Sample records for vital signs laboratory

  1. Vital Signs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Nebraska State Museum

    2002-01-01

    This activity (on pages 16-23) lets learners measure each other's vital signs—the signs that help doctors understand what's going on in a patient body. Learners measure human body temperature, respiration rate, and pulse, and compare them to vital signs of other mammals large and small, such as a cow and a rabbit. A "think it over" writing exercise finishes the activity.

  2. Vital signs monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Dale A. (Inventor); Sturm, Ronald E. (Inventor); Rinard, George A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is disclosed for monitoring vital physiological signs. Each of the system components utilizes a single hybrid circuit with each component having high accuracy without the necessity of repeated calibration. The system also has low power requirements, provides a digital display, and is of sufficiently small size to be incorporated into a hand-carried case for portable use. Components of the system may also provide independent outputs making the component useful, of itself, for monitoring one or more vital signs. The overall system preferably includes an ECG amplifier and cardiotachometer signal conditioner unit, an impedance pneumograph and respiration rate signal conditioner unit, a heart/breath rate processor unit, a temperature monitoring unit, a selector switch, a clock unit, and an LCD driver unit and associated LCDs, with the system being capable of being expanded as needed or desired, such as, for example, by addition of a systolic/diastolic blood pressure unit.

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Child Injury April 2012 1 Child Every hour, one child dies ... Print Updates Subscribe Listen Download Page last reviewed: April 16, 2012 Page last updated: April 16, 2012 ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast Cancer ... Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National Program of Cancer ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Preventing Teen Pregnancy About Vital Signs Vital Signs Social Media Other Vital Signs Issues Related Links Download this ... Index Policies Using this Site Link to Us Social Media Contact CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

  6. Sharing Vital Signs between mobile phone applications.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Dumont, Guy A; Scheffer, Cornie

    2014-01-01

    We propose a communication library, ShareVitalSigns, for the standardized exchange of vital sign information between health applications running on mobile platforms. The library allows an application to request one or multiple vital signs from independent measurement applications on the Android OS. Compatible measurement applications are automatically detected and can be launched from within the requesting application, simplifying the work flow for the user and reducing typing errors. Data is shared between applications using intents, a passive data structure available on Android OS. The library is accompanied by a test application which serves as a demonstrator. The secure exchange of vital sign information using a standardized library like ShareVitalSigns will facilitate the integration of measurement applications into diagnostic and other high level health monitoring applications and reduce errors due to manual entry of information. PMID:25570781

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Teen Drinking and Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Teen Drinking and Driving A Dangerous Mix October 2012 ... Drinking and driving can be deadly, especially for teens Fewer teens are drinking and driving, but this ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Asthma in the US

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Asthma in the US Growing every year May 2011 ... of people with asthma. Issue Details Latest Findings Asthma is increasing every year in the US. Too ...

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vital Signs Share Compartir Preventing Repeat Teen Births April 2013 1 in 5 Nearly 1 in 5 ... Print Updates Subscribe Listen Download Page last reviewed: April 2, 2013 Page last updated: April 2, 2013 ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... CRE infections on your state's Notifiable Diseases list. Health Care CEOs/Medical Officers can Require and strictly enforce ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Adults with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Adults with Disabilities Physical activity is for everybody May 2014 3x Adults with ... Problem More adults with disabilities need to get physical activity. Adults with disabilities who get no physical activity ...

  12. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  13. The ear as a location for wearable vital signs monitoring

    E-print Network

    He, David Da

    Obtaining vital signs non-invasively and in a wearable manner is essential for personal health monitoring. We propose the site behind the ear as a location for an integrated wearable vital signs monitor. This location is ...

  14. Detecting vital signs with wearable wireless sensors.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Foster, Robert; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented. PMID:22163501

  15. Walking speed: the functional vital sign.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Addie; Fritz, Stacy L; Lusardi, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Walking speed (WS) is a valid, reliable, and sensitive measure appropriate for assessing and monitoring functional status and overall health in a wide range of populations. These capabilities have led to its designation as the "sixth vital sign". By synthesizing the available evidence on WS, this scholarly review article provides clinicians with a reference tool regarding this robust measure. Recommendations on testing procedures for assessing WS, including optimal distance, inclusion of acceleration and deceleration phases, instructions, and instrumentation are given. After assessing an individual's WS, clinicians need to know what this value represents. Therefore, WS cut-off values and the corresponding predicted outcomes, as well as minimal detectable change values for specific populations and settings are provided. PMID:24812254

  16. Detecting Vital Signs with Wearable Wireless Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Foster, Robert; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented. PMID:22163501

  17. The Vital Nature Sign and Oriental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. L.

    The Yin-Yang theory is an essential principle of the ancient chinese philosophy. This paper discusses some of its properties from the point of view of modern physics and points out its relations to vital bodies.

  18. A Physical Assessment Skills Module on Vital Signs

    PubMed Central

    Louizos, Christopher; Frankel, Grace; Iacovides, Harris; Falk, Jamie; Dunford, Drena; Brink, Kelly; Kleiman, Nancy; Davis, Christine; Renaud, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a physical assessment module for pharmacy students. Design. A physical assessment module focusing on vital signs was incorporated into the curriculum for third-year pharmacy students. This module consisted of an online component, a practical skills workshop, and a clinical practice site. Assessment. The mean score on the in-class quiz, which evaluated students’ knowledge of physical assessment after completion of the online module, was 94%. During the practical skills laboratory, 48% of student-measured systolic blood pressure (BP) readings and 60% of student-measured diastolic BP readings were within 5 mmHg of the machine reading. In the assessment of blood pressure technique, areas of difficulty included detection of Korotkoff sounds; steady deflation of cuff; and hand-eye coordination. Conclusion. Students more frequently underestimated systolic BP than the diastolic BP when compared to the automated machine readings. Findings from this study will be used to improve existing modules and evaluation methods on the physical assessment of vital signs. PMID:25258442

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Hepatitis C: Testing Baby Boomers Saves Lives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Hepatitis C Testing baby boomers saves lives May 2013 3 ... boomers got infected before the dangers of hepatitis C were well known. Anyone can get hepatitis C, ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: New Hope for Stopping HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir New Hope for Stopping HIV Testing and Medical Care ... AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and early death. There's new hope today for stopping HIV in the US. ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save more lives ... all ages. Issue Details Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. What do ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Costly but Preventable October 2014 1M ... to prevent future crashes. Issue Details Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Among Youth in the US

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir HIV Among Youth in the US Protecting a Generation ... Issue Details Problem Many people get infected with HIV as a teen or young adult New HIV ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Getting Blood Pressure under Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Getting Blood Pressure Under Control Many missed opportunities to prevent heart ... high blood pressure. Issue Details Problem Controlling blood pressure has to be a priority. Why is blood ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control February 2011 39 ... http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National ...

  6. [CW bio-radar vital sign detector and experiment study].

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhao, Zhangyan; Zhang, Haiying

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact vital sign detection technique provides an effective usage in health monitoring applications. A vital sign detector was designed based on microwave bio-radar technique. Using Doppler principle, continuous wave bioradar was designed for tiny body movement detection, short-time Fourier transform and interpolation algorithm were adopted for heart and respiration rate extraction, embedded system was used for system integration, real-time signal processing software was designed on it. Experiments were done by using simulation device and human body for research and performance evaluation. The result shows that the proposed prototype can be used for single target vital signs detection at the distance of 90 cm, and the heart rate result shows a 96% recognition rate. PMID:24941771

  7. Vital signs of life on distant worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life hi-res Size hi-res: 673 kb Credits: ESA 2001. Illustration by Medialab Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life Darwin will most probably look for the spectral signature of ozone, which is unlikely to exist in any quantity for any length of time in the atmosphere of a planet that is not home to life. The background image is a view of Earth seen by the Apollo 17 crew as they traveled toward the Moon. The white patch at the bottom is Antarctica. Unobscured by clouds, Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are visible at the top of this image. The large island off the coast of Africa is the Malagasy Republic. Looking for Earth-like planets hi-res Size hi-res: 2106 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Looking for Earth-like planets Darwin has six telescopes that analyse the atmospheres of Earth-like planets Darwin's flotilla hi-res Size hi-res: 902 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Darwin's flotilla Darwin's six telescopes, a central view-combining spacecraft, and communication satellite (shown bottom left) Our radio and television broadcasts have been leaking into space since the 1930s, when the first powerful emitters were constructed. However, you can do things the other way around as well. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has used radio telescopes to listen to the cosmos for similar signals. Nowadays, astrobiologists are pinpointing more subtle signs that all life, not just intelligent life, might radiate into space. They call these telltale signatures 'biomarkers'. When ESA's Darwin mission begins sending back data in the next decade, biomarkers will help indicate whether neighbouring planets are inhabited. If we only used radio waves as markers of life, this would exclude all forms of life that have not yet developed the means to emit radio waves. Life has been around for thousands of millions of years, but human beings have used radio waves for less than a century. Malcolm Fridlund, Project Scientist for ESA's Darwin mission says, "If other planets follow the Earth's pattern, it is much more likely that they will be inhabited by dinosaurs or even bacteria than by something that can count." In the 1970s, the British scientist James Lovelock pointed out that, just by breathing, life affects the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. He suggested looking for similar effects as a way to search with telescopes for life on other planets. You can study the composition of an atmosphere by splitting a planet's light into a rainbow of colours. This 'spectrum' will contain dark lines made by various chemicals in the planet's atmosphere. Darwin's strategy is to look for oxygen because oxygen is used by some life forms and produced as waste by others. Scientists believe that without life, all free oxygen in a planet's atmosphere would disappear within just four million years, because it reacts so easily with other chemicals. "The best estimates suggest that Darwin will be able to detect the build-up of oxygen caused within a few hundred million years of life's origin," says Fridlund. Although Darwin will not detect oxygen directly, it will 'see' ozone, a form of oxygen. It will also see carbon dioxide, water, and, in certain cases, methane. Fridlund says, "The general consensus is that if we find ozone, liquid water, and carbon dioxide simultaneously, it will be a very strong indicator of life's presence." The work will not stop once Darwin completes its survey of the nearest several thousand star-planet systems. Once it finds a living planet, the race will be on to understand the nature of its life forms. That means searching for more specific biomarkers. In future space missions, for example, scientists may use chlorophyll as a biomarker. This molecule allows plants and certain bacteria to use light as an energy source. "Finding the next generation of biomarkers is a very active field of research at the moment," says Fridlund. He can see a future in which space telescope

  8. Physical03.Doc (10/31/07) VITAL SIGNS VISION

    E-print Network

    Physical03.Doc (10/31/07) NAME: SSN: VITAL SIGNS VISION Blood Pressure: Uncorrected R L Pulse SCREENING DATE RESULTS PPD POSITIVE (induration_____mm) NEGATIVE QuantiFERON TB POSITIVE NEGATIVE LAB TESTING DATE RESULTS Rubeola POSITIVE NEGATIVE Rubella POSITIVE NEGATIVE Varicella POSITIVE NEGATIVE

  9. Data Acquisition System for Doppler Radar Vital-Sign Monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander M. Vergara; Victor M. Lubecke

    2007-01-01

    Automatic gain control (AGC) units increase the dynamic range of a system to compensate for the limited dynamic range of analog to digital converters. This problem is compounded in wireless systems in which large changes in signal strength are effects of a changing environment. These issues are evident in the direct-conversion Doppler radar vital- sign monitor. Utilizing microwave radar signals

  10. Vital signs monitoring during injectable and inhalant anesthesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Serizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Reiichiro; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Inomata, Tomo

    2015-02-01

    Selecting the appropriate anesthetic protocol for the individual animal is an essential part of laboratory animal experimentation. The present study compared the characteristics of four anesthetic protocols in mice, focusing on the vital signs. Thirty-two male ddY mice were divided into four groups and administered anesthesia as follows: pentobarbital sodium monoanaesthesia; ketamine and xylazine combined (K/X); medetomidine, midazolam, and butorphanol combined (M/M/B); and isoflurane. In each group, rectal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation (SPO2) were measured, and the changes over time and instability in these signs were compared. The anesthetic depth was also evaluated in each mouse, and the percentage of mice achieving surgical anesthesia was calculated. K/X anesthesia caused remarkable bradycardia, while the respiratory rate and SPO2 were higher than with the others, suggesting a relatively strong cardiac influence and less respiratory depression. The M/M/B group showed a relatively lower heart rate and SPO2, but these abnormalities were rapidly reversed by atipamezole administration. The pentobarbital group showed a lower SPO2, and 62.5% of mice did not reach a surgical anesthetic depth. The isoflurane group showed a marked decrease in respiratory rate compared with the injectable anesthetic groups. However, it had the most stable SPO2 among the groups, suggesting a higher tidal volume. The isoflurane group also showed the highest heart rate during anesthesia. In conclusion, the present study showed the cardiorespiratory characteristics of various anesthetic protocols, providing basic information for selecting an appropriate anesthetic for individual animals during experimentation. PMID:25312399

  11. Speckle POF sensor for detecting vital signs of patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomer, M.; Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Revilla, P.; Herrero, G.; Madruga, F.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, both arterial pulse and respiratory rate have been successfully measured based on changes in speckle patterns of multimode fibers. Using two fiber-based transducers, one located on the wrist and another in the chest, both disturbances were transmitted to the fiber, varying the speckle pattern. These variations of the speckle pattern were captured using a commercial webcam and further processed using different methods. The achieved results have been presented and the simultaneous monitoring of both vital signs has been also discussed. The feasibility to use the proposed sensor system for this application is demonstrated.

  12. Vital Signs building work-up: The Museum of Anthropology

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, M.S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Architecture; Erwine, B. [Lighting Design Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The paper will present the structure and the results of an in depth study of the Museum of Anthropology, designed by Arthur Erickson Architects for the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and completed in 1976. Part of the Vital Signs Curriculum Project created by Cris Benton and administered through the University of California at Berkeley, this analytic project was designed and carried out by a faculty/student team in the Department of Architecture at the University of Washington. The significance of this study is the simultaneous presentation of qualitative and quantitative information about the thermal and luminous environment of this building.

  13. Extending role by Japanese pharmacists after training for performing vital signs monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Fujiko; Hazama, Kenji; Ikeda, Shunya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background In Japan, the circumstances in which pharmacists work are changing. Pharmacists are expected to assess conditions of patients subject to medication to ensure proper use of pharmaceutical products. To ensure fulfilment of these roles, there have already been pharmacists’ efforts in performing vital signs monitoring. Objective To clarify the necessity and related issues, by investigating the state of vital sign monitoring in clinical field by pharmacists who have been trained in vital sign monitoring. Method A web survey was conducted from 4th October to 3rd December 2012, subjecting 1,026 pharmacists who completed the vital signs training hosted by The Japanese Association of Home Care Pharmacies (JAHCP). Survey items were 1) basic information of a respondent, 2) situation of homecare conducted by pharmacists, 3) seminar attendance status, and 4) vital signs monitoring status after the seminar. Results The number of valid respondents was 430 and the response rate was 41.9%. As a result of the present research, it was revealed that 168 pharmacists (41.4%), had the opportunity to perform vital signs monitoring. By conducting vital sign monitoring, effects such as 1) improved motivation of pharmacists and better communication with patients, 2) proper use of medication, and 3) cost reduction were confirmed. Conclusion Judging from the results of the survey, pharmacists can improve medication therapy for patients by attaining vital sign skills and conduct vital sign monitoring. Pharmacists who perform vital sign monitoring should share cases where they experienced positive patient outcomes. PMID:25243033

  14. Vital sign sensing method based on EMD in terahertz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengwu; Liu, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact respiration and heartbeat rates detection could be applied to find survivors trapped in the disaster or the remote monitoring of the respiration and heartbeat of a patient. This study presents an improved algorithm that extracts the respiration and heartbeat rates of humans by utilizing the terahertz radar, which further lessens the effects of noise, suppresses the cross-term, and enhances the detection accuracy. A human target echo model for the terahertz radar is first presented. Combining the over-sampling method, low-pass filter, and Empirical Mode Decomposition improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution time-frequency technique and the centroid of the spectrogram are used to estimate the instantaneous velocity of the target's cardiopulmonary motion. The down-sampling method is adopted to prevent serious distortion. Finally, a second time-frequency analysis is applied to the centroid curve to extract the respiration and heartbeat rates of the individual. Simulation results show that compared with the previously presented vital sign sensing method, the improved algorithm enhances the signal-to-noise ratio to 1 dB with a detection accuracy of 80%. The improved algorithm is an effective approach for the detection of respiration and heartbeat signal in a complicated environment.

  15. EXPLORATION OF PREHOSPITAL VITAL SIGN TRENDS FOR THE PREDICTION OF TRAUMA OUTCOMES

    E-print Network

    useful. There has been speculation that sophisticated temporal trend- based analysis of physiologic data whether there are diagnostically useful temporal trends in prehospital vital signs of trauma patientsEXPLORATION OF PREHOSPITAL VITAL SIGN TRENDS FOR THE PREDICTION OF TRAUMA OUTCOMES Liangyou Chen

  16. Transmission and display technology for vital signs based on HTML5 canvas and COMET machanism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xie Yue

    2011-01-01

    Vital sign's transmission and display is key point for telemedicine application. the usual solution is based on C\\/S architecture, which has poor compatibility and lacks of flexibility. In this paper, we push data from server to browser automatically using COMET mechanism and display vital signs data such as ECG data in browser using HTML5 canvas tag, which explores one new

  17. Validating Emergency Department Vital Signs Using a Data Quality Engine for Data Warehouse

    PubMed Central

    Genes, N; Chandra, D; Ellis, S; Baumlin, K

    2013-01-01

    Background : Vital signs in our emergency department information system were entered into free-text fields for heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature and oxygen saturation. Objective : We sought to convert these text entries into a more useful form, for research and QA purposes, upon entry into a data warehouse. Methods : We derived a series of rules and assigned quality scores to the transformed values, conforming to physiologic parameters for vital signs across the age range and spectrum of illness seen in the emergency department. Results : Validating these entries revealed that 98% of free-text data had perfect quality scores, conforming to established vital sign parameters. Average vital signs varied as expected by age. Degradations in quality scores were most commonly attributed logging temperature in Fahrenheit instead of Celsius; vital signs with this error could still be transformed for use. Errors occurred more frequently during periods of high triage, though error rates did not correlate with triage volume. Conclusions : In developing a method for importing free-text vital sign data from our emergency department information system, we now have a data warehouse with a broad array of quality-checked vital signs, permitting analysis and correlation with demographics and outcomes. PMID:24403981

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs Share Compartir Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens April 2014 1 in 4 More than 1 in ... Print Updates Subscribe Listen Download Page last reviewed: April 8, 2014 Page last updated: April 8, 2014 ...

  19. Low-Cost Differential Front-End for Doppler Radar Vital Sign Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Richard Ribon

    We present a differential front end design for improving the performance of short-range low-cost Doppler radars for vital sign detection with application to automotive driver safety systems, health monitoring, and security ...

  20. Predictive Value of Initial Triage Vital Signs for Critically Ill Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    LaMantia, Michael A.; Stewart, Paul W.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.; Biese, Kevin J.; Forbach, Cory; Zamora, Ezequiel; McCall, Brenda K.; Shofer, Frances S.; Cairns, Charles B.; Busby-Whitehead, Jan; Kizer, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Triage of patients is critical to patient safety, yet no clear information exists as to the utility of initial vital signs in identifying critically ill older emergency department (ED) patients. The objective of this study is to evaluate a set of initial vital sign thresholds as predictors of severe illness and injury among older adults presenting to the ED. Methods: We reviewed all visits by patients aged 75 and older seen during 2007 at an academic ED serving a large community of older adults. Patients’ charts were abstracted for demographic and clinical information including vital signs, via automated electronic methods. We used bivariate analysis to investigate the relationship between vital sign abnormalities and severe illness or injury, defined as intensive care unit (ICU) admission or ED death. In addition, we calculated likelihood ratios for normal and abnormal vital signs in predicting severe illness or injury. Results: 4,873 visits by patients aged 75 and above were made to the ED during 2007, and of these 3,848 had a complete set of triage vital signs. For these elderly patients, the sensitivity and specificity of an abnormal vital sign taken at triage for predicting death or admission to an ICU were 73% (66,81) and 50% (48,52) respectively (positive likelihood ratio 1.47 (1.30,1.60); negative likelihood ratio 0.54 (0.30,0.60). Conclusion: Emergency provider assessment and triage scores that rely primarily on initial vital signs are likely to miss a substantial portion of critically ill older adults. PMID:24106542

  1. The detection of 4 vital signs of in-patients Using fuzzy database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris Rangkuti, A.; Erlisa Rasjid, Zulfany

    2014-03-01

    Actually in order to improve in the performance of the Hospital's administrator, by serve patients effectively and efficiently, the role of information technology become the dominant support. Especially when it comes to patient's conditions, such that it will be reported to a physician as soon as possible, including monitoring the patient's conditions regularly. For this reason it is necessary to have a Hospital Monitoring Information System, that is able to provide information about the patient's condition which is based on the four vital signs, temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. To monitor the 4 vital signs, the concept of fuzzy logic is used, where the vital signs number approaches 1 then the patient is close to recovery, and on the contrary, when the vital signs number approaches 0 then the patient still has problems. This system also helps nurses to provide answers to the relatives of patients, who wants to know the development of the patient's condition, including the recovery percentage based on the average of Fuzzy max from the 4 vital signs. Using Fuzzy-based monitoring system, the monitoring of the patient's condition becomes simpler and easier.

  2. Monitors Track Vital Signs for Fitness and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Have you ever felt nauseous reading a book in the back seat of a car? Or woken from a deep sleep feeling disoriented, unsure which way is up? Momentary mixups like these happen when the sensory systems that track the body's orientation in space become confused. (In the case of the backseat bookworm, the conflict arises when the reader s inner ear, part of the body s vestibular system, senses the car s motion while her eyes are fixed on the stationary pages of the book.) Conditions like motion sickness are common on Earth, but they also present a significant challenge to astronauts in space. Human sensory systems use the pull of gravity to help determine orientation. In the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station, for example, the body experiences a period of confusion before it adapts to the new circumstances. (In space, even the body s proprioceptive system, which tells the brain where the arms and legs are oriented without the need for visual confirmation, goes haywire, meaning astronauts sometimes lose track of where their limbs are when they are not moving them.) This Space Adaptation Syndrome affects a majority of astronauts, even experienced ones, causing everything from mild disorientation to nausea to severe vomiting. "It can be quite debilitating," says William Toscano, a research scientist in NASA s Ames Research Center Psychophysiology Laboratory, part of the Center s Human Systems Integration Division. "When this happens, as you can imagine, work proficiency declines considerably." Since astronauts cannot afford to be distracted or incapacitated during critical missions, NASA has explored various means for preventing and countering motion sickness in space, including a range of drug treatments. Many effective motion sickness drugs, however, cause undesirable side effects, such as drowsiness. Toscano and his NASA colleague, Patricia Cowings, have developed a different approach: Utilizing biofeedback training methods, the pair can teach astronauts, military pilots, and others susceptible to motion sickness to self-regulate their own physiological responses and suppress the unpleasant symptoms. This NASA-patented method invented by Cowings is called the Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (ATFE), and several studies have demonstrated its promise

  3. Assessment of cognitive performance using CNS vital signs after electroconvulsive treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wysoki?ski, Adam; Dzienniak, Ma?gorzata; K?oszewska, Iwona

    2014-03-01

    Little is known how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) affects cognitive functions in subjects with schizophrenia. Assessment of cognitive functions in subjects with schizophrenia treated with ECT was performed using CNS Vital Signs computerized battery of tests. Thirteen patients treated with ECT plus antipsychotics were assessed before and after 12 to 15 bilateral ECT sessions. We did not find any important changes between pre-ECT and post-ECT cognitive performance. We also found that CNS Vital Signs is a useful computerized battery test for assessing cognitive functions of subjects treated with ECT. PMID:24080543

  4. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. higher education institutions, including the black-white higher education equality index; statistics measuring the state of racial inequality; ranking the nation's law schools according to percentage of black students; and college affordability (comparing black and white…

  5. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents statistics on the status of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, examining the following issues: the black-white higher education equality index, the state of racial inequality, state-by-state projections of African American college enrollments for 1995-2015, and the history and status of African Americans in higher…

  6. The Sixth Vital Sign Fna Forms New Committee To Tackle Low Health Literacy

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    The Sixth Vital Sign Fna Forms New Committee To Tackle Low Health Literacy Nearly half of all rate of health literacy in the U.S. is cause for concern for leaders of the Florida Nurses Association. In an effort to make headway on this complex issue, the FNA has formed a new Health Literacy Committee

  7. 12 Dartmouth Medicine | dartmed.dartmouth.edu Fall 2012 VITAL SIGNS

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    12 Dartmouth Medicine | dartmed.dartmouth.edu Fall 2012 VITAL SIGNS Teenagers are constantly bombarded with well-meaning public service messages: Don't smoke. Lose weight. Get some exercise. But, for a number of reasons, some find such advice almost impossible to heed. That's especially true for teenage

  8. Reliability and validity of a computerized neurocognitive test battery, CNS Vital Signs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Thomas Gualtieri; Lynda G Johnson

    2006-01-01

    CNS Vital Signs (CNSVS) is a computerized neurocognitive test battery that was developed as a routine clinical screening instrument. It is comprised of seven tests: verbal and visual memory, finger tapping, symbol digit coding, the Stroop Test, a test of shifting attention and the continuous performance test. Because CNSVS is a battery of well-known neuropsychological tests, one should expect its

  9. The association between vital signs and major hemorrhagic injury is significantly improved after controlling for sources

    E-print Network

    vital signs, systolic blood pressure (BP) had the highest ROC AUC of 0.71 (95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.78). The ROC AUCs improved after excluding unreliable data, significantly for heart rate and respiratory rate and not significantly for heart rate and respiratory rate. The ensemble classifier yielded a final ROC AUC of 0.84 (95

  10. Using vital signs to diagnose impaired consciousness: cross sectional observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masayuki Ikeda; Takashi Matsunaga; Noritsugu Irabu; Shohji Yoshida; Asahi General

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether any vital signs can be used to quickly identify brain lesions in patients with impaired consciousness. Design Cross sectional observational study. Setting Emergency department of an urban hospital, Japan. Participants 529 consecutive patients (mean age 65 years) presenting with impaired consciousness (score < 15 on the Glasgow coma scale) during 2000. Main outcome measures The receiver

  11. Ebola triage screening and public health: the new "vital sign zero".

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L

    2015-02-01

    During public health emergencies of international concern such as the 2014 Ebola event, health care leaders need to educate clinicians on the front lines to make uncomfortable, but real triage decisions that focus on optimization of population health outcomes over individual care. Health care workers must consider their own protection first before direct contact with potentially contagious patients. In an era of globalization and emerging infectious disease, routine triage including evaluation of the standard vital signs must shift to include public health considerations with immediate consequences. A new "vital sign zero" should be taken at the time of initial patient evaluation to assess for risk and exposure to potentially contagious infectious diseases. PMID:25351634

  12. [Design of mobile vital-signs monitoring system for the elderly in nursing home].

    PubMed

    Ren, Pengling; Li, Lifeng; Chen, Longtu; Niu, Haijun; Fan, Yubo

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposed a mobile vital-signs monitoring system based on ZigBee localization and wireless transmission technology for the elderly in nursing home. The system can monitor the vital-signs (pulse, ECG and blood oxygen), localize human body and warn in emergency. The validity and accuracy of this system were testified by the experiments of mobile acquisition and storage of pulse. In these experiments, the measurement of pulse ranged from 50 to 170 time a minute, the mean error of which was less than 3%. The mean error of localizing was less than 4 m. And the data transmission rate was 250 kbps. The system, which effectively conducts the real-time monitoring of the health and safety situation for the elderly, has a great significance for protecting the elderly's life safety. PMID:24941773

  13. Home telemonitoring of vital signs--technical challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Celler, Branko G; Sparks, Ross S

    2015-01-01

    The telemonitoring of vital signs from the home is an essential element of telehealth services for the management of patients with chronic conditions, such as congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, or poorly controlled hypertension. Telehealth is now being deployed widely in both rural and urban settings, and in this paper, we discuss the contribution made by biomedical instrumentation, user interfaces, and automated risk stratification algorithms in developing a clinical diagnostic quality longitudinal health record at home. We identify technical challenges in the acquisition of high-quality biometric signals from unsupervised patients at home, identify new technical solutions and user interfaces, and propose new measurement modalities and signal processing techniques for increasing the quality and value of vital signs monitoring at home. We also discuss use of vital signs data for the automated risk stratification of patients, so that clinical resources can be targeted to those most at risk of unscheduled admission to hospital. New research is also proposed to integrate primary care, hospital, personal genomic, and telehealth electronic health records, and apply predictive analytics and data mining for enhancing clinical decision support. PMID:25163076

  14. The Effect of Live Classical Piano Music on the Vital Signs of Patients Undergoing Ophthalmic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Jorge G.; Ruszkowski, Joseph M.; Worak, Sandra R.

    2008-01-01

    Context Music and surgery. Objective To determine the effect of live classical piano music on vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Design Retrospective case series. Setting and Patients 203 patients who underwent various ophthalmologic procedures in a period during which a piano was present in the operating room of St. Francis Medical Center. [Note: St. Francis Medical Center has recently been renamed Hawaii Medical Center East.] Intervention Demographic data, surgical procedures, and the vital signs of 203 patients who underwent ophthalmic procedures were obtained from patient records. Blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate measured in the preoperative holding area were compared with the same parameters taken in the operating room, with and without exposure to live piano music. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Main outcome measure Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. Results 115 patients who were exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in the operating room compared with their vital signs measured in the preoperative holding area (P < .0001). The control group of 88 patients not exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant increase in mean arterial blood pressure (P < .0002) and heart rate and respiratory rate (P < .0001). Conclusion Live classical piano music lowered the blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. PMID:18679538

  15. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. PMID:25900584

  16. Noncontact proximity vital sign sensor based on PLL for sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yunseog; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Byung-Hyun; Ha, Sung-Jae; Lee, Hee-Jo; Yun, Gi-Ho; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a noncontact proximity vital sign sensor, using a phase locked loop (PLL) incorporated with voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) built-in planar type circular resonator, is proposed to enhance sensitivity in severe environments. The planar type circular resonator acts as a series feedback element of the VCO as well as a near-field receiving antenna. The frequency deviation of the VCO related to the body proximity effect ranges from 0.07 MHz/mm to 1.8 MHz/mm (6.8 mV/mm to 205 mV/mm in sensitivity) up to a distance of 50 mm, while the amount of VCO drift is about 21 MHz in the condition of 60 (°)C temperature range and discrete component tolerance of ± 5%. Total frequency variation occurs in the capture range of the PLL which is 60 MHz. Thus, its loop control voltage converts the amount of frequency deviation into a difference of direct current (DC) voltage, which is utilized to extract vital signs regardless of the ambient temperature. The experimental results reveal that the proposed sensor placed 50 mm away from a subject can reliably detect respiration and heartbeat signals without the ambiguity of harmonic signals caused by respiration signal at an operating frequency of 2.4 GHz. PMID:24235311

  17. [Non-linear compression for noises in non-contact vital signs detecting system].

