Sample records for vivo functional analysis

  1. Structural analysis of CTLA-4 function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Masteller, E L; Chuang, E; Mullen, A C; Reiner, S L; Thompson, C B

    2000-05-15

    CTLA-4-mediated inhibition of T cell activation may be accomplished by competition for ligands and/or by signals mediated through the intracellular domain. Studies have implicated Tyr201 in the cytoplasmic domain of CTLA-4 in regulating CTLA-4 signal transduction and intracellular trafficking. To investigate the mechanism of CTLA-4 function in vivo, transgenes encoding wild-type CTLA-4 (FL), a mutant lacking the cytoplasmic domain of CTLA-4 (DeltaCTLA-4 tail), or a CTLA-4 Tyr201 mutant (Y201V) were introduced into CTLA-4-deficient mice. CTLA-4-/- mice display an autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder resulting in tissue destruction and early death. When either the FL or the Y201V transgene was bred into CTLA-4-/- animals, a complete rescue from lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity was observed. In contrast, CTLA-4-/- mice expressing the DeltaCTLA-4 tail transgene were long lived with no evidence of multiorgan lymphocytic infiltration, but exhibited lymphadenopathy and accumulated large numbers of activated T cells. Furthermore, these animals displayed a Th2-biased phenotype which conferred susceptibility to Leishmania infection. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of CTLA-4 is mediated in part through the ability of the extracellular domain to compete for ligands. The cytoplasmic domain of CTLA-4, however, is required for complete inhibitory function of the receptor and for regulation of Th cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:10799894

  2. In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear

    E-print Network

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear Tony compared the expression and function of the Lrigs in the inner ear, which offers a sensitive system in the inner ear throughout development, with Lrig1 and Lrig3 restricted to subsets of cells and Lrig2

  3. A complementation assay for in vivo protein structure/function analysis in Physcomitrella patens (Funariaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R.; Chaves, Arielle M.; Roberts, Alison W.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: A method for rapid in vivo functional analysis of engineered proteins was developed using Physcomitrella patens. Methods and Results: A complementation assay was designed for testing structure/function relationships in cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins. The components of the assay include (1) construction of test vectors that drive expression of epitope-tagged PpCESA5 carrying engineered mutations, (2) transformation of a ppcesa5 knockout line that fails to produce gametophores with test and control vectors, (3) scoring the stable transformants for gametophore production, (4) statistical analysis comparing complementation rates for test vectors to positive and negative control vectors, and (5) analysis of transgenic protein expression by Western blotting. The assay distinguished mutations that generate fully functional, nonfunctional, and partially functional proteins. Conclusions: Compared with existing methods for in vivo testing of protein function, this complementation assay provides a rapid method for investigating protein structure/function relationships in plants.

  4. Characterization and In Vivo Functional Analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ICLN Gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbarossa, Adrien; Antoine, Etienne; Neel, Henry; Gostan, Thierry; Soret, Johann

    2014-01-01

    During the early steps of snRNP biogenesis, the survival motor neuron (SMN) complex acts together with the methylosome, an entity formed by the pICln protein, WD45, and the PRMT5 methyltransferase. To expand our understanding of the functional relationship between pICln and SMN in vivo, we performed a genetic analysis of an uncharacterized Schizosaccharomyces pombe pICln homolog. Although not essential, the S. pombe ICln (SpICln) protein is important for optimal yeast cell growth. The human ICLN gene complements the ?icln slow-growth phenotype, demonstrating that the identified SpICln sequence is the bona fide human homolog. Consistent with the role of human pICln inferred from in vitro experiments, we found that the SpICln protein is required for optimal production of the spliceosomal snRNPs and for efficient splicing in vivo. Genetic interaction approaches further demonstrate that modulation of ICln activity is unable to compensate for growth defects of SMN-deficient cells. Using a genome-wide approach and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validation tests, we also show that splicing is differentially altered in ?icln cells. Our data are consistent with the notion that splice site selection and spliceosome kinetics are highly dependent on the concentration of core spliceosomal components. PMID:24298023

  5. Expression profiling with arrays of randomly disrupted genes in mouse embryonic stem cells leads to in vivo functional analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eishou Matsuda; Toshiaki Shigeoka; Ryuji Iida; Shinya Yamanaka; Masashi Kawaichi; Yasumasa Ishida

    2004-01-01

    DNA arrays are capable of profiling the expression patterns of many genes in a single experiment. After finding a gene of interest in a DNA array, however, labor-intensive gene-targeting experiments sometimes must be performed for the in vivo analysis of the gene function. With random gene trapping, on the other hand, it is relatively easy to disrupt and retrieve hundreds

  6. Molecular motor function in axonal transport in vivo probed by genetic and computational analysis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Reis, Gerald F; Yang, Ge; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Weaver, Carole; Shah, Sameer B; Robinson, John T; Hays, Thomas S; Danuser, Gaudenz; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-05-01

    Bidirectional axonal transport driven by kinesin and dynein along microtubules is critical to neuronal viability and function. To evaluate axonal transport mechanisms, we developed a high-resolution imaging system to track the movement of amyloid precursor protein (APP) vesicles in Drosophila segmental nerve axons. Computational analyses of a large number of moving vesicles in defined genetic backgrounds with partial reduction or overexpression of motor proteins enabled us to test with high precision existing and new models of motor activity and coordination in vivo. We discovered several previously unknown features of vesicle movement, including a surprising dependence of anterograde APP vesicle movement velocity on the amount of kinesin-1. This finding is largely incompatible with the biophysical properties of kinesin-1 derived from in vitro analyses. Our data also suggest kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein motors assemble in stable mixtures on APP vesicles and their direction and velocity are controlled at least in part by dynein intermediate chain. PMID:22398725

