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Sample records for vital signs laboratory

  1. Vital Signs

    MedlinePlus

    Your vital signs show how well your body is functioning. They are usually measured at doctor's offices, often as part ... be a sign of a serious breathing problem. Temperature, which measures how hot your body is. A ...

  2. Vital Signs

    MedlinePlus

    Your vital signs show how well your body is functioning. They are usually measured at doctor's offices, often as part ... standing, which medicines you take, and your weight. Respiratory rate, which measures your breathing. Mild breathing changes can ...

  3. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the first edition of Vital Signs, a Worldwide Institute publication that provides an annual update on global environmental trends. Includes discussion of the dismantling of nuclear arms, reduction in chlorofluorocarbon production, growth in bicycle production, the decline in cigarette smoking, and decline in military…

  4. Vital signs monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Dale A. (Inventor); Sturm, Ronald E. (Inventor); Rinard, George A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is disclosed for monitoring vital physiological signs. Each of the system components utilizes a single hybrid circuit with each component having high accuracy without the necessity of repeated calibration. The system also has low power requirements, provides a digital display, and is of sufficiently small size to be incorporated into a hand-carried case for portable use. Components of the system may also provide independent outputs making the component useful, of itself, for monitoring one or more vital signs. The overall system preferably includes an ECG amplifier and cardiotachometer signal conditioner unit, an impedance pneumograph and respiration rate signal conditioner unit, a heart/breath rate processor unit, a temperature monitoring unit, a selector switch, a clock unit, and an LCD driver unit and associated LCDs, with the system being capable of being expanded as needed or desired, such as, for example, by addition of a systolic/diastolic blood pressure unit.

  5. Planetary Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  8. Aging changes in vital signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital signs include body temperature, heart rate (pulse), breathing rate, and blood pressure. As you age, your vital ... symptoms and signs of infection. HEART RATE AND BREATHING RATE As you grow older, your pulse rate is ...

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Where's the Sodium?

    MedlinePlus

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  13. CDC Vital Signs: Teen Drinking and Driving

    MedlinePlus

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  14. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Today's Heroin Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

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  16. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Is redundancy in vital signs monitoring useful?

    PubMed

    Curtis, Dorothy; Bailey, Jacob; Pino, Esteban; Shih, Eugene; Greenes, Robert; Guttag, John; Stair, Thomas; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2007-01-01

    During an ongoing study of wireless vital signs monitoring of post-triage patients with SMART [1] in the waiting area of the emergency department (ED) at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, we observed that redundancy in vital signs monitoring can be advantageous. PMID:18694023

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Recipe for Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  19. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  20. Vital signs services for secure telemedicine applications.

    PubMed Central

    Sima, C.; Raman, R.; Reddy, R.; Hunt, W.; Reddy, S.

    1998-01-01

    Telemedicine using teleconference provides only a part of the picture. The remote patient's electronic medical record and vital signs may often be essential for proper diagnosis and treatment. While there are commercial solutions for telemonitoring, they do not address issues such as security and interoperability leveraging the growing public communications infrastructure. On the other hand there are performance considerations due to the quality of service over available communications media that can hinder real-time operation. The objective of this research effort is to develop secure tele-monitoring facilities that enable healthcare providers to collaborate over public communication networks; to securely convey their patient's vital signs to a remote specialist; and to enable "near real-time" examination of those vital sign data. It is our belief that such applications can help overcome barriers to quality healthcare in the scattered populations of rural areas enabling telemedicine to be a part of the practice of medicine. The authors, who are developing secure telemedicine applications, describe their approach in developing secure vital signs services. Images Figure 3 PMID:9929242

  1. CDC Vital Signs: More People Walk to Better Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Smoking among People with Mental Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

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  6. CDC Vital Signs: Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets

    MedlinePlus

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  7. CDC Vital Signs: Making Food Safer to Eat

    MedlinePlus

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  8. CDC Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Tests Save Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  9. An Ear-Worn Vital Signs Monitor.

    PubMed

    He, David Da; Winokur, Eric S; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a wearable vital signs monitor at the ear. The monitor measures the electrocardiogram (ECG), ballistocardiogram (BCG), and photoplethysmogram (PPG) to obtain pre-ejection period (PEP), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and pulse transit time (PTT). The ear is demonstrated as a natural anchoring point for the integrated sensing of physiological signals. All three signals measured can be used to obtain heart rate (HR). Combining the ECG and BCG allows for the estimation of the PEP, while combining the BCG and PPG allows for the measurement of PTT. Additionally, the J-wave amplitude of the BCG is correlated with the SV and, when combined with HR, yields CO. Results from a clinical human study on 13 subjects demonstrate this proof-of-concept device. PMID:26208264

  10. Detecting Vital Signs with Wearable Wireless Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Foster, Robert; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented. PMID:22163501

  11. Bowel movement: the sixth vital sign.

    PubMed

    Holl, Rita M

    2014-01-01

    Bowel movements provide vital information on how the body is functioning, and constipation among older adults is especially problematic. Although we do not like hearing the details of someone else's bowel movement, it is a function that nurses need to assess, support, and treat with the same attitude as when caring for patients with pain. PMID:24722614

  12. Rating the Vitality of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickford, J. Albert; Lewis, M. Paul; Simons, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    The Expanded Graded Intergenerational Disruption Scale (EGIDS), developed by Lewis and Simons and based on work by Fishman, provides a means of rating "language vitality"--the level of development or endangerment--where "development" is understood as adding or preserving functions and "endangerment" as loss of…

  13. RADAR: A Measure of the Sixth Vital Sign?

    PubMed

    Voyer, Philippe; Champoux, Nathalie; Desrosiers, Johanne; Landreville, Philippe; McCusker, Jane; Monette, Johanne; Savoie, Maryse; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Richard, Hélène; Richard, Sylvie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of RADAR (Recognizing Active Delirium As part of your Routine) as a measure of the sixth vital sign. This study was a secondary analysis of a study (N = 193) that took place in one acute care hospital and one long-term care facility. The primary outcome was a positive sixth vital sign, defined as the presence of both an altered level of consciousness and inattention. These indicators were assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method. RADAR identified 30 of the 43 participants as having a positive sixth vital sign and 58 of the 70 cases as not, yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 83%, respectively. Positive predictive value was 71%. RADAR's characteristics, including its brevity and acceptability by nursing staff, make this tool a good candidate as a measure of the sixth vital sign. Future studies should address the generalizability of RADAR among various populations and clinical settings. PMID:26337503

  14. Hyperspectral vital sign signal analysis for medical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Li, Yao; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Chang, Chein-I.; Hu, Peter; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a completely new technology,) from a hyperspectral imaging perspective, called Hyperspectral Vital Sign Signal Analysis (HyVSSA. A hyperspectral image is generally acquired by hundreds of contiguous spectral bands, each of which is an optical sensor specified by a particular wavelength. In medical application, we can consider a patient with different vital sign signals as a pixel vector in hyperspectral image and each vital sign signal as a particular band. In light of this interpretation, a revolutionary concept is developed, which translates medical data to hyperspectral data in such a way that hyperspectral technology can be readily applied to medical data analysis. One of most useful techniques in hyperspectral data processing is, Anomaly Detection (AD) which in this medical application is used to predict outcomes such as transfusion, length of stay (LOS) and mortality using various vital signs. This study compared transfusion prediction performance of Anomaly Detection (AD) and Logistic Regression (LR).

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Getting Blood Pressure under Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco Other Digital Media Tools About Vital Signs Get Email Updates To receive email updates about ...

  16. Vital signs of life on distant worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life hi-res Size hi-res: 673 kb Credits: ESA 2001. Illustration by Medialab Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life Darwin will most probably look for the spectral signature of ozone, which is unlikely to exist in any quantity for any length of time in the atmosphere of a planet that is not home to life. The background image is a view of Earth seen by the Apollo 17 crew as they traveled toward the Moon. The white patch at the bottom is Antarctica. Unobscured by clouds, Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are visible at the top of this image. The large island off the coast of Africa is the Malagasy Republic. Looking for Earth-like planets hi-res Size hi-res: 2106 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Looking for Earth-like planets Darwin has six telescopes that analyse the atmospheres of Earth-like planets Darwin's flotilla hi-res Size hi-res: 902 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Darwin's flotilla Darwin's six telescopes, a central view-combining spacecraft, and communication satellite (shown bottom left) Our radio and television broadcasts have been leaking into space since the 1930s, when the first powerful emitters were constructed. However, you can do things the other way around as well. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has used radio telescopes to listen to the cosmos for similar signals. Nowadays, astrobiologists are pinpointing more subtle signs that all life, not just intelligent life, might radiate into space. They call these telltale signatures 'biomarkers'. When ESA's Darwin mission begins sending back data in the next decade, biomarkers will help indicate whether neighbouring planets are inhabited. If we only used radio waves as markers of life, this would exclude all forms of life that have not yet developed the means to emit radio waves. Life has been around for thousands of millions of years, but human beings have used radio waves

  17. Vital signs of life on distant worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life hi-res Size hi-res: 673 kb Credits: ESA 2001. Illustration by Medialab Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life Darwin will most probably look for the spectral signature of ozone, which is unlikely to exist in any quantity for any length of time in the atmosphere of a planet that is not home to life. The background image is a view of Earth seen by the Apollo 17 crew as they traveled toward the Moon. The white patch at the bottom is Antarctica. Unobscured by clouds, Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are visible at the top of this image. The large island off the coast of Africa is the Malagasy Republic. Looking for Earth-like planets hi-res Size hi-res: 2106 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Looking for Earth-like planets Darwin has six telescopes that analyse the atmospheres of Earth-like planets Darwin's flotilla hi-res Size hi-res: 902 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Darwin's flotilla Darwin's six telescopes, a central view-combining spacecraft, and communication satellite (shown bottom left) Our radio and television broadcasts have been leaking into space since the 1930s, when the first powerful emitters were constructed. However, you can do things the other way around as well. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has used radio telescopes to listen to the cosmos for similar signals. Nowadays, astrobiologists are pinpointing more subtle signs that all life, not just intelligent life, might radiate into space. They call these telltale signatures 'biomarkers'. When ESA's Darwin mission begins sending back data in the next decade, biomarkers will help indicate whether neighbouring planets are inhabited. If we only used radio waves as markers of life, this would exclude all forms of life that have not yet developed the means to emit radio waves. Life has been around for thousands of millions of years, but human beings have used radio waves

  18. Education Vital Signs 1997: What Makes Students Succeed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushweller, Kevin, Ed.; Zakariya, Sally Banks, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This 13th annual edition of "Education Vital Signs" reports on indicators of school and student success, such as parent involvement, academic coursework, high school completion, technology use, achievement test scores, and student performance on reading, math, and science assessments. Also offers state-by-state statistics and a profile of school…

  19. Vital signs monitoring during injectable and inhalant anesthesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Serizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Reiichiro; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Inomata, Tomo

    2015-01-01

    Selecting the appropriate anesthetic protocol for the individual animal is an essential part of laboratory animal experimentation. The present study compared the characteristics of four anesthetic protocols in mice, focusing on the vital signs. Thirty-two male ddY mice were divided into four groups and administered anesthesia as follows: pentobarbital sodium monoanaesthesia; ketamine and xylazine combined (K/X); medetomidine, midazolam, and butorphanol combined (M/M/B); and isoflurane. In each group, rectal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation (SPO2) were measured, and the changes over time and instability in these signs were compared. The anesthetic depth was also evaluated in each mouse, and the percentage of mice achieving surgical anesthesia was calculated. K/X anesthesia caused remarkable bradycardia, while the respiratory rate and SPO2 were higher than with the others, suggesting a relatively strong cardiac influence and less respiratory depression. The M/M/B group showed a relatively lower heart rate and SPO2, but these abnormalities were rapidly reversed by atipamezole administration. The pentobarbital group showed a lower SPO2, and 62.5% of mice did not reach a surgical anesthetic depth. The isoflurane group showed a marked decrease in respiratory rate compared with the injectable anesthetic groups. However, it had the most stable SPO2 among the groups, suggesting a higher tidal volume. The isoflurane group also showed the highest heart rate during anesthesia. In conclusion, the present study showed the cardiorespiratory characteristics of various anesthetic protocols, providing basic information for selecting an appropriate anesthetic for individual animals during experimentation. PMID:25312399

  20. Monitoring of Vital Signs with Flexible and Wearable Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Khan, Yasser; Ostfeld, Aminy E; Lochner, Claire M; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C

    2016-06-01

    Advances in wireless technologies, low-power electronics, the internet of things, and in the domain of connected health are driving innovations in wearable medical devices at a tremendous pace. Wearable sensor systems composed of flexible and stretchable materials have the potential to better interface to the human skin, whereas silicon-based electronics are extremely efficient in sensor data processing and transmission. Therefore, flexible and stretchable sensors combined with low-power silicon-based electronics are a viable and efficient approach for medical monitoring. Flexible medical devices designed for monitoring human vital signs, such as body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure, pulse oxygenation, and blood glucose have applications in both fitness monitoring and medical diagnostics. As a review of the latest development in flexible and wearable human vitals sensors, the essential components required for vitals sensors are outlined and discussed here, including the reported sensor systems, sensing mechanisms, sensor fabrication, power, and data processing requirements. PMID:26867696

  1. Vital Signs building work-up: The Museum of Anthropology

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, M.S.; Erwine, B.

    1997-12-31

    The paper will present the structure and the results of an in depth study of the Museum of Anthropology, designed by Arthur Erickson Architects for the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and completed in 1976. Part of the Vital Signs Curriculum Project created by Cris Benton and administered through the University of California at Berkeley, this analytic project was designed and carried out by a faculty/student team in the Department of Architecture at the University of Washington. The significance of this study is the simultaneous presentation of qualitative and quantitative information about the thermal and luminous environment of this building.

  2. Speckle POF sensor for detecting vital signs of patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomer, M.; Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Revilla, P.; Herrero, G.; Madruga, F.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, both arterial pulse and respiratory rate have been successfully measured based on changes in speckle patterns of multimode fibers. Using two fiber-based transducers, one located on the wrist and another in the chest, both disturbances were transmitted to the fiber, varying the speckle pattern. These variations of the speckle pattern were captured using a commercial webcam and further processed using different methods. The achieved results have been presented and the simultaneous monitoring of both vital signs has been also discussed. The feasibility to use the proposed sensor system for this application is demonstrated.

  3. How vital are the vital signs? a multi-center observational study from emergency departments of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Vital signs play a critical role in prioritizing patients in emergency departments (EDs), and are the foundation of most triage methods and disposition decisions. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of vital signs documentation anytime during emergency department treatment and to explore if abnormal vital signs were associated with the likelihood of admission for a set of common presenting complaints. Methods Data were collected over a four-month period from the EDs of seven urban tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan. The variables included age, sex, hospital type (government run vs. private), presenting complaint, ED vital signs, and final disposition. Patients who were >12 years of age were included in the analysis. The data were analyzed to describe the proportion of patients with documented vitals signs, which was then crossed-tabulated with top the ten presenting complaints to identify high-acuity patients and correlation with their admission status. Results A total of 274,436 patients were captured in the Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS), out of which 259,288 patients were included in our study. Vital signs information was available for 90,569 (34.9%) patients and the most commonly recorded vitals sign was pulse (25.7%). Important information such as level of consciousness was missing in the majority of patients with head injuries. Based on available information, only 13.3% with chest pain, 12.8% with fever and 12.8% patients with diarrhea could be classified as high-acuity. In addition, hospital admission rates were two- to four-times higher among patients with abnormal vital signs, compared with those with normal vital signs. Conclusion Most patients seen in the EDs in Pakistan did not have any documented vital signs during their visit. Where available, the presence of abnormal vital signs were associated with higher chances of admission to the hospital for the most common presenting symptoms. PMID

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Heart Age - Is Your Heart Older Than You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  5. From a Vital Sign to Vitality: Selling Exercise So Patients Want to Buy It.

    PubMed

    Segar, Michelle L; Guérin, Eva; Phillips, Edward; Fortier, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is Medicine (EIM) and physical activity as a vital sign are based on health-focused research and reflect ideal frames and messages for clinicians. However, they are nonoptimal for patients because they do not address what drives patients' decision-making and motivation. With the growing national emphasis on patient-centered and value-based care, it is the perfect time for EIM to evolve and advance a second-level consumer-oriented exercise prescription and communication strategy. Through research on decision-making, motivation, consumer behavior, and meaningful goal pursuit, this article features six evidence-based issues to help clinicians make physical activity more relevant and compelling for patients to sustain in ways that concurrently support patient-centered care. Physical activity prescriptions and counseling can evolve to reflect affective and behavioral science and sell exercise so patients want to buy it. PMID:27399825

  6. Frailty: A Vital Sign for Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Alexander, Karen P

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisms of aging predispose to cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as to aggregate health challenges. For older adults, CVD is likely to exist in combination with comorbid conditions, disability, polypharmacy, falling risks, and body composition changes. These other dimensions of health result in cumulative weakening with greater clinical complexity that confound basic precepts of CVD presentation, prognosis, and treatments. A convenient operational tool is needed to gauge this age-related vulnerability such that it can be integrated in the evaluation and treatment of CVD. Frailty is a concept that is neither disease- nor age-specific, but is used to characterize the reserve that a person has available to tolerate stresses associated with aging, disease, and even therapy. Frailty arises from specific biological mechanisms in association with cumulative physiological decrements, psychosocial stresses, and physical impairments. Performance-based and survey tools have been developed and tested to measure frailty. Although different frailty tools vary in practicality, measured domains, and precise applications, all are useful in identifying risks that commonly accrue with age. Although comparisons between frailty tools are ongoing and sometimes even controversial, the rationale to integrate routine use of frailty screening as part of routine care is relatively straightforward and easy to envision. Frailty assessment applied as a vital sign (for standard maintenance and evaluation of new symptoms) enhances perspectives of risk, decision-making, and opportunities for tailored CVD management. PMID:27476987

  7. Vital sign sensing method based on EMD in terahertz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengwu; Liu, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact respiration and heartbeat rates detection could be applied to find survivors trapped in the disaster or the remote monitoring of the respiration and heartbeat of a patient. This study presents an improved algorithm that extracts the respiration and heartbeat rates of humans by utilizing the terahertz radar, which further lessens the effects of noise, suppresses the cross-term, and enhances the detection accuracy. A human target echo model for the terahertz radar is first presented. Combining the over-sampling method, low-pass filter, and Empirical Mode Decomposition improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution time-frequency technique and the centroid of the spectrogram are used to estimate the instantaneous velocity of the target's cardiopulmonary motion. The down-sampling method is adopted to prevent serious distortion. Finally, a second time-frequency analysis is applied to the centroid curve to extract the respiration and heartbeat rates of the individual. Simulation results show that compared with the previously presented vital sign sensing method, the improved algorithm enhances the signal-to-noise ratio to 1 dB with a detection accuracy of 80%. The improved algorithm is an effective approach for the detection of respiration and heartbeat signal in a complicated environment.

  8. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  9. A low-cost reader for automatically collecting vital signs in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Yi; Chen, Fuh-Gwo; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2012-08-01

    Nowadays, the use of medical sensors with embedded communication modules provides accurate number reading and automatic recording. However, such readers are usually more expensive than similar devices without an embedded communication module. Further, different vendors define proprietary communication protocols and data formats for their own medical sensors. Due to the twin issues of high cost and diversity of standards, the automatic collection of patients' vital signs is not common in hospitals, meaning that medical staff need to periodically collect all patients' vital signs. This may cause further problems in caring for patients. We propose a low-cost reader using a cheap web camera to automatically read vital sign monitors in hospitals. The reader uses a high-resolution web camera to take a series of pictures of vital sign monitors and recognizes vital signs in electronic form and then forwards that information to hospital information systems. Its major benefit is that different sensors equipped with vital sign monitors, whether they include a computer communications module, can be digital-number recognized. It saves time in recording monitored vital signs of patients widely located in hospitals. In sum medical staff care of patients may be usefully assisted by the proposed reader which automatically collects all patients' vital signs, significantly improving patient care. PMID:21607708

  10. A fuzzy model for processing and monitoring vital signs in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The area of the hospital automation has been the subject of much research, addressing relevant issues which can be automated, such as: management and control (electronic medical records, scheduling appointments, hospitalization, among others); communication (tracking patients, staff and materials), development of medical, hospital and laboratory equipment; monitoring (patients, staff and materials); and aid to medical diagnosis (according to each speciality). Methods In this context, this paper presents a Fuzzy model for helping medical diagnosis of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients and their vital signs monitored through a multiparameter heart screen. Intelligent systems techniques were used in the data acquisition and processing (sorting, transforming, among others) it into useful information, conducting pre-diagnosis and providing, when necessary, alert signs to the medical staff. Conclusions The use of fuzzy logic turned to the medical area can be very useful if seen as a tool to assist specialists in this area. This paper presented a fuzzy model able to monitor and classify the condition of the vital signs of hospitalized patients, sending alerts according to the pre-diagnosis done helping the medical diagnosis. PMID:21810277

  11. Validating Emergency Department Vital Signs Using a Data Quality Engine for Data Warehouse

    PubMed Central

    Genes, N; Chandra, D; Ellis, S; Baumlin, K

    2013-01-01

    Background : Vital signs in our emergency department information system were entered into free-text fields for heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature and oxygen saturation. Objective : We sought to convert these text entries into a more useful form, for research and QA purposes, upon entry into a data warehouse. Methods : We derived a series of rules and assigned quality scores to the transformed values, conforming to physiologic parameters for vital signs across the age range and spectrum of illness seen in the emergency department. Results : Validating these entries revealed that 98% of free-text data had perfect quality scores, conforming to established vital sign parameters. Average vital signs varied as expected by age. Degradations in quality scores were most commonly attributed logging temperature in Fahrenheit instead of Celsius; vital signs with this error could still be transformed for use. Errors occurred more frequently during periods of high triage, though error rates did not correlate with triage volume. Conclusions : In developing a method for importing free-text vital sign data from our emergency department information system, we now have a data warehouse with a broad array of quality-checked vital signs, permitting analysis and correlation with demographics and outcomes. PMID:24403981

  12. Novel Use of Google Glass for Procedural Wireless Vital Sign Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Cara A; Zayed, Mohamed A; Aalami, Oliver; Tran, Jennifer; Lau, James N

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study investigates the feasibility and potential utility of head-mounted displays for real-time wireless vital sign monitoring during surgical procedures. Methods In this randomized controlled pilot study, surgery residents (n = 14) performed simulated bedside procedures with traditional vital sign monitors and were randomized to addition of vital sign streaming to Google Glass. Time to recognition of preprogrammed vital sign deterioration and frequency of traditional monitor use was recorded. User feedback was collected by electronic survey. Results The experimental group spent 90% less time looking away from the procedural field to view traditional monitors during bronchoscopy (P = .003), and recognized critical desaturation 8.8 seconds earlier; the experimental group spent 71% (P = .01) less time looking away from the procedural field during thoracostomy, and recognized hypotension 10.5 seconds earlier. Trends toward earlier recognition of deterioration did not reach statistical significance. The majority of participants agreed that Google Glass increases situational awareness (64%), is helpful in monitoring vitals (86%), is easy to use (93%), and has potential to improve patient safety (85%). Conclusion In this early feasibility study, use of streaming to Google Glass significantly decreased time looking away from procedural fields and resulted in a nonsignificant trend toward earlier recognition of vital sign deterioration. Vital sign streaming with Google Glass or similar platforms is feasible and may enhance procedural situational awareness. PMID:26848138

  13. A Self-Calibrating Radar Sensor System for Measuring Vital Signs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chun; Liu, Jason J; Xu, Wenyao; Gu, Changzhan; Li, Changzhi; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-04-01

    Vital signs (i.e., heartbeat and respiration) are crucial physiological signals that are useful in numerous medical applications. The process of measuring these signals should be simple, reliable, and comfortable for patients. In this paper, a noncontact self-calibrating vital signs monitoring system based on the Doppler radar is presented. The system hardware and software were designed with a four-tiered layer structure. To enable accurate vital signs measurement, baseband signals in the radar sensor were modeled and a framework for signal demodulation was proposed. Specifically, a signal model identification method was formulated into a quadratically constrained l1 minimization problem and solved using the upper bound and linear matrix inequality (LMI) relaxations. The performance of the proposed system was comprehensively evaluated using three experimental sets, and the results indicated that this system can be used to effectively measure human vital signs. PMID:26011865

  14. High serum creatinine nonlinearity: a renal vital sign?

    PubMed

    Palant, Carlos E; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Pallone, Thomas L; Kimmel, Paul L; Amdur, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have nonlinear serum creatinine concentration (SC) trajectories, especially as CKD progresses. Variability in SC is associated with renal failure and death. However, present methods for measuring SC variability are unsatisfactory because they blend information about SC slope and variance. We propose an improved method for defining and calculating a patient's SC slope and variance so that they are mathematically distinct, and we test these methods in a large sample of US veterans, examining the correlation of SC slope and SC nonlinearity (SCNL) and the association of SCNL with time to stage 4 CKD (CKD4) and death. We found a strong correlation between SCNL and rate of CKD progression, time to CKD4, and time to death, even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore argue that SCNL may be a measure of renal autoregulatory dysfunction that provides an early warning sign for CKD progression. PMID:27194712

  15. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios. PMID:26137365

  16. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios. PMID:26137365

  17. Monitors Track Vital Signs for Fitness and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Have you ever felt nauseous reading a book in the back seat of a car? Or woken from a deep sleep feeling disoriented, unsure which way is up? Momentary mixups like these happen when the sensory systems that track the body's orientation in space become confused. (In the case of the backseat bookworm, the conflict arises when the reader s inner ear, part of the body s vestibular system, senses the car s motion while her eyes are fixed on the stationary pages of the book.) Conditions like motion sickness are common on Earth, but they also present a significant challenge to astronauts in space. Human sensory systems use the pull of gravity to help determine orientation. In the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station, for example, the body experiences a period of confusion before it adapts to the new circumstances. (In space, even the body s proprioceptive system, which tells the brain where the arms and legs are oriented without the need for visual confirmation, goes haywire, meaning astronauts sometimes lose track of where their limbs are when they are not moving them.) This Space Adaptation Syndrome affects a majority of astronauts, even experienced ones, causing everything from mild disorientation to nausea to severe vomiting. "It can be quite debilitating," says William Toscano, a research scientist in NASA s Ames Research Center Psychophysiology Laboratory, part of the Center s Human Systems Integration Division. "When this happens, as you can imagine, work proficiency declines considerably." Since astronauts cannot afford to be distracted or incapacitated during critical missions, NASA has explored various means for preventing and countering motion sickness in space, including a range of drug treatments. Many effective motion sickness drugs, however, cause undesirable side effects, such as drowsiness. Toscano and his NASA colleague, Patricia Cowings, have developed a different approach: Utilizing biofeedback training methods, the pair can

  18. The detection of 4 vital signs of in-patients Using fuzzy database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris Rangkuti, A.; Erlisa Rasjid, Zulfany

    2014-03-01

    Actually in order to improve in the performance of the Hospital's administrator, by serve patients effectively and efficiently, the role of information technology become the dominant support. Especially when it comes to patient's conditions, such that it will be reported to a physician as soon as possible, including monitoring the patient's conditions regularly. For this reason it is necessary to have a Hospital Monitoring Information System, that is able to provide information about the patient's condition which is based on the four vital signs, temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. To monitor the 4 vital signs, the concept of fuzzy logic is used, where the vital signs number approaches 1 then the patient is close to recovery, and on the contrary, when the vital signs number approaches 0 then the patient still has problems. This system also helps nurses to provide answers to the relatives of patients, who wants to know the development of the patient's condition, including the recovery percentage based on the average of Fuzzy max from the 4 vital signs. Using Fuzzy-based monitoring system, the monitoring of the patient's condition becomes simpler and easier.

  19. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents statistical data on the progress of African Americans in higher education, discussing: the black-white higher education equality index; statistics measuring the state of racial inequality; blacks in the performing and fine arts; and state-by-state comparison of blacks as a percentage of all public and private college enrollments compared…

  20. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents the statistical record of the progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education in the United States. Statistical indicators measure racial and educational inequality, higher education statistics in black African nations, the number of black students and scholars at colleges and universities in the United States, and the…

  1. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore, Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides statistical evidence that measures progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education in the United States. Data include racial inequality; graduation rates from liberal arts colleges, state universities, and black colleges; and graduation rates of black athletes. (GR)

  2. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education. Topics include the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; the still-missing statistics on blacks in higher education; and reasons for hope regarding African Americans in higher…

  3. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, focusing on the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; students and faculty from black African nations at U.S. colleges and universities; and the pay scale of faculty at black…

  4. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, focusing on the Black-White Higher Education Equality Index, statistics that measure the state of racial inequality, the pay scale of faculty at black colleges and universities, and leading foundation grants to African American higher…

  5. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education in the United States, focusing on: a higher education equality index, racial inequality, African Americans in medical school, trends in black enrollment, black faculty and administrators, and black Ph.D.s. (SLD)

  6. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education focuses on the black-white higher education equity index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; rankings of black enrollments at the nation's 50 highest-ranked universities and liberal arts colleges; and students and faculty from…

  7. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents statistics on the status of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, examining the following issues: the black-white higher education equality index, the state of racial inequality, state-by-state projections of African American college enrollments for 1995-2015, and the history and status of African Americans in higher…

  8. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Examines the Black-White Higher Education Equality Index; the relative status of Blacks and Whites in education; students and faculty from black African nations at U.S. colleges; progress by black coaches and administrators in college sports; black enrollments at selective universities; progress in winning science and engineering degrees; and…

  9. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. higher education institutions, focusing on the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; the superior graduation rates of black scholarship athletes; and whether the college athletic powerhouses are ignoring the…

  10. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. higher education institutions, including the black-white higher education equality index; statistics measuring the state of racial inequality; ranking the nation's law schools according to percentage of black students; and college affordability (comparing black and white…

  11. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents statistics on the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, discussing the following: the black/white higher-education equality issue, statistics measuring the state of racial inequality, African-American doctoral degrees at an all-time high, the pay scale of faculty at black colleges and universities, and…

  12. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Provides statistical data that describe the present and potential future of blacks in higher education as well as highlighting positive and durable changes at particular colleges and universities. Specific areas include educational equality, college admissions, standardized test scores, and graduation rates of black athletes. Comments on…

  13. Pyruvate dose response studies targeting the vital signs following hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pushpa; Vyacheslav, Makler; Carissa, Chalut; Vanessa, Rodriguez; Bodo, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the optimal effective dose of sodium pyruvate in maintaining the vital signs following hemorrhagic shock (HS) in rats. Materials and Methods: Anesthetized, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent computer-controlled HS for 30 minute followed by fluid resuscitation with either hypertonic saline, or sodium pyruvate solutions of 0.5 M, 1.0 M, 2.0 M, and 4.0 M at a rate of 5ml/kg/h (60 minute) and subsequent blood infusion (60 minute). The results were compared with sham and non- resuscitated groups. The animals were continuously monitored for mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate, pulse pressure, temperature, shock index and Kerdo index (KI). Results: The Sham group remained stable throughout the experiment. Non-resuscitated HS animals did not survive for the entire experiment due to non-viable vital signs and poor shock and KI. All fluids were effective in normalizing the vital signs when shed blood was used adjunctively. Sodium pyruvate 2.0 M was most effective, and 4.0 M solution was least effective in improving the vital signs after HS. Conclusions: Future studies should be directed to use 2.0 M sodium pyruvate adjuvant for resuscitation on multiorgan failure and survival rate in HS. PMID:26229300

  14. Presidents' Vital Signs: Implications for Institutional Decision Making. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Glenn M.; Ducanis, Alex J.