    PubMed

    Lu, G H; Wang, J Q; Yang, G S; Wang, H B; Jin, X J; Qiu, L J; Yang, B

    2001-11-01

    A method for compressing the noises overlapping in the breath and heart signals of human beings, detected by the non-contact vital signs detecting system during the display of the waveforms in time domain, is discussed in this paper in detail. And what's more, the problem that the noise level is changed along with the increase of the gain of AD data-acquisition card and the display--gain of the software is solved by researching into the threshold of noise-level contraction in two types of circumstance in the lab, and the result of the breath and heart signal in the condition of lower noise is realized as well. PMID:12583260

  18. Patient Reactions to Vital Sign Measures: Comparing Home Monitoring Technology to Face-to-Face Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Kimberly; Chamoff, Breanna

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly home health agencies are using home-based technologies to monitor vital signs of chronically ill patients. Patients receive measurements such as blood pressure and weight that indicate risks to their health. Cognitive reactions to risk measures have been studied for face-to-face delivery; however, it is unknown whether the same reactions exist with technology delivery. Reported in this article are study results of a comparative content expert analysis of reactions to technology-delivered health-risk measures. Results suggest that patients have the similar reactions but may be more likely to just accept, without evaluating or considering threats to their health. As home telemonitoring applications continue to evolve, care must be taken avoid creating passive patients and develop best practices that use technology to encourage beneficial self-care behaviors. PMID:22337499

  19. Safe patient transfer system with monitoring of location and vital signs.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Kurihara, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kajiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, ubiquitous computing technologies have been applied in the field of medicine. Especially radio frequency identification (RFID) and small sensor networks could provide information about medical practices and patient status in order to prevent malpractices and improve the quality of medical care. As an example of this application, we developed a new system, named "a smart stretcher," which continuously monitors the patient's vital signs and detects apnea during transfer within a hospital. This system consists of a small air-mat type pressure sensor measuring both heart rate and respiration rate and a wireless network transmitting these vital data as well as patient ID to an alerting system to notify hospital staff of patient emergencies. Results of experiments in a clinical setting indicated that the system was reliable in continuous respiration monitoring and detection of apnea during patient transfer on the stretcher; however, detection of heartbeat rate was practically difficult because of the motion noises. Moreover patient ID and location were also correctly detected in real time. These results suggested the feasibility of our system for real clinical use. PMID:19845148

  20. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  1. Patient Vital Signs Monitoring using Wireless Body Area Networks Baozhi Chen, John Paul Varkey, Dario Pompili, John K-J Li, and Ivan Marsic

    E-print Network

    Pompili, Dario

    vital signs transmission using Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs) is developed, implemented in Tiny that - with minimum added RF interference - i) collects and prioritizes vital signs transmission using WBANs [1], ii patients, in this work we propose a new interference-aware WBAN system that can continuously monitor vital

  2. ["Pharmacy 3.0" and the meaning of vital signs for pharmacists].

    PubMed

    Hazama, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, the proportion of elderly people had reached up to 23% in 2009. The number of elderly people in long-term nursing homes or nursing facilities will increase in the next decade. By 2025, the majority of the elderly people would have developed cancer, stroke, cardio-vascular diseases, and dementia. Almost all of them would be treated with prescribed drugs. They would also have dysphagia and have difficulties in remembering their medications in the long term. Therefore, for the benefit of such a community, the work force, especially in the field of drug distribution, will need to be increased to prevent the incidence of patients who forget to take their medications. Further, the educational curriculum for pharmaceutical students has been changed to a new version, and some Japanese pharmacy shops have been switching over to "Pharmacy 3.0," which is the next generation model. In this pharmacy, the pharmacists will play an additional new role; they will not only dispense drugs but also support home recuperation leveraging some vital signs and physical assessments. In my opinion, this novel scheme of medical service developed with pharmacists playing this new role may be a boon to the patient/elderly community in Japan who are facing the collapse of healthcare systems. In conclusion, Collaborative Drug Therapy Management (CDTM) in the practice of the pharmacists is essential for increasing the efficiency of the Japanese healthcare systems. PMID:22214574

  3. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  4. A magnetic induction measurement system for adult vital sign monitoring: evaluation of capacitive and inductive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, H.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic induction (MI) measurement technique could provide an unobtrusive contactless method for continuous monitoring of vital signs such as breathing and cardiac activity in bed. In this paper, we present a magnetic induction system to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring heart and lung activity and the preliminary measurement results. The excitation and detection coils are designed to be implemented in a single printed circuit board, allowing the use of the system in a bed with coils under the mattress. The electronic system is based on a 16 bit arbitrary waveform generator (PXI-5422, National instrument) operating at a sample rate of 200 MS/s for the excitation signal and the detected amplified signal is then, sampled at 100 MS/s by a 14 bit digitizer (PXI-5122, National Instruments). The preliminary results at 10 MHz show the ability of the system to detect solutions with different conductivities. However the capacitive effect is in the same order of magnitude as the inductive effect due to eddy currents. Safety of the system has been evaluated to be in accordance with the standards of human exposure to the magnetic fields.

  5. Ontology-driven monitoring of patient's vital signs enabling personalized medical detection and alert.

    PubMed

    Hristoskova, Anna; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Tsiknakis, Manolis; De Turck, Filip

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI) framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF). Its novelty is the integration of: (i) personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii) intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii) dynamic adaptation of the vital signs' monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient's condition on the most suited device within the physician's reach. PMID:24445411

  6. Health technology assessment review: Remote monitoring of vital signs - current status and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in communications technologies and associated computing and digital electronics now permit patient data, including routine vital signs, to be surveyed at a distance. Remote monitoring, or telemonitoring, can be regarded as a subdivision of telemedicine - the use of electronic and telecommunications technologies to provide and support health care when distance separates the participants. Depending on environment and purpose, the patient and the carer/system surveying, analysing or interpreting the data could be separated by as little as a few feet or be on different continents. Most telemonitoring systems will incorporate five components: data acquisition using an appropriate sensor; transmission of data from patient to clinician; integration of data with other data describing the state of the patient; synthesis of an appropriate action, or response or escalation in the care of the patient, and associated decision support; and storage of data. Telemonitoring is currently being used in community-based healthcare, at the scene of medical emergencies, by ambulance services and in hospitals. Current challenges in telemonitoring include: the lack of a full range of appropriate sensors, the bulk weight and size of the whole system or its components, battery life, available bandwidth, network coverage, and the costs of data transmission via public networks. Telemonitoring also has the ability to produce a mass of data - but this requires interpretation to be of clinical use and much necessary research work remains to be done. PMID:20875149

  7. Ontology-Driven Monitoring of Patient's Vital Signs Enabling Personalized Medical Detection and Alert

    PubMed Central

    Hristoskova, Anna; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Tsiknakis, Manolis; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI) framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF). Its novelty is the integration of: (i) personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii) intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii) dynamic adaptation of the vital signs’ monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient's condition on the most suited device within the physician's reach. PMID:24445411

  8. Minimal gender differences on the CNS vital signs computerized neurocognitive battery.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L; Brooks, Brian L; Ashton Rennison, V Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Normative test scores often are corrected for demographic variables that can have an impact on neurocognitive abilities (e.g., gender, age, education, and ethnicity). The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are gender differences on the CNS Vital Signs computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants, selected from a large normative database, were 100 healthy adults aged 18 to 68 years old (M(age) = 35.8 years, SD = 13.6) with 15.5 years of education (SD = 2.2). Men (n = 50) and women (n = 50) were individually and precisely matched on age, education, ethnicity, computer use, occupation, and handedness. This battery of seven tests yields 23 test scores, 5 domain scores (Memory, Psychomotor Speed, Reaction Time, Complex Attention, and Cognitive Flexibility), and a total score. Men had significantly better scores than did women on the Finger-Tapping Test for the right hand (p = .006, Cohen's d = 0.57). No other scores were significantly different, although there were small-medium effect sizes in favor of women on Symbol-Digit Coding (d = .39) and Verbal Memory (d = .37). The trends toward gender differences in word-list recognition memory and processing speed are consistent with the literature, but because they were nonsignificant and the effect sizes were modest, the clinician likely does not need to factor this into test interpretation. PMID:24826494

  9. Creating a hospital-wide patient safety net: Design and deployment of ZigBee vital sign sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tia; Selavo, Leo; Welsh, Matt

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in wireless technologies can enable patient monitors to be far more versatile than ones that are used today. We developed wireless vital sign sensors that operate on a robust, infrastructure-independent, and instantaneously deployable wireless communication network. These sensors were easily and rapidly deployed in a diverse variety of care settings to provide continuous patient monitoring. PMID:18694060

  10. Validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Newest Vital Sign: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Takamichi; Sumitani, Masahiko; Suka, Machi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Odajima, Takeshi; Igarashi, Ataru; Kusama, Makiko; Okamoto, Masako; Sugimori, Hiroki; Kawahara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy (HL) refers to the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services, and is thus needed to make appropriate health decisions. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS) is comprised of 6 questions about an ice cream nutrition label and assesses HL numeracy skills. We developed a Japanese version of the NVS (NVS-J) and evaluated the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in patients with chronic pain. The translation of the original NVS into Japanese was achieved as per the published guidelines. An observational study was subsequently performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in 43 Japanese patients suffering from chronic pain. Factor analysis with promax rotation, using the Kaiser criterion (eigenvalues ?1.0), and a scree plot revealed that the main component of the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors, and each factor consists of two NVS-J items. The criterion-related validity of the total NVS-J score was significantly correlated with the total score of Ishikawa et al.'s self-rated HL Questionnaire, the clinical global assessment of comprehensive HL level, cognitive function, and the Brinkman index. In addition, Cronbach's coefficient for the total score of the NVS-J was adequate (alpha?=?0.72). This study demonstrated that the NVS-J has good validity and reliability. Further, the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors: "basic numeracy ability," "complex numeracy ability," and "serious-minded ability." These three HL abilities comprise a 3-step hierarchical structure. Adequate HL should be promoted in chronic pain patients to enable coping, improve functioning, and increase activities of daily living (ADLs) and quality of life (QOL). PMID:24762459

  11. Validity and Reliability of the Japanese Version of the Newest Vital Sign: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kogure, Takamichi; Sumitani, Masahiko; Suka, Machi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Odajima, Takeshi; Igarashi, Ataru; Kusama, Makiko; Okamoto, Masako; Sugimori, Hiroki; Kawahara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy (HL) refers to the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services, and is thus needed to make appropriate health decisions. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS) is comprised of 6 questions about an ice cream nutrition label and assesses HL numeracy skills. We developed a Japanese version of the NVS (NVS-J) and evaluated the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in patients with chronic pain. The translation of the original NVS into Japanese was achieved as per the published guidelines. An observational study was subsequently performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in 43 Japanese patients suffering from chronic pain. Factor analysis with promax rotation, using the Kaiser criterion (eigenvalues ?1.0), and a scree plot revealed that the main component of the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors, and each factor consists of two NVS-J items. The criterion-related validity of the total NVS-J score was significantly correlated with the total score of Ishikawa et al.'s self-rated HL Questionnaire, the clinical global assessment of comprehensive HL level, cognitive function, and the Brinkman index. In addition, Cronbach's coefficient for the total score of the NVS-J was adequate (alpha?=?0.72). This study demonstrated that the NVS-J has good validity and reliability. Further, the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors: “basic numeracy ability,” “complex numeracy ability,” and “serious-minded ability.” These three HL abilities comprise a 3-step hierarchical structure. Adequate HL should be promoted in chronic pain patients to enable coping, improve functioning, and increase activities of daily living (ADLs) and quality of life (QOL). PMID:24762459

  12. "Interns are vital to the laboratory. They are excited

    E-print Network

    Demirel, Melik C.

    , INL's deputy laboratory director for Science & Technology IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY THERMO of science, technology, engineering and math INL interns also receive extensive training - like resume an accredited U.S. college and can obtain a U.S. work authorization (CPT, OPT, Permanent Resident Alien, etc

  13. Laboratory Emergency Information Signs What Are They?

    E-print Network

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    Materials Neurotixins Radioactive Materials Lasers Biohazards (infections, recombinant DNA) Animals Projects the Sign CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Building Name: __________________ Room/Lab Number

  14. A New Paradigm of Technology-Enabled 'Vital Signs' for Early Detection of Health Change for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Popescu, Mihail; Galambos, Colleen; Koopman, Richelle J; Alexander, Gregory L; Phillips, Lorraine J; Musterman, Katy; Back, Jessica; Miller, Steven J

    2014-11-26

    Environmentally embedded (nonwearable) sensor technology is in continuous use in elder housing to monitor a new set of 'vital signs' that continuously measure the functional status of older adults, detect potential changes in health or functional status, and alert healthcare providers for early recognition and treatment of those changes. Older adult participants' respiration, pulse, and restlessness are monitored as they sleep. Gait speed, stride length, and stride time are calculated daily, and automatically assess for increasing fall risk. Activity levels are summarized and graphically displayed for easy interpretation. Falls are detected when they occur and alerts are sent immediately to healthcare providers, so time to rescue may be reduced. Automated health alerts are sent to healthcare staff, based on continuously running algorithms applied to the sensor data, days and weeks before typical signs or symptoms are detected by the person, family members, or healthcare providers. Discovering these new functional status 'vital signs', developing automated methods for interpreting them, and alerting others when changes occur have the potential to transform chronic illness management and facilitate aging in place through the end of life. Key findings of research in progress at the University of Missouri are discussed in this viewpoint article, as well as obstacles to widespread adoption. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25428525

  15. Effect of Massage Therapy on Vital Signs and GCS Scores of ICU Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unalleviated complications related to hospitalization, including stress, anxiety, and pain, can easily influence different structures, like the neural system, by enhancing the stimulation of sympathetic nervous pathways and causing unstable vital signs and deterioration in the level of consciousness. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of massage therapy by family members on vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale Score (GCS) of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the ICU of the Shariati Hospital during 2012; 45 ICU patients and 45 family members in the experimental group and the same number of patients and family members in the control group were consecutively selected . The data collection instrument consisted of two parts. The first part included demographic data (age, marital status and Body Mass Index) and the second part included a checklist to record the patient’s vital signs (systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR)) and GCS. All measurements were done at the same time in both groups before the intervention (full body massage therapy), and 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, and 4 hours after intervention. The patients were provided with a 60-minute full body massage The massage protocol included static, surface tension, stretching, superficial lymph unload, transverse friction, and myofacial releasing techniques. Results: Significant differences were observed between experimental and control groups in the SBP at 1 hour, SBP 2 hours, and SBP 3 hours, and also in GCS at 1 hour to GCS at 4 hours (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant difference between experimental and control groups in SBP at all time points (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage via family members had several positive effects on the patients’ clinical conditions, and therefore, it should be recognized as one of the most important clinical considerations in hospitalized patients. PMID:25337518

  16. 2009 International Symposium on Wearable Computers Clinical Implementation of a Head-Mounted Display of Patient Vital Signs

    E-print Network

    David Liu; Simon A Jenkins; Penelope M Sanderson

    Head-mounted displays (HMDs) can superimpose a patient’s vital signs over the anesthesiologist’s field of view in the operating room. Prior simulator-based studies have found that anesthesiologists wearing an HMD spend more time looking towards the patient and less time looking towards the monitors compared to standard monitoring. We review potential approaches for interfacing an HMD with clinical monitoring equipment at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, and describe the technical solution we implemented. Furthermore, we implemented a method of recording video data in the operating room without interfering with normal clinical practice. Finally, we present analyses of two clinical scenarios where HMDs might be particularly useful. 1.

  17. High-Sensitivity Software-Configurable 5.8GHz Radar Sensor Receiver Chip in 0.13- m CMOS for Noncontact Vital Sign Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changzhi Li; Xiaogang Yu; Chien-Ming Lee; Dong Li; Lixin Ran; Jenshan Lin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, analyses on sensitivity and link budget have been presented to guide the design of high-sensitivity noncontact vital sign detector. Important design issues such as flicker noise, baseband bandwidth, and gain budget have been discussed with practical considerations of analog-to-digital interface and signal processing methods in noncontact vital sign detection. Based on the analyses, a direct-conversion 5.8-GHz radar

  18. Meditation for Quality Improvement of Medical Encounters: Single-Intervention, Vedanta-Based Meditation Effects on Vital Signs and Mood Indices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jayaram Srinivasan; Patrick J. Breheny

    2012-01-01

    A 15-minute, single-intervention, individually guided, Vedanta-based meditation was evaluated for acute effects on vital signs and mood indices. This study included 99 volunteers. Subjects were led in meditations incorporating breathing techniques, relaxation exercises, mental imagery, and silent mantra repetition. Pre- and post-intervention vital signs and mood indices were assessed, including heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature, Beck Depression Inventory

  19. Accurate and continuous non-contact vital signs monitoring using phased array antennas in a clutter-free anechoic chamber.

    PubMed

    Boothby, A; Das, V; Lopez, J; Tsay, J; Nguyen, T; Banister, R E; Lie, D Y C

    2013-01-01

    Continuous and accurate monitoring of human vital signs is an important part of the healthcare industry, as it is the basic means by which the clinicians can determine the instantaneous status of their patients. Doppler-based noncontact vital signs (NCVS) sensor systems can monitor the heart and respiration rates without touching the patient, but it has been observed that that the accuracy of these NCVS sensors can be diminished by reflections from background clutters in the measurement environment, and that high directivity antennas can increase the sensing accuracy. Therefore, this work explores a NCVS sensor with continuous data taken inside an anechoic chamber where the background cluttering is negligible. In addition, a high directivity custom-made beam-steerable phased array antenna system is used to improve the performance and functionality of the 2.4GHz NCVS sensor we have built. We believe this work is the 1st systematic study using Doppler-based phased array systems for NCVS sensing performed in a clutter-free anechoic chamber. PMID:24110324

  20. Huntington's Disease: Two-Year Observational Follow-Up of Executive Function Evaluation with CNS Vital Signs Test in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Cerqueira, Ana Claudia; Ferraz, Lígia Maria Chaves; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic, degenerative, and progressive central nervous system disease. It is characterized by motor abnormalities and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Objective. To describe the precise degree of clinical severity of patients with HD through a new neurocognitive assessment. Methods. Unprecedented battery of computerized tests, CNSVS (Central Nervous System Vital Signs), was applied at three different moments in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The accurate and reliable CNSVS objectively provided the cognitive state of patients and allowed for the evaluation of disease progression. Case Report. P., 26, female, without any medication, with normal psychomotor development is a parent carrier of HD. In 2008, she was diagnosed with HD in accordance with the Medical Genetics Laboratories. Conclusion. The tests may be useful to reveal the exact measure of the current evolutionary stage of HD patients, allowing for more efficient planning of treatment and future procedures, such as the medication, therapy, and physical activity to be administered. PMID:22203851

  1. A Wearable Vital Signs Monitor at the Ear for Continuous Heart Rate and Pulse Transit Time Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Eric S.; Da He, David; Sodini, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    A continuous, wearable and wireless vital signs monitor at the ear is demonstrated. The device has the form factor of a hearing aid and is wirelessly connected to a PC for data recording and analysis. The device monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) in a single lead configuration, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) with a MEMS triaxial accelerometer, and the photoplethysmograms (PPG) with 660nm and 940nm LED sources and a static photocurrent subtraction analog front end. Clinical tests are conducted, including Valsalva and head-up tilt maneuvers. Peak timing intervals between the ECG, BCG and PPG are extracted and are shown to relate to pre-ejection period and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) extracted from cross-correlation between the PPG and BCG shows improved results compared to the pulse arrival time (PAT) method for tracking changes in MAP. PMID:23366488

  2. A wearable vital signs monitor at the ear for continuous heart rate and pulse transit time measurements.

    PubMed

    Winokur, Eric S; He, David Da; Sodini, Charles G

    2012-01-01

    A continuous, wearable and wireless vital signs monitor at the ear is demonstrated. The device has the form factor of a hearing aid and is wirelessly connected to a PC for data recording and analysis. The device monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) in a single lead configuration, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) with a MEMS triaxial accelerometer, and the photoplethysmograms (PPG) with 660 nm and 940 nm LED sources and a static photocurrent subtraction analog front end. Clinical tests are conducted, including Valsalva and head-up tilt maneuvers. Peak timing intervals between the ECG, BCG and PPG are extracted and are shown to relate to pre-ejection period and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) extracted from cross-correlation between the PPG and BCG shows improved results compared to the pulse arrival time (PAT) method for tracking changes in MAP. PMID:23366488

  3. Automated analysis of vital signs to identify patients with substantial bleeding before hospital arrival: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Khitrov, Maxim Y; Gates, Jonathan D; Odom, Stephen R; Havens, Joaquim M; de Moya, Marc A; Wilkins, Kevin; Wedel, Suzanne K; Kittell, Erin O; Reifman, Jaques; Reisner, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Trauma outcomes are improved by protocols for substantial bleeding, typically activated after physician evaluation at a hospital. Previous analysis suggested that prehospital vital signs contained patterns indicating the presence or absence of substantial bleeding. In an observational study of adults (aged ?18 years) transported to level I trauma centers by helicopter, we investigated the diagnostic performance of the Automated Processing of the Physiological Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) system, a computational platform for real-time analysis of vital signs, for identification of substantial bleeding in trauma patients with explicitly hemorrhagic injuries. We studied 209 subjects prospectively and 646 retrospectively. In our multivariate analysis, prospective performance was not significantly different from retrospective. The APPRAISE system was 76% sensitive for 24-h packed red blood cells of 9 or more units (95% confidence interval, 59% - 89%) and significantly more sensitive (P < 0.05) than any prehospital Shock Index of 1.4 or higher; sensitivity, 59%; initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) less than 110 mmHg, 50%; and any prehospital SBP less than 90 mmHg, 50%. The APPRAISE specificity for 24-h packed red blood cells of 0 units was 87% (88% for any Shock Index ?1.4, 88% for initial SBP <110 mmHg, and 90% for any prehospital SBP <90 mmHg). Median APPRAISE hemorrhage notification time was 20 min before arrival at the trauma center. In conclusion, APPRAISE identified bleeding before trauma center arrival. En route, this capability could allow medics to focus on direct patient care rather than the monitor and, via advance radio notification, could expedite hospital interventions for patients with substantial blood loss. PMID:25664983

  4. The use of spectral skin reflectivity and laser doppler vibrometry data to determine the optimal site and wavelength to collect human vital sign signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Kenneth A.; Kaur, Balvinder; Hodgkin, Van A.

    2012-06-01

    The carotid artery has been used extensively by researchers to demonstrate that Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) is capable of exploiting vital sign signatures from cooperative human subjects at stando. Research indicates that, the carotid, although good for cooperative and non-traumatic scenarios, is one of the first vital signs to become absent or irregular when a casualty is hemorrhaging and in progress to circulatory (hypovolemic) shock. In an effort to determine the optimal site and wavelength to measure vital signs off human skin, a human subject data collection was executed whereby 14 subjects had their spectral skin reflectivity and vital signs measured at five collection sites (carotid artery, chest, back, right wrist and left wrist). In this paper, we present our findings on using LDV and re ectivity data to determine the optimal collection site and wavelength that should be used to sense pulse signals from quiet and relatively motionless human subjects at stando. In particular, we correlate maximum levels of re ectivity across the ensemble of 14 subjects with vital sign measurements made with an LDV at two ranges, for two scenarios.

  5. ER 101: Vital Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... able to do so. Some glass thermometers contain mercury (the silver-colored liquid in the thermometer), which ... to humans and the environment. Glass thermometers containing mercury are no longer recommended. According to The Environmental ...

  6. Microwave stethoscope: development and benchmarking of a vital signs sensor using computer-controlled phantoms and human studies.

    PubMed

    Celik, Nuri; Gagarin, Ruthsenne; Huang, Gui Chao; Iskander, Magdy F; Berg, Benjamin W

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a new microwave-based method and associated measurement system for monitoring multiple vital signs (VS) as well as the changes in lung water content. The measurement procedure utilizes a single microwave sensor for reflection coefficient measurements, hence the name "microwave stethoscope (MiSt)," as opposed to the two-sensor transmission method previously proposed by the authors. To compensate for the reduced sensitivity due to reflection coefficient measurements, an improved microwave sensor design with enhanced matching to the skin and broadband operation, as well as an advanced digital signal processing algorithm are used in developing the MiSt. Results from phantom experiments and human clinical trials are described. The results clearly demonstrate that MiSt provides reliable monitoring of multiple VS such as the respiration rate, heart rate, and the changes in lung water content through a single microwave measurement. In addition, information such as heart waveforms that correlates well with electrocardiogram is observed from these microwave measurements. Details of the broadband sensor design, experimental procedure, DSP algorithms used for VS extraction, and obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:23358946

  7. Engagement, Alignment, and Rigor as Vital Signs of High-Quality Instruction: A Classroom Visit Protocol for Instructional Improvement and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Diane M.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Deci, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates engagement (E), alignment (A), and rigor (R) as vital signs of high-quality teacher instruction as measured by the EAR Classroom Visit Protocol, designed by the Institute for Research and Reform in Education (IRRE). Findings indicated that both school leaders and outside raters could learn to score the protocol with…

  8. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Kohut

    2007-01-01

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low.

  9. Utility of monitoring capnography, pulse oximetry, and vital signs in the detection of airway mishaps: a hyperoxemic animal model.

    PubMed

    Poirier, M P; Gonzalez Del-Rey, J A; McAneney, C M; DiGiulio, G A

    1998-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the time interval for changes in end-tidal CO2, oxygen saturation (SaO2), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) in response to an acute airway obstruction or hypopharyngeal extubation in a hyperoxemic model. Complete and partial airway obstructions were simulated with complete and partial cross-clamping of an endotracheal (ET) tube in five anesthetized, nonparalyzed, mechanically ventilated Yorkshire minipigs with initial PAo2 of > 400 mm Hg. Placement of the ET tube into the hypopharynx was performed to simulate accidental extubation. Both sidestream (SS) and mainstream (MS) capnography were used. Continuous pulse oximetry monitored SaO2, femoral arterial catheter monitored systolic BP, and electrocardiograph monitored HR. The time intervals for the capnograph wave to flatten and for the monitor to display zero were recorded after each airway alteration. The time interval to a change in the initial HR of 10 beats/min, a change of initial systolic BP of 10 mm Hg, and a change of initial SaO2 of 5% were recorded. Experiments were carried out for 180 seconds, and 25 trials were performed. HR, systolic BP, and SaO2 did not change for the 180-second duration of the trials. Complete obstruction produced a flattening of the SS and MS waveform in 8 +/- 2 seconds and 6 +/- 2 seconds, respectively. The SS and MS monitors displayed zero in 19 +/- 1 seconds and 68 +/- 7 seconds, respectively. Partial obstruction did not produce flattening of the wave or a monitor displaying zero. Hypopharyngeal extubation produced a flattening of the SS and MS waveform in 7 +/- 1 seconds and 7 +/- 2 seconds, respectively. The SS and MS monitors displayed zero in 18 +/- 3 seconds and 76 +/- 16 seconds, respectively. Continuous end-tidal CO2 capnography detects acute airway obstruction and hypopharyngeal extubation more rapidly than does pulse oximetry or vital sign monitoring in a hyperoxemic porcine model. PMID:9672448

  10. [Coefficients of correlation of clinical laboratory data as signs of mechanisms of regulation].

    PubMed

    Genkin, A A

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the coefficients of correlation of clinical laboratory signs in patients with diseases of the blood and lymph, respiratory organs, and cardiovascular system were analyzed using OMIS research biomedical system (Intellectual Systems, St. Petersburg. 1993). Correlation coefficient is interpreted not as a measure of relationship between signs, but as an indicator of regulation processes in a live organism. The coefficients of correlation are most frequently different for the signs whose mean values are unchanged under the same conditions. This means that a comparative analysis of relationship between the signs largely contributes to such branches of medicine in which the conclusions are based on analysis of the mean tendencies. Such branches are primarily new tests for early diagnosis of tumorous diseases, assessment of dissemination and malignancy of the process, understanding of the processes of malignant degeneration, etc. Automated analysis of differences in correlations may be useful to decipher the ambiguous and dynamic relationships between different submultiplicities of immunocompetent elements in different forms of immune response (and in various states of the organism). Use of the new system opens new vistas in studies of the signs of vital activity of cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Not only new mechanisms regulating the hemodynamics, respiration, and cardiorespiratory relationships were disclosed; relationships between physiological parameters and cellular elements were revealed, which could be hardly suspected before. A fragment of a study of survival factors in acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (carried out in cooperation with N.N. Mamayev) is presented for illustration. A close positive relationship between the humoral and cellular immunity (at least of their components analyzed in this study) is demonstrated to be destructive for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia. An optimal variant is their independent regulation or regulation leading to variously directed changes. PMID:8925219

  11. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...own description of his or her physical or mental impairment(s). The claimant's statements...to establish that there is a physical or mental impairment(s). (b) Signs...electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological...

  12. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...own description of his or her physical or mental impairment(s). The claimant's statements...to establish that there is a physical or mental impairment(s). (b) Signs...electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological...

  13. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...own description of his or her physical or mental impairment(s). The claimant's statements...to establish that there is a physical or mental impairment(s). (b) Signs...electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological...

  14. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...own description of his or her physical or mental impairment(s). The claimant's statements...to establish that there is a physical or mental impairment(s). (b) Signs...electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  16. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  19. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  20. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  1. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  3. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception. They must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated. (c) Laboratory...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Trucker Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to 84% in 2013). View larger image and text description Infographic View larger image and text description What Can Be Done Federal government is: ... to take rest breaks. Prohibiting truck drivers from text messaging or using a handheld cell phone while ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Adopt policies that promote bicycling and public transportation. Communities can: Create and maintain safe neighborhoods for physical ... local fruits and vegetables to schools, businesses, and communities. All people can: Eat more fruits and vegetables ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Secondhand Smoke

    MedlinePLUS

    ... major source of exposure. Eliminating smoking in indoor spaces fully protects nonsmokers from exposure to SHS. Half of the US population is covered by state or local smokefree laws that do not allow indoor smoking in worksites and public places, including restaurants and bars. Most people have ...

  8. Aging changes in vital signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Normal body temperature does not change much with aging. But as you get older, it becomes harder ... to wear layers of clothing to feel warm. Aging decreases your ability to sweat. You may have ...