  7. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  8. Functional effects of dopamine transporter gene genotypes on in vivo dopamine transporter functioning: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Faraone, S V; Spencer, T J; Madras, B K; Zhang-James, Y; Biederman, J

    2014-08-01

    Much psychiatric genetic research has focused on a 40-base pair variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism located in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the dopamine active transporter (DAT) gene (SLC6A3). This variant produces two common alleles with 9- and 10-repeats (9R and 10R). Studies associating this variant with in vivo DAT activity in humans have had mixed results. We searched for studies using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to evaluate this association. Random effects meta-analyses assessed the association of the 3'UTR variant with DAT activity. We also evaluated heterogeneity among studies and evidence for publication bias. We found twelve studies comprising 511 subjects, 125 from PET studies and 386 from SPECT studies. The PET studies provided highly significant evidence that the 9R allele was associated with increased DAT activity in human adults. The SPECT studies were highly heterogeneous. As a group, they suggested no association between the 3'UTR polymorphism and DAT activity. When the analysis was limited to the most commonly used ligand, [123I]?-CIT, stratification by affection status dramatically reduced heterogeneity and revealed a significant association of the 9R allele with increased DAT activity for healthy subjects. In humans, the 9R allele of the 3'UTR polymorphism of SLC6A3 regulates dopamine activity in the striatal brain regions independent of the presence of neuropsychiatric illness. Differences in study methodology account for the heterogeneous results across individual studies. PMID:24061496

  9. Ex vivo functional analysis, expansion and adoptive transfer of cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Crough, Tania; Beagley, Leone; Smith, Corey; Jones, Linda; Walker, David G; Khanna, Rajiv

    2012-10-01

    The frequent detection of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigens in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has raised the possibility of exploiting CMV-specific T-cell immunotherapy to control this disease in CMV--seropositive patients. Here, we have conducted a comprehensive ex vivo profiling of CMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in a cohort of GBM patients. Of the patients analyzed, approximately half exhibited serological evidence of past infection with CMV. Although no CMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses could be detected in the serologically negative GBM patients, virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses were detected in all seropositive GBM patients. Using major histocompatibility complex-peptide multimers, the frequency of CMV-specific T-cells in the patients detected ranged from 0.1 to 22% of CD8(+) T-cells and a high proportion of these cells were positive for the human natural killer-1 glycoprotein CD57. Furthermore, ex vivo polychromatic functional analysis of the CMV-specific T-cells from GBM patients revealed that large proportions of these cells were unable to produce multiple cytokines (macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1?, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)? and interferon (IFN)?) and displayed limited cytolytic function (CD107a mobilization) following stimulation with CMV peptide epitopes. However, in vitro stimulation with CMV peptide epitopes in the presence of ?C cytokine dramatically reversed the polyfunctional profile of these antigen-specific T-cells with high levels of MIP-1?, TNF?, IFN? and CD107a mobilization. Most importantly, adoptive transfer of these in vitro-expanded T-cells in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) therapy into a patient with recurrent GBM was coincident with a long-term disease-free survival. These studies provide an important platform for a formal assessment of combination therapies based on CMV-specific T-cells and TMZ for recurrent GBM. PMID:22508289

  10. In vivo functional analysis reveals specific roles for the integrin-binding sites of talin.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Stephanie J; Pines, Mary; Fairchild, Michael J; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion receptors play diverse roles during animal development and require precise spatiotemporal regulation, which is achieved through the activity of their binding partners. Integrins, adhesion receptors that mediate cell attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM), connect to the intracellular environment through the cytoplasmic adapter protein talin. Talin has two essential functions: orchestrating the assembly of the intracellular adhesion complex (IAC), which associates with integrin, and regulating the affinity of integrins for the ECM. Talin can bind to integrins through two different integrin-binding sites (IBS-1 and IBS-2, respectively). Here, we have investigated the roles of each in the context of Drosophila development. We find that although IBS-1 and IBS-2 are partially redundant, they each have specialized roles during development: IBS-1 reinforces integrin attachment to the ECM, whereas IBS-2 reinforces the link between integrins and the IAC. Disruption of each IBS has different developmental consequences, illustrating how the functional diversity of integrin-mediated adhesion is achieved. PMID:21558413

  11. Beyond Drosophila: RNAi In Vivo and Functional

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    Beyond Drosophila: RNAi In Vivo and Functional Genomics in Insects Xavier Bell´es Institut de of how to discover these functions. The RNA interference (RNAi) technique, which generates loss-of-function phenotypes by depletion of a chosen transcript, can help to overcome this challenge. RNAi can unveil

  12. Structural and functional analysis of the ribosome landing pad of poliovirus type 2: in vivo translation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, R; Pelletier, J; Le, S Y; Sonenberg, N