    In an examination of institutional decision making, this study identified types of data used by college presidents in assessing their institution's stability and their perception of the comparative importance of various indicators purported to demonstrate the vital signs of an institution. Indicators were in the areas of Student Flow, Finance, and…

  15. Measuring Adult Literacy in Health Care: Performance of the Newest Vital Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Weiss, Barry D.; Davis, Terry C.; Skripkauskas, Silvia; Rodrigue, Christopher; Bass, Pat F., III; Wolf, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare performance of the newest vital sign (NVS) with existing literacy measures. Methods: We administered the NVS and REALM to 129 patients, and NVS and S-TOFHLA to 119 patients all in public clinics. Results: The NVS demonstrated high sensitivity for detecting limited literacy and moderate specificity (area under the receiver…

  16. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    The "Vital Signs" section of this journal presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education. Every issue contains a composite index of higher educational indicators. This issue features data on African American college enrollment, the enrollment of African American women, and law school…

  17. Vital Signs Strongly Predict Massive Transfusion Need in Geriatric Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Fligor, Scott C; Hamill, Mark E; Love, Katie M; Collier, Bryan R; Lollar, Dan; Bradburn, Eric H

    2016-07-01

    Early recognition of massive transfusion (MT) requirement in geriatric trauma patients presents a challenge, as older patients present with vital signs outside of traditional thresholds for hypotension and tachycardia. Although many systems exist to predict MT need in trauma patients, none have specifically evaluated the geriatric population. We sought to evaluate the predictive value of presenting vital signs in geriatric trauma patients for prediction of MT. We retrospectively reviewed geriatric trauma patients presenting to our Level I trauma center from 2010 to 2013 requiring full trauma team activation. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated to assess discrimination of arrival vital signs for MT prediction. Ideal cutoffs with high sensitivity and specificity were identified. A total of 194 patients with complete data were analyzed. Of these, 16 patients received MT. There was no difference between the MT and non-MT groups in sex, age, or mechanism. Systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and shock index all were strongly predictive of MT need. Interestingly, we found that heart rate does not predict MT. MT in geriatric trauma patients can be reliably and simply predicted by arrival vital signs. Heart rate may not reflect serious hemorrhage in this population. PMID:27457863

  18. Does Size and Location of the Vital Signs Monitor Matter? A Study of Two Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of an observational study in which we compared how the size and location of the vital signs monitor impact teamwork at two trauma centers. Our observations focused on three factors: information exchange, situational awareness, and ergonomic issues. We found that the smaller display was difficult to view and required more team communication and workarounds, such as periodic verbal reports. The larger and closer display, although accessible to more team members, did not uniformly improve team’s situational awareness because vital signals were not verbalized and the monitor was often ignored. We suggest introducing multiple larger and closer displays, while keeping the practice of periodic verbal reporting. PMID:21347070

  19. [Design of mobile vital-signs monitoring system for the elderly in nursing home].

    PubMed

    Ren, Pengling; Li, Lifeng; Chen, Longtu; Niu, Haijun; Fan, Yubo

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposed a mobile vital-signs monitoring system based on ZigBee localization and wireless transmission technology for the elderly in nursing home. The system can monitor the vital-signs (pulse, ECG and blood oxygen), localize human body and warn in emergency. The validity and accuracy of this system were testified by the experiments of mobile acquisition and storage of pulse. In these experiments, the measurement of pulse ranged from 50 to 170 time a minute, the mean error of which was less than 3%. The mean error of localizing was less than 4 m. And the data transmission rate was 250 kbps. The system, which effectively conducts the real-time monitoring of the health and safety situation for the elderly, has a great significance for protecting the elderly's life safety. PMID:24941773

  20. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration. PMID:26174867

  1. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  2. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s. PMID:25933881

  3. Verification of a non-contact vital sign monitoring system using an infant simulator.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Li, Changzhi; Yu, Xiaogang; Weiss, Michael D; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, experimental result using a 5.8 GHz Doppler radar to monitor the variations of vital signs of an infant simulator under different medical conditions is presented. The infant simulator can mimic cardiovascular derangements seen in critically ill infants. The result demonstrates the system is capable of tracking a majority of the changes in heart rate and respiratory rate. Analysis suggests possible techniques for further improvement, such as direct coupling circuit, carrier frequency tuning and spectral analysis. PMID:19963860

  4. Whole body massage for reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients in cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Abasi, Ali; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients admitted in coronary care units face various stressors. Ambiguity of future life conditions and unawareness of caring methods intensifies the patients’ anxiety and stress. This study was conducted to assess the effects of whole body massage on anxiety and vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 patients. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. The intervention group received a session of whole body massage and the control group received routine care. The levels of State, Trait and overall anxiety and vital signs were assessed in both groups before and after intervention. Independent sample t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square and Fischer exact tests were used for data analysis. Results: The baseline overall mean score of anxiety was 79.43±29.34 in the intervention group and was decreased to 50.38±20.35 after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in the overall mean anxiety in the control group during the study. The baseline diastolic blood pressure was 77.05±8.12 mmHg and was decreased to 72.18±9.19 mmHg after the intervention (p=0.004). Also, significant decreases were occurred in heart rate and respiration rate of intervention group after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in vital signs of the control group during the study. Conclusion: The results suggest that whole body massage was effective in reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. PMID:25405113

  5. Effect on Cessation Counseling of Documenting Smoking Status as a Routine Vital Sign: An ACORN Study

    PubMed Central

    Rothemich, Stephen F.; Woolf, Steven H.; Johnson, Robert E.; Burgett, Amy E.; Flores, Sharon K.; Marsland, David W.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Guidelines encourage primary care clinicians to document smoking status when obtaining patients’ blood pressure, temperature, and pulse rate (vital signs), but whether this practice promotes cessation counseling is unclear. We examined whether the vital sign intervention influences patient-reported frequency and intensity of tobacco cessation counseling. METHODS This study was a cluster-randomized, controlled trial conducted in the Virginia Ambulatory Care Outcomes Research Network (ACORN). At intervention practices, nurses and medical assistants were instructed to assess the tobacco use status of every adult patient and record it with the traditional vital signs. Control practices did not use any systematic tobacco screening or identification system. Outcomes were the proportion of smokers reporting clinician counseling of any kind and the frequency of 2 counseling subcomponents: simple quit advice and more intensive discussion. RESULTS A total of 6,729 adult patients (1,149 smokers) at 18 primary care practices completed exit questionnaires during a 6-month comparison period. Among 561 smokers at intervention practices, 61.9% reported receiving any counseling, compared with 53.4% of the 588 smokers at control practices, for a difference of 8.6% (P = .04). The effect was largely restricted to simple advice, which was reported by 59.9% of intervention patients and 51.5% of control patients (P=.04). There was no significant increase in more extensive discussion, with 32.5% and 29.3% of patients at intervention and control practices, respectively, reporting this type of counseling (P=.18). CONCLUSIONS The vital sign intervention promotes tobacco counseling at primary care practices through a modest increase in simple advice to quit. When implemented as a stand-alone intervention, it does not appear to increase intensive counseling. PMID:18195316

  6. Through-Wall Multiple Targets Vital Signs Tracking Based on VMD Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiaming; Hong, Hong; Zhao, Heng; Li, Yusheng; Gu, Chen; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Targets located at the same distance are easily neglected in most through-wall multiple targets detecting applications which use the single-input single-output (SISO) ultra-wideband (UWB) radar system. In this paper, a novel multiple targets vital signs tracking algorithm for through-wall detection using SISO UWB radar has been proposed. Taking advantage of the high-resolution decomposition of the Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD) based algorithm, the respiration signals of different targets can be decomposed into different sub-signals, and then, we can track the time-varying respiration signals accurately when human targets located in the same distance. Intensive evaluation has been conducted to show the effectiveness of our scheme with a 0.15 m thick concrete brick wall. Constant, piecewise-constant and time-varying vital signs could be separated and tracked successfully with the proposed VMD based algorithm for two targets, even up to three targets. For the multiple targets' vital signs tracking issues like urban search and rescue missions, our algorithm has superior capability in most detection applications. PMID:27537880

  7. Home telemonitoring of vital signs--technical challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Celler, Branko G; Sparks, Ross S

    2015-01-01

    The telemonitoring of vital signs from the home is an essential element of telehealth services for the management of patients with chronic conditions, such as congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, or poorly controlled hypertension. Telehealth is now being deployed widely in both rural and urban settings, and in this paper, we discuss the contribution made by biomedical instrumentation, user interfaces, and automated risk stratification algorithms in developing a clinical diagnostic quality longitudinal health record at home. We identify technical challenges in the acquisition of high-quality biometric signals from unsupervised patients at home, identify new technical solutions and user interfaces, and propose new measurement modalities and signal processing techniques for increasing the quality and value of vital signs monitoring at home. We also discuss use of vital signs data for the automated risk stratification of patients, so that clinical resources can be targeted to those most at risk of unscheduled admission to hospital. New research is also proposed to integrate primary care, hospital, personal genomic, and telehealth electronic health records, and apply predictive analytics and data mining for enhancing clinical decision support. PMID:25163076

  8. The Effect of Live Classical Piano Music on the Vital Signs of Patients Undergoing Ophthalmic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Jorge G.; Ruszkowski, Joseph M.; Worak, Sandra R.

    2008-01-01

    Context Music and surgery. Objective To determine the effect of live classical piano music on vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Design Retrospective case series. Setting and Patients 203 patients who underwent various ophthalmologic procedures in a period during which a piano was present in the operating room of St. Francis Medical Center. [Note: St. Francis Medical Center has recently been renamed Hawaii Medical Center East.] Intervention Demographic data, surgical procedures, and the vital signs of 203 patients who underwent ophthalmic procedures were obtained from patient records. Blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate measured in the preoperative holding area were compared with the same parameters taken in the operating room, with and without exposure to live piano music. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Main outcome measure Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. Results 115 patients who were exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in the operating room compared with their vital signs measured in the preoperative holding area (P < .0001). The control group of 88 patients not exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant increase in mean arterial blood pressure (P < .0002) and heart rate and respiratory rate (P < .0001). Conclusion Live classical piano music lowered the blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. PMID:18679538

  9. Vital signs monitoring plan for the Klamath Network: Phase I report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarr, Daniel; Odion, Dennis; Truitt, Robert E.; Beever, Erik A.; Shafer, Sarah; Duff, Andrew; Smith, Sean B.; Bunn, Windy; Rocchio, Judy; Sarnat, Eli; Alexander, John; Jessup, Steve

    2004-01-01

    This report chronicles the Phase 1 stage of the vital signs monitoring program for the Klamath Network. It consists of two chapters and eleven appendixes. The purposes of Chapter One are to 1) describe the network administrative structure and approach to planning; 2) introduce the Klamath Network parks, their resources, and environmental settings; 3) explain the need for monitoring changes in resources and supporting environments; 4) identify key information gaps that limit understanding of how to best achieve these monitoring goals. The purpose of Chapter Two is to develop the descriptive information provided in Chapter One into a conceptual basis for vital signs monitoring and to present the Network’s initial suite of conceptual models. The Report Appendices provide in-depth information on a variety of topics researched in preparation of the report, including: detailed natural resource profiles for each park, supporting policies and guidelines, regional fire regimes, vegetation types of the parks, exotic species threats, interagency monitoring programs, air issues, water quality (Phase 1 Report), Network vital signs (Scoping Summary Report), rare species, and rare habitats of the parks.

  10. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Guazzi, Alessandro; Jorge, João; Davis, Sara; Watkinson, Peter; Green, Gabrielle; Shenvi, Asha; McCormick, Kenny; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Current technologies to allow continuous monitoring of vital signs in pre-term infants in the hospital require adhesive electrodes or sensors to be in direct contact with the patient. These can cause stress, pain, and also damage the fragile skin of the infants. It has been established previously that the colour and volume changes in superficial blood vessels during the cardiac cycle can be measured using a digital video camera and ambient light, making it possible to obtain estimates of heart rate or breathing rate. Most of the papers in the literature on non-contact vital sign monitoring report results on adult healthy human volunteers in controlled environments for short periods of time. The authors' current clinical study involves the continuous monitoring of pre-term infants, for at least four consecutive days each, in the high-dependency care area of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. The authors have further developed their video-based, non-contact monitoring methods to obtain continuous estimates of heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation for infants nursed in incubators. In this Letter, it is shown that continuous estimates of these three parameters can be computed with an accuracy which is clinically useful. During stable sections with minimal infant motion, the mean absolute error between the camera-derived estimates of heart rate and the reference value derived from the ECG is similar to the mean absolute error between the ECG-derived value and the heart rate value from a pulse oximeter. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in the NICU using ambient light is feasible, and the authors have shown that clinically important events such as a bradycardia accompanied by a major desaturation can be identified with their algorithms for processing the video signal. PMID:26609384

  11. Developing Brain Vital Signs: Initial Framework for Monitoring Brain Function Changes Over Time.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Hajra, Sujoy; Liu, Careesa C; Song, Xiaowei; Fickling, Shaun; Liu, Luke E; Pawlowski, Gabriela; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Smith, Aynsley M; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Van Den Broek, Rudi; Rizzotti, Rowena; Fisher, Kirk; D'Arcy, Ryan C N

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessment of brain function relies heavily on indirect behavior-based tests. Unfortunately, behavior-based assessments are subjective and therefore susceptible to several confounding factors. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs), derived from electroencephalography (EEG), are often used to provide objective, physiological measures of brain function. Historically, ERPs have been characterized extensively within research settings, with limited but growing clinical applications. Over the past 20 years, we have developed clinical ERP applications for the evaluation of functional status following serious injury and/or disease. This work has identified an important gap: the need for a clinically accessible framework to evaluate ERP measures. Crucially, this enables baseline measures before brain dysfunction occurs, and might enable the routine collection of brain function metrics in the future much like blood pressure measures today. Here, we propose such a framework for extracting specific ERPs as potential "brain vital signs." This framework enabled the translation/transformation of complex ERP data into accessible metrics of brain function for wider clinical utilization. To formalize the framework, three essential ERPs were selected as initial indicators: (1) the auditory N100 (Auditory sensation); (2) the auditory oddball P300 (Basic attention); and (3) the auditory speech processing N400 (Cognitive processing). First step validation was conducted on healthy younger and older adults (age range: 22-82 years). Results confirmed specific ERPs at the individual level (86.81-98.96%), verified predictable age-related differences (P300 latency delays in older adults, p < 0.05), and demonstrated successful linear transformation into the proposed brain vital sign (BVS) framework (basic attention latency sub-component of BVS framework reflects delays in older adults, p < 0.05). The findings represent an initial critical step in developing, extracting, and

  12. Developing Brain Vital Signs: Initial Framework for Monitoring Brain Function Changes Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh Hajra, Sujoy; Liu, Careesa C.; Song, Xiaowei; Fickling, Shaun; Liu, Luke E.; Pawlowski, Gabriela; Jorgensen, Janelle K.; Smith, Aynsley M.; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Van Den Broek, Rudi; Rizzotti, Rowena; Fisher, Kirk; D'Arcy, Ryan C. N.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessment of brain function relies heavily on indirect behavior-based tests. Unfortunately, behavior-based assessments are subjective and therefore susceptible to several confounding factors. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs), derived from electroencephalography (EEG), are often used to provide objective, physiological measures of brain function. Historically, ERPs have been characterized extensively within research settings, with limited but growing clinical applications. Over the past 20 years, we have developed clinical ERP applications for the evaluation of functional status following serious injury and/or disease. This work has identified an important gap: the need for a clinically accessible framework to evaluate ERP measures. Crucially, this enables baseline measures before brain dysfunction occurs, and might enable the routine collection of brain function metrics in the future much like blood pressure measures today. Here, we propose such a framework for extracting specific ERPs as potential “brain vital signs.” This framework enabled the translation/transformation of complex ERP data into accessible metrics of brain function for wider clinical utilization. To formalize the framework, three essential ERPs were selected as initial indicators: (1) the auditory N100 (Auditory sensation); (2) the auditory oddball P300 (Basic attention); and (3) the auditory speech processing N400 (Cognitive processing). First step validation was conducted on healthy younger and older adults (age range: 22–82 years). Results confirmed specific ERPs at the individual level (86.81–98.96%), verified predictable age-related differences (P300 latency delays in older adults, p < 0.05), and demonstrated successful linear transformation into the proposed brain vital sign (BVS) framework (basic attention latency sub-component of BVS framework reflects delays in older adults, p < 0.05). The findings represent an initial critical step in developing, extracting, and

  13. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Mauricio; Guazzi, Alessandro; Jorge, João; Davis, Sara; Watkinson, Peter; Green, Gabrielle; Shenvi, Asha; McCormick, Kenny; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-09-01

    Current technologies to allow continuous monitoring of vital signs in pre-term infants in the hospital require adhesive electrodes or sensors to be in direct contact with the patient. These can cause stress, pain, and also damage the fragile skin of the infants. It has been established previously that the colour and volume changes in superficial blood vessels during the cardiac cycle can be measured using a digital video camera and ambient light, making it possible to obtain estimates of heart rate or breathing rate. Most of the papers in the literature on non-contact vital sign monitoring report results on adult healthy human volunteers in controlled environments for short periods of time. The authors' current clinical study involves the continuous monitoring of pre-term infants, for at least four consecutive days each, in the high-dependency care area of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. The authors have further developed their video-based, non-contact monitoring methods to obtain continuous estimates of heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation for infants nursed in incubators. In this Letter, it is shown that continuous estimates of these three parameters can be computed with an accuracy which is clinically useful. During stable sections with minimal infant motion, the mean absolute error between the camera-derived estimates of heart rate and the reference value derived from the ECG is similar to the mean absolute error between the ECG-derived value and the heart rate value from a pulse oximeter. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in the NICU using ambient light is feasible, and the authors have shown that clinically important events such as a bradycardia accompanied by a major desaturation can be identified with their algorithms for processing the video signal. PMID:26609384

  14. The haptic kymograph: a diagnostic tele-haptic device for sensation of vital signs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngseok; Kesavadas, T

    2005-01-01

    The kymograph is device for measuring and presenting pressure-based signals, such as human heart beat and artery volume pressure. The Haptic Kymograph is a haptically-enhanced tele-medicine system which is used to acquire human vital signs and then to transform these signs into sensible, scalable and ubiquitous media so that a user can easily comprehend subtle and ambiguous signals in a remote place. In an experiment setup a patient's artery pressure pulse was captured at 200 Hz of sampling rate, transmitted via TCP/IP network, and replicated in a remote place using a PHANToM haptic device coupled with a real-time visual interface. In this paper we report our recent progresses in developing a low-cost input system, network interfaces and haptic replication of the human artery volume pulse signal. PMID:15718738

  15. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. PMID:25900584

  16. Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

    1991-08-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

  17. Community Vital Signs: Taking the Pulse of the Community While Caring for Patients.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Bazemore, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 both the Institute of Medicine and the National Quality Forum recommended the inclusion of social determinants of health data in electronic health records (EHRs). Both entities primarily focus on collecting socioeconomic and health behavior data directly from individual patients. The burden of reliably, accurately, and consistently collecting such information is substantial, and it may take several years before a primary care team has actionable data available in its EHR. A more reliable and less burdensome approach to integrating clinical and social determinant data exists and is technologically feasible now. Community vital signs-aggregated community-level information about the neighborhoods in which our patients live, learn, work, and play-convey contextual social deprivation and associated chronic disease risks based on where patients live. Given widespread access to "big data" and geospatial technologies, community vital signs can be created by linking aggregated population health data with patient addresses in EHRs. These linked data, once imported into EHRs, are a readily available resource to help primary care practices understand the context in which their patients reside and achieve important health goals at the patient, population, and policy levels. PMID:27170802

  18. Sensitivity Enhanced Vital Sign Detection Based on Antenna Reflection Coefficient Variation.

    PubMed

    An, Yong-Jun; Yun, Gi-Ho; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a vital sign detection sensor based on reflection coefficient variance from an antenna used in wireless communication devices. The near-field effect is estimated by performing 3D full-wave simulations using a dipole antenna and the magnitude variation of the reflection coefficient induced by human thorax movement due to heart and lungs is observed. The results support the possibility of vital sign detection based on the magnitude variation of the reflection coefficient from an antenna, which can be explained as a narrowband modulation scheme. In particular, a sensitivity enhancement method is proposed and analyzed, and experiments are carried out for heartbeat detection using a dipole antenna with the proposed system. Experimental results are compared between the direct detection and sensitivity enhancement detection schemes. FM signal is also applied to confirm that the proposed sensor works properly in conjunction with an existing communication system. The proposed cardiopulmonary detection sensor is implemented with off-the-shelf components at 2.4 GHz and excellent performance is obtained. PMID:25706824

  19. Vital signs in intensive care: automatic acquisition and consolidation into electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Telmo; Ribeiro, Cristina; Granja, Cristina

    2009-02-01

    The integration of computer systems into clinical practice is a consequence of the growing sophistication of medical machinery. The fact that patient management in large institutions is handled by complex information systems brings about the need for integration between applications on both sides. The paper describes a prototype for automatic data collection from intensive care devices developed at Pedro Hispano Hospital in Portugal. The system acts as an application gateway between the network of patient monitoring devices and the general-purpose hospital network. The conformance to medical standards is one of the main concerns. The international standard Health Level 7 (HL7) has been adopted to import vital signs, as well as to prepare data for visualization in departmental applications and to organize archives. The design has followed the administrative and clinical processes in the hospital closely, leading to a successful interaction with the health professionals. Automatic acquisition eliminates transcription errors, improves the quality of records and allows the assembly of large electronic archives of vital sign data. The concern with data archiving in standard formats opens many possibilities for further analysis of the collected data sets. The possibility of communicating via the HL7 standard makes the whole system easily interoperable with applications in related domains. PMID:19238896

  20. Can we improve the clinical utility of respiratory rate as a monitored vital sign?

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangyou; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; McKenna, Thomas M; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-06-01

    Respiratory rate (RR) is a basic vital sign, measured and monitored throughout a wide spectrum of health care settings, although RR is historically difficult to measure in a reliable fashion. We explore an automated method that computes RR only during intervals of clean, regular, and consistent respiration and investigate its diagnostic use in a retrospective analysis of prehospital trauma casualties. At least 5 s of basic vital signs, including heart rate, RR, and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, were continuously collected from 326 spontaneously breathing trauma casualties during helicopter transport to a level I trauma center. "Reliable" RR data were identified retrospectively using automated algorithms. The diagnostic performances of reliable versus standard RR were evaluated by calculation of the receiver operating characteristic curves using the maximum-likelihood method and comparison of the summary areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). Respiratory rate shows significant data-reliability differences. For identifying prehospital casualties who subsequently receive a respiratory intervention (hospital intubation or tube thoracotomy), standard RR yields an AUC of 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.69), whereas reliable RR yields an AUC of 0.67 (0.57-0.77), P < 0.05. For identifying casualties subsequently diagnosed with a major hemorrhagic injury and requiring blood transfusion, standard RR yields an AUC of 0.60 (0.49-0.70), whereas reliable RR yields 0.77 (0.67-0.85), P < 0.001. Reliable RR, as determined by an automated algorithm, is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of respiratory pathology and major hemorrhage in a trauma population. It may be a useful input to a wide variety of clinical scores and automated decision-support algorithms. PMID:19008777

  1. Impact of peer pressure on accuracy of reporting vital signs: An interprofessional comparison between nursing and medical students.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Alyshah; Beran, Tanya N

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical relationship between nursing and medicine has long been known, yet its direct influence on procedural tasks has yet to be considered. Drawing on the theory of conformity from social psychology, we suggest that nursing students are likely to report incorrect information in response to subtle social pressures imposed by medical students. Second-year medical and third-year nursing students took vital signs readings from a patient simulator. In a simulation exercise, three actors, posing as medical students, and one nursing student participant all took a total of three rounds of vital signs on a high-fidelity patient simulator. In the first two rounds the three actors individually stated the same correct vital signs values, and on the third round the three actors individually stated the same incorrect vital sign values. This same procedure was repeated with actors posing as nursing students, and one medical student. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that nursing student participants (M = 2.84; SD = 1.24) reported a higher number of incorrect vital signs than did medical student participants (M = 2.13; SD = 1.07), F (1,100) = 5.51, p = 0.021 (Cohen's d = 0.61). The study indicated that social pressure may prevent nursing students from questioning incorrect information within interprofessional environments, potentially affecting quality of care. PMID:26833111

  2. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  3. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  4. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  5. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  6. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  7. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  8. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  9. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  10. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  11. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  13. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  15. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  16. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  18. Utilization of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) in Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Shealy, Kayce M; Threatt, Tiffaney B

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy refers to the ability of a patient to obtain, communicate, process, and understand basic information related to health and services. It is estimated that the majority of adult Americans may have difficulty understanding health information. In addition, limited health literacy of patients is linked to over $100 billion in health care costs. Measurement of health literacy may aid in improving communication with patients, and thus to improving outcomes and decreasing costs. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS) is a tool that has been used to assess health literacy in a variety of patients. It has been validated against other measures including the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Patients are categorized as high likelihood of limited health literacy, possible limited health literacy, or adequate literacy. The NVS has been used in a variety of settings and tested among a wide range of patient groups. The most common setting for use is in primary care, probably due to the relatively quick assessment of health literacy (within 3 minutes). The NVS has been used in Caucasians, African Americans, Hispanics, and several other ethnicities. Assessment with the NVS has been conducted in adult patients across the age continuum, and with several different health conditions, including diabetes, kidney disease, and pain. This article seeks to review the published uses to date and to provide suggestions for potential uses of the NVS. PMID:26507669

  19. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviours, and Cardiovascular Health: When Will Cardiorespiratory Fitness Become a Vital Sign?

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Although it is generally agreed upon that a physically active lifestyle and regular exercise are good for heart health, it is much less appreciated by the public that the prolonged hours of sedentary time resulting from sitting at work or screen time are also risk factors for cardiovascular outcomes and other cardiometabolic diseases. In this short narrative review, evidence is discussed and prudent recommendations are made in the context of the sedentary, affluent lifestyle that characterizes a large proportion of our population. It has become overwhelmingly clear that a sedentary lifestyle is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. In addition, vigorous physical activity and exercise is also associated with metabolic and cardiovascular adaptations that are compatible with cardiovascular health. In that regard, cardiorespiratory fitness, a reliable metric to assess the ability of the cardiovascular system to sustain prolonged physical work, has been shown to be the most powerful predictor of mortality and morbidity, way beyond classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as smoking, cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes. On the basis of the evidence available, it is proposed that both dimensions of overall physical activity level (reducing sedentary time and performing regular physical activity or endurance type exercise) should be targeted to reduce CVD risk. Finally, because of the robust evidence that poor cardiorespiratory fitness is an independent risk factor for CVD and related mortality, it is proposed that this simple physiological metric should be incorporated as a vital sign in CVD risk factor evaluation and management. PMID:26907579

  20. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Jin, Jingxi; Lv, Hao; Li, Sheng; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-01-01

    After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE) methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors. PMID:26115454

  1. Measuring the "fifth vital sign" in cataract surgery patients--is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Henry, Cynthia; Navarro, Victoria; Jun, Albert; Annaberdyev, Shohrat

    2006-01-01

    As an ophthalmic nurse, you may wonder why it is so important to assess and manage the pain, or "fifth vital sign" of cataract surgery patients. How much pain could a patient experience as a result of a relatively short procedure? In January 2004, while reviewing the pain levels of 135 outpatient surgery patients undergoing cataract surgery, 21% of the patients reported pain. Twelve percent (12%) experienced mild pain and 9% experienced moderate to severe pain. Pain relief was recorded in 38% of cases. It was noted that there was no pain reassessment recorded by nurses in 62% of cases, demonstrating a deficit in pain assessment and documentation. At our institution, the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital, there is a pain assessment and management policy that requires a postoperative pain goal be identified prior to any surgical procedure. Hospital guidelines should be followed for documentation of pain in the outpatient setting. To improve the quality of pain assessment and documentation, and to meet the hospital compliance rate of 85%, an audit was performed on 60 outpatient cataract surgery charts over a one-month period. An initial compliance rate of 83% was established. After staff education and changes to the critical pathway, a re-audit demonstrated an increase to 95% in pain assessment and documentation. PMID:17253012

  2. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Meinert, D.L.

    1991-05-01

    As part of Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

  3. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Meinert, D.L.

    1991-05-01

    As part of Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

  4. Certification in emergency nursing associated with vital signs attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Christian N; Polomano, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    Regimented vital signs (VS) assessment for all emergency patients is a common practice in many US emergency departments despite the paucity of evidence supporting its utility. Nurse attitude may be a factor that maintains this ritualized practice. Understanding the relationship between attitudes, practices, and nurse demographic factors may be the first step to challenging this ritual in order to implement evidence-based practices. A 20-item questionnaire was developed to assess emergency nurse attitudes and practices related to VS. A convenience sample of emergency nurses from the mid-Atlantic region of the United States was used. Eighty-one emergency nurses participated. Results demonstrated wide variations in VS practice and attitudes, though some strongly held attitudes are inconsistent with the literature. Certification in emergency nursing had significant associations with beliefs that nurses' clinical judgment should be the determinant for VS frequency (p < .05) and that triage VS are not an accurate representation of patient condition (p < .05). The practice of assessing the patient first and reviewing VS after was also associated with certification (p < .05). This study begins to address emergency nurse attitudes and practices of VS so that evidence-based changes can be implemented and further research on VS frequency conducted. It also demonstrates the relationship between specialty certification and evidence-supported attitudes and practices. PMID:26796285

  5. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  6. A magnetic induction measurement system for adult vital sign monitoring: evaluation of capacitive and inductive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, H.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic induction (MI) measurement technique could provide an unobtrusive contactless method for continuous monitoring of vital signs such as breathing and cardiac activity in bed. In this paper, we present a magnetic induction system to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring heart and lung activity and the preliminary measurement results. The excitation and detection coils are designed to be implemented in a single printed circuit board, allowing the use of the system in a bed with coils under the mattress. The electronic system is based on a 16 bit arbitrary waveform generator (PXI-5422, National instrument) operating at a sample rate of 200 MS/s for the excitation signal and the detected amplified signal is then, sampled at 100 MS/s by a 14 bit digitizer (PXI-5122, National Instruments). The preliminary results at 10 MHz show the ability of the system to detect solutions with different conductivities. However the capacitive effect is in the same order of magnitude as the inductive effect due to eddy currents. Safety of the system has been evaluated to be in accordance with the standards of human exposure to the magnetic fields.

