction. Three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the SST k-? turbulence model for the fluid in the whole flow passage, while transient structure dynamic analysis is used with the finite element method for the structure side. The dynamic stresses in the rotor system are computed according to the fourth strength theory. The stress results show that the highest stress is near the loose bearing and that the equivalent stress increases with the flow rate because the dynamic stresses are closely related to the pressure load. The stress distributions on the blade pressure side, suction side, leading edge, and trailing edge are each analysed for different flow rates; the highest stress distribution is found on the pressure side. On the blade pressure side, a relatively large stress is found near the trailing edge and hub side. Based on these results, a stress distribution prediction method is proposed for centrifugal pumps, which considers the interaction between the fluid and structure. The method can be used to check the dynamic stress at different flow rates when optimising the pump design to increase the pump reliability.

  17. PIV pictures of stream field predict haemolysis index of centrifugal pump with streamlined impeller.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Feng, Z G; Ru, W M; Zeng, P; Yuan, H Y

    2007-01-01

    Previously it has been found by pump haemolysis testing that the flow rate has a remarkable effect on index of haemolysis (IH), while pressure head does not affect IH. Recent investigation with particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology has demonstrated that IH is directly related to the flow pattern of stream field in impeller vane channels. PIV is a visible approach showing the real flow status in the pump. The different positions of a tracer particle in two PIV pictures taken at 20 micros intervals decide the velocity value and direction. The velocity vectors of many particles draw the flow pattern of the stream field. The same pictures are taken at 2, 4 and 6 l min(-1) flow rates while the pressure head is kept unchanged at 100 mmHg; then the pictures are taken at 4 l min(-1) flow with different pressure heads of 80, 100 and 120 mmHg. Results reveal that the flow rate of 4 l min(-1) (IH = 0.030) has the best stream field, and neither turbulence nor separation can be seen. In other flow rates (IH: 0.048 - 0.082), there is obviously second flow. Meanwhile, no significant difference can be seen among the PIV pictures of different pressure heads pumped, which agrees with the results of haemolysis testing showing that pressure has no effect on pump haemolysis. It may be concluded that the haemolysis property of a centrifugal pump can be assessed approximately by PIV pictures, which are much easier to take than haemolysis tests. PMID:17566927

  18. Effect of modification to tongue and impeller geometry on unsteady flow, pressure fluctuations, and noise in a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, R.; Chu, S.; Katz, J.

    1997-07-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), pressure, and noise measurements are used to study the effect of modifications to tongue and impeller geometries on the flow structure and resulting noise in a centrifugal pump. It is demonstrated that the primary sources of noise are associated with interactions of the nonuniform outflux from the impeller (jet/wake phenomenon) with the tongue. Consequently, significant reduction of noise is achieved by increasing the gap between the tongue and the impeller up to about 20% of the impeller radius. Further increase in the gap affects the performance adversely with minimal impact on the noise level. When the gap is narrow, the primary sources of noise are impingement of the wake on the tip of the tongue, and tongue oscillations when the pressure difference across it is high. At about 20% gap, the entire wake and its associated vorticity trains miss the tongue, and the only (quite weak) effect of nonuniform outflux is the impingement of the jet on the tongue. An attempt is also made to reduce the nonuniformity in outflux from the impeller by inserting short vanes between the blades. They cause reduction in the size of the original wakes, but generate an additional jet/wake phenomenon of their own. Both wakes are weak to a level that their impacts on local pressure fluctuations and noise are insignificant. The only remaining major contributor to noise is tongue oscillations. This effect is shown to be dependent on the stiffness of the tongue.

  19. Research of fluid-induced pressure fluctuation due to impeller-volute interaction in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Z.; Yang, K.; Y Li, D.; Gong, R. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The fluid pressure fluctuation generated by unsteady flow is a very important factor to induce vibration of the centrifugal pump. The relative movement between impeller and volute generates an unsteady interaction which affects not only the overall pump performance, but is also responsible for pressure fluctuations. Pressure fluctuations interact with the volute casing or even with the circuit and give rise to dynamic effects over the mechanical parts, which are one of the most important sources of vibration and hydraulic noise. To investigate the flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump, the unsteady flow is simulated by CFD methods in this paper. Unsteady flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump is obtained considering the impeller-volute interaction in the whole flow field. Based on the unsteady flow simulation, amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pressure fluctuation in the centrifugal pump are obtained through setting up monitoring point at the impeller outlet. The research shows that the frequency component include the blade passing frequency as the main component, the multiplication of blade passing frequency, and the harmonic interference due to the unsteady flow.

  20. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  1. Study on Internal Flow and External Performance of a Semi-open Impeller Centrifugal Pump with Different Tip Clearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiao-Qi; Cui, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zu-Chao

    2015-04-01

    To study the influence of tip clearance on internal flow characteristics and external performance of a prototype centrifugal pump with a semi-open impeller, the unsteady numerical simulation and performance experiments are carried out in this paper. The evolution process of leakage vortex with time t, the flow characteristics and the magnitude of leakage rate in tip clearance are obtained in details. The results indicate that the H-Q curve hump of centrifugal pump shows a weakened trend with the increasing of tip clearance ?c. Meanwhile, the leakage rate ?Q and the ratio of leakage rate to discharge flow rate (?) gradually increase. At the same tip clearance, the leakage rate ?Q increases, while the ratio of leakage rate to discharge flow rate (?) decreases with the increasing of discharge flow rate Q. It is found that higher volumetric loss account for a higher percentage of the total loss at small flow rate condition. There easily exist strong leakage vortexes in the impeller inlet, impeller passage and impeller outlet. The pressure difference between suction side and pressure side makes the fluid pass through the tip clearance layer to form a lower pressure region and leakage vortex.

  2. Studies of the impact of prerotation problem of the secondary impeller on performance of multi-stage centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. L.; Wu, P.; Jiang, Q. L.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    In engineering practice, part of the multi-stage centrifugal pumps is designed without space guide vanes due to the size restrictions and the volute is distorted much in shape. In these pumps, tangential velocity of the fluid at the outlet of the first-stage impeller is so great that it has caused a prerotation problem which will affect the inlet flow conditions of the secondary impeller leading to serious efficiency and head decline of the secondary impeller. The head problem of the second stage in multi-stage centrifugal pumps caused by prerotation at the entrance of the second stage was analyzed and the internal hydraulic performance was optimized by setting clapboards in the volute in this paper. CFD numerical simulation method combined with experiment was applied to predict the effect of internal clapboards on the performance of the centrifugal pump. The original prototype was transformed according to the simulation result and tested to verify the optimization work. The experiment result shows that hydraulic performance is remarkably improved compared with the original one and the prerotation problem is basically solved.

  3. Unsteady flow in a viscous oil transporting centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Guang

    2011-12-01

    Acoustic resonances are frequently fatal problems in centrifugal pump operations. Low pressure pulsation of fluid in the blade pass frequency is helpful to prevent from such problems. In addition, for a high quality centrifugal pump, a lower broadband noise level is also on demand. The acoustic resonance and broadband noise are associated with unsteadiness of flow in the pump. Even there exist extensive analyses of unsteady flow in centrifugal pumps by means of CFD so far, the effect of high viscosity of fluid pumped on the unsteadiness of flow feature remains unclear. Thus, the unsteady flow in an experimental centrifugal pump was exploited numerically when it transported the liquids with different viscosities. The velocity profiles at the impeller discharge were validated with the results of LDV measurement for water. The viscosity effect on the fluctuation of flow in the volute was clarified quantitatively. It was shown the increasing viscosity of fluid makes the fluctuation in flow variables less substantial and results into a less noticed tendency of separation of flow from the blade pressure side.

  4. Centrifugal acceleration modes for incompressible fluid in the leakage annulus between a shrouded pump impeller and its housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for calculating complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the fluid resonances and is used to analyze the perturbed flow in the leakage path between a shrouded-pump impeller and its housing. The eigenvalues obtained are consistent with the forced-response curves. First- and second-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to lateral excitations, and first-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to axial excitation.

  5. Improvement of hemocompatibility in centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yada, Toru; Saito, Sakae; Hirai, Shusaku; Yamane, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a noncontact-type centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and a semi-open impeller for mechanical circulatory assist. The impeller is levitated by an original spiral-groove thrust bearing and a herringbone-groove journal bearing, without any additional displacement-sensing module or additional complex control circuits. The pump was improved by optimizing the groove direction of the spiral-groove thrust bearing and the pull-up magnetic force between the rotor magnet and the stator coil against the impeller. To evaluate hemocompatibility, we conducted a levitation performance test and in vitro hemocompatibility tests by means of a mock-up circulation loop. In the hemolysis test, the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced from 0.721 to 0.0335 g/100 L corresponding to an expansion of the bearing gap from 1.1 to 56.1 microm. In the in vitro antithrombogenic test, blood pumps with a wide thrust bearing gap were effective in preventing thrombus formation. Through in vitro evaluation tests, we confirmed that hemocompatibility was improved by balancing the hydrodynamic fluid dynamics and magnetic forces. PMID:19681836

  6. Compressibility effects on rotor forces in the leakage path between a shrouded pump impeller and its housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Nhai The

    1993-01-01

    A modified approach to Childs' previous work on fluid-structure interaction forces in the leakage path between an impeller shroud and its housing is presented in this paper. Three governing equations consisting of continuity, path-momentum, and circumferential-momentum equations were developed to describe the leakage path inside a pump impeller. Radial displacement perturbations were used to solve for radial and circumferential force coefficients. In addition, impeller-discharge pressure disturbances were used to obtain pressure oscillation responses due to precessing impeller pressure wave pattern. Childs' model was modified from an incompressible model to a compressible barotropic-fluid model (the density of the working fluid is a function of the pressure and a constant temperature only). Results obtained from this model yielded interaction forces for radial and circumferential force coefficients. Radial and circumferential forces define reaction forces within the impeller leakage path. An acoustic model for the same leakage path was also developed. The convective, Coriolis, and centrifugal acceleration terms are removed from the compressible model to obtain the acoustics model. A solution due to impeller discharge pressure disturbances model was also developed for the compressible and acoustics models. The results from these modifications are used to determine what effects additional perturbation terms in the compressible model have on the acoustic model. The results show that the additional fluid mechanics terms in the compressible model cause resonances (peaks) in the force coefficient response curves. However, these peaks only occurred at high values of inlet circumferential velocity ratios greater than 0.7. The peak pressure oscillation was shown to occur at the wearing ring seal. Introduction of impeller discharge disturbances with n = 11 diametral nodes showed that maximum peak pressure oscillations occurred at nondimensional precession frequencies of f = 6.4 and f = 7.8 for this particular pump. Bolleter's results suggest that for peak pressure oscillations to occur at the wearing ring seal, the nondimensional excitation frequency should be on the order of f = 2.182 for n = 11. The resonances found in this research do not match the excitation frequencies predicted by Bolleter. At the predicted peak excitation frequencies given by Bolleter, the compressible model shows an attenuation of the pressure oscillations at the seal exit. The compressibility of the fluid does not have a significant influence on the model at low values of nondimensional excitation frequency. At high values of nondimensional frequency, the effects of compressibility become more significant. For the acoustic analysis, the convective, Coriolis, and centrifugal acceleration terms do affect the results to a limited extent for precession excitation and to a large extent for a pressure excitation when the fluid operates at relatively high Mach numbers.

  7. Numerical investigation of sediment erosion to the impeller in a double-suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. X.; Dong, F. D.; Cheng, X. R.

    2013-12-01

    Based on Euler-Lagrange multiphase flow model and Finnie ductile material erosion model, using phase coupled SIMPLE algorithm, k-e RNG turbulence model and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation, the solid-liquid two-phase flows in a double-suction centrifugal pump is simulated. The erosion rate and solid mass concentration distribution on the pressure and suction surfaces of blades were obtained in different situations, which include different solid mass concentration (2.17kg/m3, 8.66kg/m3 and 14kg/m3) and different sediment diameter (0.019mm, 0.036mm, and 0.076mm). By comparisons of the test and numerical simulation values, the reliability of numerical calculation method has been verified. The numerical simulation result obtained show that the Finnie ductile material erosion model can accurately predict the erosion rate and erosion areas on the impeller. The erosion rate is increases with solid sediment diameter or solid mass concentration increasing. The main erosion areas on the pressure surface of blades near the blade inlet and outlet and close to the hub, and on the suction surface of blades near the blade inlet and close to the hub. For different sediment diameter or solid mass concentration, the erosion rate on the pressure surface of blades is always greater than that on its suction surface.

  8. Unshrouded Centrifugal Turbopump Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prueger, George; Williams, Morgan; Chen, Wei; Paris, John; Stewart, Eric; Williams, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The ratio of rocket engine thrust to weight is a limiting constraint in placing more payload into orbit at a low cost. A key component of an engine's overall weight is the turbopump weight, Reducing the turbopump weight can result in significant engine weight reduction and hence, increased delivered payload. There are two main types of pumps: centrifugal and axial pumps. These types of pumps can be further sub-divided into those with shrouds and those without shrouds (unshrouded pumps). Centrifugal pumps can achieve the same pump discharge pressure as an axial pump and it requires fewer pump stages and lower pump weight than an axial pump. Also, with unshrouded centrifugal pumps (impeller), the number of stages and weight can be further reduced. However. there are several issues with regard to using an unshrouded impeller: 1) there is a pump performance penalty due to the front open face recirculation flow; 2) there is a potential pump axial thrust problem from the unbalanced front open face and the back shroud face; and, 3) since test data is very linu'ted for this configuration, there is uncertainty in the magnitude and phase of the rotordynamics forces due to the front impeller passage. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the design of an unshrouded impeller and to examine the design's hydrodynamic performance, axial thrust, and rotordynamics performance. The design methodology will also be discussed. This work will help provide some guidelines for unshrouded impeller design. In particular, the paper will discuss the design of three unshrouded impellers - one with 5 full and 5 partial blades (5+5). one with 6+6 blades and one with 8+8 blades. One of these designs will be selected for actual fabrication and flow test. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to help design and optimize the unshrouded impeller. The relative pump performance penalty is assessed by comparing the CFD results of the unshrouded impeller with the equivalent shrouded impeller for a particular design. Limited unshrouded - versus - shrouded impeller data from the J-2 pump is used to anchor the CFD. Since no detailed impeller blade force data is available, axial thrust and rotordynamic force predictions are based on the CFD model. For the axial thrust, the impeller front flow passage axial force is integrated from the CFD results and compared to the equivalent shrouded impeller axial force. For the rotordynamics forces, the fluid reaction forces are computed from unsteady flow CFD results using a moving boundary method; the rotor- shaft is moved at several whirl-to-speed frequency ratios to extract the rotordynamics coefficients.

  9. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.; Franz, R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Rotor Force Test Facility at the California Institute of Technology is to artificially orbit the center of rotation of an impeller enclosed within a volute over a range of frequencies from zero to synchronous and to measure the resulting forces on the impeller. Preliminary data from the first stage experiments in which the shaft is orbited at low frequency is reported. Steady volute forces along with stiffness matrices due to the change in position of the rotor center are measured. Static pressure taps around the volute are used to obtain volute pressure distributions for various fixed positions of the impeller center and for various flow rates. Static pressure forces are calculated from these pressure distributions allowing a more complete analysis of the components of the impeller forces. Comparison is made with various existing theoretical and experimental results.

  10. Experimental study on a centrifugal pump with an open impeller during startup period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuliang; Zhu, Zuchao; Jin, Yingzi; Cui, Baoling; Li, Yi; Dou, Huashu

    2013-02-01

    Transient performance of fluid machinery during transient operating periods, such as startup and stopping, has been drawn more attentions recently due to the growing engineering needs. In this paper, the transient behavior of a prototype centrifugal pump with an open impeller during rapid startup period is studied experimentally. The variations of the rotational speed, flow rate, head, and shaft power during rapid startup period are recorded in experiments at different discharge valve openings. In addition, the non-dimensional flow rate and head are also used to analyze the transient behavior. The research result shows that the rise characteristic of the rotational speed is not basically changed by working points, while mainly depends on the startup characteristics of the driving motor. Compared with the rapid rise of the rotational speed, the flow rate rises slowly in the initial stage of startup. Moreover, the flow rate lags behind the rotational speed to rise to final stable value, and the delay becomes more severe with the increase of the discharge valve opening. The shaft power impact phenomenon generally exists in the process of startup. The non-dimensional analysis shows that the non-dimensional head is very high at the very beginning of startup, and quickly falls to the minimum, then gradually rises to final stable value, while the non-dimensional flow rate always shows the rise tendency during whole startup period. In conclusion, it is found from the non-dimensional results that the quasi-steady analysis is unable to accurately assess the transient flow during startup period.

  11. Parametric study of blade tip clearance, flow rate, and impeller speed on blood damage in rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahn Ju; Diao, Chenguang; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong; Kameneva, Marina V; Antaki, James F

    2009-06-01

    Phenomenological studies on mechanical hemolysis in rotary blood pumps have provided empirical relationships that predict hemoglobin release as an exponential function of shear rate and time. However, these relations are not universally valid in all flow circumstances, particularly in small gap clearances. The experiments in this study were conducted at multiple operating points based on flow rate, impeller speed, and tip gap clearance. Fresh bovine red blood cells were resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline at about 30% hematocrit, and circulated for 30 min in a centrifugal blood pump with a variable tip gap, designed specifically for these studies. Blood damage indices were found to increase with increased impeller speed or decreased flow rate. The hemolysis index for 50-microm tip gap was found to be less than 200-microm gap, despite increased shear rate. This is explained by a cell screening effect that prevents cells from entering the smaller gap. It is suggested that these parameters should be reflected in the hemolysis model not only for the design, but for the practical use of rotary blood pumps, and that further investigation is needed to explore other possible factors contributing to hemolysis. PMID:19473143

  12. Experimental investigation of the hydrodynamic forces on the shroud of a centrifugal pump impeller. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuang, Fei

    1989-01-01

    Fluid-induced forces acting on a rotating impeller are known to cause rotor-dynamic problems in turbomachines. The forces generated by leakage flow along the front shroud surface of a centrifugal turbomachine impeller play an important role among these fluid-induced forces. The present research was aimed to gain a better understanding of these shroud forces. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to simulate the impeller shroud leakage flow. Hydrodynamic forces and steady and unsteady pressure distributions on the rotating shroud were measured as functions of eccentricity, width of shroud clearance, face seal clearance and shaft rotating speed. The forces measured from the dynamometer and manometers agreed well. The hydrodynamic force matrices were found skew-symmetric and statically unstable. This is qualitatively similar to the result of previous hydrodynamic volute force measurements. Nondimensionalized normal and tangential forces decrease slightly as Reynolds number increases. As the width of the shroud clearance decreases and/or the eccentricity increases, the hydrodynamic forces increase nonlinearly. There was some evidence found that increased front seal clearance could reduce the radial shroud forces and the relative magnitude of the destabilizing tangential force. Subharmonic pressure fluctuations were also observed which may adversely affect the behavior of the rotor system.

  13. Real-Time Observation of Thrombus Growth Process in an Impeller of a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump by Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the thrombus formation in cardiovascular devices such as rotary blood pumps is the most important issue in developing more hemocompatible devices. The objective of this study was to develop a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) method to visualize the thrombus growth process within a rotary blood pump and investigate the optical properties of the thrombus. An in vitro thrombogenic test was conducted using fresh porcine blood and a specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a transparent bottom. The pump rotating at 3000?rpm circulated the blood at 1.0?L/min. The bottom surface of the pump was illuminated with white light pulsed at the same frequency as the pump rotation, and the backward-scattered light was imaged using the HSI system. Using stroboscopic HSI and an image construction algorithm, dynamic spectral imaging at wavelengths ranging from 608 to 752?nm within the rotating pump was achieved. After completing the experiment, we collected the red thrombus formed in the pump impeller and quantified the thrombus hemoglobin concentration (Hbthrombus ). The spectrum changed around the center of the impeller, and the area of change expanded toward the impeller flow path. The shape corresponded approximately to the shape of the thrombus. The spectrum change indicated that the light scattering derived from red blood cells decreased. The Hbthrombus was 4.7?±?1.3?g/dL versus a total hemoglobin of 13?±?0.87?g/dL. The study revealed that Hbthrombus was reduced by the surrounding blood flow. PMID:26234451

  14. The Effects of the Back Clearance Size and the Balance Holes on the Back Clearance Flow of the Centrifugal Pump with Semi-Open Impeller 

    E-print Network

    Park, Sang

    2010-01-16

    on the effect of the back clearance on the hydrodynamic forces upon the semi-open impeller showed the opposite trend: increasing the back clearance results in the reduced axial loading. In this work, the CFD simulation of an entire pump and detailed analysis...

  15. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 ?m. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 ?m. PMID:23442235

  16. New centrifugal blood pump with dual impeller and double pivot bearing system: wear evaluation in bearing system, performance tests, and preliminary hemolysis tests.

    PubMed

    Bock, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Adriana; Silva, Maxwell; Antunes, Pedro; Fonseca, Jeison; Legendre, Daniel; Leme, Juliana; Arruda, Celso; Biscegli, José; Nicolosi, Denys; Andrade, Aron

    2008-04-01

    A new dual impeller centrifugal blood pump has been developed as a research collaboration between Baylor College of Medicine and Institute Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology for long-term left ventricle assist device (LVAD). A design feature of this new pump is a dual impeller that aims to minimize a stagnant flow pattern around the inlet port. Several different materials were tested in order to adopt a double pivot bearing design originally developed by Prof. Dr. Yukihiko Nosé from Baylor College of Medicine. Hydraulic performance tests were conducted with two different inlet ports' angle configurations 30 degrees and 45 degrees . Pump with inlet port angle of 45 degrees achieved best values of pressure ahead and flow after 1800 rpm. Preliminary hemolysis tests were conducted using human blood. The pump showed good performance results and no alarming trace of hemolysis, proving to be a feasible long-term LVAD. PMID:18370949

  17. Impeller shroud

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, S.S.

    1987-08-18

    In a compressor for a gas turbine engine, an engine housing, a rotor assembly including an impeller, the impeller has an inlet portion with an axial component and an outlet portion with a radial component. The impeller includes a hub having a flared cantilever radial configuration and unshrouded blade tips, the rotor assembly being mounted to the engine housing by bearing means, a stator assembly including a shroud surrounding and concentric with the rotor assembly, the shroud including an impeller shroud member. The impeller has a flared shape with an inlet portion fixed to the shroud and an outlet portion being unsupported, means mounting the stator assembly shroud to the engine housing only in the area of the bearing downstream of the compressor relative to the impeller, such that the shroud including the impeller shroud are supported at the area of the bearing in a cantilever manner and the thermal expansion growth distance of the impeller shroud is the same as the expansion growth distance of the impeller from the bearing, the impeller shroud surrounding the blade tips of the impeller with minimum clearance and whereby any deflection of the impeller shroud will occur at the outlet portion thereof in correspondence with any deflection of the outlet portion of the impeller.

  18. A finite-element-based perturbation model for the rotordynamic analysis of shrouded pump impellers: Part 2: User's guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskharone, Erian A.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the computational steps involved in executing a finite-element-based perturbation model for computing the rotor dynamic coefficients of a shrouded pump impeller or a simple seal. These arise from the fluid/rotor interaction in the clearance gap. In addition to the sample cases, the computational procedure also applies to a separate category of problems referred to as the 'seal-like' category. The problem, in this case, concerns a shrouded impeller, with the exception that the secondary, or leakage, passage is totally isolated from the primary-flow passage. The difference between this and the pump problem is that the former is analytically of the simple 'seal-like' configuration, with two (inlet and exit) flow-permeable stations, while the latter constitutes a double-entry / double-discharge flow problem. In all cases, the problem is that of a rotor clearance gap. The problem here is that of a rotor excitation in the form of a cylindrical whirl around the housing centerline for a smooth annular seal. In its centered operation mode, the rotor is assumed to give rise to an axisymmetric flow field in the clearance gap. As a result, problems involving longitudinal or helical grooves, in the rotor or housing surfaces, go beyond the code capabilities. Discarding, for the moment, the pre- and post-processing phases, the bulk of the computational procedure consists of two main steps. The first is aimed at producing the axisymmetric 'zeroth-order' flow solution in the given flow domain. Detailed description of this problem, including the flow-governing equations, turbulence closure, boundary conditions, and the finite-element formulation, was covered by Baskharone and Hensel. The second main step is where the perturbation model is implemented, with the input being the centered-rotor 'zeroth-order' flow solution and a prescribed whirl frequency ratio (whirl frequency divided by the impeller speed). The computational domain, in the latter case, is treated as three dimensional, with the number of computational planes in the circumferential direction being specified a priori. The reader is reminded that the deformations in the finite elements are all infinitesimally small because the rotor eccentricity itself is a virtual displacement. This explains why we have generically termed the perturbation model the 'virtually' deformable finite-element category. The primary outcome of implementing the perturbation model is the tangential and radial components, F(sub theta)(sup *) and F(sub r)(sup *) of the fluid-exerted force on the rotor surface due to the whirling motion. Repetitive execution of the perturbation model subprogram over a sufficient range of whirl frequency ratios, and subsequent interpolation of these fluid forces, using the least-square method, finally enable the user to compute the impeller rotor dynamic coefficients of the fluid/rotor interaction.

  19. A finite-element-based perturbation model for the rotordynamic analysis of shrouded pump impellers: Part 2: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, Erian A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the computational steps involved in executing a finite-element-based perturbation model for computing the rotor dynamic coefficients of a shrouded pump impeller or a simple seal. These arise from the fluid/rotor interaction in the clearance gap. In addition to the sample cases, the computational procedure also applies to a separate category of problems referred to as the 'seal-like' category. The problem, in this case, concerns a shrouded impeller, with the exception that the secondary, or leakage, passage is totally isolated from the primary-flow passage. The difference between this and the pump problem is that the former is analytically of the simple 'seal-like' configuration, with two (inlet and exit) flow-permeable stations, while the latter constitutes a double-entry / double-discharge flow problem. In all cases, the problem is that of a rotor clearance gap. The problem here is that of a rotor excitation in the form of a cylindrical whirl around the housing centerline for a smooth annular seal. In its centered operation mode, the rotor is assumed to give rise to an axisymmetric flow field in the clearance gap. As a result, problems involving longitudinal or helical grooves, in the rotor or housing surfaces, go beyond the code capabilities. Discarding, for the moment, the pre- and post-processing phases, the bulk of the computational procedure consists of two main steps. The first is aimed at producing the axisymmetric 'zeroth-order' flow solution in the given flow domain. Detailed description of this problem, including the flow-governing equations, turbulence closure, boundary conditions, and the finite-element formulation, was covered by Baskharone and Hensel. The second main step is where the perturbation model is implemented, with the input being the centered-rotor 'zeroth-order' flow solution and a prescribed whirl frequency ratio (whirl frequency divided by the impeller speed). The computational domain, in the latter case, is treated as three dimensional, with the number of computational planes in the circumferential direction being specified a priori. The reader is reminded that the deformations in the finite elements are all infinitesimally small because the rotor eccentricity itself is a virtual displacement. This explains why we have generically termed the perturbation model the 'virtually' deformable finite-element category. The primary outcome of implementing the perturbation model is the tangential and radial components, F(sub theta)(sup *) and F(sub r)(sup *) of the fluid-exerted force on the rotor surface due to the whirling motion. Repetitive execution of the perturbation model subprogram over a sufficient range of whirl frequency ratios, and subsequent interpolation of these fluid forces, using the least-square method, finally enable the user to compute the impeller rotor dynamic coefficients of the fluid/rotor interaction. These are the direct and cross-coupled stiffness, damping, and inertia effects of the fluid/rotor interaction.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics verified the advantages of streamlined impeller design in improving flow patterns and anti-haemolysis properties of centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Wang, F Q; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y; Feng, Z G

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology was applied to predict the flow patterns in the authors' streamlined blood pump and an American bio-pump with straight vanes and shroud, respectively. Meanwhile, haemolysis comparative tests of the two pumps were performed to verify the theoretical analysis. The results revealed that the flow patterns in the streamlined impeller are coincident with its logarithmic vanes and parabolic shroud, and there is neither separate flow nor impact in the authors' pump. In the bio-pump, the main flow has the form of logarithmic spiral in vertical section and parabola in cross section, thus there are both stagnation and swirl between the main flow and the straight vanes and shroud. Haemolysis comparative tests demonstrated that the authors' pump has an index of haemolysis of 0.030, less than that of the bio-pump (0.065). PMID:17060163

  1. Design rules for pumping and metering of highly viscous fluids in microfluidics

    E-print Network

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    and protein crystallization2 to distillation3 and fuel cells.4 The idea of a ``lab on a chip,'' capableDesign rules for pumping and metering of highly viscous fluids in microfluidics Sarah L. Perry.1039/c0lc00035c The use of fluids that are significantly more viscous than water in microfluidics has

  2. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 7: High pressure fuel turbo-pump third stage impeller analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Kirby V.

    1989-01-01

    This volume summarizes the analysis used to assess the structural life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbo-Pump (HPFTP) Third Stage Impeller. This analysis was performed in three phases, all using the DIAL finite element code. The first phase was a static stress analysis to determine the mean (non-varying) stress and static margin of safety for the part. The loads involved were steady state pressure and centrifugal force due to spinning. The second phase of the analysis was a modal survey to determine the vibrational modes and natural frequencies of the impeller. The third phase was a dynamic response analysis to determine the alternating component of the stress due to time varying pressure impulses at the outlet (diffuser) side of the impeller. The results of the three phases of the analysis show that the Third Stage Impeller operates very near the upper limits of its capability at full power level (FPL) loading. The static loading alone creates stresses in some areas of the shroud which exceed the yield point of the material. Additional cyclic loading due to the dynamic force could lead to a significant reduction in the life of this part. The cyclic stresses determined in the dynamic response phase of this study are based on an assumption regarding the magnitude of the forcing function.

  3. Performance correction chart of centrifugal oil pump for handling viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, G. J.; Zhang, W. H.; Chen, J.; Fu, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    The viscosity of oil has a pronounced impact on the operating conditions of the pump. Pumps that are tested with water but are used to transport viscous fluids must have their head, flow, and efficiency values corrected to approximate their performance with the viscous fluid. In this article the hydraulic characteristics of centrifugal oil pumps with different specific speeds for pumping viscous fluids are studied experimentally. The relationship of correction factor with performance characteristics, rotational speed and oil viscosity is investigated. According to the affinity law by KSB, the performance correction chart of flow rate, head and efficiency is plotted. The typical calculated examples show that the calculated results by the diagram methods are consistent with the experiments.

  4. A finite-element-based perturbation model for the rotordynamic analysis of shrouded pump impellers: Part 1: Model development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, Erian A.

    1993-01-01

    This study concerns the rotor dynamic characteristics of fluid-encompassed rotors, with special emphasis on shrouded pump impellers. The core of the study is a versatile and categorically new finite-element-based perturbation model, which is based on a rigorous flow analysis and what we have generically termed the 'virtually' deformable finite-element approach. The model is first applied to the case of a smooth annular seal for verification purposes. The rotor excitation components, in this sample problem, give rise to a purely cylindrical, purely conical, and a simultaneous cylindrical/conical rotor whirl around the housing centerline. In all cases, the computed results are compared to existing experimental and analytical data involving the same seal geometry and operating conditions. Next, two labyrinth-seal configurations, which share the same tooth-to-tooth chamber geometry but differ in the total number of chambers, were investigated. The results, in this case, are compared to experimental measurements for both seal configurations. The focus is finally shifted to the shrouded-impeller problem, where the stability effects of the leakage flow in the shroud-to-housing secondary passage are investigated. To this end, the computational model is applied to a typical shrouded-impeller pump stage, fabricated and rotor dynamically tested by Sulzer Bros., and the results compared to those of a simplified 'bulk-flow' analysis and Sulzer Bros.' test data. In addition to assessing the computed rotor dynamic coefficients, the shrouded-impeller study also covers a controversial topic, namely that of the leakage-passage inlet swirl, which was previously cited as the origin of highly unconventional (resonance-like) trends of the fluid-exerted forces. In order to validate this claim, a 'microscopic' study of the fluid/shroud interaction mechanism is conducted, with the focus being on the structure of the perturbed flow field associated with the impeller whirl. The conclusions of this study were solidified by the outcome of a numerical-certainty exercise, where the grid dependency of the numerical results is objectively examined. The final phase of the shrouded-impeller investigation involves the validation of a built-in assumption, in all other perturbation models, whereby single-harmonic tangential distributions of all the flow thermophysical properties are imposed. The last phase of the investigation course is aimed at verifying the fine details of the perturbed flow field in light of recent set of detailed LDA measurements in a smooth annular seal. Grid dependency of the fluid-induced forces is also investigated, and specific recommendations are made.

  5. A finite-element-based perturbation model for the rotordynamic analysis of shrouded pump impellers: Part 1: Model development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskharone, Erian A.

    1993-09-01

    This study concerns the rotor dynamic characteristics of fluid-encompassed rotors, with special emphasis on shrouded pump impellers. The core of the study is a versatile and categorically new finite-element-based perturbation model, which is based on a rigorous flow analysis and what we have generically termed the 'virtually' deformable finite-element approach. The model is first applied to the case of a smooth annular seal for verification purposes. The rotor excitation components, in this sample problem, give rise to a purely cylindrical, purely conical, and a simultaneous cylindrical/conical rotor whirl around the housing centerline. In all cases, the computed results are compared to existing experimental and analytical data involving the same seal geometry and operating conditions. Next, two labyrinth-seal configurations, which share the same tooth-to-tooth chamber geometry but differ in the total number of chambers, were investigated. The results, in this case, are compared to experimental measurements for both seal configurations. The focus is finally shifted to the shrouded-impeller problem, where the stability effects of the leakage flow in the shroud-to-housing secondary passage are investigated. To this end, the computational model is applied to a typical shrouded-impeller pump stage, fabricated and rotor dynamically tested by Sulzer Bros., and the results compared to those of a simplified 'bulk-flow' analysis and Sulzer Bros.' test data. In addition to assessing the computed rotor dynamic coefficients, the shrouded-impeller study also covers a controversial topic, namely that of the leakage-passage inlet swirl, which was previously cited as the origin of highly unconventional (resonance-like) trends of the fluid-exerted forces. In order to validate this claim, a 'microscopic' study of the fluid/shroud interaction mechanism is conducted, with the focus being on the structure of the perturbed flow field associated with the impeller whirl. The conclusions of this study were solidified by the outcome of a numerical-certainty exercise, where the grid dependency of the numerical results is objectively examined. The final phase of the shrouded-impeller investigation involves the validation of a built-in assumption, in all other perturbation models, whereby single-harmonic tangential distributions of all the flow thermophysical properties are imposed. The last phase of the investigation course is aimed at verifying the fine details of the perturbed flow field in light of recent set of detailed LDA measurements in a smooth annular seal. Grid dependency of the fluid-induced forces is also investigated, and specific recommendations are made.

  6. Unshrouded Impeller Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droege, Alan R.; Williams, Robert W.; Garcia, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    To increase payload and decrease the cost of future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs), engineers at NASA/MSFC and Boeing, Rocketdyne are developing unshrouded impeller technology for application to rocket turbopumps. An unshrouded two-stage high-pressure fuel pump is being developed to meet the performance objectives of a three-stage shrouded pump. The new pump will have reduced manufacturing costs and pump weight. The lower pump weight will allow for increased payload.

  7. Swimming and pumping of rigid helical bodies in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Spagnolie, Saverio E.

    2014-04-01

    Rotating helical bodies of arbitrary cross-sectional profile and infinite length are explored as they swim through or transport a viscous fluid. The Stokes equations are studied in a helical coordinate system, and closed form analytical expressions for the force-free swimming speed and torque are derived in the asymptotic regime of nearly cylindrical bodies. High-order accurate expressions for the velocity field and swimming speed are derived for helical bodies of finite pitch angle through a double series expansion. The analytical predictions match well with the results of full numerical simulations, and accurately predict the optimal pitch angle for a given cross-sectional profile. This work may improve the modeling and design of helical structures used in microfluidic manipulation, synthetic microswimmer engineering, and the transport and mixing of viscous fluids.

  8. Three-dimensional calculation of air-water two-phase flow in centrifugal pump impeller based on a bubbly flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Minemura, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    1993-12-01

    To predict the behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flows in a centrifugal pump impeller, a three-dimensional numerical method is proposed on the basis of a bubbly flow model. Under the assumption of homogeneous bubbly flow entraining fine bubbles, the equation of motion of the mixture is represented by that of liquid-phase and the liquid velocity is expressed as a potential for a quasi-harmonic equation. This equation is solved with a finite element method to obtain the velocities, and the equation of motion of an air bubble is integrated numerically in the flow field to obtain the void fraction. These calculations are iterated to obtain a converged solution. The method has been applied to a radial-flow pump, and the results obtained have been confirmed by experiments within the range of bubbly flow regime.

  9. Influence of impeller and diffuser geometries on the lateral fluid forces of whirling centrifugal impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohashi, Hideo; Sakurai, Akira; Nishihama, Jiro

    1989-01-01

    Lateral fluid forces on two-dimensional centrifugal impellers, which whirl on a circular orbit in a vaneless diffuser, were reported. Experiments were further conducted for the cases in which a three-dimensional centrifugal impeller, a model of the boiler feed pump, whirls in vaneless and vaned diffusers. The influence of the clearance configuration between the casing and front shroud of the impeller was also investigated. The result indicated that the fluid dynamic interaction between the impeller and the guide vanes induces quite strong fluctuating fluid forces to the impeller, but nevertheless its influence on radial and tangential force components averaged over a whirling orbit is relatively small.

  10. On-site Real-Time Inspection System for Pump-impeller using X-band Linac X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Natsui, Takuya; Taguchi, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Lee, Ki woo; Hashimoto, Eiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Sakumi, Akira; Yusa, Noritaka; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanabe, Eiji

    2009-03-10

    The methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) are generally ultrasonic, neutron, eddy-current and X-rays, NDT by using X-rays, in particular, is the most useful inspection technique having high resolution. We can especially evaluate corroded pipes of petrochemical complex, nuclear and thermal-power plants by the high energy X-ray NDT system. We develop a portable X-ray NDT system with X-band linac and magnetron. This system can generate a 950 keV electron beam. We are able to get X-ray images of samples with 1 mm spatial resolution. This system has application to real time impeller inspection because linac based X-ray sources are able to generate pulsed X-rays. So, we can inspect the rotating impeller if the X-ray pulse rate is synchronized with the impeller rotation rate. This system has application in condition based maintenance (CBM) of nuclear plants, for example. However, 950 keV X-ray source can only be used for thin tubes with 20 mm thickness. We have started design of a 3.95 MeV X-band linac for broader X-ray NDT application. We think that this X-ray NDT system will be useful for corrosion wastage and cracking in thicker tubes at nuclear plants and impeller of larger pumps. This system consists of X-band linac, thermionic cathode electron gun, magnetron and waveguide components. For achieving higher electric fields the 3.95 MeV X-band linac structure has the side-coupled acceleration structure. This structure has more efficient acceleration than the 950 keV linac with alternating periodic structure (APS). We adopt a 1.3 MW magnetron for the RF source. This accelerator system is about 30 cm long. The beam current is about 150 mA, and X-ray dose rate is 10 Gy at 1 m/500 pps. In this paper, the detail of the whole system concept and the electromagnetic field of designed linac structure will be reported.

  11. Effect of impeller cutdown on developed head

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidiah, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the manner, in which a new approach towards calculating the head developed by a centrifugal impeller can be applied towards predicting the head developed by a pump with a cut-down impeller. A comparison with actual test-data demonstrates, that this approach is capable of producing more reliable results, than any of the presently known methods.

  12. Pressure and momentum field investigation of a centrifugal pump through dynamic loading of a semi-open impeller 

    E-print Network

    Anwer, Sohaib

    1998-01-01

    conditions for the pump after generating performance curves. The pressure distribution inside the pump housing was measured through pressure taps drilled in the front and back housing. These pressure measurements were obtained for distinct geometric...

  13. Fluid Dynamics of Small, Rugged Vacuum Pumps of Viscous-Drag Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The need to identify spikes in the concentration of hazardous gases during countdowns to space shuttle launches has led Kennedy Space Center to acquire considerable expertise in the design, construction, and operation of special-purpose gas analyzers of mass-spectrometer type. If such devices could be miniaturized so as to fit in a small airborne package or backpack them their potential applications would include integrated vehicle health monitoring in later-generation space shuttles and in hazardous material detection in airports, to name two examples. The bulkiest components of such devices are vacuum pumps, particularly those that function in the low vacuum range. Now some pumps that operate in the high vacuum range (e.g. molecular-drag and turbomolecular pumps) are already small and rugged. The present work aims to determine whether, on physical grounds, one may or may not adopt the molecular-drag principle to the low-vacuum range (in which case viscous-drag principle is the appropriate term). The deliverable of the present effort is the derivation and justification of some key formulas and calculation methods for the preliminary design of a single-spool, spiral-channel viscous-drag pump.

  14. Damping Vibration at an Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.; Rowan, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration of pump shaft is damped at impeller--where vibration-induced deflections are greatest--by shroud and seal. Damping reduces vibrational motion of shaft at bearings and load shaft places on them. Flow through clearance channel absorbs vibration energy.

  15. Computation of the flow field in a centrifugal impeller with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejong, Frederik J.; Choi, Sang-Keun; Govindan, T. R.; Sabnis, Jayant S.

    1992-07-01

    To support the design effort of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) Fuel Pump Stage, viscous flow calculations were performed in a centrifugal impeller with splitter blades. These calculations were carried out with a Navier-Stokes solver (MINT), which employs a linearized block-implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure to iteratively solve a finite difference form of the system of conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy in body-fitted coordinates. A computational grid was generated algebraically for the 'channel' between two main blades of the impeller and extended both upstream of the impeller inlet and downstream of the impeller exit so that the appropriate boundary conditions could be applied. The results of the calculations show that although the overall level of flow distortion near the impeller exit is not very large, there is a noticeable difference between the flow patterns in the two 'passages' (one passage between the pressure side of the splitter blade and the suction side of the next full blade).

  16. Computation of the flow field in a centrifugal impeller with splitter blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejong, Frederik J.; Choi, Sang-Keun; Govindan, T. R.; Sabnis, Jayant S.

    1992-01-01

    To support the design effort of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) Fuel Pump Stage, viscous flow calculations were performed in a centrifugal impeller with splitter blades. These calculations were carried out with a Navier-Stokes solver (MINT), which employs a linearized block-implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure to iteratively solve a finite difference form of the system of conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy in body-fitted coordinates. A computational grid was generated algebraically for the 'channel' between two main blades of the impeller and extended both upstream of the impeller inlet and downstream of the impeller exit so that the appropriate boundary conditions could be applied. The results of the calculations show that although the overall level of flow distortion near the impeller exit is not very large, there is a noticeable difference between the flow patterns in the two 'passages' (one passage between the pressure side of the splitter blade and the suction side of the next full blade).

  17. Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Potential Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2007-03-01

    Using a standard vibratory horn apparatus, the relative cavitation-erosion resistance of a number of cast alloys in mercury was evaluated to facilitate material selection decisions for Hg pumps. The performance of nine different alloys - in the as-cast condition as well as following a case-hardening treatment intended to increase surface hardness - was compared in terms of weight loss and surface profile development as a function of sonication time in Hg at ambient temperature. The results indicated that among several potentially suitable alloys, CD3MWCuN perhaps exhibited the best overall resistance to cavitation in both the as-cast and surface treated conditions while the cast irons examined were found unsuitable for service of this type. However, other factors, including cost, availability, and vendor schedules may influence a material selection among the suitable alloys for Hg pumps.