  9. Estuarine water quality in parks of the Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network: Development and early implementation of vital signs estuarine nutrient-enrichment monitoring, 2003-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopp, Blaine S.; Nielsen, Martha; Glisic, Dejan; Neckles, Hilary A.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents results of pilot tests of a protocol for monitoring estuarine nutrient enrichment for the Vital Signs Monitoring Program of the National Park Service Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network. Data collected from four parks during protocol development in 2003-06 are presented: Gateway National Recreation Area, Colonial National Historic Park, Fire Island National Seashore, and Assateague Island National Seashore. The monitoring approach incorporates several spatial and temporal designs to address questions at a hierarchy of scales. Indicators of estuarine response to nutrient enrichment were sampled using a probability design within park estuaries during a late-summer index period. Monitoring variables consisted of dissolved-oxygen concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, water temperature, salinity, attenuation of downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), and turbidity. The statistical sampling design allowed the condition of unsampled locations to be inferred from the distribution of data from a set of randomly positioned "probability" stations. A subset of sampling stations was sampled repeatedly during the index period, and stations were not rerandomized in subsequent years. These "trend stations" allowed us to examine temporal variability within the index period, and to improve the sensitivity of the monitoring protocol to detecting change through time. Additionally, one index site in each park was equipped for continuous monitoring throughout the index period. Thus, the protocol includes elements of probabilistic and targeted spatial sampling, and the temporal intensity ranges from snapshot assessments to continuous monitoring.

  10. The effects of dietary chromium(III) picolinate on growth performance, vital signs, and blood measurements of pigs during immune stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beob G; Lindemann, Merlin D; Cromwell, Gary L

    2010-06-01

    This experiment used 24 pigs (26.0 kg) to investigate the effects of dietary chromium (Cr) on pigs challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Following 35 days of diet exposure, the immune stress treatments were: (1) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) injection and no Cr, (2) LPS injection and no Cr, (3) LPS injection and Cr 1,000 ppb, and (4) LPS injection and Cr 2,000 ppb. At 0 h, PBS or LPS was injected intraperitoneally in each pig. During the first 12 h post-injection, pigs challenged with LPS lost 951 g, while the PBS group gained 170 g (p < 0.001). Compared with the PBS group, LPS-challenged pigs consumed less feed (p < 0.01) during the first 24 h. The LPS group had higher rectal temperature at 2 and 4 h and higher respiratory rate at 1.3 and 8.5 h than the PBS group (p < 0.05). Plasma collected at 3 h had higher cortisol (p < 0.001) and lower glucose (p < 0.05) concentrations in the LPS group than the PBS group. However, supplemental Cr did not affect the response variables. Overall, the LPS challenge affects growth performance, vital signs, and plasma variables, but dietary Cr is unable to moderate stress-related effects associated with an LPS challenge. PMID:19714298

  11. The effect of intravenous Dexamethasone on post-cesarean section pain and vital signs: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Azar Danesh; Feizi, Awat; Jabalameli, Mitra; Nouri, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Any operation leads to body stress and tissue injury that causes pain and its complications. Glucocorticoids such as Dexamethasone are strong anti-inflammatory agents, which can be used for a short time post-operative pain control in various surgeries. Main purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of administration of intravenous (IV) Dexamethasone on reducing the pain after cesarean. Methods: A double-blind prospective randomized clinical trial was performed on 60 patients candidate for elective caesarean section. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: A (treatment: 8 mg IV Dexamethasone) and B (control: 2 mL normal saline). In both groups, variables such as mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pain and vomiting severity (based on visual analog scale) were recorded in different time points during first 24 h after operation. Statistical methods using repeated measure analysis of variances and t-test, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for analyzing data. Findings: The results indicated that within-group comparisons including severity of pain, MAP, RR and HR have significant differences (P < 0.001 for all variables) during the study period. Between group comparisons indicated significant differences in terms of pain severity (P < 0.001), MAP (P = 0.048) and HR (P = 0.078; marginally significant), which in case group were lower than the control group. Conclusion: IV Dexamethasone could efficiently reduce post-operative pain severity and the need for analgesic consumption and improve vital signs after cesarean section. PMID:24991614

  12. Vital Pulpotomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A vital pulpotomy removes less pulp than root canal treatment. Vital pulpotomy removes tissue from inside the ... that you see above the gum line. Root canal treatment removes all of the nerve tissue, including ...

  13. Non-contact, Wavelet-based Measurement of Vital Signs using Thermal Imaging S. Yu. Chekmenev, H. Rara, and Aly A. Farag

    E-print Network

    Farag, Aly A.

    a living person, which include heart rate, breathing rate, temperature and blood pressure. The signs can approaches for measuring heart rate and respiration. The proposed method has potential applications in non on the measurement of the breathing rate and heart rate. The baseline standard for pulse measurement

  14. Methods of sperm vitality assessment.

    PubMed

    Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Librach, Clifford L

    2013-01-01

    Sperm vitality is a reflection of the proportion of live, membrane-intact spermatozoa determined by either dye exclusion or osmoregulatory capacity under hypo-osmotic conditions. In this chapter we address the two most common methods of sperm vitality assessment: eosin-nigrosin staining and the hypo-osmotic swelling test, both utilized in clinical Andrology laboratories. PMID:22992899

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Recipe for Food Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Food Safety Protecting people from deadly Listeria food poisoning June 2013 1600 About 1,600 people in ... is the 3rd leading cause of death from food poisoning. 90% At least 90% of people who get ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vaccinated against HPV as recommended . State and local public health can Encourage women to get screened by working with state Medicaid programs, community health centers, and community-based groups. Help women get screened, get ... MMWR Science Clips Related ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... increasingly as a painkiller because it is a generic drug that can provide long-lasting pain relief. But ... methadone. Methadone is available as a low-cost generic drug. It is often listed as a preferred drug ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... niños: [PODCAST - 1:15 minutes] Childhood Overweight and Obesity Child and Teen BMI Calculator About BMI for Children ... On Other Web Sites Let’s Move! Let’s Move! Child Care We Can! ChooseMyPlate.gov The Community Guide: Obesity Prevention and Control MedlinePlus - Obesity in Children MedlinePlus - ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Screening and Counseling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to deliver these services to patients. States and Communities can: Encourage health care plans and provider organizations ... how many adults are receiving these services in communities. Consider alternative ways to deliver these services in ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    MedlinePLUS

    ... role of alcohol in injuries and deaths. Supporting proven programs and policies that decrease binge drinking. States ... Can Be Done The US government is Supporting proven programs and policies to reduce binge drinking. Helping ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... through the Affordable Care Act. Doctors, nurses, and health care systems can Test patients for HIV as a regular part of medical care. Counsel patients who do not have HIV on how to prevent ... or mental health services. Work with health departments to get and ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Where's the Sodium?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tell how much sodium is in restaurant foods. Brands of foods matter: Different brands of the same foods may have different sodium ... can: Develop and implement efforts that: Increase public awareness about the amount of sodium added to processed ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Overdoses A growing epidemic, especially among women July 2013 48,000 Nearly 48,000 women died of ... Subscribe Listen Download Page last reviewed: July 2, 2013 Page last updated: July 3, 2013 Content source: ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lives on the road each year. Minimum legal drinking age laws prohibit selling alcohol to people under age ... Keeping and enforcing 21 as the minimum legal drinking age helps keep young, inexperienced drivers from drinking and ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... than others. SOURCE: IMS, National Prescription Audit (NPA TM ), 2012. View larger image and text. Infographic Health ... different levels. SOURCE: IMS, National Prescription Audit (NPA TM ), 2012. View larger image and text. Making a ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Support for Breastfeeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Read text version What Can Be Done Federal government can: Promote maternity care policies and practices that ... Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. State and local government can: Set statewide maternity care quality standards for ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... image and text. What Can Be Done Federal government is: Working with state and local agencies to ... using genome sequencing and analysis. State and local governments can: Adopt and enforce all provisions of the ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2009 – 2010 View larger graphic Using the correct car seat or booster seat can be a lifesaver: ... always buckled in an age- and size-appropriate car seat or booster seat. View larger graphic Keep ...

  9. Medical laboratory scientists are educated in the theoretical and practical aspects of laboratory medicine. As vital members of the health care team,

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    -requisites to obtain a certificate in the following disciplines: Hematology, Chemistry, Microbiology, or Blood Banking. All coursework is completed online while practicums are completed at an approved clincal site-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN BLOOD BANKING (17 CREDIT HOURS TOTAL) (3 credits each, unless noted) MLS 4118 Laboratory

  10. Monitoring Mobile Device Vitals for Effective Reporting (ER)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Ransbottom; Grant A. Jacoby

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines how to proactively screen the health of a corporate network and perform first aid by systematically monitoring vital signs of mobile devices within the network. The first contribution is the set of vital signs consisting of event activities such as registry content changes, active processes, open ports, power usage thresholds, and power signatures (using the Battery-based intrusion

  11. Plant Growth and Vitality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikhail V. Kozlov; Elena L. Zvereva; Vitali E. Zverev

    Many different ways to define plant vitality or vigour have been suggested. Although definitions differ in details, they generally\\u000a refer to the capacities to live or grow, as well as to resist stress (reviewed by Dobbertin 2005). Importantly, the hypothetical\\u000a ‘optimal’ plant vitality remains a theoretical concept: it can neither be measured directly nor predicted on the basis of\\u000a other

  12. American Sign Language Browser

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The American Sign Language (ASL) Browser, developed by the Communication Technology Laboratory at Michigan State University, indexes video clips that demonstrate thousands of ASL signs. To view a video clip illustrating an ASL sign, users select a word or phrase from 1 of 26 alphabetical lists. Written instructions explaining how to make each sign accompany every video clip. Each clip in this visual dictionary is a Quicktime movie of about 100K.

  13. NIPER Lab WARDEN -- Description and LabVIEW{reg_sign} executable code of a general-purpose laboratory-automation program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    This report is Volume 1 (the description) of a two volume series that describes a general purpose, automation computer program developed by NIPER for data acquisition/control/analysis/presentation. This software was developed to provide interactive computer control of a variety of instruments typically found in laboratories and pilot plants in order to improve efficiency in operation and safe handling of potentially hazardous operations. For example, it is easily adaptable for operating a laboratory that conducts experiments at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, such as those found in a steamflooding laboratory. The software was developed in an object-oriented graphical language around National Instruments` LabVIEW{reg_sign} which is the future trend in automation programming.

  14. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Intergroup Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that ethnolinguistic vitality depends on four crucial social psychological factors: perceived strength differential, intergroup distance, utilitarianism and intergroup discordance. The influence of these factors on the vitality of subordinate and dominant groups is outlined. It is proposed that the vitality of both types of groups…

  15. Development of a portable vital sensing system for home telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, F; Sankai, Y

    2007-01-01

    For safe and effective home medical care, a network system for observing one's vital signs noninvasively and evaluating one's health conditions is highly desirable. In this paper, we described a portable vital sensing system and a home medical server to establish a home telemedicine system. In order to develop a portable vital sensing system, physiological sensing circuit, digital signal processor and wireless communication device are integrated into a small electrical circuit, called "smart telecom unit" with a size of 25mm * 37mm. By using a smart telecom unit, noninvasive vital sensing units including blood pressure, electrocardiograph, pulse wave and body temperature were developed. These sensing units are able to communicate vital records to a home medical server, which consists of a small computer and virtual physiological model to estimate health conditions and can seamlessly connect to the Internet. The accuracy and stability were evaluated in the system performance test. As a result of a performance test of a portable vital sensing system, these vital data could be measured easily and noninvasively. In addition, vital sensing system is able to communicate vital records to home medical server. Hence, it could be confirmed that it was useful to analyze daily health condition in order to prevent a lifestyle disease like hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes. PMID:18003350

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Tests Save Lives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... indicator for clinical preventive services. State and local public health can: Work with those doctors, health systems and public health professionals who have already greatly increased CRC testing ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... snack. Children eat about 15% of sodium at breakfast, 30% at lunch, 39% at dinner, and 16% ... Nutrition Standards for National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs . Implement food purchasing policies and standards that ...

  18. Hydroacoustic estimates of fish abundance. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1991-03-01

    Hydroacoustics, as defined in the context of this report, is the use of a scientific sonar system to determine fish densities with respect to numbers and biomass. These two parameters provide a method of monitoring reservoir fish populations and detecting gross changes in the ecosystem. With respect to southeastern reservoirs, hydroacoustic surveys represent a new method of sampling open water areas and the best technology available. The advantages of this technology are large amounts of data can be collected in a relatively short period of time allowing improved statistical interpretation and data comparison, the pelagic (open water) zone can be sampled efficiently regardless of depth, and sampling is nondestructive and noninvasive with neither injury to the fish nor alteration of the environment. Hydroacoustics cannot provide species identification and related information on species composition or length/weight relationships. Also, sampling is limited to a minimum depth of ten feet which precludes the use of this equipment for sampling shallow shoreline areas. The objective of this study is to use hydroacoustic techniques to estimate fish standing stocks (i.e., numbers and biomass) in several areas of selected Tennessee Valley Reservoirs as part of a base level monitoring program to assess long-term changes in reservoir water quality.

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Making Food Safer to Eat

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ensure that food production and service facilities adopt proven preventive measures and enforce food safety laws and ... contamination when raising livestock or food animals. Adopt proven preventive measures for food safety plans in all ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Cancer Screenings: Colorectal Cancer and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cdc.gov/vitalsigns www http://www.cdc.gov/cancer 36% Only 36% of uninsured adults aged 50– ... 74 are up-to-date with mammography screening. Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Breast Cancer 22M 22 million ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Smoking among People with Mental Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share Compartir Adult Smoking Focusing on People with Mental Illness February 2013 1 in 3 More than 1 ... Smoking is much more common in adults with mental illness than other adults Smoking and mental illness Nicotine ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Seat Belt Use in the US

    MedlinePLUS

    ... t wearing their seat belts on every trip. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for people age 5 - 34. More than 2.3 million adult drivers and passengers were treated in emergency departments for ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses in the US

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health plans that identify and address improper patient use of painkillers. Pass, enforce and evaluate pill mill, doctor shopping and other laws to reduce prescription painkiller abuse. Encourage professional licensing ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: More People Walk to Better Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Read text version What Can Be Done US government is: Working with partners to carry out the ... people to be more active. State or local governments can: Consider walking when creating long-range community ...

  5. Linguistic Landscape and Ethnolinguistic VitalityAn Empirical Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodrigue Landry; Richard Y. Bourhis

    1997-01-01

    Linguistic landscape refers to the visibility and salience of languages on public and commercial signs in agiven territory or region. It is proposed that the linguistic landscape may serve important informational and symbolic functions as a marker of the relative power and status of the linguistic communities inhabiting the territory. Using the theoretical framework of ethnolinguistic vitality, it was hypothesized

  6. Organizational Vitality in Student Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Stephen F.; O'Donnell, Jo Anne

    Institutional vitality, a broad measure of the quality of organizational life at colleges and universities, has not been systematically addressed in the literature. To identify management and personnel practices which contribute to institutional vitality within student affairs divisions, a two-stage methodology was employed. First, an…

  7. Identifying the Most Sensitive and Specific Sign and Symptom Combinations for Cholera: Results from an Analysis of Laboratory-Based Surveillance Data from Haiti, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lucien, Mentor Ali Ber; Schaad, Nicolas; Steenland, Maria W.; Mintz, Eric D.; Emmanuel, Rossignol; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Adrien, Paul; Joseph, Gerard A.; Katz, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Since October 2010, over 700,000 cholera cases have been reported in Haiti. We used data from laboratory-based surveillance for diarrhea in Haiti to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of the cholera case definitions recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). From April 2012 to May 2013, we tested 1,878 samples from hospitalized patients with acute watery diarrhea; 1,178 (62.7%) yielded Vibrio cholerae O1. The sensitivity and specificity of the WHO case definition for cholera in an epidemic setting were 91.3% and 43.1%, respectively, and the PPV and NPV were 72.8% and 74.8%, respectively. The WHO case definition for cholera in an area where cholera is not known to be present had lower sensitivity (63.1%) and NPV (55.1%) but higher specificity (74.2%) and PPV (80.0%). When laboratory diagnostic testing is not immediately available, clinicians can evaluate signs and symptoms to more accurately identify cholera patients. PMID:25732682

  8. Identifying the most sensitive and specific sign and symptom combinations for cholera: results from an analysis of laboratory-based surveillance data from haiti, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Mentor Ali Ber; Schaad, Nicolas; Steenland, Maria W; Mintz, Eric D; Emmanuel, Rossignol; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Adrien, Paul; Joseph, Gerard A; Katz, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    Since October 2010, over 700,000 cholera cases have been reported in Haiti. We used data from laboratory-based surveillance for diarrhea in Haiti to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of the cholera case definitions recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). From April 2012 to May 2013, we tested 1,878 samples from hospitalized patients with acute watery diarrhea; 1,178 (62.7%) yielded Vibrio cholerae O1. The sensitivity and specificity of the WHO case definition for cholera in an epidemic setting were 91.3% and 43.1%, respectively, and the PPV and NPV were 72.8% and 74.8%, respectively. The WHO case definition for cholera in an area where cholera is not known to be present had lower sensitivity (63.1%) and NPV (55.1%) but higher specificity (74.2%) and PPV (80.0%). When laboratory diagnostic testing is not immediately available, clinicians can evaluate signs and symptoms to more accurately identify cholera patients. PMID:25732682

  9. Dollar Signs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Children's Museum of Houston

    2014-09-19

    In this activity, learners use number sense and mental math strategies to estimate the price of a sign. Learners pretend they are in charge of making signs for businesses and must calculate the cost of three orders using estimation. This activity provides an opportunity for learners to practice making estimates of the sum of more than two numbers. This activity guide contains sample questions to ask, literary connections, extensions, and alignment to local and national standards.

  10. Tongue protrusion as an indicator of vital burning.

    PubMed

    Bernitz, Herman; van Staden, Paul J; Cronjé, Christine M; Sutherland, René

    2014-03-01

    In the forensic assessment of burned bodies, the question of whether the victim was exposed to the fire before or after death is of crucial importance. Several external signs have been used in the past to indicate heat exposure prior to the death of the victim but these did not include tongue protrusion. The internal signs of heat exposure are generally regarded as much more important than those observed externally. No one factor has been found to be totally reliable. This study found a statistically significant dependence between tongue protrusion and presence of soot in the respiratory tract and stomach, the latter being a good indicator of vital burning. The results of this study confirm that tongue protrusion can be used as an additional indicator of vital burning. PMID:23609218

  11. Understanding and Forecasting Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karan, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Forecasting of ethnolinguistic vitality can only be done within a well-functioning descriptive and explanatory model of the dynamics of language stability and shift. It is proposed that the Perceived Benefit Model of Language Shift, used with a taxonomy of language shift motivations, provides that model. The model, based on individual language…

  12. Vitalism in Naive Biological Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Suzanne C.; Taplin, John E.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    Three experiments investigated use of vitalistic explanations for biological phenomena by 5- and 10-year-olds and by adults. Results replicated the original Japanese finding of vitalistic thinking among English-speaking 5-year-olds, identified the more active component of vitalism as a belief in the transfer of energy during biological processes,…

  13. Refining the Notion of Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that the notion of ethnolinguistic vitality has been used ambiguously in the vitality theory, denoting three distinct theoretical concepts: sustainability (Su), strength (S) and vitality (V). It is hypothesised that sustainability is a group's ability to continue existing as a group while vitality is its ability to act as a…

  14. Wilderness Sign

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wilderness sign beside a mountain hiking trail in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. This image was taken while the photographer was participating in the 2009 Joint Annual Meeting of these leading scientific societies: Mycological Society of America, American Bryological and Lichenological Society, ...

  15. Electronic Data Processing of National Vital Statistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Halbert L. Dunn

    1960-01-01

    At the present time, national vital statistics are tabulated on electric accounting machines. During the past two years, the National Office of Vital Statistics has been engaged in a study of the feasibility of electronic data processing equipment. In terms of possible applications of electronic data processing systems within the National Office of Vital Statistics, the NOVS program falls into

  16. International vital statistics: a resource guide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengzhi Wang

    2003-01-01

    While the concept of vital statistics is rich in meaning, standardization of these valuable data has eluded governments, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and demographic researchers. Primarily due to discrepancies of sociopolitical systems and availability of resources, international vital statistics are diverse and variant in terms of vital classification and registration and data processing and reporting. That said, birth,

  17. Battlefield triage life signs detection techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olga Boric-Lubecke; Jenshan Lin; Byung-Kwon Park; Changzhi Li; Wansuree Massagram; Victor M. Lubecke; Anders Host-Madsen

    2008-01-01

    Getting to wounded soldiers on the battlefield is a precarious task, and medics have a very high casualty rate. It is therefore a vital importance to prioritize which soldiers to attend to first. The first step is to detect life signs - if a soldier is dead or alive, and prioritize recovery of live soldiers. The second step is to

  18. Vitalism and the Darwin Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James

    2012-08-01

    There are currently both scientific and public debates surrounding Darwinism. In the scientific debate, the details of evolution are in dispute, but not the central thesis of Darwin's theory; in the public debate, Darwinism itself is questioned. I concentrate on the public debate because of its direct impact on education in the United States. Some critics of Darwin advocate the teaching of intelligent design theory along with Darwin's theory, and others seek to eliminate even the mention of evolution from science classes altogether. Many of these critics base their objections on the claim that non-living matter cannot give rise to living matter. After considering some of the various meanings assigned to `vitalism' over the years, I argue that a considerable portion of Darwin deniers support a literal version of vitalism that is not scientifically respectable. Their position seems to be that since life cannot arise naturally, Darwin's theory accomplishes nothing: If it can only account for life forms changing from one to another (even this is disputed by some) but not how life arose in the first place, what's the point? I argue that there is every reason to believe that living and non-living matter differ only in degree, not in kind, and that all conversation about Darwinism should start with the assumption that abiogenesis is possible unless or until compelling evidence of its impossibility is presented. That is, I advocate a position that the burden of proof lies with those who claim "Life only comes from life." Until that case is made, little weight should be given to their position.

  19. SignWriting Based Sign Language Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antônio Carlos Da Rocha Costa; Graçaliz Pereira Dimuro

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to the computer processing of deaf sign languages that uses SignWriting as the writing system\\u000a for deaf sign languages, and SWML (SignWriting Markup Language) as its computer encoding. Every kind of language and document\\u000a processing (storage and retrieval, analysis and generation, translation, spellchecking, search, animation, dictionary automation,\\u000a etc.) can be applied to sign language texts

  20. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    Dress for success At a recent physics teachers meeting a colleague commented to me on the generally poor state of the throng's sartorial elegance. It's not that she thought they should all be clothes horses or catwalk models but certain rules seem to have been ignored. This didn't just apply to the older people in the crowd. In the interests of physics we drew up a few basic rules that seemed to have gone awry and we present them here for the benefit of new members of the profession: Trousers should meet shoes, or at least come within 2 cm of the laces. NB. Pedal pushers are not acceptable male attire. Sandals and socks should also be avoided. One of the few equations that all of the general public know (like E = mc2) is Socks + Sandals = Beard. Hair should be washed at least once a week (whether it needs to be or not), combing should take place more frequently. Particular styles are not important, but avoid hiding receding hair using the comb-over. If your jacket/cardigan frays at the elbow throw it away. Patching it up with leather patches is not decorous or clever. NB. Carpet samples are not an acceptable alternative. If you are watching a re-run of a 1970s television show one afternoon and you find yourself thinking how much you admire the actors' dress sense then it is time to go clothes shopping. Colours should match and complement each other. Some combinations should be banned, for example brown jacket with orange shirts are a no-no. Under no circumstances should you try to match brown tweed with anything, unless it's the inside of your dustbin. Men and ties. It is very common to want to wear one's old school or college tie to show off your origins and this is to be commended. However, it is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Ironing should be done on all outer garments, though there is no need to iron creases (fore and aft) so sharp that they cause paper cuts. Stains. If you accidentally spill some food or drink on your clothes, make sure you attempt to remove it as soon as possible and preferably within the same lunar cycle. Some teachers seem to think they should be worn with pride like the stains on a chemistry teacher's white coat. This is a myth. Materials. For scientists continually teaching about the wonder of smart materials, physics teachers are remarkably conservative in their choice of materials for their clothes. Try to break out from the traditional corduroy and tweed and practise what you teach. It is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Steven Chapman Science Year Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science Signing Off takes a humorous and irreverent look at physics education. The views expressed here are those of the author and are not endorsed by the Editorial Board for Physics Education. Can you contribute a zany attitude or humorous anecdote? Please send your offering to ped@iop.org marked Signing Off.

  1. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology teachers in your own time. D Read the textbook ten minutes before the class. Mostly A's: Traditional physics teacher, will fit straight in. Within days of taking up post you will wonder why he isn't already wearing a fine coating of chalk after years of teaching. Make a good offer of a long contract. Mostly B's: Slightly trendy and progressive. Consider buying a good computer instead. Mostly C's: A dangerous and possibly offensive teacher: they make you feel old and are liable to disrupt timetabling by making teaching popular. Don't worry - they will soon burn out and retire. Mostly D's: As a normal human being, this person is totally unsuited to physics teaching - they expect to work less than 50 hours each week, and enjoy living. KP

  2. Vital Soil: Function, Value and Properties.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article is a review of the book, Vital Soil: Function, Value and Properties. Soil vitality has been defined as the ability of soil ecosystems to stay in balance in a changing world. The soil environment and the life that it supports developed over centuries and millennia, but careless human ac...

  3. NATIONAL VITAL STATISTICS SYSTEM - MORTALITY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, State laws require death certificates to be completed for all deaths, and Federal law mandates national collection and publication of deaths and other vital statistics data. The National Vital Statistics System, the Federal compilation of this data, is the r...

  4. Protecting Vital Records in a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Van

    2005-01-01

    The second a student enters kindergarten, a set of vital records is created, and this body of information expands throughout a child's academic career. Vital school records contain highly sensitive, private information, and there is no shortage of laws and policies to govern the handling, management and protection of such information. Schools…

  5. Does Ethnolinguistic Vitality Theory Account for the Actual Vitality of Ethnic Groups? A Critical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmur, Kutlay

    2011-01-01

    Ethnolinguistic vitality theory asserts that Status, Demographic, Institutional Support and Control factors make up the vitality of ethnolinguistic groups. An assessment of a group's strengths and weaknesses in each of these dimensions provides a rough classification of ethnolinguistic groups into those having low, medium, or high vitality. Low…

  6. Biographical Sketch -Larry Mahrt A. Vital Statistics

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Biographical Sketch - Larry Mahrt A. Vital Statistics: Present Position: Professor Affiliation of Wisconsin Ph.D. (1972) - Meteorology (Minor: Mathematics), University of Wisconsin C. Professional, Corvallis, Oregon. 2004 - present: Senior Research Scientist, NorthWest Research Associates, Bellevue, WA. D

  7. HEALTH, VITAL GOALS, AND CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES

    PubMed Central

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or ‘central human capabilities and functionings’. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings—or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. PMID:22420910

  8. Vital Exhaustion and Retinal Microvascular Changes in Cardiovascular Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ning; Rogers, Sophie; Mosley, Thomas H; Klein, Ronald; Couper, David; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-01-01

    Objective Negative psychological factors, such as depression, have been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Whether this link is mediated by macrovascular or microvascular disease is unknown. This study aimed to determine whether vital exhaustion, a measure of negative emotion, is associated with microvascular changes in the retina. Methods A population-based, cross-sectional study of 10,364 white and African Americans aged 48–73 years. Vital exhaustion scores were determined from the Maastricht questionnaire and categorized into quartiles. Retinopathy signs and retinal vascular caliber were graded from retinal photographs following standardized protocols. Results After adjusting for age, gender, race, study center, education, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, and other risk factors, higher vital exhaustion scores (highest versus lowest quartiles) were modestly associated with the presence of retinopathy (odds ratio [OR] 1.27; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.01, 1.59), particularly retinal hemorrhages (OR 1.71; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.44), and with generalized retinal venular widening (OR 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.38). Analyzing vital exhaustion as a continuous variable did not change the pattern of the associations. Conclusions Middle-aged people with vital exhaustion may be more likely to have retinopathy signs that have been identified as risk predictors of cardiovascular events. Further research is needed to explore the possible adverse effects of negative emotion on the microcirculation. PMID:19073748

  9. Mobile Arabic sign language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faisal Al Ameiri; Mohamed Jamal Zemerly; Mohamed Al Marzouqi

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a mobile application with several features which can be used to teach Arabic sign language and to communicate using it. These features include translating from Arabic text to Arabic sign language, video chatting where two users can use the application to chat in Arabic sign language, SMS messaging and translating SMS messages to Arabic sign language, in

  10. Sign Language Tutoring Tool

    E-print Network

    Aran, Oya; Benoit, Alexandre; Carrillo, Ana Huerta; Fanard, François-Xavier; Campr, Pavel; Akarun, Lale; Caplier, Alice; Rombaut, Michele; Sankur, Bulent

    2008-01-01

    In this project, we have developed a sign language tutor that lets users learn isolated signs by watching recorded videos and by trying the same signs. The system records the user's video and analyses it. If the sign is recognized, both verbal and animated feedback is given to the user. The system is able to recognize complex signs that involve both hand gestures and head movements and expressions. Our performance tests yield a 99% recognition rate on signs involving only manual gestures and 85% recognition rate on signs that involve both manual and non manual components, such as head movement and facial expressions.

  11. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119...MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems...

  12. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119...MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems...

  13. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119...MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems...

  14. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119...MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems...

  15. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119...MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems...

  16. Objective Local Vitality and Linguistic Networks as Predictors of Perceived Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincze, László; Harwood, Jake

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the relationship between objective ethnolinguistic vitality, individual networks of linguistic contacts (INLCs) and perceived vitality among German-speaking (N = 415) and Italian-speaking (N = 379) adolescents in South Tyrol, Italy. Supporting our hypothesis, we found that INLC has a greater effect on perceived…

  17. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  18. Signs of Overload

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs of Overload Healthy Living Listen Signs of Overload Article Body Although stress is a part of ... 12 (Copyright © 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be ...

  19. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  20. Whitening non vital teeth – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moraru, Iren; ?uculin?, Mihaela; B?t?iosu, Marilena; Gheorghi??, Lelia; Diaconu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    Commonly used in cosmetic dentistry teeth whitening can be used combined with other restorative techniques during dental treatment. Non-vital teeth whitening is necessary whenever we need an improvement of their aspect, as it’s a known fact that these teeth can have a grey or pink-grey coloration when they are not correctly endodontical treated. PMID:24778849

  1. Rethinking the Ethics of Vital Organ Donations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franklin G. Miller; Robert D. Truog

    2008-01-01

    Accepted medical practice already violates the dead donor rule. Explicitly jettisoning the rule—allowing vital organs to be extracted, under certain conditions, from living patients—is a radical change only at the conceptual level. But it would expand the pools of eligible organ donors.