  7. Cost-efficient speckle interferometry with plastic optical fiber for unobtrusive monitoring of human vital signs.

    PubMed

    Podbreznik, Peter; Đonlagić, Denis; Lešnik, Dejan; Cigale, Boris; Zazula, Damjan

    2013-10-01

    A cost-efficient plastic optical fiber (POF) system for unobtrusive monitoring of human vital signs is presented. The system is based on speckle interferometry. A laser diode is butt-coupled to the POF whose exit face projects speckle patterns onto a linear optical sensor array. Sequences of acquired speckle images are transformed into one-dimensional signals by using the phase-shifting method. The signals are analyzed by band-pass filtering and a Morlet-wavelet-based multiresolutional approach for the detection of cardiac and respiratory activities, respectively. The system is tested with 10 healthy nonhospitalized persons, lying supine on a mattress with the embedded POF. Experimental results are assessed statistically: precisions of 98.8% ± 1.5% and 97.9% ± 2.3%, sensitivities of 99.4% ± 0.6% and 95.3% ± 3%, and mean delays between interferometric detections and corresponding referential signals of 116.6 ± 55.5 and 1299.2 ± 437.3 ms for the heartbeat and respiration are obtained, respectively. PMID:24089254

  8. Computational Depth of Anesthesia via Multiple Vital Signs Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sadrawi, Muammar; Fan, Shou-Zen; Abbod, Maysam F.; Jen, Kuo-Kuang; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the depth of anesthesia (DoA) index using artificial neural networks (ANN) which is performed as the modeling technique. Totally 63-patient data is addressed, for both modeling and testing of 17 and 46 patients, respectively. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is utilized to purify between the electroencephalography (EEG) signal and the noise. The filtered EEG signal is subsequently extracted to achieve a sample entropy index by every 5-second signal. Then, it is combined with other mean values of vital signs, that is, electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR), pulse, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and signal quality index (SQI) to evaluate the DoA index as the input. The 5 doctor scores are averaged to obtain an output index. The mean absolute error (MAE) is utilized as the performance evaluation. 10-fold cross-validation is performed in order to generalize the model. The ANN model is compared with the bispectral index (BIS). The results show that the ANN is able to produce lower MAE than BIS. For the correlation coefficient, ANN also has higher value than BIS tested on the 46-patient testing data. Sensitivity analysis and cross-validation method are applied in advance. The results state that EMG has the most effecting parameter, significantly. PMID:26568957

  9. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Jin, Jingxi; Lv, Hao; Li, Sheng; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-01-01

    After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE) methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors. PMID:26115454

  10. Health technology assessment review: Remote monitoring of vital signs - current status and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in communications technologies and associated computing and digital electronics now permit patient data, including routine vital signs, to be surveyed at a distance. Remote monitoring, or telemonitoring, can be regarded as a subdivision of telemedicine - the use of electronic and telecommunications technologies to provide and support health care when distance separates the participants. Depending on environment and purpose, the patient and the carer/system surveying, analysing or interpreting the data could be separated by as little as a few feet or be on different continents. Most telemonitoring systems will incorporate five components: data acquisition using an appropriate sensor; transmission of data from patient to clinician; integration of data with other data describing the state of the patient; synthesis of an appropriate action, or response or escalation in the care of the patient, and associated decision support; and storage of data. Telemonitoring is currently being used in community-based healthcare, at the scene of medical emergencies, by ambulance services and in hospitals. Current challenges in telemonitoring include: the lack of a full range of appropriate sensors, the bulk weight and size of the whole system or its components, battery life, available bandwidth, network coverage, and the costs of data transmission via public networks. Telemonitoring also has the ability to produce a mass of data - but this requires interpretation to be of clinical use and much necessary research work remains to be done. PMID:20875149

  11. Exercise Is Medicine Initiative: Physical Activity as a Vital Sign and Prescription in Adult Rehabilitation Practice.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Rachel E

    2016-09-01

    To support rehabilitation health care professionals' efforts to increase physical activity levels among their outpatient rehabilitation and postdischarge patients, we review the Exercise is Medicine (EIM) initiative. The EIM initiative was launched in 2007 jointly by the American College of Sports Medicine and American Medical Association. Three principles underlie the EIM initiative. First, physical activity should be monitored as a vital sign; second, physical activity is an effective medical modality and should be prescribed; and third, success of their vision requires top down and bottom up efforts by 3 key stakeholder groups: health care providers, exercise professionals, and the community. The target weekly physical activity level is 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, as established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization. Persons falling below the weekly target physical activity level should be prescribed physical activity and/or referred to an exercise professional for implementation support. Selection of an exercise professional for referral is based on the patient's risk stratification and need to participate in clinically supervised physical activity. PMID:27470321

  12. Computational Depth of Anesthesia via Multiple Vital Signs Based on Artificial Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Sadrawi, Muammar; Fan, Shou-Zen; Abbod, Maysam F; Jen, Kuo-Kuang; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the depth of anesthesia (DoA) index using artificial neural networks (ANN) which is performed as the modeling technique. Totally 63-patient data is addressed, for both modeling and testing of 17 and 46 patients, respectively. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is utilized to purify between the electroencephalography (EEG) signal and the noise. The filtered EEG signal is subsequently extracted to achieve a sample entropy index by every 5-second signal. Then, it is combined with other mean values of vital signs, that is, electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR), pulse, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and signal quality index (SQI) to evaluate the DoA index as the input. The 5 doctor scores are averaged to obtain an output index. The mean absolute error (MAE) is utilized as the performance evaluation. 10-fold cross-validation is performed in order to generalize the model. The ANN model is compared with the bispectral index (BIS). The results show that the ANN is able to produce lower MAE than BIS. For the correlation coefficient, ANN also has higher value than BIS tested on the 46-patient testing data. Sensitivity analysis and cross-validation method are applied in advance. The results state that EMG has the most effecting parameter, significantly. PMID:26568957

  13. Logistic regression function for detection of suspicious performance during baseline evaluations using concussion vital signs.

    PubMed

    Hill, Benjamin David; Womble, Melissa N; Rohling, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized logistic regression to determine whether performance patterns on Concussion Vital Signs (CVS) could differentiate known groups with either genuine or feigned performance. For the embedded measure development group (n = 174), clinical patients and undergraduate students categorized as feigning obtained significantly lower scores on the overall test battery mean for the CVS, Shipley-2 composite score, and California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition subtests than did genuinely performing individuals. The final full model of 3 predictor variables (Verbal Memory immediate hits, Verbal Memory immediate correct passes, and Stroop Test complex reaction time correct) was significant and correctly classified individuals in their known group 83% of the time (sensitivity = .65; specificity = .97) in a mixed sample of young-adult clinical cases and simulators. The CVS logistic regression function was applied to a separate undergraduate college group (n = 378) that was asked to perform genuinely and identified 5% as having possibly feigned performance indicating a low false-positive rate. The failure rate was 11% and 16% at baseline cognitive testing in samples of high school and college athletes, respectively. These findings have particular relevance given the increasing use of computerized test batteries for baseline cognitive testing and return-to-play decisions after concussion. PMID:25371976

  14. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 4. Vital Signs, Patient Assessment. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fourth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content: vital signs (temperature, pulse, respirations, and blood pressure) and patient assessment at the scene of an emergency. Each section contains objectives,…

  15. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation Within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Walston, James M.; Cabrera, Daniel; Bellew, Shawna D.; Olive, Marc N.; Lohse, Christine M.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rapid-response teams (RRTs) are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED) disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS) at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations). The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10%) based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls). Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25–3.27]), tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73–4.92]), and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42–3.56]) upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65–4.60]), more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP) (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08–2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19–2.80] for high BP), higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44–7.07]) and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43–3.67]). Early RRT activation was associated with increased

  16. Validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Newest Vital Sign: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Takamichi; Sumitani, Masahiko; Suka, Machi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Odajima, Takeshi; Igarashi, Ataru; Kusama, Makiko; Okamoto, Masako; Sugimori, Hiroki; Kawahara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy (HL) refers to the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services, and is thus needed to make appropriate health decisions. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS) is comprised of 6 questions about an ice cream nutrition label and assesses HL numeracy skills. We developed a Japanese version of the NVS (NVS-J) and evaluated the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in patients with chronic pain. The translation of the original NVS into Japanese was achieved as per the published guidelines. An observational study was subsequently performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in 43 Japanese patients suffering from chronic pain. Factor analysis with promax rotation, using the Kaiser criterion (eigenvalues ≥1.0), and a scree plot revealed that the main component of the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors, and each factor consists of two NVS-J items. The criterion-related validity of the total NVS-J score was significantly correlated with the total score of Ishikawa et al.'s self-rated HL Questionnaire, the clinical global assessment of comprehensive HL level, cognitive function, and the Brinkman index. In addition, Cronbach's coefficient for the total score of the NVS-J was adequate (alpha = 0.72). This study demonstrated that the NVS-J has good validity and reliability. Further, the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors: "basic numeracy ability," "complex numeracy ability," and "serious-minded ability." These three HL abilities comprise a 3-step hierarchical structure. Adequate HL should be promoted in chronic pain patients to enable coping, improve functioning, and increase activities of daily living (ADLs) and quality of life (QOL). PMID:24762459

  17. Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tim; Schell, Carl Otto; Lugazia, Edwin; Blixt, Jonas; Mulungu, Moses; Castegren, Markus; Eriksen, Jaran; Konrad, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs) have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Tanzania. Methods and Findings Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001). A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 4.9 (2.9–8.3)). Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5–16.2)). In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02) giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94). Conclusion The introduction of a

  18. Permutation entropy analysis of vital signs data for outcome prediction of patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos; Yang, Shiming; Hu, Peter F; Mackenzie, Colin F; Stansbury, Lynn G; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Permutation entropy is computationally efficient, robust to outliers, and effective to measure complexity of time series. We used this technique to quantify the complexity of continuous vital signs recorded from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using permutation entropy calculated from early vital signs (initial 10-20% of patient hospital stay time), we built classifiers to predict in-hospital mortality and mobility, measured by 3-month Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE). Sixty patients with severe TBI produced a skewed dataset that we evaluated for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The overall prediction accuracy achieved 91.67% for mortality, and 76.67% for 3-month GOSE in testing datasets, using the leave-one-out cross validation. We also applied Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis to compare classifiers built from different learning methods. Those results support the applicability of permutation entropy in analyzing the dynamic behavior of TBI vital signs for early prediction of mortality and long-term patient outcomes. PMID:25464358

  19. The effect of expiratory rib cage compression before endotracheal suctioning on the vital signs in patients under mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Bousarri, Mitra Payami; Shirvani, Yadolah; Agha-Hassan-Kashani, Saeed; Nasab, Nouredin Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, mucus production and secretion is high as a result of the endotracheal tube. Because endotracheal suction in these patients is essential, chest physiotherapy techniques such as expiratory rib cage compression before endotracheal suctioning can be used as a means to facilitate mobilizing and removing airway secretion and improving alveolar ventilation. As one of the complications of mechanical ventilation and endotracheal suctioning is decrease of cardiac output, this study was carried out to determine the effect of expiratory rib cage compression before endotracheal suctioning on the vital signs in patients under mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial with a crossover design. The study subjects included 50 mechanically ventilated patients, hospitalized in intensive care wards of Valiasr and Mousavi hospitals in Zanjan, Iran. Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling and randomly allocated to groups 1 and 2. The patients received endotracheal suctioning with or without rib cage compression, with a minimum of 3 h interval between the two interventions. Expiratory rib cage compression was performed for 5 min before endotracheal suctioning. Vital signs were measured 5 min before and 15 and 25 min after endotracheal suctioning. Data were recorded on a data recording sheet. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results: There were statistically significant differences in the means of vital signs measured 5 min before with 15 and 25 min after endotracheal suctioning with rib cage compression (P < 0. 01). There was no significant difference in the means of diastolic pressure measured 25 min after with baseline in this stage). But on the reverse mode, there was a significant difference between the means of pulse and respiratory rate 15 min after endotracheal suctioning and the baseline values (P < 0.002). This effect continued up to 25 min after endotracheal

  20. If Health Education Had "Vital Signs", then Where Would We Take Its Pulse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the author shares some thoughts about health education profession, including some things that educators need to do to keep the profession "vital". He also offers some thoughts that educators need to consider as they attempt to respond effectively to the challenges that lie before them now, and face them in the future. He discusses…

  1. Evaluating Effects of Language Recognition on Language Rights and the Vitality of New Zealand Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rachel Locker; Manning, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Status planning through legislation made New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) an official language in 2006. But this strong symbolic action did not create resources or mechanisms to further the aims of the act. In this article we discuss the extent to which legal recognition and ensuing language-planning activities by state and community have affected…

  2. Effect of Massage Therapy on Vital Signs and GCS Scores of ICU Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unalleviated complications related to hospitalization, including stress, anxiety, and pain, can easily influence different structures, like the neural system, by enhancing the stimulation of sympathetic nervous pathways and causing unstable vital signs and deterioration in the level of consciousness. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of massage therapy by family members on vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale Score (GCS) of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the ICU of the Shariati Hospital during 2012; 45 ICU patients and 45 family members in the experimental group and the same number of patients and family members in the control group were consecutively selected . The data collection instrument consisted of two parts. The first part included demographic data (age, marital status and Body Mass Index) and the second part included a checklist to record the patient’s vital signs (systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR)) and GCS. All measurements were done at the same time in both groups before the intervention (full body massage therapy), and 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, and 4 hours after intervention. The patients were provided with a 60-minute full body massage The massage protocol included static, surface tension, stretching, superficial lymph unload, transverse friction, and myofacial releasing techniques. Results: Significant differences were observed between experimental and control groups in the SBP at 1 hour, SBP 2 hours, and SBP 3 hours, and also in GCS at 1 hour to GCS at 4 hours (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant difference between experimental and control groups in SBP at all time points (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage via family members had several positive effects on the patients’ clinical conditions, and therefore, it should

  3. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Gholami-Motlagh, Farzaneh; Jouzi, Mina; Soleymani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an inseparable part of our lives and a serious threat to health. Therefore, it is necessary to use certain strategies to prevent disorders caused by anxiety and adjust the vital signs of people. Swedish massage is one of the most recognized techniques for reducing anxiety. This study aims to compare the effects of two massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study with a two-group, crossover design was conducted on 20 healthy women who were selected by simple sampling method and were randomly assigned to BNC (Back, Neck, and Chest) or LAF (Leg, Arm, and Face) groups. Massage therapy was carried out for a 14-week period (two 4-week massage therapy sessions and 6 weeks washout stage). Gathered data were analyzed using paired t-test with a significance level of P < 0.05. Results: Both BNC and LAF methods caused a significant decrease in systolic BP in the first stage (P = 0.02, 0.00); however, diastolic BP showed significant decrease only in BNC group (P = 0.01). The mean average of body temperature of LAF group showed a significant decrease in the first stage (P = 0.0.3), and pulse and respiratory rate showed significant decrease in both groups during the second stage (P = 0.00). In addition, anxiety scores showed no significant difference before and after massage therapy (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage therapy caused a decrease in systolic BP, pulse, and respiratory rate. It can be concluded that massage therapy was useful for decreasing the vital signs associated with anxiety in healthy women. PMID:27563325

  4. The Nurse Watch: Design and Evaluation of a Smart Watch Application with Vital Sign Monitoring and Checklist Reminders.

    PubMed

    Bang, Magnus; Solnevik, Katarina; Eriksson, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Computerized wearable devices such as smart watches will become valuable nursing tools. This paper describes a smart-watch system developed in close collaboration with a team of nurses working in a Swedish ICU. The smart-watch system provides real-time vital-sign monitoring, threshold alarms, and to-do reminders. Additionally, a Kanban board, visualized on a multitouch screen provides an overview of completed and upcoming tasks. We describe an approach to implement automated checklist systems with smart watches and discuss aspects of importance when implementing such memory and attention support. The paper is finalized with an in-development formative evaluation of the system. PMID:26958162

  5. The Nurse Watch: Design and Evaluation of a Smart Watch Application with Vital Sign Monitoring and Checklist Reminders

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Magnus; Solnevik, Katarina; Eriksson, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Computerized wearable devices such as smart watches will become valuable nursing tools. This paper describes a smart-watch system developed in close collaboration with a team of nurses working in a Swedish ICU. The smart-watch system provides real-time vital-sign monitoring, threshold alarms, and to-do reminders. Additionally, a Kanban board, visualized on a multitouch screen provides an overview of completed and upcoming tasks. We describe an approach to implement automated checklist systems with smart watches and discuss aspects of importance when implementing such memory and attention support. The paper is finalized with an in-development formative evaluation of the system. PMID:26958162

  6. Predictive Symptoms and Signs of Laboratory-confirmed Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeng-How; Huang, Po-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Influenza infection poses annual threats and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis is the key to successful treatment. Laboratory-based diagnosis has various limitations. Diagnosis based on symptoms or signs is still indispensable in clinical practice. We investigated the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza. A prospective study across 2 influenza seasons was performed from June 2010 to June 2012 at 2 branches (Taipei and Lin-Kou) of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Patients who visited outpatient clinics with suspected acute respiratory tract infection were sampled by throat swab or nasopharyngeal swab. RT-PCR and/or virus culture were used as a reference standard. We used logistic regression to identify the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection. We also evaluated the performance metrics of different influenza-like illness used in Taiwan, the USA, and WHO. A total of 158 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of influenza infection was 45% (71/158). Fever, cough, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal congestion were significant predictors for influenza infection. Whereas fever + cough had a best sensitivity (86%; confidence interval [CI] 76%–93%), fever + cough and sneezing had a best specificity (77%; CI 62%–88%). Different case definitions of influenza-like illness had comparable accuracy in sensitivity and specificity. Clinical diagnosis based on symptoms and signs is useful for allocating resources, identifying those who may benefit from early antiviral therapy and providing valuable information for surveillance purpose. PMID:26554802

  7. The implications of probability matching for clinician response to vital sign alarms: a theoretical study of alarm fatigue.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James M

    2015-01-01

    Alarm fatigue has been recognised as a significant health technology safety risk. 'Probability matching', in which clinicians respond to the alarm at a rate identical to the perceived reliability of the alarm, has been postulated as a model to explain alarm fatigue. In this article, we quantitatively explore the implications of probability matching for systolic blood pressure alarms. We find that probability matching could have a profound effect on clinician response to the alarm, with a response rate of only 8.6% when the alarm threshold is 90 mm Hg and the optimal threshold for a systolic blood pressure alarm would only be 77 mm Hg. We use the mathematical framework to assess a mitigation strategy when clinicians have a limit to the capacity to respond. We find that a tiered alarm in which clinicians receive information on the severity of vital sign perturbation significantly improves the opportunity to rescue patients. Practitioner Summary: Using a theoretical model, we predict that probability matching, a postulated model of clinician behaviour, can result in a profound decrease in clinician response to alarms for decreased blood pressure. A mitigating strategy is to create alarms that convey information on the degree of vital sign perturbation. PMID:25849772

  8. Effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during laparotomy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Naddaf, H.; Varzi, H. Najafzade; Sabiza, S.; Falah, H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during and after laparotomy in dogs. Eight clinically healthy, adult male dogs, weighing 20 kg were used. All dogs were initially sedated by acepromazine. Thirty minutes later, ketamine plus xylazine was used to induce anesthesia. Surgical incision of laparotomy was done. After a 5 min manipulation of the abdominal organs, the incision was sutured. Vital signs including heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature (RT) were recorded at the times of -30: premedication, 0: induction and Surgical incision, 30: End of surgery, 60, 90 and 120 min. Blood was sampled at the above mentioned times and analyzed using a commercial ELISA kit for cortisol. A significant decreasing trend in RT was observed during the studied times. No significant changes were observed in heart rate and respiratory rate (p>0.05), except at the time of 60 respiratory rate significantly decreased when compared to the time of 90 (p=0.026) and 120 (p=0.041). A non-significant but increasing trend in plasma levels of cortisol was observed. PMID:26623345

  9. Ontology-Driven Monitoring of Patient's Vital Signs Enabling Personalized Medical Detection and Alert

    PubMed Central

    Hristoskova, Anna; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Tsiknakis, Manolis; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI) framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF). Its novelty is the integration of: (i) personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii) intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii) dynamic adaptation of the vital signs’ monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient's condition on the most suited device within the physician's reach. PMID:24445411

  10. Huntington's Disease: Two-Year Observational Follow-Up of Executive Function Evaluation with CNS Vital Signs Test in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Cerqueira, Ana Claudia; Ferraz, Lígia Maria Chaves; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic, degenerative, and progressive central nervous system disease. It is characterized by motor abnormalities and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Objective. To describe the precise degree of clinical severity of patients with HD through a new neurocognitive assessment. Methods. Unprecedented battery of computerized tests, CNSVS (Central Nervous System Vital Signs), was applied at three different moments in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The accurate and reliable CNSVS objectively provided the cognitive state of patients and allowed for the evaluation of disease progression. Case Report. P., 26, female, without any medication, with normal psychomotor development is a parent carrier of HD. In 2008, she was diagnosed with HD in accordance with the Medical Genetics Laboratories. Conclusion. The tests may be useful to reveal the exact measure of the current evolutionary stage of HD patients, allowing for more efficient planning of treatment and future procedures, such as the medication, therapy, and physical activity to be administered. PMID:22203851

  11. Vital Sign Prediction of Adverse Maternal Outcomes in Women with Hypovolemic Shock: The Role of Shock Index

    PubMed Central

    El Ayadi, Alison M.; Nathan, Hannah L.; Seed, Paul T.; Butrick, Elizabeth A.; Hezelgrave, Natasha L.; Shennan, Andrew H.; Miller, Suellen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal vital sign predictor of adverse maternal outcomes in women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage and to develop thresholds for referral/intensive monitoring and need for urgent intervention to inform a vital sign alert device for low-resource settings. Study Design We conducted secondary analyses of a dataset of pregnant/postpartum women with hypovolemic shock in low-resource settings (n = 958). Using receiver-operating curve analysis, we evaluated the predictive ability of pulse, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, shock index, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure for three adverse maternal outcomes: (1) death, (2) severe maternal outcome (death or severe end organ dysfunction morbidity); and (3) a combined severe maternal and critical interventions outcome comprising death, severe end organ dysfunction morbidity, intensive care admission, blood transfusion ≥ 5 units, or emergency hysterectomy. Two threshold parameters with optimal rule-in and rule-out characteristics were selected based on sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values. Results Shock index was consistently among the top two predictors across adverse maternal outcomes. Its discriminatory ability was significantly better than pulse and pulse pressure for maternal death (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively), diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure for severe maternal outcome (p<0.01), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure for severe maternal outcome and critical interventions (p<0.01). A shock index threshold of ≥ 0.9 maintained high sensitivity (100.0) with clinical practicality, ≥ 1.4 balanced specificity (range 70.0–74.8) with negative predictive value (range 93.2–99.2), and ≥ 1.7 further improved specificity (range 80.7–90.8) without compromising negative predictive value (range 88.8–98.5). Conclusions For women with hypovolemic

  12. A Wearable Vital Signs Monitor at the Ear for Continuous Heart Rate and Pulse Transit Time Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Eric S.; Da He, David; Sodini, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    A continuous, wearable and wireless vital signs monitor at the ear is demonstrated. The device has the form factor of a hearing aid and is wirelessly connected to a PC for data recording and analysis. The device monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) in a single lead configuration, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) with a MEMS triaxial accelerometer, and the photoplethysmograms (PPG) with 660nm and 940nm LED sources and a static photocurrent subtraction analog front end. Clinical tests are conducted, including Valsalva and head-up tilt maneuvers. Peak timing intervals between the ECG, BCG and PPG are extracted and are shown to relate to pre-ejection period and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) extracted from cross-correlation between the PPG and BCG shows improved results compared to the pulse arrival time (PAT) method for tracking changes in MAP. PMID:23366488

  13. Trends in vital signs and routine biomarkers in patients with sepsis during resuscitation in the emergency department: a prospective observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quinten, Vincent M; van Meurs, Matijs; ter Maaten, Jan C; Ligtenberg, Jack J M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sepsis lacks a reliable and readily available measure of disease activity. Thereby, it remains unclear how to monitor response to treatment. Research on numerous (new) biomarkers associated with sepsis provided disappointing results and little is known about changes in vital signs during sepsis resuscitation. We hypothesised that trends in vital signs together with routine biomarker levels during resuscitation might provide information about the response to treatment at a very early stage of sepsis in the emergency department (ED). We therefore explore trends in vital signs and routine biomarker levels during sepsis resuscitation in the ED. Design Prospective observational pilot study. Setting ED of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Participants 99 Adult non-trauma patients with suspected infection and 2 or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria admitted to the ED. Primary and secondary outcome measures Vital signs and biomarker levels at admittance (T0) and after 3 h in the ED (T1). Results In total, data of 99 patients were analysed. Of these patients, 63 presented with sepsis, 30 with severe sepsis and 6 with septic shock. All vital signs decreased, except for peripheral oxygen saturation which increased. Almost all routine biomarker levels decreased during resuscitation, except for C reactive protein, bands, potassium, troponin T and direct bilirubin which remained stable. Sodium, chloride and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide increased slightly. Conclusions Vital signs and biomarker levels showed descending trends during resuscitation, except for parameters directly affected by treatment modalities. Despite these trends, most patients improved clinically. Trends in vital signs and routine biomarkers might be helpful in predicting clinical course and response to treatment in patients with sepsis during early resuscitation. PMID:27225646

  14. A protocol for developing early warning score models from vital signs data in hospitals using ensembles of decision trees

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Michael; Tam, Benjamin; Thabane, Lehana; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple early warning scores (EWS) have been developed and implemented to reduce cardiac arrests on hospital wards. Case–control observational studies that generate an area under the receiver operator curve (AUROC) are the usual validation method, but investigators have also generated EWS with algorithms with no prior clinical knowledge. We present a protocol for the validation and comparison of our local Hamilton Early Warning Score (HEWS) with that generated using decision tree (DT) methods. Methods and analysis A database of electronically recorded vital signs from 4 medical and 4 surgical wards will be used to generate DT EWS (DT-HEWS). A third EWS will be generated using ensemble-based methods. Missing data will be multiple imputed. For a relative risk reduction of 50% in our composite outcome (cardiac or respiratory arrest, unanticipated intensive care unit (ICU) admission or hospital death) with a power of 80%, we calculated a sample size of 17 151 patient days based on our cardiac arrest rates in 2012. The performance of the National EWS, DT-HEWS and the ensemble EWS will be compared using AUROC. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was received from the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (#13-724-C). The vital signs and associated outcomes are stored in a database on our secure hospital server. Preliminary dissemination of this protocol was presented in abstract form at an international critical care meeting. Final results of this analysis will be used to improve on the existing HEWS and will be shared through publication and presentation at critical care meetings. PMID:26353873

  15. Automated analysis of vital signs to identify patients with substantial bleeding before hospital arrival: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Khitrov, Maxim Y; Gates, Jonathan D; Odom, Stephen R; Havens, Joaquim M; de Moya, Marc A; Wilkins, Kevin; Wedel, Suzanne K; Kittell, Erin O; Reifman, Jaques; Reisner, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Trauma outcomes are improved by protocols for substantial bleeding, typically activated after physician evaluation at a hospital. Previous analysis suggested that prehospital vital signs contained patterns indicating the presence or absence of substantial bleeding. In an observational study of adults (aged ≥18 years) transported to level I trauma centers by helicopter, we investigated the diagnostic performance of the Automated Processing of the Physiological Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) system, a computational platform for real-time analysis of vital signs, for identification of substantial bleeding in trauma patients with explicitly hemorrhagic injuries. We studied 209 subjects prospectively and 646 retrospectively. In our multivariate analysis, prospective performance was not significantly different from retrospective. The APPRAISE system was 76% sensitive for 24-h packed red blood cells of 9 or more units (95% confidence interval, 59% - 89%) and significantly more sensitive (P < 0.05) than any prehospital Shock Index of 1.4 or higher; sensitivity, 59%; initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) less than 110 mmHg, 50%; and any prehospital SBP less than 90 mmHg, 50%. The APPRAISE specificity for 24-h packed red blood cells of 0 units was 87% (88% for any Shock Index ≥1.4, 88% for initial SBP <110 mmHg, and 90% for any prehospital SBP <90 mmHg). Median APPRAISE hemorrhage notification time was 20 min before arrival at the trauma center. In conclusion, APPRAISE identified bleeding before trauma center arrival. En route, this capability could allow medics to focus on direct patient care rather than the monitor and, via advance radio notification, could expedite hospital interventions for patients with substantial blood loss. PMID:25664983

  16. Non-contact video-based vital sign monitoring using ambient light and auto-regressive models.

    PubMed

    Tarassenko, L; Villarroel, M; Guazzi, A; Jorge, J; Clifton, D A; Pugh, C

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing of the reflectance photoplethysmogram using a video camera typically positioned 1 m away from the patient's face is a promising method for monitoring the vital signs of patients without attaching any electrodes or sensors to them. Most of the papers in the literature on non-contact vital sign monitoring report results on human volunteers in controlled environments. We have been able to obtain estimates of heart rate and respiratory rate and preliminary results on changes in oxygen saturation from double-monitored patients undergoing haemodialysis in the Oxford Kidney Unit. To achieve this, we have devised a novel method of cancelling out aliased frequency components caused by artificial light flicker, using auto-regressive (AR) modelling and pole cancellation. Secondly, we have been able to construct accurate maps of the spatial distribution of heart rate and respiratory rate information from the coefficients of the AR model. In stable sections with minimal patient motion, the mean absolute error between the camera-derived estimate of heart rate and the reference value from a pulse oximeter is similar to the mean absolute error between two pulse oximeter measurements at different sites (finger and earlobe). The activities of daily living affect the respiratory rate, but the camera-derived estimates of this parameter are at least as accurate as those derived from a thoracic expansion sensor (chest belt). During a period of obstructive sleep apnoea, we tracked changes in oxygen saturation using the ratio of normalized reflectance changes in two colour channels (red and blue), but this required calibration against the reference data from a pulse oximeter. PMID:24681430

  17. The use of spectral skin reflectivity and laser doppler vibrometry data to determine the optimal site and wavelength to collect human vital sign signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Kenneth A.; Kaur, Balvinder; Hodgkin, Van A.