    1991-01-01

    The naturally uncapped genomic and mRNAs of poliovirus initiate translation by an internal ribosome-binding mechanism. The mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) of poliovirus is approximately 750 nucleotides in length and has seven to eight (depending on the serotype) AUG codons upstream of the initiator AUG. The sequence required for internal ribosome binding has been termed the ribosome landing pad (RLP). To better understand the mechanisms of internal initiation, we have determined the boundaries and critical elements of the RLP of poliovirus type 2 (Lansing strain) in vivo. By using deletion analysis, we demonstrate the existence of a core RLP in the poliovirus mRNA 5' UTR whose boundaries are between nucleotides 134 and 155 at the 5' end and nucleotides 556 and 585 at the 3' end. Sequences flanking the core RLP affect translational activity. The importance of several stem-loop structures in the RLP for internal initiation has been determined. Mutation of the phylogenetically conserved loop sequences in the proximal stem-loop structure of the RLP (stem-loop structure III; nucleotides 127 to 165) abolished internal translation. However, deletion of the second stem-loop in the RLP (stem-loop structure IV; nucleotides 189 to 223) reduced internal translation by only 50%. Internal deletions encompassing nucleotides 240 to 300, 350 to 380, or 450 to 480, predicted to disrupt stem-loop structure V and possibly VI, also abrogated internal initiation. Small point mutations within a short polypyrimidine sequence, highly conserved among all picornaviruses, abolished translation. A conservation of distance between the conserved polypyrimidine tract and a downstream AUG could play an important role in the mechanism of internal initiation. Images PMID:1656077

  13. Phenotypical Analysis of Atypical PKCs In Vivo Function Display a Compensatory System at Mouse Embryonic Day 7.5

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Sebastian; Braun, Ursula; Roos, Norbert; Li, Shaohua; Lüdtke, Timo H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The atypical protein kinases C (PKC) isoforms ?/? and ? play crucial roles in many cellular processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Possible redundancy between the two isoforms has always been an issue since most biochemical tools do not differentiate between the two proteins. Thus, much effort has been made during the last decades to characterize the functions of aPKCs using gene targeting approaches and depletion studies. However, little is known about the specific roles of each isoform in mouse development. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the importance of PKC? in mouse development we designed PKC? deletion mutants using the gene targeting approach. We show that the deletion of PKC?, results in a reduced size of the amniotic cavity at E7.5 and impaired growth of the embryo at E8.5 with subsequent absorption of the embryo. Our data also indicate an impaired localization of ZO-1 and disorganized structure of the epithelial tissue in the embryo. Importantly, using electron microscopy, embryoid body formation and immunofluorescence analysis, we found, that in the absence of PKC?, tight junctions and apico-basal polarity were still established. Finally, our study points to a non-redundant PKC? function at E9.5, since expression of PKC? is able to rescue the E7.5 phenotype, but could not prevent embryonic lethality at a later time-point (E9.5). Conclusion Our data show that PKC? is crucial for mouse embryogenesis but is dispensable for the establishment of polarity and tight junction formation. We present a compensatory function of PKC? at E7.5, rescuing the phenotype. Furthermore, this study indicates at least one specific, yet unknown, PKC? function that cannot be compensated by the overexpression of PKC? at E9.5. PMID:23690951

  14. In Vivo Performance of a Novel Fluorinated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent for Functional Analysis of Bile Acid Transport

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel trifluorinated cholic acid derivative, CA-lys-TFA, was designed and synthesized for use as a tool to measure bile acid transport noninvasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, the in vivo performance of CA-lys-TFA for measuring bile acid transport by MRI was investigated in mice. Gallbladder CA-lys-TFA content was quantified using MRI and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice were compared to those in mice lacking expression of Asbt, the ileal bile acid transporter. 19F signals emanating from the gallbladders of WT mice 7 h after oral gavage with 150 mg/kg CA-lys-TFA were reproducibly detected by MRI. Asbt-deficient mice administered the same dose had undetectable 19F signals by MRI, and gallbladder bile CA-lys-TFA levels were 30-fold lower compared to WT animals. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of in vivo imaging of an orally absorbed drug using 19F MRI. Fluorinated bile acid analogues have potential as tools to measure and detect abnormal bile acid transport by MRI. PMID:24708306

  15. Functional analysis of the promoter region of amphioxus ?-actin gene: a useful tool for driving gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Li, Guang; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2014-10-01

    Amphioxus is a promising new animal model for developmental biology. To develop molecular tools for this model, we characterized the promoter region of a cytoplasmic ?-actin gene (Bb-actin-6-2) from the Chinese amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. In situ hybridization and real time-quantitative PCR analyses showed that this gene is expressed in many tissues throughout embryonic development. Cloning of cDNA revealed two isoforms with distinct transcription start sites. Isoform #1 exhibits a similar exon/intron and regulatory element organization to that of vertebrate ?-actin, whereas isoform #2 lacks the first exon of isoform #1 and recruits its first intron as a promoter. The activities of upstream promoter regions in the two isoforms were examined using the lacZ reporter system in amphioxus embryos. The proximal promoter of isoform #1 drove reporter gene expression broadly in 58.6 % of injected embryos. That of isoform #2 exhibited much higher activity (91.5 %) than that of isoform #1 or the human EF-1-? gene (38.2 %). We determined the minimal promoter regions of the two isoforms via functional analysis. These two regions, alone or inserted a random DNA fragment upstream, had no detectable activity, but when an upstream enhancer was inserted, the promoters directed reporter gene expression in 61.0 and 93.8 %, respectively, of injected embryos in a tissue-specific manner. Our study not only provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying amphioxus Bb-actin-6-2 gene expression, but also identifies two sets of efficient proximal and minimal promoters. These promoters could be used to construct gene expression vectors for transgenic studies using amphioxus as a model. PMID:25078982

  16. Functional analysis of crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone by in vivo assay with wild-type and mutant recombinant proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romina Mettulio; Piero Giulio Giulianini; Enrico Antonio Ferrero; Simonetta Lorenzon; Paolo Edomi