  18. Implantable centrifugal blood pump with dual impeller and double pivot bearing system: electromechanical actuator, prototyping, and anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Bock, Eduardo; Antunes, Pedro; Leao, Tarcisio; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Fonseca, Jeison; Leme, Juliana; Utiyama, Bruno; da Silva, Cibele; Cavalheiro, Andre; Filho, Diolino Santos; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, Jose; Andrade, Aron; Arruda, Celso

    2011-05-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump has been developed with original features for a left ventricular assist device. This pump is part of a multicenter and international study with the objective to offer simple, affordable, and reliable devices to developing countries. Previous computational fluid dynamics investigations and wear evaluation in bearing system were performed followed by prototyping and in vitro tests. In addition, previous blood tests for assessment of normalized index of hemolysis show results of 0.0054±2.46 × 10?³ mg/100 L. An electromechanical actuator was tested in order to define the best motor topology and controller configuration. Three different topologies of brushless direct current motor (BLDCM) were analyzed. An electronic driver was tested in different situations, and the BLDCM had its mechanical properties tested in a dynamometer. Prior to evaluation of performance during in vivo animal studies, anatomical studies were necessary to achieve the best configuration and cannulation for left ventricular assistance. The results were considered satisfactory, and the next step is to test the performance of the device in vivo. PMID:21595708

  19. Creating A Data Base For Design Of An Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prueger, George H.; Chen, Wei-Chung

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of Taguchi method of parametric design to create data base facilitating optimization of design of impeller in centrifugal pump. Data base enables systematic design analysis covering all significant design parameters. Reduces time and cost of parametric optimization of design: for particular impeller considered, one can cover 4,374 designs by computational simulations of performance for only 18 cases.

  20. A concept for improving efficiency of multistage centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardy, H. F.

    1970-01-01

    Multichannel impeller consists of successive stage impellers arranged concentrically without clearances between them. Reduction in friction is predicted to increase pump efficiency by 5 to 10 percent.

  1. Computer Program Aids Design Of Impeller Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Galazin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    Impeller blades for centrifugal turbopumps designed quickly with help of computer program. Generates blade contours and continually subjects them to evaluation. Checks physical parameters to ensure they are compatible with required performance and recycles design if criteria not met. Program written for centrifugal turbomachinery, also adapted to such axial pump components as inducer blades and stator vanes.

  2. Development and Validation of High Performance Unshrouded Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Williams, M.; Paris, John K.; Prueger, G. H.; Williams, Robert; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of using a two-stage unshrouded impeller turbopump to replace the current three-stage reusable launch vehicle engine shrouded impeller hydrogen pump has been evaluated from the standpoint of turbopump weight reduction and overall payload improvement. These advantages are a by-product of the higher tip speeds that an unshrouded impeller can sustain. The issues associated with the effect of unshrouded impeller tip clearance on pump efficiency and head have been evaluated with one-dimensional tools and full three-dimensional rotordynamic fluid reaction forces and coefficients have been established through time dependent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the whole 360 degree impeller with different rotor eccentricities and whirling ratios. Unlike the shrouded impeller, the unshrouded impeller forces are evaluated as the sum of the pressure forces on the blade and the pressure forces on the hub using the CFD results. The turbopump axial thrust control has been optimized by adjusting the first stage impeller backend wear ring seal diameter and diverting the second stage backend balance piston flow to the proper location. The structural integrity associated with the high tip speed has been checked by analyzing a 3D-Finite Element Model at maximum design conditions (6% higher than the design speed). This impeller was fabricated and tested in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center water-test rig. The experimental data will be compared with the analytical predictions and presented in another paper. The experimental data provides validation data for the numerical design and analysis methodology. The validated numerical methodology can be used to help design different unshrouded impeller configurations.

  3. Impeller flow field measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, J. R.; Fleeter, S.

    1991-01-01

    A series of experiments are performed to investigate and quantify the three-dimensional mean flow field in centrifugal compressor flow passages and to evaluate contemporary internal flow models. The experiments include the acquisition and analysis of LDV data in the impeller passages of a low-speed moderate-scale research mixed-flow centrifugal compressor operating at its design point. Predictions from a viscous internal flow model are then correlated with these data. The LDV data show the traditional jet-wake structure observed in many centrifugal compressors, with the wake observed along the shroud 70 percent of the length from the pressure to suction surface. The viscous model predicts the major flow phenomena. However, the correlations of the viscous predictions with the LDV data were poor.

  4. Floating portable pump

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, H. A.

    1985-11-19

    A floating portable pump is constructed of a float defining a well for containing water, a centrifugal pump supported on the float with its impeller shaft extending vertically and with its suction inlet submerged in water in the well, and an internal combustion engine arranged to drive the pump impeller. The pump and engine are secured together on the float in an arrangement such that the engine causes rotation of the pump impeller to cause the pump to draw water from the well through its suction inlet and discharge water from the pump discharge.

  5. High efficiency centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nasvytis, P.J.; Jahrstorfer, G.W.

    1983-10-11

    A high speed fuel pump for a gas turnbine engine has a positively-driven shroud positioned between a main impeller and the wall of a pumping cavity to reduce impeller drag. The shroud is formed by a first disc having a boost impeller connected to its central hub portion and a second disc having a gear carried by its central hub portion. The main drive shaft assembly to which the main impeller is connected, carries a gear which meshes with gear mounted upon a shaft. The shaft also carries a gear which meshes with the gear. The gears are sized so that the shroud is driven at one-half the speed of the main impeller in order to maximize impeller drag reduction and enhance pumping capability when severe inlet conditions are present at the pump inlet.

  6. PIV measurement of internal flow characteristics of very low specific speed semi-open impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.-D.; Nishino, K.; Kurokawa, J.; Matsui, J.

    2004-11-01

    Detailed particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow fields inside semi-open impellers have been performed to understand better the internal flow patterns that are responsible for the unique performance of these centrifugal pumps operated in the range of very low specific speed. Two impellers, one equipped with six radial blades (impeller A) and the other with four conventional backward-swept blades (impeller B), are tested in a centrifugal pump designed to be operated at a non-dimensional specific speed of ns=0.24. Complex flow patterns captured by PIV are discussed in conjunction with the overall pump performance measured separately. It is revealed that impeller A achieves higher effective head than impeller B even though the flow patterns in impeller A are more complex, exhibiting secondary flows and reverse flows in the impeller passage. It is shown that both the localized strong outward flow at the pressure side of each blade outlet and the strong outward through-flow along the suction side of each blade are responsible for the better head performance of impeller A.

  7. Swimming and pumping by helical waves in viscous and viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Spagnolie, Saverio E.

    2015-02-01

    We study helical bodies of arbitrary cross-sectional profile as they swim or transport fluid by the passage of helical waves. Many cases are explored: the external flow problem of swimming in a cylindrical tube or an infinite domain, the internal fluid pumping problem, and confined/unconfined swimming and internal pumping in a viscoelastic (Oldroyd-B) fluid. A helical coordinate system allows for the analytical calculation of swimming and pumping speeds and fluid velocities in the asymptotic regime of nearly cylindrical bodies. In a Newtonian flow, a matched asymptotic analysis results in corrections to the swimming speed accurate to fourth-order in the small wave amplitude, and the results compare favorably with full numerical simulations. We find that the torque-balancing rigid body rotation generally opposes the direction of wave passage, but not always. Confinement can result in local maxima and minima of the swimming speed in the helical pitch, and the effects of confinement decrease exponentially fast with the diameter of the tube. In a viscoelastic fluid, we find that the effects of fluid elasticity on swimming and internal pumping modify the Newtonian results through the mode-dependent complex viscosity, even in a confined domain.

  8. Transient internal characteristic study of a centrifugal pump during startup process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F. F.; Ma, X. D.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    The transient process of a centrifugal pump existed in a variety of occasions. There were a lot of researches in the external characteristic in startup process and stopping process, but internal characteristics were less observed and studied. Study of the internal flow field had significant meanings. The performance of a pump could be evaluated and improved by revealing the flow field. In the other hand, the prediction of external characteristic was based on the correct analysis of the internal flow. In this paper, theoretical method and numerical simulation were used to study the internal characteristic of a centrifugal pump. The theoretical study showed that the relative flow in an impeller was composed of homogeneous flow and axial vortex flow. The vortex intensity was mainly determined by angular velocity of impeller, flow channel width and blade curvature. In order to get the internal flow field and observe the evolution of transient internal flow in the impeller, Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) were used to study the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible viscous flows in a centrifugal pump during starting period. The Dynamic Mesh (DM) method with non-conformal grid boundaries was applied to get the external characteristic and internal flow field. The simulate model included three pumps with different blade numbers and the same blade curvature. The relative velocity vector showed that there was a big axial vortex in impeller channel. At the beginning, the vortex was raised in the pressure side of the impeller outlet and with time went on, it shifted to the middle flow channel of the impeller and the vortex intensity increased. When the speed and flow rate reached a definite value, the influence of the axial vortex began to get smaller. The vortex developed faster when the flow channel got narrower. Due to the evolution of axial vortex, the slip factor during starting period was smaller than that in quasi-steady condition. As a result, transient head was lower than quasi-steady head in startup process.

  9. Viscous to inertial pumping transitions in a robotic gill plate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Mary; Kiger, Ken

    2010-11-01

    Biological oscillating appendage systems are known to exhibit distinct patterns of movement based on their Reynolds number. Flapping kinematics (net flow perpendicular to appendage stroke plane) are associated with Re > 100, while rowing kinematics (flow in the direction of appendage motion) are typically associated with Re < 1. Previous studies of pumping by mayfly nymph gill plate arrays have shown a transition between rowing and flapping at a Re 5. Although the flow generated by the animal could be documented, the limited range of behavior of the animal prevented a detailed study of why and how such a pumping mechanism might be optimized. Towards this end, a two-degree-of-freedom robotic oscillating plate array has been constructed, which allows for the variation of the Reynolds number, plate spacing, plate shape, and stroke/pitch amplitude beyond what is exhibited by the animal system. Using PIV, these combinations allow the individual influence of each feature on the pumping efficiency to be observed, and elucidate how it may be optimized for engineered devices. The current results will compare this simplified system to the flow generated by the typical mayfly, to determine how effectively the model performs in comparison to the more complex animal system.

  10. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  11. CFD parametric study of consortium impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-07-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform. Due to the complexity of blade geometries, the TANDEM blade configurations were analyzed with the multi-zone grid structure. Both the 7.5 deg- and the 22.5 deg-clocking TANDEM blade cases utilized a 80K mesh system. The numerical result of two TANDEM blade modifications indicates the efficiency and the head are worse than those of the baseline case due to larger flow distortion. The gap between the TANDEM blade and the full blade allows the flow passes through and heavily loads the pressure side of the partial blade such that flow reversal occurs near the suction side of the splitter. The flow split at the exit of impeller blades is very non-uniform for TANDEM blade cases, and this will greatly induce the side load on the diffuser. impeller.

  12. CFD Parametric Study of Consortium Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform. Due to the complexity of blade geometries, the TANDEM blade configurations were analyzed with the multi-zone grid structure. Both the 7.5 deg- and the 22.5 deg-clocking TANDEM blade cases utilized a 80K mesh system. The numerical result of two TANDEM blade modifications indicates the efficiency and the head are worse than those of the baseline case due to larger flow distortion. The gap between the TANDEM blade and the full blade allows the flow passes through and heavily loads the pressure side of the partial blade such that flow reversal occurs near the suction side of the splitter. The flow split at the exit of impeller blades is very non-uniform for TANDEM blade cases, and this will greatly induce the side load on the diffuser. Therefore, the TANDEM blade modification in the present CFD analysis does not improve the performance of the consortium impeller.

  13. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  14. Comparison between predicted and experimentally measured flow fields at the exit of the SSME HPFTP impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bache, George

    1993-07-01

    Validation of CFD codes is a critical first step in the process of developing CFD design capability. The MSFC Pump Technology Team has recognized the importance of validation and has thus funded several experimental programs designed to obtain CFD quality validation data. The first data set to become available is for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Impeller. LDV Data was taken at the impeller inlet (to obtain a reliable inlet boundary condition) and three radial positions at the impeller discharge. Our CFD code, TASCflow, is used within the Propulsion and Commercial Pump industry as a tool for pump design. The objective of this work, therefore, is to further validate TASCflow for application in pump design. TASCflow was used to predict flow at the impeller discharge for flowrates of 80, 100 and 115 percent of design flow. Comparison to data has been made with encouraging results.

  15. CFD analyses for advanced pump design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejong, F. J.; Choi, S.-K.; Govindan, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    As one of the activities of the NASA/MSFC Pump Stage Technology Team, the present effort was focused on using CFD in the design and analysis of high performance rocket engine pumps. Under this effort, a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code was used for various inducer and impeller flow field calculations. An existing algebraic grid generation procedure was-extended to allow for nonzero blade thickness, splitter blades, and hub/shroud cavities upstream or downstream of the (main) blades. This resulted in a fast, robust inducer/impeller geometry/grid generation package. Problems associated with running a compressible flow code to simulate an incompressible flow were resolved; related aspects of the numerical algorithm (viz., the matrix preconditioning, the artificial dissipation, and the treatment of low Mach number flows) were addressed. As shown by the calculations performed under the present effort, the resulting code, in conjunction with the grid generation package, is an effective tool for the rapid solution of three-dimensional viscous inducer and impeller flows.

  16. CFD analyses for advanced pump design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejong, F. J.; Choi, S.-K.; Govindan, T. R.

    1994-04-01

    As one of the activities of the NASA/MSFC Pump Stage Technology Team, the present effort was focused on using CFD in the design and analysis of high performance rocket engine pumps. Under this effort, a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code was used for various inducer and impeller flow field calculations. An existing algebraic grid generation procedure was-extended to allow for nonzero blade thickness, splitter blades, and hub/shroud cavities upstream or downstream of the (main) blades. This resulted in a fast, robust inducer/impeller geometry/grid generation package. Problems associated with running a compressible flow code to simulate an incompressible flow were resolved; related aspects of the numerical algorithm (viz., the matrix preconditioning, the artificial dissipation, and the treatment of low Mach number flows) were addressed. As shown by the calculations performed under the present effort, the resulting code, in conjunction with the grid generation package, is an effective tool for the rapid solution of three-dimensional viscous inducer and impeller flows.

  17. Consider zig-zag impeller for desalination projects

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, W.

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the application of a novel pump with a zig-zag impeller that is suited for vapor condensation. The pump is proposed to be used as the vapor condensation portion of a vapor desalination plant. Small scale testing is currently under way. No additional heat needs to be added to the seawater which boils by application of a vacuum to the desalting tank. The zig-zag pump then condenses the resulting pure water vapor and pumps it to a holding tank.

  18. Impeller flow field characterization with a laser two-focus velocimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozowski, L. A.; Ferguson, T. V.; Rojas, L.

    1993-07-01

    Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, prevalent in the rocket engine turbomachinery industry, necessitates data of sufficient quality and quantity to benchmark computational codes. Existing data bases for typical rocket engine configurations, in particular impellers, are limited. In addition, traditional data acquisition methods have several limitations: typically transducer uncertainties are 0.5% of transducer full scale and traditional pressure probes are unable to provide flow characteristics in the circumferential (blade-to-blade) direction. Laser velocimetry circumvents these limitations by providing +0.5% uncertainty in flow velocity and +0.5% uncertainty in flow angle. The percent of uncertainty in flow velocity is based on the measured value, not full range capability. The laser electronics multiple partitioning capability allows data acquired between blades as the impeller rotates, to be analyzed separately, thus providing blade-to-blade flow characterization. Unlike some probes, the non-intrusive measurements made with the laser velocimeter does not disturb the flow. To this end,, and under Contract (NAS8-38864) to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), an extensive test program was undertaken at Rocketdyne. Impellers from two different generic rocket engine pump configurations were examined. The impellers represent different spectrums of pump design: the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) impeller was designed in the 1 1970's the Consortium for CFD application in Propulsion Technology Pump Stage Technology Team (Pump Consortium) optimized impeller was designed with the aid of modern computing techniques. The tester configuration for each of the impellers consisted of an axial inlet, an inducer, a diffuser, and a crossover discharge. While the tested configurations were carefully chosen to be representative of generic rocket engine pumps, several features of both testers were intentionally atypical. A crossover discharge, downstream of the impeller, rather than a volute discharge was used to minimize asymmetric flow conditions that might be reflected in the impeller discharge flow data. Impeller shroud wear ring radial clearances were purposely close to minimize leakage flow, thus increasing confidence in using the inlet data as an input to CFD programs. The empirical study extensively examined the flow fields of the two impellers via performance of laser two-focus velocimeter surveys in an axial plane upstream of the impellers and in multiple radial planes downstream of the impellers. Both studies were performed at the impeller design flow coefficients. Inlet laser surveys that provide CFD code inlet boundary conditions were performed in one axial plane, with ten radial locations surveyed. Three wall static pressures, positioned circumferentially around the impeller inlet, were used to identify asymmetrical pressure distributions in the inlet survey plane. impeller discharge flow characterization consisted of three radial planes for the SSME HPFTP impeller and two radial planes for the Pump Consortium optimized impeller. &Housing wall static pressures were placed to correspond to the radial locations surveyed with the laser velocimeter. Between five and thirteen axial stations across the discharge channel width were examined in each radial plane during the extensive flow mapping. The largely successful empirical flow characterization of two different impellers resulted in a substantial contribution to the limited existing data base, and yielded accurate data for CFD code benchmarking.

  19. Apparatus for pumping liquids at or below the boiling point

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A pump comprises a housing having an inlet and an outlet. An impeller assembly mounted for rotation within the housing includes a first impeller piece having a first mating surface thereon and a second impeller piece having a second mating surface therein. The second mating surface of the second impeller piece includes at least one groove therein so that at least one flow channel is defined between the groove and the first mating surface of the first impeller piece. A drive system operatively associated with the impeller assembly rotates the impeller assembly within the housing.

  20. 76 FR 34192 - Commercial and Industrial Pumps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ...Efficiency for Single Stage Centrifugal Pumps'' \\8\\ show that for typical...Efficiency for Single Stage Centrifugal Pumps,'' Varese, Italy: European...Centrifugal (Radial) Flow Centrifugal pumps use bladed impellers with...

  1. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  2. Centrifugal pumps: Design and application

    SciTech Connect

    Lobanoff, V.S.; Ross, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    The book shows how to select hydraulic geometry, predict performance, develop hydraulic passage for pump case and impeller, and analyze pump behavior. Contents include: Elements of pump design. Introduction. Specific speed and modelling laws. Impeller design. General pump design. Volute design. Design of multi-stage casing. Double-suction pumps. Diffusion casing design. Applications include. Pipelines, waterflood, and CO/sub 2/ pumps. High-speed, boiler feed, process, and non-metallic pumps. Vertical process mixed flow, and axial flow pumps. Mechancial design. Shaft design, rotor dynamics, axial thrust bearings, and case support and baseplate designs.

  3. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  4. An analytical investigation into the performance of centrifugal pumps flowing two-phase non-condensable mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sterrett, J.D.; Knight, R.W.; Reece, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    A compressible, viscous, non-homogeneous analytical two-phase centrifugal pump impeller model is presented. Results from this model show improved agreement to experimental data over previously published two-phase pump model results. The non-dimensional form of this model provides significant insight into the issue of scaling two-phase experimental results from the reduced-scale laboratory to full-scale prototype systems. The results from this analysis show that two-phase dimensional similitude is not consistent with single-phase pump dimensional similitude and that the pump head degradation occurs at a lower gas void fraction in reduced-scale pumps than in larger prototype systems. The results from this effort also show that the magnitude of the pump suction pressure is an important scaling parameter.

  5. Numerical studies in a centrifugal pump with the improved blade considering cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P. F.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhou, X.; Zhang, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a centrifugal pump with the improved blade for cavitation is studied numerically. A 3D impeller with logarithmic spiral blade profile was designed by the in-house hydraulic design code using a centrifugal pump geometric parameters, and the blade profile curve of suction side on the designed impeller is replaced by a combination of tangent line and circle arc line. The cavitation flows in the centrifugal pump with designed impeller, modified impeller and centrifugal pump spectrum impeller are respectively calculated by two-phase CFD simulation at three flow rates. The tests of the centrifugal pump have been conducted to verify numerical simulation. The effects of designed impeller and modified impeller on hydraulic efficiency, critical cavitation number, cavitation length, head drop performance and vapor cavity distribution in impeller are investigated. The results show that the modification of blade profile curve of suction side can improve the cavitation performance of an impeller and hydraulic efficiency of centrifugal pump. Compared with designed impeller, the critical cavitation number of centrifugal pump with modified impeller decrease by 26.5% under the same flow rate coefficient, and the cavitation intensity in the modified impeller is weakened effectively. The hydraulic efficiency of modified impeller also increases by 4.9%.

  6. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozeman, Richard J.; Akkerman, James W.; Aber, Greg S.; Vandamm, George A.; Bacak, James W.; Svejkovsky, Paul A.; Benkowski, Robert J.

    1993-11-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  7. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (inventor); Akkerman, James W. (inventor); Aber, Greg S. (inventor); Vandamm, George A. (inventor); Bacak, James W. (inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis for the Reduction of Impeller Discharge Flow Distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; McConnaughey, P. K.; Eastland, A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in the design and analysis of high performance rocket engine pumps has increased in recent years. This increase has been aided by the activities of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Pump Stage Technology Team (PSTT). The team's goals include assessing the accuracy and efficiency of several methodologies and then applying the appropriate methodology(s) to understand and improve the flow inside a pump. The PSTT's objectives, team membership, and past activities are discussed in Garcia1 and Garcia2. The PSTT is one of three teams that form the NASA/MSFC CFD Consortium for Applications in Propulsion Technology (McConnaughey3). The PSTT first applied CFD in the design of the baseline consortium impeller. This impeller was designed for the Space Transportation Main Engine's (STME) fuel turbopump. The STME fuel pump was designed with three impeller stages because a two-stage design was deemed to pose a high developmental risk. The PSTT used CFD to design an impeller whose performance allowed for a two-stage STME fuel pump design. The availability of this design would have lead to a reduction in parts, weight, and cost had the STME reached production. One sample of the baseline consortium impeller was manufactured and tested in a water rig. The test data showed that the impeller performance was as predicted and that a two-stage design for the STME fuel pump was possible with minimal risk. The test data also verified another CFD predicted characteristic of the design that was not desirable. The classical 'jet-wake' pattern at the impeller discharge was strengthened by two aspects of the design: by the high head coefficient necessary for the required pressure rise and by the relatively few impeller exit blades, 12, necessary to reduce manufacturing cost. This 'jet-wake pattern produces an unsteady loading on the diffuser vanes and has, in past rocket engine programs, lead to diffuser structural failure. In industrial applications, this problem is typically avoided by increasing the space between the impeller and the diffuser to allow the dissipation of this pattern and, hence, the reduction of diffuser vane unsteady loading. This approach leads to small performance losses and, more importantly in rocket engine applications, to significant increases in the pump's size and weight. This latter consideration typically makes this approach unacceptable in high performance rocket engines.

  9. [Improved design of permanent maglev impeller assist heart].

    PubMed

    Qian, Kunxi; Zeng, Pei; Ru, Weimin; Yuan, Haiyu

    2002-12-01

    Magnetic bearing has no mechanical contact between the rotor and stator. And a rotary pump with magnetic bearing has therefore no mechanical wear and thrombosis due to bearing. The available magnetic bearings, however, are devised with electric magnets, need complicated control and remarkable energy consumption. Resultantly, it is difficult to apply an electric magnetic bearing to rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, implantability and reliability. The authors have developed a levitated impeller pump merely with permanent magnets. The rotor is supported by permanent magnetic forces radially. On one side of the rotor, the impeller is fixed; and on the other side of the rotor, the driven magnets are mounted. Opposite to this driven magnets, a driving motor coil with iron corn magnets is fastened to the motor axis. Thereafter, the motor drives the rotor via a rotating magnetic field. By laboratory tests with saline, if the rotor stands still or rotates under 4,000 rpm, the rotor has one-point contact axially with the driving motor coil. The contacting point is located in the center of the rotor. As the rotating speed increases gradually to more than 4,000 rpm, the rotor will detache from the stator axially. Then the rotor will be fully levitated. Since the axial levitation is produced by hydraulic force and the driven magnets have a gyro-effect, the rotor rotates very steadly during levitation. As a left ventricular assist device, the pump works in a rotating speed range of 5,000-8,000 rpm, the levitation of the impeller hence is ensured by practical use of the pump. PMID:12561356

  10. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  11. LH2 pump component development testing in the electric pump room at test cell C inducer no. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, F. X.; Brunner, J. J.; Kirk, K. G.; Mathews, J. P.; Nishioka, T.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a turbine pump for use with the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles are discussed. It was determined that the pump will be a two stage centrifugal pump with both stages having backswept impellers and an inducer upstream of the first stage impeller. The test program provided demonstration of the ability of the selected design to meet the imposed requirements.

  12. Pressure oscillation in the leakage annulus between a shrouded impeller and its housing due to impeller-discharge-pressure disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The perturbed flow in the leakage path between a shrouded-pump impeller and its housing is analyzed using experiences with the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) wearing-ring seals. Analysis is based on a bulk-flow model which consists of the path-momentum, circumferential momentum, and continuity equations. The pressure oscillations in the leakage annulus are driven by a circumferential variation of the impeller discharge pressure. It is shown that the occurrence and nature of the pressure oscillations depend on the tangential-velocity ratio of the fluid entering the seal, the order of the Fourier coefficient, the closeness of the precessional frequency of the rotating pressure field to the first natural frequency of the fluid annulus, and the clearance of the wearing-ring seal. The results obtained may explain the internal melting observed on SSME HPFTP seal parts.

  13. Scaling of impeller response to impeller-diffuser interactions in centrifugal compressors

    E-print Network

    Tarr, David Landon

    2008-01-01

    A numerical investigation has been conducted to quantify the effect of impeller-diffuser interaction on changes in impeller performance. An assessment is made of the hypothesis that the nondimensional parameter characterizing ...

  14. Mud degasser pump

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.H.; Phillips, V.Q.; Sharki, M.J.

    1981-05-26

    Gas laden drilling mud is effectively handled by a centrifugal pump system which allows the flow of released gases from the drilling mud to move in the same axial direction as the mud flow through the pump; whereupon the released gases may be conducted to safe disposal areas. A hollow-centered impeller is driven by a hollow shaft through which the gases may be withdrawn. A prerotation chamber and impeller shroud below the impeller admit drilling mud into the impeller housing, providing the drilling mud with initial rotational velocity through a reduced radius, and further establishing a central opening through which gases escaping from the drilling mud will be released due to centrifugal forces on the mud. Released gases may then be removed through the central passage in the hollow shaft, which shaft may be provided with external means for preventing upward flow of fluid therearound.

  15. Oxygen mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor using different impeller configurations for environmental purposes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Golbabaei, Farideh; Mehrnia, Momammad Reza; Neghab, Masoud; Mohammad, Kazem; Nikpey, Ahmad; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniature stirred tank bioreactor was designed for treatment of waste gas containing benzene, toluene and xylene. Oxygen mass transfer characteristics for various twin and single-impeller systems were investigated for 6 configurations in a vessel with 10 cm of inner diameter and working volume of 1.77L. Three types of impellers, namely, Rushton turbine, Pitched 4blades and Pitched 2blades impellers with downward pumping have been used. Deionized water was used as a liquid phase. With respect to other independent variables such as agitation speed, aeration rate, type of sparger, number of impellers, the relative performance of these impellers was assessed by comparing the values of (KLa) as a key parameter. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations as a function of the operational conditions have been proposed, to study the oxygen transfer rates from air bubbles generated in the bioreactor. It was shown that twin Rushton turbine configuration demonstrates superior performance (23% to 77% enhancement in KLa) compared with other impeller compositions and that sparger type has negligible effect on oxygen mass transfer rate. Agitation speeds of 400 to 800 rpm were the most efficient speeds for oxygen mass transfer in the stirred bioreactor. PMID:23369581

  16. Oxygen mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor using different impeller configurations for environmental purposes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniature stirred tank bioreactor was designed for treatment of waste gas containing benzene, toluene and xylene. Oxygen mass transfer characteristics for various twin and single-impeller systems were investigated for 6 configurations in a vessel with 10 cm of inner diameter and working volume of 1.77L. Three types of impellers, namely, Rushton turbine, Pitched 4blades and Pitched 2blades impellers with downward pumping have been used. Deionized water was used as a liquid phase. With respect to other independent variables such as agitation speed, aeration rate, type of sparger, number of impellers, the relative performance of these impellers was assessed by comparing the values of (KLa) as a key parameter. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations as a function of the operational conditions have been proposed, to study the oxygen transfer rates from air bubbles generated in the bioreactor. It was shown that twin Rushton turbine configuration demonstrates superior performance (23% to 77% enhancement in KLa) compared with other impeller compositions and that sparger type has negligible effect on oxygen mass transfer rate. Agitation speeds of 400 to 800 rpm were the most efficient speeds for oxygen mass transfer in the stirred bioreactor. PMID:23369581

  17. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Flow Field in a 4:1 Pressure Ratio Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, G. J.; Prahst, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    A laser-doppler anemometer was used to obtain flow-field velocity measurements in a 4:1 pressure ratio, 4.54 kg/s (10 lbm/s), centrifugal impeller, with splitter blades and backsweep, which was configured with a vaneless diffuser. Measured through-flow velocities are reported for ten quasi-orthogonal survey planes at locations ranging from 1% to 99% of main blade chord. Measured through-flow velocities are compared to those predicted by a 3-D viscous steady flow analysis (Dawes) code. The measurements show the development and progression through the impeller and vaneless diffuser of a through-flow velocity deficit which results from the tip clearance flow and accumulation of low momentum fluid centrifuged from the blade and hub surfaces. Flow traces from the CFD analysis show the origin of this deficit which begins to grow in the inlet region of the impeller where it is first detected near the suction surface side of the passage. It then moves toward the pressure side of the channel, due to the movement of tip clearance flow across the impeller passage, where it is cut by the splitter blade leading edge. As blade loading increases toward the rear of the channel the deficit region is driven back toward the suction surface by the cross-passage pressure gradient. There is no evidence of a large wake region that might result from flow separation and the impeller efficiency is relatively high. The flow field in this impeller is quite similar to that documented previously by NASA Lewis in a large low-speed backswept impeller.

  18. Oil filaments produced by an impeller in a water stirred thank

    E-print Network

    Sanjuan-Galindo, Rene; Ascanio, Gabriel; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    In this video, the mechanism followed to disperse an oil phase in water using a Scaba impeller in a cylindrical tank is presented. Castor oil (viscosity = 500 mPas) is used and the Reynolds number was fixed to 24,000. The process was recorded with a high-speed camera. Initially, the oil is at the air water interface. At the beginning of the stirring, the oil is dragged into the liquid bulk and rotates around the impeller shaft, then is pushed radially into the flow ejected by the impeller. In this region, the flow is turbulent and exhibits velocity gradients that contribute to elongate the oil phase. Viscous thin filaments are generated and expelled from the impeller. Thereafter, the filaments are elongated and break to form drops. This process is repeated in all the oil phase and drops are incorporated into the dispersion. Two main zones can be identified in the tank: the impeller discharge characterized by high turbulence and the rest of the flow where low velocity gradients appear. In this region surface f...

  19. Centrifugal pump design

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the program which permits the design of a centrifugal pump for use with water. The user enters the main design characteristics required and the program carries out the design. The program varies the number of impeller blades in order to optimize the net hydraulic efficiency of the pump. (FI)

  20. Blade design loads on the flow exciting force in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Yang, A. L.; Langand, D. P.; Dai, R.

    2012-11-01

    The three-dimensional viscous flow field of two centrifugal pumps, which have the same volute, design head, design flow rate and rotational speed but the blade design load, are analyzed based on large eddy simulation. The comparisons are implemented including the hydraulic efficiencies, flow field characteristics, pressure pulsations and unsteady forces applied on the impellers to investigate the effect of the design blade load on hydraulic performance and flow exciting force. The numerical results show that the efficiency of the pump, the impeller blade of which has larger design load, is improved by 1.1%~2.9% compared to the centrifugal pump with lower blade design load. The pressure fluctuation of the pump with high design load is more remarkable. Its maximum amplitude of coefficient of static pressure is higher by 43% than the latter. At the same time the amplitude of unsteady radial force is increased by 11.6% in the time domain. The results also imply that the blade design load is an important factor on the excitation force in centrifugal pumps.

  1. Detection of left ventricle function from a magnetically levitated impeller behavior.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Hara, Chikara; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-05-01

    The magnetically levitated (Mag-Lev) centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) with two-degrees-of-freedom active control is promising for safe and long-term support of circulation. In this study, Mag-Lev CRBP controllability and impeller behavior were studied in the simulated heart failure circulatory model. A pneumatically driven pulsatile blood pump (Medos VAD [ventricular assist device]-54 mL) was used to simulate the left ventricle (LV). The Mag-Lev CRBP was placed between the LV apex and aortic compliance tank simulating LV assistance. The impeller behavior in five axes (x, y, z, theta, and phi) was continuously monitored using five eddy current sensors. The signals of the x- and y-axes were used for feedback active control, while the behaviors of the other three axes were passively controlled by the permanent magnets. In the static mock circuit, the impeller movement was controlled to within +/-10-+/-20 microm in the x- and y-axes, while in the pulsatile circuit, LV pulsation was modulated in the impeller movement with the amplitude being 2-22 microm. The amplitude of impeller movement measured at 1800 rpm with the simulated failing heart (peak LV pressure [LVP] = 70 mm Hg, mean aortic pressure [AoP(mean)] = 55 +/- 20 mm Hg, aortic flow = 2.7 L/min) was 12.6 microm, while it increased to 19.2 microm with the recovered heart (peak LVP = 122 mm Hg, AoP(mean) = 100 +/- 20 mm Hg, aortic flow = 3.9 L/min). The impeller repeated the reciprocating movement from the center of the pump toward the outlet port with LV pulsation. Angular rotation (theta, phi) was around +/-0.002 rad without z-axis displacement. Power requirements ranged from 0.6 to 0.9 W. Five-axis impeller behavior and Mag-Lev controller stability were demonstrated in the pulsatile mock circuit. Noncontact drive and low power requirements were shown despite the effects of LV pulsation. The impeller position signals in the x- and y-axes reflected LV function. The Mag-Lev CRBP is effective not only for noncontact low power control of the impeller, but also for diagnosis of cardiac function noninvasively. PMID:16683956

  2. Vibration analysis of large centrifugal pump rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhao, W.; Ge, J. G.; Ma, D.; Li, C. M.; Bao, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Through the critical speed of centrifugal pumps, internal flow field and the force of the impeller, we analyze centrifugal pump vibration. Using finite element analysis software ANSYS to calculate the natural frequency of the rotor system and the critical speed; with the help of the Fluent software to simulate pump internal flow field, we conclude that speed increase will not cause intense vibration of the fluid in the pump. Using unsteady numerical simulation we discovered that in an impeller suffering transient radial force cyclical change periodically, as well as the frequency size determined by the product of the impeller speed and number of blades, resonance phenomena should make impeller to transient radial force frequency. If wanting to avoid pump resonance when it is running away, the transient radial force frequency should avoid the frequency range which can cause resonance.

  3. Magnetically suspended miniature fluid pump and method of designing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A rotary pump for pumping fluids through a patient having a housing with an internal region, a stator member and an impeller positioned within the housing and having impeller blades, wherein the impeller is magnetically suspended and rotated, and wherein the geometric configuration of the rotary pump is sized and proportioned to minimize stagnant and traumatic fluid flow within the rotary pump. The plurality of magnetic impeller blades are preferably rare earth, high-energy-density magnets selected from the group consisting of samarium cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron alloy.

  4. Experimental investigation of the steady and unsteady relative flow in a model centrifugal impeller passage

    SciTech Connect

    Abramian, M. ); Howard, J.H.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The behavior of the relative flow in centrifugal turbomachines is extremely complex due to the existence of various fluid dynamic phenomena and their interaction. At design and off-design operating conditions, the relative flow is subject to stationary unsteadiness, which includes flow separation and wakes associated with passage pressure gradients, secondary flows, and boundary layer stability. It may also be subject to periodic unsteadiness, as are the rotating stall and cyclic flow phenomena induced by the casing. This paper describes detailed measurements of the relative velocity field in a very low specific speed centrifugal pump impeller (N[sub s] = 515). Measurements were conducted by means of a recently developed rotating laser-Doppler anemometry system. Detailed quantitative descriptions of the mean and fluctuating components of the primary and secondary velocity fields are presented for an impeller without volute at design, 50 percent design, and shut-off conditions. The flow pattern in this low specific speed impeller with high blade loading is dominated by the relative eddy (a phenomenon also present in potential flow), which has suppressed suction side separation. The cyclic variation of the impeller exit flow, induced by the volute at low flow rates, is also presented for an impeller fitted with a volute.

  5. Prediction of Microporosity in Shrouded Impeller Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S. Nelson, C.D.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Morris Bean and Company was to link computer models of heat and fluid flow with previously developed quality criteria for the prediction of microporosity in a Al-4.5% Cu alloy shrouded impeller casting. The results may be used to analyze the casting process design for the commercial production of 206 o alloy shrouded impeller castings. Test impeller castings were poured in the laboratory for the purpose of obtaining thermal data and porosity distributions. Also, a simulation of the test impeller casting was conducted and the results validated with porosity measurements on the test castings. A comparison of the predicted and measured microporosity distributions indicated an excellent correlation between experiments and prediction. The results of the experimental and modeling studies undertaken in this project indicate that the quality criteria developed for the prediction of microporosity in Al-4.5% Cu alloy castings can accurately predict regions of elevated microporosity even in complex castings such as the shrouded impeller casting. Accordingly, it should be possible to use quality criteria for porosity prediction in conjunction with computer models of heat and fluid flow to optimize the casting process for the production of shrouded impeller castings. Since high levels of microporosity may be expected to result in poor fatigue properties, casting designs that are optimized for low levels of microporosity should exhibit superior fatigue life.

  6. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  7. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: steady flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Magnetically suspended left ventricular assist devices have only one moving part, the impeller. The impeller has absolutely no contact with any of the fixed parts, thus greatly reducing the regions of stagnant or high shear stress that surround a mechanical or fluid bearing. Measurements of the mean flow patterns as well as viscous and turbulent stresses were made in a shaft-driven prototype of a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump at several constant flow rates (3-9 L/min) using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The chosen range of flow rates is representative of the range over which the pump may operate while implanted. Measurements on a three-dimensional measurement grid within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser are reported. The measurements are used to identify regions of potential blood damage due to high shear stress and/or stagnation of the blood, both of which have been associated with blood damage within artificial heart valves and diaphragm-type pumps. Levels of turbulence intensity and Reynolds stresses that are comparable to those in artificial heart valves are reported. At the design flow rate (6 L/min), the flow is generally well behaved (no recirculation or stagnant flow) and stress levels are below levels that would be expected to contribute to hemolysis or thrombosis. The flow at both high (9 L/min) and low (3 L/min) flow rates introduces anomalies into the flow, such as recirculation, stagnation, and high stress regions. Levels of viscous and Reynolds shear stresses everywhere within the pump are below reported threshold values for damage to red cells over the entire range of flow rates investigated; however, at both high and low flow rate conditions, the flow field may promote activation of the clotting cascade due to regions of elevated shear stress adjacent to separated or stagnant flow. PMID:15971702

  8. Pump CFD code validation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozowski, L. A.

    1993-12-01

    Pump CFD code validation tests were accomplished by obtaining nonintrusive flow characteristic data at key locations in generic current liquid rocket engine turbopump configurations. Data were obtained with a laser two-focus (L2F) velocimeter at scaled design flow. Three components were surveyed: a 1970's-designed impeller, a 1990's-designed impeller, and a four-bladed unshrouded inducer. Two-dimensional velocities were measured upstream and downstream of the two impellers. Three-dimensional velocities were measured upstream, downstream, and within the blade row of the unshrouded inducer.

  9. Pump CFD code validation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brozowski, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    Pump CFD code validation tests were accomplished by obtaining nonintrusive flow characteristic data at key locations in generic current liquid rocket engine turbopump configurations. Data were obtained with a laser two-focus (L2F) velocimeter at scaled design flow. Three components were surveyed: a 1970's-designed impeller, a 1990's-designed impeller, and a four-bladed unshrouded inducer. Two-dimensional velocities were measured upstream and downstream of the two impellers. Three-dimensional velocities were measured upstream, downstream, and within the blade row of the unshrouded inducer.

  10. Flow Pattern Characterization for a Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a model for characterizing the flow pattern of a centrifugal impeller attending to the severity of the reverse flow. The model assumes 1) a definition of an escaping particle as the one that flows in every operational point from the trailing edge towards the leading edge of the impeller blades, and 2) a characterization of flow where an operational point is said to have a theoretical flow pattern if it is not possible to establish a fully-reversed escaping particle on it. Therefore, the first part of the article is focused on defining an escaping particle for a centrifugal compressor. The model locates over the map of a centrifugal impeller the line that splits the map in two regions: the region on the right hand side, where a theoretical flow pattern can exist, and the region on the left, where a theoretical flow pattern cannot exist. Therefore, the locus of this line marks a frontier where the expected performance of the impeller cannot be sustained as high as expected. The second part of the article uses a high-performance commercial centrifugal impeller wheel for contrasting the model. A qualitative characterization of the surge line, conclusions and discussions are presented.

  11. Axisymmetric supersonic flow in rotating impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W

    1952-01-01

    General equations are developed for isentropic, frictionless, axisymmetric flow in rotating impellers with blade thickness taken into account and with blade forces eliminated in favor of the blade-surface function. It is shown that the total energy of the gas relative to the rotating coordinate system is dependent on the stream function only, and that if the flow upstream of the impeller is vortex-free, a velocity potential exists which is a function of only the radial and axial distances in the impeller. The characteristic equations for supersonic flow are developed and used to investigate flows in several configurations in order to ascertain the effect of variations of the boundary conditions on the internal flow and the work input. Conditions varied are prerotation of the gas, blade turning rate, gas velocity at the blade tips, blade thickness, and sweep of the leading edge.

  12. Using hybrid magnetic bearings to completely suspend the impeller of a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Khanwilkar, P; Olsen, D; Bearnson, G; Allaire, P; Maslen, E; Flack, R; Long, J

    1996-06-01

    Clinically available blood pumps and those under development suffer from poor mechanical reliability and poor biocompatibility related to anatomic fit, hemolysis, and thrombosis. To alleviate these problems concurrently in a long-term device is a substantial challenge. Based on testing the performance of a prototype, and on our judgment of desired characteristics, we have configured an innovative ventricular assist device, the CFVAD4, for long-term use. The design process and its outcome, the CFVAD4 system configuration, is described. To provide unprecedented reliability and biocompatibility, magnetic bearings completely suspend the rotating pump impeller. The CFVAD4 uses a combination of passive (permanent) and active (electric) magnetic bearings, a mixed flow impeller, and a slotless 3-phase brushless DC motor. These components are shaped, oriented, and integrated to provide a compact, implantable, pancake-shaped unit for placement in the left upper abdominal quadrant of adult humans. PMID:8817963

  13. The valvo-pump. An axial, nonpulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Yozu, R; Tanaka, T; Yamazaki, K

    1991-01-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial, nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position while preserving diseased heart muscle, has several advantages over an artificial heart replacement, including 1) a good anatomic fit to the natural heart, 2) less blood contacting surface, and 3) ease of implantation. The housing for the pump is a tube, 37 mm in diameter (maximum) and 33 mm in length. Within the housing there is an impeller with either 10 vanes (33 mm in diameter) or 5 vanes (22 mm in diameter). The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare-earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 23.8 mm in diameter and 30.2 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a magnetic fluid seal. A guiding wheel with 4 vanes is located behind the impeller. The pump was studied on a hydraulic mock circulatory system to evaluate its performance characteristics. A pump flow of 6.9 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 48 mmHg, and flow of 3.1 L/min was obtained at 58 mmHg. The valvo-pump can be made feasible by developing a small, high-output, power motor and an endurable seal, as well as by optimizing the impeller design. PMID:1751257

  14. Study of blade clearance effects on centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshide, R. K.; Nielson, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, fabrication, and testing has been conducted to develop and experimentally verify analytical models to predict the effects of impeller blade clearance on centrifugal pumps. The effect of tip clearance on pump efficiency, and the relationship between the head coefficient and torque loss with tip clearance was established. Analysis were performed to determine the cost variation in design, manufacture, and test that would occur between unshrouded and shrouded impellers. An impeller, representative of typical rocket engine impellers, was modified by removing its front shroud to permit variation of its blade clearances. It was tested in water with special instrumentation to provide measurements of blade surface pressures during operation. Pump performance data were obtained from tests at various impeller tip clearances. Blade pressure data were obtained at the nominal tip clearance. Comparisons of predicted and measured data are given.