  2. Fault tree analysis for vital area identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B. Varnado; N. R. Ortiz

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of fault tree analysis to identify those areas of nuclear fuel cycle facilities which must be protected to prevent acts of sabotage that could lead to sifnificant release of radioactive material. By proper manipulation of the fault trees for a plant, an analyst can identify vital areas in a manner consistent with regulatory definitions. This

  3. Chapter 1 Leading concepts towards vital soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Eijsackers

    2004-01-01

    This introductory chapter gives an analysis of the basic elements of a vital soil, of soil protection policies and monitoring options. The background to this approach is the increase in soil functions and an overexploitation that has resulted in conflicts as well as in concern for the consequences for human health, the health of soil, and soil sustainability. These functions

  4. The Economic Vitality Formula of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konopnicki, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    An economic vitality formula of success can be accomplished by creating partnerships between local career and technical education (CTE), and workforce development and economic development entities. Student industry certifications; dynamic partnerships; programs and projects focused on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); and…

  5. Hot and Cold Ethnicities: Modes of Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the summary of the special issue of "JMMD" "Ethnolinguistic vitality". The volume shows convincingly that ethnolinguistic vitality perceptions as measured by standard methodology such as the Subjective Ethnolinguistic Vitality Questionnaires (SEVQ) are not reliable indicators of actual vitality. Evidence that ethnolinguistic…

  6. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This section presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education. The composite index of higher educational indicators shows a slight downward trend in Spring 1998. Other tables present information on racial inequality, students and faculty from Africa, graduation rates of Black Americans,…

  7. Education Vital Signs. Main Events: The Year of "No Child Left Behind."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    A brief overview of national issues in public education in 2002. Discusses the views of advocates and opponents of the No Child Left Behind Act and the school voucher movement; federal, state, and local government challenges to local school board authority; and school funding and general economic issues. (WFA)

  8. The Fifth Vital Sign: Implementation of the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana-Maria Gallo

    Several psychometric tools are available to assess pain in the neonate. Although clinically tested, most of these tools have not been integrated into the assessment of the well newborn. Information is lacking regarding the implementation of such tools and their effects in clinical practice. The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale provides a measure of the intensity of an infant's response to

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share Compartir Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables August 2014 67% The amount of whole ... juice. The amount of vegetables children ate did not change from 2003 to 2010. Moreover, in 2007- ...

  10. Extraction of the superficial facial vasculature, vital signs waveforms and rates using thermal imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Travis R. Gault; Nicholas Blumenthal; Aly A. Farag; Tom Starr

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with non-invasive and non-intrusive measurements of the human facial vasculature from thermal imaging, and estimates the waveforms and rates of the arterial pulse. The paper addresses the issues involved with use of Long-Wave IR imaging in studies of human biometrics, and focuses on measurements of human's heart rate based on a small number of thermal video frames.

  11. A textile-based wearable system for vital sign monitoring: applicability in cardiac patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Di Rienzo; F. Rizzo; G. Parati; M. Ferratini; G. Brambilla; P. Castiglioni

    2005-01-01

    We presents a new textile-based wearable system, named MagIC (Maglietta Interattiva Computerizzata), for the unobtrusive recording of cardiorespiratory and motion signals during spontaneous behavior in daily life and in a clinical environment. MagIC is composed of a vest, including textile sensors for ECG and breathing frequency detection, and a portable electronic board for motion assessment, signal preprocessing and wireless data

  12. dartmed.dartmouth.edu | Dartmouth Medicine 9Spring 2012 VITAL SIGNS

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    everywhere is ethics and humanities. And so one vein of the curriculum redesign is going to be to work on professionalism and physician well-being and physician ethics, without which all the science is worthless. Could much to know, and adding in new components, such as a master's program, feels infeasible. Another way

  13. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in higher education, offering: the Black-White Higher Education Equality Index; statistics that measure racial inequality; states in which black college enrollments are expected to grow over the next 15 years; and differences among the states in their percentages of low-income…

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... single leader responsible for program outcomes. Physicians have proven successful in this role. Drug expertise: Appoint a ... single leader responsible for program outcomes. Physicians have proven successful in this role. Drug expertise: Appoint a ...

  15. Textile technology for the vital signs monitoring in telemedicine and extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Ferratini, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    This paper illustrates two extensive applications of a smart garment we previously developed for the monitoring of ECG, respiration, and movement. In the first application, the device, named Maglietta Interattiva Computerizzata (MagIC), was used for the home monitoring of cardiac patients. The used platform included MagIC for signals collection, a touchscreen computer with a dedicated software for data handling, and a universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) dongle for data transmission, via email, to three cardiologists. Three patients daily-performed 3-min telemonitoring sessions for 30 days by using the platform. The whole system behaved correctly in 85 out of 90 sessions. In five instances, a second session was required due to UMTS traffic congestion. Only in three sessions, cardiologists asked the patient to repeat the acquisition because of poor signal quality. In the second application, MagIC was used to evaluate the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on sleep and 24 h daily life in 30 healthy subjects at 3500 and 5400 m above sea level on Mount Everest slopes. The use of MagIC garment was reported to be simple and requiring short instrumentation time even in the demanding expedition environment. The signal quality was adequate in 111 out of 115 recordings and 90% of the subjects found the vest comfortable. PMID:20421189

  16. 8 Dartmouth Medicine | dartmed.dartmouth.edu Spring 2012 VITAL SIGNS

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    . Timothy Lahey, a member of the executive leadership team charged with overseeing the process. He spoke profession Dr. Timothy Lahey Two experts who work at the intersection of biology and informatics are joining, and colon cancers, as well as Peutz- Jeghers syndrome, which increases the

  17. Design and analysis of artifact-resistive finger photoplethysmographic sensors for vital sign monitoring

    E-print Network

    Rhee, Sokwoo

    2000-01-01

    A miniaturized, telemetric, photoplethysmograph sensor for long-term, continuous monitoring is presented in this thesis. The sensor, called a "ring sensor," is attached to a finger base for monitoring beat-to-beat pulsation, ...

  18. Uranus: A Middleware Architecture for Dependable AAL and Vital Signs Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Coronato, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The design and realization of health monitoring applications has attracted the interest of large communities both from industry and academia. Several research challenges have been faced and issues tackled in order to realize effective applications for the management and monitoring of people with chronic diseases, people with disabilities, elderly people. However, there is a lack of efficient tools that enable rapid and possibly cheap realization of reliable health monitoring applications. The paper presents Uranus, a service oriented middleware architecture, which provides basic functions for the integration of different kinds of biomedical sensors. Uranus has also distinguishing characteristics like services for the run-time verification of the correctness of running applications and mechanisms for the recovery from failures. The paper concludes with two case studies as proof of concept. PMID:22736998

  19. Uranus: a middleware architecture for dependable AAL and vital signs monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Coronato, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The design and realization of health monitoring applications has attracted the interest of large communities both from industry and academia. Several research challenges have been faced and issues tackled in order to realize effective applications for the management and monitoring of people with chronic diseases, people with disabilities, elderly people. However, there is a lack of efficient tools that enable rapid and possibly cheap realization of reliable health monitoring applications. The paper presents Uranus, a service oriented middleware architecture, which provides basic functions for the integration of different kinds of biomedical sensors. Uranus has also distinguishing characteristics like services for the run-time verification of the correctness of running applications and mechanisms for the recovery from failures. The paper concludes with two case studies as proof of concept. PMID:22736998

  20. Vital signs: disparities in nonsmokers' exposure to secondhand smoke--United States, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Homa, David M; Neff, Linda J; King, Brian A; Caraballo, Ralph S; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Babb, Stephen D; Garrett, Bridgette E; Sosnoff, Connie S; Wang, Lanqing

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) from burning tobacco products causes sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), respiratory infections, ear infections, and asthma attacks in infants and children, and coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer in adult nonsmokers. No risk-free level of SHS exposure exists. SHS exposure causes more than 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants each year, and approximately $5.6 billion annually in lost productivity. Although population exposure to SHS has declined over the past 2 decades, many nonsmokers remain exposed to SHS in workplaces, public places, homes, and vehicles. PMID:25654612

  1. dartmed.dartmouth.edu | Dartmouth Medicine 17Fall 2012 VITAL SIGNS

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    are testing an "anti-inflammatory theory" that HSAT+ protects blood vessels from inflammation-vessel plaques, which are the cause of heart attack and stroke. Our mouse studies indicate that HSAT+ protects genetic variations that reduce blood-vessel production of HSAT+ . We're presently testing

  2. 75 FR 22630 - Vital Signs Minnesota, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ...UI) Wages Are Paid Through Biomedical Dynamics Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...tax account under the name Biomedical Dynamics Corporation. Accordingly, the Department...UI) wages are paid through Biomedical Dynamics Corporation, including on-site...

  3. The importance of obtaining ankle-brachial indexes in older adults: the other vital sign.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Glenda

    2005-06-01

    As the aging population increases, so does the need to identify specific health problems associated with that age group and to develop and implement strategies to manage those problems efficiently. Peripheral arterial disease, a known threat to older adults' health and independence, often leads to decreased functional ability and potential limb loss. Nurses are in a unique position to screen older adults for the disease and to implement strategies to manage the problem. An overview of arterial physiology will be presented along with identification of risk factors, how to obtain ankle-brachial indexes and interpret the results, and treatment options for mild, moderate, and severe disease. Identifying the disease in its early stages and minimizing the effects will help keep older adults living independently and improve their quality of life. PMID:16102472

  4. Vital Signs: Fruit and vegetable intake among children - United States, 2003-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Americans do not consume nearly enough fruits and vegetables. Increasing the contribution of fruits and vegetables to Americans’ diets may add under-consumed nutrients, reduce the risk of leading causes of illness and death, and help with weight management. Encouraging children to consume ade...

  5. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1992: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-eight designated swimming beaches, four informal swimming areas, two canoe launching or landing sites, and two additional sites on a canoeing stream were sampled at least ten times each during 30-day sampling periods in the summer of 1992. One designated swimming beach, one informal swimming area, and two canoe launching or landing sites exceeded the recommended criterion of geometric mean concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria of 200/100 mL. In addition to these four sites, five designated swimming beaches and one informal swimming area exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended criterion by having more than 10 percent of the fecal coliform samples with concentrations greater than 400/100 mL. Rainfall was an important factor for these six sites and the four sites that did not meet the geometric mean criterion. Some sampling sites are affected by rainfall more than others. When bacteria concentrations increase after rainfall, it indicates that site is vulnerable to contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution. Recreational use of these sites following rainfall is discouraged. If samples collected within 24 hours of rainfall (one-half inch or more) are excluded, all-but one of the ten sites have better bacteriological water quality, and two meet both the geometric mean and maximum concentration criteria. Five canoe access locations on the Bear Creek floatway, plus one site upstream and another downstream of the floatway were sampled eight times each during 1992. All seven sites met recreation criteria.

  6. The First Clinical Skill: Students Teach Students to Take Vital Signs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Gregg Dwyer; Linda A. Deloney; Mary J. Cantrell; C. James Graham

    2002-01-01

    Transition from the role of passive student to medical practitioner begins with learning the first clinical skill. This transition can be stressful for those experiencing it and to some extent by those coordinating it. Logistically, it requires demonstration of thc techniques to the entire class by a single practitioner or to smaller groups of students by multiple practitioners. The fonner

  7. The smart car seat: personalized monitoring of vital signs in automotive applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marian Walter; Benjamin Eilebrecht; Tobias Wartzek; Steffen Leonhardt

    Embedded wireless sensors are important components of mobile distributed computing networks, and one of the target applications\\u000a areas is health care. The preservation of mobility for senior citizens is one of the key issues in maintaining an independent\\u000a lifestyle. Thus health technologies inside a car can contribute both to safety issues (supervision of driver fitness) as well\\u000a as healthcare issues

  8. Annual summary of vital statistics--1985.

    PubMed

    Wegman, M E

    1986-12-01

    Data for this article, as in previous reports, are drawn principally from Monthly Vital Statistics Report, published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The international data come from the Demographic Yearbook and the quarterly Population and Vital Statistics Reports, both published by the Statistical Office of the United Nations, which has also been kind enough to provide directly more recent data. Except for mortality data by cause and age, which are based on a 10% sample, all the US data for 1984 are estimates by place of occurrence, based upon a count of certificates received in state offices between two dates, 1 month apart, regardless of when the event occurred. Experience has shown that for the country as a whole the estimates, with few exceptions, are close to the subsequent final figures. There are, however, considerable variations in some states, particularly in comparing data by place of occurrence and place of residence. State information should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:3786054

  9. Optical Sensor for Measuring American Lobster Vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-01

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  10. Optical sensor for measuring American Lobster vitality

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F. [LASST, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2011-06-10

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  11. Warning Signs of Lung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lungs Warning Signs of Lung Disease Top Stories Lung HelpLine Questions about your lung health? Need help ... Warning Signs of Lung Disease Warning Signs of Lung Disease WARNING SIGNS If you have any of ...

  12. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  13. Sign Language Film List

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lubotsky, John

    In learning any language, a good way to hone your listening skills to range of common speakers is by watching movies in the language, and sign language is no exception. Although referring to it as using your listening skills may be a bit of a stretch, viewing different people sign can be good real-life practice in order to learn the nuisances of individuals' "speech." The Sign Language Film List has attempted to compile a complete of a list of films and other works available in American Sign Language, and their efforts should be rewarding to students, speakers and instructors.

  14. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  15. Understanding road signs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Bazire; Charles Tijus

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a three levels framework that allows accounting for the understanding of road signs. We consider that a road sign is (1) the iconic transcription of (2) a legal message about categories that is displayed and has to be interpreted (3) in context. Whereas categorization is the basic process that determines decision-making, results of two experiments

  16. American Sign Museum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The American Sign Museum is the only public collection of its kind, and it is located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Its fun, colorful website just may bring back memories for some visitors. Users should definitely watch the video tour of the museum with the founder, Tod Swormstedt. The link can be found near the top of the homepage, and is entitled "Take a Video Tour." The founder explains his goals in opening the museum, which are to show "the history of the sign industry and its significant contribution to commerce and the American landscape." He also goes on to reference the urban renewal program from the 1960s called SOS, which meant Scrap Our Signs, as a source of many of the museum's holdings. The excellent "Exhibits" link on the left hand menu contains a link to the museum's permanent collection and visitors will find it is divided into eight categories, including "Painted/Non-illuminated Signs," "Plastic Signs," and "Neon Signs and Displays: The Glory Days." The Exhibits link also offers to visitors half a dozen sections of signs that can be seen from the road (On the Road), while walking around (Walking Tours), or from an armchair (Sign History).

  17. Sign-a-Palooza

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorran, Charles; Reynolds, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    A halo of signs, some stuffed into thick plastic sheaths while others curled under yellow tape, cluttered the service desks of the New City Library. They bleated out messages of closings, procedures, and warnings. Their number undermined their cause. All too often a customer would ask a question that was answered by the very sign they had pushed…

  18. A SignWriting-Based Approach to Sign Language Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Carlos da Rocha; Gracaliz Pereira Dimuro

    2001-01-01

    The SignWriting system is a practical writing system for deaf sign languages, composed of a set of intuitive graphical-schematic symbols and simple rules for combining them to represent signs. The SignWriting Markup Language (SWML) is an XML-based language for en- coding sign language texts, written in SignWriting, in an application and computer platform independent way. Thus, sign language texts, written

  19. Ghost Signs of Louisville

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-25

    What is the altogether mysterious "ghost sign?" Simply put, it is a painted advertisement on a building, most prominent prior to the 1930s. Many of these advertisements appear on brick walls in urban settings. This unique collection came out of a partnership between the University of Louisville Libraries and the school's Fine Arts department. Students in a course titled Documentary Photography explored different neighborhoods in Louisvlle, and they took over 200 photographs of various ghost signs. 122 of those images were selected for inclusion in this digital collection, and they are all available here. Visitors can browse the images at their leisure and also use the interactive map of sign collections. Some of the signs are particularly interesting, such as the H.G. Young Druggist sign and the one for the Acme Wholesale Furnace supply.

  20. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16...records in the context of the emergency management function. Vital records are those that are needed to...

  1. Annual summary of vital statistics--1982.

    PubMed

    Wegman, M E

    1983-12-01

    Data for this article, as in previous reports, are drawn principally from the Monthly Vital Statistics Report, published by the National Center for Health Statistics. The international data come from the Demographic Yearbook and the quarterly Population and Vital Statistics Report, both published by the Statistical Office of the United Nations, which has also been kind enough to provide directly more recent data. Except for mortality data by cause and age, which are based on a 10% sample, all the US data for 1982 are estimates by place of occurrence based upon a count of certificates received in state offices between two dates, one month apart, regardless of when the event occurred. Experience has shown that for the country as a whole the estimates are very close to the subsequent final figures. There are, however, considerable variations in a few of the states, particularly in comparing data by place of occurrence with data by place of residence. State information should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:6646920

  2. Annual summary of vital statistics--1986.

    PubMed

    Wegman, M E

    1987-12-01

    Data from this article, as in previous reports, are drawn principally from Monthly Vital Statistics Report, published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The international data come from the Demographic Yearbook and the quarterly Population and Vital Statistics Report, both published by the Statistical Office of the United Nations, which has also been kind enough to provide directly more recent data. Except for mortality data by cause and age, which are based on a 10% sample, all the US data for 1986 are estimates by place of occurrence, based upon a count of certificates received in state offices between two dates, 1 month apart, regardless of when the event occurred. Experience has shown that for the country as a whole the estimates, with few exceptions, are close to the subsequent final figures. There are considerable variations in some states, however, particularly in comparing provisional figures by place of occurrence and final data by place of residence. State information should be interpreted cautiously. Careful attention should be paid to the denominator when studying rates presented in this article. For overall rates, like the birth rate or death rate, the standard denominator is 1,000 total population. In instances where more refined analysis is possible, the denominator may be 100,000 and the character of the population specified. The particular denominator is indicated in the table or in the context. PMID:3684391

  3. Annual summary of vital statistics--1983.

    PubMed

    Wegman, M E

    1984-12-01

    Data for this article, as in previous reports, are drawn principally from the Monthly Vital Statistics Report, published by the National Center for Health Statistics. The international data come from the Demographic Yearbook and the quarterly Population and Vital Statistics Report, both published by the Statistical Office of the United Nations, which has also been kind enough to provide directly more recent data. Except for mortality data by cause and age, which are based on a 10% sample, all the US data for 1983 are estimates by place of occurrence based upon a count of certificates received in state offices between two dates, one month apart, regardless of when the event occurred. Experience has shown that for the country as a whole the estimates are very close to the subsequent final figures. There are, however, considerable variations in a few of the states, particularly in comparing data by place of occurrence with data by place of residence. State information should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:6504642

  4. Annual summary of vital statistics--1987.

    PubMed

    Wegman, M E

    1988-12-01

    Data for this article, as in previous reports, are drawn principally from Monthly Vital Statistics Report, published in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The international data come from the annual Demographic Yearbook and the quarterly Population and Vital Statistics Report, both published by the Statistical Office of the United Nations, which has also been kind enough to provide directly more recent data reported by various countries. US data for 1987 are estimates by place of occurrence, based upon a count of all certificates received in state offices between two dates, one month apart, regardless of when the event occurred. Mortality data by cause and age, however, come from the Current Mortality Sample, a systematic 10% of those certificates, and thus may not correspond to the actual month of death. For the US as a whole the estimates, with few exceptions, are close to the subsequent final figures. There are considerable variations in some states, however, particularly in comparing provisional figures by place of occurrence and final data by place of residence. State information should be interpreted cautiously. Careful attention should be paid to differing denominators when studying rates presented in this article. For overall rates, like the birth rate or death rate, the standard denominator is 1,000 total population. In instances in which more refined analysis is possible, other denominators are used, such as 100,000; the character of the population is specified. The particular denominator is indicated in the table or in the context. PMID:3245863

  5. Hand augmentation with stabilized hyaluronic acid (Macrolane VRF20 and Restylane Vital, Restylane Vital Light).

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Vanessa; Bachmann, Frank; Plaschke, Martina; Gottermeier, Tobias; Nast, Alexander; Rzany, Berthold

    2010-01-01

    Volume augmentation of the back of the hand is a new technique which is not yet often employed. We describe the treatment of two patients who received hyaluronic acid products produced by Q-Med (Macrolane VRF20, Restylane Vital and Vital Light). The injections of Macrolane VRF 20 were done by feathering technique using a long and blunt 18 gauge canula while Restylane was injected by tunneling or tenting technique with a 30 gauge needle. Significant adverse events did not occur. After injection of the hyaluronic acid fillers, the appearance of the back of the hands was improved. Both patients were very satisfied with the result. PMID:19817949

  6. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92.80 Section 92.80...92.80 Obtaining American vital statistics records. Individuals who inquire...to direct their inquires to the Vital Statistics Office at the place where...

  7. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92.80 Section 92.80...92.80 Obtaining American vital statistics records. Individuals who inquire...to direct their inquires to the Vital Statistics Office at the place where...

  8. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92.80 Section 92.80...92.80 Obtaining American vital statistics records. Individuals who inquire...to direct their inquires to the Vital Statistics Office at the place where...

  9. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92.80 Section 92.80...92.80 Obtaining American vital statistics records. Individuals who inquire...to direct their inquires to the Vital Statistics Office at the place where...

  10. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92.80 Section 92.80...92.80 Obtaining American vital statistics records. Individuals who inquire...to direct their inquires to the Vital Statistics Office at the place where...

  11. Suicide Warning Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge Suicide Warning Signs n Acting reckless or engaging in ... you or someone you love at risk of suicide? Get the facts and take appropriate action. Printed: ...

  12. The du Bois sign.

    PubMed

    Voelpel, James H; Muehlberger, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    According to the current literature, the term "du Bois sign" characterizes the condition of a shortened fifth finger as a symptom of congenital syphilis, Down syndrome, dyscrania, and encephalic malformation. Modern medical dictionaries and text books attribute the eponym to the French gynecologist Paul Dubois (1795-1871). Yet, a literature analysis revealed incorrect references to the person and unclear definitions of the term. Our findings showed that the origin of the term is based on observations made by the Swiss dermatologist Charles du Bois (1874-1947) in connection with congenital syphilis. In addition, a further eponymical fifth finger sign is closely associated with the du Bois sign. In conclusion, the du Bois sign has only limited diagnostic value and is frequently occurring in the normal healthy population. PMID:21263293

  13. Every sign of life

    E-print Network

    Gerasimov, Vadim, 1969-

    2003-01-01

    Every Sign of Life introduces an approach to and motivational schema for personal health monitoring. It is an exploration of how to make information collected by personal health-monitoring devices fun and engaging, and ...

  14. Warning Signs of Bullying

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to talk to kids about bullying. Respond to Bullying Learn how to respond to bullying . From stopping ... ask for help? Signs a Child is Being Bullied Look for changes in the child. However, be ...

  15. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Progress Search form Search Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Signs and Symptoms Partly because there are different types of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) , the exact symptoms vary greatly from person to ...

  16. American Sign Language Nadav Burstein

    E-print Network

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    American Sign Language Nadav Burstein NLP Seminar, 2011 1 / 14 #12;Question ? . 2 / 14 #12;Interesting Facts About Sign Languages 3 / 14 #12;Interesting Facts About Sign Languages There is no one, single, universal sign language. 3 / 14 #12;Interesting Facts About Sign Languages There is no one

  17. Skin Cancer: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatments Q - T Skin cancer Signs, symptoms Skin cancer: Signs and symptoms The most common warning sign ... appears in many ways. Learn more about skin cancer: Skin cancer Skin cancer: Who gets and causes ...

  18. Sign Language Perception Research for Improving Automatic Sign Language Recognition

    E-print Network

    Sign Language Perception Research for Improving Automatic Sign Language Recognition Gineke A. ten of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft, the Netherlands ABSTRACT Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can

  19. Signs in Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of signs in Elizabeth George Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver," in which a settler youth and a young Indian learn to communicate by signs, and how the signs reveal much about each character's culture. Summarizes the plot elements of the book, including characters who are not as sympathetic to the Indian point of view. (PA)

  20. American Sign Language University

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Vicars, William G.

    As more people become interested in learning American Sign Language, there have been a number of individuals who have begun to create websites that offer free resources related to this language. Dr. Bill Vicars is one such individual, and his site contains resources for students, teachers, parents, and your garden-variety web surfer. In the section designed for students, visitors can use the online sign language dictionary (complete with demonstration photographs), fingerspelling lessons, and numbers lessons. The section for teachers is a real gem, as it includes a number of sample syllabi, general guidelines for instructors, as well as an online library that includes subjects such as regional dialects in ASL, Chinese Sign Language and the National Theater of the Deaf. Finally, the site contains a special section for parents. Here, they can learn more about communicating effectively with their child who is deaf.

  1. The Meaning of Signs:

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article reconstructs the diagnostic act of the French pox in the French-disease hospital of sixteenth-century Augsburg. It focuses on how the participants in the clinical encounter imagined the configuration of the pox and its localization in the human body. Of central importance for answering this question is the early modern conception of physical signs. It has been argued that it was due to a specific understanding of bodily signs and their relationship to a disease and its causes, that disease definition and classification in the early modern period showed a high degree of flexibility and fluidity. This paper looks at how the sixteenth-century theoretical conception of physical signs not only shaped the diagnosis and treatment of the pox but also reflected the overall organization of institutions. PMID:17242549

  2. Pulse microwave effects on nerve vitality

    SciTech Connect

    McRee, D.I. (National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC); Wachtel, H.

    1982-07-01

    Isolated sciatic nerves of frogs were exposed to 2.45-GHz pulse-microwave radiation in a waveguide exposure system at an average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 10 mW/g. In previous studies using continuous-wave (cw) microwave radiation at an SAR of 10 mW/g, survival time of the irradiated nerve when stimulated to fire at a high rate (50 twin pulses per sec) was shorteded significantly. This investigation was performed to determine if pulse-microwave radiation produced the same of different effects on the vitality of frog sciatic nerves as continuous-wave microwave radiation. Three sets of experiments were carried out using 10-..mu..sec-wide pulses at 50 pps, with an average SAR of 10 mW/g: (1) asynchronous pulsing wherein the mw pulse was delivered at varying times in the firing cycle; (2) synchronous pulsing during the peak of the nerve action potential; and (3) synchronous pulsing during the quiescent period between nerve firings. In all three cases a significant decrease in the survival time of the exposed nerves, as compared to their unexposed mates, was seen. However, the magnitude of this effect was essentially the same in all three cases and was also comparable with the ffect seen earlier using cw (of equivalent SAR).

  3. The effects of temperature and salinity on vital biological functions of the Antarctic crustacean Serolis polita

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomasz Janecki; Anna Kidawa; Marta Potocka

    2010-01-01

    Effects of temperature rise (from 0 to +5°C) and salinity decline (from 34 to 30 psu) on vital biological functions of the\\u000a Antarctic isopod Serolis polita were studied in laboratory experiments. Behavioural reactions to food odour, as well as righting responses and reburying\\u000a in the sediments, were measured. Both temperature increase and salinity decline impaired the ability of S. polita to

  4. Using Signing Space as a Representation for Sign Language Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Lenseigne; Patrice Dalle

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a Sign language processing is often performed by processing each individual sign. Such an approach relies on an exhaustive description\\u000a of the signs and does not take in account the spatial structure of the sentence. In this paper, we will present a general\\u000a model of sign language sentences that uses the construction of the signing space as a representation of both

  5. Utilization of the wastes of vital activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gusarov, B. G.; Drigo, Y. A.; Novikov, V. M.; Samsonov, N. M.; Farafonov, N. S.; Chizhov, S. V.; Yazdovskiy, V. I.

    1979-01-01

    The recycling of wastes from the biological complex for use in life-support systems is discussed. Topics include laboratory equipment, heat treatment of waste materials, mineralization of waste products, methods for production of ammonium hydroxide and nitric acid, the extraction of sodium chloride from mineralized products, and the recovery of nutrient substances for plants from urine.

  6. Word Power: Vital to the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luere, Jeane

    Vocabulary words frequently used in the media and popular literature can be taught by using a modified foreign language laboratory method whereby the students are introduced to the words aurally. First the students are read a concocted paragraph that incorporates the new vocabulary. This is followed by repetition in which the paragraph or dialogue…

  7. European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    E-print Network

    1973-01-01

    On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  8. Sign Language Web Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  9. Smarandachely antipodal signed digraphs

    E-print Network

    P. Siva; Kota Reddy; B. Prashanth; M. Ruby Salestina

    Abstract A Smarandachely k-signed digraph (Smarandachely k-marked digraph) is an or-dered pair S = (D,?) (S = (D,µ)) where D = (V,A) is a digraph called underlying digraph of S and ?: A ? (e1, e2,..., ek) (µ: V ? (e1, e2,..., ek)) is a function, where each ei ? {+,?}. Particularly, a Smarandachely

  10. Signing in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  11. Derivative Sign Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  12. The neon sign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampere, Samuel M.

    1999-03-01

    What are a crumpled 55-gallon steel barrel and a tavern-style neon sign doing in the hallway of the physics building at a renowned and revered educational institution? It's attracting attention, stopping people in their tracks, and sending a message: physics is about size and color, motion and interaction; it's fun and it's interesting, something to experience for yourself.

  13. Sign-away Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Catherine E.

    1976-01-01

    Why would mental health clients sign release-of-information forms unless they thought a refusal to do so would jeopardize their access to service? The author believes that the practice of not advising clients of their rights to privacy has ethical implications that can compromise the value of the treatment. (Author)

  14. Handspeak: A Sign Language Dictionary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Recently renamed and updated, this "practical sign language online dictionary" features approximately 2,800 signs and is being added to on a regular basis. Visitors can use a search engine to find American Sign Language (ASL) signs for words or browse by an alphabetical index as well as by a limited subject index. Also included here are four fables told in sign language, a description of International Sign Language (ISL), and some brief, bullet-point discussions of SL culture and language. Note: the signs are demonstrated in stop-action GIF animation, so users need browsers that support this application.

  15. Clinical performance of vital bleaching techniques.

    PubMed

    Bernardon, Jussara K; Sartori, Neimar; Ballarin, Andressa; Perdigão, Jorge; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the clinical outcome of bleaching techniques in vital teeth. After IRB approval and informed consent, 90 subjects were selected based on the shade of their anterior teeth (A2 or darker, Vita Classic shade guide). Subjects were assigned to three treatment groups in a split-mouth study design: Group I: HB (at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks) vs OBL (in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide, two sessions, two-week intervals, with light irradiation); Group II: OB (in-office bleaching without light irradiation) vs OBL; Group III: HB vs combination (one session plus HB). Color change and color rebound (deltaE) were measured for a 16-week period. Color measurements were carried out with both a spectrophotometer and a shade guide at baseline, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks. Tooth sensitivity was evaluated using a VAS scale for 15 days. Both the Student's t-test and Tukey-Kramer test were used to analyze the results (p < 0.05). After one week, one session of OBL followed by HB resulted in lower color values, compared with the other bleaching methods. Group III resulted in the least shade values at one-week evaluation, when compared with the other bleaching methods. After two weeks, HE alone resulted in similar color changes as OB, OBL and OBL+HB. The use of light irradiation did not improve bleaching efficacy (OB = OBL). OBL and OB resulted in higher sensitivity rates than HB. PMID:20166405

  16. Atlas of signs in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book compiles more than 400 signs from all areas of radiology. For each sign there is a description of the sign and the clinical entities that can cause it, as well as one or more radiographic illustrations and suggestions for additional reading. When appropriate, there is a discussion of the difference between the original and current significance of the sign and whether the sign is still of any clinical value.