    2004-01-01

    The neuro-endocrine X-organ sinus-gland complex regulates important crustacean physiological processes, such as growth, reproduction and molting. Its major products are the neuropeptides of the cHH\\/MIH\\/GIH family. Until now the structure–function relationships of these neuropeptides were established by sequence comparison. To study the functional relevance of conserved amino acid residues or peptide motifs, we generated point and deletion mutants of the

  17. Proteomic analysis of the function of spot in Helicobacter pylori anti-oxidative stress in vitro and colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yundong; Li, Xinpeng; Li, Wen; Zhao, Min; Wang, Lixiang; Liu, Shili; Zeng, Jiping; Liu, Zhifang; Jia, Jihui

    2012-11-01

    As a microaerobe, Helicobacter pylori employs the global regulator SpoT for defending against oxidative stress in vitro. However, the mechanisms how SpoT affects bacterial gene expression is still unknown. Moreover, the function of SpoT in H. pylori colonization in the host is remaining undetermined. To explore the functions of the SpoT in H. pylori pathogenesis, we constructed H. pylori 26695 spoT-deficient mutant (?spoT). While grown in ambient atmosphere, protein expression profile of the ?spoT was analyzed with 2D gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Compared to the wild type, the spoT-deficient strain downregulated its transcription of the oxidative-induced genes, as well as the genes responsible for protein degradation and that related to energy metabolism. Meanwhile, the colonization ability of ?spoT strains in Mongolian gerbil was tested, the results demonstrated a decayed colonization in the mouse stomach with ?spoT than the wild type. As a matter of facts, the AGS cells infected with the ?spoT strains excreted increased level of the gastric inflammation cytokines IL-8, and the ?spoT strains showed poor survival ability when treated with reactive oxygen stress (sodium nitroprusside). The elevated capacity of stimulating cytokines and fragility to reactive oxygen stress may be contribute to decreased colonization of the spoT-deficient mutant in the mouse stomach. Conclusively, we speculate that spoT is a key regulator of the genes for H. pylori spreading in the air and colonization in host stomach. PMID:22678710

  18. Functional Analysis of in Vivo and in Organello Footprinting of HeLa Cell Mitochondrial DNA in Relationship to ATP and Ethidium Bromide Effects on Transcription

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vicente Micol; Patricio Fernandez-Silva; Giuseppe Attardii

    1997-01-01

    In vivo and in organello footprinting techniques based on methylation interference have been utilized to inves- tigate protein-DNA interactions in the transcription ini- tiation and rDNA transcription termination regions of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in functionally ac- tive mitochondria. In particular, the changes in methyl- ation reactivity of these regions in response to treat- ment of the organelles with ATP

  19. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  20. New models for analyzing mast cell functions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Laurent L.; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their well-accepted role as critical effector cells in anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions, mast cells have been implicated in a wide variety of process that contribute to disease or help to maintain health. While some of these roles were first suggested by analyses of mast cell products or functions in vitro, it is critical to determine whether, and under which circumstances, such potential roles actually can be performed by mast cells in vivo. This review discusses recent advances in the development and analysis of mouse models to investigate the roles of mast cells and mast cell-associated products during biological responses in vivo, and comments on some of the similarities and differences in the results obtained with these newer versus older models of mast cell deficiency. PMID:23127755

  1. In vivo analysis of cadherin function in the mouse intestinal epithelium: essential roles in adhesion, maintenance of differentiation, and regulation of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    A model system is described for defining the physiologic functions of mammalian cadherins in vivo. 129/Sv embryonic stem (ES) cells, stably transfected with a dominant negative N-cadherin mutant (NCAD delta) under the control of a promoter that only functions in postmitotic enterocytes during their rapid, orderly, and continuous migration up small intestinal villi, were introduced into normal C57B1/6 (B6) blastocysts. In adult B6<->129/Sv chimeric mice, each villus receives the cellular output of several surrounding monoclonal crypts. A polyclonal villus located at the boundary of 129/Sv- and B6-derived intestinal epithelium contains vertical coherent bands of NCAD delta- producing enterocytes plus adjacent bands of normal B6-derived enterocytes. A comparison of the biological properties of these cell populations established that NCAD delta disrupts cell-cell and cell- matrix contacts, increases the rate of migration of enterocytes along the crypt-villus axis, results in a loss of their differentiated polarized phenotype, and produces precocious entry into a death program. These data indicate that enterocytic cadherins are critical cell survival factors that actively maintain intestinal epithelial function in vivo. PMID:7721948

  2. In Vivo Calcium Imaging of Neural Network Function

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-01

    Spatiotemporal activity patterns in local neural networks are fundamental to brain function. Network activity can now be measured in vivo using two-photon imaging of cell populations that are labeled with fluorescent calcium indicators. In this review, we discuss basic aspects of in vivo calcium imaging and highlight recent developments that will help to uncover operating principles of neural circuits.