  15. Lidocaine Viscous

    MedlinePLUS

    ... throat often associated with cancer chemotherapy and certain medical procedures. Lidocaine viscous is not normally used for ... and call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment: rash itching hives shallow breathing difficulty breathing ...

  16. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  17. Passive magnetic bearing in the 3rd generation miniature axial flow pump-the valvo pump 2.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yuya; Yano, Tetsuya; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-06-01

    The new miniature axial flow pump (valvo pump 2) that is installed at the base of the ascending aorta consists of a six-phase stator, an impeller in which four neodymium magnets are incorporated, and passive magnetic bearings that suspend the impeller for axial levitation. The impeller is sustained by hydrodynamic force between the blade tip of the impeller and the inner housing of the stator. The passive magnetic bearing consists of a ring neodymium magnet and a columnar neodymium magnet. The ring neodymium magnet is set in the stationary side and the columnar neodymium magnet is incorporated in the impeller shaft. Both neodymium magnets are coaxially mounted, and the anterior and posterior passive magnetic bearings suspend the impeller by repulsion force against the hydrodynamic force that acts to move the impeller in the inflow port direction. The passive magnetic bearing was evaluated by a tensile test, and the levitation force of 8.5 N and stiffness of 2.45 N/mm was obtained. Performance of the axial flow pump was evaluated by an in vitro experiment. The passive magnetic bearing showed sufficient levitation capacity to suspend the impeller in an axial direction. In conclusion, the passive magnetic bearing is promising to be one of levitation technology for the third-generation axial flow blood pump. PMID:25407124

  18. Pitot heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, R.D.

    1981-12-08

    A pitot heat pump is described wherein a multi-stage pitot pump is employed as the compression means in a heat pump thermodynamic cycle. The heat pump is comprised of a multi-stage vapor pitot pump, liquid pitot pump, turbine, vaporizer, evaporator, condenser and expansion valve. The turbine is used to rotate a shaft to which the impellers of the pitot pump are attached. Refrigerant gas from the evaporator enters the first stage of the pitot pump and the impeller therein forces the refrigerant gas outwardly where it enters the narrow end of a pitot tube provided therein. The discharge end of the pitot tube is in communication with the next stage of the pitot pump. In passing through the pitot tube, the refrigerant gas expands and the centrifugal force and the kinetic energy of the gas provide the energy whereby the refrigerant gas is compressed. After the last stage, the compressed gas is transmitted to the condenser of the heat pump.

  19. Research on energy conversion mechanism of a screw centrifugal pump under the water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, H.; Li, R. N.; Su, Q. M.; Han, W.; Cheng, X. R.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to research screw centrifugal pump impeller power capability and energy conversion mechanism, we used Navier-Stokes equation and standard k-? equation turbulence model on the basis of the Euler equations to carry out screw centrifugal pump internal flow numerical simulation. This was explored by simulating specific design conditions; the medium is water, variation of speed and pressure of flow filed under the action of the impeller, and the screw centrifugal impeller shroud line and wheel line segment take monitoring sites. The monitoring points are between dynamic head and static head change to analyze the energy conversion capability along the impeller corners of screw centrifugal pump. The results show that the energy of fluid of the screw centrifugal pump is provided by spiral segment, the spiral segment in front of the impeller has played a multi-level role, it has significant reference value to research the energy conversion mechanism of screw centrifugal pump under solid-liquid two phase.

  20. Sizing pumps for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, S.Z.

    1996-11-01

    Slurry characteristics have a significant impact on centrifugal pump performance. For instance, as particle size increases or the percent solids concentration increases, pump head and efficiency decrease. Therefore, before a slurry pump is selected, it is important to define the slurry characteristics as accurately as possible. The effect of the slurry characteristics on the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump will be emphasized (the effect on flowrate is less significant). The effect of slurry characteristics is more predominant in smaller pumps (with smaller diameter impellers) than in larger pumps. The data and relationship between the various slurry parameters have been developed from correlations and nomographs published by pump vendors from their field data and test results. The information helps to avoid specifying an undersized pump/motor assembly for slurry service.

  1. Radial loads and axial thrusts on centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of a seminar organised by the Power Industries Division of the IMechE are presented in this text. Complete contents: Review of parameters influencing hydraulic forces on centrifugal impellers; The effect of fluid forces at various operation conditions on the vibrations of vertical turbine pumps; A review of the pump rotor axial equilibrium problem - some case studies; Dynamic hydraulic loading on a centrifugal pump impeller; Experimental research on axial thrust loads of double suction centrifugal pumps; A comparison of pressure distribution and radial loads on centrifugal pumps; A theoretical and experimental investigation of axial thrusts within a multi-stage centrifugal pump.

  2. Study of velocity and shear stress distributions in the impeller passages and the volute of a bio-centrifugal ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Ong, Kang Shiu; Song, Guoliang

    2008-05-01

    The velocity fields within the impeller passages of three different impellers of the Kyoto-NTN bio-centrifugal ventricular assist device are measured using laser Doppler velocimetry in this study. The 16 forward-swept-blade impeller has better performance than the 16 straight-blade and 8 backward-swept-blade impellers in terms of smooth flow pattern, and has less high-shear-stress regions in the passages. The flow distributions are found to be similar with those measured by Yu et al. Through-flow characteristics are found in the impeller when the passages open to the biggest volute space. The flow fields in the blade channels of the impeller were found to be axis symmetrical due to the double volute design with the objective of minimizing the imbalance of the radial thrust when the impeller is magnetically suspended. In addition, the high-intensity vortex which was detected by Yu et al. at the discharge channel of the pump is effectively reduced when the end of the splitter plate is modified by increasing the taper ratio from 4 to 20. The new design would reduce the hemolysis of blood due to the high shear rate of the vortex. PMID:18471167

  3. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  4. Method for Reducing Pumping Damage to Blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Robert J. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for minimizing damage to blood in a blood pump wherein the blood pump comprises a plurality of pump components that may affect blood damage such as clearance between pump blades and housing, number of impeller blades, rounded or flat blade edges, variations in entrance angles of blades, impeller length, and the like. The process comprises selecting a plurality of pump components believed to affect blood damage such as those listed herein before. Construction variations for each of the plurality of pump components are then selected. The pump components and variations are preferably listed in a matrix for easy visual comparison of test results. Blood is circulated through a pump configuration to test each variation of each pump component. After each test, total blood damage is determined for the blood pump. Preferably each pump component variation is tested at least three times to provide statistical results and check consistency of results. The least hemolytic variation for each pump component is preferably selected as an optimized component. If no statistical difference as to blood damage is produced for a variation of a pump component, then the variation that provides preferred hydrodynamic performance is selected. To compare the variation of pump components such as impeller and stator blade geometries, the preferred embodiment of the invention uses a stereolithography technique for realizing complex shapes within a short time period.

  5. Experimental investigation of rotor-stator interaction in a centrifugal pump with several vaned diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, N.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    Steady and unsteady diffuser vane pressure measurements have been conducted with a two-dimensional test impeller, in an experimental investigation of rotor-stator interaction within a centrifugal pump having several vaned diffusers, under conditions of different flow coefficients and different radial gaps between the impeller blade trailing edge and the diffuser vane leading edge. The largest pressure fluctuations on the diffuser vanes and the impeller blades were found to be of the same order of magnitude as the total pressure rise across the pump. Increasing the number of diffuser vanes was found to result in a significant decrease of impeller blade pressure fluctuations.

  6. Optimization and analysis of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Sanbao; Zhang, Yunqing; Chen, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller. PMID:25197690

  7. Optimization and Analysis of Centrifugal Pump considering Fluid-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sanbao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller. PMID:25197690

  8. Centrifugal pump performance drop due to leading edge cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. J.; Pan, Z. Y.; Zhang, D. Q.; Yuan, S. Q.

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the leading edge cavitation of the impeller of a single stage centrifugal pump. A centrifugal pump with and without inducer is investigated by numerical simulation. The simulation results of the pump with inducer were compared with experimental data under cavitating and non-cavitating situation. An acceptable agreement has been obtained for the overall performance. Cavitation phenomena are found in varied area near the impeller inlet at the condition in the impeller flow passage and induce unexpected head drop and blade load for the pump without inducer. Violent excitement of cavitation appears at conditions of low partial flow rate and low inlet pressure. As to that with inducer, through obvious cavitation occurs in the inducer passage, no violent cavitation is found in the impeller passage. The overall performance curves are also different between the two conditions.

  9. Pumping stage for multi-stage centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, J.W.

    1981-07-14

    An improved diffusion bowl and pumping vanes of a centrifugal pump stage are employed in axially stacked, multi-stage pumps for use in oil wells. The wall thickness of the annular casing portion of the diffusion bowl element is reduced to a minimum consistent with the axial loading on the pump stage and the impeller vanes are radially extended to terminate closely adjacent the minimum wall thickness portion of the casing, thereby significantly increasing the pumping pressure developed by the stage without reducing the efficiency of the stage.

  10. Portable engine-pump assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, H.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a portable engine-pump assembly that is compact and light in weight comprising: an internal combustion engine mounted with its crankshaft extending vertically, a centrifugal pump having an impeller mounted for rotation on a pump shaft within a volute chamber, means mounting the pump on and immediately beneath the engine with the pump shaft extending vertically in accurate alignment and concentricity with the engine crankshaft, means coupling the engine crankshaft and the pump shaft together so that the engine crankshaft drives the pump shaft, the pump comprising a pump body defining the volute chamber and providing a pump inlet passage and a pump discharge passage oriented in generally horizontal directions, the pump body defining an inlet chamber providing passages for the flow of liquid from the pump inlet passage into the impeller from both above and below same and including an upper body portion and a lower body portion, and an exhaust system for the engine including an exhaust passage contained in the upper body portion, a muffler having an inlet, and means providing flow communication between the exhaust passage and the inlet of the muffler.

  11. Computation of incompressible viscous flows through turbopump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as an inducer and an impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. the equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use a one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside a generic rocket engine pump inducer, a fuel pump impeller, and SSME high pressure fuel turbopump impeller. Numerical results of inducer flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the fuel pump impeller, the effect of downstream boundary conditions is investigated. Flow analyses at 80 percent, 100 percent, and 120 percent of design conditions are presented.

  12. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  13. Prognostics of slurry pumps based on a moving-average wear degradation index and a general sequential Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Tse, Peter W.

    2015-05-01

    Slurry pumps are commonly used in oil-sand mining for pumping mixtures of abrasive liquids and solids. These operations cause constant wear of slurry pump impellers, which results in the breakdown of the slurry pumps. This paper develops a prognostic method for estimating remaining useful life of slurry pump impellers. First, a moving-average wear degradation index is proposed to assess the performance degradation of the slurry pump impeller. Secondly, the state space model of the proposed health index is constructed. A general sequential Monte Carlo method is employed to derive the parameters of the state space model. The remaining useful life of the slurry pump impeller is estimated by extrapolating the established state space model to a specified alert threshold. Data collected from an industrial oil sand pump were used to validate the developed method. The results show that the accuracy of the developed method improves as more data become available.

  14. Experimental determination of dynamic characteristics of the VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael K H; Zhang, Nong; Tansley, Geoff D; Qian, Yi

    2004-12-01

    The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump, intended for long-term ventricular assist, is under development and is currently being tested for its rotor-dynamic stability. The pump consists of a shaftless impeller, which also acts as the rotor of the brushless DC motor. The impeller remains passively suspended in the pump cavity by hydrodynamic forces, which result from the small clearances between the outside surfaces of the impeller and the pump cavity. These small clearances range from approximately 50 microm to 230 microm in size in the version of pump reported here. This article presents experimental investigation into the dynamic characteristics of the impeller-bearing-pump housing system of the rotary blood pump for increasing pump speeds at different flow rates. The pump was mounted on a suspension system consisting of a platform and springs, where the natural frequency and damping ratio for the suspension system were determined. Real-time measurements of the impeller's displacement were performed using Hall effect sensors. A vertical disturbance force was exerted onto the pump housing, causing the impeller to be displaced in vertical direction from its dynamic equilibrium position within the pump cavity. The impeller displacement was represented by a decaying sine wave, which indicated the impeller restoring to its equilibrium position. From the decaying sine wave the natural frequency and stiffness coefficient of the system were determined. Furthermore, the logarithmic decrement method was used to determine the damping ratio and eventually the damping coefficient of the system. Results indicate that stiffness and damping coefficients increased as flow rate and pump speed increased, representing an increase in stability with these changing conditions. However, pump speed had a greater influence on the stiffness and damping coefficients than flow rate did, which was evident through dynamic analysis. Overall the experimental method presented in this article was successful in determining the dynamic characteristics of the system. PMID:15554937

  15. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator. PMID:21382738

  16. Strength and dynamic characteristics analyses of wound composite axial impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jifeng; Olortegui-Yume, Jorge; Müller, Norbert

    2012-03-01

    A low cost, light weight, high performance composite material turbomachinery impeller with a uniquely designed blade patterns is analyzed. Such impellers can economically enable refrigeration plants to use water as a refrigerant (R718). A strength and dynamic characteristics analyses procedure is developed to assess the maximum stresses and natural frequencies of these wound composite axial impellers under operating loading conditions. Numerical simulation using FEM for two-dimensional and three-dimensional impellers was investigated. A commercially available software ANSYS is used for the finite element calculations. Analysis is done for different blade geometries and then suggestions are made for optimum design parameters. In order to avoid operating at resonance, which can make impellers suffer a significant reduction in the design life, the designer must calculate the natural frequency and modal shape of the impeller to analyze the dynamic characteristics. The results show that using composite Kevlar fiber/epoxy matrix enables the impeller to run at high tip speed and withstand the stresses, no critical speed will be matched during start-up and shut-down, and that mass imbalances of the impeller shall not pose a critical problem.

  17. Multiple discharge cylindrical pump collector

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton (Calabasas, CA); Bremner, Robert J. (Woodland Hills, CA); Meng, Sen Y. (Reseda, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A space-saving discharge collector 40 for the rotary pump 28 of a pool-type nuclear reactor 10. An annular collector 50 is located radially outboard for an impeller 44. The annular collector 50 as a closed outer periphery 52 for collecting the fluid from the impeller 44 and producing a uniform circumferential flow of the fluid. Turning means comprising a plurality of individual passageways 54 are located in an axial position relative to the annular collector 50 for receiving the fluid from the annular collector 50 and turning it into a substantially axial direction.

  18. Optimization of Integrated Impeller Mixer via Radiotracer Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Othman, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Takriff, M. S.; Rosli, M. I.; Engku Chik, E. M. F.; Adnan, M. A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments are carried out in order to determine the mean residence time (MRT) as well as percentage of dead zone, Vdead (%), in an integrated mixer consisting of Rushton and pitched blade turbine (PBT). Conventionally, optimization was performed by varying one parameter and others were held constant (OFAT) which lead to enormous number of experiments. Thus, in this study, a 4-factor 3-level Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was introduced to obtain an accurate optimization of mixing efficiency with minimal number of experiments. This paper describes the optimal conditions of four process parameters, namely, impeller speed, impeller clearance, type of impeller, and sampling time, in obtaining MRT and Vdead (%) using radiotracer experiments. The optimum conditions for the experiments were 100?rpm impeller speed, 50?mm impeller clearance, Type A mixer, and 900?s sampling time to reach optimization. PMID:24741344

  19. Flow characteristics of a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.H.; Vafidis, C.; Whitelaw, J.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Measurements of velocity have been obtained in a centrifugal pump in terms of angle-resolved values in the impeller passages, the volute, the inlet and exit ducts and are presented in absolute and relative frames. The pump comprised a radial flow impeller with four backswept blades and a single volute, and the working liquid had the same refractive index as the transparent casing to facilitate the use of a laser-Doppler velocimeter. The flows in the impeller passages wee found to depart from the curvature of the blade surfaces at off-design conditions with separation from the suction surface and from the shroud. Secondary flows from the suction to pressure surfaces were dominated by the influences of the relative motion between the shroud and impeller surfaces and the tip leakage. Geometric differences of 0.5 mm and one degree in spacing of the four blades caused differences in passage velocity of up to 6 percent at the lowest discharge. The flowrate from each impeller passage varied with volute circumferential position by up to 25 percent at an off-design flowrate. Poor matching of the impeller and volute at off-design conditions caused swirl and separation in the inlet and exit pipes.

  20. Satellite Propellant Pump Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Veres, Joseph P.; Hah, Chunill; Nerone, Anthony L.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Fraser, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn initiated a satellite propellant pump technology demonstration program. The goal was to demonstrate the technologies for a 60 percent efficient pump at 1 gpm flow rate and 500 psia pressure rise. The pump design and analysis used the in-house developed computer codes named PUMPA and HPUMP3D. The requirements lead to a 4-stage impeller type pump design with a tip diameter of 0.54 inches and a rotational speed of 57,000 rpm. Analyses indicated that flow cavitation was not a problem in the design. Since the flow was incompressible, the stages were identical. Only the 2-stage pump was designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested for demonstration. Water was selected as the surrogate fluid for hydrazine in this program. Complete mechanical design including stress and dynamic analyses were conducted. The pump was driven by an electric motor directly coupled to the impellers. Runs up to 57,000 rpm were conducted, where a pressure rise of 200 psia at a flow rate of 0.8 gpm was measured to validate the design effort.

  1. Design, Construction, and Visualization of Transparent Full Scale High Pressure Test Facility for Electronic Submersible Pumps 

    E-print Network

    Marchetti, Joseph Michael

    2013-12-10

    Standards Institute ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers B&PV Boiler and Pressure Vessel BEP Best Efficiency Point BPD Barrels Per Day CFD Computational Fluid Dynamics CNC Computer Numerical Control ESP Electric Submersible Pump FEA Finite... ................................................................................................................ 123 B.1 Impeller FEA Report: Primary Blade Thickness: 0.171”, Material: Cast Carbon Steel .......................................................................................... 123 B.2 Impeller FEA Report: Primary Blade Thickness: 0...

  2. Detection and effects of pump low-flow operation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.A.; Greene, R.H.

    1993-12-01

    Operating experience and previous studies have shown that a significant cause of pump problems and failures can result from low- flow operation. Operation at low-flow rates can create unstable flows within the pump impeller and casing. This condition can result in an increased radial and axial thrust on the rotor, which in turn causes higher shaft stresses, increased shaft deflection, and potential bearing and mechanical seal problems. Two of the more serious results of low-flow pump operation are cavitation and recirculation. Cavitation is the formation and subsequent collapse of vapor bubbles in any flow that is at an ambient pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid medium. It is the collapse of these vapor bubbles against the metal surfaces of the impeller or casing that causes surface pitting, erosion, and deterioration. Pump recirculation more damaging than cavitation. If located at the impeller eye, recirculation damages the inlet areas of the casing. At the impeller tips, recirculation alters the outside diameter of the impeller. If recirculation occurs around impeller shrouds, it damages thrust bearings. Recirculation also erodes impellers, diffusers, and volutes and causes failure of mechanical seals and bearings. This paper reports on a utility pump failure caused by low-flow induced phenomena. ORNL is investigating the results of low-flow pump operations by evaluating the types of measurements and diagnostic techniques that are currently used by licensees to detect pump degradation. A new, enhanced application of motor current and power data analysis has been developed that uses a signal comparison methodology to produce an instability ratio indicative of normal or unstable flow conditions. Examples of this type of low-flow detection technique are presented in this paper along with a brief discussion of the various types of technologies currently being used by licensees to evaluate pump operation and determine possible degradation.

  3. The valvo-pump, an axial blood pump implanted at the heart valve position: concept and initial results.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Okamoto, E; Yamamoto, K; Mitamura, Y; Tanaka, T; Yozu, R

    1992-06-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position, has been developed. The valvo-pump consists of an impeller and a motor, which are encased in a housing. An impeller with 5 vanes (22.0 mm in diameter) is used. The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 21.3 mm in diameter and 18.5 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a ferrofluidic seal. A pump flow of 10.5 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 3.3 kPa (25 mm Hg), and a flow of 4.9 L/min was obtained at 7.0 kPa (53 mm Hg). Sealing was kept perfect against a pressure of 29.3 kPa (220 mm Hg) at 9,000 rpm. PMID:10078263

  4. Incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations in pump flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-07-01

    Flow through pump components, such as the SSME-HPFTP Impeller and an advanced rocket pump impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside an 11-inch SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump impeller, and an advanced rocket pump impeller. Numerical results of SSME-HPFTP impeller flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the advanced pump impeller, the effects of exit and shroud cavities are investigated. Flow analyses at design conditions will be presented.

  5. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Calculations in Pump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as the SSME-HPFTP Impeller and an advanced rocket pump impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside an 11-inch SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump impeller, and an advanced rocket pump impeller. Numerical results of SSME-HPFTP impeller flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the advanced pump impeller, the effects of exit and shroud cavities are investigated. Flow analyses at design conditions will be presented.

  6. Research on wear properties of centrifugal dredge pump based on liquid-solid two-phase fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. J.; Luo, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    The impeller and casing of dredge pump are worn by sediment in the flow. However, there are few studies about abrasion of the impeller and casing for normal pump operating conditions. This paper investigated the relationship between the wear rates on the surfaces of the impeller as well as casing and the sediment concentration, with the distribution of the wear rates for normal pump operating condition analyzed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure was used to simulate steady liquid-solid two-phase flow for various operating conditions. The Finnie model was then used to predict the abrasion. The results show that, the wear rate relative value of impeller and casing surface increase as the sediment concentration increases. The wear rate relative value of impeller and casing surface is larger when the pump is in low flow rate condition, and the value of casing surface is larger than that of the impeller. The wear rate relative value of pump is low when pump is in high efficiency condition. This paper shows the abrasion characteristics on the impeller and casing with sediment flow and provides reference data for predicting the abrasion conditions in the flow passage components for a dredge pump.

  7. Effects of splitter blades on the flows and characteristics in centrifugal impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Yukitoshi; Ohba, Hideki

    1992-05-01

    A five-flow pressure probe was used to perform flow measurements in an unshrouded impeller and in a shrouded impeller with splitter blades. The effect of the splitter blade on passage flow and impeller performance was analyzed by comparing the results with those of impellers without splitter blades. It is found that, in impellers with splitter blades, the blade loadings tend to become smaller, and the absolute circumferential velocities and total pressures become considerably larger than those in impellers without splitter blades. It is noted that the splitter blade effect on static pressure differs between the unshrouded and shrouded impellers.

  8. Novel maglev pump with a combined magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Michiko; Masuzawa, Toru

    2005-01-01

    The newly developed pump is a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump in which active and passive magnetic bearings are integrated to construct a durable ventricular assist device. The developed maglev centrifugal pump consists of an active magnetic bearing, a passive magnetic bearing, a levitated impeller, and a motor stator. The impeller is set between the active magnetic bearing and the motor stator. The active magnetic bearing uses four electromagnets to control the tilt and the axial position of the impeller. The radial movement of the levitated impeller is restricted with the passive stability dependent upon the top stator and the passive permanent magnetic bearing to reduce the energy consumption and the control system complexity. The top stator was designed based upon a magnetic field analysis to develop the maglev pump with sufficient passive stability in the radial direction. By implementing this analysis design, the oscillating amplitude of the impeller in the radial direction was cut in half when compared with the simple shape stator. This study concluded that the newly developed maglev centrifugal pump displayed excellent levitation performance and sufficient pump performance as a ventricular assist device. PMID:15745134

  9. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA)

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  10. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  11. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  12. Impeller loss reduction in multi-stage centrifugal compressors

    E-print Network

    Barile, Kristina (Kristina Marie)

    2015-01-01

    Loss generation features for the first stage impeller in a multistage centrifugal compressor are examined using three-dimensional RANS computations. The calculations were carried out for a baseline configuration and for ...

  13. Cavitation in transiently operating centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, P.J.; Barker, W.P.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of transient operation on a centrifugal pump`s cavitation performance was investigated experimentally in the Naval Undersea Warfare Center`s Impeller Test Facility. For low facility pressures where cavitation occurred, its inception and desinence during the transient were determined by acoustic and visualization methods whose results agreed closely with predicted values based on quasi-steady analysis. The minimum facility pressure for cavitation-free operation also correlated well with quasi-steady predictions. Impeller suction performance continuously degraded (i.e., reduced suction pressure) as facility pressure was lowered from the minimum non-cavitating pressure and as the severity of cavitation increased. This degradation was actually a redistribution of pressure across the impeller since the total head rise was unaffected. The appearance of suction pressure degradation can be used as an alternate means of determining the minimum facility pressure for cavitation-free operation.

  14. The hemolytic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps with washout holes.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Tsutsui, Tatsuo; Jikuya, Tomoaki; Yamane, Takashi

    2005-04-01

    The hemolytic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps as a function of impeller washout hole configuration and female pivot shape are observed. The pump impellers are designed with three washout hole configurations for blood circulation, and four female pivot shapes to reduce blood stagnation and to enhance antithrombogenicity. The hemolytic characteristics of the monopivot pumps were observed to be better than those of a currently available commercial centrifugal blood pump, BP-80, and changed to be nearly equal when the female pivot shape was changed. This indicates that hemolysis in monopivot pumps is mainly caused by shear stress between the male and female pivots. PMID:15787632

  15. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications. PMID:15644080

  16. Cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump with inlet guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Zha, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Gui, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of prewhirl regulation by inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump is investigated. At the impeller inlet, the streamlines are regulated by the IGVs, and the axial velocity distribution is also influenced by the IGVs. Due to the total pressure loss on the IGVs, the cavitation performance of the centrifugal pump degrades. The cavitation area in impeller with IGVs is larger than one without IGVs. The specify values of total pressure loss between the suction pipe inlet and impeller inlet for three cavitation conditions show that the IGVs will generate additional pressure loss, which is related to the IGVs angles and cavitation conditions.

  17. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  18. Performance characteristics of hydraulic turbines and pumps. Proceedings of the Winter annual meeting, Boston, MA, November 13-18, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G. Jr.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Swift, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Various topics are addressed under the headings: four quadrant and two-phase performance of turbines and pumps, cavitation in hydraulic turbines and pumps, pumps as power recovery turbines, and modeling and fluid dynamics in hydraulic turbines and pumps. Individual subjects considered include: representation of pump characteristics for transient analysis, prediction and measurement of the four-quadrant performance of an axial flow pump of specific speed 8900, hydraulic analysis on component losses of centrifugal pumps. Also discussed are: effects of volute geometry and impeller orbit on the hydraulic performance of a centrifugal pump, interaction between impeller and volute of pumps at off-design conditions, performance of small high-speed pumps, relation between efficiency characteristics and the internal flow conditions of axial-flow pumps, tests of SSME low-pressure pump in liquids at a zero throughflow, and analysis of performance characteristics of axial flow pumps.

  19. Design of a Bearingless Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barletta, Natale; Schoeb, Reto

    1996-01-01

    In the field of open heart surgery, centrifugal blood pumps have major advantages over roller pumps. The main drawbacks to centrifugal pumps are however problems with the bearings and with the sealing of the rotor shaft. In this paper we present a concept for a simple, compact and cost effective solution for a blood pump with a totally magnetically suspended impeller. It is based on the new technology of the 'Bearingless Motor' and is therefore called the 'Bearingless Blood Pump.' A single bearingless slice motor is at the same time a motor and a bearing system and is able to stabilize the six degrees of freedom of the pump impeller in a very simple way. Three degrees of freedom are stabilized actively (the rotation and the radial displacement of the motor slice). The axial and the angular displacement are stabilized passively. The pump itself (without the motor-stator and the control electronics) is built very simply. It consists of two parts only: the impeller with the integrated machine rotor and the housing. So the part which gets in contact with blood and has therefore to be disposable, is cheap. Fabricated in quantities, it will cost less than $10 and will therefore be affordable for the use in a heart-lung-machine.

  20. Preventing cavitation in high energy centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Garbers, A.W.F.; Wasfi, A.K. Ltd. )

    1990-07-01

    Large-eye impellers for high energy centrifugal pumps were developed to meet the specification of reduced NPSH{sub r} at rated flow conditions. Unfortunately, this improved NPSH performance was not without adverse tradeoffs because an abnormal increase in noise, vibration and cavitation erosion were experienced at low flows. Centrifugal pumps are often used under widely varying and adverse conditions, and in the case of high energy and large-eye impeller pumps, these conditions should be evaluated very carefully. At petrochemical complexes in Secunda in the Republic of South Africa, a centrifugal pump application for lean carbonate solution experienced frequent failures. An investigation and literature survey indicated the cause was low flow cavitation. The purpose of this article is but to give design guidelines as obtained from literature and experience.

  1. Centrifugal Pumps for Swimming Pools. National Sanitation Foundation Standard Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Committee for Swimming Pool Equipment Standards.

    The pumps discussed herein are intended to be used for recirculating water in swimming pools, both public and private. Included are the basic components which may be a part of a pump such as the housing, strainer, impeller, valves, and such other parts as are attached or a part of the pump as supplied by the manufacturer. This standard is intended…

  2. Motor-pump aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.; Gaffal, K.; Peters, J.

    1983-10-04

    A motor-pump aggregate whose pump is a glandless centrifugal pump and is intended for use in a nuclear reactor plant has hollow coaxial pump and motor shafts which are sealingly coupled to each other. To this end, the first end portion of the pump shaft extends into the adjacent first end portion of the motor shaft and has an external conical shoulder for engagement with an internal conical seat of the first end portion of the motor shaft. A feather holds the first end portions against rotation relative to one another, and the shoulder is urged against the seat by a pair of threaded connectors one of which is anchored in a disc-shaped member in the region of the second end portion of the motor shaft and the other of which is anchored in the first end portion of the pump shaft. The disc-shaped member and the second end portion of the motor shaft have mating ring gears to ensure accurate and a reproducible centering. The connection between the second end portion of the pump shaft and an impeller is similar to that between the second end portion of the motor shaft and the disc-shaped member except that one of the respective connectors is anchored in a transverse end wall which is inserted into the second end portion of and is welded to the pump shaft.

  3. Optimization of a centrifugal impeller design through CFD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C.; Eastland, A. H.; Chan, D. C.; Garcia, Roberto

    1993-07-01

    This paper discusses the procedure, approach and Rocketdyne CFD results for the optimization of the NASA consortium impeller design. Two different approaches have been investigated. The first one is to use a tandem blade arrangement, the main impeller blade is split into two separate rows with the second blade row offset circumferentially with respect to the first row. The second approach is to control the high losses related to secondary flows within the impeller passage. Many key parameters have been identified and each consortium team member involved will optimize a specific parameter using 3-D CFD analysis. Rocketdyne has provided a series of CFD grids for the consortium team members. SECA will complete the tandem blade study, SRA will study the effect of the splitter blade solidity change, NASA LeRC will evaluate the effect of circumferential position of the splitter blade, VPI will work on the hub to shroud blade loading distribution, NASA Ames will examine the impeller discharge leakage flow impacts and Rocketdyne will continue to work on the meridional contour and the blade leading to trailing edge work distribution. This paper will also present Rocketdyne results from the tandem blade study and from the blade loading distribution study. It is the ultimate goal of this consortium team to integrate the available CFD analysis to design an advanced technology impeller that is suitable for use in the NASA Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbopump.

  4. Centrifugal pump hydraulic instability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Makay, E.

    1980-06-01

    The principal objective was to define the causes of hydraulic instability in boiler feed pumps, explain their origins, and relate them to the geometries of a pump stage (e.g., inlet, impeller, diffuser or volute...). The approach is to examine the influence of each component of pump geometry on the flow path and flow mechanisms and thus eatimate the magnitudes and directions of hydraulically-induced forces on a pump rotor which influence dynamic response, pump performance, and critical speeds. The techniques and results of experiments on pump hydraulic forces are described and assessed to explain common frequency ranges. A method is developed for calculating radial hydraulic forces in a pump. The hydraulic mechanisms at work are listed, described, and related in turn to specific elements of pump stage geometry. Forces for the case in which the impeller is replaced with a solid mass are estimated. Recommendations are given for future work to measure and characterize the forces in various types of pump geometry. Two important findings are: (1) feedwater pumps must be designed for stable operation over the full range of possible flow rates, even at the cost of some reduction of efficiency at Best Operating Point; and (2) the complexities of flow within a pump stage are so great that every new design must be tested to determine its dynamic and performance characteristics over the full flow range.

  5. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-01-17

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  6. Geothermal well pump failure

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1995-06-01

    Over the years since 1978, the Geo-Heat Center has been asked for advice on new pump installations and replacement installations. For at least half that time, the advice was based on experience with pumps on the Oregon Institute of Technology since it was the only modern large geothermal direct-use installation, and of course, the Center is located on the campus. Some information on this system was readily available. The other large system, the Warm Springs Water District in Boise, Idaho, was nearly 100 years old; but, we had limited contact with them. Most, if not all, geothermal well pump problems seemed readily solved. Typical problems were worn impellers due to lack of adequate bowl lateral, broken column lineshafts due to bearing failures and hard starts, coupling failures due to hard starts, and excessive longitudinal loads, etc.

  7. Computational fluid dynamic design of rocket engine pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    Integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for design and analysis of turbomachinery components is needed as the requirements of pump performance and reliability become more stringent for the new generation of rocket engine. A fast grid generator, designed specially for centrifugal pump impeller, which allows a turbomachinery designer to use CFD to optimize the component design will be presented. The CFD grid is directly generated from the impeller blade G-H blade coordinates. The grid points are first generated on the meridional plane with the desired clustering near the end walls. This is followed by the marching of grid points from the pressure side of one blade to the suction side of a neighboring blade. This fast grid generator has been used to optimize the consortium pump impeller design. A grid dependency study has been conducted for the consortium pump impeller. Two different grid sizes, one with 10,000 grid points and one with 80,000 grid points were used for the grid dependency study. The effects of grid resolution on the turnaround time, including the grid generation and completion of the CFD analysis, is discussed. The impeller overall mass average performance is compared for different designs. Optimum design is achieved through systematic change of the design parameters. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used not only for flow analysis but also for design and optimization of turbomachinery components.

  8. Computer code for analysing three-dimensional viscous flows in impeller passages and other duct geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatchell, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A code, CATHY3/M, was prepared and demonstrated by application to a sample case. The preparation is reviewed, a summary of the capabilities and main features of the code is given, and the sample case results are discussed. Recommendations for future use and development of the code are provided.

  9. Diagnosis of Centrifugal Pump Faults Using Vibration Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albraik, A.; Althobiani, F.; Gu, F.; Ball, A.

    2012-05-01

    Pumps are the largest single consumer of power in industry. This means that faulty pumps cause a high rate of energy loss with associated performance degradation, high vibration levels and significant noise radiation. This paper investigates the correlations between pump performance parameters including head, flow rate and energy consumption and surface vibration for the purpose of both pump condition monitoring and performance assessment. Using an in-house pump system, a number of experiments have been carried out on a centrifugal pump system using five impellers: one in good condition and four others with different defects, and at different flow rates for the comparison purposes. The results have shown that each defective impeller performance curve (showing flow, head, efficiency and NPSH (Net Positive Suction Head) is different from the benchmark curve showing the performance of the impeller in good condition. The exterior vibration responses were investigated to extract several key features to represent the healthy pump condition, pump operating condition and pump energy consumption. In combination, these parameter allow an optimal decision for pump overhaul to be made [1].

  10. Cope with dissolved gases in pump calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The pressure of the liquid at the inlet of a centrifugal pump must be high enough to prevent vaporization within the pump, because this vaporization hinders the pumping and can damage the impellers. This pressure requirement must be taken into account when deciding how high to place the pump feed vessel relative to the height of the pump itself. Basically, the pump suction pressure must be greater than the fluid's vapor pressure at the pumping temperature. The difference between pump suction pressure and vapor pressure is the net positive suction head (NPSH). For cases in which the liquid contains no dissolved gases, the vapor-pressure determination is straightforward. With dissolved gases, the situation is more complicated, because vapor-pressure data for such systems are usually not at hand. Adding to the complication is the fact that centrifugal pumps generally can, as it happens, tolerate a small amount of vapor at the impeller eye. If the solubility of the dissolved gas is low and the temperature is far below the boiling point of liquid, the amount of vapor released in a pump is likely not to exceed the tolerable value unless the pressure reduction is substantial.

  11. Analysis of the performances of an axial flow tandem pump based on CFD computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Bai, Z. Y.; Zhang, M. D.; Wang, G. Y.

    2012-11-01

    Tandem pump, compared with multistage pump, goes without guide vanes between impellers. Significant reduction of the axial geometry scale, resulting from lack of guide vanes, makes great sense to high-speed propulsion. Direct interactions between front and rear impellers may lead to special flows, which are different from those in a multistage pump. There are few studies of these differences. In this article, CFD computations of flows in an axial flow tandem pump are conducted to predict the performances. FBM turbulence model, which is introduced to commercial software, is used for the simulations. Circulation coefficient is defined to help analyze energy characteristics. The results demonstrate that power of the tandem pump increases slowly as discharge is getting larger. The tandem pump has better adaptability under large discharge conditions. The head of the rear impeller is not sensitive to discharge's change, which results from that the front impeller weakens the influence of discharge's change on the rear impeller, so pump's energy characteristics may be improved.

  12. A Relevance Vector Machine-Based Approach with Application to Oil Sand Pump Prognostics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinfei; Tse, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Oil sand pumps are widely used in the mining industry for the delivery of mixtures of abrasive solids and liquids. Because they operate under highly adverse conditions, these pumps usually experience significant wear. Consequently, equipment owners are quite often forced to invest substantially in system maintenance to avoid unscheduled downtime. In this study, an approach combining relevance vector machines (RVMs) with a sum of two exponential functions was developed to predict the remaining useful life (RUL) of field pump impellers. To handle field vibration data, a novel feature extracting process was proposed to arrive at a feature varying with the development of damage in the pump impellers. A case study involving two field datasets demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed method. Compared with standalone exponential fitting, the proposed RVM-based model was much better able to predict the remaining useful life of pump impellers. PMID:24051527

  13. Backflow control improves pump performance

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, G.W.; Palgrave, R.

    1985-02-25

    Low-flow control problems with pumps and a method to reduce them are described in this article. Centrifugal, mixed and axial flow pumps of conventional design can be made to demonstrate a condition of inletflow breakdown at some point on their characteristic curve. Instead of a state of uniform inflow existing at the impeller eye, mixed conditions exist, with flow simultaneously moving in and out of the inlet annulus. This condition has been described as backflow as well as stall and inlet recirculation. The basic backflow mechanism is also described.

  14. The effect of gas fraction on centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. T.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, L. F.; Ning, C.; Xie, S. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the multiphase flow field in M125 centrifugal pump, three-dimensional modeling was used for internal flow through three-dimensional software Pro/E. Then based on SST turbulence model combining with Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation model, and structured grid to simulate the hydraulic characteristics of volute and impeller within different gas conditions. The velocity, pressure and gas volume fraction distributions of the interior flow field of volute and impeller were obtained and analyzed, which revealed the effect of gas fractions on the flow characteristic of the centrifugal pump.

  15. SSME Investment in Turbomachinery Inducer Impeller Design Tools and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas; Mitchell, William; Lunde, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Within the rocket engine industry, SSME turbomachines are the de facto standards of success with regard to meeting aggressive performance requirements under challenging operational environments. Over the Shuttle era, SSME has invested heavily in our national inducer impeller design infrastructure. While both low and high pressure turbopump failures/anomaly resolution efforts spurred some of these investments, the SSME program was a major benefactor of key areas of turbomachinery inducer-impeller research outside of flight manifest pressures. Over the past several decades, key turbopump internal environments have been interrogated via highly instrumented hot-fire and cold-flow testing. Likewise, SSME has sponsored the advancement of time accurate and cavitating inducer impeller computation fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. These investments together have led to a better understanding of the complex internal flow fields within aggressive high performing inducers and impellers. New design tools and methodologies have evolved which intend to provide confident blade designs which strike an appropriate balance between performance and self induced load management.

  16. Research on design multi-points performance curves of pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Li, H.; Xu, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    The centrifugal pump's performance curves are the most important chart to reveal relevance of different performance parameters. They can show pump's function comprehensively and graphically. However these curves can't be predicted and designed precisely, duo to the complicated flow inside the impeller and the incomplete way to design pump. The complete shape of performance curves can be gained only after test. With the development of industry, many applications need the pump operating well at different flow conditions. It means the pump's performance curves should pass some specific points. This is a problem to the designer who still uses the traditional way to design pumps. In this paper, the Design of experiments was applied to arrange a plan of experiments. Because the theory equations of performance curves contain many geometry factors of impeller, changing these factors have different influence on the shape of curves, the relationship between geometry factors and the performance under different operation points been attained after using variance analysis to deal with experiment data. The relevant regression models and graphs were drawn to help understand these relationships. Depending on the predicted values of geometry factors pump's impeller was redesigned, and the pump's performance been simulated for saving time and cost. Test shows that the shape of performance curves satisfy design objective, this example can be taken as a reference of pump's specific designs.

  17. Resilient shaft mounting for pump

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, W.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a pump. It comprises: a tube having a centrifugal pump mounted on an upper end thereof, the centrifugal pump having an inlet coaxial with the tube, an outlet disposed radially and an impeller rotatable in a housing to pump a liquid; at least one propeller disposed in the tube below the centrifugal pump, the propeller being rotatable to draw fluid upwardly in the tube; a shaft connecting the impeller of the centrifugal with the propeller in the tube; at least one triangular support for the shaft, having three resilient planar plates dimensioned to be bowed inwardly in the tube and enclosing the shaft. The plates are discrete sections, each having ends disposed against an inner surface of the tube and against an adjoining one of the plates, an intermediate portion of each of the plates resiliently bearing inwardly toward the shaft; and, a resilient bushing disposed between the plates and the shaft, the resilient bushing being a round tube deformed into a triangular shape by pressure of the plates; whereby the shaft is supported coaxially in the tube.

  18. Analysis of novel low specific speed pump designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klas, R.; Pochylý, F.; Rudolf, P.