    2012-06-01

    The carotid artery has been used extensively by researchers to demonstrate that Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) is capable of exploiting vital sign signatures from cooperative human subjects at stando. Research indicates that, the carotid, although good for cooperative and non-traumatic scenarios, is one of the first vital signs to become absent or irregular when a casualty is hemorrhaging and in progress to circulatory (hypovolemic) shock. In an effort to determine the optimal site and wavelength to measure vital signs off human skin, a human subject data collection was executed whereby 14 subjects had their spectral skin reflectivity and vital signs measured at five collection sites (carotid artery, chest, back, right wrist and left wrist). In this paper, we present our findings on using LDV and re ectivity data to determine the optimal collection site and wavelength that should be used to sense pulse signals from quiet and relatively motionless human subjects at stando. In particular, we correlate maximum levels of re ectivity across the ensemble of 14 subjects with vital sign measurements made with an LDV at two ranges, for two scenarios.

  18. Education Vital Signs 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Board Journal, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Hardy's lead article details a year of diminished expectations, highlighting teacher shortages, failing teacher competency scores, 12th graders' dismal TIMSS scores, affirmative-action setbacks, and Milwaukee voucher triumphs. Kevin Bushweller probes school violence issues. Others discuss leadership trends, school-success indicators, and…

  19. Education Vital Signs: Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakariya, Sally Banks

    1985-01-01

    Population changes and demographics shape the future of public schools. Includes statistics on ethnic makeup of student population, the projected baby boomlet, children of working mothers, households without children, and the aging population. (MD)

  20. Education Vital Signs 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence, Ed.; Bushweller, Kevin, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Begins with a look at the year's major education news: implications of the massacre at Columbine High School, major Supreme Court decisions, and pro- and anti-voucher political rhetoric. Following is an analysis of how the nation is doing on the Goals 2000. Other sections take the pulse of public education and analyze the challenges faced by…

  1. The use of vital signs as predictors for serious bacterial infections in children with acute febrile illness in a pediatric emergency setting in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Elmuntasir Taha; Ahmed, Emad; Elhussien, Manal; Salah, Tarig

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing children with serious infections from those with milder, self-limiting febrile illnesses remains a daily challenge in primary care and hospital emergency department. Measurement of vital signs is recommended as part of this assessment. To determine whether vital signs can predict children with serious bacterial infections, we studied the data of children aged 1 month to < 16 years presented who with acute febrile illness to a Pediatric emergency department in Sudan. Sample size was 150 patients. The severity of infection was classified as serious or not serious bacterial infection. Vital signs and oxygen saturation were recorded and compared to the final outcome of these children. Data analyzed bivariably and multivariably using regression analysis. Ten percent of patients were classified as having serious bacterial infection. Tachycardia and tachypnea were the most sensitive and specific in predicting serious bacterial infections with (80%, 86.6 % sensitivity) and (97.4%, 83.7% specificity), respectively. High temperature, severe hypoxemia and hypotension were the least sensitive but highly specific signs of serious bacterial infections. As a conclusion, vital signs can be used to differentiate children with serious bacterial infections from those with non-serious bacterial infections in pediatric emergency departments and has comparable sensitivity to more complicated triage systems.

  2. Committee Opinion No. 651 Summary: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers. PMID:26595581

  3. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 651: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers. PMID:26595586

  4. Microwave stethoscope: development and benchmarking of a vital signs sensor using computer-controlled phantoms and human studies.

    PubMed

    Celik, Nuri; Gagarin, Ruthsenne; Huang, Gui Chao; Iskander, Magdy F; Berg, Benjamin W

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a new microwave-based method and associated measurement system for monitoring multiple vital signs (VS) as well as the changes in lung water content. The measurement procedure utilizes a single microwave sensor for reflection coefficient measurements, hence the name "microwave stethoscope (MiSt)," as opposed to the two-sensor transmission method previously proposed by the authors. To compensate for the reduced sensitivity due to reflection coefficient measurements, an improved microwave sensor design with enhanced matching to the skin and broadband operation, as well as an advanced digital signal processing algorithm are used in developing the MiSt. Results from phantom experiments and human clinical trials are described. The results clearly demonstrate that MiSt provides reliable monitoring of multiple VS such as the respiration rate, heart rate, and the changes in lung water content through a single microwave measurement. In addition, information such as heart waveforms that correlates well with electrocardiogram is observed from these microwave measurements. Details of the broadband sensor design, experimental procedure, DSP algorithms used for VS extraction, and obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:23358946

  5. Engagement, Alignment, and Rigor as Vital Signs of High-Quality Instruction: A Classroom Visit Protocol for Instructional Improvement and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Diane M.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Deci, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates engagement (E), alignment (A), and rigor (R) as vital signs of high-quality teacher instruction as measured by the EAR Classroom Visit Protocol, designed by the Institute for Research and Reform in Education (IRRE). Findings indicated that both school leaders and outside raters could learn to score the protocol with…

  6. Introduction of a new observation chart and education programme is associated with higher rates of vital-sign ascertainment in hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Helen; Jones, Aaron; Herkes, Robert; Cook, Kathy; Stirling, Anne; Halbert, Tanya; Yates, Amanda; Lal, Sean; Gardo, Alan; Donnelly, Roy; Gattas, David J

    2011-09-01

    INTRODUCTION Local and national awareness of the need to improve the recognition and response to the clinical deterioration of hospital inpatients is high. The authors designed and implemented a programme to improve recognition of deteriorating patients in their hospital; a new observation chart for vital signs was one of the major elements. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of the new chart and associated education programme on the completeness of vital-sign recording in ward areas. METHODS The setting is a university-affiliated teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Three study periods, each lasting 14 days (preintervention, 2 weeks postintervention, 3 months postintervention), were carried out in three wards. The new observation chart was supported by an education programme. The primary outcome measures were the ascertainment rates of individual vital signs as a proportion of total observation sets. RESULTS Documentation of respiratory rate increased from 47.8% to 97.8% (p<0.001) and was sustained at 3 months postintervention (98.5%). Collection of a full set of vital signs also improved by a similar magnitude. Basic neurological observation for all patients was introduced in the new chart; the uptake of this was very good (93.1%). Ascertainment rates of blood pressure and oxygen saturation also increased by small but significant amounts from good baseline rates of 97% or higher. CONCLUSION The introduction of a new observation chart, and education regarding its use and importance, was associated with a major improvement in the recording of respiratory rate and other vital signs. PMID:21441604

  7. Using Supervised Machine Learning to Classify Real Alerts and Artifact in Online Multi-signal Vital Sign Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lujie; Dubrawski, Artur; Wang, Donghan; Fiterau, Madalina; Guillame-Bert, Mathieu; Bose, Eliezer; Kaynar, Ata M.; Wallace, David J.; Guttendorf, Jane; Clermont, Gilles; Pinsky, Michael R.; Hravnak, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Use machine-learning (ML) algorithms to classify alerts as real or artifacts in online noninvasive vital sign (VS) data streams to reduce alarm fatigue and missed true instability. METHODS Using a 24-bed trauma step-down unit’s non-invasive VS monitoring data (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], peripheral oximetry [SpO2]) recorded at 1/20Hz, and noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure [BP] less frequently, we partitioned data into training/validation (294 admissions; 22,980 monitoring hours) and test sets (2,057 admissions; 156,177 monitoring hours). Alerts were VS deviations beyond stability thresholds. A four-member expert committee annotated a subset of alerts (576 in training/validation set, 397 in test set) as real or artifact selected by active learning, upon which we trained ML algorithms. The best model was evaluated on alerts in the test set to enact online alert classification as signals evolve over time. MAIN RESULTS The Random Forest model discriminated between real and artifact as the alerts evolved online in the test set with area under the curve (AUC) performance of 0.79 (95% CI 0.67-0.93) for SpO2 at the instant the VS first crossed threshold and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.95) at 3 minutes into the alerting period. BP AUC started at 0.77 (95%CI 0.64-0.95) and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.98), while RR AUC started at 0.85 (95%CI 0.77-0.95) and increased to 0.97 (95% CI 0.94–1.00). HR alerts were too few for model development. CONCLUSIONS ML models can discern clinically relevant SpO2, BP and RR alerts from artifacts in an online monitoring dataset (AUC>0.87). PMID:26992068

  8. Utility of vital signs, heart rate variability and complexity, and machine learning for identifying the need for lifesaving interventions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Darrah, Mark I; Salinas, Jose

    2014-08-01

    To date, no studies have attempted to utilize data from a combination of vital signs, heart rate variability and complexity (HRV, HRC), as well as machine learning (ML), for identifying the need for lifesaving interventions (LSIs) in trauma patients. The objectives of this study were to examine the utility of the above for identifying LSI needs and compare different LSI-associated models, with the hypothesis that an ML model would be superior in performance over multivariate logistic regression models. One hundred four patients transported from the injury scene via helicopter were selected for the study. A wireless vital signs monitor was attached to the patient's arm and used to capture physiologic data, including HRV and HRC. The power of vital sign measurements, HRV, HRC, and Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) to identify patients requiring LSIs was estimated using multivariate logistic regression and ML. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were also obtained. Thirty-two patients underwent 75 LSIs. After logistic regression, ROC curves demonstrated better identification for LSIs using heart rate (HR) and HRC (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.81) than using HR alone (AUC of 0.73). Likewise, ROC curves demonstrated better identification for LSIs using GCS and HRC (AUC of 0.94) than using GCS and HR (AUC of 0.92). Importantly, ROC curves demonstrated that an ML model using HR, GCS, and HRC (AUC of 0.99) had superior performance over multivariate logistic regression models for identifying the need for LSIs in trauma patients. Development of computer decision support systems should utilize vital signs, HRC, and ML in order to achieve more accurate diagnostic capabilities, such as identification of needs for LSIs in trauma patients. PMID:24727872

  9. Assessment of the feasibility of an ultra-low power, wireless digital patch for the continuous ambulatory monitoring of vital signs

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Silveira, Miguel; Ahmed, Kamran; Ang, Su-Shin; Zandari, Fahriya; Mehta, Tinaz; Weir, Rebecca; Burdett, Alison; Toumazou, Chris; Brett, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Vital signs are usually recorded at 4–8 h intervals in hospital patients, and deterioration between measurements can have serious consequences. The primary study objective was to assess agreement between a new ultra-low power, wireless and wearable surveillance system for continuous ambulatory monitoring of vital signs and a widely used clinical vital signs monitor. The secondary objective was to examine the system's ability to automatically identify and reject invalid physiological data. Setting Single hospital centre. Participants Heart and respiratory rate were recorded over 2 h in 20 patients undergoing elective surgery and a second group of 41 patients with comorbid conditions, in the general ward. Outcome measures Primary outcome measures were limits of agreement and bias. The secondary outcome measure was proportion of data rejected. Results The digital patch provided reliable heart rate values in the majority of patients (about 80%) with normal sinus rhythm, and in the presence of abnormal ECG recordings (excluding aperiodic arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation). The mean difference between systems was less than ±1 bpm in all patient groups studied. Although respiratory data were more frequently rejected as invalid because of the high sensitivity of impedance pneumography to motion artefacts, valid rates were reported for 50% of recordings with a mean difference of less than ±1 brpm compared with the bedside monitor. Correlation between systems was statistically significant (p<0.0001) for heart and respiratory rate, apart from respiratory rate in patients with atrial fibrillation (p=0.02). Conclusions Overall agreement between digital patch and clinical monitor was satisfactory, as was the efficacy of the system for automatic rejection of invalid data. Wireless monitoring technologies, such as the one tested, may offer clinical value when implemented as part of wider hospital systems that integrate and support

  10. Delay-bounded semi-reliable vital sign transmission protocol for mobile telemedicine over a CDMA 1x EV-DO network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tong H; Yoo, Sun K

    2008-04-01

    The reliable and instant transmission of vital signs is important for remote time-critical patient care through a telemedicine system. However, sometimes the reliability and instantaneity conditions cannot be satisfied simultaneously under a high-noise mobile network, because they are reciprocal to each other. In this paper, the vital sign transmission protocol (VSTP) running over a CDMA 1x EVDO (Code Division Multiple Access 1x Evolution Data Only) mobile network is proposed to comply with both the reliability and instantaneity requirements. The switching buffer management scheme is combined with a hybrid error control scheme, consisting of forward error correction (FEC) and automatic repeat request (ARQ). The CDMA 1x EVDO mobile network is modeled by two states using the Markov wireless channel model to test transmission performance under diverse network conditions. Throughout the noisy environment simulation, the performance of the VSTP is compared with the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to demonstrate its efficacy over error-prone mobile network. PMID:17561431

  11. From cardiac to respiratory rate, from cardiac sounds to pulse velocity: a noncontact unified approach for the monitoring of vital signs by means of optical vibrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; De Melis, M.; Morbiducci, U.; Segers, P.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we report experimental data obtained using a novel, non contact and unified approach for the monitoring of some important vital parameters: Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, Respiration Rate, Filling Time, Pulse Transit Time. The measurement approach - named optical vibrocardiography (VCG) - has been recently described by some of the authors for what concerns the assessment of a single parameter or measurement and technical aspects. Here, we discuss the experimental setup realized to operate optical VCG in order to measure the previously cited vital parameters. We present two novel configurations for the assessment of the respiration rate and the pulse transit time. The quantities measured by optical VCG have been compared with the ones measured with golden standard instrumentations; the comparison reference instruments has shown differences with no statistical and clinical significance. Optical VCG therefore can be considered a valid, fully non-contact measurement method for the assessment of vital signs, with the additional advantage that such parameters can be assessed using one single instrument instead of a set of dedicated devices.

  12. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network.

    PubMed

    Kohut, Robert

    2007-10-01

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low. For the 244 parks for which assessments were conducted, the risk of foliar injury was high in 65 parks, moderate in 46 parks, and low in 131 parks. Among the well-known parks with a high risk of ozone injury are Gettysburg, Valley Forge, Delaware Water Gap, Cape Cod, Fire Island, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Manassas, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Mammoth Cave, Shiloh, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Yosemite. PMID:17644227

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Trucker Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clips Trucker Safety Using a seat belt matters Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.1 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Secondhand Smoke

    MedlinePlus

    ... this Page Problem Infographic What Can Be Done Science Behind the Issue Related Pages February 2015 58 million 1 in 4 nonsmokers (58 million people) in the US are still exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS). 2 in 5 About 2 in every 5 children (including 7 in 10 black children) are exposed to SHS. 1 in 3 ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... understand the laws and regulations that control the marketing and sale of alcohol. Collaborate with states and ... the Community Guide.* Support local control of the marketing and sale of alcohol. Support the minimum legal ...

  18. Aging changes in vital signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal body temperature does not change much with aging. But as you get older, it becomes harder ... to wear layers of clothing to feel warm. Aging decreases your ability to sweat. You may have ...

  19. Multiple programs: essential to the scientific vitality of the DOE Defense Program Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, P; Barnes, P D; Cummings, J; Eagan, R; Edgeworth, J; Fortner, R; Green, G; Hazi, A; Katz, M; Poppe, C

    1997-01-01

    The future of the Department of Energy's Defense Program (DP) laboratories-Los Alamos, Livermore, and Sandia-has been extensively debated and examined over the past several years. To assist in this process, I have asked that a set of documents be prepared, which, when taken together, present a comprehensive picture of the three laboratories. This document describes the multiprogram nature of the DP laboratories and the value of their involvement in non-DP work as it relates to the nuclear weapons program. The other two documents, Integration and Collaboration.. Solving Science and Technology Problems for the Nation (DOE/DP-96009797) and Roles and Responsibilities of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Laboratories in the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (DOE/DP-97000280), describe respectively the integrated nature of the DP laboratories and the roles of the laboratories as they meet their individual and collective responsibilities of ensuring the safety and reliabilities of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile.

  20. Evaluation of quality of anesthesia and analgesia and of vital signs after intramuscular administration of a combination of butorphanol, medetomidine and alfaxalone in cats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Won; Suh, Sang-Il; Choi, Ran; Hyun, Changbaig

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the quality of anesthesia, duration of analgesia and changes in vital signs after intramuscular administration of a combination of butorphanol, medetomidine and alfaxalone in domestic cats. Ten healthy adult domestic cats (weighing 2.9 ± 0.5 kg) were used in this study. Rectal temperature (T), pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (fR) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) were measured and recorded prior to intramuscular (IM) administration of butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg), medetomidine (20 ug/kg) and alfaxalone (5 mg/kg) and then every 10 min until return of consciousness. Qualitative scores for induction of anesthesia and recovery were allocated, duration of anesthesia and recovery were calculated, and adverse events were recorded. A needle prick with a 22-gauge hypodermic needle was used to assess analgesia. Scores for induction and recovery quality were acceptable. No significant adverse events except nausea (7/10) and vomiting (5/10) were observed. The mean ± SD times from induction to extubation and to standing (full recovery) were 114 ± 8 and 125 ± 7 min, respectively. There were statistically significant changes in PR, fR and SAP after induction of anesthesia. The combination of butorphanol, medetomidine and alfaxalone provided acceptable quality of anesthesia and analgesia and exerted minimal cardiopulmonary effects in domestic cats. PMID:26549435

  1. Estuarine water quality in parks of the Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network: Development and early implementation of vital signs estuarine nutrient-enrichment monitoring, 2003-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopp, Blaine S.; Nielsen, Martha; Glisic, Dejan; Neckles, Hilary A.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents results of pilot tests of a protocol for monitoring estuarine nutrient enrichment for the Vital Signs Monitoring Program of the National Park Service Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network. Data collected from four parks during protocol development in 2003-06 are presented: Gateway National Recreation Area, Colonial National Historic Park, Fire Island National Seashore, and Assateague Island National Seashore. The monitoring approach incorporates several spatial and temporal designs to address questions at a hierarchy of scales. Indicators of estuarine response to nutrient enrichment were sampled using a probability design within park estuaries during a late-summer index period. Monitoring variables consisted of dissolved-oxygen concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, water temperature, salinity, attenuation of downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), and turbidity. The statistical sampling design allowed the condition of unsampled locations to be inferred from the distribution of data from a set of randomly positioned "probability" stations. A subset of sampling stations was sampled repeatedly during the index period, and stations were not rerandomized in subsequent years. These "trend stations" allowed us to examine temporal variability within the index period, and to improve the sensitivity of the monitoring protocol to detecting change through time. Additionally, one index site in each park was equipped for continuous monitoring throughout the index period. Thus, the protocol includes elements of probabilistic and targeted spatial sampling, and the temporal intensity ranges from snapshot assessments to continuous monitoring.

  2. Design an easy-to-use infection screening system for non-contact monitoring of vital-signs to prevent the spread of pandemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guanghao; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Miyata, Keisuke; Chen, Chris; Ueda, Akiko; Kim, Seokjin; Hakozaki, Yukiya; Abe, Shigeto; Takei, Osamu; Matsui, Takemi

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of infectious diseases such as influenza, dengue fever, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are threatening the global health. Especially, developing countries in the South-East Asia region have been at serious risk. Rapid and highly reliable screening of infection is urgently needed during the epidemic season at mass gathering places, such as airport quarantine facilities, public health centers, and hospital outpatients units, etc. To meet this need, our research group is currently developing a multiple vital-signs based infection screening system that can perform human medical inspections within 15 seconds. This system remotely monitors facial temperature, heart and respiration rates using a thermopile array and a 24-GHz microwave radar, respectively. In this work, we redesigned our previous system to make a higher performance with a user-friendly interface. Moreover, the system newly included a multivariable logistic regression model (MLRM) to determine the possibility of infection. We tested the system on 34 seasonal influenza patients and 35 normal control subjects at the Japan Self-Defense Forces Central Hospital. The sensitivity and specificity of the screening system using the MLRM were 85.3% and 88.6%, respectively. PMID:25571068

  3. Evaluation of quality of anesthesia and analgesia and of vital signs after intramuscular administration of a combination of butorphanol, medetomidine and alfaxalone in cats

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Ye-Won; SUH, Sang-Il; CHOI, Ran; HYUN, Changbaig

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the quality of anesthesia, duration of analgesia and changes in vital signs after intramuscular administration of a combination of butorphanol, medetomidine and alfaxalone in domestic cats. Ten healthy adult domestic cats (weighing 2.9 ± 0.5 kg) were used in this study. Rectal temperature (T), pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (fR) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) were measured and recorded prior to intramuscular (IM) administration of butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg), medetomidine (20 ug/kg) and alfaxalone (5 mg/kg) and then every 10 min until return of consciousness. Qualitative scores for induction of anesthesia and recovery were allocated, duration of anesthesia and recovery were calculated, and adverse events were recorded. A needle prick with a 22-gauge hypodermic needle was used to assess analgesia. Scores for induction and recovery quality were acceptable. No significant adverse events except nausea (7/10) and vomiting (5/10) were observed. The mean ± SD times from induction to extubation and to standing (full recovery) were 114 ± 8 and 125 ± 7 min, respectively. There were statistically significant changes in PR, fR and SAP after induction of anesthesia. The combination of butorphanol, medetomidine and alfaxalone provided acceptable quality of anesthesia and analgesia and exerted minimal cardiopulmonary effects in domestic cats. PMID:26549435

  4. Estuarine water quality in parks of the Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network: vital signs estuarine nutrient-enrichment monitoring, 2006-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, James M.; Nixon, Matthew E.; Neckles, Hilary A.; Pooler, Penelope S.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes results of water-quality monitoring within estuaries of the National Park Service Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network (NCBN) from 2006 through 2011. Data collection formed part of the NCBN Vital Signs Monitoring Program implemented to detect threats of estuarine nutrient enrichment. Data included here were collected from six parks at predetermined intervals: Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011); Fire Island National Seashore, New York (2009, 2011); Gateway National Recreation Area, New York and New Jersey (2010); Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia (2006, 2008, 2010); George Washington Birthplace National Monument, Virginia (2009, 2011); and Colonial National Historic Park, Virginia (2008, 2010). Monitoring variables consisted of dissolved-oxygen concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, attenuation of downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), turbidity, water temperature, and salinity. All monitoring was conducted during four-week summer index periods. The monitoring design incorporated data collection at multiple, complementary spatial and temporal scales. Within each park, a spatial survey was conducted once during the index period following a probability design using a grid of tessellated hexagons as the basis for sample site selection. The spatial survey was supplemented with weekly measurements at a subset of sites and continuous monitoring at a single reference site. Within parks, data were reported as area-weighted water-quality conditions during each index period, the location and extent of estuarine area within condition categories, and spatial and temporal trends. In addition, we used a repeated measures analysis of variance to determine the extent to which variability in three water quality metrics (chlorophyll a in surface water, dissolved oxygen in bottom water, and water clarity expressed by PAR attenuation) was explained by year to year changes in

  5. Vital Statistics of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Under Laboratory Conditions: IV. Panstrongylus geniculatus.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Jorge Eduardo; Feliciangeli, M Dora

    2015-09-01

    A cohort of 100 eggs of Panstrongylus geniculatus (Latreille) was reared in the laboratory under constant conditions (temperature 26 ± 1°C, 60 ± 10% RH), with mortality and fecundity data recorded weekly. We calculated stage-specific development times, age-specific mortality and fecundity (18.4 eggs/♀/wk), and stage-specific and total preadult mortality (31.6%), and the weekly intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(o) = 0.096), the finite population growth rate (λ = 1.109), the net reproductive rate (R(0) = 60.45), and the generation time (T = 46.34 wk). Elasticity analysis showed that the dominant life-history trait determining λ was survival (particularly the adult female's survival). Adult females dominated the stage-specific reproductive value, and the egg stage dominated the stable stage distribution (SSD). The damping ratio (ρ = 1.096) suggests a relatively rapid period of recovery to a disturbed SSD. Results were compared with one previous study and conform relatively well, considering that environmental conditions were not the same. We estimated the colonizing ability of P. geniculatus, using as a criterion the ro/b index, and obtained the value of 0.74, an indicator of a good colonizer, and similar to well-known invasive species such as Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma infestans. The life history traits and demographic parameters here presented for P. geniculatus are discussed in terms of their usefulness for evolutionary studies and vector control activities. PMID:26336251

  6. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J.; Piccoli, Anthony; O’Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx® Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign

  7. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee. PMID:25957286

  8. Nuclear Material Recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory Using TechXtract{reg_sign} Decontamination Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, S.; Dennison, D.; Fife, K.; Punjak, W.

    1999-09-12

    One mission of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to affect pollution prevention and waste minimization surrounding operations at their Plutonium Facility. Efforts are underway and technologies are being deployed to capture the actinide at the source thereby reducing the amount of nuclear material leaving the facility as transuranic waste. Traditional processing alternatives for decontamination, such as strong acid leaching and surface brushing have not achieved the desired recovery efficiencies for plastic or non-actinide metal matrices. Much of the nuclear material present is fixed in the matrix, and is not susceptible to recovery with surface cleaning techniques. In addition, the relatively large secondary waste volumes associated with the acid leaching have persuaded LANL to evaluate alternative recovery methods. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and testing of a prototype chemical decontamination and co-precipitation process installed at the Los Al amos Plutonium Facility that is based on the patented TechXtract{reg_sign} system developed by Active Environmental Technologies Inc. (AET). The technology was enhanced under a PRDA contract awarded by DOE in 1997.

  9. Predictive Symptoms and Signs of Laboratory-confirmed Influenza: A Prospective Surveillance Study of Two Metropolitan Areas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeng-How; Huang, Po-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2015-11-01

    Influenza infection poses annual threats and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis is the key to successful treatment. Laboratory-based diagnosis has various limitations. Diagnosis based on symptoms or signs is still indispensable in clinical practice. We investigated the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza.A prospective study across 2 influenza seasons was performed from June 2010 to June 2012 at 2 branches (Taipei and Lin-Kou) of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Patients who visited outpatient clinics with suspected acute respiratory tract infection were sampled by throat swab or nasopharyngeal swab. RT-PCR and/or virus culture were used as a reference standard. We used logistic regression to identify the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection. We also evaluated the performance metrics of different influenza-like illness used in Taiwan, the USA, and WHO.A total of 158 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of influenza infection was 45% (71/158). Fever, cough, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal congestion were significant predictors for influenza infection. Whereas fever + cough had a best sensitivity (86%; confidence interval [CI] 76%-93%), fever + cough and sneezing had a best specificity (77%; CI 62%-88%). Different case definitions of influenza-like illness had comparable accuracy in sensitivity and specificity.Clinical diagnosis based on symptoms and signs is useful for allocating resources, identifying those who may benefit from early antiviral therapy and providing valuable information for surveillance purpose. PMID:26554802

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Safer Food Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... them from happening in the first place. Food industries can: Keep records to trace foods from source ... can be found on: www.foodsafety.gov Food industries can Keep records to trace foods from source ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... including screening and monitoring for substance abuse and mental health problems. Use prescription drug monitoring programs to identify ... effective pain treatment. Working to improve access to mental health and substance abuse treatment through implementation of the ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... in many US hospitals do not fully support breastfeeding. Some of the Ten Steps on which hospitals ...

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MMWR Science Clips Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2 weeks. Resist many common disinfectants and hand sanitizers. View larger image and text ... all FDA model Food Code provisions, including worker health and hygiene. Funding state and local efforts to detect, respond, ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths How is the US doing? Language: ... Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Problem Motor vehicle crash deaths in the US are still too ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Screening and Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Alcohol Screening and Counseling An effective but underused health ... for alcohol screening and counseling. Key points on alcohol consumption from the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines for ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Alcohol and Pregnancy Why take the risk? Language: English ... Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are completely preventable. Problem Alcohol can harm a developing baby before a woman ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Alcohol Poisoning Deaths A deadly consequence of binge drinking ... less binge drinking. Problem There are 2,200 alcohol poisoning deaths in the US each year. Alcohol ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Asthma in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... triggers. Triggers can include tobacco smoke, mold, outdoor air pollution, and colds and flu. In 2008 less than ... as tobacco smoke, mold, pet dander, and outdoor air pollution. Prescribe inhaled corticosteroids for all patients with persistent ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... the time preschoolers watch TV or use the computer in child care and the home. Support and encourage preschoolers to be physically active every day. ... Behind the Issue MMWR Science Clips Related Pages ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePlus

    ... have become resistant to all or nearly all antibiotics we have today. CRE spread between health care facilities like hospitals and nursing homes when appropriate actions are not taken. MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ) infections commonly cause pneumonia and sepsis ...

  2. Team tension as a vital sign.

    PubMed

    Nason, F

    1981-03-01

    Current efforts to provide comprehensive health care have accentuated the need for new models that integrate the biological, psychological, and social fields. One approach to meeting this need has been the development of health care teams. However, the multidisciplinary perspectives of such teams often result in tension and discord. While this tension may be partly attributable to institutional or professional biases or lack of adequate decision-making techniques, it may also be an essential diagnostic tool for exploring and integrating the paradoxes of the patient's homeostatic system. This approach captures and bridges some of the inadequacies of our prevailing knowledge base. The team's tension can be experienced as an essential empathic connectedness to the patient's life situation. Resolution of the team's internalized conflict becomes a paradigm for the patient's reintegration of his or her own paradoxical or contradictory needs. PMID:7215794

  3. Education Vital Signs. Accountability: Struggling To Comply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsom, John

    2003-01-01

    Discusses efforts by a number of states to comply with the standards and accountability requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act. Focuses on the challenges and costs of creating new tests and presents the timeline through 2014 for compliance. (Contains 11 online resources.) (WFA)

  4. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the Affordable Care Act. Doctors, nurses, and health care systems can Test patients for HIV as a regular part of medical care. Counsel patients who do not have HIV on how to prevent ... or mental health services. Work with health departments to get and ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Adults with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... your needs and abilities. Regular aerobic physical activity increases heart and lung function; improves daily living activities and independence; decreases chances of developing chronic diseases; and improves mental health. Start slowly based on your abilities and fitness level (e.g. be active for ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... the Issue Related Pages February 2014 43% Motor vehicle deaths among children age 12 and under decreased ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... enforcement seat belt laws allow police to stop vehicles just because someone is not wearing a seat ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    MedlinePlus

    ... and guidance for decision making based on proven practices. Increasing access to mental health and substance abuse treatment through the Affordable ... that do not involve prescription painkillers. Follow best practices for ... health problems. Avoiding combinations of prescription painkillers and ...