  3. Simultaneous ex vivo Functional Testing of Two Retinas by in vivo Electroretinogram System

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types. PMID:25992809

  4. A seven-year storage report of good manufacturing practice-grade naked plasmid DNA: stability, topology, and in vitro/in vivo functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Wolfgang; Schmeer, Marco; Kobelt, Dennis; Baier, Ruth; Harder, Alexander; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Aumann, Jutta; Fichtner, Iduna; Schleef, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The great interest for naked plasmid DNA in gene therapy studies is reflected by the fact that it is currently used in 18% of all gene therapy trials. Therefore, validation of topology and functionality of DNA resulting from its long-term stability is an essential requirement for safe and effective gene transfer. To this aim, we analyzed the stability of good manufacturing practice-grade pCMV? reporter plasmid DNA by capillary gel electrophoresis, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy. The plasmid DNA was produced for a clinical gene transfer study started in 2005 and was stored for meanwhile 7 years under continuously monitored conditions at -20 °C. The stability of plasmid DNA was monitored by LacZ transgene expression functional assays performed in vitro and in vivo on the 7-year-old plasmid DNA samples compared with plasmid batches newly produced in similar experimental conditions and quality standards. The analyses revealed that during the overall storage time and conditions, the proportion of open circular and supercoiled or covalently closed circular forms is conserved without linearization or degradation of the plasmid. The in vitro transfection and the in vivo jet-injection of DNA showed unaltered functionality of the long-stored plasmid. In summary, the 7-year-old and the newly produced plasmid samples showed similar topology and expression performance. Therefore, our stable storage conditions are effective to preserve the integrity of the DNA to be used in clinical studies. This is an important prerequisite for the long-term performance of gene transfer materials used in trials of long duration as well as of the reference material used in standardization procedures and assays. PMID:24067054

  5. Estimating the input function non-invasively for FDG-PET quantification with multiple linear regression analysis: simulation and verification with in vivo data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu-Hua Fang; Tsair Kao; Ren-Shyan Liu; Liang-Chih Wu

    2004-01-01

    A novel statistical method, namely Regression-Estimated Input Function (REIF), is proposed in this study for the purpose of non-invasive estimation of the input function for fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) quantitative analysis. We collected 44 patients who had undergone a blood sampling procedure during their FDG-PET scans. First, we generated tissue time-activity curves of the grey matter and the

  6. Identification of the determinants of tRNA function and susceptibility to rapid tRNA decay by high-throughput in vivo analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Michael P.; Young, David L.; Payea, Matthew J.; Zhang, Xiaoju; Kon, Yoshiko; Dean, Kimberly M.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Mathews, David H.; Fields, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Sequence variation in tRNA genes influences the structure, modification, and stability of tRNA; affects translation fidelity; impacts the activity of numerous isodecoders in metazoans; and leads to human diseases. To comprehensively define the effects of sequence variation on tRNA function, we developed a high-throughput in vivo screen to quantify the activity of a model tRNA, the nonsense suppressor SUP4oc of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a highly sensitive fluorescent reporter gene with an ochre mutation, fluorescence-activated cell sorting of a library of SUP4oc mutant yeast strains, and deep sequencing, we scored 25,491 variants. Unexpectedly, SUP4oc tolerates numerous sequence variations, accommodates slippage in tertiary and secondary interactions, and exhibits genetic interactions that suggest an alternative functional tRNA conformation. Furthermore, we used this methodology to define tRNA variants subject to rapid tRNA decay (RTD). Even though RTD normally degrades tRNAs with exposed 5? ends, mutations that sensitize SUP4oc to RTD were found to be located throughout the sequence, including the anti-codon stem. Thus, the integrity of the entire tRNA molecule is under surveillance by cellular quality control machinery. This approach to assess activity at high throughput is widely applicable to many problems in tRNA biology. PMID:25085423

  7. In Vivo Analysis of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cox2 mRNA 5'-Untranslated Leader Functions in Mitochondrial Translation Initiation and Translational Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dunstan, H. M.; Green-Willms, N. S.; Fox, T. D.

    1997-01-01

    We have used mutational and revertant analysis to study the elements of the 54-nucleotide COX2 5'-untranslated leader involved in translation initiation in yeast mitochondria and in activation by the COX2 translational activator, Pet111p. We generated a collection of mutants with substitutions spanning the entire COX2 5'-UTL by in vitro mutagenesis followed by mitochondrial transformation and gene replacement. The phenotypes of these mutants delimit a 31-nucleotide segment, from -16 to -46, that contains several short sequence elements necessary for COX2 5'-UTL function in translation. The sequences from -16 to -47 were shown to be partially sufficient to promote translation in a foreign context. Analysis of revertants of both the series of linker-scanning alleles and two short deletion/insertion alleles has refined the positions of several possible functional elements of the COX2 5'-untranslated leader, including a putative RNA stem-loop structure that functionally interacts with Pet111p and an octanucleotide sequence present in all S. cerevisiae mitochondrial mRNA 5'-UTLs that is a potential rRNA binding site. PMID:9286670

  8. Circumferentially aligned fibers guided functional neoartery regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meifeng; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Jiamin; Wang, Lina; Yang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrui; Fan, Guanwei; Ji, Shenglu; Xing, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Kong, Deling; Wang, Lianyong

    2015-08-01

    An ideal vascular graft should have the ability to guide the regeneration of neovessels with structure and function similar to those of the native blood vessels. Regeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with circumferential orientation within the grafts is crucial for functional vascular reconstruction in vivo. To date, designing and fabricating a vascular graft with well-defined geometric cues to facilitate simultaneously VSMCs infiltration and their circumferential alignment remains a great challenge and scarcely reported in vivo. Thus, we have designed a bi-layered vascular graft, of which the internal layer is composed of circumferentially aligned microfibers prepared by wet-spinning and an external layer composed of random nanofibers prepared by electrospinning. While the internal circumferentially aligned microfibers provide topographic guidance for in vivo regeneration of circumferentially aligned VSMCs, the external random nanofibers can offer enhanced mechanical property and prevent bleeding during and after graft implantation. VSMCs infiltration and alignment within the scaffold was then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the circumferentially oriented VSMCs and longitudinally aligned ECs were successfully regenerated in vivo after the bi-layered vascular grafts were implanted in rat abdominal aorta. No formation of thrombosis or intimal hyperplasia was observed up to 3 month post implantation. Further, the regenerated neoartery exhibited contraction and relaxation property in response to vasoactive agents. This new strategy may bring cell-free small diameter vascular grafts closer to clinical application. PMID:26001073