    2014-03-01

    Centrifugal pumps with very low specific speed present significant design challenges. Narrow blade channels, large surface area of hub and shroud discs relative to the blade area, and the presence of significant of blade channel vortices are typical features linked with the difficulty to achieve head and efficiency requirements for such designs. This paper presents an investigation of two novel designs of very low specific speed impellers: impeller having blades with very thick trailing edges and impeller with thick trailing edges and recirculating channels, which are bored along the impeller circumference. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were used to study the flow dynamics of those new designs. It was shown that thick trailing edges suppress local eddies in the blade channels and decrease energy dissipation due to excessive swirling. Furthermore the recirculating channels will increase the circumferential velocity component on impeller outlet thus increasing the specific energy, albeit adversely affecting the hydraulic efficiency. Analysis of the energy dissipation in the volute showed that the number of the recirculating channels, their geometry and location, all have significant impact on the magnitude of dissipated energy and its distribution which in turn influences the shape of the head curve and the stability of the pump operation. Energy dissipation within whole pump interior (blade channels, volute, rotor- stator gaps) was also studied.

  19. Effects of outlet blade angle of centrifugal pump on the pump performance under air-water two-phase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Minemura, Kiyoshi; Kinoshita, Katsuhiko; Ihara, Masaru; Furukawa, Hironori; Egashira, Kazuyuki

    1995-12-31

    To establish the optimum design parameters of offshore oil well centrifugal pumps, which should deliver crude oil containing a large amount of gas, various shapes of pump impeller with different outlet blade angles, locations of leading-edge and numbers of impeller blades as the design parameters were tested with various rotating speeds and suction pressures under air-water two-phase flow conditions. The greater the outlet blade angle, the less the degradation of the pump performance becomes, showing the optimum blade angle approximately equals to 90{degree}.

  20. Transformation of vibration signals in rotary blood pumps: the diagnostic potential of pump failure.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Although non-destructive and continuous monitoring is indispensable for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps, a practical monitoring system has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of detecting pump failure caused by thrombus formation through the monitoring of vibration signals. The data acquisition equipment included vibration pickups, a charge amplifier, vibration analysis systems, and exclusive hardware. A pivot-bearing centrifugal pump with a mock circuit was investigated for vibration analysis. To simulate the four common areas of thrombus formation, we used a piece of silicon attached to each of the following four locations: the total area of the bottom of the impeller, an eccentric shape on the bottom of the impeller, a circular shape around the shaft top, and an eccentric shape on the top of the impeller. Vibration signals were picked up, and the power spectrum density analysis was performed at pump rotational speeds of 2100, 2400, and 3000 rpm. In this study, pump failure could be detected, and the types of imitation thrombi could be determined. We conclude that vibration detection with a computerized analysis system is a potentially valuable diagnostic tool for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps. PMID:23625149

  1. New concepts and new design of permanent maglev rotary artificial heart blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2006-05-01

    According to tradition, permanent maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium. The authors have developed, to the contrary, two stable permanent maglev impeller blood pumps. The first pump is an axially driven uni-ventricular assist pump, in which the rotor with impeller is radially supported by two passive magnetic bearings, but has one point contact with the stator axially at standstill. As the pump raises its rotating speed, the increasing hydrodynamic force of fluid acting on the impeller will make the rotor taking off from contacting point and disaffiliate from the stator. Then the rotor becomes fully suspended. The second pump is a radially driven bi-ventricular assist pump, i.e., an impeller total artificial heart. Its rotor with two impellers on both ends is supported by two passive magnetic bearings, which counteract the attractive force between rotor magnets and stator coil iron core. The rotor is affiliated to the stator radially at standstill and becomes levitated during rotation. Therefore, the rotor keeps concentric with stator during rotation but eccentric at standstill, as is confirmed by rotor position detection with Honeywell sensors. It concludes that the permanent maglev needs action of a non-magnetic force to achieve stability but a rotating magnetic levitator with high speed and large inertia can maintain its stability merely with passive magnetic bearings. PMID:16183322

  2. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  3. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a radial magnetic driver.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Katakoa, Kiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Jun-ichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    A new magnetic bearing has been designed to achieve a low electronic power requirement and high stiffness. The magnetic bearing consists of 1) radial passive forces between the permanent magnet ring mounted inside the impeller rotor and the electromagnet core materials in the pump casing and 2) radial active forces generated by the electromagnets using the two gap sensor signals. The magnetic bearing was assembled into a centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) driven with a radial, magnetic coupled driver. The impeller vane shape was designed based upon the computational fluid dynamic simulation. The diameter and height of the CRBP were 75 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The magnetic bearing system required the power of 1.0-1.4 W. The radial impeller movement was controlled to within +/- 10 microm. High stiffness in the noncontrolled axes, Z, phi, and theta, was obtained by the passive magnetic forces. The pump flow of 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg head pressure was obtained at 1,800 rpm with the electrical to hydraulic efficiency being greater than 15%. The Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of the magnetic bearing CRBP was one fifth of the BioPump BP-80 and one half of the NIKKISO HPM-15 after 4 hours. The newly designed magnetic bearing with two degrees of freedom control in combination with optimized impeller vane was successful in achieving an excellent hemolytic performance in comparison with the clinical centrifugal blood pumps. PMID:15745136

  4. Low volume variable RPM submersible well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lorett, J.A.; Vandevier, J.E.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a submersible pump assembly comprising in combination: a centrifugal pump having impeller means for producing at least two flow rates for a selected head when operated at constant speed, making the pump potentially unstable, and for requiring increasing torque to produce increasing flow rates. An electric motor connects directly to the pump for driving the pump. A sensing means senses the torque output of the motor; and variable a speed drive means for varies the speed of the motor in response to the torque sensed by the sensing means to maintain a constant torque output. The constant torque applied to the pump prevents the pump from delivering more than one flow rate for a given head to stabilize the operation.

  5. Comparison of erosion resistance of solids-handling pumps: Combined first and second quarterly progress report, February 9, 1989--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hauserman, W.B.

    1989-07-21

    The Burly pump is a semi-open-impeller centrifugal, designed to handle slurries or suspensions of course solids, sustaining minimal erosive damage to the impeller. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate quantitatively the degree of erosion resistance of the open-impeller Burly pump, or pumping of highly loaded, erosive slurries, to analyze and explain any unique aspects of its performance, to provide standard hydraulic performance data, and to assist the manufacturer in further testing and design development. Evaluation of erosion rates is to be done by circulating a highly erosive quartz slurry in pumps in which normal, cast iron impellers have been replaced by epoxy castings, accelerating by orders of magnitude the rate of erosive damage that would be incurred during normal operation. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  7. A Method to Determine the Slip Factor of Centrifugal Pumps through Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zu-Chao; Dou, Hua-Shu; Cui, Bao-Ling; Li, Yi; Xiao, Jun-Jian

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a method to determine the slip factor of centrifugal impellers is proposed based on the experimental result of the external performance of centrifugal pumps. This proposed method is superior to the conventional experimental method, which needs not to measure the flow parameters at impeller outlet. The results show that the present method can be used to obtain the slip factor at offdesign condition in a wide range of flow rate besides at the design point.

  8. Effect of fluid forces on rotor stability of centrifugal compressors and pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colding-Jorgensen, J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple two dimensional model for calculating the rotordynamic effects of the impeller force in centrifugal compressors and pumps is presented. It is based on potential flow theory with singularities. Equivalent stiffness and damping coefficients are calculated for a machine with a vaneless volute formed as a logarithmic spiral. It is shown that for certain operating conditions, the impeller force has a destablizing effect on the rotor.

  9. Causes and cures of a localized cavitation problem in a double-suction centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, F.T.

    1994-12-31

    A case history of trouble shooting a localized cavitation problem in a 1000hp circulation water use double-suction centrifugal pump is presented. This paper describes a combined experimental and analytical approach that lead to find out the correct causes and cures of the severe impeller blade pitting problem. From practical and economical considerations, upgrading the material of impeller is the best measure to minimize the damage.

  10. Pump station for radioactive waste water

    DOEpatents

    Whitton, John P.; Klos, Dean M.; Carrara, Danny T.; Minno, John J.

    2003-11-18

    A pump station for transferring radioactive particle containing waste water, includes: (a.) an enclosed sump having a vertically elongated right frusto conical wall surface and a bottom surface and (b.) a submersible volute centrifugal pump having a horizontally rotating impeller and a volute exterior surface. The sump interior surface, the bottom surface and the volute exterior surface are made of stainless steel having a 30 Ra or finer surface finish. A 15 Ra finish has been found to be most cost effective. The pump station is used for transferring waste water, without accumulation of radioactive fines.

  11. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

    1989-12-12

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

  12. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, Luciano (O'Hara Twp., Allegheny County, PA); Raimondi, ALbert A. (Monroeville Borough, Allegheny County, PA)

    1989-01-01

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

  13. Experimental study on hemolysis in centrifugal blood pumps: improvement of flow visualization method.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Funakubo, A; Sakuma, I; Fukui, Y; Dohi, T

    1999-06-01

    To evaluate rotary blood pumps, flow visualization is commonly applied to determine the flow patterns in a centrifugal blood pump, which have a relationship to its hemolytic performance. However, it is very troublesome to visualize the flow near the vanes due to the high rotational speed of the impeller. The rotational speed of the impeller in a centrifugal blood pump is usually several hundred revolutions per minute. In this study, we combined a high-speed video camera based imaging method and an optical system in which the image of the rotating impeller was kept stationary. In the optical system, a prism rotating at half the speed of the impeller reflected the image of the impeller. The resultant reflected image was observed by a high-speed video camera through a half mirror. With this optical setup, the image through the half mirror became stationary, and the path of a specific tracer particle could be traced for a longer duration. A longer duration of measurements and better quality of the obtained images were realized through this improvement. Movement of a specific tracer from the inlet portion to the outlet portion of the impeller could be examined using the developed method. PMID:10392282

  14. Two-phase velocity distributions and overall performance of a centrifugal slurry pump

    SciTech Connect

    Cader, T.; Masbernat, O.; Roco, M.C. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Back-scattering LDV has been used to investigate particulate two-phase flow in a centrifugal slurry pump. The measurements reported here have been made with a dilute suspension of 0.8 mm glass beads at the impeller-casing flow interface. This interface is of practical importance because the corresponding velocity and concentration results can be used to determine the pump head and flowrate. The present study evaluates the connection between the liquid and solids velocity distribution measured around the impeller and the pump performance determined from measurements at the pump inlet and outlet. The analysis of the velocity triangles for both phases shows the effect of the pump flowrate and inlet recirculation on the pump head at the impeller outlet, as well as the effect of particle slip on pump energy efficiency. A separate group of characteristic curves is proposed to represent the periodical fluctuations of the pump flowrate, head, and loss of efficiency due to particle slip, as a function of the impeller position.

  15. [Research on the feasibility of a magnetic-coupling-driven axial flow blood pump].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Ding, Wenxiang; Wang, Wei; Chen, En; Jiang, Zuming; Zou, Wenyan

    2004-02-01

    A new-designed axial flow blood pump, dived by magnetic coupling and using internal hollow brushless DC motor and inlet and outlet in line with impeller, was tested in mimic circuit. The results showed good performance of the new pump and indicated that its hydrodynamic characteristic can meet the demands of clinical extracorporeal circulation and auxiliary circulation. PMID:15022483

  16. Laser cleaning of sulfide scale on compressor impeller blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q. H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y. L.; Liu, G. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sulfide scale on the surface of a compressor impeller blade can considerably reduce the impeller performance and its service life. To prepare for subsequent remanufacturing, such as plasma spraying, it needs to be removed completely. In the corrosion process on an FV(520)B stainless steel, sulfide scale is divided into two layers because of different outward diffusion rates of Cr, Ni and Fe. In this paper, the cleaning threshold values of the upper and inner layers and the damage threshold value of the substrate were investigated using a pulsed fiber laser. To obtain experimental evidence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D surface profilometry were employed to investigate the two kinds of sulfide layers on specimens before, during, and after laser cleaning.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of the pediatric tiny centrifugal blood pump (TinyPump).

    PubMed

    Kido, Kazuyuki; Hoshi, Hideo; Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a tiny rotary centrifugal blood pump for the purpose of supporting circulation of children and infants. The pump is designed to provide a flow of 0.1-4.0 L/min against a head pressure of 50-120 mm Hg. The diameter of the impeller is 30 mm with six straight vanes. The impeller is supported by a hydrodynamic bearing at its center and rotated with a radial coupled magnetic driver. The bearing that supports rotation of the impeller of the tiny centrifugal blood pump is very critical to achieve durability, and clot-free and antihemolytic performance. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to quantify the secondary flow through the hydrodynamic bearing at the center of the impeller and investigated the effects of bearing clearance on shear stress to optimize hemolytic performance of the pump. Two types of bearing clearance (0.1 and 0.2 mm) were studied. The wall shear stress of the 0.1-mm bearing clearance was lower than that of 0.2-mm bearing clearance at 2 L/min and 3000 rpm. This was because the axial component of the shear rate significantly decreased due to the narrower clearance even though the circumferential component of the shear rate increased. Hemolysis tests showed that the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced to 0.0076 g/100 L when the bearing clearance was reduced to 0.1 mm. It was found that the CFD prediction supported the experimental trend. The CFD is a useful tool for optimization of the hydrodynamic bearing design of the centrifugal rotary blood pump to optimize the performance of the pump in terms of mechanical effect on blood cell elements, durability of the bearing, and antithrombogenic performance. PMID:16683958

  18. Soft-iron impellers in the Madison Sodium Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nornberg, Mark; Clark, M. M.; Forest, C. B.; Plihon, N.

    2014-10-01

    In an attempt to increase the magnetic flux amplification of the two-vortex flow in the Madison Sodium Dynamo Experiment, the stainless steel impellers were replaced with soft-iron disks similar in design to the VKS dynamo experiment. Past attempts at creating a homogeneous dynamo in the Madison Sodium Dynamo Experiment relied on stainless steel impellers to drive a two-vortex flow predicted to be unstable to dynamo excitation. The resulting induction process was much weaker than laminar predictions due to the turbulent enhancement of the resistivity. The measured amplification and pulse-decay times with the soft-iron disks show an improvement in the flux amplification, but not sufficient for self-excitation. Despite the similarities in the impeller design with the VKS experiment, the differences in geometry still play a significant role in determining the threshold conditions for dynamo action. This work is supported by the DOE, NSF, the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, and a CNRS travel grant.

  19. Technical requirements and limitations of miniaturized axial flow pumps for circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Reul, H

    1994-01-01

    The engineering principles of rotary blood pumps are elucidated by means of a basic introduction into turbomachinery. Additionally, some important dimensionless quantities which relate to pumping characteristics and pump type are introduced. These theoretical fundamentals are applied to the design of high-speed microaxial pumps, especially the two Hemopump versions. The theoretical estimates clearly show that each pump version has its physical limits, especially at small impeller sizes. It is also demonstrated that not any clinically desirable working point of an axial pump can be achieved with an arbitrarily small pump size. PMID:8205568

  20. Parametric performance evaluation of a hydraulic centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, M. W.; Y Kim, K.; Ma, S. B.; Yoo, I. S.; Choi, W. C.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.

    2014-03-01

    Parametric study of a hydraulic centrifugal pump with backward curved blades has been performed numerically using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The shear stress transport turbulence model was used for analysis of turbulence. The finite volume method and an unstructured grid system were used for the numerical solution. The optimal grid system in the computational domain was selected through a grid dependency test. Tested parameters were related to the geometry of the impeller and volute: seven variables defining the hub and shroud contours and the blades angle of impeller, and two variables defining the inlet width and expansion angle of volute. The effects of these parameters on the hydrodynamic performance of the centrifugal pump have been investigated. It was found that the centrifugal water pump with the twisted blades has the enhancing efficiency compared to the straight blades pump.

  1. Inlet and outlet devices for rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E; Antaki, James F; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    The purposes of inlet and outlet devices for rotary blood pumps, including inducers and diffusers for axial pumps, inlet and exit volutes for centrifugal pumps, and inlet and outlet cannulas, are to guide the blood into the impeller, where the blood is accelerated, and to convert the high kinetic energy into pressure after the impeller discharge, respectively. The designs of the inlet and outlet devices have an important bearing on the pump performance. Their designs are highly dependent on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, guided by intuition and experience. For inlet devices, the design objectives are to eliminate separated flow, to minimize recirculation, and to equalize the radial components of velocity. For outlet devices, the design goals are to reduce speed, to minimize energy loss, and to avoid flow separation and whirl. CFD analyses indicate the velocity field and pressure distribution. Geometrical optimization of these components has been implemented in order to improve the flow pattern. PMID:15384997

  2. Hydrodynamics in a vessel stirred by simple and double helical ribbon impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameur, Houari; Bouzit, Mohamed; Ghenaim, Abdellah

    2013-03-01

    The present paper treats the agitation of shear thinning fluids in a cylindrical unbaffled vessel with a flat-bottom. Two kinds of impellers have been used: simple and double helical ribbons. This work is achieved with the help of CFD package (CFX-12.0), which is based on the finite volume method to solve the continuity and momentum equations. The effect of impeller rotational speed, fluid rheology, impeller size, impeller clearance from the tank bottom on the flow fields and power consumption have been investigated. Finally, a comparison between the two impellers is made. It was found that the best performance is obtained with double helical ribbon impeller placed at the middle of the tank, with moderate blade size and operating at Re g > 20. Our results have been compared with those of other literatures and a satisfactory agreement is observed.

  3. Viscous fluid sheets

    E-print Network

    Savva, Nikos

    2007-01-01

    We present a general theory for the dynamics of thin viscous sheets. Employing concepts from differential geometry and tensor calculus we derive the governing equations in terms of a coordinate system that moves with the ...

  4. Viscous relativistic hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Ulrich W. Heinz

    2005-12-13

    I review recent and not so recent progress on formulating and numerically implementing a consistent set of relativistic equations which describe the space-time evolution of viscous relativistic fluids without violating causality.

  5. Backswept impeller and vane island diffuser and shroud for NASA advanced-concepts compressor test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, G. L.; Holbrook, M. R.; Mcvaugh, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A centrifugal impeller based on an existing backswept design was defined. In addition, a vaned diffuser was designed to match this impeller and also to be compatible with an existing 6:1 compressor test rig. The mechanical integrity of this design was verified by analysis. Hardware was procured and inspected to insure conformity with design tolerances. An overspeed test was successfully conducted on one of the impellers fabricated under this program.

  6. Integrable viscous conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsie, Alessandro; Lorenzoni, Paolo; Moro, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    We propose an extension of the Dubrovin-Zhang perturbative approach to the study of normal forms for non-Hamiltonian integrable scalar conservation laws. The explicit computation of the first few corrections leads to the conjecture that such normal forms are parameterized by one single functional parameter, named the viscous central invariant. A constant valued viscous central invariant corresponds to the well-known Burgers hierarchy. The case of a linear viscous central invariant provides a viscous analog of the Camassa-Holm equation, that formerly appeared as a reduction of two-component Hamiltonian integrable systems. We write explicitly the negative and positive hierarchy associated with this equation and prove the integrability showing that they can be mapped respectively into the heat hierarchy and its negative counterpart, named the Klein-Gordon hierarchy. A local well-posedness theorem for periodic initial data is also proven. We show how transport equations can be used to effectively construct asymptotic solutions via an extension of the quasi-Miura map that preserves the initial datum. The method is alternative to the method of the string equation for Hamiltonian conservation laws and naturally extends to the viscous case. Using these tools we derive the viscous analog of the Painlevé I2 equation that describes the universal behaviour of the solution at the critical point of gradient catastrophe.

  7. Seal cooling for plastic pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, A.

    1988-05-24

    In a centrifugal pump having a thermally non-conductive plastic pump body, a rotatable impeller mounted on a rotatable drive shaft, and a mechanical seal between the pump body and the drive shaft separating a dry zone from a wet zone and comprising a rotatable seal member and a non-rotatable seal member, a cooling arrangement for the mechanical seal is described comprising: a thin metal thermally conductive stamping, cup shaped in configuration, and a retaining member positioned between the stamping and the non-rotatable seal member sufficiently thin so as to transfer heat from the non-rotatable seal member to the stamping. The stamping is thermally connected to the mechanical seal and operates as a heat sink and radiator to dissipate the heat buildup of the seal into the dry zone by radiation cooling.

  8. Effect of blade outlet angle on radial thrust of single-blade centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Y.; Fukutomi, J.; Fujiwara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Single-blade centrifugal pumps are widely used as sewage pumps. However, a large radial thrust acts on a single blade during pump operation because of the geometrical axial asymmetry of the impeller. This radial thrust causes vibrations of the pump shaft, reducing the service life of bearings and shaft seal devices. Therefore, to ensure pump reliability, it is necessary to quantitatively understand the radial thrust and clarify the behavior and generation mechanism. This study investigated the radial thrust acting on two kinds of single-blade centrifugal impellers having different blade outlet angles by experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Furthermore, the radial thrust was modeled by a combination of three components, inertia, momentum, and pressure, by applying an unsteady conservation of momentum to this impeller. As a result, the effects of the blade outlet angle on both the radial thrust and the modeled components were clarified. The total head of the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases more than the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 8 degrees at a large flow rate. In this case, since the static pressure of the circumference of the impeller increases uniformly, the time-averaged value of the radial thrust of both impellers does not change at every flow rate. On the other hand, since the impeller blade loading becomes large, the fluctuation component of the radial thrust of the impeller with the blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases. If the blade outlet angle increases, the fluctuation component of the inertia component will increase, but the time-averaged value of the inertia component is located near the origin despite changes in the flow rate. The fluctuation component of the momentum component becomes large at all flow rates. Furthermore, although the time-averaged value of the pressure component is almost constant, the fluctuation component of the pressure component becomes large at a large flow rate. In addition to the increase of the fluctuation component of this pressure component, because the fluctuation component of the inertia and momentum components becomes large (as mentioned above), the radial thrust increases at a large flow rate, as is the case for the impeller with a large blade outlet angle.

  9. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. PMID:17343698

  10. Quantitative visualization of flow through a centrifugal blood pump: effect of washout holes.

    PubMed

    Nishida, M; Yamane, T; Orita, T; Asztalos, B; Clarke, H

    1997-07-01

    To clarify the effect of washout holes on the flow in a centrifugal blood pump to prevent blood stagnation, a quantitative flow visualization technique was applied to compare flows in models with and without washout holes. A scaled-up model of a prototype pump and a high speed video camera were used for the flow visualization, and images were processed by particle tracking velocimetry. Particular attention was paid to the flow through the gaps behind and in front of the impeller. The results showed that in the gap behind the impeller, washout holes caused not only an inward flow, but also an increase in the tangential velocities. In the gap in front of the impeller, washout holes caused an outward flow and a decrease in the tangential velocities. Head flow characteristics were little affected by the washout holes in this initial design for which the flow through the washout holes was set to be approximately 10% of the flow in the external circuit. These results suggest that the flow through washout holes is significant in the prevention of blood stagnation in 2 ways. First, the inward radial velocity behind the impeller and outward velocity in front of the impeller result in fluid exchange, and second, a tangential velocity increase reduces fluid stagnation behind the impeller. PMID:9212946

  11. Design key to fluid flow, pump maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Krutzsch, W.C.

    1983-01-24

    This article discusses some of the possible problems caused by improperly designed piping and presents guidelines for avoiding or at least reducing them. Explains that even if design and manufacture are precisely correct and the pump perfectly matched to the operating conditions, the pump can perform properly only if supplied with a steady flow of liquid arriving at the pump suction flange under sufficient absolute pressure to equal or exceed the net positive suction head (npsh) required by the pump and with uniform velocity with no rotational component. Points out that failure of the suction piping to deliver the liquid to the pump in this condition can lead to noisy operation, random axial oscillations of the rotor, premature bearing failure, and cavitation damage to the impeller and inlet portions of the casing. Discusses adequate priming or venting, piping velocities, and elbow use limits.

  12. Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids

    DOEpatents

    Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

  13. Concrete volute pumps: technology review and improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prunières, R.; Longatte, F.; Catelan, F. X.; Philippot, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    When pumps need to deliver large water flow rates (typically more than 5 m3.s-1), concrete volute pumps (CVP) offer an interesting alternative to standard vertical wet-pit pumps. One of the major advantages of CVP is its simplicity in terms of design, manufacturability and maintainability. In addition, CVP geometrical arrangement allows to reach high performances in terms of hydraulic and mechanical behaviour. These advantages can be specifically appreciated when such pumps are used in the energy field for Power Plants which need high flow rate and reliability, and can lead to important financial savings over the Plant lifetime compared to vertical wet-pit pumps. Finally, as CVP was for a long time limited to total head rise lower than 30 mWC, it was established through CFD analysis that the addition of guide vanes between the impeller and the volute allows to achieve higher head rise without risk.

  14. Feasibility of a TinyPump system for pediatric CPB, ECMO, and circulatory assistance: hydrodynamic performances of the modified pump housing for implantable TinyPump.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Masaaki; Hoshi, Hideo; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2007-01-01

    The TinyPump is a miniature centrifugal blood pump with an extremely small priming volume of 5 ml, allowing blood transfusion free cardiopulmonary bypass as well as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in pediatric patients. In this study, a new pump housing with the angled inlet port (25 degrees toward impeller center with respect to the flow axis) was designed to optimize the pump displaced volume and to extend the application of the TinyPump to implantable support The fluid dynamic performance analysis revealed that the head pressure losses increased from 3 to 17 mm Hg in comparison with straight port design as the pump rotational speed increased from 2,000 to 4,000 rpm. This was probably caused by perturbed flow patterns at the site of the inlet bent port area and streamline hitting the off-center of the impeller. No significant effect on pumping efficiency was observed because of modification in inlet port design. Modification in the inflow and outflow port designs together with the drive mechanism reduces the height of the pump system, including the motor, to 27 mm yielding the displaced volume of 68 ml in comparison with 40 mm of the paracorporeal system with the displaced volume of 105 ml. Further analysis in terms of hemolytic as well as antithrombogenic performance will be carried out to finalize the housing design for the implantable version of the TinyPump. PMID:18043159

  15. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  16. New mechanism to reduce the size of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump: direct drive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Kijima, T; Maekawa, J

    1997-07-01

    Size reduction of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been achieved by reducing the size of the magnetic suspension and employing a direct drive mechanism in place of a brushless DC motor and a magnetic coupling. The flow has also been improved using a closed hollow impeller to remove flow obstruction at the inlet and using radial straight vanes to reduce the impeller speed by 30%. Hemolysis testing was conducted for the new models. Results showed that model DD1 presented only a slightly higher level of hemolysis than a regular extracorporeal centrifugal pump. PMID:9212927

  17. The viscous Savart sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villermaux, Emmanuel; Pistre, Violaine; Lhuissier, Henri

    2013-11-01

    We study the viscous version of the planar Savart sheet problem, using an impacting liquid jet up to 300 times more viscous than water. Two surprising observations are made, contrasting with the traditional case introduced by Savart where viscosity plays no role: First, if the radius of a viscous sheet is typically reduced compared to the water case for a given jet radius and impacting velocity, the smooth/flapping transition is delayed, allowing for smooth sheet radii substantially bigger than those permitted with water at large impacting Weber number. Second, the drop size distribution is bimodal, with a substantial fraction of the drops having a very small, well defined diameter. We understand these two facts in terms of an additional model experiment, and simple physical arguments.

  18. Hydrogen test of a small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage with a 2 inch tip diameter, .030 inch tip width shrouded impeller and volute collector was tested with liquid hydrogen as the pumped fluid. The hydrodynamic design of the pump stage is summarized and the noncavitating and cavitating performance results are presented. Test speeds were 60 and 80 percent of the 77,000 rpm design speed. Liquid hydrogen test results are compared with data from previous tests of the stage in water.

  19. Impelling and Inhibiting Forces in the Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    , intending to throw it at Spouse B. Moments after this violent im- pulse struck Spouse A, however, a powerfulImpelling and Inhibiting Forces in the Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence Eli J. Finkel strong violence-impelling forces, which lead the individual to experience action tendencies toward IPV

  20. A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a simple-structured disposable pump head.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Li, Lichuan; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2008-07-01

    A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) has been developed for use in a disposable extracorporeal system. The design of the pump is intended to eliminate mechanical contact with the impeller, to facilitate a simple disposable mechanism, and to reduce the blood-heating effects that are caused by motors and magnetic bearings. The bearing rotor attached to the impeller is suspended by a two degrees-of-freedom controlled radial magnetic bearing stator, which is situated outside the rotor. In the space inside the ringlike rotor, a magnetic coupling disk is placed to rotate the rotor and to ensure that the pump head is thermally isolated from the motor. In this system, the rotor can exhibit high passive stiffness due to the novel design of the closed magnetic circuits. The disposable pump head, which has a priming volume of 23 mL, consists of top and bottom housings, an impeller, and a rotor with a diameter of 50 mm. The pump can provide a head pressure of more than 300 mm Hg against a flow of 5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis of the MedTech Dispo is 0.0025 +/- 0.0005 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 250 mm Hg. This is one-seventh of the equivalent figure for a Bio Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), which has a value of 0.0170 +/- 0.0096 g/100 L. These results show that the MedTech Dispo offers high pumping performance and low blood trauma. PMID:18638307

  1. Influence of impeller shroud forces on turbopump rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. P.; Childs, Dara W.

    1993-01-01

    The shrouded-impeller leakage path forces calculated by Childs have been analyzed to answer two questions. First, because of certain characteristics or the results of Childs, the forces could not be modeled with traditional approaches. Therefore, an approach has been devised to include the forces in conventional rotordynamic analyses. The forces were found to be well-modeled with this approach. Finally, the effect these forces had on a simple rotor-bearing system was analyzed, and, therefore, they, in addition to seal forces, were applied to a Jeffcott rotor. The traditional methods of dynamic system analysis were modified to incorporate the impeller forces and yielded results for the eigenproblem, frequency response, critical speed, transient response, and an iterative technique for finding the frequency of free vibration as well as system stability. All results lead to the conclusion that the forces have little influence on natural frequency but can have appreciable effects on system stability. Specifically, at higher values of fluid swirl at the leakage path entrance, relative stability is reduced. The only unexpected response characteristics that occurred are attributed to the nonlinearity of the model.

  2. Influence of impeller shroud forces on turbopump rotor dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. P.; Childs, Dara W.

    1993-12-01

    The shrouded-impeller leakage path forces calculated by Childs have been analyzed to answer two questions. First, because of certain characteristics or the results of Childs, the forces could not be modeled with traditional approaches. Therefore, an approach has been devised to include the forces in conventional rotordynamic analyses. The forces were found to be well-modeled with this approach. Finally, the effect these forces had on a simple rotor-bearing system was analyzed, and, therefore, they, in addition to seal forces, were applied to a Jeffcott rotor. The traditional methods of dynamic system analysis were modified to incorporate the impeller forces and yielded results for the eigenproblem, frequency response, critical speed, transient response, and an iterative technique for finding the frequency of free vibration as well as system stability. All results lead to the conclusion that the forces have little influence on natural frequency but can have appreciable effects on system stability. Specifically, at higher values of fluid swirl at the leakage path entrance, relative stability is reduced. The only unexpected response characteristics that occurred are attributed to the nonlinearity of the model.

  3. Trailing edge noise reduction in a backward-curved impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, Gerald C.

    2002-05-01

    Motorized impellers are used in many air-moving applications including room circulation, duct flow, roof and wall exhaust, and cooling of electronic components in cabinets. These fans are backward-curved centrifugal blowers that operate with no volute casing. These fans radiate broadband noise due to turbulence ingestion and trailing edge (TE) noise generating mechanisms. Considered here are trailing edge noise generation and its reduction in a typical motorized impeller. The sound power of the subject fans is measured in an acoustically transparent test plenum according to ANSI Standard S12.11-1987. Two different serrated TE treatments are designed. The designs assume that a turbulent boundary layer exists at the blade TE, but the actual fan Reynolds number based on chord length is transitional. Therefore, to assure that a turbulent boundary layer exists at the TE, two different inlet turbulators are implemented. These trip the blade boundary layer to a turbulent state. Reported are the effects of the TE serrations and turbulators acting individually on the fan noise, along with the synergistic effects of using them in combinations. Up to 6 dBA of noise reduction is observed when the two are used together. [Work supported by Nortel Networks.

  4. Experiment of a centrifugal pump during changing speed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. J.; Shao, J.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a method of changing rotational speed of impeller periodically as the pulsatile working condition is developed to realize pulse outputs both of flow discharge and of head for a centrifugal pump through experiment. The performance of the centrifugal pump under pulsatile working operation condition is measured which indicates this model pump could produce desired pulse flow under such condition. Flow patterns at four testing points under pulsatile conditions are obtained by means of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology both with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) particles and refractive index matched (RIM) fluid. Results of PIV measurement show the distributions of velocity, streamlines, and the principal Reynolds normal stress (PRNS). Under the design flow rate condition, the relative velocity in the blade channel distributes smoothly and decreases from inlet to exit. And at the impeller exit, the relative velocity is lower close to suction side than that near pressure side of blade in most of blade channels.

  5. Design of a centrifugal blood pump with magnetic suspension.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Ikeda, T; Orita, T; Tsutsui, T; Jikuya, T

    1995-07-01

    A new concept blood pump, whose impeller is suspended by permanent magnets and a mechanical pivot without seals or ball bearings, is presented in this paper. The primary aim of the blood pump is an application to implantable artificial hearts. The prototype model is of a centrifugal type with a four-vaned semiopen impeller 50 mm in diameter. Since this mechanism has no seals or ball bearings, flow stagnation or heat generation that might cause blood cell denaturation is expected to be small. The results of performance testing for the prototype model 2 were satisfactory regarding pump head and efficiency. The radial-suspension magnets and the magnetic coupling were stable. As a result, the present mechanism has been verified to be a candidate applicable to implantable artificial hearts. PMID:8572963

  6. Numerical study of cavitation flows inside a tubular pumping station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. L.; Huang, W.; Wang, F. J.; Yang, W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-11-01

    Based on RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the full cavitation model, the cavitation flows inside a low-head tubular-pump model were predicted by using the FLUENT software. For a operating case of given flow rate, cavitation happens near the inlet on the suction surfaces of the impeller blades at the initial cavitating stage, and the cavitating area spreads to the impeller passage and hub as NPSH (net positive suction head) decreases, which will affect energy transformation. For various operating cases of cavitation flows at the given flow rates, the predicted velocity and pressure distributions as well as the vapor volumetric fraction are systematically analyzed. Finally, the cavitation performance curve of the tubular-pump model is obtained by means of the further post-processing. All the comparisons and analysis can be further employed to optimize the hydraulic and structural design of the tubular pump and to guide its safe operation.

  7. Effect of Impeller Design and Spacing on Gas Exchange in a Percutaneous Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, R. Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J.; Burgreen, Greg W.; Federspiel, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2–5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m2 (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5–10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2–13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange. PMID:24749994

  8. Effect of area ratio on the performance of a 5.5:1 pressure ratio centrifugal impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, L. F.; Clark, D. A.; Wood, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A centrifugal impeller which was initially designed for a pressure ratio of approximately 5.5 and a mass flow rate of 0.959 kg/sec was tested with a vaneless diffuser for a range of design point impeller area ratios from 2.322 to 2.945. The impeller area ratio was changed by successively cutting back the impeller exit axial width from an initial value of 7.57 mm to a final value of 5.97 mm. In all, four separate area ratios were tested. For each area ratio a series of impeller exit axial clearances was also tested. Test results are based on impeller exit surveys of total pressure, total temperature, and flow angle at a radius 1.115 times the impeller exit radius. Results of the tests at design speed, peak efficiency, and an exit tip clearance of 8 percent of exit blade height show that the impeller equivalent pressure recovery coefficient peaked at a design point area ratio of approximately 2.748 while the impeller aerodynamic efficiency peaked at a lower value of area ratio of approximately 2.55. The variation of impeller efficiency with clearance showed expected trends with a loss of approximately 0.4 points in impeller efficiency for each percent increase in exit axial tip clearance for all impellers tested.

  9. Hydrodynamic characteristics of the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kohei; Hosoda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ariyoshi, Koki; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Sato, Masami; Hara, Sintaro; Lee, Xinyang; Wu, Sheng-Yuan; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) was invented to be an ideal pump for developing the TAH and the helical flow TAH (HFTAH) using two HFPs has been developed. However, since the HFP is quite a new pump, hydrodynamic characteristics inside the pump are not clarified. To analyze hydrodynamic characteristics of the HFP, flow visualization study using the particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed. The experimental and computational models were developed to simulate the left HFP of the HFTAH and distributions of flow velocity vectors, shear stress and pressure inside the pump were examined. In distribution of flow velocity vectors, the vortexes in the vane were observed, which indicated that the HFP has a novel and quite unique working principle in which centrifugal force rotates the fluid in the helical volutes and the fluid is transferred from the inlet to the outlet helical volutes according to the helical structure. In distribution of shear stress, the highest shear stress that was considered to be occurred by the shunt flow across the impeller was found around the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not so high to cause hemolysis. This shunt flow is thought to be improved by redesigning the inlet and outlet helical volutes. In distribution of pressure, negative pressure was found near the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not high. Negative pressure is thought to be reduced with an improvement in the design of the impeller or the vane shape. PMID:25784463

  10. Global design optimization for an axial-flow tandem pump based on surrogate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. H.; Zhao, Y.; Y Wang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Tandem pump, compared with multistage pump, goes without guide vanes between impellers. Better cavitation performance and significant reduction of the axial geometry scale is important for high-speed propulsion. This study presents a global design optimization method based on surrogated method for an axial-flow tandem pump to enhance trade-off performances: energy and cavitation performances. At the same time, interactions between impellers and impacts on the performances are analyzed. Fixed angle of blades in impellers and phase angle are performed as design variables. Efficiency and minimum average pressure coefficient (MAPC) on axial sectional surface in front impeller are the objective function, which can represent energy and cavitation performances well. Different surrogate models are constructed, and Global Sensitivity Analysis and Pareto Front method are used. The results show that, 1) Influence from phase angle on performances can be neglected compared with other two design variables, 2) Impact ratio of fixed angle of blades in two impellers on efficiency are the same as their designed loading distributions, which is 4:6, 3) The optimization results can enhance the trade-off performances well: efficiency is improved by 0.6%, and the MAPC is improved by 4.5%.

  11. An experimental study on pump clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isono, M.; Nohmi, M.; Uchida, H.; Kawai, M.; Kudo, H.; Kawahara, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Saito, S.

    2014-03-01

    For sewage pump that various foreign substance is flowed into, anti-clogging performance is a factor as important as pump efficiency in order to avoid clogging trouble by foreign substance. Many investigations about pump inner flow and pump efficiency estimation have been carried out conventionally in order to realize coexistence with anti-clogging performance and pump performance. And these results have been reflected in construction of the running water section design method. As a index of anti-clogging performance, "impeller passage diameter" which is diameter of spherical solid that can pass through the pump is used widely. And there are various type of the sewage pump which have large impeller passage diameter. However real cause of clog is not a solid, and it is fibrous material such as towel and clothes, vinyl and paper diaper. In most case these material accumulate in the pump, so that clog is occurred. In this study, for the purpose of quantification of anti-clogging performance against fibrous materials, the factor that affect to clogging of pump was investigated by pump model test using a string. The test is done based on Taguchi method. In this test, type of the pump model, diameter of the string, material of the string, length of the string and flow rate are selected for the factor, and the effect that they have on the clogging of the pump was investigated. As a result of this test, it was made clear that length of the string has a strong influence on the clogging of the pump. And from the result of this test, evaluation method of anti-clogging performance of the pump against fibrous material by using string was considered. According to the result of above test based on Taguchi method, it was assumed that quantification of anti-clogging performance against fibrous materials is possible by flowing plural strings into the pump and calculating the probability of passing. Plurality sewage pumps of different types were evaluated based on this assumption. And It was confirmed that it is possible to compare anti clogging performance of the pump against fibrous materials quantitatively. And the specification of the string was selected according to the result of the test based on Taguchi method. By this method, one of the evaluation method on anti-clogging performance against fibrous materials was established.

  12. [A new approach for improving antithrombogenicity in centrifugal pump].

    PubMed

    Qian, Kunxi; Zeng, Pei; Ru, Weimin; Yuan, Haiyu

    2003-09-01

    For long-term application of the rotary pumps, it is necessary to solve the problems of bearing wear and thrombosis along the bearing. Currently, many investigators choose the magnetic bearing to realize zero-friction and no contact between the rotor and stator; the former avoids the mechanical wear and the latter eliminates the possibility of thrombus formation. We tried and found that it is difficult to apply a magnetic bearing to rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, reliability and implantable; therefore, we have developed a much simpler and much more creative approach to achieving the same results. Instead of the sliding bearing, a rolling bearing has been devised for the pump; its friction is about 1/15 of the sliding bearing. Furthermore, a wear-proof material of ultra-high-molecular weight polythene has been adopted in making the rollers, their anti-wear property in 8 times better than that of metal. Thereby, the service life of the bearing has extended to several years. For preventing the thrombus formation along the bearing, the impeller reciprocation axially as the impeller changes its rotating speed periodically to produce a pulsatile flow. The reciprocation is a result of the effects of a magnetic force between the motor rotor and stator, and a hydraulic force between the blood flow and the impeller. Similar to piston pump, the oscillating impeller can make the blood in and out of the bearing, resulting in wash-out once a circle. This is obviously beneficial to preventing thrombosis along the bearing and in the pump. The endurance tests with saline of this novel pump demonstrated a durability of the device. It promises to be able to assist the circulation of the patients permanently and to be able to replace the heart transplantation in the future. PMID:14565033

  13. Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by

    E-print Network

    Bush, John W.M.

    Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by Jeffrey M. Aristoff, Jeffrey D. Leblanc, Annette E. Hosoi, and John W. M. Bush, Massachusetts Institute of Technology We examine the form of the viscous hydraulic of height 2­10 mm. Elegaard et al.1 first demonstrated that the axial symme- try of the viscous hydraulic

  14. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  15. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  16. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions.

  17. Characterization of a centrifugal pump in He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of an effort to determine the feasibility of helium transfer in space, a centrifugal pump was tested in He II at a variety of flow rates, pump speeds, and fluid temperatures. The pump, which has a straight bladed impeller 6.86 cm in diameter, generated a maximum pressure rise of 15 kPa and a maximum flow rate of 22 g/s for the conditions of the test. Pump performance seems to be independent of fluid temperature and is in good agreement with the values predicted by the manufacturer. Over the range of flow coefficients, the measured maximum efficiency is around 50 percent. Cavitation is observed in the pump and is thought to be highly dependent on the local heating of the helium in the pump. Preliminary measurements of the noise spectra of the pump suggest a possible mechanism to predict the onset of cavitation.

  18. Life cycle costs for chemical process pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Urwin, B.; Blong, R.; Jamieson, C.; Erickson, B.

    1998-01-01

    Though construction and startup costs are always a concern, proper investment in equipment and installation will save money down the line. This is particularly important for heavily used items, such as centrifugal pumps, one of the workhouses of the chemical process industries (CPI). By properly sizing and installing a centrifugal pump, the life and efficiency of the pump can be increased. At the same time, maintenance costs can be reduced. When considering a new pump, there are several areas that require attention. The first is the baseplate design. The impeller is another area of concern. The seal chamber, the third area of importance, must be designed for proper heat dissipation and lubrication of seal faces. Lastly, the power end must be considered. Optimum bearing life, effective oil cooling and minimum shaft deflection are all vital. The paper discusses installation costs, operating cost, maintenance cost, seal environment, and extended bearing life.