  17. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  18. California Department of Public Health Vital Records MS 5103

    E-print Network

    California Department of Public Health Vital Records ­ MS 5103 P.O. Box 997410 Sacramento, CA 95899 should be mailed to: California Department of Public Health Vital Records ­ MS 5103 P.O. Box 997410 Services Agency California Department of Public Health APPLICATION

  19. Research Vitality as Sustained Excellence: What Keeps the Plates Spinning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, J. Bruce; Harvey, Jaron; Novicevic, Milorad M.; Buckley, M. Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Research vitality addresses the perseverance that faculty members in the organization sciences experience in maintaining their research quantity and quality over an extended period of time. The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical model of research vitality. Design/methodology/approach: The authors propose a model consisting of…

  20. Subjective ethnolinguistic vitality viewed as a belief system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Réal Allard; Rodrigue Landry

    1986-01-01

    Proceeding on the assumption that inter?ethnic behaviour is mediated by perceptions of ethnolinguistic vitality, it is postulated that the prediction of inter?ethnic behaviour should rely on a cognitive theory framework. In this article, cognitive orientation theory is used as a basis for the development of a model of subjective ethnolinguistic vitality viewed as a belief system. Following a discussion of

  1. An Expanded Model of Faculty Vitality in Academic Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dankoski, Mary E.; Palmer, Megan M.; Laird, Thomas F. Nelson; Ribera, Amy K.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Many faculty in today's academic medical centers face high levels of stress and low career satisfaction. Understanding faculty vitality is critically important for the health of our academic medical centers, yet the concept is ill-defined and lacking a comprehensive model. Expanding on previous research that examines vital faculty in higher…

  2. An expanded model of faculty vitality in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Dankoski, Mary E; Palmer, Megan M; Nelson Laird, Thomas F; Ribera, Amy K; Bogdewic, Stephen P

    2012-12-01

    Many faculty in today's academic medical centers face high levels of stress and low career satisfaction. Understanding faculty vitality is critically important for the health of our academic medical centers, yet the concept is ill-defined and lacking a comprehensive model. Expanding on previous research that examines vital faculty in higher education broadly and in academic medical centers specifically, this study proposes an expanded model of the unique factors that contribute to faculty vitality in academic medicine. We developed an online survey on the basis of a conceptual model (N = 564) and used linear regression to investigate the fit of the model. We examined the relationships of two predictor variables measuring Primary Unit Climate and Leadership and Career and Life Management with an overall Faculty Vitality index comprised of three measures: Professional Engagement, Career Satisfaction, and Productivity. The findings revealed significant predictive relationships between Primary Unit Climate and Leadership, Career and Life Management, and Faculty Vitality. The overall model accounted for 59% of the variance in the overall Faculty Vitality Index. The results provide new insights into the developing model of faculty vitality and inform initiatives to support faculty in academic medical centers. Given the immense challenges faced by faculty, now more than ever do we need reliable evidence regarding what sustains faculty vitality. PMID:22134490

  3. Evidence of a Housing Decision Chain in Rural Community Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Christine C.; Crull, Sue R.; Bruin, Marilyn J.; Yust, Becky L.; Shelley, Mack C.; Laux, Sharon; Memken, Jean; Niemeyer, Shirley; White, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore and explain the role housing plays in rural community vitality. Community vitality refers to economic strength and social well-being. In spring 2002 we collected primary interview data from informants in 134 small rural communities in nine north-central states and identified related secondary data from…

  4. French Sign Language Processing: Verb Agreement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emilie Guimier De Neef; Jean Véronis

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a In this paper, we propose an approach for the representation of the relationship between verbs and actors in French Sign Language.\\u000a This proposal comes from the results of an experiment conducted in the France Télécom R&D’s Natural Language laboratory using\\u000a TiLT (Linguistic Treatment of Texts), an automatic syntactic analyser and generator. The aim of this approach is to develop\\u000a a

  5. A fatal attraction: Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV1 target DC-SIGN to escape immune surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yvette van Kooyk; Ben Appelmelk; Teunis B. H Geijtenbeek

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are vital in the defense against pathogens. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that some pathogens subvert DC functions to escape immune surveillance. For example, HIV-1 targets the DC-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN (DC-specific intercellular-adhesion-molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin) to hijack DCs for viral dissemination. Binding to DC-SIGN protects HIV-1 from antigen processing and facilitates its transport to lymphoid tissues, where

  6. Sign Language Comprehension: The Case of Spanish Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez Ortiz, I. R.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were…

  7. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign language…

  8. Annual summary of vital statistics--1998.

    PubMed

    Guyer, B; Hoyert, D L; Martin, J A; Ventura, S J; MacDorman, M F; Strobino, D M

    1999-12-01

    Most vital statistics indicators of the health of Americans were stable or showed modest improvements between 1997 and 1998. The preliminary birth rate in 1998 was 14.6 births per 1000 population, up slightly from the record low reported for 1997 (14.5). The fertility rate, births per 1000 women aged 15 to 44 years, increased 1% to 65.6 in 1998, compared with 65.0 in 1997. The 1998 increases, although modest, were the first since 1990, halting the steady decline in the number of births and birth and fertility rates in the 1990s. Fertility rates for total white, non-Hispanic white, and Native American women each increased from 1% to 2% in 1998. The fertility rate for black women declined 19% from 1990 to 1996, but has changed little since 1996. The rate for Hispanic women, which dropped 2%, was lower than in any year for which national data have been available. Birth rates for women 30 years or older continued to increase. The proportion of births to unmarried women remained about the same at one third. The birth rate for teen mothers declined again for the seventh consecutive year, and the use of timely prenatal care (82.8%) improved for the ninth consecutive year, especially for black (73.3%) and Hispanic (74.3%) mothers. The number and rate of multiple births continued their dramatic rise; the number of triplet and higher-order multiple births jumped 16% between 1996 and 1997, accounting, in part, for the slight increase in the percentage of low birth weight (LBW) births. LBW continued to increase from 1997 to 1998 to 7.6%. The infant mortality rate (IMR) was unchanged from 1997 to 1998 (7.2 per 1000 live births). The ratio of the IMR among black infants to that for white infants (2.4) remained the same in 1998 as in 1997. Racial differences in infant mortality remain a major public health concern. In 1997, 65% of all infant deaths occurred to the 7.5% of infants born LBW. Among all of the states, Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire had the lowest IMRs. State-by-state differences in IMR reflect racial composition, the percentage LBW, and birth weight-specific neonatal mortality rate for each state. The United States continues to rank poorly in international comparisons of infant mortality. Expectation of life at birth increased slightly to 76.7 years for all gender and race groups combined. Death rates in the United States continue to decline, including a drop in mortality from human immunodeficiency virus. The age-adjusted death rate for suicide declined 6% in 1998; homicide declined 14%. Death rates for children from all major causes declined again in 1998. A large proportion of childhood deaths, however, continue to occur as a result of preventable injuries. PMID:10585972

  9. 3 CFR - Presidential Signing Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Presidential Signing Statements Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of March 9, 2009 Presidential Signing Statements Memorandum...serve a legitimate function in our system, at least when based on...

  10. Atopic Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Bedbugs Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips ... 2015 American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission.

  11. Contact Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatments A - D Contact dermatitis Signs and symptoms Contact dermatitis: Signs and symptoms Allergic contact dermatitis : Testing ... these symptoms, you need immediate medical care. Allergic contact dermatitis This skin condition occurs when you have ...

  12. Standard circumstances and vital goals: comments on Venkatapuram's critique.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Lennart

    2013-06-01

    This article is a reply to Venkatapuram's critique in his article Health, Vital Goals, Capabilities, this volume. I take issue mainly with three critical points put forward by Venkatapuram with regard to my theory of health. (1) I deny that the contents of my vital goals are relative to each community or context, as Venkatapuram claims. There is no conceptual connection at all between standard circumstances and vital goals, as I understand these concepts. (2) Venkatapuram notes that I stop short of filling the framework of vital goals with any content and thereby make my concept of health less concrete. I reply that some vital goals are indeed universal, viz. the ones which are necessary conditions for survival. Many other vital goals are individual and cannot therefore be included in a universal list. (3) Venkatapuram claims that my definition of vital goals is too broad, since it entails that some persons without any disease can be regarded as ill. However, in my understanding health is a relational concept from a state of complete health to a state of maximal illness. In this framework, a minor reduction of a state of complete health does not entail illness. This article also contains a comparison between my theory of health and Martha Nussbaum's theory of capabilities for dignity. PMID:22420285

  13. Linking vital rates to invasiveness of a perennial herb.

    PubMed

    Ramula, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Invaders generally show better individual performance than non-invaders and, therefore, vital rates (survival, growth, fecundity) could potentially be used to predict species invasiveness outside their native range. Comparative studies have usually correlated vital rates with the invasiveness status of species, while few studies have investigated them in relation to population growth rate. Here, I examined the influence of five vital rates (plant establishment, survival, growth, flowering probability, seed production) and their variability (across geographic regions, habitat types, population sizes and population densities) on population growth rate (?) using data from 37 populations of an invasive, iteroparous herb (Lupinus polyphyllus) in a part of its invaded range in Finland. Variation in vital rates was often related to habitat type and population density. The performance of the populations varied from declining to rapidly increasing independently of habitat type, population size or population density, but differed between regions. The population growth rate increased linearly with plant establishment, and with the survival and growth of vegetative individuals, while the survival of flowering individuals and annual seed production were not related to ?. The vital rates responsible for rapid population growth varied among populations. These findings highlight the importance of both regional and local conditions to plant population dynamics, demonstrating that individual vital rates do not necessarily correlate with ?. Therefore, to understand the role of individual vital rates in a species ability to invade, it is necessary to quantify their effect on population growth rate. PMID:24390414

  14. A fatal attraction: Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV-1 target DC-SIGN to escape immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    van Kooyk, Yvette; Appelmelk, Ben; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2003-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are vital in the defense against pathogens. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that some pathogens subvert DC functions to escape immune surveillance. For example, HIV-1 targets the DC-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN (DC-specific intercellular-adhesion-molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin) to hijack DCs for viral dissemination. Binding to DC-SIGN protects HIV-1 from antigen processing and facilitates its transport to lymphoid tissues, where DC-SIGN promotes HIV-1 infection of T cells. Recent studies demonstrate that DC-SIGN is a universal pathogen receptor that also recognizes Ebola, cytomegalovirus and mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets DC-SIGN by a mechanism that is distinct from that of HIV-1, leading to inhibition of the immunostimulatory function of DC and, hence, promotion of pathogen survival. A better understanding of DC-SIGN-pathogen interactions and their effects on DC function should help to combat infections. PMID:12727141

  15. American Sign Language Fingerspelling

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Using the method of a computer typing program meets flash-cards, this website lets you practice your skills and speed at recognizing spelled out words in American Sign Language. Beginners and experienced fingerspellers will appreciate this website: the site offers various reference charts for beginners, including printable versions. For those who know fingerspelling well, they can increase the speed settings. Overall, this site would be useful to new students attempting to learn, more experienced students wanting to practice as well as for instructors.

  16. Say It with Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Wendy

    2001-01-01

    Impressed by Marilyn Daniels' research on the educational benefits of signing for hearing children, a New Jersey early childhood education center trained its staff in sign language as a teaching tool. Students enthusiastically incorporated sign language into their activities as they increased word recognition and vocabulary growth. (MLH)

  17. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    Warning Signs of Heart Failure Updated:Jan 12,2015 By themselves, any one sign of heart failure may not be cause for alarm. But ... content was last reviewed on 08/20/2012." Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Warning Signs of Heart ...

  18. Sign Language House Program Directors

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Sign Language House Program Directors: Laura Curtin, 2014 lcurtin@uvm.edu Undecided Claire Mc Language House develop a grasp of the basics of American Sign Language as well as an understanding for Deaf will encourage members of the Sign Language House to become involved in some way with the Deaf community. We

  19. Sign language animation using TVML

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyuki Kaneko; Narichika Hamaguchi; Mamoru Doke; Seiki Inoue

    2010-01-01

    The deaf communities in Japan use a visual language called Japanese Sign Language (JSL) as their first language. Learning to read Japanese can be difficult for some deaf people, because JSL has a totally different grammar from Japanese. NHK broadcasts news and other programs in sign language (sign language broadcasts), but there is a strong demand from deaf communities for

  20. Sign Language Generation using HPSG

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Marshall; Eva Safar

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the problems of translating English to Sign Language in the ViSi- CAST1 project. An overview of the language-processing component of an English- Text to Sign-Languages translation system is described focusing upon the inherent problems of knowledge elicitation of sign language grammar and its implementation within a HPSG framework.

  1. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  2. California Department of Health Services: Vital Statistics Data Tables

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maintained by the California Department of Health Services, this Website contains data on births, deaths, fetal deaths, abortions, marriages, and divorces in the Golden State. The data posted here cover vital statistics from 1989 to 2000, including highlights from the "Advance Reports" (the main documentation of vital statistics data for the state) for 1994-1998 and data tables comparing California's vital statistics to those of the nation or breaking down these same statistics by county. There is also a link to a listing of publications of data by the department, some of which are available online.

  3. INFINITY construction contract signed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  4. 46 CFR 182.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...safety. For the purpose of this part the following are vital systems: (1) Fuel system; (2) Fire main; (3) CO2 and Halon systems; (4) Bilge system; (5) Steering system; (6) Propulsion system and its necessary auxiliaries and...

  5. [The vitalism of Paul-Joseph Barthez (1734-1806)].

    PubMed

    Han, Hee Jin

    2010-06-30

    In The Logic of Life (1970), Francois Jacob (1920- ), Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine (1965), proclaimed the end of vitalism based on the concept of life. More than two decades before this capital sentence condemning vitalism was pronounced, Georges Canguilhem (1904-1995), a French philosopher of medicine, already acknowledged that eighteenth-century vitalism was scientifically retrograde and politically reactionary or counter-revolutionary insofar as it was rooted in the animism of Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734). The negative preconception of the term 'vitalism' came to be established as an orthodox view, since Claude Bernard (1813-1878) unfairly criticized contemporary vitalism in order to propagate his idea of experimental medicine. An eminent evolutionary biologist like Ernst Mayr (1904-2005) still defended similar views in This is Biology (1997), arguing that if vitalists were decisive and convincing in their rejection of the Cartesian model (negative heuristics), however they were equally indecisive and unconvincing in their own explanatory endeavors (positive heuristics). Historically speaking, vitalists came to the forefront for their outstanding criticism of Cartesian mechanism and physicochemical reductionism, while their innovative concepts and theories were underestimated and received much less attention. Is it true that vitalism was merely a pseudo-science, representing a kind of romanticism or mysticism in biomedical science? Did vitalists lack any positive heuristics in their biomedical research? Above all, what was actually the so.called 'vitalism'? This paper aims to reveal the positive heuristics of vitalism defined by Paul.Joseph Barthez (1734-1806) who was the founder of the vitalist school of Montpellier. To this end, his work and idea are introduced with regard to the vying doctrines in physiology and medicine. At the moment when he taught at the medical school of Montpellier, his colleagues advocated the mechanism of Rene Descartes (1596-1650), the iatromechanism of Herman Boerhaave (1668-1738), the iatrochemistry of Jan Baptist van Helmont (1579-1644), the animism of Stahl, and the organicism of Theophile de Bordeu (1722-1776). On the contrary, Barthez devoted himself to synthesize diverse doctrines and his vitalism consequently illustrated an eclectic character. Always taking a skeptical standpoint regarding the capacity of biomedical science, he defined his famous concept of 'vital principle (principe vital)' as the 'x (unknown variable)' of physiology. He argued that the hypothetical concept of vital principle referred to the 'experimental cause (cause experimentale)' verifiable by positive science. Thus, the vital principle was not presupposed as an a priori regulative principle. It was an a posteriori heuristic principle resulting from several experiments. The 'positivist hypothetism' of Barthez demonstrates not only pragmatism but also positivism in his scientific terminology. Furthermore, Barthez established a guideline for clinical practice according to his own methodological principles. It can be characterized as a 'humanist pragmatism' for the reason that all sort of treatments were permitted as far as they were beneficial to the patient. Theoretical incoherence or incommensurability among different treatments did not matter to Barthez. His practical strategy for clinical medicine consisted of three principles: namely, the natural, analytic, and empirical method. This formulation is indebted to the 'analytic method (methode analytique)' of the French empiricist philosopher Etienne Bonnot de Condillac (1714-1780). In conclusion, the eighteenth.century French vitalism conceived by Barthez pursued pragmatism in general, positivism in methodology, and humanism in clinics. PMID:20671403

  6. Vital effects in coccolith calcite: Cenozoic climate-pCO2 drove the diversity of carbon acquisition strategies in coccolithophores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Clara T.; Stoll, Heather M.; Mendez-Vicente, Ana

    2012-12-01

    Coccoliths, calcite plates produced by the marine phytoplankton coccolithophores, have previously shown a large array of carbon and oxygen stable isotope fractionations (termed "vital effects"), correlated to cell size and hypothesized to reflect the varying importance of active carbon acquisition strategies. Culture studies show a reduced range of vital effects between large and small coccolithophores under high CO2, consistent with previous observations of a smaller range of interspecific vital effects in Paleocene coccoliths. We present new fossil data examining coccolithophore vital effects over three key Cenozoic intervals reflecting changing climate and atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Oxygen and carbon stable isotopes of size-separated coccolith fractions dominated by different species from well preserved Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ˜56 Ma) samples show reduced interspecific differences within the greenhouse boundary conditions of the PETM. Conversely, isotope data from the Plio-Pleistocene transition (PPT; 3.5-2 Ma) and the last glacial maximum (LGM; ˜22 ka) show persistent vital effects of ˜2‰. PPT and LGM data show a clear positive trend between coccolith (cell) size and isotopic enrichment in coccolith carbonate, as seen in laboratory cultures. On geological timescales, the degree of expression of vital effects in coccoliths appears to be insensitive topCO2 changes over the range ˜350 ppm (Pliocene) to ˜180 ppm (LGM). The modern array of coccolith vital effects arose after the PETM but before the late Pliocene and may reflect the operation of more diverse carbon acquisition strategies in coccolithophores in response to decreasing Cenozoic pCO2.

  7. Correcting vital information: estimating infant mortality, Brazil, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    de Frias, Paulo Germano; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a simplified method of correcting vital information and estimating the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil. METHODS Vital data in the information systems on mortality and live births were corrected using correction factors, estimated based on events not reported to the Brazilian Ministry of Health and obtained by active search. This simplified method for correcting vital information for the period 2000-2009 for Brazil and its federal units establishes the level of adequacy of information on deaths and live births by calculating the overall coefficient of mortality standardized by age and the ratio between reported and expected live births, respectively, in each Brazilian municipality. By applying correction factors to the number of deaths and live births reported in each county, the vital statistics were corrected, making it possible to estimate the coefficient of infant mortality. RESULTS The highest correction factors were related to infant deaths, reaching values higher than 7 for municipalities with very precarious mortality information. For deaths and live births, the correction factors exhibit a decreasing gradient as indicators of adequacy of the vital information improve. For the year 2008, the vital information corrected by the simplified method per state were similar to those obtained in the research of active search. Both the birth rate and the infant mortality rate decreased in the period in all Brazilian regions. In the Northeast, the annual rate of decline was 6.0%, the highest in Brazil (4.7%). CONCLUSIONS The active search of deaths and births allowed correction factors to be calculated by level of adequacy of mortality information and live births. The simplified method proposed here allowed vital information to be corrected per state for the period 2000-2009 and the progress of the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil, its regions and states to be assessed. PMID:24626543

  8. Landsat 6 contract signed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    A new agreement provides $220 million for development and construction of the Landsat 6 remote sensing satellite and its ground systems. The contract, signed on March 31, 1988, by the Department of Commerce (DOC) and the Earth Observation Satellite (EOSAT) Company of Lanham, Md., came just days after approval of DOC's Landsat commercialization plan by subcommittees of the House and Senate appropriations committees.The Landsat 6 spacecraft is due to be launched into orbit on a Titan II rocket in June 1991 from Vandenburg Air Force Base, Calif. The satellite will carry an Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) sensor, an instrument sensitive to electromagnetic radiation in seven ranges or bands of wavelengths. The satellite's payload will also include the Sea Wide Field Sensor (Sea-WiFS), designed to provide information on sea surface temperature and ocean color. The sensor is being developed in a cooperative effort by EOSAT and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A less certain passenger is a proposed 5-m resolution, three-band sensor sensitive to visible light. EOSAT is trying to find both private financing for the device and potential buyers of the high-resolution imagery that it could produce. The company has been actively courting U.S. television networks, which have in the past used imagery from the European Système Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite for news coverage.

  9. Signs of Change: Contemporary Attitudes to Australian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slegers, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    This study explores contemporary attitudes to Australian Sign Language (Auslan). Since at least the 1960s, sign languages have been accepted by linguists as natural languages with all of the key ingredients common to spoken languages. However, these visual-spatial languages have historically been subject to ignorance and myth in Australia and…

  10. ReflectiveSigns: Digital Signs That Adapt to Audience Attention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorg Muller; Juliane Exeler; Markus Buzeck; Antonio Krüger

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents ReflectiveSigns, i.e. digital signage (public electronic displays) that automatically learns the audience preferences for certain content in different contexts and presents content accordingly. Initially, content (videos, images and news) are presented in a random manner. Using cameras installed on the signs, the system observes the audience and detects if someone is watching the content (via face detection).

  11. 36 CFR 1223.12 - What are the objectives of a vital records program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...12 Section 1223.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.12 What are the objectives of a vital records program? A vital...

  12. 36 CFR 1223.24 - When can vital records be destroyed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...24 Section 1223.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.24 When can vital records be destroyed? The disposition of vital...

  13. Semi-Automatic Sign Language Corpora Annotation using Lexical Representations of Signs

    E-print Network

    Filhol, Michael

    Semi-Automatic Sign Language Corpora Annotation using Lexical Representations of Signs Matilde Nowadays many researches focus on the automatic recognition of sign language. High recognition rates approach. Keywords: Sign Language, Annotation, Zeebede 1. Introduction Sign Languages (SL) are visual

  14. A Review on Vital Pulp Therapy in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Parisay, Iman; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining deciduous teeth in function until their natural exfoliation is absolutely necessary. Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is a way of saving deciduous teeth. The most important factors in success of VPT are the early diagnosis of pulp and periradicular status, preservation of the pulp vitality and proper vascularization of the pulp. Development of new biomaterials with suitable biocompatibility and seal has changed the attitudes towards preserving the reversible pulp in cariously exposed teeth. Before exposure and irreversible involvement of the pulp, indirect pulp capping (IPC) is the treatment of choice, but after the spread of inflammation within the pulp chamber and establishment of irreversible pulpitis, removal of inflamed pulp tissue is recommended. In this review, new concepts in preservation of the healthy pulp tissue in deciduous teeth and induction of the reparative dentin formation with new biomaterials instead of devitalization and the consequent destruction of vital tissues are discussed. PMID:25598803

  15. NUHOMS{reg_sign} update

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, N. [Vectra Technologies, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    NUHOMS{reg_sign} is the dry spent fuel storage and transportation technology selected to date by the majority of commercial nuclear utilities. The author first gives a system overview of the NUHOMS{reg_sign}. Next she discusses the project status and licensing status. She closes with an update of the multi-purpose canister.

  16. Arabic Sign Language: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Fattah, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Sign language in the Arab World has been recently recognized and documented. Many efforts have been made to establish the sign language used in individual countries, including Jordan, Egypt, Libya, and the Gulf States, by trying to standardize the language and spread it among members of the Deaf community and those concerned. Such efforts produced…

  17. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  18. Structural Analysis of Sign Bridge

    E-print Network

    Foley, Christopher M.

    been found in many sign support structures composed of welded round hollow structural shapes (HSS and recommend changes (as required) to the procedures for design of high-mast luminaire and full-span sign contents or use thereof. This report does not constitute a standard, specification or regulation

  19. How to Sign Digital Streams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosario Gennaro; Pankaj Rohatgi

    1997-01-01

    We present a new efficient paradigm for signing digital streams. The problem of signingdigital streams to prove their authenticity is substantially different from the problemof signing regular messages. Traditional signature schemes are message oriented andrequire the receiver to process the entire message before being able to authenticate itssignature. However, a stream is a potentially very long ( or infinite) sequence

  20. Skin signs of systemic disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Yogendra Prasad Hunasehally; Richard G. Goodwin

    2011-01-01

    Skin complaints are some of the commonest reasons patients and parents seek medical attention. Some may have skin changes as part of a multi-organ disease. For others, severe skin disease may predispose to secondary internal complications. In other circumstances, skin changes may be a sign of an immunological response to infection or medication. Recognizing skin signs provides a unique opportunity

  1. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  2. Ethnolinguistic vitality under a new political dispensation in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bornman, E; Appelgryn, A E

    1997-12-01

    The dimensions and group expectations of ethnolinguistic vitality in the new South Africa were investigated in random samples of 460 Whites (347 Afrikaans-speaking; 113 English-speaking) and 466 Blacks. By means of a factor analysis, 5 factors were distinguished: Institutional Support, Group Status and Power, Maintenance of Identity, Maintenance of Symbols, and Threat to Identity. The expectations of groups differed significantly in regard to the dimensions of ethnolinguistic vitality. Relationships between these dimensions and other variables and the implications of the findings were discussed against the background of sociopolitical and economic changes in South Africa. PMID:9414623

  3. Emergency Medical Service and In-Hospital Vital Signs as Predictors of Subsequent PTSD Symptom Severity in Pediatric Injury Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Nicole R.; Christopher, Norman C.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the extent to which heart rate (HR) levels soon after a traumatic event predicted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity assessed 6 weeks and 6 months later in child trauma victims. Methods: Participants consisted of 82 children (56 boys, 26 girls) aged 8-18 who were admitted to a…

  4. Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Vital Signs with an Ambulatory Subject Using Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhelson, Ilya V.

    Finding a subject's heart rate from a distance without any contact is a difficult and very practical problem. This kind of technology would allow more comfortable patient monitoring in hospitals or in home settings. It would also allow another level of security screening, as a person's heart rate increases in stressful situations, such as when lying or hiding malicious intent. In addition, the fact that the heart rate is obtained remotely means that the subject would not have to know he/she is being monitored at all, adding to the efficacy of the measurement. Using millimeter-wave interferometry, a signal can be obtained that contains composite chest wall motion made up of component motions due to cardiac activity, respiration, and interference. To be of use, these components have to be separated from each other by signal processing. To do this, the quadrature and in-phase components of the received signal are analyzed to get a displacement waveform. After that, processing can be done on that waveform in either the time or frequency domains to find the individual heartbeats. The first method is to find the power spectrum of the displacement waveform and to look for peaks corresponding to heartbeats and respiration. Another approach is to examine the signal in the time domain using wavelets for multiresolution analysis. One more method involves studying the statistics of the wavelet-processed signal. The final method uses a heartbeat model along with probabilistic processing to find heartbeats. For any of the above methods to work, the millimeter-wave sensor has to be accurately pointed at the subject's chest. However, even small subject motions can render the rest of the gathered data useless as the antenna may have lost its aim. To combat this, a color and a depth camera are used with a servo-pan/tilt base. My program finds a face in the image and subsequently tracks that face through upcoming frames. The pan/tilt base adjusts the aim of the antenna depending on the subject's position. This makes the entire system self-aiming and also allows the subject to move to a new location and to have data acquisition continue.

  5. Effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, vital signs, and sleep quality of percutaneous coronary intervention patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6?:?2?:?0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P < .001) and improving sleep quality (t = -3.65, P = .001) compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 4.63, P = .036). The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 6.93, P = .011). In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients. PMID:23476690

  6. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6?:?2?:?0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P < .001) and improving sleep quality (t = ?3.65, P = .001) compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 4.63, P = .036). The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 6.93, P = .011). In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients. PMID:23476690

  7. Vital Signs: Fatalities and Binge Drinking Among High School Students: A Critical Issue to Emergency Departments and Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Victor; Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published significant data and trends related to drinking and driving among United States (U.S.) high school students. National data from 1991–2011 shows an overall 54% relative decrease (from 22% to 10.3%) in drinking and driving among U.S. high school students aged ? 16 years. In 2011, this still represents approximately 950,000 high school students ages 16–19 years. The decrease in drinking and driving among teens is not fully understood, but is believed to be due to policy developments, enforcement of laws, graduated licenses, and economic impacts. Most significant to emergency physicians is that even with these restrictions, in 2010 approximately 2,700 teens (ages 16–19) were killed in the U.S. and about 282,000 were treated and released from emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor-vehicle accidents. In the same year, 1 in 5 drivers between the ages of 16–19 who were involved in fatal crashes had positive (>0.00%) blood alcohol concentration (BAC). We present findings from the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report with commentary on current recommendations and policies for reducing drinking and driving among adolescents. PMID:23687547

  8. A vital signs telemonitoring system - interoperability supported by a personal health record systema and a cloud service.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Miguel F; Cajiao, Alejandro; Hidalgo, José A; Cerón, Jesús D; López, Diego M; Quintero, Víctor M; Rendón, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the development process of an acquisition and data storage system managing clinical variables through a cloud storage service and a Personal Health Record (PHR) System. First, the paper explains how a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) that captures data from two sensors corresponding to arterial pressure and heart rate is designed. Second, this paper illustrates how data collected by the WBAN are transmitted to a cloud storage service. It is worth mentioning that this cloud service allows the data to be stored in a persistent way on an online database system. Finally, the paper describes, how the data stored in the cloud service are sent to the Indivo PHR System, where they are registered and charted for future revision by health professionals. The research demonstrated the feasibility of implementing WBAN networks for the acquisition of clinical data, and particularly for the use of Web technologies and standards to provide interoperability with PHR Systems at technical and syntactic levels. PMID:24851975

  9. Automatic Recognition of Road Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yasuo; Kohashi, Yuuichirou; Ishikawa, Naoto; Nakajima, Masato

    2002-11-01

    The increase in traffic accidents is becoming a serious social problem with the recent rapid traffic increase. In many cases, the driver"s carelessness is the primary factor of traffic accidents, and the driver assistance system is demanded for supporting driver"s safety. In this research, we propose the new method of automatic detection and recognition of road signs by image processing. The purpose of this research is to prevent accidents caused by driver"s carelessness, and call attention to a driver when the driver violates traffic a regulation. In this research, high accuracy and the efficient sign detecting method are realized by removing unnecessary information except for a road sign from an image, and detect a road sign using shape features. At first, the color information that is not used in road signs is removed from an image. Next, edges except for circular and triangle ones are removed to choose sign shape. In the recognition process, normalized cross correlation operation is carried out to the two-dimensional differentiation pattern of a sign, and the accurate and efficient method for detecting the road sign is realized. Moreover, the real-time operation in a software base was realized by holding down calculation cost, maintaining highly precise sign detection and recognition. Specifically, it becomes specifically possible to process by 0.1 sec(s)/frame using a general-purpose PC (CPU: Pentium4 1.7GHz). As a result of in-vehicle experimentation, our system could process on real time and has confirmed that detection and recognition of a sign could be performed correctly.