  9. NIPER Lab WARDEN -- Description and LabVIEW{reg_sign} executable code of a general-purpose laboratory-automation program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    This report is Volume 1 (the description) of a two volume series that describes a general purpose, automation computer program developed by NIPER for data acquisition/control/analysis/presentation. This software was developed to provide interactive computer control of a variety of instruments typically found in laboratories and pilot plants in order to improve efficiency in operation and safe handling of potentially hazardous operations. For example, it is easily adaptable for operating a laboratory that conducts experiments at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, such as those found in a steamflooding laboratory. The software was developed in an object-oriented graphical language around National Instruments` LabVIEW{reg_sign} which is the future trend in automation programming.

  10. Warning Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents various signs that may indicate emotional problems in children or teens, noting that if children exhibit any of the warning signs, it is important to talk to a doctor, counselor, or mental-health professional. The warning signs are categorized as things that trouble the child, things that limit the child, behavior problems, and sudden…

  11. Noninvasive vital signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenan; Chee, Jonny; Chua, Kok Poo; Chen, ZhouDe

    2010-05-01

    Vital signals of patients, such as heart rate, temperature and movement are crucial to monitor patients in hospital. Current heart rate measurement is obtained by using Electrocardiograph, which normally applies electrodes to the patient's body. As electrodes are extremely uncomfortable to ware and hinder patient's movement, a non-invasive vital signal-monitoring device will be a better solution. Similar to Electrocardiograph, the device detects the voltage difference across the heart by using concept of capacitance, which can be obtained by two conductive fiber sewing on the bed sheet. Simultaneous temperature reading can also be detected by using surface mounted temperature sensor. This paper will mainly focus on the heart rate monitoring.

  12. Collegial Environment Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Richard L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The Commission on Instruction of the New York State Association of Two-Year Colleges sponsored a competition which solicited papers on exemplary practices and procedures that improve the spirit of vitality and morale in two-year colleges. This special journal issue includes the brief papers accepted for the competition. After Richard L. Rinehart's…

  13. Identifying the Most Sensitive and Specific Sign and Symptom Combinations for Cholera: Results from an Analysis of Laboratory-Based Surveillance Data from Haiti, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lucien, Mentor Ali Ber; Schaad, Nicolas; Steenland, Maria W.; Mintz, Eric D.; Emmanuel, Rossignol; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Adrien, Paul; Joseph, Gerard A.; Katz, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Since October 2010, over 700,000 cholera cases have been reported in Haiti. We used data from laboratory-based surveillance for diarrhea in Haiti to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of the cholera case definitions recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). From April 2012 to May 2013, we tested 1,878 samples from hospitalized patients with acute watery diarrhea; 1,178 (62.7%) yielded Vibrio cholerae O1. The sensitivity and specificity of the WHO case definition for cholera in an epidemic setting were 91.3% and 43.1%, respectively, and the PPV and NPV were 72.8% and 74.8%, respectively. The WHO case definition for cholera in an area where cholera is not known to be present had lower sensitivity (63.1%) and NPV (55.1%) but higher specificity (74.2%) and PPV (80.0%). When laboratory diagnostic testing is not immediately available, clinicians can evaluate signs and symptoms to more accurately identify cholera patients. PMID:25732682

  14. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Benthic macroinvertebrate community results

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, A.E.

    1992-08-01

    As part of an extensive Reservoir Monitoring program to examine the ecological health of reservoirs in the TVA system, benthic communities were sampled and evaluated at 41 locations on 14 TVA reservoirs. Up to ten dredge samples were collected at locations from the forebay, inflow and transition zones. Surveys were conducted between mid-March and mid-April, 1991. The results of these surveys are presented and discussed in this report.

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV Reaching people who could benefit from PrEP Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... MMWR Article 1 MMWR Article 2 Science Clips Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 35 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save ... can reduce death among all ages. Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Among Youth in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites The Community Guide MedlinePlus - HIV/AIDS MedlinePlus - African-American Health MedlinePlus - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Health MedlinePlus - Drugs and Young People World AIDS Day Statement from the White House ...

  18. Hydroacoustic estimates of fish abundance. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1991-03-01

    Hydroacoustics, as defined in the context of this report, is the use of a scientific sonar system to determine fish densities with respect to numbers and biomass. These two parameters provide a method of monitoring reservoir fish populations and detecting gross changes in the ecosystem. With respect to southeastern reservoirs, hydroacoustic surveys represent a new method of sampling open water areas and the best technology available. The advantages of this technology are large amounts of data can be collected in a relatively short period of time allowing improved statistical interpretation and data comparison, the pelagic (open water) zone can be sampled efficiently regardless of depth, and sampling is nondestructive and noninvasive with neither injury to the fish nor alteration of the environment. Hydroacoustics cannot provide species identification and related information on species composition or length/weight relationships. Also, sampling is limited to a minimum depth of ten feet which precludes the use of this equipment for sampling shallow shoreline areas. The objective of this study is to use hydroacoustic techniques to estimate fish standing stocks (i.e., numbers and biomass) in several areas of selected Tennessee Valley Reservoirs as part of a base level monitoring program to assess long-term changes in reservoir water quality.

  19. Organizational Performance Measures: The Vital Signs of TQM Investments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembcke, Barbara A.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a family of organizational performance measures that enable decision makers at institutions of higher education to weigh the returns on investment in Total Quality Management. The enrollment management process is used to illustrate the use of six performance measures. The importance of a thorough knowledge of organizational…

  20. Education Vital Signs. Leadership: The Toughest Job in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Nora

    2003-01-01

    Examines administration, motivation, and compensation among educational leaders. Discusses the high-stakes, high-stress jobs of superintendents, assistant superintendents, subject-area supervisors, principals, and assistant principals. Also looks at the role of school board members and the importance of teamwork in education. (Contains one table…

  1. CDC Vital Signs: New Hope for Stopping HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.27 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips New Hope for Stopping HIV Testing and Medical Care ... AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and early death. There's new hope today for stopping HIV in the US. ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Cancer Screenings: Colorectal Cancer and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vermont New York New Hampshire Massachusetts Connecticut Rhode Island Indiana Ohio Pennsylvania Kentucky West Virginia Virginia New ... Vermont New Hampshire Massachusetts New York Connecticut Rhode Island Indiana Ohio Pennsylvania Kentucky West Virginia Virginia New ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Tobacco Use and Secondhand Smoke

    MedlinePlus

    ... on youth access to tobacco products and tobacco marketing to youth, and closely follow them. Check the photo ID of any customer trying to buy tobacco products who appears to be 26 years of age or younger, and never sell any tobacco product ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: E-cigarette Ads and Youth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Youth and young adult exposure to e-cigarette marketing (Truth Initiative) [1.85MB] American Academy of Pediatrics ... on Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (2015) Advertising and Marketing, Public Health Law Center MMWR Science Clips Top ...

  5. Education Vital Signs. Common Measures: A Challenging Year for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Robin L.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the state of education. Through text and graphs, describes enrollment trends; spending on school construction, maintenance, and operations; changes in ACT and SAT scores; public opinion of educational vouchers and charter schools; and the growth of educational technology. (Contains eight graphs.) (WFA)

  6. Education Vital Signs. Teachers: A Search for Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    Addresses teacher qualifications and certification as mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act. Teachers must know the subjects they teach. Briefly discusses teacher-preparation programs; teacher-retention rates; different pathways into teaching; teacher pay; and districts' role in assigning out-of-field teachers. (Contains three graphs.) (WFA)

  7. A portable, inexpensive, wireless vital signs monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kaputa, David; Price, David; Enderle, John D

    2010-01-01

    The University of Connecticut, Department of Biomedical Engineering has developed a device to be used by patients to collect physiological data outside of a medical facility. This device facilitates modes of data collection that would be expensive, inconvenient, or impossible to obtain by traditional means within the medical facility. Data can be collected on specific days, at specific times, during specific activities, or while traveling. The device uses biosensors to obtain information such as pulse oximetry (SpO2), heart rate, electrocardiogram (ECG), non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP), and weight which are sent via Bluetooth to an interactive monitoring device. The data can then be downloaded to an electronic storage device or transmitted to a company server, physician's office, or hospital. The data collection software is usable on any computer device with Bluetooth capability, thereby removing the need for special hardware for the monitoring device and reducing the total cost of the system. The modular biosensors can be added or removed as needed without changing the monitoring device software. The user is prompted by easy-to-follow instructions written in non-technical language. Additional features, such as screens with large buttons and large text, allow for use by those with limited vision or limited motor skills. PMID:20715966

  8. Fish community results. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Scott, E.M. Jr.; Brown, A.M.

    1991-05-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 9 reservoirs on the Tennessee River and 37 reservoirs on its tributaries. TVA is committed to maintaining the health of aquatic resources created when the reservoir system was built. To that end, TVA in cooperation with Valley states, operates a water resource monitoring program that includes physical, chemical, and biological data collection components. Biological monitoring will target the following selected elements within three zones of the reservoir (inflow, transition, and forebay): Sediment/Water-column Acute Toxicity Screening, Benthic macroinvertebrates, and Fish. Reservoir fisheries monitoring is divided into the following activities: Fish Biomass, Fish Tissue Contamination, Fish Community Monitoring, and Fish Health Assessment. This report presents the results of fish community monitoring and fish health assessments.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Hepatitis C: Testing Baby Boomers Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested for hepatitis C. Doctors, nurses and other health care providers can: Test all baby boomers and people with other risks ... hepatitis C and all doctors, nurses, and other health care providers should test all their patients who are baby boomers for ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Costly but Preventable Language: English Español ( ... and how to prevent future crashes. Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Seat Belt Use in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... enforcement seat belt laws achieved 88% use.* Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for ...

  12. Promoting vital involvement.

    PubMed

    Kivnick, Helen Q; Stoffel, Sharon A

    2002-09-01

    Health care for the elderly generally focuses on health problems. This approach ignores the strengths and resources that maximize a person's autonomy, integrity, and ability to make contributions to society; and it exacerbates poor health. Vital involvement practice (VIP) is an approach to caring for the elderly that emphasizes an individual's capabilities by exploring factors both internal and external to the individual. VIP is identified as a model for health care providers that will improve the health and quality of life of elderly patients. PMID:12387120

  13. Vitalism, purpose and superstition.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Saher, Marieke

    2007-02-01

    Developmental studies have shown that children assign purpose to objects more liberally than adults, and that they explain biological processes in terms of vitalistic causality. This study tested the hypothesis that similar misconceptions can be found among superstitious adults. The results from 116 superstitious and 123 sceptical individuals showed that more than sceptics, superstitious individuals attributed purpose to objects, and explained biological processes in terms of organ intentionality and energy transmission. In addition, they thought of energy as a vital force, attributing life and mental properties to it. These conceptual confusions were positively associated to all types of superstitions as well as belief in alternative medicine. The results support the argument that category mistakes and ontological confusions underlie superstitious and vitalistic thinking. PMID:17319049

  14. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Intergroup Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that ethnolinguistic vitality depends on four crucial social psychological factors: perceived strength differential, intergroup distance, utilitarianism and intergroup discordance. The influence of these factors on the vitality of subordinate and dominant groups is outlined. It is proposed that the vitality of both types of groups…

  15. Development of a portable vital sensing system for home telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, F; Sankai, Y

    2007-01-01

    For safe and effective home medical care, a network system for observing one's vital signs noninvasively and evaluating one's health conditions is highly desirable. In this paper, we described a portable vital sensing system and a home medical server to establish a home telemedicine system. In order to develop a portable vital sensing system, physiological sensing circuit, digital signal processor and wireless communication device are integrated into a small electrical circuit, called "smart telecom unit" with a size of 25mm * 37mm. By using a smart telecom unit, noninvasive vital sensing units including blood pressure, electrocardiograph, pulse wave and body temperature were developed. These sensing units are able to communicate vital records to a home medical server, which consists of a small computer and virtual physiological model to estimate health conditions and can seamlessly connect to the Internet. The accuracy and stability were evaluated in the system performance test. As a result of a performance test of a portable vital sensing system, these vital data could be measured easily and noninvasively. In addition, vital sensing system is able to communicate vital records to home medical server. Hence, it could be confirmed that it was useful to analyze daily health condition in order to prevent a lifestyle disease like hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes. PMID:18003350

  16. Organizational Vitality in Student Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Stephen F.; O'Donnell, Jo Anne

    Institutional vitality, a broad measure of the quality of organizational life at colleges and universities, has not been systematically addressed in the literature. To identify management and personnel practices which contribute to institutional vitality within student affairs divisions, a two-stage methodology was employed. First, an…

  17. The use of sampling for vital registration and vital statistics.

    PubMed

    HAUSER, P M

    1954-01-01

    In this paper, the author does not so much try to give a blueprint for the application of sampling methods to vital registration and vital statistics as to show the opportunities for their use and the advantages to be derived from them. In the less developed areas of the world, modern sampling methods make it possible to obtain very accurate national statistics in the early stages of the establishment of a vital registration and vital statistics system and will lead to its more orderly and efficient development. In areas where more or less complete registration exists, the use of sampling may result in a reduction of costs and an improvement in the quality and currency of the data obtained.The sample vital statistics system proposed by the author should comprise complete primary registration units or combinations of them, representative of the entire universe for which statistics are wanted. The selection of these, however, must be made at random; but, in order to avoid bias, the units should be taken with probabilities proportionate to their size.After discussing the ways of carrying out his proposal and the relation of a sample vital statistics system to health programmes, the author considers the use of the sample system as a supplement to a complete system and the advantages of sampling for quality control, checking the completeness of registration, preparing advance tabulations, and conducting supplemental surveys and research. PMID:13199663

  18. Headaches - danger signs

    MedlinePlus

    Migraine headache - danger signs; Tension headache - danger signs; Cluster headache - danger signs; Vascular headache - danger signs ... and bleeding in the brain can cause a headache. These problems include: Abnormal connection between the arteries ...

  19. Stroke Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Advocate Stroke Warning Signs Quiz Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms THINK YOU ARE HAVING A STROKE? ... Learn more stroke signs and symptoms >>>> Stroke Warning Signs Hip-Hop F.A.S.T. Video Updated Guidelines ...

  20. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    sharp that they cause paper cuts. Stains. If you accidentally spill some food or drink on your clothes, make sure you attempt to remove it as soon as possible and preferably within the same lunar cycle. Some teachers seem to think they should be worn with pride like the stains on a chemistry teacher's white coat. This is a myth. Materials. For scientists continually teaching about the wonder of smart materials, physics teachers are remarkably conservative in their choice of materials for their clothes. Try to break out from the traditional corduroy and tweed and practise what you teach. It is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Steven Chapman Science Year Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science Signing Off takes a humorous and irreverent look at physics education. The views expressed here are those of the author and are not endorsed by the Editorial Board for Physics Education. Can you contribute a zany attitude or humorous anecdote? Please send your offering to ped@iop.org marked Signing Off.

  1. Cullen Sign and Grey Turner Sign Revisited.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F

    2016-06-01

    Cullen sign and Grey Turner sign, named after Thomas Stephen Cullen, MB, and George Grey Turner, MBBS, respectively, are signs of abdominal wall hemorrhage and are generally associated with acute pancreatitis. However, the research from which these signs arose was documented long before Cullen and Grey Turner made their contributions. The present article examines the history, pathologic mechanisms, and clinical application of these signs in relation to acute pancreatitis and ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27214777

  2. Vital Topics in School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Darrell H.

    A study to determine the topics considered vital by principals and members of the American Education Finance Association (AEFA) is described in this paper. Questionnaires mailed to two random samples of 61 AEFA members and 181 elementary/secondary principals respectively, yielded 35 returns, a 57 percent response rate, and 113 returns, a 62…

  3. Managing Enrollments for Institutional Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don

    1985-01-01

    The concept of enrollment management is gaining acceptance as a means of ensuring institutional vitality. Those responsible for enrollment management must have direct responsibility for: student marketing and recruitment, pricing and financial aid, academic and career advising, academic assistance programs, institutional research, orientation,…

  4. Understanding and Forecasting Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karan, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Forecasting of ethnolinguistic vitality can only be done within a well-functioning descriptive and explanatory model of the dynamics of language stability and shift. It is proposed that the Perceived Benefit Model of Language Shift, used with a taxonomy of language shift motivations, provides that model. The model, based on individual language…

  5. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  6. Evaluation of Efficiency Improvement in Vital Documentation Using RFID Devices.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eizen; Nakai, Miho; Ishihara, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We introduced medical devices with RFID tags and the terminal with RFID reader in our hospital. Time study was conducted in two phases. In phase I, nurses round as usual, and in phase II, the nurse round the ward with a terminal installed on a cart. This study concluded that RFID system shortens the time for vital sign documentation. However, deploying the terminals at every bedside did not contribute the more time reduction. PMID:27332473

  7. 46 CFR 128.130 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vital systems. 128.130 Section 128.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS General § 128.130 Vital systems. (a) Vital systems are those systems that are vital to a vessel's survivability and safety. For...

  8. Warning Signs After Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy > Postpartum care > Warning signs after birth Warning signs after birth E-mail to a friend Please ... infection Postpartum bleeding Postpartum depression (PPD) What warning signs should you look for? Call your provider if ...

  9. Pulp reaction to vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fugaro, Jessica O; Nordahl, Inger; Fugaro, Orlando J; Matis, Bruce A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in dental pulp after nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel. Fifteen patients between 12 and 26 years of age with caries-free first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were treated with 10% Opalescence (Ultradent Products, Inc). Tooth #5 had four days of bleaching, tooth #12 was treated for two weeks, tooth #21 was bleached for two weeks followed by two weeks without treatment and tooth #28, serving as the control, was without treatment. All teeth were extracted at the same time. Immediately after extraction, 4 mm of the most apical portion of the root was sectioned off and each specimen was placed in a vial containing 10% neutral buffered formalin. The samples were prepared for histological evaluation at the Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials (NIOM) and microscopically examined independently at both NIOM and Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). Pulp reactions were semi-quantitatively graded as none, slight, moderate and severe. Slight pulpal changes were detected in 16 of the 45 bleached teeth. Neither moderate nor severe reactions were observed. The findings indicate that the slight histological changes sometimes observed after bleaching tend to resolve within two weeks post-treatment. Statistical differences existed only between the untreated control and the four-day (p=0.0109) and two-week (p=0.0045) treatment groups. The findings from this study demonstrated that nightguard vital bleaching procedures using 10% carbamide peroxide might cause initial mild, localized pulp reactions. However, the minor histological changes observed did not affect the overall health of the pulp tissue and were reversible within two weeks post-treatment. Therefore, two weeks of treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide used for nightguard vital bleaching is considered safe for dental pulp. PMID:15279473

  10. NETosis: how vital is it?

    PubMed

    Yipp, Bryan G; Kubes, Paul

    2013-10-17

    In this review, we examine the evidence that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a critical role in innate immunity. We summarize how NETs are formed in response to various stimuli and provide evidence that NETosis is not universally a cell death pathway. Here we describe at least 2 different mechanisms by which NETs are formed, including a suicide lytic NETosis and a live cell or vital NETosis. We also evaluate the evidence for NETs in catching and killing pathogens. Finally, we examine how infections are related to the development of autoimmune and vasculitic diseases through unintended but detrimental bystander damage resulting from NET release. PMID:24009232

  11. Vanishing coccolith vital effects with alleviated CO2 limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Chan, I. Z. X.; McClelland, H. L. O.; Heureux, A. M. C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2015-09-01

    By recreating a range of geologically relevant concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the laboratory, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the vital effects in both carbon and oxygen isotopes of coccolith calcite of multiple species relates to ambient DIC concentration. Under high DIC levels, all the examined coccoliths lacked any offset from inorganic calcite, whereas in low (present-day) DIC concentrations, these vital effects and interspecies differences become substantial. These laboratory observations support the recent hypothesis from field observations that the appearance of interspecific vital effect in coccolithophores coincides with the long-term Neogene decline of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The present study brings further valuable constraints on coccolith isotopic compositions by demonstrating the threshold for the absence of vital effects under high DIC regimes. From a mechanistic viewpoint, we show that the vital effect is determined by physiology; growth rate, cell size and relative rates of photosynthesis and calcification, and a modulation of these parameters with ambient carbon availability. This study provides palaeoceanographers with a biogeochemical framework that can be utilised to further develop the use of calcareous nannofossils in palaeoceanography to derive sea surface temperature and pCO2 levels.

  12. Wearable vital parameters monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramaliu, Radu Vadim; Vasile, Alexandru; Bacis, Irina

    2015-02-01

    The system we propose monitors body temperature, heart rate and beside this, it tracks if the person who wears it suffers a faint. It uses a digital temperature sensor, a pulse sensor and a gravitational acceleration sensor to monitor the eventual faint or small heights free falls. The system continuously tracks the GPS position when available and stores the last valid data. So, when measuring abnormal vital parameters the module will send an SMS, using the GSM cellular network , with the person's social security number, the last valid GPS position for that person, the heart rate, the body temperature and, where applicable, a valid fall alert or non-valid fall alert. Even though such systems exist, they contain only faint detection or heart rate detection. Usually there is a strong correlation between low/high heart rate and an eventual faint. Combining both features into one system results in a more reliable detection device.

  13. Vitalism and the Darwin Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James

    2012-08-01

    There are currently both scientific and public debates surrounding Darwinism. In the scientific debate, the details of evolution are in dispute, but not the central thesis of Darwin's theory; in the public debate, Darwinism itself is questioned. I concentrate on the public debate because of its direct impact on education in the United States. Some critics of Darwin advocate the teaching of intelligent design theory along with Darwin's theory, and others seek to eliminate even the mention of evolution from science classes altogether. Many of these critics base their objections on the claim that non-living matter cannot give rise to living matter. After considering some of the various meanings assigned to `vitalism' over the years, I argue that a considerable portion of Darwin deniers support a literal version of vitalism that is not scientifically respectable. Their position seems to be that since life cannot arise naturally, Darwin's theory accomplishes nothing: If it can only account for life forms changing from one to another (even this is disputed by some) but not how life arose in the first place, what's the point? I argue that there is every reason to believe that living and non-living matter differ only in degree, not in kind, and that all conversation about Darwinism should start with the assumption that abiogenesis is possible unless or until compelling evidence of its impossibility is presented. That is, I advocate a position that the burden of proof lies with those who claim "Life only comes from life." Until that case is made, little weight should be given to their position.

  14. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms Partly because there are different types ... This section presents a general picture of CMT signs and symptoms. Contractures and bone deformities Many people ...

  15. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? ... be damaged as a result. About Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research ...

  16. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  17. Sign, Symbol and Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Louise Bowen; Ballinger, Raymond A.

    Signs are such a commonplace sight in our everyday lives, that we can easily miss the artistic beauty and graphic harmony of the symbols used. Thoughtfully well designed and planned signs communicate with a simplicity and directness that signmakers and designers have adhered to for ages. Even contemporary signs still reflect their timelessness…

  18. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  19. Battlefield triage life signs detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lin, Jenshan; Park, Byung-Kwon; Li, Changzhi; Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M.; Host-Madsen, Anders

    2008-04-01

    Getting to wounded soldiers on the battlefield is a precarious task, and medics have a very high casualty rate. It is therefore a vital importance to prioritize which soldiers to attend to first. The first step is to detect life signs - if a soldier is dead or alive, and prioritize recovery of live soldiers. The second step is to obtain vital signs from live soldiers, and use this to prioritize which are in most urgent need of attention. Our team at Kai Sensors, University of Hawaii and University of Florida is developing Doppler radar heart sensing technology that provides the means to detect life signs, respiration and/or heart beat, at a distance, even for subjects lying motionless, e.g., unconscious subjects, wearing body armor, and hidden from direct view. Since this technology can deliver heart rate information with high accuracy, it may also enable the assessment of a subject's physiological and psychological state based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Thus, the degree of a subject's injury may also be determined. The software and hardware developments and challenges for life signs detection and monitoring for battlefield triage will be discussed, including heart signal detection from all four sides of the human body, detection in the presence of body armor, and the feasibility of HRV parameter extraction.

  20. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  1. Client training vital for NFP.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  2. XML and the VITAL standard: the document-oriented approach for open telemedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Anagnostaki, A; Pavlopoulos, S; Koutsouris, D

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to create a common, document-oriented architecture for the interchange of medical data in healthcare telemedicine applications. Key components are: The VITAL standard specifying a common (medical device independent) representation of Vital Signs Information and the Extensible Markup Language (XML) specifying the document specifications form, an architecture that, in aggregate, define the semantics and structural constraints necessary for the exchange of vital signs and related medical data. The modelling and design technique for the described application has been the Unified Modelling Language (UML). The XMI (XML Metadata Interchange Format) of the Object Management Group (OMG) provided the meta-model for this application, for sharing objects using XML, via the transfer of the application's UML model to XML documents and DTDs. PMID:11604709

  3. Protecting Vital Records in a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Van

    2005-01-01

    The second a student enters kindergarten, a set of vital records is created, and this body of information expands throughout a child's academic career. Vital school records contain highly sensitive, private information, and there is no shortage of laws and policies to govern the handling, management and protection of such information. Schools…

  4. NATIONAL VITAL STATISTICS SYSTEM - MORTALITY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, State laws require death certificates to be completed for all deaths, and Federal law mandates national collection and publication of deaths and other vital statistics data. The National Vital Statistics System, the Federal compilation of this data, is the r...

  5. Vital Soil: Function, Value and Properties.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article is a review of the book, Vital Soil: Function, Value and Properties. Soil vitality has been defined as the ability of soil ecosystems to stay in balance in a changing world. The soil environment and the life that it supports developed over centuries and millennia, but careless human ac...

  6. Does Ethnolinguistic Vitality Theory Account for the Actual Vitality of Ethnic Groups? A Critical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmur, Kutlay

    2011-01-01

    Ethnolinguistic vitality theory asserts that Status, Demographic, Institutional Support and Control factors make up the vitality of ethnolinguistic groups. An assessment of a group's strengths and weaknesses in each of these dimensions provides a rough classification of ethnolinguistic groups into those having low, medium, or high vitality. Low…

  7. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119.710... Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems are those systems that are vital to...-vital system. (c) Piping used in a vital system must meet § 56.60 in subchapter F of this...

  8. Vanishing coccolith vital effects with alleviated carbon limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Chan, I. Z. X.; McClelland, H. L. O.; Heureux, A. M. C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    By recreating a range of geologically relevant concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the laboratory, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the vital effects in both carbon and oxygen isotopes of coccolith calcite of multiple species relates to ambient DIC concentration. Under high DIC levels, all the examined coccoliths exhibit significantly reduced isotopic offsets from inorganic calcite compared to the substantial vital effects expressed at low (preindustrial and present-day) DIC concentrations. The supply of carbon to the cell exerts a primary control on biological fractionation in coccolith calcite via the modulation of coccolithophore growth rate, cell size and carbon utilisation by photosynthesis and calcification, altogether accounting for the observed interspecific differences between coccolith species. These laboratory observations support the recent hypothesis from field observations that the appearance of interspecific vital effect in coccolithophores coincides with the long-term Neogene decline of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and bring further valuable constraints by demonstrating a convergence of all examined species towards inorganic values at high pCO2 regimes. This study provides palaeoceanographers with a biogeochemical framework that can be utilised to further develop the use of calcareous nannofossils in palaeoceanography to derive sea surface temperature and pCO2 levels, especially during periods of relatively elevated pCO2 concentrations, as they prevailed during most of the Meso-Cenozoic.

  9. Forms of vitality play in infancy.

    PubMed

    Español, Silvia; Martínez, Mauricio; Bordoni, Mariana; Camarasa, Rosario; Carretero, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we report a qualitative study based on the constant comparative method to initiate the systematic study of forms of vitality play. This is an unnoticed non-figurative play frame linked to early social play and temporal arts in which child and adult elaborate the dynamics of their own movements and sounds in a repetition-variation form. In the introduction we present the theoretical underpinnings and the sporadic observations we have done in previous studies. Then, by the iterative observations of the recorded material of a longitudinal case study on play during the third year of life, we generated the general category of forms of vitality play and four subcategories of display modes of forms of vitality play (improvised forms of vitality play, ritualized forms of vitality play, forms of vitality play combined with pretend play, and forms of vitality play combined with role playing) which are illustrated with descriptive narratives. We discuss the properties of the developed categories, the limits of the present study, and the need to continue systematizing the research on this playful activity. PMID:24909632

  10. Sign-a-Palooza

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorran, Charles; Reynolds, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    A halo of signs, some stuffed into thick plastic sheaths while others curled under yellow tape, cluttered the service desks of the New City Library. They bleated out messages of closings, procedures, and warnings. Their number undermined their cause. All too often a customer would ask a question that was answered by the very sign they had pushed…

  11. Standardization of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  12. HEALTH, VITAL GOALS, AND CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES

    PubMed Central

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or ‘central human capabilities and functionings’. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings—or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. PMID:22420910

  13. Signs of Overload

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Text Size Email Print Share Signs of Overload Page Content Article Body Although stress is a ... 12 (Copyright © 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be ...

  14. Warning Signs of Bullying

    MedlinePlus

    ... to talk to kids about bullying. Respond to Bullying Learn how to respond to bullying . From stopping ... away . Back to top Signs a Child is Bullying Others Kids may be bullying others if they: ...

  15. Symptoms and Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents Anorexia Nervosa emaciation (extremely thin from lack of nutrition) relentless ... from diuretic abuse severe dehydration from purging Binge Eating Disorder frequently eating large amounts of food (binge-eating) ...