  19. Optimization of a Continuous Hybrid Impeller Mixer via Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Othman, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Takriff, M. S.; Rosli, M. I.; Engku Chik, E. M. F.; Meor Adnan, M. A. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary steps required for conducting experiments to obtain the optimal operating conditions of a hybrid impeller mixer and to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, impeller speed and clearance parameters are examined. The hybrid impeller mixer consists of a single Rushton turbine mounted above a single pitched blade turbine (PBT). Four impeller speeds, 50, 100, 150, and 200 rpm, and four impeller clearances, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm, were the operation variables used in this study. CFD was utilized to initially screen the parameter ranges to reduce the number of actual experiments needed. Afterward, the residence time distribution (RTD) was determined using the respective parameters. Finally, the Fluent-predicted RTD and the experimentally measured RTD were compared. The CFD investigations revealed that an impeller speed of 50 rpm and an impeller clearance of 25 mm were not viable for experimental investigations and were thus eliminated from further analyses. The determination of RTD using a k-? turbulence model was performed using CFD techniques. The multiple reference frame (MRF) was implemented and a steady state was initially achieved followed by a transient condition for RTD determination. PMID:25170524

  20. Numerical calculation and optimal design of a hot water circulation pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Y Kong, F.; Xia, B.; Tan, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    The problem of hot water circulation pump head shortage is common. In this paper, numerical simulation technology, combined with orthogonal experimental design, was used to research optimal designs to improve the hot water circulation pump's head. CFX software was used to calculate the flow field in the pump, and the head-flow rate curve could be achieved. The accuracy of CFD was validated through comparison between numerical and experimental data. According to the experience, the number of impeller blades, thickness and width of impeller outlet were changed to improve the hot water circulation pump's head. A three factors and level values of model pump orthogonal experiment was designed, and numerical simulation of whole flow field based on CFX was adopted to implement the orthogonal experiment. Finally, the best designed scheme for model pump was obtained. The analysis of results indicates that the head of hot water circulation pump has increased by 7.77% at rated conditions. The distribution in impellers' internal flow field is symmetrical, and accords with the law of fluids flow in the common centrifugal pump.

  1. Performance analysis of mini centrifugal pump with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, T.; Fukutomi, J.; Wada, T.; Shinohara, H.

    2013-12-01

    Design method for a mini centrifugal pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machines is not clarified and conventional theory is not suitable for small-sized pumps. Then, a semi-open impeller for the mini centrifugal pump with 55mm impeller diameter is adopted in this research to take simplicity and maintenance into consideration. Splitter blades are adopted in this research to improve the performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump having large blade outlet angle. The performance tests are conducted with these rotors in order to investigate the effect of the splitter blades on the performance and internal flow condition of the mini centrifugal pump. A three dimensional steady numerical flow analysis is conducted to analyze rotor, volute efficiency and loss caused by a vortex. It is clarified from the experimental results that the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is improved by the effect of the splitter blades. Flow condition at outlet of the rotor becomes uniform and back flow regions are suppressed in the case with the splitter blades. Further, the volute efficiency increases and the vortex loss decreases. In the present paper, the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is shown and the flow condition is clarified with the results of the experiment and the numerical flow analysis. Furthermore, the performance analyses of the mini centrifugal pumps with and without the splitter blades are conducted.

  2. Rotordynamic forces acting on a centrifugal open impeller in whirling motion by using active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, N.; Eguchi, M.; Uchiumi, M.; Yoshida, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Rotordynamic forces acting on a centrifugal open impeller of a rocket engine turbopump were measured using a rotordynamic test stand controlled by active magnetic bearings. The tangential rotordynamic force ft had a small constantly negative value in the measured range. The direct stiffness K had a positive value under various test conditions. In general, direct stiffness K of a closed impeller had a negative value because of the Bernoulli effect. In the case of open impellers, the Bernoulli effect is speculated to be smaller because the absence of a front shroud makes K positive.

  3. Flow visualization studies to improve the spiral pump design.

    PubMed

    Andrade, A; Biscegli, J; Sousa, J E; Ohashi, Y; Nosé, Y

    1997-07-01

    The spiral pump (SP) uses centrifugal and axial pumping principles simultaneously, through a conical shaped impeller with threads in its surface. Flow visualization studies were performed in critical areas of the SP. A closed circuit loop was filled with glycerin-water solution (40%). Amberlite particles (80 mesh) were illuminated by a planar helium-neon laser light (7 mW). The particle velocities were recorded with Kodak (TMAX-400) black and white film, and the flow behavior was studied with a micro video camera and color video printer. The flow visualization studies showed no turbulence or stagnant areas in the inlet and outlet ports of the SP. When using the impeller with one lead, at the top of the threads some recirculation appeared when the total pressure head increased. Two new impellers were made. One of them had the same conical shape with a thread having 2 leads. The second had a thread with 2 leads, but it also had a bigger cone angle. These modifications improved the pump hydrodynamic performance, decreasing the recirculation in pumping conditions that require pressures over 200 mm Hg. PMID:9212938

  4. Numerical analysis of rotating stall instabilities of a pump- turbine in pump mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L. S.; Cheng, Y. G.; Zhang, X. X.; Yang, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    Rotating stall may occur at part load flow of a pump-turbine in pump mode. Unstable flow structures developing under stall condition can lead to a sudden drop of efficiency, high dynamic load and even cavitation. CFD simulations on a pump-turbine model in pump mode were carried out to reveal the onset and developed mechanisms of these unstable flow phenomena at part load. The simulation results of energy-discharge and efficiency characteristics are in good agreement with those obtained by experiments. The more deviate from design conditions with decreasing flow rate, the more flow separations within the vanes. Under specific conditions, four stationary separation zones begin to progress on the circumference, rotating at a fraction of the impeller rotation rate. Rotating stalls lead to the flow in the vane diffuser channels alternating between outward jet flow and blockage. Strong jets impact the spiral casing wall causing high pressure pulsations. Severe separations of the stall cells disturb the flow inducing periodical large amplitude pressure fluctuations, of which the intensity at different span wise of the guide vanes is different. The enforced rotating nonuniform pressure distributions on the circumference lead to dynamic uniform forces on the impeller and guide vanes. The results show that the CFD simulations are capable to gain the complicated flow structure information for analysing the unstable characteristics of the pump mode at part load.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics and digital particle image velocimetry study of the flow through an optimized micro-axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Triep, Michael; Brücker, Christoph; Schröder, Wolfgang; Siess, Thorsten

    2006-05-01

    A detailed knowledge of the flow field in a blood pump is indispensable in order to increase the efficiency of the pump and to reduce the shear-induced hemolysis. Thus, three different impeller designs were developed and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The results show a good agreement of CFD and DPIV data. An optimization of the impeller could be achieved by following the concept of turbulent drag reduction for the axisymmetric center body. PMID:16683957

  6. Investigation of the hydraulic design for a high-performance centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, T.; Okihara, T.; Torii, D.

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the hydraulic design in terms of high efficiency and good cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps for water supplies. The subject of the investigation was the centrifugal pump, which consists of a suction bend, impeller, diffuser, and discharge volute. The investigation was basically conducted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with design of experiments (DOE) and an optimization technique. The suction bend design was implemented first to obtain a uniform flow at the impeller inlet to provide good cavitation performance. We investigated the sensitivity of each parameter value comprising the suction bend configuration for obtaining uniform flow using a parameter design technique with DOE and CFD analyses. The key parameters that enable a better flow field were estimated efficiently and the values of the parameters were adjusted to obtain the optimized configuration. On the other hand, to achieve high performance of the impeller and diffuser shape, the effect of the configuration parameter values on hydraulic loss was also examined using the parameter design based on CFD and a multi-objective optimization technique. The investigation for obtaining a shape achieving high hydraulic efficiency was made practical by taking into account the trade-off of performance characteristics, i.e., performance instability at a low flow rate and gradient of the head curve. When predicting hydraulic performance, it is important to investigate the interaction of flow between the impeller and diffuser to accurately simulate the flow field. The combined analysis of the impeller and diffuser, therefore, was implemented using unsteady flow simulation, and the results were applied to the parameter design using an optimization technique. Finally, the unsteady flow calculation of a complete pump was carried out to confirm the appropriateness of the hydraulic design. The hydraulic performance of the pump was also confirmed using a model pump test. As the result of these investigations, the hydraulic shape of a high-efficiency and high-cavitation centrifugal pump was developed.

  7. Numerical simulation and performance prediction in multi-stage submersible centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. J.; Li, G. D.; Wang, Y.; Cui, Y. R.; Yin, G.; Peng, S.

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the inner flow field of multi-stage submersible centrifugal pump, the model named QD3-60/4-1.1 was selected. Steady turbulence characteristics of impellers, diffusers and return channel were calculated by Fluent software, the SIMPLEC algorithm and RNG ?-? turbulence model with sliding mesh technology. Then, the distributions of pressure, velocity and Turbulence kinetic energy was obtained and the distributions of velocity field of a channel were analysed. The results show that the static pressure in impeller is increasing with the increasing of radius. The circumferential component of relative velocity is in the opposite direction of impeller rotating. At the same radius, the component value of pressure surface is larger than suction surface. With the increasing of flow rate, absolute velocity and relative velocity flow angle are becoming small, in opposite of the relative velocity and absolute velocity flow angle. The high turbulent zone of impeller is located in the gap of impellers and diffusers. Flow similarity and structure similarity of the multi-stage submersible pump are confirmed.

  8. Counter-rotating type pump-turbine unit cooperating with wind power unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tengen; Kanemoto, Toshiaki

    2013-02-01

    This serial research proposes the hybrid power system combined the wind power unit with the counter-rotating type pump-turbine unit, to provide the constant output for the grid system, even at the suddenly fluctuating/turbulent wind. In this paper, the tandem impellers of the counter-rotating type pumping unit was operated at the turbine mode, and the performances and the flow conditions were investigated numerically and experimentally. The 3-D turbulent flows in the runners were simulated at the steady state condition by using the commercial CFD code of ANSYS-CFX ver.12 with the SST turbulence model. While providing the pump unit for the turbine mode, the maximum hydraulic efficiency is close to one of the counter-rotating type hydroelectric unit designed exclusively for the turbine mode. Besides, the runner/impeller of the unit works evidently so as to coincide the angular momentum change through the front runners/impellers with that through the rear runners/impellers, namely to take the axial flow at not only the inlet but also the outlet without the guide vanes. These results show that this type of unit is effective to work at not only the pumping but also the turbine modes.

  9. The analysis of unsteady characteristics in the low specific speed centrifugal pump with drainage gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Chen, H. X.; Wei, Q.; Zhang, R.

    2012-11-01

    The gap drainage impeller is a new structure of impeller which is based on the idea of flow control, and it has been validated in experiments that this structure can increase the pump efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to explore a valid numerical analysis method for the simulation of low specific speed centrifugal pump, and then investigate the unsteady characteristics of the gap drainage impeller pump. The internal flow numerical simulations were done at multi-flow rates, and the calculated results were analyzed based on comparison with the experimental data of hydraulic performance, pressure pulsation and vibration acceleration. It was confirmed that: the results from the simulation tend to agree well with the experiments; the unsteady method is generally superior to the steady method in computing robustness and prediction accuracy at partial flow rates; the wall friction and clearance leakage should be considered in the performance prediction of the low specific centrifugal pump; the frequency spectra of pressure fluctuation is mainly controlled by the rotor-stator interaction, and the overall energy of pressure fluctuation and vibration is increased in part-load working conditions, especially at large flow rates; the pressure pulsation and the impeller radial fluid force are uneven in circumference, and they propagate in the opposite direction of the shaft rotating; however, the calculation error is considerable when comparing with experiments, and the reasons for which should be researched furthermore.

  10. Teflon lined process pumps save over $25,000/yr in acid regeneration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, L.; Gaines, A.

    1982-03-01

    Armco's Eastern Steel Division Works in Ashland, KY includes an acid regeneration plant that uses the spray/roaster process to recover hydrochloric acid and high purity iron oxides from spent pickling liquor. Two centrifugal pumps, one operating and one on standby, were used to pump the corrosive and erosive mixture at 175-200/sup 0/F to the spray nozzles in the roaster. The impeller, casing and other wetted parts were of an acid resistant exotic metal, but the pumps had a service life of only 2 to 3 months. The impellers had to be replaced after about six weeks because of wear that reduced the discharge pressure and impaired the performance of the spray nozzles. Maintaining the pumps and replacing them several times a year was extremely expensive, since each pump cost about $6000. A 3 X 1 1/2 X 8 1/2'' centrifugal pump specifically designed for severe corrosive service was installed on a trial basis in February 1980. The process pump is built to AVS standards and features a 3/16'' thick fluoropolymer liner molded in place to the ductile iron case, and a fully open faced ductile iron impeller encapsulated with fluoropolymer. The pumps have been available for a number of years with liners and impeller coverings of Du Pont's Teflon-FEP fluorocarbon, and the acid regenerating plant has been using them in various corrosive applications since the startup in 1972. The acid regeneration plant is very pleased with the trouble-free performance of the Teflon-FEP lined pumps. They are reliable, essentially maintenance free, and maintain the discharge pressures required for efficient operation of the spray nozzles.

  11. Method of analysis for compressible flow through mixed-flow centrifugal impellers of arbitrary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Ginsburg, Ambrose; Osborn, Walter M

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for analysis of the compressible flow between the hub and the shroud of mixed-flow impellers of arbitrary design. Axial symmetry was assumed, but the forces in the meridional (hub to shroud) plane, which are derived from tangential pressure gradients, were taken into account. The method was applied to an experimental mixed-flow impeller. The analysis of the flow in the meridional plane of the impeller showed that the rotational forces, the blade curvature, and the hub-shroud profile can introduce severe velocity gradients along the hub and the shroud surfaces. Choked flow at the impeller inlet as determined by the analysis was verified by experimental results.

  12. Forced response of a centrifugal compressor stage due to the impeller-diffuser interaction

    E-print Network

    Walton, Edward James

    2014-01-01

    The unsteady pressure field experienced by a centrifugal compressor stage can be dominated by of the impeller-diffuser interaction. The energy of the unsteady field, under certain aerodynamic and structural conditions, is ...

  13. Process Optimization of Seed Precipitation Tank with Multiple Impellers Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-Liang; Lv, Chao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ting-An

    2015-07-01

    The complex fluid flow in a large-scale tank stirred with multiple Ekato Intermig impellers used in the seed precipitation process was numerically analyzed by the computational fluid dynamics method. The flow field, liquid-solid mixing, and power consumption were simulated by adopting the Eulerian granular multiphase model and standard k- ? turbulence model. A steady multiple reference frame approach was used to represent impeller rotation. The simulated results showed that the five-stage multiple Intermig impeller coupled with sloped baffles could generate circulation loops in axial, which is good for solid uniform mixing. The fluid is overmixed under the current industrial condition. Compared with the current process conditions, a three-stage impeller with L/ D of 1.25 not only could meet the industrial requirements, but also more than 20% power could be saved. The results have important implications for reliable design and optimal performance for industry.

  14. The role of impeller outflow conditions on the performance and stability of airfoil vaned radial diffusers

    E-print Network

    Everitt, Jonathan (Jonathan Neil)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis quantifies the relative importance of the impeller outflow angle, Mach number, non-uniformity and unsteadiness on diffuser performance, through diffuser experiments in a compressor stage and in a swirling flow ...

  15. Analysis of flow along smooth side of disc impeller in a pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeva, E. M.

    2015-10-01

    We consider fluid flow in an axial gap around the smooth disc rotating in a closed cavity. According to the results of experiments on different working fluids in a wide range of operating modes for smooth discs, the formula is presented to determine the coefficient of fluid flow spin subject to a rate fluid flow from the periphery to the center. On the basis of the experimental data the empirical formula is obtained for the friction torque with respect to a rate fluid flow.

  16. Development of a Compact Maglev Centrifugal Blood Pump Enclosed in a Titanium Housing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    A compact centrifugal blood pump consisting of a controlled two-degrees-of-freedom radial magnetic bearing and a brushless DC motor enclosed in a titanium housing has been developed for use as an implantable ventricular assist device. The magnetic bearing also supports axial and angular motions of the impeller via a magnetic coupling. The top housing is made of pure titanium, while the impeller and the stator are coated with pure titanium and Ti-6Al-7Nb, respectively, to improve the biocompatibility of the pump. The combination of pure titanium and titanium alloy was chosen because of the sensitivity of eddy current type displacement sensors through the intervening conducting wall. The dimensions of the pump are 69.0 mm in diameter and 28.5 mm in height. During a pump performance test, axial shifting of the impeller due to hydraulic forces led to variations in the rotational positioning signal, causing loss of control of the rotational speed. This problem was solved by conditioning the rotational positioning signal. With a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 100 mmHg, the power consumption and efficiency of the pump were 5.5 W and 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the hemolysis of the blood pump was 43.6% lower when compared to that of a commercially available pump.

  17. Hemocompatibility of a hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Kosaka, Ryo; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kato, Takahisa; Sano, Takeshi; Okubo, Takeshi; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Shigeta, Osamu; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    A noncontact type centrifugal pump without any complicated control or sensing modules has been developed as a long-term implantable artificial heart. Centrifugal pumps with impellers levitated by original hydrodynamic bearings were designed and have been modified through numerical analyses and in vitro tests. The hemolysis level was reduced by changing the pressure distribution around the impeller and subsequently expanding the bearing gap. Thrombus formation in the bearing was examined with in vitro thrombogenesis tests and was reduced by changing the groove shapes to increase the bearing-gap flow to 3% of the external flow. Unnecessary vortices around the vanes were also eliminated by changing the number of vanes from four to six. PMID:17574508

  18. Anisotropic Flow and Viscous Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Li Yan

    2012-08-15

    We report part of our recent work on viscous hydrodynamics with consistent phase space distribution $f(x,\\p)$ for freeze out. We develop the gradient expansion formalism based on kinetic theory, and with the constraints from the comparison between hydrodynamics and kinetic theory, viscous corrections to $f(x,\\p)$ can be consistently determined order by order. Then with the obtained $f(x,\\p)$, second order viscous hydrodynamical calculations are carried out for elliptic flow $v_2$.

  19. Fluctuations in viscous fingering

    E-print Network

    Mitchell G. Moore; Anne Juel; John M. Burgess; W. D. McCormick; Harry L. Swinney

    2001-10-16

    Our experiments on viscous (Saffman-Taylor) fingering in Hele-Shaw channels reveal finger width fluctuations that were not observed in previous experiments, which had lower aspect ratios and higher capillary numbers Ca. These fluctuations intermittently narrow the finger from its expected width. The magnitude of these fluctuations is described by a power law, Ca^{-0.64}, which holds for all aspect ratios studied up to the onset of tip instabilities. Further, for large aspect ratios, the mean finger width exhibits a maximum as Ca is decreased instead of the predicted monotonic increase.

  20. Viscous Ricci Dark Energy

    E-print Network

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li

    2009-05-05

    We investigate the viscous Ricci dark energy (RDE) model by assuming that there is bulk viscosity in the linear barotropic fluid and the RDE. In the RDE model without bulk viscosity, the universe is younger than some old objects at some redshifts. Since the age of the universe should be longer than any objects in the universe, the RDE model suffers the age problem, especially when we consider the object APM 08279+5255 at $z=3.91$, whose age is $t = 2.1$ Gyr. In this letter, we find that once the viscosity is taken into account, this age problem is alleviated.

  1. Hydraulic performance of a low specific speed centrifugal pump with Spanwise-Slotted Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, D. X.; Li, H.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The hydraulic efficiency of a low specific speed centrifugal pump is low because of the long and narrow meridian flow passage, and the severe disk friction. Spanwise slotted blade flow control technology has been applied to the low specific speed centrifugal pump. This paper concluded that spanwise slotted blades can improve the pump performance in both experiments and simulations. In order to study the influence to the impeller and volute by spanwise slotted blade, impeller efficiency and volute efficiency were defined. The minimum volute efficiency and the maximum pump efficiency appear at the same time in the design flow condition in the unsteady simulation. The mechanism of spanwise slotted blade flow control technology should be researched furthermore.

  2. Development of a liquid hydrogen transfer pump system with MgB2 wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Kazuhiro; Kuga, Hirotsugu; Inoue, Takuro; Watanabe, Kazuki; Uchida, Yushi; Nakamura, Taketsune; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Hongo, Motoyuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Wakuda, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kazuhide

    An electric pump composed of an MgB2 motor is combined with superconducting level sensors using thin CuNi-sheathed MgB2 wires to transfer liquid hydrogen. An impeller is attached to the lower end of a rotating shaft on the MgB2 motor and covered with an outer casing to form a centrifugal pump. Then, the MgB2 motor and impeller are placed vertically inside a cryostat with an infill of liquid hydrogen. A glass Dewar vessel is prepared to receive the liquid hydrogen transferred from the cryostat containing the MgB2 motor. The MgB2 sensors are used not only to detect the level of liquid hydrogen but also to control the electric pump on the basis of their pre-estimated calibration curves. By using the assembled pump system, the liquid hydrogen is successfully transferred from the cryostat to the glass Dewar vessel via a transfer tube.

  3. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ? and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ? model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump.

  4. Numerical analysis of the flow field in the pump chamber of a centrifugal pump with back blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Y Luo, Y.; Liu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Black blade is frequently used as a non-contact seal structure in centrifugal pumps transporting solid-liquid two-phase flow. However, it will disturb the flow in the pump and affect the pump performance. Numerical simulation for 3D turbulence in whole flow passage of a centrifugal pump with back blades was carried out based on RANS method, with SST k-? turbulence model and SIMPLEC algorithm. Calculation for a similar pump without back blades was also carried out as a comparison. Boundary condition was improved due to the existence of back blade. The influence of back blades on the flow field was analysed qualitatively for three typical conditions. Meanwhile the leakage rate was calculated for several conditions and the effect of back blades was discussed. According to the results, compared with the condition without back blades, it could be seen that back blade apparently changed the flow state in the front chamber, improved near the front shroud and worsened near the pump cover. Velocity was increased and more fluid, which flowed into the front chamber from the pump cover side, flowed back to the spiral casing from the impeller shroud side. With the increase of discharge, the absolute value of leakage rate first went up and then dropped, as a consequence of the combination of two factors, discharge and differential pressure between the impeller outlet and inlet. The seal effect of back blades is most obvious under small discharge condition, and the leakage loss diminished as discharge increased.

  5. Development of an implantable centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A H; Pacella, J J; Trumble, D R; Clark, R E

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of centrifugal pumps for short-term (0-30 days) ventricular support has been widely reported and favorably compared with pulsatile systems. A small, durable, implantable centrifugal blood pump is being developed for medium-term use (up to 6 months). The pump is based on the Medtronic Hemadyne system that has existed in multiple forms over the past 30 years. The pump is approximately the size of a tennis ball, weighs 240 g, and is comprised of a 2.5 cm plastic impeller driven by a radially coupled brushless DC motor. In vitro hydraulic performance was recorded over a wide range of flow conditions on a mock circulatory loop. The pump generated 7 L/min flow against an afterload of 100 mmHg pressure, with a maximum power draw of 10.4 watts. Pulsatile flow was preserved when placed in conjunction with a simulated left ventricle. In vivo testing was performed in 10 healthy sheep for 10-292 hr. Heparin was used to facilitate cannulation, and no anticoagulation was administered after pump implantation. Blood chemistries reflecting hematologic, pulmonary, renal, and hepatic functions were recorded and demonstrated no adverse effects with normal pump operation. Complications were related to kinking of blood conduits and thrombus formation within the cannulae. These results are encouraging and warrant further studies to prove feasibility of this pump as a medium-term implantable ventricular assist device. PMID:1457882

  6. Cavitation improvement of double suction centrifugal pump HPP Fuhren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Titzschkau, M.; Pavlin, R.; Vehar, F.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    A double suction storage pump has been refurbished because of the strong cavitation which resulted in cavitation damage on blade and consequently in frequent repairs of the impeller. The analyses of the old and the new impeller were done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), performing transient simulations with the commercial solver Ansys CFX. In the simulations, the scale-adaptive-simulation with the curvature correction (SAS-CC) turbulence model was used. No model tests were carried out. Additionally, observations with the digital camera were made through the specially designed plexi-glass window, mounted at the lid at the suction side. The predicted pump head at the operating point agrees well with the pump characteristics measurements, performed with the direct thermodynamic method. The extent of the cavitation predicted by CFD is smaller than the observed one because the cloud cavitation was not predicted. The observations of the cavitation extent show that the impeller design is better than the old one, which was also possible to anticipate based on the CFD results.

  7. AIAA 20033498 Viscous Aerodynamic Shape

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    AIAA 2003­3498 Viscous Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Wings including Planform Variables Kasidit Aerodynamics Conference Orlando, Florida/June 23­26, 2003 For permission to copy or republish, contact­4344 #12;VISCOUS AERODYNAMIC SHAPE OPTIMIZATION OF WINGS INCLUDING PLANFORM VARIABLES Kasidit Leoviriyakit

  8. Measurement of SRS reactor recirculation pump performance using pump motor power

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    In order to accurately predict reactor hydraulic behavior during a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) the performance of reactor coolant pumps under off-design conditions must be understood. The LOCA of primary interest for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors involves the aspiration of air into the recirculated heavy water flow as reactor tank inventory is lost (system temperatures are too low to result in significant flashing of water coolant into steam). Entrained air causes degradation in the performance of the large recirculation pumps. The amount of degradation is a parameter used in computer codes which predict the course of the accident. This paper describes the analysis of data obtained during in-reactor simulated LOCA tests, and presents the head degradation curve for the SRS reactor recirculation pumps. The greatest challenge of the analysis was to determine a reasonable estimate of mixture density at the pump suction. Specially designed three-beam densitometers were used to determine mixture density. Since it was not feasible to place them in the most advantageous location the measured pump motor power, along with other techniques (pressure corrected gamma densitometer void fraction), were used to calculate the average mixture density at the pump impeller. These techniques provided good estimates of pump suction mixture density. Measurements from more conventional instruments were used to arrive at the value of pump two-component head over a wide range of flows. The results were significantly different from previous work with commercial reactor recirculation pumps.

  9. Hydraulic design and performance analysis of low specific speed centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Zhang, Y. X.; Ji, Z. L.; Chen, L.

    2012-11-01

    Since low specific speed centrifugal pump with long narrow flow divergent channels has positive slope of head-capacity characteristic curve, low flow rate instability and high flow rate power overload, special events about its hydraulic design are still under study. This paper demonstrates a method for hydraulic design of low specific speed centrifugal pump complex impeller (with splitter blades) which is based on 2D flow theory. In this method, obtain the basic geometry parameters by empirical correlation, adjust impeller profile according to given flow cross section area distribution and wrapping angles distribution, relate the position of splitter blades to slip factor. Based on this method, low specific speed centrifugal pump impellers have been designed using the same design parameters (Head, Capacity, Rotation Speed, etc) with different factors. And 3D turbulent flow fields in design pumps have been solved by using RANS equations with RNG k-epsilon turbulence model. The investigation to the effects of different splitter blades on velocity distributions and pressure distributions along the flow channels and hydraulic performance of centrifugal pumps are presented. The result shows that properly placed splitter blades by choosing suitable design factors will improve the flow in the pump and enhance the hydraulic performance of it.

  10. Flow Analysis of the Cleveland Clinic Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Golding, Leonard A. R.; Smith, William A.; Horvath, David; Medvedev, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    An implantable ventricular assist rotordynamic blood pump is being developed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in cooperation with the NASA Lewis Research Center. At the nominal design condition, the pump provides blood flow at the rate of 5 liters per minute at a pressure rise of 100 mm of mercury and a rotative speed of 3000 RPM. Bench testing of the centrifugal pump in a water/glycerin mixture has provided flow and pressure data at several rotative speeds. A one-dimensional empirical based pump flow analysis computer code developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used in the design process to simulate the flow in the primary centrifugal pump stage. The computer model was used to size key impeller and volute geometric parameters that influence pressure rise and flow. Input requirements to the computer model include a simple representation of the pump geometry. The model estimates the flow conditions at the design and at off-design operating conditions at the impeller leading and trailing edges and the volute inlet and exit. The output from the computer model is compared to flow and pressure data obtained from bench testing.

  11. Investigation of centrifugal pump performance under two-phase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Noghrehkar, G.R.; Kawaji, M.; Chan, A.M.C.; Nakamura, H.; Kukita, Y.

    1995-03-01

    A one-dimensional two-fluid model has been used to study the centrifugal pump head degradation phenomena and to analyze the gas-liquid interaction within the pump impeller under high pressure, steam-water two-phase flow conditions. The analytical model was used to predict the two-phase pump head data for the small-scale and full-scale nuclear reactor pumps and the predictions of the head degradation compared favorably with the test data for different suction void fractions. The physical mechanisms responsible for head degradation were also investigated.

  12. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  13. Skylab viscous damper study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The proposed magnetically anchored viscous fluid damper can maintain the Skylab in a gravity-gradient stabilized mode at the anticipated reboost altitudes. The parameters influencing damper performance (and thereby affecting the degree of risk) are: (1) amount of skylab pitch bias in the orbit plane which will result from aerodynamic trim conditions of the post-reboost configuration Skylab; (2) the lowest altitude to which the post-reboost Skylab will be allowed to decay prior to the next rendezvous; (3) maximum allowable weight and size of the proposed damper in order to match shuttle/TRS mission constraints; (4) the amount of magnetic materials expected to be in the vicinity of the damper.

  14. Catenaries in viscous fluid

    E-print Network

    Chakrabarti, Brato

    2015-01-01

    This work explores a simple model of a slender, flexible structure in a uniform flow, providing analytical solutions for the translating, axially flowing equilibria of strings subjected to a uniform body force and drag forces linear in the velocities. The classical catenaries are extended to a five-parameter family of curves. A sixth parameter affects the tension in the curves. Generic configurations are planar, represented by a single first order equation for the tangential angle. The effects of varying parameters on representative shapes, orbits in angle-curvature space, and stress distributions are shown. As limiting cases, the solutions include configurations corresponding to "lariat chains" and the towing, reeling, and sedimentation of flexible cables in a highly viscous fluid. Regions of parameter space corresponding to infinitely long, semi-infinite, and finite length curves are delineated. Almost all curves subtend an angle less than $\\pi$ radians, but curious special cases with doubled or infinite ra...

  15. Design considerations of volute geometry of a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng Kong; Wong, Yew Wah; Hu, Wei

    2005-12-01

    This article compares two different design techniques that are conventionally used in the design of volutes for centrifugal pumps. The imbalanced forces due to the geometry of the volute need to be taken into consideration especially in centrifugal blood pumps with magnetically suspended impeller. A reduction of these forces can reduce the instability of the impeller motion as well as the power needed to counteract its influence. Volutes using the constant angular momentum (CAM) and the constant mean velocity (CMV) methods were developed and modeled numerically. The computational results on the effect of volute geometry on the performance of a centrifugal blood pump impeller for six different volutes are presented here. For volutes designed using the CAM method, model B (volute expansion angle of 3 degrees ) had the lowest radial force of 0.26 N while the pressure head generated was 12,900 Pa. For volutes designed using the CMV method, model F (1.6 m/s) had the lowest imbalanced force of 0.45 N. However, the pressure developed by this pump was also one of the lowest at 10,652 Pa. Furthermore, when the peak scalar stresses and the mean exposure time of particles for all designs were determined using Lagrangian particle tracking method, it was observed that in general, the peak scalar stresses in CAM designed volutes are lower than those designed using CMV method. The mean exposure time of particles in the pump ranged from 400 to 500 ms. The simulation results showed that the volute designed using CAM method was superior to that of a CMV volute in terms of the magnitude of the radial force and the peak scalar stresses for the same pressure head generated. Results show that the design of volutes for blood pumps should go beyond conventional empirical methods to obtain optimal results. PMID:16305649

  16. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are efficient, easy to service

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    A series of self-priming centrifugal pumps was awarded Top Honors in the process pump category of the 1982 Chemical Processing Vaaler competition because the judges were favorably impressed by the high operating efficiency over a wide range of flow conditions, and the easy-to-service design that reduces overall operating costs. The self-priming pumps also offer certain advantages over conventional vertical or submerged pumps in wet pit service. Features for up to 75% operating efficiency include a unique hydraulic design to eliminate the need for close tolerances, a smooth-walled volute casing to minimize friction loss and drag, and a multi-vane open impeller that will handle solids up to 1 1/4'' in diameter. The pump can handle varying loads with very little loss of efficiency.

  17. Investigation of the washout effect in a magnetically driven axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Triep, Michael; Brücker, Christoph; Kerkhoffs, Wolfgang; Schumacher, Oliver; Marseille, Oliver

    2008-10-01

    For a long-term implementation of the magnetically driven CircuLite blood pump system, it is extremely important to be able to ensure a minimum washout flow in order to avoid dangerous stagnation regions in the gap between the impeller and the motor casing as well as near the pivot-axle area at the holes in the impeller's hub. In general, stagnation zones are prone to thrombus formation. Here, the optimal impeller/motor gap width will be determined and the washout flow for different working conditions will be quantitatively calculated. The driving force for this secondary flow is mainly the strong pressure difference between both ends of the gap. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) will be used for this analysis. PMID:18959666

  18. Time-resolved particle imaging velocimetry for the investigation of rotating stall in a radial pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, N.; Zähringer, K.; Pap, E.

    2005-08-01

    The operating range of turbomachines is limited in terms of the low flow rate by instabilities appearing in flow-leading parts of the machinery resulting in the creation of vortices. If the flow is further throttled, stall cells can start to propagate in the impeller at a fraction of the rotor speed. This article presents an investigation of rotating stall at different flow rates in a radial pump using time-resolved particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). This technique was used to investigate the flow field at the same position in every channel of the impeller during several revolutions. Frequency analysis was applied to the measured velocities to calculate the angular speed of the rotating stall in the impeller. The interest of time-resolved PIV to understand rotating stall is demonstrated, as it allows measurement of transient, irregularly appearing flow fields.

  19. Numerical investigation of unsteady turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump at partial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Baoshan, Z.; ShuLiang, C.; Yuchuan, W.; Xuhe, W.

    2014-03-01

    The unsteady non-cavitation and cavitation turbulent flows in a centrifugal pump at partial load condition are numerically investigated by CFX 13.0. The numerical framework employs the combination of RNG k-? turbulence model and transport equation cavitation model, in which the effects of compressibility of fluid on cavitation region and pressure fluctuation on saturation pressure are both taken into consideration. The good agreement between the numerical and experimental values validates that the numerical framework can accurately predict the turbulent flows in the centrifugal pump. The complex flow characteristics in impeller at non-cavitation and cavitation conditions are revealed. For the noncavitation flow, the dominant frequencies of pressure fluctuation of monitoring points in impeller are all the Impeller Rotation Frequency 24.17Hz. The maximum value of pressure fluctuation on the blade pressure side appears at the 0.8 chord length from the blade leading edge due to a clockwise rotating vortex, which incepts, develops and disappears when the corresponding blade passes through the volute tongue. The dominant frequencies of pressure fluctuation of monitoring points in volute are the Blade Pass Frequency 145 Hz or twice of it. The maximum value of pressure fluctuation in the volute appears near the tongue region, where the flow fields are uneven with strong second flow in the cross section. For the cavitation flow, as the cavitation develops at the blade leading edge, the turbulent flows in the impeller are greatly influenced by the bubble shedding and collapse. The maximum values of pressure fluctuation in impeller increase with the development of cavitation, and reach the largest magnification of about 2.0 in comparison to the non-cavitation flow when the pressure at the pump inlet is very low. The complicated phenomenon of unsteady turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump indicates that the vortex has great influence on the flow pattern.

  20. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  1. Alloy 20 centrifugal pumps corrosion-free with sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.; Ormond, D.L.

    1986-09-01

    General Battery Corporation manufactures an extensive line of lead-acid batteries for trucks, automobiles, motorcycles, electric-powered vehicles and lighting systems in eight eastern, mid-western and west coast plants. The plant in Hamburg, PA, which produces the most diversified line of batteries, was storing 66/sup 0/ Baume sulfuric acid in tanks located 30' overhead. The concentrated acid flows by gravity to four cutting tanks for dilution with pure water to reduce the specific gravity (sp gr). The dilute 1.100-1.400 sp gr sulfuric acid was being transferred from the cutting tanks to production lines, or to recycle storage tanks, by three centrifugal pumps. The three pumps required frequent, costly maintenance or replacement, usually because of corroded casings and impellers. A fourth pump was kept as a reserve unit to replace one that failed. A more reliable pump was badly needed, especially since future plant expansions and changes in the acid handling system would require additional pumps. Centrifugal pumps from various vendors were investigated for corrosion resistance, performance and projected maintenance requirements. An ANSI standard dimension process pump with rugged casing and impeller of corrosion resistant alloy 20 was elected for the acid-test, replacing one of the three pumps in dilute acid distribution service. The nine alloy 29, ANSI standard centrifugal pumps significantly reduced acid transfer costs by eliminating the need to replace corroded components. The same pump is being considered for acid service in other General Battery plants as a result of the reliable performance and minimal maintenance requirements.

  2. Development of a locally mass flux conservative computer code for calculating 3-D viscous flow in turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.

    1982-01-01

    The VANS successive approximation numerical method was extended to the computation of three dimensional, viscous, transonic flows in turbomachines. A cross-sectional computer code, which conserves mass flux at each point of the cross-sectional surface of computation was developed. In the VANS numerical method, the cross-sectional computation follows a blade-to-blade calculation. Numerical calculations were made for an axial annular turbine cascade and a transonic, centrifugal impeller with splitter vanes. The subsonic turbine cascade computation was generated in blade-to-blade surface to evaluate the accuracy of the blade-to-blade mode of marching. Calculated blade pressures at the hub, mid, and tip radii of the cascade agreed with corresponding measurements. The transonic impeller computation was conducted to test the newly developed locally mass flux conservative cross-sectional computer code. Both blade-to-blade and cross sectional modes of calculation were implemented for this problem. A triplet point shock structure was computed in the inducer region of the impeller. In addition, time-averaged shroud static pressures generally agreed with measured shroud pressures. It is concluded that the blade-to-blade computation produces a useful engineering flow field in regions of subsonic relative flow; and cross-sectional computation, with a locally mass flux conservative continuity equation, is required to compute the shock waves in regions of supersonic relative flow.

  3. Inducer analysis/pump model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.

    1994-03-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design information in a productive manner. The main goal of this study was to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes an extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving zonal interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. In the present study, three key components of the turbopump, the inducer, impeller, and diffuser, were investigated by the proposed pump model, and the numerical results were benchmarked by the experimental data provided by Rocketdyne. For the numerical calculation of inducer flows with tip clearance, the turbulence model and grid spacing are very important. Meanwhile, the development of the cross-stream secondary flow, generated by curved blade passage and the flow through tip leakage, has a strong effect on the inducer flow. Hence, the prediction of the inducer performance critically depends on whether the numerical scheme of the pump model can simulate the secondary flow pattern accurately or not. The impeller and diffuser, however, are dominated by pressure-driven flows such that the effects of turbulence model and grid spacing (except near leading and trailing edges of blades) are less sensitive. The present CFD pump model has been proved to be an efficient and robust analytical tool for pump design due to its very compact numerical structure (requiring small memory), fast turnaround computing time, and versatility for different geometries.

  4. Inducer analysis/pump model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.

    1994-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design information in a productive manner. The main goal of this study was to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes an extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving zonal interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. In the present study, three key components of the turbopump, the inducer, impeller, and diffuser, were investigated by the proposed pump model, and the numerical results were benchmarked by the experimental data provided by Rocketdyne. For the numerical calculation of inducer flows with tip clearance, the turbulence model and grid spacing are very important. Meanwhile, the development of the cross-stream secondary flow, generated by curved blade passage and the flow through tip leakage, has a strong effect on the inducer flow. Hence, the prediction of the inducer performance critically depends on whether the numerical scheme of the pump model can simulate the secondary flow pattern accurately or not. The impeller and diffuser, however, are dominated by pressure-driven flows such that the effects of turbulence model and grid spacing (except near leading and trailing edges of blades) are less sensitive. The present CFD pump model has been proved to be an efficient and robust analytical tool for pump design due to its very compact numerical structure (requiring small memory), fast turnaround computing time, and versatility for different geometries.

  5. Effect of NACA Injection Impeller on Mixture Distribution of Double-Row Radial Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Frank E; Ritter, William K; Miller, Mahlon A

    1945-01-01

    The NACA injection impeller was developed to improve the mixture distribution of aircraft engines by discharging the fuel from a centrifugal supercharger impeller and thus to promote a thorough mixing of fuel and charge air. Experiments with a double-row radial aircraft engine indicated that for the normal range of engine power the NACA injection impeller provided marked improvement in mixture distribution over the standard spray-bar injection system used in the same engine. The mixture distribution at cruising conditions was excellent; at 1200, 1500, and 1700 brake horsepower, the differences between the fuel-air ratios of the richest and the leanest cylinders were reduced to approximately one-third their former values.

  6. Counter-rotating type axial flow pump unit in turbine mode for micro grid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, R.; Takano, G.; Murakami, T.; Kanemoto, T.; Komaki, K.

    2012-11-01

    Traditional type pumped storage system contributes to adjust the electric power unbalance between day and night, in general. This serial research proposes the hybrid power system combined the wind power unit with the pump-turbine unit, to provide the constant output for the grid system, even at the suddenly fluctuating/turbulent wind. In the pumping mode, the pump should operate unsteadily at not only the normal but also the partial discharge. The operation may be unstable in the rising portion of the head characteristics at the lower discharge, and/or bring the cavitation at the low suction head. To simultaneously overcome both weak points, the authors have proposed a superior pump unit that is composed of counter-rotating type impellers and a peculiar motor with double rotational armatures. This paper discusses the operation at the turbine mode of the above unit. It is concluded with the numerical simulations that this type unit can be also operated acceptably at the turbine mode, because the unit works so as to coincide the angular momentum change through the front runners/impellers with that thorough the rear runners/impellers, namely to take the axial flow at not only the inlet but also the outlet without the guide vanes.

  7. Influence of blade outlet angle on performance of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Wang, Canfei; Zhu, Zuchao; Jin, Yingzi

    2013-04-01

    In order to analyze the influence of blade outlet angle on inner flow field and performance of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, the flow field in the pump with different blade outlet angles 32.5° and 39° was numerically calculated. The external performance experiment was also carried out on the pump. Based on SIMPLEC algorithm, time-average N-S equation and the rectified k-? turbulent model were adopted during the process of computation. The distributions of velocity and pressure in pumps with different blade outlet angles were obtained by calculation. The numerical results show that backflow areas exist in the two impellers, while the inner flow has a little improvement in the impeller with larger blade outlet angle. Blade outlet angle has a certain influence on the static pressure near the long-blade leading edge and tongue, but it has little influence on the distribution of static pressure in the passages of impeller. The experiment results show that the low-specific-speed centrifugal pump with larger blade outlet angle has better hydraulic performance.

  8. Numerical investigation of the effects of splitter blades on the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Yuan, S. Q.; Zhang, J. F.; Feng, Y. N.; Lu, J. X.