  9. Urethral function after cystectomy: a canine in vivo experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilhelm A. Hiibner; Flavio Trigo-Rocha; Eugen G. Plas; Emil A. Tanagho

    1993-01-01

    To study the function of the pelvic floor and the isolated urethra after removal of the bladder, 5 male and 5 female mongrel dogs were used in an acute in vivo experiment. Urethral pressure changes secondary to unilateral stimulation of the pelvic and pudendal nerves were recorded. After baseline data of the intact system were documented, the following procedures were

  10. Dendritic spines: from structure to in vivo function

    PubMed Central

    Rochefort, Nathalie L; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic spines arise as small protrusions from the dendritic shaft of various types of neuron and receive inputs from excitatory axons. Ever since dendritic spines were first described in the nineteenth century, questions about their function have spawned many hypotheses. In this review, we introduce understanding of the structural and biochemical properties of dendritic spines with emphasis on components studied with imaging methods. We then explore advances in in vivo imaging methods that are allowing spine activity to be studied in living tissue, from super-resolution techniques to calcium imaging. Finally, we review studies on spine structure and function in vivo. These new results shed light on the development, integration properties and plasticity of spines. PMID:22791026

  11. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo-ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging-and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  12. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  13. Biophotonics techniques for structural and functional imaging, in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging is being conducted in a variety of medical applications, including optical breast cancer imaging, functional brain imaging, endoscopy, exercise medicine, and monitoring the photodynamic therapy and progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the past three decades, in vivo diffuse optical breast cancer imaging has shown promising results in cancer detection, and monitoring the progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The use of near infrared spectroscopy for functional brain imaging has been growing rapidly. In fluorescence imaging, the difference between autofluorescence of cancer lesions compared to normal tissues were used in endoscopy to distinguish malignant lesions from normal tissue or inflammation and in determining the boarders of cancer lesions in surgery. Recent advances in drugs targeting specific tumor receptors, such as AntiBodies (MAB), has created a new demand for developing non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for detection of cancer biomarkers, and for monitoring their down regulations during therapy. Targeted treatments, combined with new imaging techniques, are expected to potentially result in new imaging and treatment paradigms in cancer therapy. Similar approaches can potentially be applied for the characterization of other disease-related biomarkers. In this chapter, we provide a review of diffuse optical and fluorescence imaging techniques with their application in functional brain imaging and cancer diagnosis. PMID:22433452

  14. Biophotonics techniques for structural and functional imaging, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging is being conducted in a variety of medical applications, including optical breast cancer imaging, functional brain imaging, endoscopy, exercise medicine, and monitoring the photodynamic therapy and progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the past three decades, in vivo diffuse optical breast cancer imaging has shown promising results in cancer detection, and monitoring the progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The use of near infrared spectroscopy for functional brain imaging has been growing rapidly. In fluorescence imaging, the difference between autofluorescence of cancer lesions compared to normal tissues were used in endoscopy to distinguish malignant lesions from normal tissue or inflammation and in determining the boarders of cancer lesions in surgery. Recent advances in drugs targeting specific tumor receptors, such as AntiBodies (MAB), has created a new demand for developing non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for detection of cancer biomarkers, and for monitoring their down regulations during therapy. Targeted treatments, combined with new imaging techniques, are expected to potentially result in new imaging and treatment paradigms in cancer therapy. Similar approaches can potentially be applied for the characterization of other disease-related biomarkers. In this chapter, we provide a review of diffuse optical and fluorescence imaging techniques with their application in functional brain imaging and cancer diagnosis. PMID:22433452

  15. In vivo investigation of cilia structure and function using Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Eric R.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are key organelles in development and homeostasis. The ever-expanding complement of cilia associated proteins necessitates rapid and tractable models for in vivo functional investigation. Xenopus laevis provides an attractive model for such studies, having multiple ciliated populations, including primary and multiciliated tissues. The rapid external development of Xenopus and the large cells make it an especially excellent platform for imaging studies. Here we present embryological and cell-biological methods for the investigation of cilia structure and function in Xenopus laevis, with a focus on quantitative live and fixed imaging. PMID:25837389

  16. Functional Analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-73B PH Domain Demonstrates a Role in Activation of the Rac GTPase In Vitro and Axon Guidance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kubiseski, Terrance J.; Culotti, Joe; Pawson, Tony

    2003-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-73B protein regulates axon guidance through its ability to act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the CeRAC/MIG-2 GTPases. Like other GEFs for Rho family GTPases, UNC-73B has a Dbl homology (DH) catalytic domain, followed by a C-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. We have explored whether the PH domain cooperates with the adjacent DH domain to promote UNC-73B GEF activity and axonal pathfinding. We show that the UNC-73B PH domain binds preferentially to monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositides in vitro. Replacement of residues Lys1420 and Arg1422 with Glu residues within the PH domain impaired this phospholipid binding but did not affect the in vitro catalytic activity of the DH domain. In contrast, a mutant UNC-73B protein with a Trp1502-to-Ala substitution in the PH domain still interacted with phosphorylated phosphatidylinositides but had lost its GEF activity. UNC-73B minigenes containing these mutations were microinjected into C. elegans and transferred to unc-73(e936) mutant worms. Unlike the wild-type protein, neither PH domain mutant was able to rescue the unc-73 axon guidance defect. These results suggest that the UNC-73B PH domain plays distinct roles in targeting and promoting GEF activity towards the Rac GTPase, both of which are important for the directed movements of motorneurons in vivo. PMID:12972602