  16. The du Bois sign.

    PubMed

    Voelpel, James H; Muehlberger, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    According to the current literature, the term "du Bois sign" characterizes the condition of a shortened fifth finger as a symptom of congenital syphilis, Down syndrome, dyscrania, and encephalic malformation. Modern medical dictionaries and text books attribute the eponym to the French gynecologist Paul Dubois (1795-1871). Yet, a literature analysis revealed incorrect references to the person and unclear definitions of the term. Our findings showed that the origin of the term is based on observations made by the Swiss dermatologist Charles du Bois (1874-1947) in connection with congenital syphilis. In addition, a further eponymical fifth finger sign is closely associated with the du Bois sign. In conclusion, the du Bois sign has only limited diagnostic value and is frequently occurring in the normal healthy population. PMID:21263293

  17. Detecting specific health-related events using an integrated sensor system for vital sign monitoring.

    PubMed

    Adnane, Mourad; Jiang, Zhongwei; Choi, Samjin; Jang, Hoyoung

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for the detection of apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data is presented. The method is based on the intelligent combination of an integrated sensor system for long-time cardiorespiratory signal monitoring and dedicated signal-processing packages. Integrated sensors are a PVDF film and conductive fabric sheets. The signal processing package includes dedicated respiratory cycle (RC) and QRS complex detection algorithms and a new method using the respiratory cycle variability (RCV) for detecting apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data. Results show that our method is suitable for online analysis of long time series data. PMID:22399978

  18. [Design of the remote monitoring system of vital sign based on smartphone and mobile internet].

    PubMed

    Wen, Chuanxue; Zhou, Hongjian; Zhang, Junfei

    2015-02-01

    The present paper presents the design of a remote monitoring system based on smartphone and mobile internet. The system can realize functions such as multi-physiological parameter collection, micromation of collecting equipment, real-time monitoring, remote data transmission, automatic alarm, physiological parameter analyze and Global Position System (GPS) location of patient's position. Besides acting as a receiver and transmission platform, smartphone can also process and analyze the physiological parameters, such as detection of the apnea from electrocardiogram (ECG). The system contains technologies of MCU, Bluetooth transmission, Android and Wed development, wavelet transform, mobile communication as a whole. It propels further developments of the remote mobile medical based on smartphone. PMID:25997272

  19. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2010-11: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2012

    2012-01-01

    APPA's Information and Research Committee's goal for this year was to enhance the survey and report tools by making them both more navigable, user friendly, and accurate. Significant progress has been made with all of these initiatives. APPA also automated many of the internal processes for the survey and report, which resulted in a…

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Blood Pressure Control -- Helping Patients Take Their Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking their blood pressure medicine as directed. Problem Medicines don’t work if people don’t take ... reasons people don’t take their blood pressure medicine as directed vary: Not filling the prescription – ...

  1. Textile technology for the vital signs monitoring in telemedicine and extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Ferratini, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    This paper illustrates two extensive applications of a smart garment we previously developed for the monitoring of ECG, respiration, and movement. In the first application, the device, named Maglietta Interattiva Computerizzata (MagIC), was used for the home monitoring of cardiac patients. The used platform included MagIC for signals collection, a touchscreen computer with a dedicated software for data handling, and a universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) dongle for data transmission, via email, to three cardiologists. Three patients daily-performed 3-min telemonitoring sessions for 30 days by using the platform. The whole system behaved correctly in 85 out of 90 sessions. In five instances, a second session was required due to UMTS traffic congestion. Only in three sessions, cardiologists asked the patient to repeat the acquisition because of poor signal quality. In the second application, MagIC was used to evaluate the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on sleep and 24 h daily life in 30 healthy subjects at 3500 and 5400 m above sea level on Mount Everest slopes. The use of MagIC garment was reported to be simple and requiring short instrumentation time even in the demanding expedition environment. The signal quality was adequate in 111 out of 115 recordings and 90% of the subjects found the vest comfortable. PMID:20421189

  2. Vital Signs: Fruit and vegetable intake among children - United States, 2003-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Americans do not consume nearly enough fruits and vegetables. Increasing the contribution of fruits and vegetables to Americans’ diets may add under-consumed nutrients, reduce the risk of leading causes of illness and death, and help with weight management. Encouraging children to consume ade...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now

    MedlinePlus

    ... 62 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities. Health Care Providers can Know if patients in your facility ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Think Sepsis. Time Matters.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Think sepsis. Time matters. Language: English Español ( ... the antibiotic type, dose, and duration are correct. Health care facility CEOs/administrators can Make infection control a ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution ... resistance and improving prescribing practices. Work with other health care facilities to prevent infections, transmission, and resistance. Problem ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Fruits and Vegetables [PDF - 2.1 MB] Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies and Solutions for My Community School ... Progress in Obesity Prevention Institute of Medicine. Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies Top of Page Get Email Updates ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking a Serious, Under-Recognized Problem Among Women and Girls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Underage drinking is affected by exposure to alcohol marketing. Underage drinking is also influenced by adult drinking, ... alcohol use. Reporting on youth exposure to alcohol marketing because it influences underage drinking. We know what ...

  8. Vital signs: disparities in nonsmokers' exposure to secondhand smoke--United States, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Homa, David M; Neff, Linda J; King, Brian A; Caraballo, Ralph S; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Babb, Stephen D; Garrett, Bridgette E; Sosnoff, Connie S; Wang, Lanqing

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) from burning tobacco products causes sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), respiratory infections, ear infections, and asthma attacks in infants and children, and coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer in adult nonsmokers. No risk-free level of SHS exposure exists. SHS exposure causes more than 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants each year, and approximately $5.6 billion annually in lost productivity. Although population exposure to SHS has declined over the past 2 decades, many nonsmokers remain exposed to SHS in workplaces, public places, homes, and vehicles. PMID:25654612

  9. Vital Signs: Food categories contributing the most to sodium consumption - United States, 2007-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the U.S. population consumes sodium in excess of daily guidelines (<2,300 mg overall and 1,500 mg for specific populations). Excessive sodium consumption raises blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the nation’s first and fourth leading causes of death. I...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... These six bacteria are among the most deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, identified as urgent or serious threats by CDC: CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae), MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ), ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (extended-spectrum ...

  11. Progress Monitoring in an Integrated Health Care System: Tracking Behavioral Health Vital Signs.

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, Bradley; Franklin, Allie; Mercer, Brian; Fraynt, Rebecca; Simon, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Progress monitoring implementation in an integrated health care system is a complex process that must address factors such as measurement, technology, delivery system care processes, patient needs and provider requirements. This article will describe how one organization faced these challenges by identifying the key decision points (choice of measure, process for completing rating scale, interface with electronic medical record and clinician engagement) critical to implementation. Qualitative and quantitative data will be presented describing customer and stakeholder satisfaction with the mental health progress monitoring tool (MHPMT) as well as organizational performance with key measurement targets. PMID:25840521

  12. Uranus: A Middleware Architecture for Dependable AAL and Vital Signs Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Coronato, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The design and realization of health monitoring applications has attracted the interest of large communities both from industry and academia. Several research challenges have been faced and issues tackled in order to realize effective applications for the management and monitoring of people with chronic diseases, people with disabilities, elderly people. However, there is a lack of efficient tools that enable rapid and possibly cheap realization of reliable health monitoring applications. The paper presents Uranus, a service oriented middleware architecture, which provides basic functions for the integration of different kinds of biomedical sensors. Uranus has also distinguishing characteristics like services for the run-time verification of the correctness of running applications and mechanisms for the recovery from failures. The paper concludes with two case studies as proof of concept. PMID:22736998

  13. Education Vital Signs. State of the States: The Nation in Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Board Journal, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This is a compilation of educational data, presented in charts, for each state and the District of Columbia. Included are demographic data, financial and budgetary data, and academic information. Also included are national averages for each item listed. Includes the 16 sources for the information presented here. (WFA)

  14. Education Vital Signs. Main Events: The Year of "No Child Left Behind."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    A brief overview of national issues in public education in 2002. Discusses the views of advocates and opponents of the No Child Left Behind Act and the school voucher movement; federal, state, and local government challenges to local school board authority; and school funding and general economic issues. (WFA)

  15. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. higher education institutions, focusing on the black-white higher education equality index, statistics that measure the state of racial inequality, ranking the nation's law schools by percentages of black students, state-by-state review of African American enrollments in…

  16. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of African Americans' progress in U.S. higher education institutions, discussing: the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure racial inequality; ranking law schools by percentage of black students; black enrollments at the nation's highest-ranked universities and highest-ranked liberal…

  17. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1992: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-eight designated swimming beaches, four informal swimming areas, two canoe launching or landing sites, and two additional sites on a canoeing stream were sampled at least ten times each during 30-day sampling periods in the summer of 1992. One designated swimming beach, one informal swimming area, and two canoe launching or landing sites exceeded the recommended criterion of geometric mean concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria of 200/100 mL. In addition to these four sites, five designated swimming beaches and one informal swimming area exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended criterion by having more than 10 percent of the fecal coliform samples with concentrations greater than 400/100 mL. Rainfall was an important factor for these six sites and the four sites that did not meet the geometric mean criterion. Some sampling sites are affected by rainfall more than others. When bacteria concentrations increase after rainfall, it indicates that site is vulnerable to contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution. Recreational use of these sites following rainfall is discouraged. If samples collected within 24 hours of rainfall (one-half inch or more) are excluded, all-but one of the ten sites have better bacteriological water quality, and two meet both the geometric mean and maximum concentration criteria. Five canoe access locations on the Bear Creek floatway, plus one site upstream and another downstream of the floatway were sampled eight times each during 1992. All seven sites met recreation criteria.

  18. SBIRT as a Vital Sign for Behavioral Health Identification, Diagnosis, and Referral in Community Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Dwinnells, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental design study was to examine the effectiveness of the behavioral health Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) program at a community health center. The study group was twice as likely (25.3%) to have depression and substance abuse diagnosed compared with the control group (11.4%) (P <.001). Referral rates for the study group were more likely to occur (12.4%) compared with referral rates for the control group (1.0%) (P <.001); however, the kept appointment rates by patients for behavioral health problems referrals remained low for both groups. SBIRT was effectively utilized in a community health center, resulting in increased rates for diagnosis of behavioral health problems and referrals of patients. PMID:25964405

  19. Assessing Vital Signs: Applying Two Participatory Evaluation Frameworks to the Evaluation of a College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Susan C.; Magilvy, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation research has been in progress to clarify the concept of participatory evaluation and to assess its impact. Recently, two theoretical frameworks have been offered--Daigneault and Jacob's participatory evaluation measurement index and Champagne and Smits' model of practical participatory evaluation. In this case report, we apply these…

  20. Vital signs: taking the pulse of your managed care contract performance.

    PubMed

    Waymack, Pamela M; Ward, William J

    2005-07-01

    Three essential baseline measures of managed care performance that should be reported on a regular basis are: Overall profitability of the organization's managed care portfolio. Payer mix and profitability. Performance of major managed care contracts. PMID:16060097

  1. 75 FR 22630 - Vital Signs Minnesota, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... FR 59253). At the request of the State, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of the... shift in production of automation design and build components. The amended notice applicable to...

  2. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2011-12: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an expanded Web-based "Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) Report." The purpose of APPA's Facilities Performance Indicators is to provide a representative set of statistics about facilities in educational institutions. APPA's Information and Research Committee's goal for this year was to enhance the…

  3. Vital Signs Screening for Alcohol Misuse in a Rural Primary Care Clinic: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, J. Paul; Guyinn, Monique R.; Matthews, Michael; Okosun, Ike; Dent, M. Marie

    2008-01-01

    Context: Alcohol misuse is more common in rural areas, and rural problem drinkers are less likely to seek alcohol treatment services. Rural clinics face unique challenges to implementing routine alcohol screening and intervention. Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using the single alcohol screening question (SASQ) during routine nursing vital…

  4. Clinical validation of LTMS-S: A wearable system for vital signs monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Olivier; Ferrario, Damien; Proença, Martin; Porchet, Jacques-André; Falhi, Abdessamad; Grossenbacher, Olivier; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Della Ricca, Nicolas; Sartori, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    LTMS-S is a new wearable system for the monitoring of several physiological signals--including a two-lead electrocardiogram (ECG)--and parameters, such as the heart rate, the breathing rate, the peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), the core body temperature (CBT), and the physical activity. All signals are measured using only three sensors embedded within a vest. The sensors are standalone with their own rechargeable battery, memory, wireless communication and with an autonomy exceeding 24 hours. This paper presents the results of the clinical validation of the LTMS-S system. PMID:26736954

  5. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2012-13: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This paper features an expanded Web-based "Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) Report." The purpose of APPA's Facilities Performance Indicators is to provide a representative set of statistics about facilities in educational institutions. "The Facilities Performance Indicators Report" is designed for survey…

  6. Uranus: a middleware architecture for dependable AAL and vital signs monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Coronato, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The design and realization of health monitoring applications has attracted the interest of large communities both from industry and academia. Several research challenges have been faced and issues tackled in order to realize effective applications for the management and monitoring of people with chronic diseases, people with disabilities, elderly people. However, there is a lack of efficient tools that enable rapid and possibly cheap realization of reliable health monitoring applications. The paper presents Uranus, a service oriented middleware architecture, which provides basic functions for the integration of different kinds of biomedical sensors. Uranus has also distinguishing characteristics like services for the run-time verification of the correctness of running applications and mechanisms for the recovery from failures. The paper concludes with two case studies as proof of concept. PMID:22736998

  7. Vital Signs: Preparing for Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus - United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Widespread Zika virus transmission in the Region of the Americas since 2015 has heightened the urgency of preparing for the possibility of expansion of mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus during the 2016 mosquito season (1). CDC and other U.S. government agencies have been working with state and local government partners on prevention and early detection of Zika virus infection and will increase these activities during April as part of their preparation for the anticipated emergence of mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus in the continental United States. PMID:27054688

  8. Skin wounds vitality markers in forensic pathology: An updated review.

    PubMed

    Casse, Jean-Matthieu; Martrille, Laurent; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Gauchotte, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Wound age evaluation is one of the most challenging issues in forensic pathology. In the first minutes or hours, standard histological examination may not determine whether the wound was inflicted in the pre- or post-mortem period. While red blood cell infiltration is classically considered as a sign of vital reaction, several studies have shown that extravasation of blood cells may also occur after death and cannot be used as a reliable marker in the diagnosis of wound vitality. Numerous studies about wound vitality are available in the literature. They have evaluated markers involved in coagulation or inflammation, using various methods such as enzymology, molecular biology or immunohistochemistry. In this update, we first introduce some methodological principles. Then, we review the main studies available in the literature. Immunohistochemistry seems to be the most valuable method, given its easy application and the possibility to analyse the localization of the molecules of interest. Some markers are promising, such as CD15, TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β, TGFα or TGFβ1. Prior to their application in daily practice, these early results need to be confirmed with other studies, conducted by independent teams and integrating multiple controls. Most notably, the antibodies have to be tested in numerous post-mortem wounds. Indeed, a critical risk of overexpression in post-mortem wounds is present. Some promising markers have been later invalidated because of post-mortem false positivity. Finally, optimal sensitivity and specificity values could probably be reached by combining several markers, validated by large groups of pre- and post-mortem wounds. PMID:26101444

  9. An Examination of the Validity of the Subjective Vitality Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Jessica R.; Barker, Valerie; Giles, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The concept of group "vitality" was developed over 30 years ago to assist in understanding of power relations between language groups. However, vitality has also been an important consideration when attempting to understand intergroup relations more generally. Vitality researchers distinguish "subjective" vitality from "objective" vitality. This…

  10. Vital physical signals measurements using a webcam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jianfei; Yan, Yonggang; Yao, Lifeng

    2013-10-01

    Non-contact and remote measurements of vital physical signals are important for reliable and comfortable physiological self-assessment. In this paper, we provide a new video-based methodology for remote and fast measurements of vital physical signals such as cardiac pulse and breathing rate. A webcam is used to track color video of a human face or wrist, and a Photoplethysmography (PPG) technique is applied to perform the measurements of the vital signals. A novel sequential blind signal extraction methodology is applied to the color video under normal lighting conditions, based on correlation analysis between the green trace and the source signals. The approach is successfully applied in the measurement of vital signals under the condition of different illuminating in which the target signal can also be found out accurately. To assess the advantages, the measuring time of a large number of cases is recorded correctly. The experimental results show that it only takes less than 30 seconds to measure the vital physical signals using presented technique. The study indicates the proposed approach is feasible for PPG technique, which provides a way to study the relationship of the signal for different ROI in future research.

  11. Methodology to automatically detect abnormal values of vital parameters in anesthesia time-series: Proposal for an adaptable algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Antoine; Jeanne, Mathieu; Marcilly, Romaric; Kipnis, Eric; Schiro, Jessica; Logier, Régis; Tavernier, Benoît

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal values of vital parameters such as hypotension or tachycardia may occur during anesthesia and may be detected by analyzing time-series data collected during the procedure by the Anesthesia Information Management System. When crossed with other data from the Hospital Information System, abnormal values of vital parameters have been linked with postoperative morbidity and mortality. However, methods for the automatic detection of these events are poorly documented in the literature and differ between studies, making it difficult to reproduce results. In this paper, we propose a methodology for the automatic detection of abnormal values of vital parameters. This methodology uses an algorithm allowing the configuration of threshold values for any vital parameters as well as the management of missing data. Four examples illustrate the application of the algorithm, after which it is applied to three vital signs (heart rate, SpO2, and mean arterial pressure) to all 2014 anesthetic records at our institution. PMID:26817405

  12. Computational triadic algebras of signs

    SciTech Connect

    Zadrozny, W.

    1996-12-31

    We present a finite model of Peirce`s ten classes of signs. We briefly describe Peirce`s taxonomy of signs; we prove that any finite collection of signs can be extended to a finite algebra of signs in which all interpretants are themselves being interpreted; and we argue that Peirce`s ten classes of signs can be defined using constraints on algebras of signs. The paper opens the possibility of defining multimodal cognitive agents using Peirce`s classes of signs, and is a first step towards building a computational logic of signs based on Peirce`s taxonomies.

  13. The Meaning of Signs:

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article reconstructs the diagnostic act of the French pox in the French-disease hospital of sixteenth-century Augsburg. It focuses on how the participants in the clinical encounter imagined the configuration of the pox and its localization in the human body. Of central importance for answering this question is the early modern conception of physical signs. It has been argued that it was due to a specific understanding of bodily signs and their relationship to a disease and its causes, that disease definition and classification in the early modern period showed a high degree of flexibility and fluidity. This paper looks at how the sixteenth-century theoretical conception of physical signs not only shaped the diagnosis and treatment of the pox but also reflected the overall organization of institutions. PMID:17242549

  14. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  15. Signs in Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of signs in Elizabeth George Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver," in which a settler youth and a young Indian learn to communicate by signs, and how the signs reveal much about each character's culture. Summarizes the plot elements of the book, including characters who are not as sympathetic to the Indian point of view. (PA)

  16. The Economic Vitality Formula of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konopnicki, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    An economic vitality formula of success can be accomplished by creating partnerships between local career and technical education (CTE), and workforce development and economic development entities. Student industry certifications; dynamic partnerships; programs and projects focused on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); and…

  17. VIEW: Vital Information for Education and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Vocational Education Research Coordinating Unit, Clemson.

    VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work) is a compilation of 300 separate sheets each of which presents information about an occupation, ranging from actor and actress to zoologist. Each sheet contains the DOT (Dictionary of Occupational Titles) classification number, a description of the occupation, qualitative job information, employment…

  18. The Vital Program: Transforming ICT Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Pete; Twining, Peter; Walsh, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Developing a model for effective large-scale continuous professional development (CPD) for teachers remains a significant obstacle for many governments worldwide. This article describes the development and evolution of Vital--a CPD program designed to enhance the teaching of information communication technology in state-funded primary and…

  19. 46 CFR 169.642 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vital systems— (a) A marine engineering system identified by the OCMI as being crucial to the survival... feet in length— (1) Bilge system; (2) Ballast system; (3) Fire protection system; (4) Fuel oil system; and (5) Steering and steering control system. Bilge Systems...

  20. 46 CFR 128.130 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... auxiliaries vital to the vessel's survivability and safety. (10) Any other marine-engineering system... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT... personnel aboard. (b) For the purpose of this subchapter, a system not identified by paragraph (a) of...

  1. 46 CFR 128.130 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... auxiliaries vital to the vessel's survivability and safety. (10) Any other marine-engineering system... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT... personnel aboard. (b) For the purpose of this subchapter, a system not identified by paragraph (a) of...

  2. 46 CFR 128.130 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... auxiliaries vital to the vessel's survivability and safety. (10) Any other marine-engineering system... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT... personnel aboard. (b) For the purpose of this subchapter, a system not identified by paragraph (a) of...

  3. 46 CFR 169.642 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vital systems— (a) A marine engineering system identified by the OCMI as being crucial to the survival... feet in length— (1) Bilge system; (2) Ballast system; (3) Fire protection system; (4) Fuel oil system; and (5) Steering and steering control system. Bilge Systems...

  4. 46 CFR 128.130 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... auxiliaries vital to the vessel's survivability and safety. (10) Any other marine-engineering system... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT... personnel aboard. (b) For the purpose of this subchapter, a system not identified by paragraph (a) of...

  5. 46 CFR 169.642 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vital systems— (a) A marine engineering system identified by the OCMI as being crucial to the survival... feet in length— (1) Bilge system; (2) Ballast system; (3) Fire protection system; (4) Fuel oil system; and (5) Steering and steering control system. Bilge Systems...

  6. 46 CFR 169.642 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vital systems— (a) A marine engineering system identified by the OCMI as being crucial to the survival... feet in length— (1) Bilge system; (2) Ballast system; (3) Fire protection system; (4) Fuel oil system; and (5) Steering and steering control system. Bilge Systems...

  7. Achieving and maintaining cognitive vitality with aging.

    PubMed

    Fillit, Howard M; Butler, Robert N; O'Connell, Alan W; Albert, Marilyn S; Birren, James E; Cotman, Carl W; Greenough, William T; Gold, Paul E; Kramer, Arthur F; Kuller, Lewis H; Perls, Thomas T; Sahagan, Barbara G; Tully, Tim

    2002-07-01

    Cognitive vitality is essential to quality of life and survival in old age. With normal aging, cognitive changes such as slowed speed of processing are common, but there is substantial interindividual variability, and cognitive decline is clearly not inevitable. In this review, we focus on recent research investigating the association of various lifestyle factors and medical comorbidities with cognitive aging. Most of these factors are potentially modifiable or manageable, and some are protective. For example, animal and human studies suggest that lifelong learning, mental and physical exercise, continuing social engagement, stress reduction, and proper nutrition may be important factors in promoting cognitive vitality in aging. Manageable medical comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, also contribute to cognitive decline in older persons. Other comorbidities such as smoking and excess alcohol intake may contribute to cognitive decline, and avoiding these activities may promote cognitive vitality in aging. Various therapeutics, including cognitive enhancers and protective agents such as antioxidants and anti-inflammatories, may eventually prove useful as adjuncts for the prevention and treatment of cognitive decline with aging. The data presented in this review should interest physicians who provide preventive care management to middle-aged and older individuals who seek to maintain cognitive vitality with aging. PMID:12108606

  8. Vital Senses: Sources of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erikson, Joan Mowat

    1985-01-01

    Educating for personal knowing requires an approach to learning that is based in direct sensory experience. Creative art activity nurtures the development of vital sensory experience at every stage of the life cycle. Through imagination, sensory experience is transformed into self-knowledge and conceptual thought; together they illuminate the…

  9. Refereed Publications of Vital Business Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaszczynski, Carol; Scott, James Calvert; Green, Diana J.

    2009-01-01

    Problem: No systematic research has explored the refereed publications records of vital business educators. Data Collection Procedures: A total of 120 prominent business educators were mailed a survey about their publication practices and history, yielding a 61% usable return rate from 73 completed questionnaires. Results: The six research…

  10. Derivative Sign Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  11. Sign-away Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Catherine E.

    1976-01-01

    Why would mental health clients sign release-of-information forms unless they thought a refusal to do so would jeopardize their access to service? The author believes that the practice of not advising clients of their rights to privacy has ethical implications that can compromise the value of the treatment. (Author)

  12. Signs of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styles-Lopez, Robin

    1998-01-01

    Explains how to make a well-designed signage package that is effective and enhances visitor first impressions of an institution. Examines questions to ask when planning traffic-pattern signage and the significance of the different hierarchy of signs; concludes with advice on signage design. (GR)

  13. Sign Language Web Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  14. Signing in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  15. Suicide Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... health professional or by call- ing the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK if you or someone you know exhibits any of the following signs: n Threatening to ... or writing about death, dying, or suicide when these actions are out of the ordinary ...

  16. Comparison of measurements with PetroSense{reg_sign} Portable Hydrocarbon Analyzer (PHA 100) and laboratory analysis of bailed samples (EPA method 8015M) when used in monitoring sparging process

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, D.P.; Wing, T.; Dandge, D.K.; Leclerc, R.; Sword, M.A.; Havens, S.; Worland, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    The PetroSense{reg_sign} PHA-100 is a portable hydrocarbon analyzer that can measure total hydrocarbons in real time, in-situ, in water, vapor and the water vapor interface. The performance of the PetroSense{reg_sign} PHA-100 in the field when used to monitor the levels of hydrocarbons in a monitoring well at an Under Ground Storage (UST) site in Las Vegas is discussed, and compared to the lab analysis of the water samples taken at the same time. The authors also discuss its use for monitoring the progress of a sparging process at another site in Las Vegas. In both cases the PHA-100 showed excellent correlation with lab analyzed samples.

  17. The Impact of Zodiac Signs on Human Nature and Fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, Naira

    2015-07-01

    Horoscope signs have unavoidable impact on human behaviour and interests, health and even fate. Moreover, intermingled with the impact of planets they become a powerful force able to bring about unbelievable changes. The investigation reveals that horoscopes have existed in the Armenian reality since ancient times. The most striking fact about their eistence is that in order to have and use zodiak signs in one's national culture, the nation should first of all have sufficient knowledge in Astrological Sciences since the system of zodiak signs has a direct reference to the cognitive processes and scientific knowledge of the universe, astrological issues and sometimes even there is a hint on hidden signs and messages. Anania Shirakatsi, one of the learned Armenians, had to display much diplomacy with the Armenian Church and religion when discussing the topic in his manuscripts. His observations are still of much importance and vitality even today.

  18. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  19. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  20. Hot and Cold Ethnicities: Modes of Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the summary of the special issue of "JMMD" "Ethnolinguistic vitality". The volume shows convincingly that ethnolinguistic vitality perceptions as measured by standard methodology such as the Subjective Ethnolinguistic Vitality Questionnaires (SEVQ) are not reliable indicators of actual vitality. Evidence that ethnolinguistic…

  1. Optical sensor for measuring American Lobster vitality

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-10

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  2. Optical Sensor for Measuring American Lobster Vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-01

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  3. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign language…

  4. Sign Language Comprehension: The Case of Spanish Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez Ortiz, I. R.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were…

  5. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    PubMed Central

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in the citation form. Sign lowering has been documented previously, but this is the first study to examine it in phonetic detail. The data presented here are tokens of the sign WONDER, as produced by six native signers, in two phonetic contexts and at three signing rates, which were captured by optoelectronic motion capture. The results indicate that sign lowering occurred for all signers, according to the factors we manipulated. Sign production was affected by several phonetic factors that also influence speech production, namely, production rate, phonetic context, and position within an utterance. In addition, we have discovered interesting variations in sign production, which could underlie distinctions in signing style, analogous to accent or voice quality in speech. PMID:20607146

  6. The Golden S Sign.

    PubMed

    Potdar, Pradip V; Nayak, Mitali M

    2015-08-01

    A 60 year old male farmer, chronic smoker, presented with complaints of productive cough since 1 month, swelling of the face and neck since 3 weeks and dyspnoea since 10 days, which was worse at night. There, was history of loss of appetite and considerable weight loss. There was no history of fever. On examination vitals were stable. The patient had right cervical lymphadenitis and right supraclavicular lymphadenitis. There was edema of face, neck and bilateral upper limbs. There was evidence of dilated veins over right arm, chest wall and suffusion of conjunctiva. On examination of the respiratory system, movements were reduced on the right side with dull note in right supramammary region. Vocal resonance was increased in the corresponding area. Breath sounds were reduced in the right inframammary, infraaxillary and infrascapular areas. Examination of cardiovascular and central nervous system was normal. Per abdomen examination revealed no abnormality. PMID:27604437

  7. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  8. Measles (Rubeola): Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Signs and Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... of a patient with Koplik spots, an early sign of measles infection. Three to five days after ...

  9. Quine and the Segregrational Sign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, George

    1999-01-01

    In the context of theory of integrational linguistics, the segregational sign is distinguished from the integrational sign, and the operation of the former is analyzed. Focus is on how logic guides the sign, and how the theory of W. V. Quine accounts for these issues. (MSE)

  10. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  11. Sign language for telemanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pook, Polly K.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1995-12-01

    Literal teleoperation doesn't work very well. Limited bandwidth, long latencies, non- anthropomorphic mappings all make the effort of teleoperation tedious at best and ineffective at worst. Instead, users of teleoperated and semi-autonomous systems want their robots to `just do it for them,' without sacrificing the operator's intent. Our goal is to maximize human strategic control in teleoperator assisted robotics. In our teleassisted regime, the human operator provides high-level contexts for low-level autonomous robot behaviors. The operator wears an EXOS hand master to communicate via a natural sign language, such as pointing to objects and adopting a grasp preshape. Each sign indicates intention: e.g., reaching or grasping; and, where applicable, a spatial context: e.g., the pointing axis or preshape frame. The robot, a Utah/MIT hand on a Puma arm, acts under local servo control within the proscribed contexts. This paper extends earlier work [Pook & Ballard 1994a] by adding remote visual sensors to the teleassistance repertoire. To view the robot site, the operator wears a virtual research helmet that is coupled to binocular cameras mounted on a second Puma 760. The combined hand-head sensors allows teleassistance to be performed remotely. The example task is to open a door. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the teleassistance model by bootstrapping a `pick and place' task from the door opening task.