    2014-03-01

    For the centrifugal pump, additional splitter blades are sometimes necessary in order to improve the head and efficiency. On the other hand, the additional splitter blades will have effect on the cavitation performance due to the changes at the impeller inlet channel. In order to investigate this influence, three impeller schemes were proposed based on a model pump IS50-32-160, one without splitter blades and another two with splitter blades of different inlet diameters. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the characteristics of internal flow and the pump cavitation performances at different NPSHA with the CFD technique. The results show that the additional splitter blades will have some positive effect on the pump cavitation performance if the inlet diameter of the splitter blade is properly selected. The reason behind such improvement is that it helps to avoid the flow blocking at the impeller inlet and the vortex cavitation inside the blade passages effectively. For the pump model under our investigation, the cavitation performance reaches its best when the inlet diameter of the splitter blade is 0.725D2.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics of gap flow in a biocentrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Song, Guoliang; Yu, Simon Ching Man; Lim, Tau Meng

    2005-08-01

    The centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller has shown its superiority as compared to other artificial heart pumps. However, there is still insufficient understanding of fluid mechanics related issues in the clearance gap. The design nature of the pump requires sufficient washout in the clearance between the impeller and the stationary pump housing inner surface. In this study, numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the flow fields in the gap of the Kyoto-NTN centrifugal blood pump. The flow patterns in the gap region of the blood pump were presented and regions of high and low velocity were identified. It was found that the radial velocity of the blood in the gap was closely related to the pressure distribution at the exit of the impeller, both the highest pressure gradient and the highest radial velocity in the gap occurred at an angular position of 170 degrees . The mass flow rate in the gap was estimated to be 25.2% of the pump outflow, which is close to the measurement results of a five times enlarged test pump. The wall shear stresses on the gap surface were found to be over 21 Pa and below 300 Pa, which is correspondingly higher than the threshold of thrombi formation and is lower than the shearing threshold of red blood cells. Comparison of the 1 : 1 simulation model with the measurement results on a five times enlarged test pump indicates that there are some differences in the resulting radial velocity distributions in the gap and thus the washout mechanism. Two symmetrical high washout regions at both the cutwater and splitter plate were observed in the simulation instead of a single washout region at the splitter plate found in the experimental study. This may be due to the scaling effect of the enlarged test pump; also the medium used in the experiment is different from the simulation. PMID:16048478

  10. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation. PMID:10886073

  11. Current status of the gyro centrifugal blood pump--development of the permanently implantable centrifugal blood pump as a biventricular assist device (NEDO project).

    PubMed

    Nosé, Yukihiko; Furukawa, Kojiro

    2004-10-01

    The New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) project was started in 1995. The goal is the development of a multipurpose, totally implantable biventricular assist device (BVAD) that can be used for any patient who suffers from severe heart failure. Our C1E3 (two-week pump) centrifugal pump, called the Gyro pump, has three design characteristics: a magnetic coupling and double pivot bearing system, an eccentric inlet port, and secondary vanes on the bottom of the impeller. The pump was miniaturized. The C1E3 evolved into the NEDO PI-601, a totally implantable centrifugal pump for BVAD. The current NEDO PI-710 pump (five-year pump) system includes a centrifugal pump with pivot bearings, a hydraulically-levitated impeller, an rpm-controlled miniaturized actuator (all-in-one actuator plus controller), an emergency clamp on the left outflow, and a Frank-Starling-type flow control. The final mass production model is now finalized, and the final animal study and two-year endurance studies are ongoing. PMID:15385004

  12. Unilateral contact induced blade/casing vibratory interactions in impellers: Analysis for rigid casings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batailly, Alain; Meingast, Markus; Legrand, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    This contribution addresses the vibratory analysis of unilateral-contact induced structural interactions between a bladed impeller and its surrounding rigid casing. Such assemblies can be found in helicopter or small aircraft engines for instance and the interactions of interest shall arise due to the always tighter operating clearances between the rotating and stationary components. The investigation is conducted by extending to cyclically symmetric structures an in-house time-marching based tool dedicated to unilateral contact occurrences in turbomachines. The main components of the considered impeller together with the associated assumptions and modelling principles considered in this work are detailed. Typical dynamical features of cyclically symmetric structures, such as the aliasing effect and frequency clustering are explored in this nonlinear framework by means of thorough frequency-domain analyses and harmonic trackings of the numerically predicted impeller displacements. Additional contact maps highlight the existence of critical rotational velocities at which displacements potentially reach high amplitudes due to the synchronization of the bladed assembly vibratory pattern with the shape of the rigid casing. The proposed numerical investigations are also compared to a simpler and (almost) empirical criterion: it is suggested, based on nonlinear numerical simulations with a linear reduced order model of the impeller and a rigid casing, that this criterion may miss important critical velocities emanating from the unfavorable combination of aliasing and contact-induced higher harmonics in the vibratory response of the impeller. Overall, this work suggests a way to enhance guidelines to improve the design of impellers in the context of nonlinear and nonsmooth dynamics.

  13. Catenaries in viscous fluid

    E-print Network

    Brato Chakrabarti; J. A. Hanna

    2016-01-04

    This work explores a simple model of a slender, flexible structure in a uniform flow, providing analytical solutions for the translating, axially flowing equilibria of strings subjected to a uniform body force and drag forces linear in the velocities. The classical catenaries are extended to a five-parameter family of curves. A sixth parameter affects the tension in the curves. Generic configurations are planar, represented by a single first order equation for the tangential angle. The effects of varying parameters on representative shapes, orbits in angle-curvature space, and stress distributions are shown. As limiting cases, the solutions include configurations corresponding to "lariat chains" and the towing, reeling, and sedimentation of flexible cables in a highly viscous fluid. Regions of parameter space corresponding to infinitely long, semi-infinite, and finite length curves are delineated. Almost all curves subtend an angle less than $\\pi$ radians, but curious special cases with doubled or infinite range occur on the borders between regions. Separate transitions in the tension behavior, and counterintuitive results regarding finite towing tensions for infinitely long cables, are presented. Several physically inspired boundary value problems are solved and discussed.

  14. Incompressible Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-13

    NACHOS2 is a finite element program designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, incompressible viscous fluid flow problems. The basic flows considered may be isothermal, nonisothermal, or may involve other physical processes, such as mass transport. Both steady and transient flows may be analyzed. The class of problems treated are those described by the two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) incompressible form of the Navier-Stokes equations. An energy transport equation is included in the formulation for problems inmore »which heat transfer effects are important. Two auxiliary transport equations can be added to describe other physical processes,e.g. mass transfer, chemical reactions. Among the specific types of flow problems treated are: isothermal flow; forced, free, or mixed convection; conjugate heat transfer; flow in saturated porous media with or without heat transfer; and inelastic, non-Newtonian flows with or without heat transfer. Other problem classes are possible depending on the specific definitions applied to the auxiliary transport equations.« less

  15. Catenaries in viscous fluid

    E-print Network

    Brato Chakrabarti; J. A. Hanna

    2015-09-03

    This work explores a simple model of a slender, flexible structure in a uniform flow, providing analytical solutions for the translating, axially flowing equilibria of strings subjected to a uniform body force and drag forces linear in the velocities. The classical catenaries are extended to a five-parameter family of curves. A sixth parameter affects the tension in the curves. Generic configurations are planar, represented by a single first order equation for the tangential angle. The effects of varying parameters on representative shapes, orbits in angle-curvature space, and stress distributions are shown. As limiting cases, the solutions include configurations corresponding to "lariat chains" and the towing, reeling, and sedimentation of flexible cables in a highly viscous fluid. Regions of parameter space corresponding to infinitely long, semi-infinite, and finite length curves are delineated. Almost all curves subtend an angle less than $\\pi$ radians, but curious special cases with doubled or infinite range occur on the borders between regions. Separate transitions in the tension behavior, and counterintuitive results regarding finite towing tensions for infinitely long cables, are presented. Several physically inspired boundary value problems are solved and discussed.

  16. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. Impact of Impellers on the Axisymmetric Magnetic Mode in the VKS2 Dynamo Experiment R. Laguerre,1,2

    E-print Network

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    not occur with stainless steel impellers, using the same available power. The purpose of this LetterImpact of Impellers on the Axisymmetric Magnetic Mode in the VKS2 Dynamo Experiment R. Laguerre,1 2006, the observed magnetic field showed a strong axisymmetric component, implying that nonaxisymmetric

  18. A theoretical study of fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a vaned diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Acosta, Allan J.; Yoshida, Yoshiki

    1989-01-01

    The fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a vaned diffuser are analyzed on the assumption that the number of impeller and diffuser vanes is so large that the flows are perfectly guided by the vanes. The flow is taken to be two dimensional, inviscid, and incompressible, but the effects of impeller and diffuser losses are taken into account. It is shown that the interaction with the vaned diffuser may cause destabilizing fluid forces. From these discussions, it is found that the whirling forces are closely related to the steady head-capacity characteristics of the impeller. This physical understanding of the whirling forces can be applied also to the cases with volute casings. At partial capacities, it is shown that the impeller forces change greatly when the flow rate and whirl velocity are near to the impeller or vaned diffuser attributed rotating stall onset capacity, and the stall propagation velocity, respectively. In such cases the impeller forces may become destabilizing for impeller whirl.

  19. Investigation of the jet-wake flow of a highly loaded centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckardt, D.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations, aimed at developing a better understanding of the complex flow field in high performance centrifugal compressors were performed. Newly developed measuring techniques for unsteady static and total pressures as well as flow directions, and a digital data analysis system for fluctuating signals were thoroughly tested. The loss-affected mixing process of the distorted impeller discharge flow was investigated in detail, in the absolute and relative system, at impeller tip speeds up to 380 m/s. A theoretical analysis proved good coincidence of the test results with the DEAN-SENOO theory, which was extended to compressible flows.

  20. Reactor internal pump behavior during cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Komita, Hideo; Usuki, Shouji; Fukuda, Shinichi )

    1989-11-01

    The characteristics of reactor internal pumps (RIPs) under cavitation conditions were experimentally evaluated in full scale with different water temperature parameters. The hydraulic performance and vibration behavior under cavitation conditions were clarified. An advanced boiling water reactor is equipped with RIPs for coolant recirculation. The RIP is a vertical, single-stage, mixed-flow pump that is mounted in the annular downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. In general, when a pump operates under cavitation conditions, the pump total head decreases, and the appearance and collapse of vapor bubbles induce vibration and noise, causing damage to components. Various reports have been made on centrifugal pump behavior in cold water, but very few have discussed the characteristics of a mixed-flow pump like the RIP in hot water. Very few have measured impeller vibration in hot water, which is significantly influenced by cavitation. Therefore, it is difficult to precisely determine RIP behavior under cavitation conditions. Hydraulic performance and vibration behavior under cavitation conditions are experimentally clarified in this paper.

  1. Development of a miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Outa, E; Ogino, S; Otake, Y; Shiozaki, H; Fujimoto, T; Tagusari, O; Kitamura, M

    1993-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as a totally implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). This pump consists of an impeller combined with a guide-vane, a tube housing, and a DC motor. The pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged to the ascending aorta. Our newly developed axial flow pump system has the following advantages: 1) it is a simple and compact system, 2) minimal blood stasis both in the device and the LV cavity, 3) minimal blood contacting surface of the pump, 4) easy accessibility with a less invasive surgical procedure, and 5) low cost. A pump flow > 5 L/min was obtained against 100 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. The pump could produce a passive pulsatile flow effect with a beating heart more efficiently than other non-pulsatile pumps because of minimal pressure drop and inertia along the bypass tract. Anatomic fit studies using dissected hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cadavers showed that this pump could smoothly pass through the aortic valve without any interference with mitral valve function. Recently, a dynamic pressure groove bearing and a miniature lip seal have been developed. The dynamic pressure groove bearing has a simple structure and acts as a pressure resistant sealing mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8268533

  2. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  3. Oxygen pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Special considerations to be given to the design, fabrication, and use of centrifugal pumps for liquid O2 to avoid conditions that lead to system failure are given. Emphasis was placed on turbine pumps for flight applications.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation in a Centrifugal Pump at Low Flow Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lei; Cao, Shu-Liang; Wang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Bao-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Based on the full cavitation model which adopts homogeneous flow supposition and considering the compressibility effect on cavitation flow to modify the re-normalization group k-in turbulence model by the density function, a computational model is developed to simulate cavitation flow of a centrifugal pump at low flow rate. The Navier-Stokes equation is solved with the SIMPLEC algorithm. The calculated curves of net positive suction head available (NPSHa) HNPSHa agree well with the experimental data. The critical point of cavitation in centrifugal pump can be predicted precisely, and the NPSH critical values derived from simulation are consistent with the experimental data. Thus the veracity and reliability of this computational model are verified. Based on the result of numerical simulation, the distribution of vapor volume fraction in the impeller and pressure at the impeller inlet are analyzed. Cavities first appear on the suction side of the blade head near the front shroud. A large number of cavities block the impeller channels, which leads to the sudden drop of head at the cavitation critical point. With the reduction of NPSHa, the distribution of pressure at the impeller inlet is more uniform.

  5. Nature's pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven

    1994-10-01

    Although diverse in both form and function, the fluid-forcing devices in organisms have many of the capabilities and limitations of pumps of human design. Nature's pumps certainly look quite different from those of our technology, but all of them perform the same task. The author examines a few of these with an eye toward technological parallels and the two functional classes -- positive-displacement pumps and fluid-dynamic pumps.

  6. Fluid dynamic design for low hemolysis in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support as a bridge to decision pump. The impeller is levitated using hydrodynamic bearings without any complicated control circuit or displacement sensor. However, the effect of the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area on the hemolytic property has not been clarified, even if the bearing gap is same size. The purpose of this study is to experimentally evaluate the effect of the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area in the bearing gaps on the hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We prepared three models for testing. These models have the same bearing gap size by adjusting the impeller levitation position. However, the outer circumferential velocity of the impeller and the bearing area in the minimum bearing gaps are different. The outer circumferential velocity of the impeller and the bearing area were assumed to be related to the maximum shear rate and the exposure time. For the evaluation, we conducted an impeller levitation performance test and an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) was reduced from 0.084 g/100 L to 0.040 g/100 L corresponding to a reduction in the outer circumferential velocity and a reduction in the bearing area, even if the minimum bearing gaps were same size. We confirmed that, even if the bearing gap was same size under the stably levitated condition, the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area should be decreased in order to improve the hemolytic property. PMID:24110292

  7. Aerodynamic stiffness of an unbound eccentric whirling centrifugal impeller with an infinite number of blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Branagan, L. A.; Kocur, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    An unbounded eccentric centrifugal impeller with an infinite number of log spiral blades undergoing synchronous whirling in an incompressible fluid is considered. The forces acting on it due to coriolis forces, centripetal forces, changes in linear momentum, changes in pressure due to rotating and changes in pressure due to changes in linear momentum are evaluated.

  8. 32 Scientific American, January 2014 Photograph by Tktk Tktk Unconscious impulses and desires impel

    E-print Network

    Bargh, John A.

    scientists who study the mind. Sigmund Freud's massive body of work emphasized the conscious as the locus many of our atti- tudes toward others. Sigmund Freud meditated on the mean- ing of the unconscious and desires impel what we think and do in ways Freud never dreamed of By John A. Bargh psychology Unconscious

  9. Comparing the performances of circular ponds with different impellers by CFD simulation and microalgae culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chen; Huang, Jianke; Ye, Chunyu; Cheng, Wenchao; Chen, Jianpei; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics of circular ponds with three different impellers (hydrofoil, four-pitched-blade turbine, and grid plate). The reliability of the CFD model was validated by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Hydrodynamic analyses were conducted to evaluate the average velocity magnitude along the light direction (Uz), turbulence properties, average shear stress, pressure loss and the volume percentage of dead zone inside circular ponds. The simulation results showed that Uz value of hydrofoil was 58.9, 40.3, and 28.8% higher than those of grid plate with single arm, grid plate with double arms and four-pitched blade turbines in small-scale circular ponds, respectively. In addition, hydrofoil impeller with down-flow operation had outstanding mixing characteristics. Lastly, the results of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation experiments indicated that the biomass concentration of hydrofoil impeller with down-flow operation was 65.2 and 88.8% higher than those of grid plate with double arms and four-pitched-blade turbine, respectively. Therefore, the optimal circular pond mixing system for microalgae cultivation involved a hydrofoil impeller with down-flow operation. PMID:25680396

  10. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  11. Computation of stress distribution in a mixed flow pump based on fluid-structure interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F. F.; Chen, T.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The internal flow evolution of the pump was induced with impeller movement. In various conditions, the peak load on centrifugal blade under the change of rotational speed or flow rate was also changed. It would cause an error when inertia load with a safety coefficient (that was difficult to ascertain) was applied in structure design. In order to accurately analyze the impeller stress under various conditions and improve the reliability of pump, based on a mixed flow pump model, the stress distribution characteristic was analyzed under different flow rates and rotational speeds. Based on a three-dimensional calculation model including impeller, guide blade, inlet and outlet, the three-dimension incompressible turbulence flow in the centrifugal pump was simulated by using the standard k-epsilon turbulence model. Based on the sequentially coupled simulation approach, a three-dimensional finite element model of impeller was established, and the fluid-structure interaction method of the blade load transfer was discussed. The blades pressure from flow simulation, together with inertia force acting on the blade, was used as the blade loading on solid surface. The Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to calculate the stress distribution of the blade respectively under inertia load, or fluid load, or combined load. The results showed that the blade stress changed with flow rate and rotational speed. In all cases, the maximum stress on the blade appeared on the pressure side near the hub, and the maximum static stress increased with the decreasing of the flow rate and the increasing of rotational speed. There was a big difference on the static stress when inertia load, fluid load and combined loads was applied respectively. In order to more accurately calculate the stress distribution, the structure analysis should be conducted due to combined loads. The results could provide basis for the stress analysis and structure optimization of pump.

  12. Numerical analysis of the inner flow field of a biocentrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Song, Guoliang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2006-06-01

    Implantable ventricular assist devices have been regarded as a promising instrument in the clinical treatment of patients with severe heart failures. In this article, a three-dimensional model of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump was generated and a computational fluid dynamics solution of the inner flow field of the pump including the static pressure distributions, velocity profiles, and the shear stress distributions of the blood was presented. The results revealed that reverse flow generally occurred in the impeller blade channels during the operation of the pump, due to the imbalance of the flow and the pressure gradient generated in the blade channels. The flow pattern at the exit of the blade channels was varying with its angular positions in the pump. The reverse flow at the exit of the impeller blade channels was found to be closely related with the static pressure distribution in the volute passage. Higher pressure in the volute caused severe backflow from the volute into the blade channels. To clarify the effects of a moving impeller on the blood, shear stresses of the blood in the pump were investigated according to the simulation results. The studies indicated that at the beginning of the splitter plate and the cutwater, the highest shear stress exceeded 700 Pa. At other regions such as the inlet and outlet of the impeller blade channels and some regions in the volute passage, shear stresses were found to be about 200 Pa. These areas are believed to have a high possibility of rendering blood trauma. PMID:16734599

  13. Centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices with low priming and ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Fonseca, Jeison; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    A new model of centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices has been developed and evaluated. The design of the device is based on centrifugal pumping principles and the usage of ceramic bearings, resulting in a pump with reduced priming (35 ± 2 mL) that can be applied for up to 30 days. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is an efficient tool to optimize flow path geometry, maximize hydraulic performance, and minimize shear stress, consequently decreasing hemolysis. Initial studies were conducted by analyzing flow behavior with different impellers, aiming to determine the best impeller design. After CFD studies, rapid prototyping technology was used for production of pump prototypes with three different impellers. In vitro experiments were performed with those prototypes, using a mock loop system composed of Tygon tubes, oxygenator, digital flow meter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control, filled with a solution (1/3 water, 1/3 glycerin, 1/3 alcohol) simulating blood viscosity and density. Flow-versus-pressure curves were obtained for rotational speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. As the next step, the CFD analysis and hydrodynamic performance results will be compared with the results of flow visualization studies and hemolysis tests. PMID:24219168

  14. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD. PMID:24237361

  15. Unsteady flow characteristic of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump under different flow-rate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Chen, Desheng; Xu, Wenjing; Jin, Yingzi; Zhu, Zuchao

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the unsteady flow characteristics in centrifugal pump, the flow field in a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump with complex impeller is numerically simulated under different conditions. The RNG ?-? turbulence model and sliding mesh are adopted during the process of computation. The results show that the interaction between impeller and volute results in the unstable flow of the fluid, which causes the uneven distribution of pressure fluctuations around the circumference of volute. Besides the main frequency and its multiple frequency of pressure fluctuations in the centrifugal pump, the frequency caused by the long blades of complex impeller also plays a dominant role in the low-frequency areas. Furthermore, there exists biggish fluctuation phenomenon near the tongue. The composition of static pressure fluctuations frequency on the volute wall and blade outlet is similar except that the fluctuation amplitude near the volute wall reduces. In general, the different flow rates mainly have influence on the amplitude of fluctuation frequency in the pump, while have little effect on the frequency composition.

  16. Laboratory slurry erosion tests and pump wear rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Tuzson, J.J.

    1984-06-01

    From order-of-magnitude calculations, the erosion mechanism in slurry pumps for mining applications was found to be a scouring type. Impact erosion was found to be unlikely to occur. The erosion model assumes a ''sliding bed'' type of flow pattern and neglects the effect of turbulent diffusion of slurry particles. This choice was based on flow regime data from slurry pipeline flow and was not verified experimentally in pumps. A new centrifugal-erosion laboratory testing fixture was designed and fabricated at Allis-Chalmers which reproduces this type of erosion. Since flow conditions were closely controlled, an absolute rate of erosion could be determined. For mild steel (Rockwell C = 10) and aluminum oxide particles, a specific erosion energy of 1.5 X 10/sup 8/ in-lb/in/sup 3/ (1000 joules/mm/sup 3/) was measured. Flow pattern and slurry concentrations were calculated in a pump impeller using a quasi-three-dimensional streamline curvature method. These were combined with the above erosion model and the local erosion rate was estimated. Actual operating data had to be estimated for a quarry application of the pump because field test data was not available. The uncertainties of the field test data did not allow an exact numerical verification of the wear rate calculation, but order of magnitude agreement was obtained. The wear rate distribution agreed very well with the wear pattern observed on the impeller used in the quarry and the locations of excessive wear could be identified.

  17. Use minimum flow data to prolong centrifugal pump life

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Environmental and safety concerns and, in the US, the consequences of failing of meet EPA regulations are intensifying efforts to improve the reliability of pumping equipment. A critical step toward achieving this goal is eliminating cavitation, and the resulting impeller and shaft vibrations, which, ultimately, cause seal and bearing failure. In centrifugal pumps, cavitation results when they run at very low flow rates, as can happen during unplanned upsets or interruptions. This particularly true since many centrifugal pumps are now controlled by automatic valves in their discharge lines. The problem can be prevented by providing a small bypass line to the pump`s suction source, to control temperature rise in the pump. Usually, the minimum flow is so low that the bypass loop can be kept open without detracting from the pump`s efficiency. It needn`t require a flow control valve or any special instrumentation, but will let the pump run at a comfortable flow, even with the control valve closed. This paper describes a method to determine minimum thermal flow to prevent cavitation.

  18. Gyro-effect stabilizes unstable permanent maglev centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi

    2007-03-01

    According to Earnshaw's Theorem (1839), the passive maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium and thus an extra coil is needed to make the rotor electrically levitated in a heart pump. The author had developed a permanent maglev centrifugal pump utilizing only passive magnetic bearings, to keep the advantages but to avoid the disadvantages of the electric maglev pumps. The equilibrium stability was achieved by use of so-called "gyro-effect": a rotating body with certain high speed can maintain its rotation stably. This pump consisted of a rotor (driven magnets and an impeller), and a stator with motor coil and pump housing. Two passive magnetic bearings between rotor and stator were devised to counteract the attractive force between the motor coil iron core and the rotor driven magnets. Bench testing with saline demonstrated a levitated rotor under preconditions of higher than 3,250 rpm rotation and more than 1 l/min pumping flow. Rotor levitation was demonstrated by 4 Hall sensors on the stator, with evidence of reduced maximal eccentric distance from 0.15 mm to 0.07 mm. The maximal rotor vibration amplitude was 0.06 mm in a gap of 0.15 mm between rotor and stator. It concluded that Gyro-effect can help passive maglev bearings to achieve stabilization of permanent maglev pump; and that high flow rate indicates good hydraulic property of the pump, which helps also the stability of passive maglev pump. PMID:17380386

  19. 241-SY-101 mixer pump lifetime expectancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1995-12-08

    The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-726, Rev. 0 241-SY-101 Mixer Pump Lifetime Expectancy is to determine a best estimate of the mean lifetime of non-repairable (located in the waste) essential features of the hydrogen mitigation mixer pump presently installed in 101-SY. The estimated mean lifetime is 9.1 years. This report does not demonstrate operation of the entire pump assembly within the Tank Farm ``safety envelope``. It was recognized by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) this test pump was not specifically designed for long term service in tank 101-SY. In June 95 the DNFSB visited Hanford and ask the question, ``how long will this test pump last and how will the essential features fail?`` During the 2 day meeting with the DNFSB it was discussed and defined within the meeting just exactly what essential features of the pump must operate. These essential features would allow the pump to operate for the purpose of extending the window for replacement. Operating with only essential features would definitely be outside the operating safety envelope and would require a waiver. There are three essential features: 1. The pump itself (i.e. the impeller and motor) must operate 2. Nozzles and discharges leg must remain unplugged 3. The pump can be re-aimed, new waste targeted, even if manually.

  20. Experimental study and numerical simulation of the solid-phase particles' influence on outside characteristics of slurry pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. W.; Zhao, J.; Zou, W. J.; Hu, S. G.

    2012-11-01

    At present solid-liquid two-phase flow pump faces two big problems: the low efficiency, the short life, then the concentration of the conveyed solid-phase media are the important factors which affect the outside characteristics about this two phase flow pump. This article presents the outside characteristics' experimental research and internal flow field's simulation analysis on AH type slurry pump which is product by Shijiazhuang Shi- Jiang pump industry, discusses the flow rule in the impeller, and summaries the influence of the solid phased particles' concentration on the performance of the slurry pump's outside characteristics. At last, the rationality and accuracy of the numerical calculation method are verified through the way of comparing numerical simulation with experimental results in this two phase flow pump. And the relation between slurry pump's outside characteristics and granule concentration is summarized, which provided theoretical guidance for the slurry pump's optimization design and selection.

  1. CFD applications in pump flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Liang; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed paper is to develop a computational procedure that solves incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for pump flows. The solution method is based on the pseudo-compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. As a benchmark problem, the flow through the Rocketdyne inducer is numerically simulated. A coarse grid solution is obtained with a single zone by using an algebraic turbulence model. In multi-zone fine grid computation, a one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model is utilized. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and a good agreement is found between the two. The resulting computer code is then applied to the flow analysis inside a two-stage fuel pump impeller operating at 80 percent, 100 percent, and 120 percent of design flow.

  2. Effect of the NACA Injection Impeller on the Mixture Distribution of a Double-row Radial Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Frank E.; Ritter, William K.; Miller, Mahlon A.

    1946-01-01

    For the normal range of engine power the impeller provided marked improvement over the standard spray-bar injection system. Mixture distribution at cruising was excellent, maximum cylinder temperatures were reduced about 30 degrees F, and general temperature distribution was improved. The uniform mixture distribution restored the normal response of cylinder temperature to mixture enrichment and it reduced the possibility of carburetor icing, while no serious loss in supercharger pressure rise resulted from injection of fuel near the impeller outlet. The injection impeller also furnished a convenient means of adding water to the charge mixture for internal cooling.

  3. Splitter-bladed centrifugal compressor impeller designed for automotive gas turbine application. [at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pampreen, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical design and fabrication of two splitter-bladed centrifugal compressor impellers were completed for rig testing at NASA Lewis Research Center. These impellers were designed for automotive gas turbine application. The mechanical design was based on NASA specifications for blade-shape and flowpath configurations. The contractor made engineering drawings and performed calculations for mass and center-of-gravity, for stress and vibration analyses, and for shaft critical speed analysis. One impeller was machined to print; the other had a blade height and exit radius of 2.54 mm larger than print dimensions.

  4. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational speed to obtain average blood flow and pressure, compared with the reference pump. PMID:24251773

  5. Fjords in viscous fingering: Selection of width and opening angle

    E-print Network

    Leif Ristroph; Matthew Thrasher; Mark B. Mineev-Weinstein; Harry L. Swinney

    2006-08-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths 1/2 lambda_c, where lambda_c is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0 degrees plus or minus 1.0 degree. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  6. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Ristroph, Leif; Thrasher, Matthew; Swinney, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  7. Numerical analysis of head degrade law under cavitation condition of contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the flow-head characteristic curve, the SST turbulence model, homogeneous multiphase model and Rayleigh-Plesset equation were applied to simulate the cavitation characteristics in contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump under different conditions based on ANSYS CFX software. The distribution of cavity, pressure coefficient of the blade at the design point under different cavitation conditions were obtained. The analysis results of flow field show that the vapour volume distribution on the impeller indicates that the vapour first appears at the leading edge of blade and then extends to the outlet of impeller with the reduction of Net Positive Suction Head Allowance (NPSHA). The present study illustrates that the main reason for the decline of the pump performance is the development of cavitation, and the simulation can truly reflect the cavitation performance of the contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump.

  8. Influence of bearing support structures on shaft vibration of large hydraulic pump/turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Pistner, C.A.; Greenplate, B.S.; Waddell, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Start-up transient loads from pump/turbine impellers can cause excessive vibration problems in the shaft system. If the radial guide bearing supports are structurally soft or loose, or if the bearings are worn, the resulting radial shaft movement causes abnormal wear. The wear normally occurs at the impeller sealing surfaces, main shaft seals, motor/generator components, piping, brackets, foundation connections, etc. This paper explores the critical factors causing shaft system vibration problems at the Tennessee Valley Authority`s Raccoon Mountain Pumped Storage Plant, as well as the unique modifications which were implemented to strengthen and improve the units. The solution involved extensive three-dimensional finite element structural and thermal transient analyses of the original and re-designed turbine shoe bearing, bearing housings, and support structures. The conclusion compares the calculated and measured shaft system response to transient loads of the original and modified system.

  9. Viscous sintering of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, F. B.; Scheu, B.; Vasseur, J.; Tuffen, H.; von Aulock, F. W.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K. U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic ash is often deposited in a hot state. Volcanic ash containing glass, deposited above the glass transition interval, has the potential to sinter viscously both to itself (particle-particle) and to exposed surfaces. Here, we constrain the kinetics of this process experimentally under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions using standard glasses and volcanic ash. In the absence of external load, this process is dominantly driven by surface relaxation. In such cases the sintering process is rate-limited by the melt viscosity, the size of the particles and the melt-vapour interfacial tension. We propose a polydisperse continuum model that describes the transition from a packing of particles to a dense pore-free melt and evaluate its efficacy in describing the kinetics of volcanic viscous sintering. We apply our model to viscous sintering scenarios for cooling crystal-poor rhyolitic ash using the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano as a case example. We predict that moderate cooling rates result in the common observation of incomplete sintering and the preservation of pore networks. Finally we discuss the effect of crystallisation, external loading and volatile degassing or regassing during viscous sintering and assert that such complexities must be considered in the volcanic scenario.

  10. Discrete Viscous Sheets Christopher Batty

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    - ple yet consistent model for viscous forces. We incorporate nonlin- ear surface tension forces with three key features: first, we model surface tension effects with a force that seeks to minimize surface that combine both the fluidity of liquids, and the buckling and wrinkling instabilities of thin materials

  11. Suppression of secondary flows in a double suction centrifugal pump with different loading distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, H. F.; Wang, F. J.; Zhang, Z. C.; Yao, Z. F.; Zhou, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary flow is one of the main reasons for low efficiency in double suction centrifugal pump. In a 3-D inverse design method, the pump blade could be designed by a specified loading distribution to control the flow field in pump. In order to study the influence of loading distribution on secondary flow of a double suction centrifugal pump, the external characteristics and the internal flow field of the pump with three kinds of loading distributions are analysed by using CFD approach. According to the simulation results, it is found that the form of fore-loading distribution at shroud and aft-loading distribution at hub could improve the optimal efficiency and broaden the high efficiency area of the pump. Furthermore, the secondary flow in impeller exit region and volute could be significantly suppressed if the slope of loading distribution curve of shroud is set to be -0.7.

  12. Heart Pump Design for Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Through a Lewis CommTech Program project with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the NASA Lewis Research Center is playing a key role in the design and development of a permanently implantable, artificial heart pump assist device. Known as the Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS), this device will take on the pumping role of the damaged left ventricle of the heart. The key part of the IVAS is a nonpulsatile (continuous flow) artificial heart pump with centrifugal impeller blades, driven by an electric motor. Lewis is part of an industry and academia team, led by the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), that is working with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation to make IVAS a reality. This device has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives each year, since 80 percent of heart attack victims suffer irreversible damage to the left ventricle, the part of the heart that does most of the pumping. Impeller blade design codes and flow-modeling analytical codes will be used in the project. These codes were developed at Lewis for the aerospace industry but will be applicable to the IVAS design project. The analytical codes, which currently simulate the flow through the compressor and pump systems, will be used to simulate the flow within the blood pump in the artificial heart assist device. The Interdisciplinary Technology Office heads up Lewis' efforts in the IVAS project. With the aid of numerical modeling, the blood pump will address many design issues, including some fluid-dynamic design considerations that are unique to the properties of blood. Some of the issues that will be addressed in the design process include hemolysis, deposition, recirculation, pump efficiency, rotor thrust balance, and bearing lubrication. Optimum pumping system performance will be achieved by modeling all the interactions between the pump components. The interactions can be multidisciplinary and, therefore, are influenced not only by the fluid dynamics of adjacent components but also by thermal and structural effects. Lewis-developed flow-modeling codes to be used in the pump simulations will include a one-dimensional code and an incompressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow code. These codes will analyze the prototype pump designed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. With an improved understanding of the flow phenomena within the prototype pump, design changes to improve the performance of the pump system can be verified by computer prior to fabrication in order to reduce risks. The use of Lewis flow modeling codes during the design and development process will improve pump system performance and reduce the number of prototypes built in the development phase. The first phase of the IVAS project is to fully develop the prototype in a laboratory environment that uses a water/glycerin mixture as the surrogate fluid to simulate blood. A later phase of the project will include testing in animals for final validation. Lewis will be involved in the IVAS project for 3 to 5 years.

  13. Cavitation performance improvement of high specific speed mixed-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Sun, Y. B.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation performance improvement of large hydraulic machinery such as pump and turbine has been a hot topic for decades. During the design process of the pumps, in order to minimize size, weight and cost centrifugal and mixed-flow pump impellers are required to operate at the highest possible rotational speed. The rotational speed is limited by the phenomenon of cavitation. The hydraulic model of high-speed mixed-flow pump with large flow rate and high pumping head, which was designed based on the traditional method, always involves poor cavitation performance. In this paper, on the basis of the same hydraulic design parameters, two hydraulic models of high-speed mixed-flow pump were designed by using different methods, in order to investigate the cavitation and hydraulic performance of the two models, the method of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was adopted for internal flow simulation of the high specific speed mixed-flow pump. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the influences of impeller parameters and three-dimensional configuration on pressure distribution of the blades' suction surfaces were analyzed. The numerical simulation results shows a better pressure distribution and lower pressure drop around the leading edge of the improved model. The research results could provide references to the design and optimization of the anti-cavitation blade.

  14. Performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, T.; Fukutomi, J.; Kaji, K.; Wada, T.

    2012-11-01

    Mini centrifugal pumps having a diameter smaller than 100mm are employed in many fields. But the design method for the mini centrifugal pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machines is not clarified and conventional theory is not suitable for small-sized pumps. Therefore, mini centrifugal pumps with simple structure were investigated by this research. Splitter blades were adopted in this research to improve the performance and the internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump which had large blade outlet angle. The original impeller without the splitter blades and the impeller with the splitter blades were prepared for an experiment. The performance tests are conducted with these rotors in order to investigate the effect of the splitter blades on performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump. On the other hand, a three dimensional steady numerical flow analysis is conducted with the commercial code (ANSYS-CFX) to investigate the internal flow condition in detail. It is clarified from the experimental results that the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is improved by the effect of the splitter blades. The blade-to-blade low velocity regions are suppressed in the case with the splitter blades and the total pressure loss regions are decreased. The effects of the splitter blades on the performance and the internal flow condition are discussed in this paper.

  15. Transitions in viscous withdrawal Wendy W. Zhang

    E-print Network

    Gardel, Margaret

    Transitions in viscous withdrawal Wendy W. Zhang Physics & James Franck Institute University / viscous entrainment Cohen PRE `04, Zhang PRL `04, Case & Nagel PRL `07, Blanchette & Zhang `08... 2, Girard & Le Bars `02, Schmidt & Zhang `08... 3. Viscous drainage Chaieb `04, Courrech du Pont & Eggers

  16. Fluorescent image tracking velocimetry of the Nimbus AxiPump.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, J P; Shaffer, F D; Maher, T R; Dennis, T J; Borovetz, H S; Antaki, J F

    1993-01-01

    High shear rates and extended residence times causing hemolysis and platelet activation can develop in an assist pump or cannula when inferior flow conditions exist. The high volume output of a miniature axial flow pump presents challenges in avoiding these adverse conditions. To assess the hemodynamics within the continuous flow Nimbus Axi-Pump, vector flow fields inside a translucent inflow cannula and a modified 12 mm AxiPump were mapped. Fluorescent image tracking velocimetry was used to track the motion of neutrally buoyant fluorescent particles (30 microns) using pulsed laser light, high resolution video cameras, and computer image analysis. An acrylic pump housing and cannula were integrated into a mock circulatory loop filled with a Newtonian, optically clear blood analog fluid. The flow parameters were controlled to yield known, physiologic loading conditions, including varying degrees of pulsatility. Cannula flow visualization results exhibited critical recirculation patterns at the bend. These results will be used to further optimize the design of the inflow. Particle impact was seen at the pump inlet in the inducer region of the rotor. Very good attachment of flow from the rotor to stator was observed when the pump operated at normal operating speeds. Intermittent regurgitant flow fields were evident in the presence of increased pulsatility and low pump speed. These results have lead to improvements in impeller design and speed control criteria to avoid potential deleterious flows. PMID:8268616

  17. Design and performance of family of diffusing scrolls with mixed-flow impeller and vaneless diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W Byron; Bradshaw, Guy R

    1949-01-01

    A family of diffusing scrolls was designed for use with a mixed-flow impeller and a small-diameter vaneless diffuser. The design theory, intended to maintain a uniform pressure around the scroll inlet, permits determination of the position of scroll cross sections of preassigned area by considering the radial variation in fluid density and the effects of friction along the scroll. Inasmuch as the design method leaves the cross-sectional shape undetermined, the effect of certain variations in scroll shape was investigated by studying scrolls having angles of divergence (of the scroll walls downstream of the entrance section) of 24 degrees, 40 degrees, and 80 degrees. A second 80 degree scroll was of asymmetrical construction and a third was plaster-cast instead of sand-cast. Each scroll was tested as a compressor component at actual impeller tip speeds of 700 to 1300 feet per second from full throttle to surge.

  18. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG ?-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  19. Two-phase flow centrifugal pump performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisely, Eugene Andras

    The performance of centrifugal pumps subjected to a liquid-gas-mixture flow is a significant concern to manufacturers and to some users such as Chemical, Nuclear Power Plants, and Gas-Oil Industries. Particularly in the nuclear power industry, the prediction of performance degradation under the two-phase flow conditions occurring in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is a significant part of the overall analysis of that accident. In this experimental work, the pressure distribution was measured in a rotating, partially shrouded, open, radial impeller and volute under a wide range of air-water two-phase flow conditions. To obtain these pressure measurements, small-diameter pressure-tap holes were drilled through the casing of the radial pump. High speed photography was used to determine the flow regime of the air-water mixture through the vane and in the volute. An analytical model was developed to predict the radial pump single- and two-phase flow pressure distribution. This distribution was compared with the test data for different suction void fractions. The physical mechanism responsible for pump performance degradation was also investigated.

  20. Small centrifugal pumps for low-thrust rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furst, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Six small, low specific speed centrifugal pump configurations were designed, fabricated, and tested. The configurations included shrouded, and 25 and 100% admission open face impellers with 2 inch tip diameters; 25, 50, and 100% emission vaned diffusers; and volutes with conical exits. Impeller tip widths varied from 0.030 inch to 0.052 inch. Design specific speeds (N sub s = RPM*GPM**0.5.FT**0.75) were 430 (four configurations) and 215 (two configurations). The six configurations were tested with water as the pumped fluid. Noncavitating performance results are presented for the design speed of 24,500 rpm over a flowrate range from 1 to 6 gpm for the N sub s = 430 configurations and test speeds up to 29,000 rpm over a flowrate range from 0.3 to 1.2 gpm for the N sub s = 215 configurations. Cavitating performance results are presented over a flowrate range from 60 to 120% of design flow. Fabrication of the small pump conponents is also discussed.

  1. Experimental Impeller Fragmentation of Iliocaval Thrombosis Under Tulip Filter Protection: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Vorwerk, Dierk; Schuermann, Karl; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of catheter fragmentation of massive caval thrombosis and of filter protection against procedure-related pulmonary embolism. Methods: In 10 sheep, a self-expanding tulip-shaped filter made from Wallstent mesh (diameter 25 mm) was introduced from the right jugular approach into the proximal inferior vena cava. Experimentally induced massive iliocaval thrombosis was fragmented by an impeller catheter (expanded diameter 14 mm), which was advanced coaxially through the sheath of the expanded filter. Post-procedural cavography and pulmonary angiography were performed to document the extent of caval recanalization and pulmonary embolism. Results: In all cases, impeller fragmentation cleared the inferior vena cava and the iliac veins of thrombi completely. Fragments washed downstream were trapped in the filter. In two of the first cases, parts of the clots caused pulmonary embolism before the filter was in place. Further events were avoided by a modification of the experimental setup. Except for some small peripheral perfusion defects in two cases, pulmonary angiograms did not show any incidence of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that impeller fragmentation of iliocaval thrombi under tulip filter protection is effective and does not cause significant pulmonary embolism.

  2. Sugarcane bagasse enzymatic hydrolysis: rheological data as criteria for impeller selection.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leonardo Tupi Caldas; Pereira, Lucas Tupi Caldas; Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; Bon, Elba Pinto da Silva; Freitas, Suely Pereira

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to select an efficient impeller to be used in a stirred reactor for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse. All experiments utilized 100 g (dry weight)/l of steam-pretreated bagasse, which is utilized in Brazil for cattle feed. The process was studied with respect to the rheological behavior of the biomass hydrolysate and the enzymatic conversion of the bagasse polysaccharides. These parameters were applied to model the power required for an impeller to operate at pilot scale (100 l) using empirical correlations according to Nagata [16]. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out using a blend of cellulases, ?-glucosidase, and xylanases produced in our laboratory by Trichoderma reesei RUT C30 and Aspergillus awamori. Hydrolyses were performed with an enzyme load of 10 FPU/g (dry weight) of bagasse over 36 h with periodic sampling for the measurement of viscosity and the concentration of glucose and reducing sugars. The mixture presented pseudoplastic behavior. This rheological model allowed for a performance comparison to be made between flat-blade disk (Rushton turbine) and pitched-blade (45°) impellers. The simulation showed that the pitched blade consumed tenfold less energy than the flat-blade disk turbine. The resulting sugar syrups contained 22 g/l of glucose, which corresponded to 45% cellulose conversion. PMID:20844924

  3. Velocity measurements downstream of the impellers in a multistage centrifugal blower

    SciTech Connect

    Arnulfi, G.L.; Pinamonti, P.; Micheli, D.