  17. Functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-73B PH domain demonstrates a role in activation of the Rac GTPase in vitro and axon guidance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubiseski, Terrance J; Culotti, Joe; Pawson, Tony

    2003-10-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-73B protein regulates axon guidance through its ability to act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the CeRAC/MIG-2 GTPases. Like other GEFs for Rho family GTPases, UNC-73B has a Dbl homology (DH) catalytic domain, followed by a C-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. We have explored whether the PH domain cooperates with the adjacent DH domain to promote UNC-73B GEF activity and axonal pathfinding. We show that the UNC-73B PH domain binds preferentially to monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositides in vitro. Replacement of residues Lys1420 and Arg1422 with Glu residues within the PH domain impaired this phospholipid binding but did not affect the in vitro catalytic activity of the DH domain. In contrast, a mutant UNC-73B protein with a Trp1502-to-Ala substitution in the PH domain still interacted with phosphorylated phosphatidylinositides but had lost its GEF activity. UNC-73B minigenes containing these mutations were microinjected into C. elegans and transferred to unc-73(e936) mutant worms. Unlike the wild-type protein, neither PH domain mutant was able to rescue the unc-73 axon guidance defect. These results suggest that the UNC-73B PH domain plays distinct roles in targeting and promoting GEF activity towards the Rac GTPase, both of which are important for the directed movements of motorneurons in vivo. PMID:12972602

  18. Novel in vivo techniques to visualize kidney anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Intravital imaging using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become an increasingly popular and widely used experimental technique in kidney research over the past few years. MPM allows deep optical sectioning of the intact, living kidney tissue with submicron resolution, which is unparalleled among intravital imaging approaches. MPM has solved a long-standing critical technical barrier in renal research to study several complex and inaccessible cell types and anatomical structures in vivo in their native environment. Comprehensive and quantitative kidney structure and function MPM studies helped our better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the healthy and diseased kidney. This review summarizes recent in vivo MPM studies with a focus on the glomerulus and the filtration barrier, although select, glomerulus-related renal vascular and tubular functions are also mentioned. The latest applications of serial MPM of the same glomerulus in vivo, in the intact kidney over several days, during the progression of glomerular disease are discussed. This visual approach, in combination with genetically encoded fluorescent markers of cell lineage, has helped track the fate and function (e.g., cell calcium changes) of single podocytes during the development of glomerular pathologies, and provided visual proof for the highly dynamic, rather than static, nature of the glomerular environment. Future intravital imaging applications have the promise to further push the limits of optical microscopy, and to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of kidney injury. Also, MPM will help to study new mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration, a cutting-edge area of kidney research. PMID:25738253

  19. [Localization and functions of mesenchymal stromal cells in vivo].

    PubMed

    Payushina, V

    2015-01-01

    Studying mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is a very topical problem. Numerous experiments in vitro promoted understanding of MSC biology to a great extent. However, many aspects of their behavior in vivo still remain unclear. This review deals with MSC localization and functioning in an organism. MSC are present in various tissues, changing their numbers and traits during ontogenesis. Pericytes, or adventitial cells, can be considered as possible equivalents of MSC in vivo. Self-maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation of MSC are controlled by their tissue microenvironment that includes surrounding cells, soluble molecules, and extracellular matrix. At early stages of ontogenesis, MSC, probably, migrate throughout an organism. The migration occur also through a mature organism when tissues happen to be damaged. MSC move pointedly to the damaged parts and render a reparative effect which is due, first of all, to paracrine production of bioactive molecules. Immunomodulatory properties of MSC also play their role in tissues regeneration. An important function of MSC consists in creation of hematopoietic microenvironment. They secrete humoral regulators of hemopoiesis such as cytokines and chemoattractants. In addition, they interact with hemopoietic cells via surface molecules. Possibly, MSC sustain the stable functioning of other tissues as well. Their unique features make them quite attractive for clinical use, although successful introduction of MSC into medical practice requires their further studying. PMID:25985489

  20. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:23631798

  1. Use of NADH fluorescence to determine mitochondrial function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat

    2009-10-01

    Normal mitochondrial function is a critical factor in maintaining cellular homeostasis in various organs of the body. Due to the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in many pathological states, the real-time in vivo monitoring of the mitochondrial metabolic state is crucially important. This type of monitoring in animal models as well as in patients provides real-time data that can help interpret experimental results or optimize patient treatment. In this paper we are summarizing the following items: (1) presenting the solid scientific ground underlying nicotine amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) NADH fluorescence measurements based on published materials. (2) Presenting NADH fluorescence monitoring and its physiological significance. (3) Providing the reader with basic information on the methodologies of the fluorometers reflectometers. (4) Clarifying various factors affecting the monitored signals, including artifacts. (5) Presenting the potential use of monitoring mitochondrial function in vivo for the evaluation of drug development. The large numbers of publications by different groups testify to the valuable information gathered in various experimental conditions. The monitoring of NADH levels in the tissue provides the most important information on the metabolic state of the mitochondria in terms of energy production and intracellular oxygen levels. Although NADH signals are not calibrated in absolute units, their trend monitoring is important for the interpretation of physiological or pathological situations. To better understand the tissue function, the multiparametric approach has been developed where NADH serves as the key parameter to be monitored. PMID:19703658