  10. Cutaneous signs of systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Laju M; Lambert, Phelps J; Gagna, Claude E; Maghari, Amin; Lambert, W Clark

    2011-01-01

    Commonly used dermatologic eponyms and characteristic skin signs are enormously helpful in guiding a diagnosis, even though they may not be pathonemonic. They include, on the nails, Aldrich-Mees' lines (syn.: Mees' lines), Beau's lines, Muehrcke's lines, Terry's nails, and half and half nails, often associated, respectively, with arsenic poisoning, acute stress or systemic illness, severe hypertension, liver disease and uremia, and, around the nails, Braverman's sign, associated with collagen-vascular disease. Elsewhere, one may see the Asboe-Hansen and Nikolsky's signs, indicative of the pemphigus group of diseases, Auspitz's sign, a classic finding in psoriasis, Borsieri's and Pasita's signs, seen in early scarlet fever, the butterfly rash, indicative of systemic lupus erythematosus, and the buffalo hump, seen in Cushing's disease and also in the more common corticosteroid toxicity. Gottron's papules and the heliotrope rash are signs of dermatomyositis. Janeway's lesions and Osler's nodes are seen in bacterial endocarditis. A Dennie-Morgan fold under the eye is seen in association with atopic disease. Koplik's spots are an early sign of rubeola. Fitzpatrick's sign is indicative of a benign lesion (dermatofibroma), whereas Hutchinson's sign is indicative of a malignant one (subungual melanoma). Petechiae are seen in many diseases, including fat embolization, particularly from a large bone fracture following trauma. Palpable purpura is indicative of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and is an early, critical sign in Rickettsial diseases, including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, which must be diagnosed and treated early. Hyperpigmentation of areolae and scars is seen in Addison's disease. Acanthosis nigricans may indicate internal cancer, especially stomach cancer, whereas Bazex's syndrome occurs in synchrony with primary, usually squamous cancer, in the upper aerodigestive tract or metastatic cancer in cervical lymph nodes. Perioral pigmented macules or one or more cutaneous sebaceous neoplasms may be a sign of the Peutz-Jeghers or Muir-Torre syndrome, respectively, both associated also with intestinal polyps that have a malignant potential. Telangiectasiae in the perioral region may be associated with similar lesions internally in Osler-Weber-Rendu disease. Kerr's sign is indicative of spinal cord injury and Darier's sign of mastocytosis. Post proctoscopic periobital purpura (PPPP) is a phenomenon observed in some patients with systemic amyloidosis. Koebner's isomorphic response refers to the tendency of an established dermatosis, such as psoriasis, to arise in (a) site(s) of trauma, whereas Wolf's isotrophic response refers to a new dermatosis, such as tinea, not yet seen in the patient, arising in (a) site(s) of a former but different dermatosis, such as zoster. PMID:21855727

  11. Social Security: Strengthening a Vital Safety Net for Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Since 1935, Social Security has provided a vital safety net for millions of Americans who cannot work because of age or disability. This safety net has been especially critical for Americans of Latino decent, who number more than 50 million or nearly one out of every six Americans. Social Security is critical to Latinos because it is much more…

  12. Capturing the vital vascular fingerprint with optical coherence tomography

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Capturing the vital vascular fingerprint with optical coherence tomography Gangjun Liu1 hasbeenacceptedin forensics sincethenineteenth century, and the fingerprint has become one of the most widely used biometric characteristics. Most of the modern fingerprint recognition systems are based on the print pattern

  13. Faculty Vitality in the Comprehensive University: Changing Context and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Susy S.; Burton, John

    1995-01-01

    Two surveys of DePaul University (Illinois) faculty, in 1986 and 1992, suggest that models for improvement of faculty vitality at comprehensive universities take into account the particular institutional direction and mission articulation of such institutions, in addition to conventional factors such as workload and reward structure. (MSE)

  14. Strengthening Ecological Mindfulness through Hybrid Learning in Vital Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution a key policy "tool" used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice,…

  15. Perceived ethnolinguistic vitality: The Anglo? and Greek?Australian setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard Giles; Doreen Rosenthal; Louis Young

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of how ethnic groups cognitively represent some of the societal forces impinging upon them and relevant outgroups. By utilising the concept of ‘vitality’ and its attending measurement instrument (the SVQ), Greek? and Anglo?Australians’ construals of the sociostructural positions of their own and that of the other group were elicited. The results indicated quite complex cognitive

  16. Ten Indicators of Vitality in Smaller Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a means of quickly ascertaining the relative health of smaller academic libraries by presenting a top ten list of vitality indicators. The list is based on an observational convenience sampling of thirty smaller academic libraries across the United States. The indicators making the list were those which appeared most often in…

  17. Organizational Diversity, Vitality and Outcomes in the Civil Rights Movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan. Olzak; Emily. Ryo

    2007-01-01

    Sociologists often assert, but rarely test, the claim that organizational diversity benefi ts social movements by invigorating movement vitality and facilitating success. Our analysis of black civil rights organizations shows that goal and tactical diversity of a social movement is largely a function of organizational density, level of resources available to the movement, and the number of protests initiated by

  18. And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy

    E-print Network

    And Our State's Economic Vitality Colorado's Recreation Economy Bryan Martin, The Colorado Mountain Club #12;Colorado's Recreation Economy The Colorado Mountain Club · 8,000 Members · 14 Chapters's Recreation Economy By the Numbers · $10 Billion Annually · 107,000 Jobs · $500 Million in State Tax Revenue

  19. Patent Blue: A Novel Vital Dye in Vitreoretinal Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Mennel; Carsten H. Meyer; Andreas Tietjen; Eduardo B. Rodrigues; Jörg C. Schmidt

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine a novel vital dye (patent blue; Blueron®) for vitreoretinal surgery in a prospective consecutive case series. Methods: Five patients with either idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM; n = 2), proliferative vitreoretinopathy (n = 2), or a macular hole (n = 1) underwent a three-port pars plana vitrectomy. Patent blue assisted staining of the retinal surface followed by a

  20. EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Economic Contribution of Museums in

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Economic Contribution of Museums in Minnesota A REPORT: Minnesota Association of Museums and the University of Minnesota Carlson Chair for Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality #12;#12; ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF MUSEUMS IN MINNESOTA i Report Reviewers: Nina Clark

  1. Inferring Ethnolinguistic Vitality in a Community of Northeast Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John Charles

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of ethnolinguistic vitality as the framework for a sociolinguistic survey measuring attitudes to multilingualism and reporting on the experiences of a community of Northeast Thailand (Isan) that forms part of Thailand's largest minority. The aim of the study was to examine the experiences of participants in a…

  2. Reviewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality: The Case of Anglo-Nigerian Pidgin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Charles C.

    2000-01-01

    Using Anglo-Nigerian Pidgin as an illustration, this article demonstrates that there may be a need to broaden the scope of ethnolinguistic vitality to take cognizance of languages such as Pidgins and Creoles that may not be categorizable as ethnic languages or languages of any particular social group. (Author/VWL)

  3. Media Use and Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Bilingual Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moring, Tom; Husband, Charles; Lojander-Visapaa, Catharina; Vincze, Laszlo; Fomina, Joanna; Manty, Nadja Nieminen

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the relationships between media, media use and language retention. In pursuing this aim, we explore the utility of ethnolinguistic vitality (EV) as a fruitful conceptual tool. The extant research on the relationship between the media and language retention and development provides an encouragement to pursue in more detail…

  4. Language Attrition, Language Shift, and Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmur, Kutlay; de Bot, Kees; Korzilius, Hubert

    1999-01-01

    Presents findings of research investigating first-language attrition of Turkish speakers in Australia and the role of subjunctive ethnolinguistic vitality perceptions in that process. Examines the relationship between societal factors and individuals' perceptions of the language contact situation as reflected in their speech behavior. (Author/VWL)

  5. CONFIDENCE LIMITS FOR POPULATION PROJECTIONS WHEN VITAL RATES VARY RANDOMLY

    E-print Network

    CONFIDENCE LIMITS FOR POPULATION PROJECTIONS WHEN VITAL RATES VARY RANDOMLY TIM GERRODE. The projected total future population size is approximately log- normally distributed, but confidence limits of living resources. The predicted size of an age-structured population can be projected if"its initial size

  6. Armed Forces VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Walter H.; Zerface, W. A., Ed.

    Armed Services VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work) is described as a cooperative program with the Department of Defense which (1) introduces career opportunities and training available through volunteer service enlistment, (2) will be provided to senior high schools at no cost, and (3) presents materials in both printed and microfilm…

  7. Curiosity-driven `Blue Sky' Research: a threatened vital activity?

    E-print Network

    Grant, P. W.

    Curiosity-driven `Blue Sky' Research: a threatened vital activity? Sir John Cadogan Inaugural.manchester.ac.uk Page 6: `Cisplatin': By Larry Ostby [Public domain] via Wikipedia Commons #12;Curiosity-driven `Blue............................................... 10 Appendix 3: Comments on the ROPA scheme... ............. 48 #12;1 Curiosity-driven `Blue Sky

  8. Vital longeVity We invite you to share our

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    of both economic consequences and compromised quality of life for an increasing proportion's groundbreaking work to ultimately decrease the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and other causes of dementia VITALITY FOR LIFE Today, America's 79 million baby boomers are reaching age 65 at the rate of about one

  9. Project Vitality; Phase III. A Program for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Ana Unified School District, CA.

    The 1972-73 school year Project VITALITY is described to provide coordinated work study career development for students in grades seven through 12 or equivalent ages who are legally assigned to the special programs, students in the Teen Mothers program, and those students dismissed from the educable mentally retarded program after August 1, 1969.…

  10. Do warning signs on electronic gaming machines influence irrational cognitions?

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Sally; Blaszczynski, Alex; Nower, Lia

    2009-08-01

    Electronic gaming machines are popular among problem gamblers; in response, governments have introduced "responsible gaming" legislation incorporating the mandatory display of warning signs on or near electronic gaming machines. These signs are designed to correct irrational and erroneous beliefs through the provision of accurate information on probabilities of winning and the concept of randomness. There is minimal empirical data evaluating the effectiveness of such signs. In this study, 93 undergraduate students were randomly allocated to standard and informative messages displayed on an electronic gaming machine during play in a laboratory setting. Results revealed that a majority of participants incorrectly estimated gambling odds and reported irrational gambling-related cognitions prior to play. In addition, there were no significant between-group differences, and few participants recalled the content of messages or modified their gambling-related cognitions. Signs placed on electronic gaming machines may not modify irrational beliefs or alter gambling behaviour. PMID:19810444

  11. xdamp: An IDL{reg_sign}-based Data Manipulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.

    1995-04-01

    The original DAMP (DAta Manipulation Program) was written by Mark Hedemann of Sandia National Laboratories and used the CA-DISSPLA{trademark} (available from Computer Associates International, Inc., Garden City, NY) graphics package as its engine. It was used to plot, modify, and otherwise manipulate the one-dimensional data waveforms (data vs time) from a wide variety of accelerators. With the waning of CA-DISSPLA and the increasing popularity of UNIX{reg_sign}-based workstations, a replacement was needed. This package uses the IDL{reg_sign} software, available from Research Systems Incorporated in Boulder, Colorado, as the engine, and creates a set of widgets to manipulate the data in a manner similar to the original DAMP. IDL is currently supported on a wide variety of UNIX platforms such as IBM{reg_sign} workstations, Hewlett Packard workstations, SUN{reg_sign} workstations, Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} computers, Macintosh{reg_sign} computers and Digital Equipment Corporation VMS{reg_sign} systems. Thus, this program should be portable across many platforms. We have verified operation, albeit with some IDL bugs, on IBM UNIX platforms, DEC Alpha systems, HP 9000/7OO series workstations, and Macintosh computers, both regular and PowerPC{trademark} versions.

  12. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What elements must a vital records program include...MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include...vital records program must contain all elements listed in FCD 1, Annex I...

  13. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What elements must a vital records program include...MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include...vital records program must contain all elements listed in FCD 1, Annex I...

  14. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What elements must a vital records program include...MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include...vital records program must contain all elements listed in FCD 1, Annex I...

  15. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What elements must a vital records program include...MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include...vital records program must contain all elements listed in FCD 1, Annex I...

  16. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What elements must a vital records program include...MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include...vital records program must contain all elements listed in FCD 1, Annex I...

  17. Hidradenitis Suppurativa: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for you How to prepare for your appointment Genital warts Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment ... in these areas: Underarms (one or both) Groin (genitals, around the anus, and surrounding area) Buttocks Upper ...

  18. Herpes Simplex: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for you How to prepare for your appointment Genital warts Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment ... usually develop around the mouth or on the genitals, but the sores can appear almost anywhere on ...

  19. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  20. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be possible to delay or prevent a major mental illness altogether. What are the Signs and Symptoms to ... two of these symptoms can’t predict a mental illness. But a person experiencing several together that are ...

  1. Poison Ivy: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causes Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome Tips for managing Hives Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips ... Rash from poison ivy: Redness, small, itchy bumps (hives), and itchy skin are common. If this is ...

  2. Yale University Campus Signage exterior sign system

    E-print Network

    by the President and Ocers in 2002. Sign installation began in the spring of 2003. objectives A coherentYale University Campus Signage exterior sign system itemization appendix a: interior signs appendix of the University Printer November 2014 #12;blue signs gray signs 2 yale university campus signage contents 3

  3. Spoken Spanish generation from sign language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rubén San Segundo; José M. Pardo; Javier Ferreiros; Valentín Sama; Roberto Barra-Chicote; Juan Manuel Lucas; D. Sánchez; A. García

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Spoken Spanish generator from sign-writing. The sign language considered was the Spanish sign language (LSE: Lengua de Signos Española). This system consists of an advanced visual interface (where a deaf person can specify a sequence of signs in sign-writing), a language translator (for generating the sequence of words in Spanish), and finally, a

  4. Signed domination numbers of graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaeun Lee; Xin-zhong Lu

    Let G be a flnite connected simple graph with vertex set V (G) and edge set E(G). A function f : V (G) ! f¡1;1g is a signed dominating function if for every vertex v 2 V (G), the closed neighborhood of v contains more vertices with function values 1 than with ¡1. The signed domination number ?s(G) of G

  5. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or artistic significance...and restoration of a landmark sign is permitted. Substantial change in size, lighting, or message content will...

  6. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or artistic significance...and restoration of a landmark sign is permitted. Substantial change in size, lighting, or message content will...

  7. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or artistic significance...and restoration of a landmark sign is permitted. Substantial change in size, lighting, or message content will...

  8. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or artistic significance...and restoration of a landmark sign is permitted. Substantial change in size, lighting, or message content will...

  9. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or artistic significance...and restoration of a landmark sign is permitted. Substantial change in size, lighting, or message content will...

  10. United States vital statistics and the measurement of gestational age.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joyce A

    2007-09-01

    Estimates of the gestational age of the newborn based on US Birth Certificate data are extensively used to monitor trends in infant and maternal health and to improve our understanding of adverse pregnancy outcome. Two measures of gestational age, the 'date of the last normal menses' (LMP) and the 'clinical estimate of gestation' (CE), have been available from birth certificate data since 1989. Reporting irregularities with the LMP-based measure are well-documented, and important questions remain regarding the derivation of the CE. Changes in perinatal medicine and in vital statistics reporting in recent years may have importantly altered gestational age data based on vital statistics. This study describes how gestational age measures are collected and edited in US national vital statistics, and examines changes in the reporting of these measures by race and Hispanic origin between 1990 and 2002. Data are drawn from the National Center for Health Statistics' restricted use US birth files for 1990-2002. Bivariable statistics are used. The percentage of records with missing LMP dates declined markedly over the study period, overall, and for each racial/Hispanic origin group studied. A marked shift in the distribution of the CE of gestational age was also observed, suggesting changes both in the true distribution of age at birth, and in the derivation of this measure. Agreement between the LMP-based and CE estimates increased over the study period, especially among preterm births. However, a high proportion of LMP dates continue to be missing or invalid and the derivation of the CE is still uncertain. In sum, although the reporting of gestational age measures in vital statistics appears to have improved between 1990 and 2002, substantial concerns with both the LMP-based and the CE persist. Efforts to identify approaches to further improve upon the quality of these data are needed. PMID:17803614

  11. Strengthening ecological mindfulness through hybrid learning in vital coalitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution a key policy `tool' used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice, is analysed using a form of reflexive monitoring and evaluation. The example focuses on a multi-stakeholder learning process around the transformation of a somewhat sterile pre-school playground into an intergenerational green place suitable for play, discovery and engagement. Our analysis of the policy-framework and the case leads us to pointing out the importance of critical interventions at so-called tipping points within the transformation process and a discussion of the potential of hybrid learning in vital coalitions in strengthening ecological mindfulness. This paper does not focus on establishing an evidence base for the causality between this type of learning and a change in behavior or mindfulness among participants as a result contributing to a vital coalition but rather focusses on the conditions, processes and interventions that allow for such learning to take place in the first place.

  12. COMMON SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS IN HYPOTHYROIDISM IN CENTRAL PART OF IRAN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Jabbari; Sima Besharat; Nasrin Razavianzadeh; Mansour Moetabar

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the common signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism in persons with clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism that was confirmed with laboratory tests. Methodology This descriptive cross-sectional study was done during 13 months in medical centers of Shahrood city, in central part of Iran. All cases with probable diagnosis of hypothyroidism based on the signs and

  13. Differential vital staining of normal fibroblasts and melanoma cells by an anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cie?lar-Pobuda, Artur; Wigenius, Jens; Karlsson, Thommie; ?os, Marek J; Kågedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2015-03-01

    Molecular probes for imaging of live cells are of great interest for studying biological and pathological processes. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP) polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA), has previously been used for vital staining of cultured fibroblasts as well as transformed cells with results indicating differential staining due to cell phenotype. Herein, we investigated the behavior of PTAA in two normal and five transformed cells lines. PTAA fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctated pattern whereas the probe was more concentrated in a one-sided perinuclear localization in the five transformed cell lines. In fibroblasts, PTAA fluorescence was initially associated with fibronectin and after 24 h partially localized to lysosomes. The uptake and intracellular target in malignant melanoma cells was more ambiguous and the intracellular target of PTAA in melanoma cells is still elusive. PTAA was well tolerated by both fibroblasts and melanoma cells, and microscopic analysis as well as viability assays showed no signs of negative influence on growth. Stained cells maintained their proliferation rate for at least 12 generations. Although the probe itself was nontoxic, photoinduced cellular toxicity was observed in both cell lines upon irradiation directly after staining. However, no cytotoxicity was detected when the cells were irradiated 24 h after staining, indicating that the photoinduced toxicity is dependent on the cellular location of the probe. Overall, these studies certified PTAA as a useful agent for vital staining of cells, and that PTAA can potentially be used to study cancer-related biological and pathological processes. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:25605326

  14. Evaluating Importance of Facial Expression in American Sign Language and Pidgin Signed English Animations

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Andrew

    of American Sign Language (ASL) and Pidgin Signed English (PSE) have accessibility benefits for many signersEvaluating Importance of Facial Expression in American Sign Language and Pidgin Signed English. Keywords Accessibility Technology for People who are Deaf, American Sign Language, Pidgin Signed English

  15. A descriptive model of signs for Sign Language processing Michael Filhol, PhD thesis abstract

    E-print Network

    Filhol, Michael

    A descriptive model of signs for Sign Language processing Michael Filhol, PhD thesis abstract Keywords Natural language processing, signing avatar, sign description model, formal representation of Sign Languages, so as to use the descriptions with Sign Language processing programs. Situated

  16. Employing signed TV broadcasts for automated learning of British Sign Language

    E-print Network

    Zisserman, Andrew

    Employing signed TV broadcasts for automated learning of British Sign Language Patrick Buehler 1 is to automatically learn British Sign Language (BSL) signs from TV footage using the supervi­ sory information in sign language recognition has typically required man­ ual training data to be generated for the sign e

  17. POSSIBLE SPECTRAL SIGNS OF SERPENTINES AND CHLORITES IN REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF CELESTIAL SOLID BODIES

    E-print Network

    Busarev, Vladimir V.

    POSSIBLE SPECTRAL SIGNS OF SERPENTINES AND CHLORITES IN REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF CELESTIAL SOLID, 119992 Moscow, RF. Introduction: Serpentines and chlorites are known as usual hydrothermal products, 12]. According to our laboratory spectral investigations, serpentines and chlorites have prominent

  18. Astrological birth signs in suicide: hypothesis or speculation?

    PubMed

    Salib, Emad

    2003-04-01

    Astrology is no longer regarded as a science by many, because its claims are almost impossible to test empirically in controlled laboratory conditions and it can not meet the scientific need to be reproducible. However, the majority of those who read their 'star signs' can identify aspects of their personality in what they read and it is possible that this may influence their attitudes and actions. The literature has neglected astrological signs as a possible predictor of suicide ideation. To see whether astrological birth signs are associated with suicide and the method used, data was collected from the Public Health Department in North Cheshire representing all the Cheshire Coroner's verdicts of suicide, and open verdicts, in all deceased aged 60 and above between 1989 and 2000. The observed occurrence of deaths due to natural causes, and suicide, in relation to birth signs did not differ significantly from what would be expected from chance. However, the distribution of suicide by hanging appeared significantly higher in those with a birth sign of Virgo and lowest in Sagittarius and Scorpio. The distribution of violent and non-violent suicides in relation to star signs showed higher occurences of violent death in persons born in the summer months. PMID:12741653

  19. Developing New Mexico Health Care Policy: An application of the Vital Issues Process

    SciTech Connect

    Engi, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Icerman, L. [Icerman & Associates, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Vital Issues Process, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories Strategic Technologies Department, was utilized by the Health Care Task Force Advisory Group to apply structure to their policy deliberations. By convening three expert panels, an overarching goal for the New Mexico health care system, seven desired outcomes, nine policy options, and 17 action items were developed for the New Mexico health care system. Three broadly stated evaluation criteria were articulated and used to produce relative rankings of the desired outcomes and policy options for preventive care and information systems. Reports summarizing the policy deliberations were submitted for consideration by the Health Care Task Force, a Joint Interim Committee of the New Mexico Legislature, charged with facilitating the development and implementation of a comprehensive health care delivery system for New Mexico. The Task Force reported its findings and recommendations to the Second Session of the 41st New Mexico State Legislature in January 1994.

  20. Animated American Sign Language Dictionary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created and maintained by Randy Stine, an ASL enthusiast, this site is designed to help users learn about ASL and the Deaf community. The heart of the site is the Dictionary, a collection of basic words that are signed in a brief video sequence, a simple, but very clever idea. The Dictionary also contains the signs for A to Z and 0 to 9. Users will also find a large number of resources for and about the Deaf community. These include related links, articles, services, and non-profit agencies.

  1. Habitable worlds with no signs of life

    E-print Network

    Cockell, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    'Most habitable worlds in the cosmos will have no remotely detectable signs of life' is proposed as a biological hypothesis to be tested in studies of exoplanets. Habitable planets could be discovered elsewhere in the Universe, yet there are many hypothetical scenarios whereby the search for life on them could yield negative results. Scenarios for habitable worlds with no remotely detectable signatures of life include: planets that are habitable, but have no biosphere (Uninhabited Habitable Worlds); planets with life, but lacking any detectable surface signatures of that life (laboratory examples are provided) and planets with life, where the concentration of atmospheric gases produced or removed by biota are impossible to disentangle from abiotic processes because of the lack of detailed knowledge of planetary conditions (the 'problem of exoplanet thermodynamic uncertainty'). A rejection of the hypothesis would require that the origin of life usually occurs on habitable planets, that spectrally detectable pi...

  2. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...anatomical, physiological, or psychological phenomena which can be shown...diagnostic techniques include chemical tests, electrophysiological studies...electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological...

  3. Biofilm structure and cell vitality in a laboratory model of subgingival plaque

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. K. Hope; M. Wilson

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of dental plaque below the gingival margin (i.e. subgingival plaque) is responsible for the most prevalent microbe-induced diseases of humans — the periodontal diseases. Access to this plaque is difficult, making studies of its structure in vivo very difficult. We have, therefore, used a constant-depth film fermenter to grow microcosm subgingival dental plaques under conditions similar to those

  4. Signs of Life on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, L.

    2012-04-01

    The search for "habitable zones" in extrasolar planetary systems is based on the premise of "normal" physical conditions in a habitable zone, i.e. pressure, temperature range, and atmospheric composition similar to those on the Earth. However, one should not exclude completely the possibility of the existence of life at relatively high temperatures, despite the fact that at the first glance it seems impossible. The planet Venus with its dense, hot (735 K), oxigenless CO2 - atmosphere and high 92 bar-pressure at the surface could be the natural laboratory for the studies of this type. Amid exoplanets, celestial bodies with the physical conditions similar to the Venusian can be met. The only existing data of actual close-in observations of Venus' surface are the results of a series of missions of the soviet VENERA landers which took place the 1970's and 80's in the atmosphere and on the surface of Venus. For 36 and 29 years since these missions, respectively, I repeatedly returned to the obtained images of the Venus' surface in order to reveal on them any unusual objects observed in the real conditions of Venus. The new analysis of the Venus' panoramas was based on the search of unusual elements in two ways. Since the efficiency of the VENERA landers maintained for a long time they produced a large number of primary television panoramas during the lander's work. Thus, one can try to detect: (a) any differences in successive images (appearance or disappearance of parts of the image or change of their shape), and understand what these changes are related to (e.g., wind), and whether they are related to hypothetical habitability of a planet. Another sign (b) of the wanted object is their morphological peculiarities which distinguishes them from the ordinary surface details. The results of VENERA-9 (1975) and VENERA -13 (1982) are of the main interest. A few relatively large objects ranging from a decimeter to half meter and with unusual morphology were observed in some images, but were absent in the other or altered their shape. What sources of energy, in principle, could be used by life in the high temperature oxigenless atmosphere? The objects found are large enough, they are not micro-organisms. It is most natural to assume that, like on Earth, Venusian fauna is heterotrophic, and the source of its life is hypothetical autotrophic flora. There is enough light for flora's photosynthesis. Since the critical temperature of water on Venus is about 320°C and the temperature at the surface is about 460°C, the metabolism of organisms on Venus (if any) should be built without water, on the basis of some other liquid medium. Based on data analyzed it has been suggested that because of the limited energy capacity of the Venusian fauna, the temporal characteristics of their physical actions can be much longer than that of the Earth.

  5. Cooperative Sign Language Tutoring: A Multiagent Approach

    E-print Network

    DeAngelis, Gregory

    Cooperative Sign Language Tutoring: A Multiagent Approach Ilker Yildirim, Oya Aran, Pinar Yolum {ilker.yildirim, aranoya, pinar.yolum, akarun}@boun.edu.tr Abstract. Sign languages can be learned inherent properties of sign languages, such as the existence of dialects. 1 Introduction Sign language

  6. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  7. Tactile Signing with One-Handed Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Tactile signing among persons with deaf-blindness is not homogenous; rather, like other forms of language, it exhibits variation, especially in turn taking. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language, tactile Norwegian Sign Language, and tactile French Sign Language focused on tactile communication with four hands, in which partially blind or…

  8. Supporting sign language in Human Computer Interaction,

    E-print Network

    Lucas, Peter

    Supporting sign language in Human Computer Interaction, Understanding the challenge #12;Abstract Sign language is at present little used in human computer interaction although it would be of great value to do so for those speaking sign language. Seeing the great value implementing sign language

  9. Eye Gaze in Creative Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Michiko; Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eye gaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze…

  10. Boosted road sign detection and recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sin-Yu Chen; Jun-Wei Hsieh

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a boosted system to detect and recognize roads signs from videos. The system first uses the Adaboost algorithm to learn the visual characteristics of road sign. Then, a cascaded structure is then used to detect road signs from videos in real time. After detection, a rectification process is then applied for rectifying different skewed road signs into

  11. The cross-cultural importance of satisfying vital needs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Allen Andrew A

    2009-11-01

    Ethical beliefs may vary across cultures but there are things that must be valued as preconditions to any cultural practice. Physical and mental abilities vital to believing, valuing and practising a culture are such preconditions and it is always important to protect them. If one is to practise a distinct culture, she must at least have these basic abilities. Access to basic healthcare is one way to ensure that vital abilities are protected. John Rawls argued that access to all-purpose primary goods must be ensured. Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum claim that universal capabilities are what resources are meant to enable. Len Doyal and Ian Gough identify physical health and autonomy as basic needs of every person in every culture. When we disagree on what to prioritize, when resources to satisfy competing demands are scarce, our common needs can provide a point of normative convergence. Need-based rationing, however, has been criticized for being too indeterminate to give guidance for deciding which healthcare services to prioritize and for tending to create a bottomless-pit problem. But there is a difference between needing something (first-order need) and needing to have the ability to need (second-order need). Even if we disagree about which first-order need to prioritize, we must accept the importance of satisfying our second-order need to have the ability to value things. We all have a second-order need for basic healthcare as a means to protect our vital abilities even if we differ in what our cultures consider to be particular first-order needs. PMID:19788646

  12. How informed is signed consent?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D J Byrne; A Napier; A Cuschieri

    1988-01-01

    The assurance that patients fully understand the information given to them before they sign the consent form for operation has never been validated in this country. One hundred patients were interviewed by an independent medical observer in one surgical unit in a teaching hospital between two and five days after their operation. Although all the patients interviewed were fully aware

  13. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  14. Chickenpox (Varicella) Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Multimedia Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Signs & Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Complications Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles ... file Text file Zip Archive file SAS file ePub file ...

  15. NEW APPROACHES: Questions of sign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, G.

    1998-07-01

    Positive and negative signs are frequently misapplied. In textbooks, the subject of their correct use is often ignored. This might not be because the subject is trivial. Misuse in those same books suggests it might be because authors are unaware of some basic rules.

  16. Skin Signs in Anorexia nervosa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Strumìa; E. Varotti; E. Manzato; M. Gualandi

    2001-01-01

    Background: Eating disorders are becoming an epidemic in Europe, particularly among young women, but European studies concerning this topic are few. In eating disorders, significant medical complications occur in all of the primary human organ systems, including the skin. Objective: The purpose of this study was to improve the knowledge of skin signs in anorexia nervosa (AN) and verify whether

  17. The HyperSign Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulezer, Susan

    This report describes ongoing activities and results of the HyperSign Immersion Project developed at the Public School for the Deaf in New York City, New York. The project's objectives were to: (1) provide a means to enable Deaf students to assume a self-directed role in education; (2) provide an on-site prototype of a technologically supportive…

  18. The wireless monitoring of vital parameters: a design study.

    PubMed

    Becker, J; Gebauer, D; Maier-Hein, L; Schwaibold, M; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    This project shows the way vital parameters can be transmitted and visualized with no connecting cables necessary to the PDA. This was realized using a sensor developed with an integrated Bluetooth interface and a PDA, also equipped with Bluetooth. This radio connection can span up to 10 m, and parameters, such as pulse frequency, oxygen saturation in blood, ECG measurements and plethysmograms, can be transmitted. Using the software introduced in this work, the transmitted measurements can be displayed numerically or graphically on the PDA. The software simultaneously checks for any limits and sends a warning message if these limits are exceeded. All received data are additionally documented. PMID:12465322

  19. Capturing the vital vascular fingerprint with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-08-01

    Using fingerprints as a method to identify an individual has been accepted in forensics since the nineteenth century, and the fingerprint has become one of the most widely used biometric characteristics. Most of the modern fingerprint recognition systems are based on the print pattern of the finger surface and are not robust against spoof attaching. We demonstrate a novel vital vascular fingerprint system using Doppler optical coherence tomography that provides highly sensitive and reliable personal identification. Because the system is based on blood flow, which only exists in a livng person, the technique is robust against spoof attaching. PMID:23913068

  20. 75 FR 60459 - National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics; Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ...National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics; Nominations AGENCY: Office of the...National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics (NCVHS). The NCVHS is the statutory...themselves in the following fields: Health statistics, electronic interchange of health...