    1995-10-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on a four-stage centrifugal blower, having the aim of obtaining an accurate description of the flow field behind the impellers in several operative conditions and for different geometric configurations. Actually, the test plant allows one to change the turbomachinery characteristics assembling one, two, three, or four stages and three different types of diffuser. In this first research step, the blower has been tested in the four-stage vaneless diffuser configuration. The unsteady flow field behind the impellers and in the diffusers has been measured by means of a hot-wire anemometer. A phase-locked ensemble-averaging technique has been utilized to obtain the relative flow field from the instantaneous signals for the stationary hot-wire probes. Several detailed measurement sets have been performed using both single and crossed hot-wire probes, to obtain the velocity vectors and turbulence trends, just behind the blower impellers and in several radial positions of the vaneless diffusers. These measurements have been done at different flow rate conditions, covering unsteady flow rate phenomena (rotating stall) also. The results obtained allowed the authors to get a detailed flow field analysis in the multistage centrifugal blower, in relation to the geometric configuration and to the differing operating conditions.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of viscous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E.; Hiller, W. J.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear viscous droplet oscillations are analysed by solving the Navier-Stokes equation for an incompressible fluid. The method is based on mode expansions with modified solutions of the corresponding linear problem. A system of ordinary differential equations, including all nonlinear and viscous terms, is obtained by an extended application of the variational principle of Gauss to the underlying hydrodynamic equations. Results presented are in a very good agreement with experimental data up to oscillation amplitudes of 80% of the unperturbed droplet radius. Large-amplitude oscillations are also in a good agreement with the predictions of Lundgren & Mansour (boundary integral method) and Basaran (Galerkin-finite element method). The results show that viscosity has a large effect on mode coupling phenomena and that, in contradiction to the linear approach, the resonant mode interactions remain for asymptotically diminishing amplitudes of the fundamental mode.

  5. Particle stress and viscous compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, D.; Kytoemaa, H.K.

    1994-12-31

    This study describes the transition between the quasi-static and the viscous regimes of shearing of thin layers of spheres in a viscous fluid at high solid loadings. Experiments were conducted in a Couette-type shear cell in two complementary modes: (a) constant particle normal stress, variable solid fraction and (b) constant solid fraction, variable particle normal stress. In steady shearing under the constraint of constant solid fraction, transition from a strain rate independent stress to a linearly dependent on was found to occur with a local minimum in the stresses with respect to strain rage; correspondingly, the solid fraction assumed a maximum with respect to strain rate under conditions of constant normal stress. At sufficiently high strain rates, the mixture exhibited a linear Newtonian-like scaling between strain rate and both shear and normal stresses. These measurements of normal stress are the first since those of Bagnold (1954).

  6. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump. PMID:22040356

  7. Self-Oscillations (Surging) of a Single-Stage Centrifugal Pump in the Cavitation Regime and Their Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2013-07-01

    The self-oscillations (surging) of a single-stage centrifugal pump working in a hydraulic system in the cavitation regime before the stall of the water feed were investigated. The character of change in these oscillations with change in the value of the acoustic capacitance positioned at the input of the pump was determined. The damping of the indicated self-oscillations with the use of an acoustic liquid damper connected to the hydraulic system was investigated. The impossibility of realization of a model of cavitation self-oscillations for a single-stage impeller pump was substantiated.

  8. Preliminary validation of a new magnetic wireless blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Hashi, Shuichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    In general, a blood pump must be small, have a simple configuration, and have sufficient hydrodynamic performance. Herein, we introduce new mechanisms for a wireless blood pump that is small and simple and provides wireless and battery-free operation. To achieve wireless and battery-free operation, we implement magnetic torque and force control methods that use two external drivers: an external coil and a permanent magnet with a DC-motor, respectively. Power harvesting can be used to drive an electronic circuit for wireless monitoring (the observation of the pump conditions and temperature) without the use of an internal battery. The power harvesting will be used as a power source to drive other electronic devices, such as various biosensors with their driving circuits. To have both a compact size and sufficient pumping capability, the fully magnetic impeller has five stages and each stage includes four backward-curved blades. The pump has total and inner volumes of 20 and 9.8?cc, respectively, and weighs 52?g. The pump produces a flow rate of approximately 8?L/min at 80?mm?Hg and the power generator produces 0.3?W of electrical power at 120??. The pump also produces a minimum flow rate of 1.5?L/min and a pressure of 30?mm?Hg for circulation at a maximum distance of 7.5?cm. PMID:23634711

  9. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA)

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  10. Slurry pumping: Pump performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Taccani, R.; Pediroda, V.; Reini, M.; Giadrossi, A.

    2000-07-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being used increasingly for transportation of slurries through pipelines. To design a slurry handling system it is essential to have a knowledge of the effects of suspended solids on the pump performance. A new test loop has been realized in the laboratory of the Energetics Department of the University of Trieste which allows pump performance to be determined at various pump speeds, with many different mixture concentrations and rheologies. The pump test rig consists of 150 mm diameter pipe with facilities for measuring suction and discharge pressure, flowrate, pump input power and speed, slurry density and temperature. In particular flowrate is measured by diverting flow into a weighing tank and timing a specified volume of slurry. An automatic PC based data acquisition system has been implemented. Preliminary tests with clear water show that performance can be measured with good repeatability and accuracy. The new test rig is used to verify the range of validity of the correlations to predict pump performance, available in literature and of that proposed by authors. This correlation, based on a Neural Network and not on a predefined analytical expression, can be easily improved with new experimental data.

  11. Reduced-order modeling for rotating rotor-bearing systems with cracked impellers using three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Li, Bing; He, Zhengjia

    2015-10-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method is presented in this paper for dynamics analysis of rotating impeller-shaft-bearing assembly with cracked impellers. Based on three-dimensional finite element model, the complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate an efficient reduced-order model (ROM) for studying the effects of crack on the global vibration of the rotating assembly. First, a modeling framework for impeller-shaft-bearing systems in rotating frame is presented. Rotational effects, including Coriolis matrix and centrifugal softening, have been taken into account. Then, the governing equation of motion of the damped gyroscopic system is reduced by the complex CMS method. Finally, the obtained ROM is employed to study the effects of crack on assembly's vibration. During the steady-state response analysis, external excitations on the impeller due to rotor-stator interactions have been taken into account, which was however neglected in previous investigations on rotordynamics. Numerical results show that the lower-order eigenvalues and the unbalance response of the assembly are not sensitive to the local crack on impeller. Nevertheless, the flexible coupling between impeller and shaft becomes more complex when the air flow-induced excitations are considered. Under EO1 traveling wave excitations, a crack leads to slight changes in the assembly's response. In contrast, the effect of crack becomes significant when the assembly is excited by EO2 and higher EO excitations. Moreover, the nonlinear crack breathing effects affect the assembly's response obviously. Finally, a potential technique for detecting the crack on impeller during operation is discussed.

  12. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Arnold D. (Alameda, CA)

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  13. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.W.; Bonin, J.H.; Daniel, A.D.

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas. 9 figs.

  14. Pivot wear of a centrifugal blood pump developed for circulatory assist.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Nonaka, Katsunobu; Miyoshi, Hisashi; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Kosaka, Ryo; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a monopivot centrifugal pump for circulatory assist for a period of more than 2 weeks. The impeller is supported by a pivot bearing at one end and by a passive magnetic bearing at the other. The pivot undergoes concentrated exposure to the phenomena of wear, hemolysis, and thrombus formation. The pivot durability, especially regarding the combination of male/female pivot radii, was examined through rotating wear tests and animal tests. As a result, combinations of similar radii for the male/female pivots were found to provide improved pump durability. In the extreme case, the no-gap combination would result in no thrombus formation. PMID:19184290

  15. Application of energy gradient theory in flow instability in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, H. S.; Jiang, W.

    2013-12-01

    The flow instability in a centrifugal pump is studied using the energy gradient theory. Since the Re is high, the base flow is assumed to be turbulent. The distribution of the energy gradient function K at various flow rates is obtained from numerical simulations. According to the energy gradient method, the area with larger value of K is the place to cause instability and to be of high turbulence intensity. The results show that instability is easier to be excited in the area of impeller outlet and volute tongue. In order to improve the stability of centrifugal pumps working under low flow rate condition, carefulness must be taken in these two key areas.

  16. Optimal hydraulic design of new-type shaft tubular pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. G.; Zhang, R. T.; Zhou, J. R.

    2012-11-01

    Based on the characteristics of large flow rate, low-head, short annual operation time and high reliability of city flood-control pumping stations, a new-type shaft tubular pumping system featuring shaft suction box, siphon-type discharge passage with vacuum breaker as cutoff device was put forward, which possesses such advantages as simpler structure, reliable cutoff and higher energy performance. According to the design parameters of a city flood control pumping station, a numerical computation model was set up including shaft-type suction box, siphon-type discharge passage, pump impeller and guide vanes. By using commercial CFD software Fluent, RNG ?-epsilon turbulence model was adopted to close the three-dimensional time-averaged incompressible N-S equations. After completing optimal hydraulic design of shaft-type suction box, and keeping the parameters of total length, maximum width and outlet section unchanged, siphon-type discharge passages of three hump locations and three hump heights were designed and numerical analysis on the 9 hydraulic design schemes of pumping system were proceeded. The computational results show that the changing of hump locations and hump heights directly affects the internal flow patterns of discharge passages and hydraulic performances of the system, and when hump is located 3.66D from the inlet section and hump height is about 0.65D (D is the diameter of pump impeller), the new-type shaft tubular pumping system achieves better energy performances. A pumping system model test of the optimal designed scheme was carried out. The result shows that the highest pumping system efficiency reaches 75.96%, and when at design head of 1.15m the flow rate and system efficiency were 0.304m3/s and 63.10%, respectively. Thus, the validity of optimal design method was verified by the model test, and a solid foundation was laid for the application and extension of the new-type shaft tubular pumping system.

  17. Computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    1989-01-01

    Incompressible Navier-Stokes solution methods and their applications to three-dimensional flows are discussed. A brief review of existing methods is given followed by a detailed description of recent progress on development of three-dimensional generalized flow solvers. Emphasis is placed on primitive variable formulations which are most promising and flexible for general three-dimensional computations of viscous incompressible flows. Both steady- and unsteady-solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Finally, examples of real world applications of these flow solvers are given.

  18. Development of an explicit multigrid algorithm for quasi-three-dimensional viscous flows in turbo-machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    A rapid quasi three-dimensional analysis was developed for blade-to-blade flows in turbomachinery. The analysis solves the unsteady Euler or thin layer Navier-Stokes equations in a body-fitted coordinate system. It accounts for the effects of rotation, radius change, and stream-surface thickness. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity model is used for turbulent flows. The equations which are solved by a two-stage Runge-Kutta scheme made efficient by use of vectorization, a variable time-step, and a flux-based multigrid scheme, are described. A stability analysis is presented for the two-stage scheme. Results for a flat-plate model problem show the applicability of the method to axial, radial, and rotating geometries. Results for a centrifugal impeller and a radial diffuser show that the quasi three-dimensional viscous analysis can be a practical design tool.

  19. Optimal Tracing of Viscous Shocks in Solutions of Viscous Conservation Laws

    E-print Network

    Optimal Tracing of Viscous Shocks in Solutions of Viscous Conservation Laws Wen Shen and Mee Rea@math.psu.edu May 25, 2006 Abstract This paper contains a qualitative study of a scalar conservation law with viscos obtaining an optimal finite dimensional description of solutions to the viscous conservation law. We

  20. Enhancement of hemocompatibility of the MERA monopivot centrifugal pump: toward medium-term use.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2013-02-01

    The MERA monopivot centrifugal pump has been developed for use in open-heart surgery, circulatory support, and bridge-to-decision for up to 4?weeks. The pump has a closed-type, 50-mm diameter impeller with four straight paths. The impeller is supported by a monopivot bearing and is driven by a radial-flux magnet-coupling motor. Because flow visualization experiments have clarified sufficient pivot wash and stagnation at the sharp corner of the pivot support was suggested, sharp corners were removed in the design stage. The index of hemolysis of the pump operating at more than 200?mm?Hg was found to be lower than that of a commercial pump. Four-week animal tests were then conducted two times; improvement of thrombus formation was seen in the female pivot through modification of female pivot geometry. Overall antithrombogenicity was also recorded. Finally, to assure mid-term use, an additional 4-week durability test revealed that the rate of the axial pivot wear was as small as 1.1?µm/day. The present in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that the MERA monopivot centrifugal pump has sufficient hemocompatibility and durability for up to 4?weeks. PMID:23020805

  1. Computational Study of the CC3 Impeller and Vaneless Diffuser Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Sameer; Beach, Timothy A.; Skoch, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are compatible with the low exit corrected flows found in the high pressure compressor of turboshaft engines and may play an increasing role in turbofan engines as engine overall pressure ratios increase. Centrifugal compressor stages are difficult to model accurately with RANS CFD solvers. A computational study of the CC3 centrifugal impeller in its vaneless diffuser configuration was undertaken as part of an effort to understand potential causes of RANS CFD mis-prediction in these types of geometries. Three steady, periodic cases of the impeller and diffuser were modeled using the TURBO Parallel Version 4 code: 1) a k-epsilon turbulence model computation on a 6.8 million point grid using wall functions, 2) a k-epsilon turbulence model computation on a 14 million point grid integrating to the wall, and 3) a k-omega turbulence model computation on the 14 million point grid integrating to the wall. It was found that all three cases compared favorably to data from inlet to impeller trailing edge, but the k-epsilon and k-omega computations had disparate results beyond the trailing edge and into the vaneless diffuser. A large region of reversed flow was observed in the k-epsilon computations which extended from 70% to 100% span at the exit rating plane, whereas the k-omega computation had reversed flow from 95% to 100% span. Compared to experimental data at near-peak-efficiency, the reversed flow region in the k-epsilon case resulted in an under-prediction in adiabatic efficiency of 8.3 points, whereas the k-omega case was 1.2 points lower in efficiency.

  2. Computational Study of the CC3 Impeller and Vaneless Diffuser Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Sameer; Beach, Timothy A.; Skoch, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are compatible with the low exit corrected flows found in the high pressure compressor of turboshaft engines and may play an increasing role in turbofan engines as engine overall pressure ratios increase. Centrifugal compressor stages are difficult to model accurately with RANS CFD solvers. A computational study of the CC3 centrifugal impeller in its vaneless diffuser configuration was undertaken as part of an effort to understand potential causes of RANS CFD mis-prediction in these types of geometries. Three steady, periodic cases of the impeller and diffuser were modeled using the TURBO Parallel Version 4 code: (1) a k-e turbulence model computation on a 6.8 million point grid using wall functions, (2) a k-e turbulence model computation on a 14 million point grid integrating to the wall, and (3) a k-? turbulence model computation on the 14 million point grid integrating to the wall. It was found that all three cases compared favorably to data from inlet to impeller trailing edge, but the k-e and k-? computations had disparate results beyond the trailing edge and into the vaneless diffuser. A large region of reversed flow was observed in the k-e computations which extended from 70 to 100 percent span at the exit rating plane, whereas the k-? computation had reversed flow from 95 to 100 percent span. Compared to experimental data at near-peak-efficiency, the reversed flow region in the k-e case resulted in an underprediction in adiabatic efficiency of 8.3 points, whereas the k-? case was 1.2 points lower in efficiency.

  3. Suppression of the secondary flow in a suction channel of a large centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, D.; Nagahara, T.; Okihara, T.

    2013-12-01

    The suction channel configuration of a large centrifugal pump with a 90-degree bend was studied in detail to suppress the secondary flow at the impeller inlet for improving suction performance. Design of experiments (DOE) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of several primary design parameters of the suction channel. A DOE is a powerful tool to clarify the sensitivity of objective functions to design parameters with a minimum of trials. An L9 orthogonal array was adopted in this study and nine suction channels were designed, through which the flow was predicted by steady state calculation. The results indicate that a smaller bend radius with a longer straight nozzle, distributed between the bend and the impeller, suppresses the secondary flow at the impeller inlet. An optimum ratio of the cross sectional areas at the bend inlet and outlet was also confirmed in relationship to the contraction rate of the downstream straight nozzle. These findings were obtained by CFD and verified by experiments. The results will aid the design of large centrifugal pumps with better suction performance and higher reliability.

  4. The study of a reactor cooling pump under two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Yuan, S. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the steady pressure field has been investigated numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in a nuclear reactor cooling pump. As a multiphase approach the Eulerian-Eulerian two fluid model has been applied to calculated five computational models with different kinds of blades. The analysis of inner flow field of the five model pumps shows that the pressure in the impeller increases with the increase of the gas contents and the pressure distributions are irregular at the inlet of different blades when the gas contents less than 20%. With the increase of the number of blades, the vortexes at the outlet of impeller decrease whereas the vortexes in the deep of the volute markedly increases and high velocity of the fluid huddle is generated gradually at the outlet pipes. Under the action of centrifugal force and Coriolis force, gas phase mainly concentrated at the lower velocity and lower pressure area. The radial force on the impeller gradually increases with the increase of the gas contents.

  5. Performance of J33-A-23 Turbojet-Engine Compressor. II; Over-All Performance Characteristics of Compressor with 34-Blade Impeller at Equivalent Impeller Speeds from 6000 to 11.750 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beede, William L.; Kovach, Karl

    1948-01-01

    The J33-A-23 compressor with a 34-blade impeller was operated at ambient inlet temperature and an inlet pressure of 14 inches mercury absolute over a range of equivalent impeller speeds from 6000 to 11,750 rpm. Additional runs at equivalent speeds of 7,000, 10,000, and 11,750 rpm and ambient inlet temperature were made at inlet pressures of 5 and 10 inches mercury absolute. The results of this investigation are compared with those of the J33-A-23 compressor with a 17-blade impeller. At the design equivalent speed of 11,750 rpm the 533-A-23 compressor with a 34-blade impeller had a peak pressure ratio of 4.49 at an equivalent weight flow of 82.4 pounds per second and an adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency of 0.740. The maximum equivalent flow at design speed was 91.8 pounds per second. The peak efficiency at design speed (0.757) occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 85.5 pounds per second. The maximum adiabatic temperature- rise efficiency of 0.773 was obtained at an equivalent impeller speed of 10,000 rpm, an equivalent weight flow of 65.8 pounds per second, and a pressure ratio of 3.27. At equivalent impeller speeds of.l0,000 and 11,75O rpm a decrease in inlet pressure resulted in a decrease in maximum equivalent weight flow, peak pressure ratio, and peak adiabatic temperature- rise efficiency.

  6. Fluctuating pressures in pump diffuser and collector scrolls, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloteman, Donald P.

    1989-01-01

    The cracking of scroll liners on the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (HPFTP) on hot gas engine test firings has prompted a study into the nature of pressure fluctuations in centrifugal pump states. The amplitudes of these fluctuations and where they originate in the pump stage are quantified. To accomplish this, a test program was conducted to map the pressure pulsation activity in a centrifugal pump stage. This stage is based on typical commercial (or generic) pump design practice and not the specialized design of the HPFTP. Measurements made in the various elements comprising the stage indicate that pulsation activity is dominated by synchronous related phenomena. Pulsation amplitudes measured in the scroll are low, on the order of 2 to 7 percent of the impeller exit tip speed velocity head. Significant non-sychronous pressure fluctuations occur at low flow, and while of interest to commercial pump designers, have little meaning to the HPFTP experience. Results obtained with the generic components do provide insights into possible pulsation related scroll failures on the HPFTP, and provide a basis for further study.

  7. Magnetically suspended rotary blood pump with radial type combined motor-bearing.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Kita, T; Matsuda, K; Okada, Y

    2000-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is being developed with a combined motor-bearing for long-term ventricular assist systems. The combined motor-bearing actively suspends a rotor in a radial direction to deal with radial force unbalance in the pump and rotates the rotor by using the electric magnetic field. Therefore, the pump has no mechanical parts such as bearings of the motor and has a long lifetime. The developed pump consists of a thin rotor with a semi open-type 6 vane impeller and a stator to suspend and rotate the rotor. The rotor has 4-pole permanent magnets on the circumferential surface. The outer diameter and the thickness of the rotor are 60 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Axial movement and tilt of the rotor are restricted by passive stability based on the thin rotor structure. Radial movements of the rotor, such as levitation in radial direction and rotation, are controlled actively by using electric magnets of the stator. The electric magnet coils to produce levitation and rotation forces are constructed on the periphery stator. The p +/- 2-pole algorithm and the synchronous motor mechanism are adopted to levitate and rotate the rotor. The radial gap between the rotor and the stator is 1 mm. A closed-loop circuit filled with water was connected to the developed pump to examine the basic performance of the pump and the magnetic suspension system. Maximum rotational speed, flow rate, and head were 2,800 rpm, 11 L/min, and 270 mm Hg, respectively. The rotor with the impeller could be suspended completely during the entire pumping process. We conclude the pump with the combined motor-bearing has sufficient performance for the blood pump. PMID:10886067

  8. Effects of the primary passage on the flow through the secondary passage of a shrouded-impeller pump 

    E-print Network

    Wyman, Nicholas James

    1994-01-01

    A method for determining the turbulent flow through the leakage passage in rotating machinery has been enhanced to allow for the modeling of complex multiplyconnected flow domains such as that of the combined primary and secondary flow passages...

  9. Feasibility of a miniature centrifugal rotary blood pump for low-flow circulation in children and infants.

    PubMed

    Takatani, Setsuo; Hoshi, Hideo; Tajima, Kennichi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Asama, Junichio; Shimshi, Tadahiko; Yoshikawa, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a seal-less, tiny centrifugal rotary blood pump was designed for low-flow circulatory support in children and infants. The design was targeted to yield a compact and priming volume of 5 ml with a flow rate of 0.5-4 l/min against a head pressure of 40-100 mm Hg. To meet the design requirements, the first prototype had an impeller diameter of 30 mm with six straight vanes. The impeller was supported with a needle-type hydrodynamic bearing and was driven with a six-pole radial magnetic driver. The external pump dimensions included a pump head height of 20 mm, diameter of 49 mm, and priming volume of 5 ml. The weight was 150 g, including the motor driver. In the mock circulatory loop, using fresh porcine blood, the pump yielded a flow of 0.5-4.0 l/min against a head pressure of 40-100 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 1800-4000 rpm using 1/4" inflow and outflow conduits. The maximum flow and head pressure of 5.25 l/min and 244 mm Hg, respectively, were obtained at a rotational speed of 4400 rpm. The maximum electrical-to-hydraulic efficiency occurred at a flow rate of 1.5-3.5 l/min and at a rotational speed of 2000-4400 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis, which was evaluated using fresh porcine blood, was 0.0076 g/100 l with the impeller in the down-mode and a bearing clearance of 0.1 mm. Further refinement in the bearing and magnetic coupler are required to improve the hemolytic performance of the pump. The durability of the needle-type hydrodynamic bearing and antithrombotic performance of the pump will be performed before clinical applications. The tiny centrifugal blood pump meets the flow requirements necessary to support the circulation of pediatric patients. PMID:16322718

  10. Viscous-pendulum damper suppresses structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1964-01-01

    The viscous pendulum damper consists of a cylinder containing round trays on which round lead slugs rest. When assembled, the container is filled with a viscous liquid and attached, with axis vertical, to the structure. The device permits varying the damping of structural vibrations.

  11. Flow visualization in a centrifugal blood pump with an eccentric inlet port.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Kodama, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Yoshiro; Shinohara, Toshiyuki; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2004-06-01

    Flow visualization analysis was applied to the Baylor/Miwatec centrifugal artificial heart to evaluate its fluid dynamic characteristics regarding antithrombogenicity. An eccentric vortex was found both in the upper and the lower gaps of the impeller, which is supposed to be caused by the eccentric inlet port. Therefore, one-way flow toward the outlet is formed and washes the pivot. The combination of an eccentric vortex and a pivot bearing that is washed is unique to the Baylor/Miwatec pump. For the male pivots exposed to periodic wash, the minimum shear rate around the bottom pivot was estimated to be 650/s, which is higher than the threshold for thrombus formation shown by other studies. The wall shear rate at the impeller bottom surface was found to be larger in the top contact mode than in the bottom contact mode. PMID:15153149

  12. Hydraulic design, numerical simulation and BVF diagnosis of high efficiency centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Chen, L.; Zhou, X.; Jiangand, C. W.; Su, M.

    2012-11-01

    Under the Two-dimensional Flow Theory and the Velocity Coefficient Theory, a centrifugal-pump impeller has been designed, based on the parameters of IS150-125-250 centrifugal pump. And self-compiled programs have been used to complete the hydraulic design of the whole flow passage of centrifugal pump. The space bending and twisting characteristics of the design blade are more obvious. Then, numerical simulation is applied to the inner flow field of the two pumps using RANS (Reynolds Averaged N-S) Equation with a standard k-? two-equation turbulence model. The compare of the numerical simulation data of two centrifugal pumps, getting from 13 working points including design condition, shows that, the design pump has higher head and efficiency in the range of lower flow rate. Based on the numerical results of the inner flow of the design pump and model pump, the boundary vorticity flux (BVF) diagnostics has been used to analyze the BVF distribution of suction surface and pressure surface of two pumps. The result shows that, the BVF distribution of the design pump is more uniform and smooth, with smaller peak value.

  13. In vitro evaluation of the TandemHeart pediatric centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Svitek, Robert G; Smith, Douglas E; Magovern, James A

    2007-01-01

    The pediatric TandemHeart pump is being developed for short-term circulatory support of patients varying in size from 2 to 40 kg. The pump withdraws blood from the left atrium via cannula inserted percutaneously, either through the right internal jugular vein or transhepatically, and pumps the blood back into the arterial system via the carotid or femoral artery. High resolution stereolithography (SLA) was used to create an upper housing and impeller design, which were assembled into a functional pump prototype. Pressure-flow characteristics of the pump were determined in a blood analogue solution and compared with the pressure-flow requirements of the intended cannulation. At 5,500 rpm, the pump was able to generate 0.4 L/min of flow with a pressure rise of 325 mm Hg and 2.0 L/min with a pressure rise of 250 mm Hg. The hydraulic performance of the pump will enable at least 50% of cardiac output when the arterial cannula is placed in the carotid artery. The hemolysis of the TandemHeart pediatric pump at 5,500 rpm was compared with the BP-50 pediatric centrifugal pump in vitro using bovine blood flowing at 0.4 L/min against 250 mm Hg. The TandemHeart pump produced a similar increase in plasma free hemoglobin levels during the duration of the 6 hour test. PMID:18043160

  14. One-month biocompatibility evaluation of the pediatric TinyPump in goats.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yusuke; Kitao, Takashi; Nagaoka, Eiki; Kimura, Taro; Yokoyama, Yoshimasa; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Tominaga, Ryuji; Takatani, Setsuo

    2011-08-01

    The TinyPump is an extracorporeal, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump with its impeller suspended magnetically and hydrodynamically to provide short-term mechanical circulatory support for children and infants. We have previously demonstrated that the in vivo experiments of the experimental TinyPump showed acceptable stable performance at pump flows averaging around 1.0 L/min with low hemolytic and thrombogenic properties for up to 2 weeks. We present here the 1-month in vivo evaluation of the TinyPump, whose design was modified further for more durable operation. The pump was implanted as a left ventricular assist device in five goats (12.5-26.7 kg), with inflow inserted into the left ventricular apex and outflow anastomosed to the descending aorta. Five animals were supported for 110 pump days, with mean pump flow of 1.19 ± 0.03 L/min at a pump speed of 2679 ± 97 rpm. Two animals reached the scheduled end point of 30 days without device failure, and mean plasma-free hemoglobin was 1.7 ± 0.8 mg/dL. Hematologic and biochemical data of these two animals showed no evidence of cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic dysfunction. Although further experiments are needed, the modified TinyPump offers promise as a short-term mechanical circulatory support device in pediatric population. PMID:21843296

  15. Orthogonal decomposition as a design tool: With application to a mixing impeller

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, Benjamin

    2013-05-15

    Digital manufacturing eliminates the expense and time required to develop custom products. By utilizing this technology, designers can quickly create a customized product specifically for their performance needs. But the timescale and expense from the engineering design workflows used to develop these customized products have not been adapted from the workflows used in mass production. In many cases these customized designs build upon already successful mass-produced products that were developed using conventional engineering design workflows. Many times as part of this conventional design process significant time is spent creating and validating high fidelity models that accurately predict the performance of the final design. These existing validated high fidelity models used for the mass-produced design can be reused for analysis and design of unknown products. This thesis explores the integration of reduced order modeling and detailed analysis into the engineering design workflow developing a customized design using digital manufacturing. Specifically, detailed analysis is coupled with proper orthogonal decomposition to enable the exploration of the design space while simultaneously shaping the model representing the design. This revised workflow is examined using the design of a laboratory scale overhead mixer impeller. The case study presented here is compared with the design of the Kar Dynamic Mixer impeller developed by The Dow Chemical Company. The result of which is a customized design for a refined set of operating conditions with improved performance.

  16. Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Garg, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, have been screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Mar-M247LC has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium indicate this inert environment may debit long term creep resistance of this alloy. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy® X, Inconel® 617, Inconel® 740, Nimonic® 263, Incoloy® MA956, and Haynes 230 are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. Haynes 230 has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium are just underway for this alloy. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Therefore, long term microstructural stability is also being screened.

  17. Comparison of velocity-log data collected using impeller and electromagnetic flowmeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhouse, M.W.; Izbicki, J.A.; Smith, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have used flowmeters in environments that are within the expectations of their published ranges. Electromagnetic flowmeters have a published range from 0.1 to 79.0 m/min, and impeller flowmeters have a published range from 1.2 to 61.0 m/min. Velocity-log data collected in five long-screened production wells in the Pleasant Valley area of southern California showed that (1) electromagnetic flowmeter results were comparable within ??2% to results obtained using an impeller flowmeter for comparable depths; (2) the measured velocities from the electromagnetic flowmeter were up to 36% greater than the published maximum range; and (3) both data sets, collected without the use of centralizers or flow diverters, produced comparable and interpretable results. Although either method is acceptable for measuring wellbore velocities and the distribution of flow, the electromagnetic flowmeter enables collection of data over a now greater range of flows. In addition, changes in fluid temperature and fluid resistivity, collected as part of the electromagnetic flowmeter log, are useful in the identification of flow and hydrogeologic interpretation.

  18. Tensile and Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper represents a status report documenting the work on creep of superalloys performed under Project Prometheus. Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, are being screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy X, (Haynes International, Inc., Kokomo, IN), Inconel 617, Inconel 740, Nimonic 263, and Incoloy MA956 (Special Metals Corporation, Huntington, WV) are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Conventional tensile and creep tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 K on specimens extracted from the materials. Initial microstructure evaluations were also undertaken.

  19. Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, john; Garg, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, have been screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Mar-M247LC has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium indicate this inert environment may debit long term creep resistance of this alloy. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy(Registered TradeMark) X, Inconel(Registered TradeMark) 617, Inconel(Registered TradeMark) 740, Nimonic(Registered TradeMark) 263, Incoloy(Registered TradeMark) MA956, and Haynes 230 are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. Haynes 230 has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium are just underway for this alloy. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Therefore, long term microstructural stability is also being screened.

  20. A 2.5D Single Passage CFD Model for Centrifugal Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura S.; Ding, W.; Yano, K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the single passage model based on CFD to analyze the flow in blade passages of a centrifugal pump. The model consists of the flow passage between two impeller blades and the spaces in the inlet eye as well as in the volute. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form are solved by a finite difference method. The code is designed to investigate the velocity and pressure distributions and intended to investigate how the pump design affects fluid flow through the rotor as well as the pump performance. An early part of the paper investigates the behavior of the model as well as validity of the assumptions made in the model. Then, applications to a rotodynamic heart pump are presented.

  1. Design and optimization of a large flow rate booster pump in SWRO energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Z. N.; Wu, P.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) is a high energy-consumption industry, so energy efficiency is an important issue. Energy recovery systems, which contain a pressure exchanger and a booster pump, are widely used in SWRO plants. As a key part of energy recovery system, the difficulty of designing booster pumps lies in high inlet pressure, high medium causticity and large flow rate. High inlet pressure adds difficulties to seal design, and large flow rate and high efficiency requirement bring high demand for hydraulic design. In this paper, a 625 m3/h booster pump is designed and optimized according to the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation results. The impeller and volute is well designed, a new type of high pressure mechanical seal is applied and axial force is well balanced. After optimization based on blade redesign, the efficiency of the pump was improved. The best efficiency reaches more than 85% at design point according to the CFD simulation result.

  2. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  3. Numerical simulation of the effect of solid-volume fraction on induction force of screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Ma, W.; Li, R. N.; Gao, Y.; Gao, H.

    2012-11-01

    The solid-liquid two-phase unsteady flow in a screw centrifugal pump was simulated with unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations and sliding mesh technology. The distribution of the pressure at volute outlet, radial force, axial force and total moment are presented in this paper. The effects of solid-phase volume fractions on the value and direction of the induction thrust are analyzed. Seven monitor points are arranged on the inner surface of volute along the impeller rotation. The characters of the induced force on the monitor points with different solid-phase volume fractions are investigated. The results indicated that different solid-volume fractions have litter effects on the trend and direction of pressure at volute, radial force, axial force and total moment during one period, but the value of induction forces increase with the increasing of solid-volume fraction; The pressure fluctuation on the monitor points has with different trends during one period, which depends on the direction of the monitor points and the rotor-stator interaction strength of impeller and volute. With the rotation of impeller, the values of pressure in the whole passage are further increased along the rotation direction with the role of impeller vane. Solid-phase volume fraction has few effects on change trend of induced thrust as radial force and axial force on the monitor points, but the values of pressure on the monitor points increase with the increasing of solid-volume fraction.

  4. An implantable centrifugal blood pump for long term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Litwak, P; Kormos, R L; Mori, T; Tagusari, O; Antaki, J F; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Umezu, M; Tomioka, J; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P

    1997-01-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump was developed as an implantable left ventricular assist system. The impeller diameter is 40 mm and the pump dimensions are 55 x 64 mm. This first prototype was fabricated from titanium alloy, resulting in a pump weight of 400 g including a brushless DC motor. Weight of the second prototype pump was reduced to 280 g. The entire blood contacting surface is coated with diamond like carbon to improve blood compatibility. Flow rates of over 7 L/min against 100 mmHg pressure at 2,500 rpm with 9 W total power consumption have been measured. A newly designed mechanical seal with a recirculating purge system ("Cool-Seal") is used as a shaft seal. In this seal system, seal temperature is kept under 40 degrees C to prevent heat denaturation of blood proteins. Purge fluid also cools the pump motor coil and journal bearing. The purge fluid is continuously purified and sterilized by an ultrafiltration filter incorporated into the paracorporeal drive console. In vitro experiments with bovine blood demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100 L). In vivo experiments are currently ongoing using calves. Via left thoracotomy, left ventricular apex-descending aorta bypass was performed utilizing a PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) vascular graft, with the pump placed in the left thoracic cavity. In two in vivo experiments, pump flow rate was maintained at 5-8 L/min, and pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W. All plasma free hemoglobin levels were measured at < 15 mg/dl. The seal system has demonstrated good seal capability with negligible purge fluid consumption (< 0.5 ml/ day). Both animals remain under observation after 162 and 91 days of continuous pump function. PMID:9360134

  5. Computational Approach for Developing Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the computational approach to developing a ventricular assist device (VAD) which utilizes NASA aerospace technology. The VAD is used as a temporary support to sick ventricles for those who suffer from late stage congestive heart failure (CHF). The need for donor hearts is much greater than their availability, and the VAD is seen as a bridge-to-transplant. The computational issues confronting the design of a more advanced, reliable VAD include the modelling of viscous incompressible flow. A computational approach provides the possibility of quantifying the flow characteristics, which is especially valuable for analyzing compact design with highly sensitive operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and rocket engine technology has been applied to modify the design of a VAD which enabled human transplantation. The computing requirement for this project is still large, however, and the unsteady analysis of the entire system from natural heart to aorta involves several hundred revolutions of the impeller. Further study is needed to assess the impact of mechanical VADs on the human body

  6. Unsteady internal flow conditions of mini-centrifugal pump with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, T.; Fukutomi, J.; Kaji, K.; Wada, T.

    2013-02-01

    Mini centrifugal pumps having a diameter smaller than 100mm are employed in many fields. But the design method for the mini centrifugal pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machines is not clarified and conventional theory is not suitable for small-sized pumps. Therefore, mini centrifugal pumps with simple structure were investigated by this research. Splitter blades were adopted in this research to improve the performance and the internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump which had large blade outlet angle. The original impeller without the splitter blades and the impeller with the splitter blades were prepared for experiment. The performance tests are conducted with these rotors in order to investigate the effect of the splitter blades on performance and internal flow condition of mini centrifugal pump. On the other hand, a three dimensional unsteady numerical flow analysis was conducted to investigate the change of the internal flow according to the rotor rotation. It is clarified from the experimental results that the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is improved by the splitter blades. The blade-to-blade low velocity region was suppressed in the case with the splitter blades. In addition to that, the unsteady flows near the volute casing tongue were suppressed due to the splitter blades. In the present paper, the performance of the mini centrifugal pump is shown and the unsteady flow condition is clarified with the results of the numerical flow analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the splitter blades on the performance and the unsteady internal flow condition are investigated.

  7. Hydraulic performance numerical simulation of high specific speed mixed-flow pump based on quasi three-dimensional hydraulic design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Su, M.; Hou, H. C.; Song, P. F.

    2013-12-01

    This research adopts the quasi three-dimensional hydraulic design method for the impeller of high specific speed mixed-flow pump to achieve the purpose of verifying the hydraulic design method and improving hydraulic performance. Based on the two families of stream surface theory, the direct problem is completed when the meridional flow field of impeller is obtained by employing iterative calculation to settle the continuity and momentum equation of fluid. The inverse problem is completed by using the meridional flow field calculated in the direct problem. After several iterations of the direct and inverse problem, the shape of impeller and flow field information can be obtained finally when the result of iteration satisfies the convergent criteria. Subsequently the internal flow field of the designed pump are simulated by using RANS equations with RNG k-? two-equation turbulence model. The static pressure and streamline distributions at the symmetrical cross-section, the vector velocity distribution around blades and the reflux phenomenon are analyzed. The numerical results show that the quasi three-dimensional hydraulic design method for high specific speed mixed-flow pump improves the hydraulic performance and reveal main characteristics of the internal flow of mixed-flow pump as well as provide basis for judging the rationality of the hydraulic design, improvement and optimization of hydraulic model.

  8. Improvement of hemocompatibility for hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal pump by optimizing step bearings.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for a mechanically circulatory assist. The impeller levitated with original hydrodynamic bearings without any complicated control and sensors. However, narrow bearing gap has the potential for causing hemolysis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing to minimize hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. Firstly, we performed the numerical analysis of the step bearing based on Reynolds equation, and measured the actual hydrodynamic force of the step bearing. Secondly, the bearing gap measurement test and the hemolysis test were performed to the blood pumps, whose step length were 0 %, 33 % and 67 % of the vane length respectively. As a result, in the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic force was the largest, when the step bearing was around 70 %. In the actual evaluation tests, the blood pump having step 67 % obtained the maximum bearing gap, and was able to improve the hemolysis, compared to those having step 0% and 33%. We confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing worked effectively, and the blood pump having step 67 % was suitable configuration to minimize hemolysis, because it realized the largest bearing gap. PMID:22254562

  9. Suction specific speed is important in pump failure rates

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.L.

    1983-01-17

    Urges that caution should be exercised when purchasing centrifugal pumps for hydrocarbon or water service with a suction specific speed (S /SUB s/) greater than 11,000, unless operation is closely controlled near the best efficiency point (BEP). Explains that pumps with S /SUB s/ greater than 11,000 usually should not be operated at flowrates less than 60-70% of BEP because of impeller inlet eye recirculation problems. Suggests that if it is not possible to avoid a high S /SUB s/ number and the process cannot be closely controlled, a bypass and possibly a cooler may be necessary to keep the pump operating reliably. Presents results of a survey performed on 480 centrifugal pumps in a large Gulf Coast refinery over a period of 5 yrs, which provided data to support 11,000 as a good bench mark for S /SUB s/. Discusses confirming a bench mark; failure frequency vs. suction specific speed; determining BEP; determining S /SUB s/; mechanical problems; and choosing pumps for a refinery or petrochemical plant.

  10. Numerical simulation of hydrodynamics in a pump-turbine at off-design operating conditions in turbine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J. P.; Seidel, U.; Koutnik, J.

    2012-11-01

    The hydrodynamics of a reduced-scaled model of a radial pump-turbine is investigated under off-design operating conditions, involving runaway and "S-shape" turbine brake curve at low positive discharge. It is a low specific speed pump-turbine machine of Francis type with 9 impeller blades and 20 stay vanes as well as 20 guide vanes. The computational domain includes the entire water passage from the spiral casing inlet to the draft tube outlet. Completely structured hexahedral meshes generated by the commercial software ANSYS-ICEM are employed. The unsteady incompressible simulations are performed using the commercial code ANSYS-CFX13. For turbulence modeling the standard k-? model is applied. The numerical results at different operating points are compared to the experimental results. The predicted pressure amplitude is in good agreement with the experimental data and the amplitude of normal force on impeller is in reasonable range. The detailed analysis reveals the onset of the flow instabilities when the machine is brought from a regular operating condition to runaway and turbine break mode. Furthermore, the rotating stall phenomena are well captured at runaway condition as well as low discharge operating condition with one stall cell rotating inside and around the impeller with about 70% of its frequency. Moreover, the rotating stall is found to be the effect of rotating flow separations developed in several consecutive impeller channels which lead to their blockage. The reliable simulation of S-curve characteristics in pump-turbines is a basic requirement for design and optimization at off-design operating conditions.

  11. Biosynthesis of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus using oxygen vector and optimum impeller tip speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zee-Wei; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2012-09-01

    The potential use of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane as oxygen vectors for enhancing hyaluronic acid (HA) biosynthesis by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 was investigated using a 2-L stirred-tank bioreactor equipped with helical ribbon or Rushton turbine impellers. The volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector influenced the gas-liquid volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) positively. Batch HA fermentation with 1% (v/v) n-dodecane or 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane addition was carried out at different impeller tip speeds. Even though cell growth was lower in the fermentation with oxygen vector addition, the HA productivity and molecular weight were higher when compared to the fermentation without oxygen vector at low impeller tip speed. The highest HA concentration (4.25 gHA/l) and molecular weight (1.54 × 10(7) Da) were obtained when 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane and 0.785 m/s impeller tip speed of helical ribbon were used. PMID:22608992

  12. Numerical investigation of solid-liquid two phase flow in a non-clogging centrifugal pump at off-design conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B. J.; Huang, Z. F.; Chen, H. L.; Hou, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    The solid-liquid two-phase flow fields in the non-clogging centrifugal pump with a double-channel impeller have been investigated numerically for the design condition and also off-design conditions, in order to study the solid-liquid two-phase flow pattern and non-clogging mechanism in non-clogging centrifugal pumps. The main conclusions include: The sand volume fraction distribution is extremely inhomogeneous in the whole flow channel of the pump at off-design conditions. In the impeller, particles mainly flow along the pressure surface and hub; In the volute, particles mainly accumulate in the region near to the exit of volute, the largest sand volume fraction is observed at the tongue, and a large number of particles collide with volute wall and exit the volute after circling around the volute for several times. When the particle diameter increases, particles tend to accumulate on the pressure side of the impeller, and more particles crash with the pressure side of the blade. And larger sand volume fraction gratitude is also observed in the whole flow channel of the pump. With the decrease of the inlet sand volume fraction, particles tend to accumulate on the suction side of the blade. Compared with the particle diameter, the inlet sand volume fraction has less influence on the sand volume fraction gratitude in the whole channel of the pump. At the large flow rate, the minimum and maximum sand volume fraction in the whole flow channel of the model pump tends to be smaller than that at the small flow rate. Thus, it is concluded that the water transportation capacity increases with the flow rate. This research will strengthen people's understanding of the multiphase flow pattern in non-clogging centrifugal pumps, thus provides a theoretical basis for the optimal design of non-clogging centrifugal pumps.