  12. INFINITY construction contract signed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  13. [Reverse Chaddock sign].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kunio

    2011-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the Babinski reflex is the most well-known and important pathological reflex in clinical neurology. Among many other pathological reflexes that elicit an upgoing great toe, such as Chaddock, Oppenheim, Gordon, Schaefer, and Stransky, only the Chaddock reflex is said to be as sensitive as the Babinski reflex. The optimal receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes are the lateral plantar surface and the external inframalleolar area of the dorsum, respectively. It has been said that the Babinski reflex, obtained by stroking the sole, is by far the best and most reliable method of eliciting an upgoing great toe. However, the Chaddock reflex, the external malleolar sign, is also considered sensitive and reliable according to the literature and everyday neurological practice. The major problems in eliciting the Babinski reflex by stroking the lateral part of the sole are false positive or negative responses due to foot withdrawal, tonic foot response, or some equivocal movements. On the other hand, according to my clinical experience, the external inframalleolar area, which is the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex, is definitely suitable for eliciting the upgoing great toe. In fact, the newly proposed method to stimulate the dorsum of the foot from the medial to the lateral side, which I term the "reversed Chaddock method," is equally sensitive to demonstrate pyramidal tract involvement. With the "reversed Chaddock method", the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex may be postulated to be in the territory of the sural nerve, which could be supported by the better response obtained on stimulation of the postero-lateral calf than the anterior shin. With regard to the receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes, the first sacral dermatome (S1) is also considered a reflexogenous zone, but since the dermatome shows marked overlapping, the zones vary among individuals. As upgoing toe responses are consistently observed in

  14. To Capture a Face: A Novel Technique for the Analysis and Quantification of Facial Expressions in American Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Kegl, Judy

    2006-01-01

    American Sign Language uses the face to express vital components of grammar in addition to the more universal expressions of emotion. The study of ASL facial expressions has focused mostly on the perception and categorization of various expression types by signing and nonsigning subjects. Only a few studies of the production of ASL facial…

  15. Arabic sign language: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, M A

    2005-01-01

    Sign language in the Arab World has been recently recognized and documented. Many efforts have been made to establish the sign language used in individual countries, including Jordan, Egypt, Libya, and the Gulf States, by trying to standardize the language and spread it among members of the Deaf community and those concerned. Such efforts produced many sign languages, almost as many as Arabic-speaking countries, yet with the same sign alphabets. This article gives a tentative account of some sign languages in Arabic through reference to their possible evolution, which is believed to be affected by the diglossic situation in Arabic, and by comparing some aspects of certain sign languages (Jordanian, Palestinian, Egyptian, Kuwaiti, and Libyan) for which issues such as primes, configuration, and movement in addition to other linguistic features are discussed. A contrastive account that depicts the principal differences among Arabic sign languages in general and the spoken language is given. PMID:15778217

  16. Snamprogetti signs MTBE contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-04-15

    Snamprogetti (Milan) will use a Russian-developed dehydrogenation process in a world-scale methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) plant it is to build at Arzew, Algeria for a previously announced joint venture of Sonatrach (Algiers), Total (Paris), and Ecofuel (Milan). The 600,000-m.t./year plant will be the first in the West to use the improved Snamprogetti-Yarsintez fluidized-bed dehydrogenation (FBD) technology proven on a demonstration plant at Yaroslavl, Russia. The process has also been selected for use in Oxyfuel Corp.`s 500,000-m.t./year MTBE plant near Beaumont, TX. Although the environmental permit is already in place, final agreement for this project has not yet been signed.

  17. [Vitality loss: influence of orthodontic process].

    PubMed

    Bernard-Granger, Chloé; Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Vitality loss is an unusual event that can occur before, during or after an orthodontic treatment. It can lead to loss of sensitivity, color change or necrosis of the pulp tissue. Before starting the orthodontic treatment, we have to identify the tooth's risk (injured tooth, included occlusal trauma...). Knowing that, if an endodontic treatment has to be done, it is better to do it before starting orthodontic forces. Lamps do not provide problems except high intensity halogen ones. RPE on children, Le Fort I and mandibular osteotomies, corticotomies, genioplasties are responsible of a transitory ischemia without reaching a pathogen level. Mini-screws or mini-plates may be iatrogenic, if they impact the root. The repair options depend on the delay before removing the miniscrew and the nature of injured tissue. PMID:26337093

  18. Optical determination of dental pulp vitality.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J M; Webber, R L; Walker, E C

    1991-04-01

    In this preliminary study, we explored the feasibility of employing photoplethysmography and pulse oximetry to assess the status of the blood circulation in the dental pulp. A simple photometer that measures diffuse light transmission at 575 nm was built to record tooth plethysmograms, and the ability to distinguish vital from surgically devitalized teeth of a dog using plethysmography was demonstrated. As an extension of the photoplethysmographic technique, red-infrared pulse oximetry applied to the measurement of the oxygen saturation (SO2) of blood in the pulp was also examined using an in vitro test setup. Results suggest that the measurement of relative SO2 changes is feasible, but standard dual-wavelength pulse oximetry does not enable determination of SO2 independent of tooth geometry and sensor placement. PMID:1855796

  19. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are vital records identified? 1223.16 Section 1223.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified?...

  20. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How are vital records identified? 1223.16 Section 1223.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified?...

  1. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are vital records identified? 1223.16 Section 1223.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified?...

  2. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are vital records identified? 1223.16 Section 1223.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified?...

  3. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are vital records identified? 1223.16 Section 1223.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified?...

  4. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... on a circuit that is not vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel does not trip equipment that is vital; and (2) A short-circuit on a circuit that is vital to the propulsion, control,...

  5. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... on a circuit that is not vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel does not trip equipment that is vital; and (2) A short-circuit on a circuit that is vital to the propulsion, control,...

  6. The effects of sign design features on bicycle pictorial symbols for bicycling facility signs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyunghui; Rogoff, Aaron; Smith-Jackson, Tonya

    2013-11-01

    The inanimate bicycle symbol has long been used to indicate the animate activity of bicycling facility signs. In contrast, either the inanimate bicycle symbol or the animate bicycle symbol has been used interchangeably for the standard pavement symbols in bike lanes. This has led to confusion among pedestrians and cyclists alike. The purpose of this study was to examine two different designs (inanimate symbol vs. animate symbol) involved in the evaluation of perceived preference and glance legibility, and investigate sign design features on bicycle pictorial symbols. Thirty-five participants compared current bicycle signs (inanimate symbols) to alternative designs (animate symbols) in a controlled laboratory setting. The results indicated that the alternative designs (animate symbols) showed better performance in both preference and glance legibility tests. Conceptual compatibility, familiarity, and perceptual affordances were found to be important factors as well. PMID:23623234

  7. [Acid-base status in newborn calves during the first days of life considering different states of vitality].

    PubMed

    Herfen, K; Bostedt, H

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the differentiations of the acid-base status in bovine neonates during the first 96 hours of life. Due to the short intervals in the taking of blood samples, noticeable fluctuations in the acid-base status during the first minutes and hours of life of newborn calves were documented. Altogether, 25 matures and eutrophe calves of the DSB, DRB and DFV breeds were provided by the clinic for this study. Apart from an immediate post natum clinical interpretation of the vital signs in the neonates-using the APGAR-score-the pH value, current Base Excess and the CO2 pressure were simultaneously ascertained. Further continuous evaluation of the acid-base status was subsequently followed in the first phase of adaptation. For that alone, twelve blood samples were taken from the vena jugularis within the first 60 minutes after parturition. Until the end of the examination period on the fourth day of life, the tests amounted to 26 measurements altogether per experimentee. Due to the concrete results ascertained from the initial clinical and laboratory observations, the experimentees could be divided into distinct classes of vitality. The acid-base status of all the calves deteriorated during the first minutes of life, indicating that the pH value and Base Excess fall clearly under the initial level in all aspects of vitality directly post natum. On average the minimum pH values are reached between the third and 15th minute of life and remain between 0.019 and 0.096 below the initial values during this period. A varying rapid increase of the pH value follows, together with a balancing out of the Base difference. Despite isolated individual variations as the acid-base status develops, the lowering of the pH values in the first minutes of life is assessed as being a normal biological phenomenon. Deviations from this occur rarely (8%) and do not conform to the norm. The pH value stabilization in connection with this crucial early postnatal phase

  8. The vital issues process: Strategic planning for a changing world

    SciTech Connect

    Engi, D.; Glicken, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Vital Issues process (VIp) is a strategic planning tool initially developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Office of Foreign Intelligence (OFI)* of the US Department of Energy (DOE). It was further developed and refined through its application to a variety of strategic purposes for a range of public and semipublic organizations. The VIp provides a structured mechanism for assisting organizations in accomplishing specified objectives by identifying and prioritizing a portfolio of strategic issues, programmatic areas, or responses to a specified problem. It employs day-long panel meetings in a specified format to elicit a broad range of perspectives on a particular issue in a nonconfrontational manner and to facilitate the interaction and synthesis of diverse viewpoints on a specific topic. The VIp is unique in its incorporation of two primary approaches in each panel session: a qualitative or transactional segment, which entails the synthesis of the alternatives through negotiations or discussion, and a quantitative or net benefit maximization segment, an analytical approach, which involves prioritization of the alternatives using pairwise comparisons. This combination of facilitated group discussion and quantitative ranking provides input to strategic management decisions in the form of stakeholder-defined and -prioritized items as well as information on potential barriers to the implementation of policies and programs. This is the final volume in the series Identifying Vital Issues: New Intelligence Strategies for a New World, a three-volume set that gives an accounting of the VIp as implemented for OFI. This volume provides an in-depth description of the methodology used in the VIp.

  9. Incidence and clinical vital parameters in primary ketosis of Murrah buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ankit; Sindhu, Neelesh; Kumar, Parmod; Kumar, Tarun; Charaya, Gaurav; Surbhi; Jain, V. K.; Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence and clinical vital parameters in cases of primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes brought to teaching veterinary clinical complex, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar and from adjoining villages of the district Hisar, Haryana, India. Materials and Methods: The investigation was conducted on 24 clinical cases (out of total 145 screened) of primary ketosis. The diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of clinical signs and significantly positive two tests for ketone bodies in urine (Rothera’s and Keto-Diastix strip test). Data collected were statistically analyzed using independent Student’s t-test. Results: Overall incidence of disease in these areas was found to be 16.55% and all the animals were recently parturited (mean: 1.42±0.14 month), on an average in their third lactation (mean: 2.38±0.30) and exhibited clinical signs such as selective anorexia (refusal to feed on concentrate diet), drastic reduction in milk yield (mean: 64.4±5.35%), ketotic odor from urine, breath, and milk and rapid loss of body condition. All the clinical vital parameters in ketotic buffaloes (body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, and rumen movements) were within normal range. Conclusion: Primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes was the most common seen in the third lactation, within the first 2 months after parturition with characteristics clinical signs and no variability in vital parameters. The disease has severe effect on the production status of affected animal. PMID:27047203

  10. Signs of Change: Contemporary Attitudes to Australian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slegers, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    This study explores contemporary attitudes to Australian Sign Language (Auslan). Since at least the 1960s, sign languages have been accepted by linguists as natural languages with all of the key ingredients common to spoken languages. However, these visual-spatial languages have historically been subject to ignorance and myth in Australia and…

  11. Utilization of the wastes of vital activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gusarov, B. G.; Drigo, Y. A.; Novikov, V. M.; Samsonov, N. M.; Farafonov, N. S.; Chizhov, S. V.; Yazdovskiy, V. I.

    1979-01-01

    The recycling of wastes from the biological complex for use in life-support systems is discussed. Topics include laboratory equipment, heat treatment of waste materials, mineralization of waste products, methods for production of ammonium hydroxide and nitric acid, the extraction of sodium chloride from mineralized products, and the recovery of nutrient substances for plants from urine.

  12. Laboratory Turnaround Time

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Turnaround time (TAT) is one of the most noticeable signs of laboratory service and is often used as a key performance indicator of laboratory performance. This review summarises the literature regarding laboratory TAT, focusing on the different definitions, measures, expectations, published data, associations with clinical outcomes and approaches to improve TAT. It aims to provide a consolidated source of benchmarking data useful to the laboratory in setting TAT goals and to encourage introduction of TAT monitoring for continuous quality improvement. A 90% completion time (sample registration to result reporting) of <60 minutes for common laboratory tests is suggested as an initial goal for acceptable TAT. PMID:18392122

  13. Arabic Sign Language: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Fattah, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Sign language in the Arab World has been recently recognized and documented. Many efforts have been made to establish the sign language used in individual countries, including Jordan, Egypt, Libya, and the Gulf States, by trying to standardize the language and spread it among members of the Deaf community and those concerned. Such efforts produced…

  14. NUHOMS{reg_sign} update

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, N.

    1995-12-31

    NUHOMS{reg_sign} is the dry spent fuel storage and transportation technology selected to date by the majority of commercial nuclear utilities. The author first gives a system overview of the NUHOMS{reg_sign}. Next she discusses the project status and licensing status. She closes with an update of the multi-purpose canister.

  15. Sign Program for a University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Engineering News, 1968

    1968-01-01

    A co-ordinated sign program for a multi-campus university not only helps students and visitors find their way around, but is a design element that adds identification and unity. Graphic designer, Paul Arthur, has designed a modular sign system for the University of Tennessee with all elements having standard color, lettering, size and materials.…

  16. Signing Apes and Evolving Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    Linguistics retains from its antecedents, philology and the study of sacred writings, some of their apologetic and theological bias. Thus it has not been able to face squarely the question how linguistic function may have evolved from animal communication. Chimpanzees' use of signs from American Sign Language forces re-examination of language…

  17. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  18. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  19. Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Walter P.; McGregor, Tony L.

    This paper describes the use of Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language (KPISL) in one small, Keresan-speaking pueblo in central New Mexico, where 15 out of 650 tribal members have severe to profound hearing loss (twice the national average). KPISL did not originate for the same purposes as the Plains Indian Sign Language, (PISL) which was developed…

  20. Driveway identification signing and marking

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    A primary purpose of a public highway is to provide access to commercial establishments. Driveways to fast-food restaurants, banks, retail stores, and office buildings line many road sections. A bewildering array of reflectorized, unreflectorized, lighted, and unlighted high- and low-mounted signs with varying messages direct motorists in and out of many of the driveways, while other access points have no signs. In a very few cases, the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices-type signing for one-way roads has been installed for the one-way-type circulation design at some of these establishments. Should MUTCD-type one-way signs be recommended practice to control and provide a more uniform identification of these driveways when necessary. Are there signs not presently in the MUTCD that should be added to cope with this situation.

  1. Automatic Recognition of Road Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yasuo; Kohashi, Yuuichirou; Ishikawa, Naoto; Nakajima, Masato

    2002-11-01

    The increase in traffic accidents is becoming a serious social problem with the recent rapid traffic increase. In many cases, the driver"s carelessness is the primary factor of traffic accidents, and the driver assistance system is demanded for supporting driver"s safety. In this research, we propose the new method of automatic detection and recognition of road signs by image processing. The purpose of this research is to prevent accidents caused by driver"s carelessness, and call attention to a driver when the driver violates traffic a regulation. In this research, high accuracy and the efficient sign detecting method are realized by removing unnecessary information except for a road sign from an image, and detect a road sign using shape features. At first, the color information that is not used in road signs is removed from an image. Next, edges except for circular and triangle ones are removed to choose sign shape. In the recognition process, normalized cross correlation operation is carried out to the two-dimensional differentiation pattern of a sign, and the accurate and efficient method for detecting the road sign is realized. Moreover, the real-time operation in a software base was realized by holding down calculation cost, maintaining highly precise sign detection and recognition. Specifically, it becomes specifically possible to process by 0.1 sec(s)/frame using a general-purpose PC (CPU: Pentium4 1.7GHz). As a result of in-vehicle experimentation, our system could process on real time and has confirmed that detection and recognition of a sign could be performed correctly.

  2. Graphical Display of Clinical and Laboratory Data Using a Desktop Computer Interfaced with a Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, J. J.; Munson, P. J.; Lewis, T.; Rodbard, D.

    1981-01-01

    A desktop computer has been used successfully to provide high quality graphical display of clinical data (e.g. vital signs) and laboratory data in conjunction with a hospital information system (Technicon MIS). This approach offers several advantages: 1) ease and speed of operation for physician with a pushbutton, menu-driven program; 2) ease and speed of system development; 3) versatility and flexibility. This approach also encourages use of the computer by physicians for a wide range of other applications. ImagesFigure 1

  3. The Subsystem of Numerals in Catalan Sign Language: Description and Examples from a Psycholinguistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Mariana; Tolchinsky, Liliana

    2004-01-01

    Linguistic descriptions of sign languages are important to the recognition of their linguistic status. These languages are an essential part of the cultural heritage of the communities that create and use them and vital in the education of deaf children. They are also the reference point in language acquisition studies. Ours is exploratory…

  4. LSE-Sign: A lexical database for Spanish Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Costello, Brendan; Baus, Cristina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The LSE-Sign database is a free online tool for selecting Spanish Sign Language stimulus materials to be used in experiments. It contains 2,400 individual signs taken from a recent standardized LSE dictionary, and a further 2,700 related nonsigns. Each entry is coded for a wide range of grammatical, phonological, and articulatory information, including handshape, location, movement, and non-manual elements. The database is accessible via a graphically based search facility which is highly flexible both in terms of the search options available and the way the results are displayed. LSE-Sign is available at the following website: http://www.bcbl.eu/databases/lse/. PMID:25630312

  5. 12 CFR 749.2 - Vital records preservation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RECORDS PRESERVATION PROGRAM AND APPENDICES-RECORD RETENTION GUIDELINES; CATASTROPHIC ACT PREPAREDNESS... using duplicate records to restore vital member services in the event of catastrophic act. Credit...

  6. New Approaches in Vital Pulp Therapy in Permanent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam; Parisay, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Vitality of dental pulp is essential for long-term tooth survival. The aim of vital pulp therapy is to maintain healthy pulp tissue by eliminating bacteria from the dentin-pulp complex. There are several different treatment options for vital pulp therapy in extensively decayed or traumatized teeth. Pulp capping or pulpotomy procedures rely upon an accurate assessment of the pulp status, and careful management of the remaining pulp tissue. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of new approaches in vital pulp therapy in permanent teeth. PMID:24396371

  7. [Imaging signs in chest diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Krombach, G A

    2016-08-01

    Signs in chest imaging are defined as typical findings which can be easily recognized on x‑ray photographs or computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. They are caused by different typical pathophysiological processes. Due to the association of a certain pathophysiological cause with a given sign, knowledge and use of these signs can allow the possible differential diagnoses to be narrowed down. If other imaging findings and clinical data are additionally taken into account, the diagnosis can be made with a high degree of confidence in many cases. PMID:27369549

  8. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Change Direction initiative is working to change the culture of mental health in America. It encourages people ... signs of emotional suffering and to change the culture around mental health and mental illness. Learn more ...

  9. Ivy Sign in Moyamoya Disease.

    PubMed

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Saglam, Muzaffer; Yildiz, Bulent; Anagnostakou, Vania; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2016-02-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic disease characterized by the progressive stenosis and collateral development of the distal internal carotid arteries. In this disease, several collateral vascular structures develop following stenosis and occlusion. The ivy sign is a characteristic Magnetic rezonance imaging (MRI) finding frequently encountered in patients with moyamoya. It can be observed both in post contrast T1-weighted images and Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. While this sign manifests in the form of contrasting on the cortical surfaces due to the formation of leptomeningeal collateral development and increased numbers of pial vascular webs on post contrast images, in FLAIR images it originates from the slow arterial flow in the leptomeningeal collateral vascular structures. In this case, we presented the Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) signs of moyamoya disease and "ivy sign" in MRI and its development mechanism in a 16 years old female patient. PMID:27026766

  10. Deaf Phone: Sign Language Telephone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsing, R.; Sosnowski, Thomas P.

    1985-12-01

    Using the technologies of image processing, spatial/temporal resolution reduction and picture coding, a terminal has been designed and constructed which allows the transmission of deaf sign language over low bandwidth telephone lines in real time. Using the hardware, six deaf subjects have evaluated this system. A series of psycho-physical experiments were conducted to determine the minimum image quality required to convey meaning in hand-sign language as used by the deaf.

  11. Workforce and Economic Vitality Issue Paper. Aging Initiative: Project 2030.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Human Services, St. Paul.

    A public policy study in Minnesota, conducted as part of Project 2030, looked at the impacts of the aging of the baby boom generation on the work force and the economic vitality of the state by the year 2030. The study found the following general trends affecting the work force and economic vitality and noted the relation of each to the aging…

  12. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  13. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  14. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  15. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  16. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  17. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  18. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  19. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  20. Faculty Vitality and Institutional Productivity: Critical Perspectives for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Shirley M., Ed.; Lewis, Darrell R., Ed.

    Issues concerning faculty career vitality, including institutional policy options and demographic and external pressures, are addressed in 12 chapters. In the first chapter, Shirley M. Clark, Carol M. Boyer, and Mary Corcoran review theoretical and conceptual issues concerning institutional and faculty vitality. The following chapters and authors…

  1. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  2. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  3. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of vital equipment. (a) The coordination...

  4. Evidence of a Housing Decision Chain in Rural Community Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Christine C.; Crull, Sue R.; Bruin, Marilyn J.; Yust, Becky L.; Shelley, Mack C.; Laux, Sharon; Memken, Jean; Niemeyer, Shirley; White, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore and explain the role housing plays in rural community vitality. Community vitality refers to economic strength and social well-being. In spring 2002 we collected primary interview data from informants in 134 small rural communities in nine north-central states and identified related secondary data from…

  5. Research Vitality as Sustained Excellence: What Keeps the Plates Spinning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, J. Bruce; Harvey, Jaron; Novicevic, Milorad M.; Buckley, M. Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Research vitality addresses the perseverance that faculty members in the organization sciences experience in maintaining their research quantity and quality over an extended period of time. The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical model of research vitality. Design/methodology/approach: The authors propose a model consisting of…

  6. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic...

  7. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic...

  8. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic...

  9. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic...

  10. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic...

  11. xdamp: An IDL{reg_sign}-based Data Manipulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.

    1995-04-01

    The original DAMP (DAta Manipulation Program) was written by Mark Hedemann of Sandia National Laboratories and used the CA-DISSPLA{trademark} (available from Computer Associates International, Inc., Garden City, NY) graphics package as its engine. It was used to plot, modify, and otherwise manipulate the one-dimensional data waveforms (data vs time) from a wide variety of accelerators. With the waning of CA-DISSPLA and the increasing popularity of UNIX{reg_sign}-based workstations, a replacement was needed. This package uses the IDL{reg_sign} software, available from Research Systems Incorporated in Boulder, Colorado, as the engine, and creates a set of widgets to manipulate the data in a manner similar to the original DAMP. IDL is currently supported on a wide variety of UNIX platforms such as IBM{reg_sign} workstations, Hewlett Packard workstations, SUN{reg_sign} workstations, Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} computers, Macintosh{reg_sign} computers and Digital Equipment Corporation VMS{reg_sign} systems. Thus, this program should be portable across many platforms. We have verified operation, albeit with some IDL bugs, on IBM UNIX platforms, DEC Alpha systems, HP 9000/7OO series workstations, and Macintosh computers, both regular and PowerPC{trademark} versions.

  12. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19–21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity. PMID:26311984

  13. Skin signs in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescent females and young women. AN is associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay, and developmental delay. Skin signs are almost always detectable in severe AN and awareness of them may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN. Skin signs are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs, such as laxatives and diuretics, and of the psychiatric morbidity. They include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrhoeic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, acquired striae distensae, acral coldness. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell’s sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms due to laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions by drugs. Symptoms due to psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the “hidden” signs of eating disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder. PMID:20808514

  14. Skin signs in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2009-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescent females and young women. AN is associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay, and developmental delay. Skin signs are almost always detectable in severe AN and awareness of them may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN. Skin signs are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs, such as laxatives and diuretics, and of the psychiatric morbidity. They include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrhoeic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, acquired striae distensae, acral coldness.The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell's sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms due to laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions by drugs. Symptoms due to psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the "hidden" signs of eating disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder. PMID:20808514

  15. Serial position encoding of signs.

    PubMed

    Miozzo, Michele; Petrova, Anna; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Peressotti, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Reduced short-term memory (STM) capacity has been reported for sign as compared to speech when items have to be recalled in a specific order. This difference has been attributed to a more precise and efficient serial position encoding in verbal STM (used for speech) than visuo-spatial STM (used for sign). We tested in the present investigation whether the reduced STM capacity with signs stems from a lack of positional encoding available in verbal STM. Error analyses reported in prior studies have revealed that positions are defined in verbal STM by distance from both the start and the end of the sequence (both-edges positional encoding scheme). Our analyses of the errors made by deaf participants with finger-spelled letters revealed that the both-edges positional encoding scheme underlies the STM representation of signs. These results indicate that the cause of the STM disadvantage is not the type of positional encoding but rather the difficulties in binding an item in visuo-spatial STM to its specific position in the sequence. Both-edges positional encoding scheme could be specific of sign, since it has not been found in visuo-spatial STM tasks conducted with hearing participants. PMID:27244095

  16. Linking vital rates to invasiveness of a perennial herb.

    PubMed

    Ramula, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Invaders generally show better individual performance than non-invaders and, therefore, vital rates (survival, growth, fecundity) could potentially be used to predict species invasiveness outside their native range. Comparative studies have usually correlated vital rates with the invasiveness status of species, while few studies have investigated them in relation to population growth rate. Here, I examined the influence of five vital rates (plant establishment, survival, growth, flowering probability, seed production) and their variability (across geographic regions, habitat types, population sizes and population densities) on population growth rate (λ) using data from 37 populations of an invasive, iteroparous herb (Lupinus polyphyllus) in a part of its invaded range in Finland. Variation in vital rates was often related to habitat type and population density. The performance of the populations varied from declining to rapidly increasing independently of habitat type, population size or population density, but differed between regions. The population growth rate increased linearly with plant establishment, and with the survival and growth of vegetative individuals, while the survival of flowering individuals and annual seed production were not related to λ. The vital rates responsible for rapid population growth varied among populations. These findings highlight the importance of both regional and local conditions to plant population dynamics, demonstrating that individual vital rates do not necessarily correlate with λ. Therefore, to understand the role of individual vital rates in a species ability to invade, it is necessary to quantify their effect on population growth rate. PMID:24390414

  17. Emergency Medical Service and In-Hospital Vital Signs as Predictors of Subsequent PTSD Symptom Severity in Pediatric Injury Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Nicole R.; Christopher, Norman C.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the extent to which heart rate (HR) levels soon after a traumatic event predicted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity assessed 6 weeks and 6 months later in child trauma victims. Methods: Participants consisted of 82 children (56 boys, 26 girls) aged 8-18 who were admitted to a…

  18. Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Vital Signs with an Ambulatory Subject Using Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhelson, Ilya V.

    Finding a subject's heart rate from a distance without any contact is a difficult and very practical problem. This kind of technology would allow more comfortable patient monitoring in hospitals or in home settings. It would also allow another level of security screening, as a person's heart rate increases in stressful situations, such as when lying or hiding malicious intent. In addition, the fact that the heart rate is obtained remotely means that the subject would not have to know he/she is being monitored at all, adding to the efficacy of the measurement. Using millimeter-wave interferometry, a signal can be obtained that contains composite chest wall motion made up of component motions due to cardiac activity, respiration, and interference. To be of use, these components have to be separated from each other by signal processing. To do this, the quadrature and in-phase components of the received signal are analyzed to get a displacement waveform. After that, processing can be done on that waveform in either the time or frequency domains to find the individual heartbeats. The first method is to find the power spectrum of the displacement waveform and to look for peaks corresponding to heartbeats and respiration. Another approach is to examine the signal in the time domain using wavelets for multiresolution analysis. One more method involves studying the statistics of the wavelet-processed signal. The final method uses a heartbeat model along with probabilistic processing to find heartbeats. For any of the above methods to work, the millimeter-wave sensor has to be accurately pointed at the subject's chest. However, even small subject motions can render the rest of the gathered data useless as the antenna may have lost its aim. To combat this, a color and a depth camera are used with a servo-pan/tilt base. My program finds a face in the image and subsequently tracks that face through upcoming frames. The pan/tilt base adjusts the aim of the antenna depending on the subject's position. This makes the entire system self-aiming and also allows the subject to move to a new location and to have data acquisition continue.

  19. A vital signs telemonitoring system - interoperability supported by a personal health record systema and a cloud service.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Miguel F; Cajiao, Alejandro; Hidalgo, José A; Cerón, Jesús D; López, Diego M; Quintero, Víctor M; Rendón, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the development process of an acquisition and data storage system managing clinical variables through a cloud storage service and a Personal Health Record (PHR) System. First, the paper explains how a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) that captures data from two sensors corresponding to arterial pressure and heart rate is designed. Second, this paper illustrates how data collected by the WBAN are transmitted to a cloud storage service. It is worth mentioning that this cloud service allows the data to be stored in a persistent way on an online database system. Finally, the paper describes, how the data stored in the cloud service are sent to the Indivo PHR System, where they are registered and charted for future revision by health professionals. The research demonstrated the feasibility of implementing WBAN networks for the acquisition of clinical data, and particularly for the use of Web technologies and standards to provide interoperability with PHR Systems at technical and syntactic levels. PMID:24851975

  20. Implementing routine screening for distress, the sixth vital sign, for patients with head and neck and neurologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Bultz, Barry D; Waller, Amy; Cullum, Jodi; Jones, Paula; Halland, Johan; Groff, Shannon L; Leckie, Catriona; Shirt, Lisa; Blanchard, Scott; Lau, Harold; Easaw, Jacob; Fassbender, Konrad; Carlson, Linda E

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the benefits of incorporating screening for distress as a routine part of care for patients with head and neck and neurologic cancers in a tertiary cancer center. Using a comparative 2-cohort pre-post implementation sequential design, consecutive outpatients with head and neck and neurologic cancers were recruited into 2 separate cohorts. Cohort 1 included patients attending clinics during April 2010, before the implementation of the screening program. The program was then implemented and patients completed the Screening for Distress Minimum Dataset (the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System [ESAS] and the Canadian Problem Checklist [CPC]) at each clinic visit. Cohort 2 included patients attending clinics during March 2011. Consenting patients completed screening and outcome measures (ESAS, CPC, and either the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain or the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck). A total of 146 patients (78 head and neck and 68 neurologic) provided data for Cohort 1, and 143 (81 head and neck and 62 neurologic) provided data for Cohort 2. Compared with Cohort 1, patients with neurologic cancers in Cohort 2 reported significantly higher scores on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy: General total and emotional quality of life subscale; fewer high scores (≥ 4) on the ESAS breathlessness item; and fewer problems with fears/worries, frustration/anger, finding meaning in life, and worry about friends/family. Head and neck patients in Cohort 2 reported significantly higher emotional quality of life and fewer problems with eating and weight than those in Cohort 1. Although no definitive causal attributions can be made, patients exposed to routine screening for distress reported better well-being and fewer emotional, physical, and practical problems than historical controls. PMID:24142826

  1. Ecological thresholds as a basis for defining management triggers for National Park Service vital signs: case studies for dryland ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Miller, Mark E.; Belote, R. Travis; Garman, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Threshold concepts are used in research and management of ecological systems to describe and interpret abrupt and persistent reorganization of ecosystem properties (Walker and Meyers, 2004; Groffman and others, 2006). Abrupt change, referred to as a threshold crossing, and the progression of reorganization can be triggered by one or more interactive disturbances such as land-use activities and climatic events (Paine and others, 1998). Threshold crossings occur when feedback mechanisms that typically absorb forces of change are replaced with those that promote development of alternative equilibria or states (Suding and others, 2004; Walker and Meyers, 2004; Briske and others, 2008). The alternative states that emerge from a threshold crossing vary and often exhibit reduced ecological integrity and value in terms of management goals relative to the original or reference system. Alternative stable states with some limited residual properties of the original system may develop along the progression after a crossing; an eventual outcome may be the complete loss of pre-threshold properties of the original ecosystem. Reverting to the more desirable reference state through ecological restoration becomes increasingly difficult and expensive along the progression gradient and may eventually become impossible. Ecological threshold concepts have been applied as a heuristic framework and to aid in the management of rangelands (Bestelmeyer, 2006; Briske and others, 2006, 2008), aquatic (Scheffer and others, 1993; Rapport and Whitford 1999), riparian (Stringham and others, 2001; Scott and others, 2005), and forested ecosystems (Allen and others, 2002; Digiovinazzo and others, 2010). These concepts are also topical in ecological restoration (Hobbs and Norton 1996; Whisenant 1999; Suding and others, 2004; King and Hobbs, 2006) and ecosystem sustainability (Herrick, 2000; Chapin and others, 1996; Davenport and others, 1998). Achieving conservation management goals requires the protection of resources within the range of desired conditions (Cook and others, 2010). The goal of conservation management for natural resources in the U.S. National Park System is to maintain native species and habitat unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. Achieving this goal requires, in part, early detection of system change and timely implementation of remediation. The recent National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program (NPS I&M) was established to provide early warning of declining ecosystem conditions relative to a desired native or reference system (Fancy and others, 2009). To be an effective tool for resource protection, monitoring must be designed to alert managers of impending thresholds so that preventive actions can be taken. This requires an understanding of the ecosystem attributes and processes associated with threshold-type behavior; how these attributes and processes become degraded; and how risks of degradation vary among ecosystems and in relation to environmental factors such as soil properties, climatic conditions, and exposure to stressors. In general, the utility of the threshold concept for long-term monitoring depends on the ability of scientists and managers to detect, predict, and prevent the occurrence of threshold crossings associated with persistent, undesirable shifts among ecosystem states (Briske and others, 2006). Because of the scientific challenges associated with understanding these factors, the application of threshold concepts to monitoring designs has been very limited to date (Groffman and others, 2006). As a case in point, the monitoring efforts across the 32 NPS I&M networks were largely designed with the knowledge that they would not be used to their full potential until the development of a systematic method for understanding threshold dynamics and methods for estimating key attributes of threshold crossings. This report describes and demonstrates a generalized approach that we implemented to formalize understanding and estimating of threshold dynamics for terrestrial dryland ecosystems in nationa

  2. Collecting psychosocial "vital signs" in electronic health records: Why now? What are they? What's new for psychology?