  1. Safety criteria for the vital processor interlocking at HoornKersenboogerd

    E-print Network

    Fokkink, Wan

    Safety criteria for the vital processor interlocking at Hoorn­Kersenboogerd Wan Fokkink Department­ Kersenboogerd, computer equipment based on a Vital Processor Interlock- ing (VPI) is used in order to ensure

  2. 46 CFR 108.403a - Fire extinguishing systems: Non-vital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 108.403a Fire extinguishing systems: Non-vital services. Each enclosed ventilating system for electric motors or generators not used for vital services must have an access into the system for firefighting or be protected by a fixed...

  3. 46 CFR 108.403a - Fire extinguishing systems: Non-vital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 108.403a Fire extinguishing systems: Non-vital services. Each enclosed ventilating system for electric motors or generators not used for vital services must have an access into the system for firefighting or be protected by a fixed...

  4. 36 CFR 1223.20 - What are the requirements for accessing vital records during an emergency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...20 Section 1223.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.20 What are the requirements for accessing vital records during an...

  5. 36 CFR 1223.22 - How must agencies protect vital records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...22 Section 1223.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.22 How must agencies protect vital records? Agencies must take...

  6. 36 CFR 1223.18 - Must vital records be in a particular form or format?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.18 ...records or copies of records. Consult NARA records management guidance on vital records at...

  7. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128...EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as...

  8. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128...EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as...

  9. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128...EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as...

  10. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128...EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as...

  11. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128...EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as...

  12. The "guitar pick" sign: a novel sign of retrobulbar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Jonathan; Sanz, Geoffrey E; Matero, David; Guth, Todd; Erickson, Catherine; Liao, Michael M; Kendall, John L

    2011-05-01

    Retrobulbar hemorrhage is a rare complication of blunt ocular trauma. Without prompt intervention, permanent reduction in visual acuity can develop in as little as 90 minutes. We report a novel bedside ultrasound finding of conical deformation of the posterior ocular globe: the "guitar pick" sign. In our elderly patient, the ocular globe shape normalized post-lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis. Identifying this sonographic finding may add to the clinical examination when deciding whether to perform decompression. PMID:21524372

  13. Mars Analytical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagati, M. Gawad; Ale-Ibrahaim, Kordi; Bins, Llonda; Davis, Michael; Gamalo, Johnny; Johnson, Matt; May, Neal; Seneviratne, Waruna; Yurko, Aric; Yurko, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    As mankind continues to explore the solar system, planetary colonization may become an important goal. Permanently manned space stations, bases on the moon, and colonization of Mars will be important steps in this exploration. The colonization and exploration of Mars will be a particular challenge. As mankind one day attempts this colonization, knowledge of the Martian environment and human capacity to live there will become vitally important. The first scientific outposts on Mars will need research laboratories to make discoveries about how we can better live there and use the natural resources of the planet to sustain human life. The design of a laboratory for an existing Martian base is the purpose of this project. A laboratory on Mars would be very useful to the scientists we send.

  14. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    PubMed Central

    Caprara, Mariagiovanna; Molina, María Ángeles; Schettini, Rocío; Santacreu, Marta; Orosa, Teresa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rojas, Macarena; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative) are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants' satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished. PMID:23476644

  15. [The markers of wound vitality in forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Gauchotte, Guillaume; Martrille, Laurent; Plénat, François; Vignaud, Jean-Michel

    2013-04-01

    Skin wounds datation is one of the most challenging problems in forensic pathology. The vitality of a recent wound cannot be affirmed when no inflammatory cell is visible. There are in the literature numerous studies about wound vitality, looking for markers involved in coagulation or inflammation, using various methods such as enzymology, molecular biology or immunohistochemistry. In this update, we first introduce some methodological principles to respect. Then, we review the main studies available in the literature. We insist on immunohistochemistry, which seems to be the more valuable method, given its easiness to perform and the possibility to analyze the localization of the molecules of interest. Some markers are promising, such as TNF?, IL-6, IL-1?, TGF? or TGF?1. Before using them in daily practice, these first results need to be confirmed with other studies, driven by independent teams and integrating multiple controls. Most notably, the antibodies have to be tested in numerous post-mortem wounds. Indeed, there is a critical risk of overexpression in post-mortem wounds, and some interesting markers have been secondary invalidated because of post-mortem false positivity (e.g. fibronectin, P-selectin). Finally, optimal sensibility and specificity values would be probably reached by combining several markers, validated with large groups of pre- and post-mortem wounds. PMID:23582835

  16. Old Signs, New Signs, Whose Signs? Sociolinguistic Variation in the NZSL Lexicon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rachel; McKee, David

    2011-01-01

    Lexicographers, teachers and interpreters of New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) are challenged by the degree of lexical variation that exists in this young language. For instance, most numerals between one and twenty have two or more variants in common use (McKee, McKee, and Major 2008), a situation that contrasts with most established spoken…

  17. Healthy SignsHealthy SignsHealthy Signs Mission of NCDHR: To promote health and prevent

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Visits! Deaf Healthcare Survey Update! Deaf Health Literacy and Cardiovascular Risk Study Underway! What Survey, please click here. Deaf Health Literacy and Cardiovascular Risk Study Underway! Deaf Health! Click here to sign up to take the Health Literacy Survey! NCDHR NEEDS YOU! NCDHR NEEDS YOU! Click here

  18. A worksite vitality intervention to improve older workers' lifestyle and vitality-related outcomes: results of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Strijk, Jorien E; Proper, Karin I; van Mechelen, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a worksite vitality intervention on vigorous physical activity (VPA), fruit intake, aerobic capacity, mental health and need for recovery after work among older hospital workers (ie, 45?years and older). Methods The 6-month intervention was evaluated using a randomised controlled trial design. Workers who were randomised to the intervention group (n=367; control: n=363) received the Vital@Work intervention containing (1) a Vitality Exercise Program (VEP) combined with (2) three visits to Personal Vitality Coach. The VEP consisted of a weekly yoga session, a weekly workout session and weekly unsupervised aerobic exercising. Free fruit was provided at the VEP. Data on the outcome measures were collected (ie, year 2009–2010) at baseline (n=730) and 6?months of follow-up after baseline (n=575) using questionnaires, accelerometers and 2?km walk tests. Effects were analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle with complete cases (n=575) and imputed data (n=730) using linear regression analyses. Additional analyses were performed for high yoga and workout compliance (ie, >mean number of sessions). Results Effects were found for sports activities (?=40.4?min/week, 95% CI 13.0 to 67.7) and fruit intake (?=2.7 pieces/week, 95% CI 0.07 to 4.7) and were stronger for workers with high compliance to yoga (sport: ?=49.6?min/week, 95% CI 13.9 to 85.2; fruit: ?=3.8 pieces/week, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.4) and workout sessions (sport: ?=72.9?min/week, 95% CI 36.1 to 109.8; fruit: ?=4.0 pieces/week, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.4). The intervention group lowered their need for recovery, when compared to controls (?=?3.5, 95% CI ?6.4 to ?0.54), with stronger effects for high workout compliance (?=?5.3, 95% CI ?9.3 to ?1.3). No effects were found on VPA, aerobic capacity or mental health. Conclusions Implementation of worksite yoga and workout facilities and minimal fruit interventions should be considered by employers to promote transitions into healthier lifestyles and thereby health. PMID:22268128

  19. Faculty Vitality in the Comprehensive University: Changing Context and Concerns. AIR 1993 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Susy; Burton, John

    Central to the debates surrounding accountability, cost containment, and effectiveness in higher education are issues concerning faculty vitality and productivity. This paper proposes that the nature of faculty vitality and the interactions between individual and institutional vitality are different for comprehensive universities, particularly…

  20. The Impact of Inter-Ethnic Discordance on Subjective Vitality Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin; Zabrodskaja, Anastassia

    2011-01-01

    Subjective ethno-linguistic vitality expresses a group's perception of its own ability to act as a distinctive collective entity in intergroup encounters. Although subjective vitality questionnaires have proved to be reliable instruments of measurement, there has been criticism that they underestimate actual vitality (see Yagmur, this issue). A…

  1. Empirical Evaluation of a Mathematical Model of Ethnolinguistic Vitality: The Case of Voro

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin; Niglas, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an empirical evaluation of a mathematical model of ethnolinguistic vitality. The model adds several new factors to the set used in previous models of ethnolinguistic vitality and operationalises it in a manner that would make it easier to compare the vitality of different groups. According to the model, the…

  2. Institutional Vitality in Higher Education. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Currents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Thomas H.

    1982-01-01

    Institutional vitality in higher education and measures of vitality are considered. Vitality may be viewed as the capacity of a college or university to incorporate organizational strategies that support the continuing investment of energy by faculty and staff both in their own careers and in the realization of the institution's mission.…

  3. Reading the Signs: A Video Based Sign Dictionary Helen Cooper, Nicolas Pugeault and Richard Bowden

    E-print Network

    Bowden, Richard

    Reading the Signs: A Video Based Sign Dictionary Helen Cooper, Nicolas Pugeault and Richard Bowden.cooper|n.pugeault|r.bowden@surrey.ac.uk Abstract This article presents a dictionary for Sign Language using visual sign recognition based within the top 10 ranked signs. 1. Introduction Being able to use a dictionary is a key aspect when learn

  4. Learning Signs from Subtitles: A Weakly Supervised Approach to Sign Language Recognition

    E-print Network

    Bowden, Richard

    Learning Signs from Subtitles: A Weakly Supervised Approach to Sign Language Recognition Helen of Sign Language Recognition (SLR) is the lack of labelled realistic data. Sign Language, being as com- plex as any spoken language, has many thousands of signs each differing from the next by minor changes

  5. Heterogeneous Data Sources for Signed Language Analysis and Synthesis: The SignCom Project

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Heterogeneous Data Sources for Signed Language Analysis and Synthesis: The SignCom Project Kyle in the SignCom project may be used for the analysis and synthesis of French Sign Language (LSF) utterances annotations of signed language elicitation sessions. The addition of mocap data to traditional data structures

  6. The South African Sign Language Machine Translation Project: Issues on Non-manual Sign Generation

    E-print Network

    van Zijl, Lynette

    The South African Sign Language Machine Translation Project: Issues on Non-manual Sign Generation LYNETTE VAN ZIJL and ANDRIES COMBRINK Stellenbosch University We report on the South African Sign Language-manual Signs, Machine Translation, Sign Language 1. INTRODUCTION The South African Deaf community

  7. Effects of Varying Rate of Signing on ASL Manual Signs and Nonmanual Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2009-01-01

    Spoken languages are characterized by flexible, multivariate prosodic systems. As a natural language, American Sign Language (ASL), and other sign languages (SLs), are also expected to be characterized in the same way. Artificially created signing systems for classroom use, such as signed English, serve as a contrast to natural sign languages. The…

  8. Science Nation: Signing Made Easy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Studies show as many as 75 percent of hearing parents of deaf children never become fluent signers. Alarmed by these statistics and with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, computer scientist and Georgia Tech professor Thad Starner began to develop interactive tools, such as video games and cell phone apps, to make sign language easier to learn for both the deaf and the hearing communities.

  9. Semen analysis workshops in India and Africa: the vital role of training and external quality control programmes

    PubMed Central

    Franken, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty seven individuals from 16 African and Indian andrology laboratories attended several semenology workshops from 1997 to 2013. The external quality control programme in Africa indicated the ability of participants to maintain the technology skills following a hands-on training. The pre-training sessions of the workshops indicated a total lack of knowledge how to perform a semen analysis according to the WHO manual. This was the case for morphology, motility and concentration. The results of this report underline the vital role of training as well as external quality control programmes. PMID:24753935

  10. [Notes on vital statistics for the study of perinatal health].

    PubMed

    Juárez, Sol Pía

    2014-01-01

    Vital statistics, published by the National Statistics Institute in Spain, are a highly important source for the study of perinatal health nationwide. However, the process of data collection is not well-known and has implications both for the quality and interpretation of the epidemiological results derived from this source. The aim of this study was to present how the information is collected and some of the associated problems. This study is the result of an analysis of the methodological notes from the National Statistics Institute and first-hand information obtained from hospitals, the Central Civil Registry of Madrid, and the Madrid Institute for Statistics. Greater integration between these institutions is required to improve the quality of birth and stillbirth statistics. PMID:24878259

  11. Vital Statistics of the United States, 1997, Volume I, Natality

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In 2000 the National Center for Health Statistics released the second installment of Vital Statistics of the United States, 1997, Volume I, Natality, adding twelve tables of data on births and fertility in the US to the twelve released in April. (There are 39 tables total with the remaining 15 to be released later this year.) The tables break down data on births, birth rates, and fertility rates by race, age, state and region, residency status, martial status, place of delivery, prenatal care, and other indicators. Many of the tables include data from previous years for the sake of comparison, reaching back in some cases to 1909. The Technical Appendix offers detailed descriptions of the data included, and all tables are posted individually in .pdf format.

  12. LPT. Low power test control building (TAN641) east facade. Sign ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Low power test control building (TAN-641) east facade. Sign says "Energy and Systems Technology Laboratory, INEL" (Post-ANP-use). Camera facing west. INEEL negative no. HD-40-3-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Exploring the Ancestral Roots of American Sign Language: Lexical Borrowing from Cistercian Sign Language and French Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle, Keith Martin

    2010-01-01

    American Sign Language (ASL) is the natural and preferred language of the Deaf community in both the United States and Canada. Woodward (1978) estimated that approximately 60% of the ASL lexicon is derived from early 19th century French Sign Language, which is known as "langue des signes francaise" (LSF). The lexicon of LSF and ASL may be derived…

  14. Teaching Laboratory Neuroscience at Bowdoin: The Laboratory Instructor Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hauptman, Stephen; Curtis, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Bowdoin College is a small liberal arts college that offers a comprehensive Neuroscience major. The laboratory experience is an integral part of the major, and many students progress through three stages. A core course offers a survey of concepts and techniques. Four upper-level courses function to give students more intensive laboratory research experience in neurophysiology, molecular neurobiology, social behavior, and learning and memory. Finally, many majors choose to work in the individual research labs of the Neuroscience faculty. We, as laboratory instructors, are vital to the process, and are actively involved in all aspects of the lab-based courses. We provide student instruction in state of the art techniques in neuroscience research. By sharing laboratory teaching responsibilities with course professors, we help to prepare students for careers in laboratory neuroscience and also support and facilitate faculty research programs. PMID:23493807

  15. Teaching laboratory neuroscience at bowdoin: the laboratory instructor perspective.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, Stephen; Curtis, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Bowdoin College is a small liberal arts college that offers a comprehensive Neuroscience major. The laboratory experience is an integral part of the major, and many students progress through three stages. A core course offers a survey of concepts and techniques. Four upper-level courses function to give students more intensive laboratory research experience in neurophysiology, molecular neurobiology, social behavior, and learning and memory. Finally, many majors choose to work in the individual research labs of the Neuroscience faculty. We, as laboratory instructors, are vital to the process, and are actively involved in all aspects of the lab-based courses. We provide student instruction in state of the art techniques in neuroscience research. By sharing laboratory teaching responsibilities with course professors, we help to prepare students for careers in laboratory neuroscience and also support and facilitate faculty research programs. PMID:23493807

  16. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from the shore and the...

  17. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Section 328.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ADVERTISEMENT OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7? by 3?...

  18. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Section 328.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ADVERTISEMENT OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7? by 3?...

  19. Derivative Sign Patterns in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Given a function defined on a subset of the plane whose partial derivatives never change sign, the signs of the partial derivatives form a two-dimensional pattern. We explore what patterns are possible for various planar domains.

  20. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by ... Emotions Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head ...

  1. Evaluation of alternative sign replacement strategies

    E-print Network

    McCaleb, James Bradley

    1996-01-01

    data in Texas; an economic analysis of alternative sign replacement strategies; and a sensitivity analysis of key variables within the economic analysis. The recommendations in this study will allow TXDOT to implement the most cost-effective sign...

  2. 30 CFR 56.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major electrical...

  3. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  4. 30 CFR 56.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major electrical...

  5. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  6. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  7. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  8. The lepton flavor violating decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup Minus-Or-Plus-Sign} at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Keune, A., E-mail: anne.keune@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    The possibility of improving the limit on the branching fraction of the lepton flavor violating decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup {+-}} Micro-Sign {sup Minus-Or-Plus-Sign} at LHCb is discussed. It is shown that a simple, cut-based analysis is sufficient to improve the upper limit on this branching fraction within the lifetime of LHCb.

  9. FORCING SIGNED DOMINATION NUMBERS IN GRAPHS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATEMATIQKI VESNIK; S. M. Sheikholeslami

    We initiate the study of forcing signed domination in graphs. A function f : V (G) ¡! f¡1;+1g is called signed dominating function if for each v 2 V (G), P u2N(v) f(u) ‚ 1. For a signed dominating function f of G, the weight f is w(f) = P v2V f(v). The signed domination number ?s(G) is the minimum

  10. Language Standardization and Signed Language Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the issue of the use of signed language dictionaries in the standardization of signed languages with reference to the Australian Sign language (Auslan) dictionaries. Details the structure of the Auslan dictionaries and argues that bilingual, bidirectional dictionaries of this type must be produced if communities are to encourage language…

  11. Dictionaries of African Sign Languages: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaling, Constanze H.

    2012-01-01

    This article gives an overview of dictionaries of African sign languages that have been published to date most of which have not been widely distributed. After an introduction into the field of sign language lexicography and a discussion of some of the obstacles that authors of sign language dictionaries face in general, I will show problems…

  12. Must the Sign-Language Go?.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaudet, Edward M.

    1997-01-01

    This reprinted article from 1899 argues against the abolition of sign language in the classrooms of students with deafness. It also discusses the benefits of sign language and the ability of sign language to explain words and to convey information. (CR)

  13. SPECTRALLY ARBITRARY COMPLEX SIGN PATTERN MATRICES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YUBIN GAO; YANLING SHAO; YIZHENG FAN

    2009-01-01

    An n × n complex sign pattern matrix S is said to be spectrallyarbitraryif for everymonic nth degree polynomial f (?) with coefficients from C, there is a complex matrix in the complex sign pattern class of S such that its characteristic polynomial is f (?). If S is a spectrally arbitrarycomplex sign pattern matrix, and no proper subpattern of

  14. Similarities & Differences in Two Brazilian Sign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira-Brito, Lucinda

    1984-01-01

    mparison of sign language used by Urubu-Kaapor Indians in the Amazonian jungle (UKSL) and sign language used by deaf people in Sao Paulo (SPSL). In the former situation, deaf people are more integrated and accepted into their community than in Sao Paulo, because most hearing individuals are able and willing to use sign language to communicate with…

  15. South African Sign Language Machine Translation Project

    E-print Network

    van Zijl, Lynette

    South African Sign Language Machine Translation Project Lynette van Zijl Department of Computer Sign Language Machine Translation project, and point out the role that the project is playing in the larger context of South African Sign Language and accessibility for the South African Deaf community. 1

  16. The ATIS Sign Language Corpus Jan Bungeroth

    E-print Network

    van Zijl, Lynette

    The ATIS Sign Language Corpus Jan Bungeroth , Daniel Stein , Philippe Dreuw , Hermann Ney , Sara Africa lynette@cs.sun.ac.za Abstract Systems that automatically process sign language rely on appropriate data. We therefore present the ATIS sign language corpus that is based on the domain of air travel

  17. Sign Language Planning: Pragmatism, Pessimism and Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Graham H.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the present collection of sign language planning studies. Contextualising the analyses against the backdrop of core issues in the theory of language planning and the evolution of applied sign linguistics, it is argued that--while the sociolinguistic circumstances of signed languages worldwide can, in many respects, be…

  18. PROFICIENCY TESTING IN FOREIGN & AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGES

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    PROFICIENCY TESTING IN FOREIGN & AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGES For More Information JLCAV Revised 1 the QC Foreign Language Requirement with American Sign Language (ASL) Students who intend to fulfill the Foreign Language Requirement through American Sign Language need to make an appointment

  19. A Qualitative Approach Computer Sign Language

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    A Qualitative Approach to Computer Sign Language Recognition Derek Eugen Lyons Magdalen College Trinity Term 2002 A Qualitative Approach to Computer Sign Language Recognition Abstract This thesis concerns itself with the problem of Computer Sign Language Recogni- tion (CSLR). We may conceptualize

  20. Use of sign language materials in teaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johanna Mesch; Lars Wallin

    In Sweden, we have started to use a digital version of the Swedish Sign Language corpus for teaching purposes. Some of the material is now used with students in two separate courses: Swedish Sign Language for beginners, and Swedish Sign Language Linguistics (for deaf and hearing signers). In this workshop we will present some teaching methods and technical problems. Selected

  1. Sign Language Generation in an ALE HPSG

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Marshall; Stefan M

    1 Abstract During the past fifty years sign languages have been recognised as genuine languages with their own syntax and distinctive phonology. In the case of sign languages, phonetic description characterises the manual and non- manual aspects of signing. The latter relate to facial ex- pression and upper torso position. In the case of man- ual components these characterise hand

  2. ROAD AND TRAFFIC SIGN DETECTION AND RECOGNITION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hasan FLEYEH; Mark DOUGHERTY

    2 Abstract. This paper presents an overview of the road and traffic sign detection and recognition. It describes the characteristics of the road signs, the requirements and difficulties behind road signs detection and recognition, how to deal with outdoor images, and the different techniques used in the image segmentation based on the colour analysis, shape analysis. It shows also the

  3. A Segmental Framework for Representing Signs Phonetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The arguments for dividing the signing stream in signed languages into sequences of phonetic segments are compelling. The visual records of instances of actually occurring signs provide evidence of two basic types of segments: postural segments and trans-forming segments. Postural segments specify an alignment of articulatory features, both manual…

  4. Library Sign Systems. Workshop Program Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, Patricia M.

    These program materials from the Library Sign Systems Workshop include a news story on the workshop; notes in outline form for a speech presented by Joe Sonderman, president of a graphic designs firm; and an annotated bibliography on signs and sign systems. The news release summarizes a presentation by Dorothy Pollet and Peter Haskell, editors of…

  5. Cutaneous signs of classical dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, M; Capo, A; Meogrossi, G; Amerio, P

    2014-10-01

    Idiopathic immune myopathies (IIM) are an heterogeneous group of autoimmune muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle involvement. Dermatomyositis (DM) is the most common form of IIM. It is a multisystem disorder characterized by symmetric proximal, extensor, inflammatory myopathy, vascular involvement and a characteristic cutaneous eruption. Six types of DM have been identified: idiopathic, juvenile (JDM), cancer-related other autoimmune diseases-related, iatrogenic DM and amyopathic DM. Cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease and can precede from several months to years muscle or systemic involvement. Three groups of signs have been described: pathognomonic, highly characteristic and compatible. Although differences exist among the different clinical presentation of skin lesions, they share common histological findings including the presence of interface dermatitis with epidermal atrophy, basement membrane degeneration, vacuolar alteration of basal keratinocytes, and dermal changes consisting of interstitial mucin deposition and a sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. DM is a serious disease; the correct evaluation of any skin lesion suggesting an early diagnosis is of utmost importance. Skin signs may, also, represent a marker of treatment efficacy even though systemic symptoms worsening may not always be followed by more severe skin lesions. PMID:25014587

  6. Incidence of Postoperative Pain after Single- and Multi-Visit Endodontic Treatment in Teeth with Vital and Non-Vital Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Bayram; Ercan, Ertugrul; Dalli, Mehmet; Dulgergil, Coruh Turksel; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Colak, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess the incidence of postoperative pain after single- and multi-visit endodontic treatment of teeth with vital and non-vital pulp. Methods In total, 306 patients with teeth requiring endodontic treatment were identified and were included in this study. Two experienced clinicians treated the patients, who were randomly assigned to two groups. While the teeth of patients in group 1 were obturated, group 2 were temporarily sealed and obturated after one week. Three days after the root canal instrumentation of each tooth, the patients were asked whether they experienced any postoperative pain and to rate the level of discomfort as no, mild, moderate, or severe pain. Data were analyzed statistically using the chi-square test. Results No significant difference in postoperative pain was found between vital and non-vital teeth (P>.01). Mild, moderate, and severe pain occurred in 31.4, 13.7, and 4.6% of vital teeth, respectively. Postoperative pain occurred in 107 (69.9%) and 106 (69.3%) teeth in the single- and multi-visit treatment groups, respectively. There was no significant difference in postoperative pain between the two groups (P>.01). Conclusions The prevalence of postoperative pain did not differ between vital and non-vital teeth. The majority of patients in either groups reported no or only mild pain. PMID:19826598

  7. Magnitude and sign correlations in heartbeat fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazy, Y.; Ivanov, P. C.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    We propose an approach for analyzing signals with long-range correlations by decomposing the signal increment series into magnitude and sign series and analyzing their scaling properties. We show that signals with identical long-range correlations can exhibit different time organization for the magnitude and sign. We find that the magnitude series relates to the nonlinear properties of the original time series, while the sign series relates to the linear properties. We apply our approach to the heartbeat interval series and find that the magnitude series is long-range correlated, while the sign series is anticorrelated and that both magnitude and sign series may have clinical applications.

  8. Reading Between the Signs: How are Transitions Built in Signed Languages?

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Reading Between the Signs: How are Transitions Built in Signed Languages? TISLR 2010 Abstract Kyle descriptions of LSF (French Sign Language) for the purposes of pho- netic analysis and language synthesis in Signed Languages?, Indiana : United States (2010)" #12;synchronization of traditional linguistic

  9. ON THE ROLE OF SIGN ORDER AND MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE IN MEMORY FOR AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE SENTENCES

    E-print Network

    ON THE ROLE OF SIGN ORDER AND MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE IN MEMORY FOR AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE was investigated by testing signers' recognition for American Sign Language (ASL) sentences. Using a continuous as autonomous languages. American Sign Language (ASL) is the common form of communication used by deaf native

  10. Large Lexicon Project: American Sign Language Video Corpus and Sign Language Indexing/Retrieval Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Athitsos, Vassilis

    Large Lexicon Project: American Sign Language Video Corpus and Sign Language Indexing the meaning of an unknown sign is not nearly so straightforward as looking up a word from a written language). Such methods have achieved good results on continuous Chinese Sign Language with vocab- ularies of about 5

  11. SignSpeak Understanding, Recognition, and Translation of Sign Languages Philippe Dreuw1

    E-print Network

    Ney, Hermann

    SignSpeak ­ Understanding, Recognition, and Translation of Sign Languages Philippe Dreuw1 , JensSpeak project will be the first step to approach sign language recognition and translation at a scientific level translation of spoken languages. Deaf communities revolve around sign languages as they are their natural

  12. PALILALIA IN SIGN LANGUAGE Sign languages, which use the hands and arms as

    E-print Network

    PALILALIA IN SIGN LANGUAGE Sign languages, which use the hands and arms as articulators, are the natural languages of deaf people. Research indicates that sign, like speech, can break down at the level describes the first known case of a deaf sign language user with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). PSP

  13. Early sign language acquisition in children and gorillas: vocabulary content and sign iconicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Bonvillian; Francine G. P. Patterson

    1993-01-01

    The early sign language acquisition of 22 young children of deaf parents and 2 lowland gorillas was examined in several longitudinal studies. Both the children and gorillas acquired numerous signs during these investigations, with the children typically learning new signs more rapidly than the gorillas. Comparisons of the content of the children's and gorillas' early sign lexicons revealed a pattern

  14. A teaching system of Japanese sign language using sign language recognition and generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirohiko Sagawa; Masaru Takeuchi

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, the number of sign language learners is increasing in Japan. And there are many teaching materials of sign language such as textbooks, videotapes and software for PCs. However, these teaching materials have several problems that learners cannot study sign language sufficiently because the learners can mainly study manual gestures, cannot change the direction to see signed gestures,

  15. Extraction of Isolated Signs from Sign Language Videos via Multiple Sequence Alignment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pinar Santemiz; Oya Aran; Murat Saraclar; Lale Akarun

    In this work, we present an alignment-based method to perform sign segmentation and to extract isolated signs from continuous sign language videos. Sign videos contain many modalities, the most prominent of which are hand gestures, manifested as hand motion and shape, which are represented by a variety of extracted features in this work. We compare two different align- ment approaches,

  16. A SIGN MATCHING TECHNIQUE TO SUPPORT SEARCHES IN SIGN LANGUAGE TEXTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliano Baldez de Freitas

    This paper presents a technique for matching two signs written in the SignWriting system. We have defined such technique to support procedures for searching in sign language texts that were written in that writing system. Given the graphical nature of SignWriting, a graphical pattern matching method is needed, which can deal in controlled ways with the small graphical variations writers

  17. Evaluation of optical methods of detecting dental pulp vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Michael E.; Gluskin, Alan H.; Goon, William W.; Chew, Bradford B.; Crone, Willem A.; Jones, Henry W.

    1997-01-01

    An attempt to develop an optical probe to assess dental pulp vitality led to the conclusion that it would be difficult to construct an effective optical probe for the middle-aged and older patient who is a common candidate for pulpal assessment. In such patients, vascularity of the gingiva is so much greater than that of the pulp that signals originating in the gingiva overwhelm pulpal effects. This conclusion applies to photoplethysmography, pulse oximetry, and laser Doppler flowmetry, and probably to spectrophotometry as well. The effect of the gingiva was first demonstrated by placing opaque plastic film in the gingival sulcus, which caused attenuation of light passing through molar and bicuspid teeth. More dramatically, the remaining pulsatile signal could be much further attenuated by vasoconstricting the gingiva. An unusually sensitive photoplethysmograph was developed (noise floor, with signal averaging, was near 10 fA), as were a variety of optical probes (including two that approached the tooth below the gingival margin). The tools, methods, and conceptual models that were developed are intended also to be of use to investigators who are developing optical problems for use in younger subjects, in whom such probes appear to be useful.