  13. Wrinkling and sagging of viscous sheets

    E-print Network

    Teichman, Jeremy Alan, 1975-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis explores the wrinkling and sagging behavior of thin viscous Newtonian sheets and filaments motivated by analogous scenarios in elasticity. These problems involve dynamic free boundaries and geometric nonlinearities ...

  14. Initiation of Viscous Detonation Christopher M. Romick,

    E-print Network

    -capturing using WENO5M ­ Both methods use a fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration · Viscous ­ Using wavelet functions ­ Using a 5th order WENO scheme for advective terms and a 4th order central difference

  15. Saddle–node bifurcation of viscous profiles

    PubMed Central

    Achleitner, Franz; Szmolyan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Traveling wave solutions of viscous conservation laws, that are associated to Lax shocks of the inviscid equation, have generically a transversal viscous profile. In the case of a non-transversal viscous profile we show by using Melnikov theory that a parametrized perturbation of the profile equation leads generically to a saddle–node bifurcation of these solutions. An example of this bifurcation in the context of magnetohydrodynamics is given. The spectral stability of the traveling waves generated in the saddle–node bifurcation is studied via an Evans function approach. It is shown that generically one real eigenvalue of the linearization of the viscous conservation law around the parametrized family of traveling waves changes its sign at the bifurcation point. Hence this bifurcation describes the basic mechanism of a stable traveling wave which becomes unstable in a saddle–node bifurcation. PMID:23576830

  16. Evaluation of Failed Crane Chempumps Used During Salt Well Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    ELSEN, J.J.

    2000-09-18

    The Interim Stabilization Project is responsible for removing pumpable interstitial liquid from remaining single shelled tanks and transferring the waste to safer double-shelled tanks. This waste transfer is conducted by installing a saltwell pumping system within the designated single shell tank, and transferring the waste to double shelled tank using approved transfer lines. The saltwell pumping system is placed within a saltwell screen installed into the tank waste, the screen is designed to allow gravity flow of liquid into the screen and prevent solids from entering the pumping system. A foot valve consisting of a venturi jet and nozzle creates a suction, picking up waste at an equal rate as the out flow transfer rate of the saltwell system. A centrifugal pump is used to create the motive force across the eductor and drive the waste through the associated system piping and transfer lines leading to the double shelled tanks. The centrifugal pump that has typically been used in the saltwell pumping system installations is the Crane Chempump, model GA-1 1/2 K with 4 3/4 inch impeller. The following evaluation is not intended to be an all inclusive analysis of the operation of a saltwell system and associated pump. This evaluation will detail some of the noted failures in specific saltwell systems and document those findings. Due to the large number of saltwell systems installed over the duration of the Stabilization Project, only those saltwell systems installed over the last two years within S, SX, U, A and AX tank farms, shall be included in this evaluation. After identification of the pump failures mechanism, recommendations shall be identified to address potential means of improving overall operational efficiency and reducing overall equipment failures.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of the pump parameters in the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kyohei; Ishii, Kohei; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ariyoshi, Kouki; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Imachi, Kou; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) was invented to develop a total artificial heart at the University of Tokyo in 2005. The HFP consists of the multi-vane impeller involving rotor magnets, a motor stator and pump housing having double-helical volutes. To investigate the characteristics of the HFP, computational fluid dynamics analysis was performed. Validation of the computational model was performed with the data of the actual pump. A control computational model in which the vane area corresponded approximately to that of the actual pump was designed for the parametric study. The parametric study was performed varying the vane height, vane width and helical volute pitch. When the vane height was varied from 0.5 to 1.5 times that of the control computational model, the H-Q (pressure head vs. flow) and efficiency curves were translated in parallel with the vane height. When the vane height was two and three times that of the control computational model, the profile of these curves changed. From the results, the best proportion for the vane was considered to be a vane height between 1.5 and 2 times the vane width. The effect of vane width was not very strong compared to that of the vane height. A similar tendency in vane height was observed by varying the helical volute pitch. The best helical volute-pitch size is considered to be between 1.5 and 2 times the vane width. Although further study is necessary to determine the best values for these parameters, the characteristics of the pump parameters in the HFP could be approximately clarified. PMID:24318404

  18. One thousand dollar assist heart pump for patients from developing countries.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi

    2007-01-01

    In spite of continuous improvements in device design and applications, the profound use of heart pump has been limited because of its high price. The available clinically applied heart pump costs mostly about 100 thousands US Dollars. The author has since long tried to develop a heart pump costing only 1000 Dollars for recovery or bridge to heart transplantation therapies. The device is a radially driven centrifugal pump with a brush-less DC motor and a streamlined impeller. Its bearing is rolling bearing using 4 to 6 needles, manufactured by special wear-proof polythene with super-high-molecular weight, thus the service life achieves more than 10 years. To avoid thrombus formation, a special purge system is introduced to the bearing, allowing the saline with heparin to be infused through the bearing into the pump. The bearing, therefore, keeps working in the saline, and absolutely no thrombus will be formed along the bearing. Animal experiments demonstrated that a 30 mL fluid infusion per hour is enough to prevent thrombus formation. With these improvements, the impeller pump has continuously run for 14 months in the laboratory, and no bearing wear can be measured. The device, weighing 150 g, is fully implantable, consumes approximately 9.6 W, delivers a 9Lmin-1 blood flow against a 120 mmHg mean pressure, and reaches a highest total efficiency of 24.7% for the motor (including the controller) and the pump. The device has been used in animal experiments together with an American artificial lung for more than one month in the University of Texas and also in human trials in the Taiwan University. PMID:19662122

  19. A new model of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass: design improvement, performance, and hemolysis tests.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Dos Santos, Alex Eugênio; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, José F

    2011-05-01

    A new model of blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) application has been developed and evaluated in our laboratories. Inside the pump housing is a spiral impeller that is conically shaped and has threads on its surface. Worm gears provide an axial motion of the blood column. Rotational motion of the conical shape generates a centrifugal pumping effect and improves pumping performance. One annular magnet with six poles is inside the impeller, providing magnetic coupling to a brushless direct current motor. In order to study the pumping performance, a mock loop system was assembled. Mock loop was composed of Tygon tubes (Saint-Gobain Corporation, Courbevoie, France), oxygenator, digital flowmeter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control. Experiments were performed on six prototypes with small differences in their design. Each prototype was tested and flow and pressure data were obtained for rotational speed of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. Hemolysis was studied using pumps with different internal gap sizes (1.35, 1.45, 1.55, and 1.7 mm). Hemolysis tests simulated CPB application with flow rate of 5 L/min against total pressure head of 350 mm Hg. The results from six prototypes were satisfactory, compared to the results from the literature. However, prototype #6 showed the best results. Best hemolysis results were observed with a gap of 1.45 mm, and showed a normalized index of hemolysis of 0.013 g/100 L. When combined, axial and centrifugal pumping principles produce better hydrodynamic performance without increasing hemolysis. PMID:21595709

  20. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5?mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2?mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200?mm?Hg and a flow rate of 4.0?L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25??m, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26146791

  1. The effect of surface roughness on activation of the coagulation system and platelet adhesion in rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Linneweber, Jörg; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kerzscher, Ullrich; Affeld, Klaus; Nosé, Yukihiko; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2007-05-01

    The surface roughness of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) is important for the biocompatibility of blood pumps. However, little is known about the effect of surface roughness on the antithrombogenicity of the device. The present study investigated the effect of surface roughness on the activation of the coagulation system and platelet adhesion in an impeller-type blood pump. Three identical Baylor Gyro 710 centrifugal blood pumps (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA) were manufactured with impeller surface roughness of 0.05, 0.2, and 0.4 microm, respectively, as determined by a stylus profilometer and by scanning electron microscopy. Whole blood was anticoagulated (1-IU heparin/mL, ACT 250 s) and circulated for 60 min in an artificial circulatory system, simulating LVAD perfusion (5-L/min flow against 100 mm Hg). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed to quantify fibrinogen- and von Willebrand factor (vWf) adsorption as well as platelet adhesion directly on the impellers of the pumps. Levels of prothrombin fragment F1.2 and thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex were measured in order to quantify activation of coagulation. Compared with the 0.05-microm surface, platelet adhesion was 40 and 76% higher on the 0.2- and 0.4-microm surface, respectively (P < 0.01). The evaluation of adsorbed fibrinogen and vWf showed significant higher protein antigen levels on the rougher surfaces (P < 0.01). Furthermore, nonpulsatile perfusion activated the coagulation system. By contrast, the surface roughness had no significant influence on plasma prothrombin F1.2 fragment- and TAT concentrations. Antithrombogenicity was significantly reduced in pumps with inferior metal-finishing quality. PMID:17470203

  2. Feasibility of a tiny Gyro centrifugal pump as an implantable ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Nakata, K; Ohtsuka, G; Takano, T; Glueck, J; Fujisawa, A; Makinouchi, K; Yokokawa, M; Nosé, Y

    1999-08-01

    The Gyro pumps were developed for long-term circulatory support. The first generation Gyro pump (C1E3) achieved 1 month paracorporeal circulatory support in chronic animal experiments; the second generation (PI702) implantable ventricular assist device (VAD) was successful for over 6 months. The objective of the next generation Gyro pump is for use as a long-term totally implantable VAD and for pediatric circulatory support. This tiny Gyro pump (KP101) was fabricated with the same design concept as the other Gyro pumps. The possibility of an implantable VAD was determined after performance and hemolysis test results were compared to those of the other Gyro pumps. The pump housing and impeller were fabricated from polycarbonate with an impeller diameter of 35 mm. The diameter and height of the pump housings are 52.3 mm and 29.9 mm, respectively. At this time, a DC brushless motor drives the KP101, which is the same as that for the C1E3. The pump performance was measured in 37% glycerin water at 37 degrees C. Hemolysis tests were performed utilizing a compact mock loop filled with fresh bovine blood in a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) condition at 37 degrees C. The KP101 achieved the LVAD conditions of 5 L/min and 100 mm Hg at 2,900 rpm; generated 10 L/min against 100 mm Hg at 3,200 rpm; 3 L/min against 90 mm Hg at 2,600 rpm; and 2 L/min against 80 mm Hg at 2,400 rpm. In addition, the pump efficiency during this experiment was 12.5%. The other Gyro pumps. that is, the C1E3, PI601, and PI701, in an LVAD condition require 1,600, 2,000, and 2,000 rpm, respectively. The KP101 produced a normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) value of 0.005 g/100 L. With regard to the NIH, the other Gyro pumps, namely the C1E3, PI601, and PI701 demonstrated 0.0007, 0.0028, and 0.004 g/100 L, respectively. The KP101 produced an acceptable pressure flow curve for a VAD. The NIH value was higher than that of other Gyro pumps, but is in an acceptable range. PMID:10463506

  3. A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump that is introduced through the left ventricular apex.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Kitamura, M; Eishi, K; Kawai, A; Tagusari, O; Niinami, H; Akimoto, T; Nojiri, C

    1992-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as an implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The pump consists of a tube housing (10 cm in length and 14 mm in diameter), a three-vane impeller combined with a guide vane, and a DC motor. This pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged into the ascending aorta. A pump flow of > 8 L/min was obtained against 90 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. In an acute dog model, this pump could produce a sufficient output of 200 ml/kg/min. In addition, the pump flow profile demonstrated a pulsatile pattern, although the rotation speed was fixed. This is mainly due to the changes in flow rate during a cardiac cycle--that is, during systole, the flow rate increases to the maximum, while the differential pressure between the LV and the aorta decreases to the minimum. Thus, this simple and compact axial flow blood pump can be a potential LVAD, with prompt accessibility and need for less invasive surgical procedures. PMID:1457948

  4. High speed horizontal pump is efficient at low flows and easy to maintain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    This article focuses on high speed end suction horizontal centrifugal pump was awarded Honors in the process pump category of the 1982 Chemical Processing Vaaler competition because the advanced hydraulic design provides an extraordinarily stable head capacity curve from minimum flow to runout which makes systems simpler, more economical and easier to control. This stability, which lowers the hydraulic minimum flow to 15-20% of the best efficiency point, is achieved through a combination of advanced impeller designs and the company's patent pending back flow catcher that eliminates inducer surging. The pump has a capacity of 400 gpm with heads to 4500' to meet virtually any high head, low flow demand of the petroleum refining, petrochemical and chemical industries.

  5. An implantable aortic valvo-pump for destination therapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the possibility of a long-term applicable left ventricular assist device, a 23 mm outer diameter and 31 g weight implantable aortic valvo-pump was developed. It consists of a rotor and a stator; the rotor has a driven magnets assemble and an impeller, the stator has a motor coil with iron core and a outflow guide vane. The device locates the position of aortic valve, delivers the blood directly from left ventricle to aorta. Neither connecting conduits nor "bypass" circuits are necessary. Therefore, the device has promisingly better antithrombogenicity than other heart pumps. In hemodynamic testing, the pump can produce a blood flow of 7 l/min volume with 50 mmHg pressure increase at 15,000 rpm rotating speed, and at zero flow rate the pump can maintain a diastolic pressure over 80 mmHg at same rotating speed. For further studies the blood compatibility and the durability of the device are of most importance. PMID:16900420

  6. Centrifugal slurry pump wear and hydraulic studies. Quarterly technical progress report for the period of 1 April 1987--30 June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P

    1987-12-31

    This report marks the fourth quarter of the third phase of the centrifugal slurry pump improvement program. The program was begun in 1982 to improve the operating life of centrifugal slurry pumps for coal liquefaction service. The first phase reviewed pilot plant experience with centrifugal slurry pumps and identified, with the help of a literature search, the critical design parameters and materials required for such improvement. The second phase encompassed extensive small-scale testing of several hydraulic design concepts and materials testing and selection - the results being incorporated in a prototype slurry pump design. This third phase of the work has included i) prototype slurry pump testing against a state-of-the-art coal liquefaction slurry pump, wherein substantial reduction of wear was obtained at 60% higher speed at the same head and flow rate therefore at 60% higher specific speed - and ii) an investigation as to whether still higher specific speed is possible. The prototype pump tested in (i) had a specific speed of 600. Another pump of this same design was re-fitted for investigation (ii) with a smaller impeller and associated liners so as to operate at a specific speed of 1000. Both the 600 and the 1000 impellers for this latter investigation (ii) were made of mild carbon steel to accelerate the testing time. The two pumps were run in series in the slurry test loop using AS {number_sign}110 sand ({approximately} 110 mesh) at a concentration of 30% by weight in water at 80{degrees}F. As previously reported, 24 hours of test time revealed a slightly lower overall wear rate for the 1000-specific-speed pump; however, excessive local wear occurred in the impeller eye area of that pump. This was attributed to too large a clearance between the pump-out vanes and the suction side of the volute liner. Wear elsewhere in the pump was uniform and comparable to that of the 600-specific-speed prototype pump. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Controls of Wellbore Flow Regimes on Pump Effluent Composition

    SciTech Connect

    James Martin-Hayden; plummer; Sanford Britt

    2014-01-01

    Where well water and formation water are compositionally different or heterogeneous, pump effluent composition will vary due to partial mixing and transport induced by pumping. Investigating influences of purging and sampling methodology on composition variability requires quantification of wellbore flow regimes and mixing. As a basis for this quantification, analytical models simulating Poiseuille flow were developed to calculate flow paths and travel times. Finite element modeling was used to incorporate influences of mixing. Parabolic velocity distributions within the screened interval accelerate with cumulative inflow approaching the pump intake while an annulus of inflowing formation water contracts uniformly to displace an axial cylinder of pre-pumping well water as pumping proceeds. Increased dispersive mixing forms a more diffuse formation water annulus and the contribution of formation water to pump effluent increases more rapidly. Models incorporating viscous flow and diffusion scale mixing show that initially pump effluent is predominantly pre-pumping well water and compositions vary most rapidly. After two screen volumes of pumping, 94% of pump effluent is inflowing formation water. Where the composition of formation water and pre-pumping well water are likely to be similar, pump effluent compositions will not vary significantly and may be collected during early purging or with passive sampling. However, where these compositions are expected to be considerably different or heterogeneous, compositions would be most variable during early pumping, that is, when samples are collected during low-flow sampling. Purging of two screen volumes would be required to stabilize the content and collect a sample consisting of 94% formation water.

  8. Effect of impeller type and mechanical agitation on the mass transfer and power consumption aspects of ASBR operation treating synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Michelan, Rogério; Zimmer, Thiago R; Rodrigues, José A D; Ratusznei, Suzana M; de Moraes, Deovaldo; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugenio

    2009-03-01

    The effect of flow type and rotor speed was investigated in a round-bottom reactor with 5 L useful volume containing 2.0 L of granular biomass. The reactor treated 2.0 L of synthetic wastewater with a concentration of 800 mgCOD/L in 8-h cycles at 30 degrees C. Five impellers, commonly used in biological processes, have been employed to this end, namely: a turbine and a paddle impeller with six-vertical-flat-blades, a turbine and a paddle impeller with six-45 degrees -inclined-flat-blades and a three-blade-helix impeller. Results showed that altering impeller type and rotor speed did not significantly affect system stability and performance. Average organic matter removal efficiency was about 84% for filtered samples, total volatile acids concentration was below 20 mgHAc/L and bicarbonate alkalinity a little less than 400 mgCaCO3/L for most of the investigated conditions. However, analysis of the first-order kinetic model constants showed that alteration in rotor speed resulted in an increase in the values of the kinetic constants (for instance, from 0.57 h(-1) at 50 rpm to 0.84 h(-1) at 75 rpm when the paddle impeller with six-45 degrees -inclined-flat-blades was used) and that axial flow in mechanically stirred reactors is preferable over radial-flow when the vertical-flat-blade impeller is compared to the inclined-flat-blade impeller (for instance at 75 rpm, from 0.52 h(-1) with the six-flat-blade-paddle impeller to 0.84 h(-1) with the six-45 degrees -inclined-flat-blade-paddle impeller), demonstrating that there is a rotor speed and an impeller type that maximize solid-liquid mass transfer in the reaction medium. Furthermore, power consumption studies in this reduced reactor volume showed that no high power transfer is required to improve mass transfer (less than 0.6 kW/10(3)m3). PMID:18814952

  9. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA)

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  10. Liquid metal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1982-11-23

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  11. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B. (Schenectady, NY); Brynsvold, Glen V. (San Jose, CA); Jahns, Thomas M. (Schenectady, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  12. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  13. Dry vacuum pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, R.

    2008-05-01

    For decades and for ultimate pressure below 1 mbar, oil-sealed Rotary Vane Pumps have been the most popular solution for a wide range of vacuum applications. In the late 80ies, Semiconductor Industry has initiated the development of the first dry roughing pumps. Today SC applications are only using dry pumps and dry pumping packages. Since that time, pumps manufacturers have developed dry vacuum pumps technologies in order to make them attractive for other applications. The trend to replace lubricated pumps by dry pumps is now spreading over many other market segments. For the Semiconductor Industry, it has been quite easy to understand the benefits of dry pumps, in terms of Cost of Ownership, process contamination and up-time. In this paper, Technology of Dry pumps, its application in R&D/industries, merits over conventional pumps and future growth scope will be discussed.

  14. A fluid dynamic analysis using flow visualization of the Baylor/NASA implantable axial flow blood pump for design improvement.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, J T; Meier, D; Mizuguchi, K; Damm, G; Aber, G; Benkowski, R; Nosé, Y; Noon, G P; DeBakey, M E

    1995-02-01

    The Baylor/NASA Axial Blood Flow Pump has been developed for use as an implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The pump is intended as an assist device for either pulmonary or systemic circulatory support for more than 3-months' duration. To date the pump provides acceptable results in terms of thrombus formation and hemolysis (IH of 0.018 g/100 L). A fluid dynamics analysis using flow visualization was performed to investigate the flow fields and to determine areas within the pump that could be improved. These studies focused upon the inflow area in front of the pump. A prototype axial flow pump assembly was constructed to facilitate the flow visualization studies. Particle image tracking velocimetry techniques were used to measure Amberlite particles suspended in a blood analog fluid composed of 63% water and 37% glycerin. This method used a pulsed (612 Hz) laser light to determine flow velocity profiles, shear stress, Reynolds numbers, and stagnant areas within the axial pump. These studies showed that the flow straightener (a vaned assembly in the pump inflow) reduced Reynolds numbers from 4,640 to 2,540 (at 8.5 L/min) and that the flow straightener exacerbates a discontinuity found between it and the impeller. Within the inflow area, a maximum of 80 N/m2 shear stress was measured, which is well below published blood damage thresholds. Design variations were investigated resulting in a smoother flow transition between flow straightener and impeller. These variations must be investigated further to establish a correlation with hemolysis and thrombus formation. PMID:7763196

  15. Simultaneous viscous-inviscid coupling via transpiration

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, K.F.C.; Giles, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    In viscous-inviscid coupling analysis, the direct coupling technique and the inverse coupling technique are commonly adopted. However, stability and convergence of the algorithms derived are usually very unsatisfactory. Here, by using the transpiration technique to simulate the effect of the displacement thickness, a new simultaneous coupling method is derived. The integral boundary layer equations and the full potential equation are chosen to be the viscous-inviscid coupled system. After discretization, the Newton-Raphson technique is proposed to solve the coupled nonlinear system. Several numerical results are used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. 15 refs., 23 figs.

  16. A computational method for viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite-difference procedure for numerically solving viscous incompressible flows is presented. The pressure-field solution is based on the pseudocompressibility method in which a time-derivative pressure term is introduced into the mass-conservation equation to form a set of hyperbolic equations. The pressure-wave propagation and the spreading of the viscous effect is investigated using simple test problems. Computed results for external and internal flows are presented to verify the present method which has proved to be very robust in simulating incompressible flows.

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation of the unsteady flow field and tone generation in an isolated centrifugal fan impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Daniel; Carolus, Thomas H.

    2010-10-01

    In spite of a low circumferential Mach number the sound of isolated centrifugal fan impellers is sometimes dominated by distinctive tones at blade passing frequency (BPF) and integer multiples. This paper reports on an experimental and numerical investigation intended to unveil the tone generating mechanism. The sound spectra from three impellers operating at a large range of speed were measured and decomposed into Strouhal and Helmholtz number dependent functions. This led to the preliminary conclusion that the BPF related tones are exclusively flow-induced. Based on hot-wire and blade pressure fluctuation measurements and a subsequent correlation analysis, coherent flow structures different from those associated with the principal azimuthal flow pattern due to the blades were detected. Eventually a numerical three-dimensional unsteady flow simulation revealed an inlet vortex. It takes on a helical form, with the vortex core slowly varying its position with respect to the impeller center. As the blades cut through that quasi-stationary helical vortex they encounter blade force fluctuations, producing the BPF tones. Slow spin of the vortex core and slow variation of vortex strength were identified as the reasons for amplitude modulation of the BPF tone.

  18. Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xuele Qi; Norman Turnquist; Farshad Ghasripoor

    2012-05-31

    Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) present higher efficiency, larger production rate, and can be operated in deeper wells than the other geothermal artificial lifting systems. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300 C geothermal water at 80kg/s flow rate in a maximum 10-5/8-inch diameter wellbore to improve the cost-effectiveness. In this paper, an advanced ESP design tool comprising a 1D theoretical model and a 3D CFD analysis has been developed to design ESPs for geothermal applications. Design of Experiments was also performed to optimize the geometry and performance. The designed mixed-flow type centrifugal impeller and diffuser exhibit high efficiency and head rise under simulated EGS conditions. The design tool has been validated by comparing the prediction to experimental data of an existing ESP product.

  19. Optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yasui, Kazuya; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump as a bridge-to-decision device. The purpose of the present study is to determine the optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. We prepared eight pump models having bearing gaps of 20, 30, 40, 80, 90, 100, 180, and 250??m. The driving conditions were set to a pressure head of 200?mm?Hg and a flow rate of 4?L/min. First, the orbital radius of the impeller was measured for the evaluation of the impeller stability. Second, the hemolytic property was evaluated in an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the orbital radius was not greater than 15??m when the bearing gap was between 20 and 100??m. The relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios in comparison with BPX-80 were 37.67 (gap: 20??m), 0.95 (gap: 30??m), 0.96 (gap: 40??m), 0.82 (gap: 80??m), 0.77 (gap: 90??m), 0.92 (gap: 100??m), 2.76 (gap: 180??m), and 2.78 (gap: 250??m). The hemolysis tended to increase at bearing gaps of greater than 100??m due to impeller instability. When the bearing gap decreased from 30 to 20??m, the relative NIH ratios increased significantly from 0.95 to 37.67 times (P?pump for the reduction of hemolysis. PMID:25234763

  20. Geometric optimization of a step bearing for a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller has been developed for mechanical circulatory assistance. However, a narrow bearing gap has the potential to cause hemolysis. The purpose of the present study is to optimize the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing in order to reduce hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. First, a numerical analysis of the step bearing, based on lubrication theory, was performed to determine the optimal design. Second, in order to assess the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic forces calculated in the numerical analysis were compared with those obtained in an actual measurement test using impellers having step lengths of 0%, 33%, and 67% of the vane length. Finally, a bearing gap measurement test and a hemolysis test were performed. As a result, the numerical analysis revealed that the hydrodynamic force was the largest when the step length was approximately 70%. The hydrodynamic force calculated in the numerical analysis was approximately equivalent to that obtained in the measurement test. In the measurement test and the hemolysis test, the blood pump having a step length of 67% achieved the maximum bearing gap and reduced hemolysis, as compared with the pumps having step lengths of 0% and 33%. It was confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing was effective, and the developed blood pump having a step length of approximately 70% was found to be a suitable configuration for the reduction of hemolysis. PMID:23834855

  1. Classification of Unsteady Flow Patterns in a Rotodynamic Blood Pump: Introduction of Non-Dimensional Regime Map.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Brackett, Jaclyn; Antaki, James F

    2015-09-01

    Rotodynamic blood pumps (also known as rotary or continuous flow blood pumps) are commonly evaluated in vitro under steady flow conditions. However, when these devices are used clinically as ventricular assist devices (VADs), the flow is pulsatile due to the contribution of the native heart. This study investigated the influence of this unsteady flow upon the internal hemodynamics of a centrifugal blood pump. The flow field within the median axial plane of the flow path was visualized with particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a transparent replica of the Levacor VAD. The replica was inserted in a dynamic cardiovascular simulator that synchronized the image acquisition to the cardiac cycle. As compared to steady flow, pulsatile conditions produced periodic, transient recirculation regions within the impeller and separation in the outlet diffuser. Dimensional analysis revealed that the flow characteristics could be uniquely described by the non-dimensional flow coefficient (?) and its time derivative ([Formula: see text]), thereby eliminating impeller speed from the experimental matrix. Four regimes within the ?-[Formula: see text] plane were found to classify the flow patterns, well-attached or disturbed. These results and methods can be generalized to provide insights for both design and operation of rotodynamic blood pumps for safety and efficacy. PMID:26577357

  2. Whole blood pumping with a microthrottle pump

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Johnston, I. D.; Tan, C. K. L.; Tracey, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that microthrottle pumps (MTPs) display the capacity to pump solid phase suspensions such as polystyrene beads which prove challenging to most microfluidic pumps. In this paper we report employing a linear microthrottle pump (LMTP) to pump whole, undiluted, anticoagulated, human venous blood at 200 ?l min?1 with minimal erythrocyte lysis and no observed pump blockage. LMTPs are particularly well suited to particle suspension transport by virtue of their relatively unimpeded internal flow-path. Micropumping of whole blood represents a rigorous real-world test of cell suspension transport given blood’s high cell content by volume and erythrocytes’ relative fragility. A modification of the standard Drabkin method and its validation to spectrophotometrically quantify low levels of erythrocyte lysis by hemoglobin release is also reported. Erythrocyte lysis rates resulting from transport via LMTP are determined to be below one cell in 500 at a pumping rate of 102 ?l min?1. PMID:21264059

  3. In vivo evaluation of the "TinyPump" as a pediatric left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Takashi; Ando, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Mariko; Kimura, Taro; Ohsawa, Hideyuki; Machida, Shinya; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Sakota, Daisuke; Konno, Tomohiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takatani, Setsuo

    2011-05-01

    Pediatric patients with end-stage heart failure require mechanical circulatory support (MCS) just as adults do. In order to meet the special requirements for neonates' and infants' MCS, pediatric circulatory support devices must be compact with low priming volume, easily controllable with low flow, less traumatic for blood cells and tissues, and biocompatible with minimum anticoagulation. We have designed and developed a miniature rotary centrifugal blood pump, "TinyPump," with a priming volume of 5 mL, which has already demonstrated its controllable performance for low flow and durability in vitro. To evaluate the feasibility of the TinyPump as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) suitable for neonates and infants, we have examined the biocompatibility and hemodynamic performance of the TinyPump in a pediatric animal model using Shiba goats. The TinyPump is a miniaturized centrifugal pump weighing 150 g comprising a disposable pump head with a 30-mm diameter impeller having six straight-vanes and a reusable motor driver. The impeller in the pump head is supported by a hydrodynamic bearing at its center and is driven by radial magnetic force coupled to the motor driver. TinyPump implantations were performed in 22 Shiba goats (17 female and 5 male), with body weights ranging from 8.4 to 27.2 kg. Under gas anesthesia, via left lateral thoracotomy, a 22 Fr inflow cannula was inserted through the left ventricular apex, while a 6-mm outflow graft was anastomosed to the descending aorta, which were then connected to a TinyPump mounted on the animal's back. Postoperative hemodynamic monitoring included heart rate, arterial and central venous pressure, pump flow, and rotation speed. Target pump flow in all animals was maintained at 0.9 ± 0.1 L/min, which is approximately half the normal pulmonary artery flow measured in control animals. Blood samples were collected to evaluate peripheral organ functions, hemolysis, and thrombosis. Goats were divided into three groups-acute phase (6 h; n = 4), subchronic phase (6 h 2 postoperative days [POD]; n = 11), and chronic phase (3 POD-16 POD; n = 8)-based on their survival duration. In the early experiments, hemolysis and thrombi formation at the impeller bearing resulted in termination of the study. Subsequent modifications of the bearing design, pump housing design, and magnetic coupling force helped to minimize the hemolysis and thrombi formation, prolonging the survival duration of the Shiba goats to 2 weeks with minimum adverse effects on the blood components and organ functions. With further experiments and improvements in pump durability and hemocompatibility, the TinyPump can serve as a suitable circulatory support device for neonates and infants bridging to heart transplantation as well as to heart recovery. PMID:21595723

  4. Quench-Induced Stresses in AA2618 Forgings for Impellers: A Multiphysics and Multiscale Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobaut, Nicolas; Saelzle, Peter; Michel, Gilles; Carron, Denis; Drezet, Jean-Marie

    2015-05-01

    In the fabrication of heat-treatable aluminum parts such as AA2618 compressor impellers for turbochargers, solutionizing and quenching are key steps to obtain the required mechanical characteristics. Fast quenching is necessary to avoid coarse precipitation as it reduces the mechanical properties obtained after heat treatment. However, fast quenching induces residual stresses that can cause unacceptable distortions during machining. Furthermore, the remaining residual stresses after final machining can lead to unfavorable stresses in service. Predicting and controlling internal stresses during the whole processing from heat treatment to final machining is therefore of particular interest to prevent negative impacts of residual stresses. This problem is multiphysics because processes such as heat transfer during quenching, precipitation phenomena, thermally induced deformations, and stress generation are interacting and need to be taken into account. The problem is also multiscale as precipitates of nanosize form during quenching at locations where the cooling rate is too low. This precipitation affects the local yield strength of the material and thus impacts the level of macroscale residual stresses. A thermomechanical model accounting for precipitation in a simple but realistic way is presented. Instead of modelling precipitation that occurs during quenching, the model parameters are identified using a limited number of tensile tests achieved after representative interrupted cooling paths in a Gleeble machine. The simulation results are compared with as-quenched residual stresses in a forging measured by neutron diffraction.

  5. An experimental study of a small high-speed LH2 pump for rockets: Fluid dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Hirota, Kunio

    1991-11-01

    A small high speed rocket engine hydrogen pump was designed, fabricated, and tested at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL)/National Space Development Agency (NASDA) turbopump test facility. The pump uses liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen as the working fluid in order to determine its associated fluid dynamic performance. The focus is on the overall and the suction performance. The overall performance was judged to be good. However, at high speed and high pressure conditions (50,000 rpm) a clearance occurred between the pump casing and the pump outlet guide vane. This resulted in the pump outlet guide vane showing reduced performance as compared to the low speed conditions (30,000 rpm). Design of the pump outlet guide vane is subsequently necessary to improve high speed pump performance. Prediction of the impeller performance was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results when pump efficiency is taken into consideration. In addition, the inducer showed a smaller required Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) value than the design value, in fact, it could operate even in a two phase flow condition at the pump inlet.

  6. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R. (Edelstein, IL); Elliott, Christopher M. (Metamora, IL)

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  7. World-first implantable aortic valvo-pump (IAVP) with sufficient haemodynamic capacity.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Wang, D F; Topaz, S; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y; Zwischenberg, J B

    2005-01-01

    For better anatomic and physiologic fitting, a novel implantable aortic valvo-pump (IAVP) has been developed. A valvo-pump is a micro axial flow impeller pump, which has the same dimensions and function, as well as the same location, of a valve. Therefore, IAVP needs no inlet and outlet tubes, no additional anatomic occupation, and has less physiologic disturbance to natural circulation compared with the traditional bypass left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The device has a stator and a rotor. The stator consists of a motor coil with an iron core and an outflow guide vane; the rotor includes driven magnets and impeller. There is neither bearing nor strut in both the pump and the motor. In order to reduce the attractive force between the rotor and the stator, so as to enhance the durability of the performance, the rotor magnets were minimized without reducing the driving torque and efficiency of the motor. The impeller vane was designed according to a three-dimensional and analytical method, for preventing stasis and turbulence. The largest outer diameter is 24.7 mm and the length at this point is 12.4 mm. The total weight is 40 g (including the rotor of 11 g). The consumed power is 7 W (14 V x 0.5 A) at 15 000 rpm. This rotating speed stays unchanged during haemodynamic testing together with a pulsatile centrifugal pump, which imitates a failing ventricle. The maximal flow cross IAVP reaches over 10 l min(-1) and the pressure head at 0 l min(-1) can be as large as 80 mmHg. At flow rate of 4 - 8 l min(-1), IAVP enlarges the flow c. 1 l min(-1) and meanwhile increases the pressure about 10 mmHg. The pressure pulsatility generated by the pulsatile centrifugal pump remains 40 mmHg after passing IAVP. By first animal experimental trial the device was sewed in aortic position of an 80 kg pig without harm to adjacent tissue and organs. IAVP promises to be a viable alternative to natural donor heart for heart transplantation in the future. PMID:16287680

  8. Viscous Driven-Cavity Solver: User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1997-01-01

    The viscous driven-cavity problem is solved using a stream-function and vorticity formulation for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. This report provides the user's manual and FORTRAN code for the set of governing equations presented in NASA TM-110262.

  9. Open-Source Syringe Pump Library

    PubMed Central

    Wijnen, Bas; Hunt, Emily J.; Anzalone, Gerald C.; Pearce, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores a new open-source method for developing and manufacturing high-quality scientific equipment suitable for use in virtually any laboratory. A syringe pump was designed using freely available open-source computer aided design (CAD) software and manufactured using an open-source RepRap 3-D printer and readily available parts. The design, bill of materials and assembly instructions are globally available to anyone wishing to use them. Details are provided covering the use of the CAD software and the RepRap 3-D printer. The use of an open-source Rasberry Pi computer as a wireless control device is also illustrated. Performance of the syringe pump was assessed and the methods used for assessment are detailed. The cost of the entire system, including the controller and web-based control interface, is on the order of 5% or less than one would expect to pay for a commercial syringe pump having similar performance. The design should suit the needs of a given research activity requiring a syringe pump including carefully controlled dosing of reagents, pharmaceuticals, and delivery of viscous 3-D printer media among other applications. PMID:25229451

  10. Open-source syringe pump library.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, Bas; Hunt, Emily J; Anzalone, Gerald C; Pearce, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    This article explores a new open-source method for developing and manufacturing high-quality scientific equipment suitable for use in virtually any laboratory. A syringe pump was designed using freely available open-source computer aided design (CAD) software and manufactured using an open-source RepRap 3-D printer and readily available parts. The design, bill of materials and assembly instructions are globally available to anyone wishing to use them. Details are provided covering the use of the CAD software and the RepRap 3-D printer. The use of an open-source Rasberry Pi computer as a wireless control device is also illustrated. Performance of the syringe pump was assessed and the methods used for assessment are detailed. The cost of the entire system, including the controller and web-based control interface, is on the order of 5% or less than one would expect to pay for a commercial syringe pump having similar performance. The design should suit the needs of a given research activity requiring a syringe pump including carefully controlled dosing of reagents, pharmaceuticals, and delivery of viscous 3-D printer media among other applications. PMID:25229451

  11. Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karl

    1946-01-01

    The investigation of the flow in a centrifugal pump indicated that the flow patterns in frictional fluid are fundamentally different from those in frictionless fluid. In particular, the dead air space adhering to the section side undoubtedly causes a reduction of the theoretically possible delivery head. The velocity distribution over a parallel circle is also subjected to a noticeable change as a result of the incomplete filling of the passages. The relative velocity on the pressure side of the vane, which for passages completely filled with active flow would differ little from zero even at comparatively lower than normal delivery volume, is increased, so that no rapid reverse flow occurs on the pressure side of the vane even for smaller delivery volume. It was established, further, that the flow ceases to be stationary for very small quantities of water. The inflow to the impeller can be regarded as radial for the operating range an question. The velocity triangles at the exit are subjected to a significant alteration in shape ae a result of the increased peripheral velocity, which may be of particular importance in the determination of the guide vane entrance angle.

  12. Preclinical study of a novel hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump for long-term cardiopulmonary support : In vivo performance during percutaneous cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    An extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump with a hydrodynamically levitated impeller was developed for use in a durable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system. The present study examined the biocompatibility of the blood pump during long-term use by conducting a series of 30-day chronic animal experiments. The ECMO system was used to produce a percutaneous venoarterial bypass between the venae cavae and carotid artery in adult goats. No anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was administered during the experiments. Three out of four animals survived for the scheduled 30-day period, and the blood pumps and membrane oxygenators both exhibited sufficient hydrodynamic performance and good antithrombogenicity, while one animal died of massive bleeding from the outflow cannulation site. The animals' plasma free hemoglobin had returned to within the normal range by 1 week after the surgical intervention, and their hemodynamic and biochemistry parameters remained within their normal ranges throughout the experiment. The explanted centrifugal blood pumps did not display any trace of thrombus formation. Based on the biocompatibility demonstrated in this study, the examined centrifugal blood pump, which includes a hydrodynamically levitated impeller, is suitable for use in durable ECMO systems. PMID:25975380

  13. Alternative backing up pump for turbomolecular pumps

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

    2003-04-22

    As an alternative to the use of a mechanical backing pump in the application of wide range turbomolecular pumps in ultra-high and extra high vacuum applications, palladium oxide is used to convert hydrogen present in the evacuation stream and related volumes to water with the water then being cryo-pumped to a low pressure of below about 1.e.sup.-3 Torr at 150.degree. K. Cryo-pumping is achieved using a low cost Kleemenco cycle cryocooler, a somewhat more expensive thermoelectric cooler, a Venturi cooler or a similar device to achieve the required minimization of hydrogen partial pressure.

  14. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H. (Livermore, CA); Call, Wayne R. (Tracy, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cyropumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels the alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independent pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  15. Evaluation of Static Mixer Flow Enhancements for Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Prototype for ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Ha, Tam T; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, Theodore M; Rasmussen, David A; Hechler, Michael P; Pearce, R.J.H.; Dremel, M.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (50 to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype

  16. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T.; Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P.; Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias; Boissin, J.-C.

    2014-01-29

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  17. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T.; Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P.; Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias; Boissin, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  18. Optimal design of the hydrodynamic multi-arc bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kazuya; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish an optimal design of the multi-arc hydrodynamic bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level. The multi-arc bearing was designed to fulfill the required specifications: (i) ensuring the uniform bearing stiffness for various bearing angles; (ii) ensuring a higher bearing stiffness than the centrifugal force to prevent impeller whirl; and (iii) adjusting the bearing clearance as much as possible to reduce hemolysis. First, a numerical analysis was performed to optimize three design parameters of the multi-arc bearing: number of arcs N, bearing clearance C, and groove depth H. To validate the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the impeller trajectories for six pump models were measured. Finally, an in vitro hemolysis test was conducted to evaluate the hemolytic property of the multi-arc bearing. As a result of the numerical analysis, the optimal parameter combination was determined as follows: N=4, C=100 ?m, and H ? 100 ?m. In the measurements of the impeller trajectory, the optimal parameter combination was found to be as follows: N=4, C=90 ?m, and H=100 ?m. This result demonstrated the high reliability of the numerical analysis. In the hemolysis test, the parameter combination that achieved the smallest hemolysis was obtained as follows: N=4, C=90 ?m, and H=100 ?m. In conclusion, the multi-arc bearing could be optimized for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level. PMID:23980526

  19. Disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump: design and in vitro performance.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Arai, Hirokuni; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-07-01

    A magnetically levitated (MagLev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a disposable pump head has been designed to realize a safe, easy-to-handle, reliable, and low-cost extracorporeal blood pump system. It consisted of a radial magnetic-coupled driver with a magnetic bearing having a two-degree freedom control and a disposable pump head unit with a priming volume of 24 mL. The easy on-off disposable pump head unit was made into a three-piece system consisting of the top and bottom housings, and the impeller-rotor assembly. The size and weight of the disposable pump unit were 75 mm x 45 mm and 100 g, respectively. Because the structure of the pump head unit is easily attachable and removable, the gap between the electromagnets of the stator and the target material in the rotor increased to 1.8 mm in comparison to the original integrated bearing system of 1.0 mm. The pump performance, power requirements, and controllability of the magnetic bearing revealed that from 1400 to 2400 rpm, the pump performance remained fairly unchanged. The amplitudes of the X- and Y-axis rotor oscillation increased to +/- 24 microm. The axial displacement of the rotor, 0.4 mm, toward the top housing was also observed at the pump rpm between 1400 and 2400. The axial and rotational stiffness of the bearing were 15.9 N/mm and 4.4 Nm/rad, respectively. The MagLev power was within 0.7 Watts. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a disposable, magnetically suspended CBP as the safe, reliable, easy-to-handle, low-cost extracorporeal circulation support device. PMID:15982279

  20. Performance degradation of a large production reactor recirculation pump during off-design conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    In order to accurately predict reactor hydraulic behavior during a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) the performance of reactor coolant pumps under off-design conditions must be understood. The LOCA of primary interest for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors involves the aspiration of air into the recirculated heavy water flow as reactor tank inventory is lost, (system temperatures are too low to result in significant flashing of water coolant into steam). Entrained air causes degradation in the performance of the large recirculation pumps. The amount of degradation is a parameter used in computer codes which predict the course of the accident. This paper describes the analysis of data obtained during in-reactor simulated LOCA tests, and presents the head degradation curve for the SRS reactor recirculation pumps. The greatest challenge of the analysis was to determine a reasonable estimate of mixture density at the pump suction. Specially designed three-beam densitometers were used to determine mixture density. Since it was not feasible to place them in the most advantageous location, measured pump motor power along with other techniques, were used to calculate the average mixture density at the pump impeller. This technique provides a good estimate of pump suction mixture density. Measurements from more conventional instruments were used to arrive at the value of pump two-component head over a wide range of flows. The results were significantly different from previous work with commercial reactor recirculation pumps. Further experimental work using a 1/4 scale model of the SRS pump should provide an opportunity to confirm these results, and is currently in progress.