    PubMed

    Matthews, Karen A; Adler, Nancy E; Forrest, Christopher B; Stead, William W

    2016-09-01

    Social, psychological, and behavioral factors are recognized as key contributors to health, but they are rarely measured in a systematic way in health care settings. Electronic health records (EHRs) can be used in these settings to routinely collect a standardized set of social, psychological, and behavioral determinants of health. The expanded use of EHRs provides opportunities to improve individual and population health, and offers new ways for the psychological community to engage in health promotion and disease prevention efforts. This article addresses 3 issues. First, it discusses what led to current efforts to include measures of psychosocial and behavioral determinants of health in EHRs. Second, it presents recommendations of an Institute of Medicine committee regarding inclusion in EHRS of a panel of measures that meet a priori criteria. Third, it identifies new opportunities and challenges these recommendations present for psychologists in practice and research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27571529

  3. Monte-Carlo Simulation and Automated Test Bench for Developing a Multichannel NIR-Based Vital-Signs Monitor.

    PubMed

    Bruser, Christoph; Strutz, Nils; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors mounted in beds promises to unlock new applications in home and low acuity monitoring. This paper presents a novel concept for such a system based on an array of near infrared (NIR) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. We focus on modeling and analyzing the underlying technical measurement principle with the help of a 2D model of a polyurethane foam mattress and Monte-Carlo simulations of the opto-mechanical interaction responsible for signal genesis. Furthermore, a test rig to automatically and repeatably impress mechanical vibrations onto a mattress is introduced and used to identify the properties of a prototype implementation of the proposed measurement principle. Results show that NIR-based sensing is capable of registering miniscule deformations of the mattress with a high spatial specificity. As a final outlook, proof-of-concept measurements with the sensor array are presented which demonstrate that cardiorespiratory movements of the body can be detected and that automatic heart rate estimation at competitive error levels is feasible with the proposed approach. PMID:25203992

  4. A method of detecting heartbeat locations in the ballistocardiographic signal from the fiber-optic vital signs sensor.

    PubMed

    Krej, Mariusz; Dziuda, Lukasz; Skibniewski, Franciszek Wojciech

    2015-07-01

    We present a flexible, easy-to-expand digital signal processing method for detecting heart rate (HR) for cardiac vibration signals of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The FBG-based method of measuring HR is possible to use during the magnetic resonance imaging procedure, which is its unique advantage. Our goal was to design a detection method with plurality of parameters and to subject these parameters to genetic algorithm optimization technique. In effect, we arrived at a method that is well able to deal with much distorted signals with low SNR. We proved that the method we developed allows automatic adjustment to the shape of the waves of signal carrying useful information about the moments of heartbeat. Thus, we can easily adapt our technique to the analysis of signals, which contains information on HR, from sensors employing different techniques of strain detection. The proposed method has the capabilities of analyzing signals in semi-real-time (online) with beat-to-beat resolution, significantly low delay, and negligible computational power requirements. We verified our method on recordings in a group of seven subjects. Verification included over 6000 heartbeats (82 min 47 s of recordings). The root-mean-square error of our method does not exceed 6.0 bpm. PMID:25622330

  5. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P < .001) and improving sleep quality (t = −3.65, P = .001) compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 4.63, P = .036). The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 6.93, P = .011). In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients. PMID:23476690

  6. Ivy Sign in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Saglam, Muzaffer; Yildiz, Bulent; Anagnostakou, Vania; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic disease characterized by the progressive stenosis and collateral development of the distal internal carotid arteries. In this disease, several collateral vascular structures develop following stenosis and occlusion. The ivy sign is a characteristic Magnetic rezonance imaging (MRI) finding frequently encountered in patients with moyamoya. It can be observed both in post contrast T1-weighted images and Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. While this sign manifests in the form of contrasting on the cortical surfaces due to the formation of leptomeningeal collateral development and increased numbers of pial vascular webs on post contrast images, in FLAIR images it originates from the slow arterial flow in the leptomeningeal collateral vascular structures. In this case, we presented the Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) signs of moyamoya disease and “ivy sign” in MRI and its development mechanism in a 16 years old female patient. PMID:27026766

  7. The Role of Sign Phonology and Iconicity during Sign Processing: The Case of Deaf Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormel, Ellen; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of sign phonology and iconicity during sign processing in deaf children, the roles of these sign features were examined using an experimental sign-picture verification paradigm. Participants had to make decisions about sign-picture pairs, manipulated according to phonological sign features (i.e., hand shape, movement,…

  8. Moral Vitalism: Seeing Good and Evil as Real, Agentic Forces.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Brock; Bain, Paul; Buhrmester, Michael D; Gómez, Ángel; Vázquez, Alexandra; Knight, Clinton G; Swann, William B

    2015-08-01

    Moral vitalism refers to a tendency to view good and evil as actual forces that can influence people and events. We introduce a scale designed to assess the belief in moral vitalism. High scorers on the scale endorse items such as "There are underlying forces of good and evil in this world." After establishing the reliability and criterion validity of the scale (Studies 1, 2a, and 2b), we examined the predictive validity of the moral vitalism scale, showing that "moral vitalists" worry about being possessed by evil (Study 3), being contaminated through contact with evil people (Study 4), and forfeiting their own mental purity (Study 5). We discuss the nature of moral vitalism and the implications of the construct for understanding the role of metaphysical lay theories about the nature of good and evil in moral reasoning. PMID:26089349

  9. Líneas Vitales: Programas y servicios del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Artículos y videos sobre los programas y servicios del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer de la serie educativa Líneas Vitales del NCI, la cual está dirigida especialmente a poblaciones multiculturales.

  10. Astrological birth signs in suicide: hypothesis or speculation?

    PubMed

    Salib, Emad

    2003-04-01

    Astrology is no longer regarded as a science by many, because its claims are almost impossible to test empirically in controlled laboratory conditions and it can not meet the scientific need to be reproducible. However, the majority of those who read their 'star signs' can identify aspects of their personality in what they read and it is possible that this may influence their attitudes and actions. The literature has neglected astrological signs as a possible predictor of suicide ideation. To see whether astrological birth signs are associated with suicide and the method used, data was collected from the Public Health Department in North Cheshire representing all the Cheshire Coroner's verdicts of suicide, and open verdicts, in all deceased aged 60 and above between 1989 and 2000. The observed occurrence of deaths due to natural causes, and suicide, in relation to birth signs did not differ significantly from what would be expected from chance. However, the distribution of suicide by hanging appeared significantly higher in those with a birth sign of Virgo and lowest in Sagittarius and Scorpio. The distribution of violent and non-violent suicides in relation to star signs showed higher occurences of violent death in persons born in the summer months. PMID:12741653

  11. Signs of Life on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, L.

    2012-04-01

    The search for "habitable zones" in extrasolar planetary systems is based on the premise of "normal" physical conditions in a habitable zone, i.e. pressure, temperature range, and atmospheric composition similar to those on the Earth. However, one should not exclude completely the possibility of the existence of life at relatively high temperatures, despite the fact that at the first glance it seems impossible. The planet Venus with its dense, hot (735 K), oxigenless CO2 - atmosphere and high 92 bar-pressure at the surface could be the natural laboratory for the studies of this type. Amid exoplanets, celestial bodies with the physical conditions similar to the Venusian can be met. The only existing data of actual close-in observations of Venus' surface are the results of a series of missions of the soviet VENERA landers which took place the 1970's and 80's in the atmosphere and on the surface of Venus. For 36 and 29 years since these missions, respectively, I repeatedly returned to the obtained images of the Venus' surface in order to reveal on them any unusual objects observed in the real conditions of Venus. The new analysis of the Venus' panoramas was based on the search of unusual elements in two ways. Since the efficiency of the VENERA landers maintained for a long time they produced a large number of primary television panoramas during the lander's work. Thus, one can try to detect: (a) any differences in successive images (appearance or disappearance of parts of the image or change of their shape), and understand what these changes are related to (e.g., wind), and whether they are related to hypothetical habitability of a planet. Another sign (b) of the wanted object is their morphological peculiarities which distinguishes them from the ordinary surface details. The results of VENERA-9 (1975) and VENERA -13 (1982) are of the main interest. A few relatively large objects ranging from a decimeter to half meter and with unusual morphology were observed in some

  12. Bioceramic Materials and the Changing Concepts in Vital Pulp Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yangpei; Bogen, George; Lim, Jung; Shon, Won-Jun; Kang, Mo K

    2016-05-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is devised to preserve and maintain vitality of pulpally involved teeth challenged by a variety of intraoral conditions. Notable progress has been made in this field due to a better understanding of pulp physiology, improved clinical protocols and advanced bioceramic materials paired with adhesive technology. With focused case selection, conservative VPT can provide reliable treatment options for permanent teeth diagnosed with normal pulps or reversible pulpitis. PMID:27290822

  13. The Sociolinguistics of Sign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Ceil, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines how sign languages are distributed around the world; what occurs when they come in contact with spoken and written languages, and how signers use them in a variety of situations. Each chapter introduces the key issues in a particular area of inquiry and provides a comprehensive review of the literature. The seven…

  14. The HyperSign Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulezer, Susan

    This report describes ongoing activities and results of the HyperSign Immersion Project developed at the Public School for the Deaf in New York City, New York. The project's objectives were to: (1) provide a means to enable Deaf students to assume a self-directed role in education; (2) provide an on-site prototype of a technologically supportive…

  15. Pronouns in Mexican Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumlee, Marilyn

    This paper provides an analysis of the manual and non-manual pronouns identified in Mexican Sign Language (MSL) used by a female speaker in 1993, discusses syntactic uses of each type, and examines pronoun deletion. MSL has two distinct modes of expressing pronominal relationships: manual pronouns (including indexical, incorporated, classifiers,…

  16. Library Signs and the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Marjorie A.

    This essay outlines general criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of an existing or proposed sign system for libraries with respect to the needs of physically disabled library users, specifically the deaf, the blind, and those confined to wheelchairs. The function of the International Symbol of Access is described, and design considerations…

  17. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  18. Signing Shakespeare: Romeo Loves Juliet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Liz; Cambridge, Terry

    1995-01-01

    A language arts teacher of junior high students with deafness or hearing impairments familiarized her students with "Romeo and Juliet" by telling the story in speech and signs, exploring the characters's personalities, reviewing vocabulary, putting the characters into contemporary situations, and directing the students in a full-scale production…

  19. Eye Gaze in Creative Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Michiko; Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eye gaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze…

  20. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  1. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  2. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  3. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  4. Tactile Signing with One-Handed Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Tactile signing among persons with deaf-blindness is not homogenous; rather, like other forms of language, it exhibits variation, especially in turn taking. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language, tactile Norwegian Sign Language, and tactile French Sign Language focused on tactile communication with four hands, in which partially blind or…

  5. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  6. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and...

  7. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  8. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  11. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Symbolic signs....

  12. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  13. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and...

  14. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  18. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Symbolic signs....

  19. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and...

  20. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  2. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  3. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  4. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Symbolic signs....

  5. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs....

  6. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and...

  7. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  8. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  11. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Symbolic signs....

  12. The "guitar pick" sign: a novel sign of retrobulbar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Jonathan; Sanz, Geoffrey E; Matero, David; Guth, Todd; Erickson, Catherine; Liao, Michael M; Kendall, John L

    2011-05-01

    Retrobulbar hemorrhage is a rare complication of blunt ocular trauma. Without prompt intervention, permanent reduction in visual acuity can develop in as little as 90 minutes. We report a novel bedside ultrasound finding of conical deformation of the posterior ocular globe: the "guitar pick" sign. In our elderly patient, the ocular globe shape normalized post-lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis. Identifying this sonographic finding may add to the clinical examination when deciding whether to perform decompression. PMID:21524372

  13. A New Paradigm of Technology-Enabled ‘Vital Signs’ for Early Detection of Health Change for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Popescu, Mihail; Galambos, Colleen; Koopman, Richelle J; Alexander, Gregory L; Phillips, Lorraine J; Musterman, Katy; Back, Jessica; Miller, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally embedded (nonwearable) sensor technology is in continuous use in elder housing to monitor a new set of ‘vital signs' that continuously measure the functional status of older adults, detect potential changes in health or functional status, and alert healthcare providers for early recognition and treatment of those changes. Older adult participants' respiration, pulse, and restlessness are monitored as they sleep. Gait speed, stride length, and stride time are calculated daily, and automatically assess for increasing fall risk. Activity levels are summarized and graphically displayed for easy interpretation. Falls are detected when they occur and alerts are sent immediately to healthcare providers, so time to rescue may be reduced. Automated health alerts are sent to healthcare staff, based on continuously running algorithms applied to the sensor data, days and weeks before typical signs or symptoms are detected by the person, family members, or healthcare providers. Discovering these new functional status ‘vital signs', developing automated methods for interpreting them, and alerting others when changes occur have the potential to transform chronic illness management and facilitate aging in place through the end of life. Key findings of research in progress at the University of Missouri are discussed in this viewpoint article, as well as obstacles to widespread adoption. PMID:25428525

  14. Old Signs, New Signs, Whose Signs? Sociolinguistic Variation in the NZSL Lexicon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rachel; McKee, David

    2011-01-01

    Lexicographers, teachers and interpreters of New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) are challenged by the degree of lexical variation that exists in this young language. For instance, most numerals between one and twenty have two or more variants in common use (McKee, McKee, and Major 2008), a situation that contrasts with most established spoken…

  15. [The vitalism of Paul-Joseph Barthez (1734-1806)].

    PubMed

    Han, Hee Jin

    2010-06-30

    In The Logic of Life (1970), Francois Jacob (1920- ), Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine (1965), proclaimed the end of vitalism based on the concept of life. More than two decades before this capital sentence condemning vitalism was pronounced, Georges Canguilhem (1904-1995), a French philosopher of medicine, already acknowledged that eighteenth-century vitalism was scientifically retrograde and politically reactionary or counter-revolutionary insofar as it was rooted in the animism of Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734). The negative preconception of the term 'vitalism' came to be established as an orthodox view, since Claude Bernard (1813-1878) unfairly criticized contemporary vitalism in order to propagate his idea of experimental medicine. An eminent evolutionary biologist like Ernst Mayr (1904-2005) still defended similar views in This is Biology (1997), arguing that if vitalists were decisive and convincing in their rejection of the Cartesian model (negative heuristics), however they were equally indecisive and unconvincing in their own explanatory endeavors (positive heuristics). Historically speaking, vitalists came to the forefront for their outstanding criticism of Cartesian mechanism and physicochemical reductionism, while their innovative concepts and theories were underestimated and received much less attention. Is it true that vitalism was merely a pseudo-science, representing a kind of romanticism or mysticism in biomedical science? Did vitalists lack any positive heuristics in their biomedical research? Above all, what was actually the so.called 'vitalism'? This paper aims to reveal the positive heuristics of vitalism defined by Paul.Joseph Barthez (1734-1806) who was the founder of the vitalist school of Montpellier. To this end, his work and idea are introduced with regard to the vying doctrines in physiology and medicine. At the moment when he taught at the medical school of Montpellier, his colleagues advocated the mechanism of Rene

  16. Correcting vital information: estimating infant mortality, Brazil, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    de Frias, Paulo Germano; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a simplified method of correcting vital information and estimating the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil. METHODS Vital data in the information systems on mortality and live births were corrected using correction factors, estimated based on events not reported to the Brazilian Ministry of Health and obtained by active search. This simplified method for correcting vital information for the period 2000-2009 for Brazil and its federal units establishes the level of adequacy of information on deaths and live births by calculating the overall coefficient of mortality standardized by age and the ratio between reported and expected live births, respectively, in each Brazilian municipality. By applying correction factors to the number of deaths and live births reported in each county, the vital statistics were corrected, making it possible to estimate the coefficient of infant mortality. RESULTS The highest correction factors were related to infant deaths, reaching values higher than 7 for municipalities with very precarious mortality information. For deaths and live births, the correction factors exhibit a decreasing gradient as indicators of adequacy of the vital information improve. For the year 2008, the vital information corrected by the simplified method per state were similar to those obtained in the research of active search. Both the birth rate and the infant mortality rate decreased in the period in all Brazilian regions. In the Northeast, the annual rate of decline was 6.0%, the highest in Brazil (4.7%). CONCLUSIONS The active search of deaths and births allowed correction factors to be calculated by level of adequacy of mortality information and live births. The simplified method proposed here allowed vital information to be corrected per state for the period 2000-2009 and the progress of the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil, its regions and states to be assessed. PMID:24626543

  17. Spectrum of Signs of Pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Miele, Vittorio; Schillirò, Maria Laura; Nasuto, Michelangelo; Chiaese, Vincenzo; Romano, Luigia; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is caused by rupture of a hollow viscus that includes the stomach, small bowel, and large bowel, with the exception of those portions that are retroperitoneal in the duodenum and colon. The causes of pneumoperitoneum are numerous, ranging from iatrogenic and benign causes to more life-threatening conditions. In the absence of a benign cause of pneumoperitoneum, the identification of free intraperitoneal gas usually indicates the need for emergency surgery to repair a perforated bowel. The plain film is the primary diagnostic tool for detecting pneumoperitoneum: multiple signs of free intraperitoneal air can be found especially on supine abdominal radiographs. Computed tomography (CT) examination has been shown to be more sensitive than abdominal radiographs for the detection of free intraperitoneal air. It is important that the radiologist become familiar with the signs of pneumoperitoneum that can be discerned on abdominal radiographs, on CT scout view, and on CT scan. PMID:26827732

  18. Chronic Pruritus: a Paraneoplastic Sign

    PubMed Central

    Yosipovitch, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Chronic itch could be a presenting sign of malignancy. Pruritus of lymphoma is the common prototype of paraneoplastic itch and can precede other clinical signs by weeks and months. Paraneopalstic pruritus has also been associated with solid tumors and is an important clinical symptom in paraneoplastic skin diseases such as erythroderma, Grovers disease, malignant acanthosis nigricans, generalized granuloma annulare, Bazex syndrome and dermatomyositis. In any case with high index of suspicion a thorough work-up is required. This review highlights the association between itch and malignancy and presents new findings related to pathophysiological mechanisms and the treatment of itch associated with malignancy. Combinative therapies reducing itch sensitization and transmission using selective serotonin and neuroepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, Kappa opioids and Neuroleptics are of prime importance in reducing this bothersome symptom. PMID:21054705

  19. A novel codification scheme based on the "VITAL" and "DICOM" Standards for telemedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Anagnostaki, Anthoula P; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Kyriakou, Efthivoulos; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2002-12-01

    The field of interest discussed in this study is a novel codification scheme for (vital signs) medical device communication and patient monitoring data interchange, into the context of effective home care service provisioning. With medical technology having developed in isolation and major manufacturers developing their own proprietary communication protocols, which preclude connection to devices from different manufacturers, and with healthcare trends having evolved, pointing to primary care, telecare and home care monitoring, there is an increasing need for technical standardization in healthcare environments and the development of protocols that enable communication in a structured and open way. In this study, a novel codification scheme has been developed, based on two healthcare informatics standards, the VITAL and DICOM Sup. 30, in addressing the robust interchange of waveform and medical data for a home care application. Based on this scheme, we created a real-time facility, consisting of a base unit and a telemedicine (mobile) unit, that enables home telemonitoring, by installing the telemedicine unit at the patient's home while the base unit remains at the physician's office or hospital. The system allows the transmission of vital biosignals (3-lead ECG, pulse rate, blood pressure and SpO2) of the patient. This paper presents an object-oriented design with unified modeling language (UML) of a class hierarchy for exchanging the acquired medical data and performing alert management, and investigates the applicability of the proposed scheme into a commercial patient-connected medical device, thus addressing service and functionality requirements with focus on home-care applications. The system has been validated for technical performance over several telecommunication means and for clinical validity via real patient-involved pilot trials. PMID:12542235

  20. CERN single sign on solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormancey, E.

    2008-07-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his Active Directory group membership can be checked before allowing access to a specific web page.

  1. Effects of Varying Rate of Signing on ASL Manual Signs and Nonmanual Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2009-01-01

    Spoken languages are characterized by flexible, multivariate prosodic systems. As a natural language, American Sign Language (ASL), and other sign languages (SLs), are also expected to be characterized in the same way. Artificially created signing systems for classroom use, such as signed English, serve as a contrast to natural sign languages. The…

  2. Eponymous Dermatological Signs in Bullous Dermatoses

    PubMed Central

    Ganapati, Sentamilselvi

    2014-01-01

    Clinical signs are evolved by clinicians through their careful clinical examination. Medical professionals are generally familiar with these signs because of the emphasis given to them by the teaching faculty while they were students. Some of these signs are eponymously named after the clinicians giving credit to their observation. Eponymous signs in vesiculobullous diseases such as Nikolsky sign and Asboe Hansen sign (Bulla spread sign) are well known and were described during the 19th and 20th century, respectively. Cerebriform tongue in pemphigus vegetans was described by Premalatha (1981) three decades ago and is well recognized and cited in several text books and articles in leading journals. All these signs are revisited below with an emphasis on cerebriform tongue in pemphigus vegetans which could eponymously be called as Premalatha sign. PMID:24470655

  3. Vital effects in coccolith calcite: Cenozoic climate-pCO2 drove the diversity of carbon acquisition strategies in coccolithophores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Clara T.; Stoll, Heather M.; Mendez-Vicente, Ana

    2012-12-01

    Coccoliths, calcite plates produced by the marine phytoplankton coccolithophores, have previously shown a large array of carbon and oxygen stable isotope fractionations (termed "vital effects"), correlated to cell size and hypothesized to reflect the varying importance of active carbon acquisition strategies. Culture studies show a reduced range of vital effects between large and small coccolithophores under high CO2, consistent with previous observations of a smaller range of interspecific vital effects in Paleocene coccoliths. We present new fossil data examining coccolithophore vital effects over three key Cenozoic intervals reflecting changing climate and atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Oxygen and carbon stable isotopes of size-separated coccolith fractions dominated by different species from well preserved Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ˜56 Ma) samples show reduced interspecific differences within the greenhouse boundary conditions of the PETM. Conversely, isotope data from the Plio-Pleistocene transition (PPT; 3.5-2 Ma) and the last glacial maximum (LGM; ˜22 ka) show persistent vital effects of ˜2‰. PPT and LGM data show a clear positive trend between coccolith (cell) size and isotopic enrichment in coccolith carbonate, as seen in laboratory cultures. On geological timescales, the degree of expression of vital effects in coccoliths appears to be insensitive topCO2 changes over the range ˜350 ppm (Pliocene) to ˜180 ppm (LGM). The modern array of coccolith vital effects arose after the PETM but before the late Pliocene and may reflect the operation of more diverse carbon acquisition strategies in coccolithophores in response to decreasing Cenozoic pCO2.

  4. A Review on Vital Pulp Therapy in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Parisay, Iman; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining deciduous teeth in function until their natural exfoliation is absolutely necessary. Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is a way of saving deciduous teeth. The most important factors in success of VPT are the early diagnosis of pulp and periradicular status, preservation of the pulp vitality and proper vascularization of the pulp. Development of new biomaterials with suitable biocompatibility and seal has changed the attitudes towards preserving the reversible pulp in cariously exposed teeth. Before exposure and irreversible involvement of the pulp, indirect pulp capping (IPC) is the treatment of choice, but after the spread of inflammation within the pulp chamber and establishment of irreversible pulpitis, removal of inflamed pulp tissue is recommended. In this review, new concepts in preservation of the healthy pulp tissue in deciduous teeth and induction of the reparative dentin formation with new biomaterials instead of devitalization and the consequent destruction of vital tissues are discussed. PMID:25598803

  5. A review on vital pulp therapy in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Parisay, Iman; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining deciduous teeth in function until their natural exfoliation is absolutely necessary. Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is a way of saving deciduous teeth. The most important factors in success of VPT are the early diagnosis of pulp and periradicular status, preservation of the pulp vitality and proper vascularization of the pulp. Development of new biomaterials with suitable biocompatibility and seal has changed the attitudes towards preserving the reversible pulp in cariously exposed teeth. Before exposure and irreversible involvement of the pulp, indirect pulp capping (IPC) is the treatment of choice, but after the spread of inflammation within the pulp chamber and establishment of irreversible pulpitis, removal of inflamed pulp tissue is recommended. In this review, new concepts in preservation of the healthy pulp tissue in deciduous teeth and induction of the reparative dentin formation with new biomaterials instead of devitalization and the consequent destruction of vital tissues are discussed. PMID:25598803

  6. Exploring the Ancestral Roots of American Sign Language: Lexical Borrowing from Cistercian Sign Language and French Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle, Keith Martin

    2010-01-01

    American Sign Language (ASL) is the natural and preferred language of the Deaf community in both the United States and Canada. Woodward (1978) estimated that approximately 60% of the ASL lexicon is derived from early 19th century French Sign Language, which is known as "langue des signes francaise" (LSF). The lexicon of LSF and ASL may be derived…

  7. Signs and Symptoms of Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Providers Laboratory Testing for Mumps Infection Specimen Collection, Storage, and Shipment Questions and Answers about Lab Testing ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file Zip Archive ...

  8. Reflexology: its effects on physiological anxiety signs and sedation needs.

    PubMed

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Khorshid, Leyla; Uyar, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether reflexology has an effect on the physiological signs of anxiety and level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support, a single blinded, randomized controlled design with repeated measures was used in the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey. Patients (n = 60) aged between 18 and 70 years and were hospitalized in the intensive care unit and receiving mechanically ventilated support. Participants were randomized to a control group or an intervention group. The latter received 30 minutes of reflexology therapy on their feet, hands, and ears for 5 days. Subjects had vital signs taken immediately before the intervention and at the 10th, 20th, and 30th minutes of the intervention. In the collection of the data, "American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale" was used. The reflexology therapy group had a significantly lower heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate than the control group. A statistically significant difference was found between the averages of the scores that the patients included in the experimental and control groups received from the agitation, anxiety, sleep, and patient-ventilator synchrony subscales of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale. Reflexology can serve as an effective method of decreasing the physiological signs of anxiety and the required level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support. Nurses who have appropriate training and certification may include reflexology in routine care to reduce the physiological signs of anxiety of patients receiving mechanical ventilation. PMID:24304626

  9. Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Infants & Children Page Content ​Eye exams ... treated successfully. What are warning signs of a vision problem? Babies up to 1 year of age: ...

  10. Sign Language From the Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson sent a special sign language message to Earth. Interpretation done by non-certified users of American Sign Language (ASL) who are fluent in conversational ASL; syntax...

  11. Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs . Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 days after tick bite) Fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle ... examples of EM rashes Later Signs and Symptoms (days to months after tick bite) Severe headaches and ...

  12. Derivative Sign Patterns in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Given a function defined on a subset of the plane whose partial derivatives never change sign, the signs of the partial derivatives form a two-dimensional pattern. We explore what patterns are possible for various planar domains.

  13. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  14. Grandfather Moose: Sign Language Nursery Rhymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Harley

    1987-01-01

    "Grandfather Moose" rhymes, written to follow the Mother Goose tradition, are short, appealing, easy-to-memorize sign language nursery rhymes which employ visual poetic devices such as similar signs and transitional flow of movement. (CB)

  15. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Next Topic How is childhood leukemia diagnosed? Signs and symptoms of childhood leukemia Many of the ... blood cells do. Fever is often the main sign of infection. But some children might have a ...

  16. Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Next Topic How are Wilms tumors diagnosed? Signs and symptoms of Wilms tumor Wilms tumors can ... the abdomen (belly): This is often the first sign of a Wilms tumor. Parents may notice this ...

  17. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  18. What Are Some Common Signs of Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications What are some common signs of pregnancy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The primary sign of pregnancy is missing a menstrual period or ...

  19. Signs of Heroin Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Heroin Use and Addiction Signs of Heroin Use and Addiction Listen People who are trying ... Español English Español PDF Version Download "I needed heroin just to get by." Deon was addicted to ...

  20. Signs of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Listen After the "high" of ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...