  18. Plant roots and spectroscopic methods – analyzing species, biomass and vitality

    PubMed Central

    Rewald, Boris; Meinen, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand plant functioning, plant community composition, and terrestrial biogeochemistry, it is decisive to study standing root biomass, (fine) root dynamics, and interactions belowground. While most plant taxa can be identified by visual criteria aboveground, roots show less distinctive features. Furthermore, root systems of neighboring plants are rarely spatially segregated; thus, most soil horizons and samples hold roots of more than one species necessitating root sorting according to taxa. In the last decades, various approaches, ranging from anatomical and morphological analyses to differences in chemical composition and DNA sequencing were applied to discern species’ identity and biomass belowground. Among those methods, a variety of spectroscopic methods was used to detect differences in the chemical composition of roots. In this review, spectroscopic methods used to study root systems of herbaceous and woody species in excised samples or in situ will be discussed. In detail, techniques will be reviewed according to their usability to discern root taxa, to determine root vitality, and to quantify root biomass non-destructively or in soil cores holding mixtures of plant roots. In addition, spectroscopic methods which may be able to play an increasing role in future studies on root biomass and related traits are highlighted. PMID:24130565

  19. An innovative nonintrusive driver assistance system for vital signal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Yu, Xiong Bill

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes an in-vehicle nonintrusive biopotential measurement system for driver health monitoring and fatigue detection. Previous research has found that the physiological signals including eye features, electrocardiography (ECG), electroencephalography (EEG) and their secondary parameters such as heart rate and HR variability are good indicators of health state as well as driver fatigue. A conventional biopotential measurement system requires the electrodes to be in contact with human body. This not only interferes with the driver operation, but also is not feasible for long-term monitoring purpose. The driver assistance system in this paper can remotely detect the biopotential signals with no physical contact with human skin. With delicate sensor and electronic design, ECG, EEG, and eye blinking can be measured. Experiments were conducted on a high fidelity driving simulator to validate the system performance. The system was found to be able to detect the ECG/EEG signals through cloth or hair with no contact with skin. Eye blinking activities can also be detected at a distance of 10 cm. Digital signal processing algorithms were developed to decimate the signal noise and extract the physiological features. The extracted features from the vital signals were further analyzed to assess the potential criterion for alertness and drowsiness determination. PMID:25375690

  20. Identifying vital effects in Halimeda algae with Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, C. L.; Stanley, S. M.; Henderson, G. M.; Jenkyns, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical records of biogenic carbonates provide some of the most valuable records of the geological past, but are often difficult to interpret without a mechanistic understanding of growth processes. In this experimental study, Halimeda algae are used as a test organism to untangle some of the specific factors that influence their skeletal composition, in particular their Ca-isotope composition. Algae were stimulated to precipitate both calcite and aragonite by growth in artificial Cretaceous seawater, resulting in experimental samples with somewhat malformed skeletons. The Ca-isotope fractionation of the algal calcite (-0.6‰) appears to be much smaller than that for the algal aragonite (-1.4‰), similar to the behaviour observed in inorganic precipitates. However, the carbonate from Halimeda has higher Ca-isotope ratios than inorganic forms by approximately 0.25‰, likely because of Rayleigh distillation within the algal intercellular space. In identifying specific vital effects and the magnitude of their influence on Ca-isotope ratios, this study suggests that mineralogy has a first-order control on the marine Ca-isotope cycle.

  1. Plant roots and spectroscopic methods - analyzing species, biomass and vitality.

    PubMed

    Rewald, Boris; Meinen, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand plant functioning, plant community composition, and terrestrial biogeochemistry, it is decisive to study standing root biomass, (fine) root dynamics, and interactions belowground. While most plant taxa can be identified by visual criteria aboveground, roots show less distinctive features. Furthermore, root systems of neighboring plants are rarely spatially segregated; thus, most soil horizons and samples hold roots of more than one species necessitating root sorting according to taxa. In the last decades, various approaches, ranging from anatomical and morphological analyses to differences in chemical composition and DNA sequencing were applied to discern species' identity and biomass belowground. Among those methods, a variety of spectroscopic methods was used to detect differences in the chemical composition of roots. In this review, spectroscopic methods used to study root systems of herbaceous and woody species in excised samples or in situ will be discussed. In detail, techniques will be reviewed according to their usability to discern root taxa, to determine root vitality, and to quantify root biomass non-destructively or in soil cores holding mixtures of plant roots. In addition, spectroscopic methods which may be able to play an increasing role in future studies on root biomass and related traits are highlighted. PMID:24130565

  2. Use of vital wheat gluten in aquaculture feeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary In aquaculture, when alternative protein sources of Fish Meal (FM) in diets are investigated, Plant Proteins (PP) can be used. Among them, Vital Wheat Gluten (VWG) is a proteinaceous material obtained from wheat after starch extraction. “It is mainly composed of two types of proteins, gliadins and glutenins, which confer specific visco-elasticity that’s to say ability to form a network providing suitable binding. This will lead to specific technological properties that are notably relevant to extruded feeds”. Besides these properties, VWG is a high-protein ingredient with an interesting amino-acid profile. Whereas it is rather low in lysine, it contains more sulfur amino acids than other PP sources and it is high in glutamine, which is known to improve gut health and modulate immunity. VWG is a protein source with one of the highest nitrogen digestibility due to a lack of protease inhibitor activity and to the lenient process used to make the product. By this way, addition of VWG in diet does not adversely affect growth performance in many fish species, even at a high level, and may secure high PP level diets that can induce health damages. PMID:24237766

  3. Habitable worlds with no signs of life.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S

    2014-04-28

    'Most habitable worlds in the cosmos will have no remotely detectable signs of life' is proposed as a biological hypothesis to be tested in the study of exoplanets. Habitable planets could be discovered elsewhere in the Universe, yet there are many hypothetical scenarios whereby the search for life on them could yield negative results. Scenarios for habitable worlds with no remotely detectable signatures of life include: planets that are habitable, but have no biosphere (Uninhabited Habitable Worlds); planets with life, but lacking any detectable surface signatures of that life (laboratory examples are provided); and planets with life, where the concentrations of atmospheric gases produced or removed by biota are impossible to disentangle from abiotic processes because of the lack of detailed knowledge of planetary conditions (the 'problem of exoplanet thermodynamic uncertainty'). A rejection of the hypothesis would require that the origin of life usually occurs on habitable planets, that spectrally detectable pigments and/or metabolisms that produce unequivocal biosignature gases (e.g. oxygenic photosynthesis) usually evolve and that the organisms that harbour them usually achieve a sufficient biomass to produce biosignatures detectable to alien astronomers. PMID:24664917

  4. The Brockenbrough – Braunwald – Morrow Sign

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder and usually asymptomatic. However, approximately 25% of patients develop left ventricular outflow obstruction and can develop angina, syncope, or congestive heart failure. Initiation and titration of beta-blockade usually results in symptomatic improvement. Patients with medically refractory symptoms can see further symptomatic improvement and relief of obstruction with either surgical myectomy or alcohol septal ablation (ASA). Although surgical myectomy has been the gold standard, ASA has been shown in nonrandomized studies and a meta-analysis to be comparable. In patients undergoing ASA without a rest obstruction, the Brokenbrough-Braunwald-Morrow sign can be used to accurately determine the degree of left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction prior to, during, and after ASA. PMID:24932361

  5. Mediating effect of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Recep; Satici, Seydi Ahmet; Akin, Ahmet

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the mediating effects of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness. 297 university students (157 women, 140 men; M age = 20.1 yr., SD = 1.3) were administered the Facebook Addiction Scale, the Subjective Vitality Scale, and the Subjective Happiness Scale. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that Facebook addiction partially mediated the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness. PMID:24693824

  6. High-performance laboratories and cleanrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Tschudi; Dale Sartor; Evan Mills; Tengfang Xu

    2002-01-01

    The California Energy Commission sponsored this roadmap to guide energy efficiency research and deployment for high performance cleanrooms and laboratories. Industries and institutions utilizing these building types (termed high-tech buildings) have played an important part in the vitality of the California economy. This roadmap's key objective to present a multi-year agenda to prioritize and coordinate research efforts. It also addresses

  7. Autonomous detection of indoor and outdoor signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Steven; Snorrason, Magnus; Goodsell, Thomas; Stevens, Mark R.

    2005-05-01

    Most goal-oriented mobile robot tasks involve navigation to one or more known locations. This is generally done using GPS coordinates and landmarks outdoors, or wall-following and fiducial marks indoors. Such approaches ignore the rich source of navigation information that is already in place for human navigation in all man-made environments: signs. A mobile robot capable of detecting and reading arbitrary signs could be tasked using directions that are intuitive to hu-mans, and it could report its location relative to intuitive landmarks (a street corner, a person's office, etc.). Such ability would not require active marking of the environment and would be functional in the absence of GPS. In this paper we present an updated version of a system we call Sign Understanding in Support of Autonomous Navigation (SUSAN). This system relies on cues common to most signs, the presence of text, vivid color, and compact shape. By not relying on templates, SUSAN can detect a wide variety of signs: traffic signs, street signs, store-name signs, building directories, room signs, etc. In this paper we focus on the text detection capability. We present results summarizing probability of detection and false alarm rate across many scenes containing signs of very different designs and in a variety of lighting conditions.

  8. Symptoms and signs in interpreting Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) intoxication - an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute poisoning with gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been a serious medical and social problem in different parts of the world including Sweden. GHB is a drug of abuse which acts primarily as central nervous system (CNS) depressants. GHB has serious toxicity, although many young users do not recognise GHB as a dangerous drug. The aim of this pilot study was to explore how symptoms with risk of failure in vital functions would be valued among professionals that encounter GHB intoxication in the emergency phase. Methods A web-based survey focusing on the assessment of vital clinical signs for possible GHB intoxication using a numeric scale was carried out during April and May 2011. The participants, n 105, are all professionals who encounter GHB intoxicated in the emergency phase, but have different levels of training in GHB intoxication, mainly Registered Nurses (RNs) in southwest Sweden, employed in pre-hospital or emergency departments at somatic and most psychiatric health care facilities, as well as police officers who in their work come into contact with drug users. Responses in the survey were scored according to risk of GHB intoxication with serious failure of vital functions. The score value was then referred to a so-called evidence based priority (EBP) scale and analysed using descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results Cardiac arrest, coma, hypoxia, general convulsions, slow respiratory and heart rate and pale skin are symptoms with the highest risk of serious failure in vital physical functions and were predominantly recognised as such. Conclusion Despite the professionals' different levels of training in GHB intoxication, all of them were relatively well aware of and in accordance regarding the most risky symptoms. The interpretation score for the less risky symptoms and signs of GHB intoxication varied depending on their degree of training. The results should be viewed cautiously, as the size of the professional groups and their general knowledge of critical symptoms of GHB poisoning varied. PMID:24758357

  9. Thunderstorm charging: Laboratory experiments clarified

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Brooks; C. P. R. Saunders

    1995-01-01

    Further laboratory experiments of thunderstorm charging by ice crystal collisions with riming graupel pellets have led to results that may help account for a major difference between two independent studies reported earlier. The problem concerns values of the cloud liquid water content required to change the sign of graupel charging. The present work has noted and investigated differences in the

  10. School Chemistry Laboratory Safety Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Patricia; Palassis, John

    2006-01-01

    The guide presents information about ordering, using, storing, and maintaining chemicals in the high school laboratory. The guide also provides information about chemical waste, safety and emergency equipment, assessing chemical hazards, common safety symbols and signs, and fundamental resources relating to chemical safety, such as Material…

  11. Genetic Evidence for the Vital Function of Osterix in Cementogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, X.; Han, X.; Ren, Y.; Gao, T.; Xiao, Y; de Crombrugghe, B.; Somerman, M.J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2012-01-01

    To date, attempts to regenerate a complete tooth, including the critical periodontal tissues associated with the tooth root, have not been successful. Controversy still exists regarding the origin of the cell source for cellular cementum (epithelial or mesenchymal). This disagreement may be partially due to a lack of understanding of the events leading to the initiation and development of the tooth roots and supportive tissues, such as the cementum. Osterix (OSX) is a transcriptional factor essential for osteogenesis, but its role in cementogenesis has not been addressed. In the present study, we first documented a close relationship between the temporal-and spatial-expression pattern of OSX and the formation of cellular cementum. We then generated 3.6 Col 1-OSX transgenic mice, which displayed accelerated cementum formation vs. WT controls. Importantly, the conditional deletion of OSX in the mesenchymal cells with two different Cre systems (the 2.3 kb Col 1 and an inducible CAG-CreER) led to a sharp reduction in cellular cementum formation (including the cementum mass and mineral deposition rate) and gene expression of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by cementocytes. However, the deletion of the OSX gene after cellular cementum formed did not alter the properties of the mature cementum as evaluated by backscattered SEM and resin-cast SEM. Transient transfection of Osx in the cementoblasts in vitro significantly inhibited cell proliferation and increased cell differentiation and mineralization. Taken together, these data support 1) the mesenchymal origin of cellular cementum (from PDL progenitor cells); 2) the vital role of OSX in controlling the formation of cellular cementum; and 3) the limited remodeling of cellular cementum in adult mice. PMID:22246569

  12. A vital link: water and vegetation in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerten, D.

    2013-10-01

    This paper argues that the interplay of water, carbon and vegetation dynamics fundamentally links some global trends in the current and conceivable future Anthropocene, such as cropland expansion, freshwater use, and climate change and its impacts. Based on a review of recent literature including geographically explicit simulation studies with the process-based LPJmL global biosphere model, it demonstrates that the connectivity of water and vegetation dynamics is vital for water security, food security and (terrestrial) ecosystem dynamics alike. The water limitation of net primary production of both natural and agricultural plants - already pronounced in many regions - is shown to increase in many places under projected climate change, though this development is partially offset by water-saving direct CO2 effects. Natural vegetation can to some degree adapt dynamically to higher water limitation, but agricultural crops usually require some form of active management to overcome it - among them irrigation, soil conservation and eventually shifts of cropland to areas that are less water-limited due to more favourable climatic conditions. While crucial to secure food production for a growing world population, such human interventions in water-vegetation systems have, as also shown, repercussions on the water cycle. Indeed, land use changes are shown to be the second-most important influence on the terrestrial water balance in recent times. Furthermore, climate change (warming and precipitation changes) will in many regions increase irrigation demand and decrease water availability, impeding rainfed and irrigated food production (if not CO2 effects counterbalance this impact - which is unlikely at least in poorly managed systems). Drawing from these exemplary investigations, some research perspectives on how to further improve our knowledge of human-water-vegetation interactions in the Anthropocene are outlined.

  13. Challenges in measuring measles case fatality ratios in settings without vital registration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Measles, a highly infectious vaccine-preventable viral disease, is potentially fatal. Historically, measles case-fatality ratios (CFRs) have been reported to vary from 0.1% in the developed world to as high as 30% in emergency settings. Estimates of the global burden of mortality from measles, critical to prioritizing measles vaccination among other health interventions, are highly sensitive to the CFR estimates used in modeling; however, due to the lack of reliable, up-to-date data, considerable debate exists as to what CFR estimates are appropriate to use. To determine current measles CFRs in high-burden settings without vital registration we have conducted six retrospective measles mortality studies in such settings. This paper examines the methodological challenges of this work and our solutions to these challenges, including the integration of lessons from retrospective all-cause mortality studies into CFR studies, approaches to laboratory confirmation of outbreaks, and means of obtaining a representative sample of case-patients. Our experiences are relevant to those conducting retrospective CFR studies for measles or other diseases, and to those interested in all-cause mortality studies. PMID:20642812

  14. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    E-print Network

    #12;2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Water is a fundamental component of the natural ecosystems upon which society depends for the delivery of vital goods and services. Water1 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Scientists at the ORNL Throughfall

  15. Bush Signs CAFTA into law

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This past Tuesday, President Bush signed into law the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), but only after a rather protracted period of difficult and contentious debate in Congress. After signing the bill, Bush remarked that the agreement would defend against â??forces that oppose democracy, seek to limit economic freedom and want to drive a wedge between the United States and the rest of the Americas." Essentially, CAFTA eliminates a number of tariffs and opens up the region to goods and services originating in the United States. A number of critics emerged during the process of approving CAFTA, including those in organized labor and other industries, many of whom claimed that the agreement would result in fewer jobs in the sugar and textile industries. As CAFTA only squeaked by in the House during the approval process, a number of commentators have suggested that this does not bode well for other free trade agreements with Thailand and Bahrain that have been under development as of late.The first link leads to a Los Angeles Times piece that provides coverage of the recent passage of CAFTA into law. The second link leads to an online article from this Wednesdayâ??s San Francisco Chronicle about CAFTA, along with some informed commentary from Jon Haverman, a research fellow with the Public Policy Institute of California. The third link will lead visitors to a helpful news article from the Detroit News which discusses the potential effects that the passage of CAFTA may have on various labor groups. The fourth link leads to a Financial Times article (requiring a free trial subscription) that looks at the broader transformation of organized labor, with specific reference to CAFTA. The fifth link leads to a very helpful page maintained by the International Trade Administration within the US Department of Commerce where users can read official factsheets and press releases about CAFTA. The sixth and final link leads to a statement issued by AFL-CIO President John Sweeney on the passage of CAFTA by the House of Representatives.

  16. Sign Language Translation via DRT and HPSG

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Éva Sáfár; Ian Marshall

    2002-01-01

    We present an overview of the language-processing component of an English-Text to Sign-Languages translation system1, concentrating on the role of Discourse Representation Structures as the intermediate semantic representation and the use\\u000a of HPSG for synthesis of equivalent signed sequences. A short introduction to the main characteristics of Sign Languages is\\u000a also presented.

  17. Solving linear programs from sign patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoru Iwata; Naonori Kakimura

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to provide a connection between qualitative matrix theory and linear programming. A linear program\\u000a $$\\\\max\\\\{cx \\\\mid Ax=b, x\\\\geq 0\\\\}$$ is said to be sign-solvable if the set of sign patterns of the optimal solutions is uniquely determined by the sign patterns of A, b, and c. It turns out to be NP-hard to decide whether

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease? The signs and symptoms of coronary heart ... will have signs and symptoms of the disease. Heart Disease Signs and Symptoms The illustration shows the ...

  19. Interpretation of hand signs in Buddhist art.

    PubMed

    Ghori, Ahmer K; Chung, Kevin C

    2007-01-01

    Hand signs (called mudras in Sanskrit) play an important role in Buddhist art. They represent specific events from the life of Sidharta Gautama, the founder of Buddhism. These events symbolize moral principles important to the discipline. There are six important hand signs: (1) dhyana mudra, (2) varada mudra, (3) abhaya mudra, (4) vitarka mudra, (5) dharmachakra mudra, and (6) bhumispara mudra. The use of these hand signs was popularized by Buddhist universities in India around the 4th or 5th century ad. This paper will examine the symbolism behind the six main hand signs and reveal their message, which will be valuable for modern society. PMID:17606078

  20. Subjective frequency ratings for 432 ASL signs.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Rachel I; Hall, Matthew L; Zvaigzne, Meghan

    2014-06-01

    Given the importance of lexical frequency for psycholinguistic research and the lack of comprehensive frequency data for sign languages, we collected subjective estimates of lexical frequency for 432 signs in American Sign Language (ASL). Our participants were 59 deaf signers who first began to acquire ASL at ages ranging from birth to 14 years old and who had a minimum of 10 years of experience. Subjective frequency estimates were made on a scale ranging from 1 = rarely see the sign to 7 = always see the sign. The mean subjective frequency ratings for individual signs did not vary in relation to age of sign language exposure (AoLE), chronological age, or length of ASL experience. Nor did AoLE show significant effects on the response times (RTs) for making the ratings. However, RTs were highly correlated with mean frequency ratings. These results suggest that the distributions of subjective lexical frequencies are consistent across signers with varying AoLEs. The implications for research practice are that subjective frequency ratings from random samples of highly experienced deaf signers can provide a reasonable measure of lexical control in sign language experiments. The Appendix gives the mean and median subjective frequency ratings and the mean and median log(RT) of the ASL signs for the entire sample; the supplemental material gives these measures for the three AoLE groups: native, early, and late. PMID:23943581

  1. Microminiature Monitor for Vital Electrolyte and Metabolite Levels of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohda, Koji; Gratzl, Miklos

    2004-01-01

    Ions, such as proton (pH) and potassium, play a crucial role in body fluids to maintain proper basic functioning of cells and tissues. Metabolites, such as glucose, control the energy available to the entire human body in normal as well as stress situations, and before, during, and after meals. These molecules diffuse easily between blood in the capillaries and the interstitial fluid residing between cells and tissues. We have developed and approach to monitoring of critical ions (called electrolytes) and glucose in the interstitial fluid under the human skin. Proton and potassium levels sensed using optode technology that translates the respective ionic concentrations into variable colors of corresponding ionophore/dye/polymeric liquid membranes. Glucose is monitored indirectly, by coupling through immobilized glucose oxidase with local pH that is then detected using a similar color scheme. The monitor consists of a tiny plastic bar, 100-200 microns wide and 1-2 mm long, placed just under the skin, with color changing spots for each analyte as well as blanks. The colors are read and translated into concentration values by a CCD camera. Direct optical coupling between the in vivo sensing bar and the ex vivo detector device requires no power, and thus eliminates the need for wires or optical fibers crossing the skin. The microminiature bar penetrates the skin easily and painlessly, so that astronauts could insert it themselves. The approach is fully compatible with telemetry in space, and thus, in vivo clinical data will be available real time in the Earth based command center once the device is fully developed. The information provided can be used for collecting hitherto unavailable vital data on clinical effects of space travel. Managing clinical emergencies in space with the sensor already in place should also become much more efficient than without a continuous monitor, as is currently the case. Civilian applications may include better glucose control of patients with moderate to severe diabetes: a growing health problem in the US and World-wide.

  2. xdamp Version 3: An IDL{reg_sign}-based data and image manipulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.

    1998-05-01

    The original DAMP (DAta Manipulation Program) was written by Mark Hedemann of Sandia National Laboratories and used the CA-DISSPLA{trademark} (available from Computer Associates International, Inc., Garden City, NY) graphics package as its engine. It was used to plot, modify, and otherwise manipulate the one-dimensional data waveforms (data vs. time) from a wide variety of accelerators. With the waning of CA-DISSPLA and the increasing popularity of Unix{reg_sign}-based workstations, a replacement was needed. This package uses the IDL{reg_sign} software, available from Research Systems Incorporated in Boulder, Colorado, as the engine, and creates a set of widgets to manipulate the data in a manner similar to the original DAMP and earlier versions of xdamp. IDL is currently supported on a wide variety of Unix platforms such as IBM{reg_sign} workstations, Hewlett Packard workstations, SUN{reg_sign} workstations, Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} computers, Macintosh{reg_sign} computers and Digital Equipment Corporation VMS{reg_sign} and Alpha{reg_sign} systems. Thus, xdamp is portable across many platforms. The author has verified operation, albeit with some minor IDL bugs, on personal computers using Windows 95 and Windows NT; IBM Unix platforms; and DEC alpha and VMS systems; HP 9000/700 series workstations; and Macintosh computers, both regular and PowerPC{trademark} versions. Version 3 adds the capability to manipulate images to the original xdamp capabilities.

  3. Ethnolinguistic vitality, self?confidence and second language proficiency: An investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Normand Labrie; Richard Clément

    1986-01-01

    Past studies of the social?psychological factors involved in second language acquisition have primarily been focussed on individual determinants of second language competence. Recent theoretical attempts at integrating contextual or environmental determinants have underlined the possible role of ethnolinguistic vitality. The present study was conducted to assess the influence of ethnolinguistic vitality on different constructs of Clément's model of second language

  4. Notes on the construction of a ‘subjective vitality questionnaire’ for ethnolinguistic groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Yvon Bourhis; Howard Giles; Doreen Rosenthal

    1981-01-01

    Group ‘vitality’ was recently proposed as a framework for objectively categorizing ethnolinguistic groups in terms of their ability to behave as distinctive collective entities in intergroup settings (Giles, Bourhis & Taylor, 1977). ‘Objective’ accounts of group vitality using status, demographic and institutional support data gathered from secondary sources appear a useful tool for comparing ethnolinguistic groups in cross?cultural research. This

  5. Subjective Vitality as Mediator and Moderator of the Relationship between Life Satisfaction and Subjective Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Recep; Satici, Seydi Ahmet; Satici, Begüm; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the mediator and moderator effects of subjective vitality on the relationship between life satisfaction and subjective happiness were investigated. The participants were 378 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Subjective Vitality Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Subjective…

  6. Comparison of several Russian populations by vital statistics and frequency of genes causing hereditary pathology

    SciTech Connect

    El`chinova, G.I.; Mamedova, R.A.; Brusintseva, O.V.; Ginter, E.K. [Medical-Genetic Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-11-01

    Distances computed from vital statistics using the Euclid formula and thus termed {open_quotes}vital{close_quotes} are proposed for use in population studies. An example of use of these statistics for comparison of four large geographically separated Russian populations is given. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Real-time multiparametric spectroscopy as a practical tool for evaluation of tissue vitality in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eliyahu Pevzner; Assaf Deutsch; Tamar Manor; Nava Dekel; Revital Etziony; Igor Derzy; Nisim Razon; Avraham Mayevsky

    2003-01-01

    In medical practice the monitoring of organ and tissue vitality is a critical need in operating rooms as well as in intensive care units (ICUs). The concept of multiparametric monitoring of tissue vitality was described in details in our previous publication. The device, called \\

  8. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Language Use amongst Eastern European Migrants in East Anglia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinger, Sebastian M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses language usage patterns amongst Eastern European migrants living in the East Anglia region of Great Britain. It examines the relationship between individual speakers' language use and societal factors, with an emphasis of respondents' perceptions of ethnic, cultural and linguistic vitality. A linguistic vitality and language…

  9. Perceived Institutional Support among Young Indigenous and Mestizo Students from Chiapas (México): A Group Vitality Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteban-Guitart, Moisès; Viladot, Maria Àngels; Giles, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Ethnolinguistic Vitality Theory (EVT) asserts that status, demographic and institutional support (IS) factors make up the vitality of ethnolinguistic groups within intergroup relations. Specifically, IS factor refers to the extent to which a language group enjoys representation in the various institutions of a society, in particular, mass media,…

  10. Language Use and Ethnolinguistic Vitality of Turkish Compared with the Dutch in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmur, Kutlay

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the relationships between Turkish speakers' ethnolinguistic vitality (EV) perceptions and their language maintenance (LM), language use, and choice patterns. The theoretical framework of the study is based on Giles, Bourhis, and Taylor's (1977) EV theory. In line with the model, a subjective EV vitality questionnaire,…

  11. Tourism, Transnationality and Ethnolinguistic Vitality: The Welsh in the Chubut Province, Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to develop the concept of ethnolinguistic vitality by adopting a qualitative approach to vitality rather than the statistical approach traditionally used. Ten small-size focus group style interviews were held with members of the Welsh-Argentinean community in the Chubut Province in the south of Argentina in order to explore…

  12. Tenisons, M; Zeps, D. Ornamental Sign Language In The First Order Tracery Belts 1 ORNAMENTAL SIGN LANGUAGE

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Tenisons, M; Zeps, D. Ornamental Sign Language In The First Order Tracery Belts 1 ORNAMENTAL SIGN sign language of first order where principles of sieve displacement, of asymmetric building blocks...............................................................................9 Sign language alphabet

  13. An approach to Japanese-sign language translation system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kamata; T. Yoshida; M. Watanabe; Y. Usui

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed for translating written (spoken) language (text in Japanese) into a sequence of sign words of Japanese sign language called Simultaneous Japanese Sign Language (SJSL). The Japanese-to-Sign translation system is described that uses a Japanese-to-Sign translation dictionary with about 250 signs

  14. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients With Acute Respiratory Symptoms That Suggest the Necessity of Chest X-ray for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Azadeh; Mohammadifard, Mahyar; Naseh, Godratallah; Mirgholami, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is a common illness in all parts of the world and is considered as a major cause of death among all age groups. Nevertheless, only about 5% of patients referring to their primary care physicians with acute respiratory symptoms will develop pneumonia. Objectives: This study was performed to derive practical criteria for performing chest radiographs for the evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Patients and Methods: A total of 420 patients with acute respiratory symptoms and positive findings on chest radiograph were evaluated from December 2008 to December 2009. The subjects were referred to outpatient clinics or emergency departments of Birjand's medical university hospitals, Iran, and were enrolled as positive cases. A checklist was completed for each patient including their demographic information, clinical signs and symptoms (cough, sputum production, dyspnea, chest pain, fever, tachycardia, and tachypnea), abnormal findings in pulmonary auscultation and laboratory findings (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein levels, and white blood cell count). An equal number of age-matched individuals with acute respiratory symptoms, but insignificant findings on chest radiography, were included as the control group. Finally, the diagnostic values of different findings were compared. Results: The data showed that vital signs and physical examination findings are useful screening parameters for predicting chest radiograph findings in outpatient settings. Therefore, by implementing a prediction rule, we would be able to determine which patients would benefit from a chest X-Ray (sensitivity, 94% and specificity, 57%). Conclusions: This study's findings suggest that requesting chest radiographs might not be necessary in patients with acute respiratory symptoms unless the vital signs and/or physical examination findings are abnormal. Considering the 94% sensitivity of this rule for predicting CAP, a chest radiograph is required for patients with unreliable follow-ups or moderate to high likelihood of morbidity if CAP is not initially detected.

  15. Selective Imitation for a Private Sign System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID C. KRAKAUER

    2001-01-01

    A distinctive feature of all human languages is the diverse and arbitrary nature of the sign (signifier). This can be interpreted as stating that the mapping between signals and referents is established by convention rather than by functional constraints. This property of the sign provides for a great deal of linguistic flexibility and is a key component of symbolic communication.

  16. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  17. Sign Language Subtitling by Highly Comprehensible "Semantroids"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamo-Villani, Nicolleta; Beni, Gerardo

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new method of sign language subtitling aimed at young deaf children who have not acquired reading skills yet, and can communicate only via signs. The method is based on: 1) the recently developed concept of "semantroid[TM]" (an animated 3D avatar limited to head and hands); 2) the design, development, and psychophysical evaluation…

  18. When does iconicity in sign language matter?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Baus; Manuel Carreiras; Karen Emmorey

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether iconicity in American Sign Language (ASL) enhances translation performance for new learners and proficient signers. Fifteen hearing nonsigners and 15 proficient ASL–English bilinguals performed a translation recognition task and a production translation task. Nonsigners were taught 28 ASL verbs (14 iconic; 14 noniconic) prior to performing these tasks. Only new learners benefited from sign iconicity, recognising iconic

  19. Sign Talk Development Project, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Charlotte; Zimmer, Kyra

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the program of the Sign Talk Children's Centre (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), a bilingual/bicultural day-care program for deaf and hearing children (ages two to five) of deaf and hearing parents. It also describes the program's systematic assessment of children's language delays in both English and American Sign Language. (DB)

  20. Numeral Variation in New Zealand Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, David; McKee, Rachel; Major, George

    2011-01-01

    Lexical variation abounds in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) and is commonly associated with the introduction of the Australasian Signed English lexicon into Deaf education in 1979, before NZSL was acknowledged as a language. Evidence from dictionaries of NZSL collated between 1986 and 1997 reveal many coexisting variants for the numbers from one…