  2. Algal photoreceptors: in vivo functions and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Many algae, particularly microalgae, possess a sophisticated light-sensing system including photoreceptors and light-modulated signaling pathways to sense environmental information and secure the survival in a rapidly changing environment. Over the last couple of years, the multifaceted world of algal photobiology has enriched our understanding of the light absorption mechanisms and in vivo function of photoreceptors. Moreover, specific light-sensitive modules have already paved the way for the development of optogenetic tools to generate light switches for precise and spatial control of signaling pathways in individual cells and even in complex biological systems. PMID:24081482

  3. In vivo and in vitro aging is detrimental to mouse spermatogonial stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jonathan A; Abramowitz, Lara K; Kubota, Hiroshi; Wu, Xin; Niu, Zhiyv; Avarbock, Mary R; Tobias, John W; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Brinster, Ralph L

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques to maintain the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) in vivo and in vitro for extended periods essentially allows for the indefinite continuation of an individual germline. Recent evidence indicates that the aging of male reproductive function is due to failure of the SSC niche. SSCs are routinely cultured for 6 mo, and no apparent effect of culture over this period has been observed. To determine the effects of SSC aging, we utilized an in vitro culture system, followed by quantitative transplantation experiments. After culture for 6 mo, SSCs that had been aged in vivo for 1500 days had a slower proliferation rate than SSCs that were aged in vivo to 8 or 300 days. Examination of methylation patterns revealed no apparent difference in DNA methylation between SSCs that were aged 8, 300, or 1500 days before culture. Long-term culture periods resulted in a loss of stem cell potential without an obvious change in the visual appearance of the culture. DNA microarray analysis of in vivo- and in vitro-aged SSCs identified the differential expression of several genes important for SSC function, including B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6, member B (Bcl6b), Lim homeobox protein 1 (Lhx1), and thymus cell antigen 1, theta (Thy1). Collectively, these data indicate that, although both in vitro and in vivo aging are detrimental to SSC function, in vitro aging results in greater loss of function, potentially due to a decrease in core SSC self-renewal gene expression and an increase in germ cell differentiation gene expression. PMID:21191109

  4. Identification and In Vivo Functional Analysis by Gene Disruption of ctnA, an Activator Gene Involved in Citrinin Biosynthesis in Monascus purpureus? †

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takeo; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Nihira, Takuya

    2007-01-01

    Citrinin, a secondary fungal metabolite of polyketide origin, is moderately nephrotoxic to vertebrates, including humans. From the red-pigment producer Monascus purpureus, a 21-kbp region flanking pksCT, which encodes citrinin polyketide synthase, was cloned. Four open reading frames (ORFs) (orf1, orf2, orf3, and orf4) in the 5?-flanking region and one ORF (orf5) in the 3?-flanking region were identified in the vicinity of pksCT. orf1 to orf5 encode a homolog of a dehydrogenase (similarity, 46%), a regulator (similarity, 38%), an oxygenase (similarity, 41%), an oxidoreductase (similarity, 26%), and a transporter (similarity, 58%), respectively. orf2 (2,006 bp with four introns) encodes a 576-amino-acid protein containing a typical Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding motif at the N terminus and was designated ctnA. Although reverse transcriptase PCR analysis revealed that all of these ORFs, except for orf1, were transcribed with pksCT under citrinin production conditions, the disruption of ctnA caused large decreases in the transcription of pksCT and orf5, together with reduction of citrinin production to barely detectable levels, suggesting that these two genes are under control of the ctnA product. Complementation of the ctnA disruptant with intact ctnA on an autonomously replicating plasmid restored both transcription and citrinin production, indicating that CtnA is a major activator of citrinin biosynthesis. PMID:17586673

  5. Posterior lymph heart function in two species of anurans: analysis based on both in vivo pressure-volume relationships by conductance manometry and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Dane A; Hillman, Stanley S

    2010-11-01

    Rhinella marina and Lithobates catesbeianus have known differences in the capacity to mobilize lymph to stabilize blood volume following dehydration and hemorrhage. The purpose of these experiments was to assess whether there are interspecific differences in basic lymph heart functions. The end diastolic volumes of posterior lymph hearts averaged 10.8 ?l kg?¹ in R. marina and 7.9-10.8 ?l kg?¹ in L. catesbeianus by conductance manometry, and 9-32 ?l kg?¹ in R. marina by ultrasound techniques, which correlated with body mass. Stroke volumes were approximately 20% of end diastolic volumes in both species. Peak systolic pressures and stroke work were correlated with the index of contractility (dP/dt(max)) in both species. Stroke volume was correlated to stroke work but not peak systolic pressure, end diastolic volume or end diastolic pressure indicating the preload variables do not seem to determine stroke volume as would be predicted from Starling considerations of the blood heart. Renal portal elastance (end systolic pressure/stroke volume) an afterload index did not differ interspecifically, and was equivalent to values for systemic flow indices from mice of equivalent ventricular volume. These data, taken together with predictions derived from mammalian models on the effect of high resistance indicate afterload (renal portal pressure), may be important determinants of posterior lymph heart stroke volume. The shape of the pressure-volume loop is different from an idealized version previously reported, and is influenced by end diastolic volume. Our data indicate that increasing end diastolic pressure and volume can influence the loop shape but not the stroke volume. This indicates that lymph hearts do not behave in a Starling Law manner with increased preload volume. PMID:20952620

  6. Posterior lymph heart function in two species of anurans: analysis based on both in vivo pressure–volume relationships by conductance manometry and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Dane A.; Hillman, Stanley S.

    2010-01-01

    Rhinella marina and Lithobates catesbeianus have known differences in the capacity to mobilize lymph to stabilize blood volume following dehydration and hemorrhage. The purpose of these experiments was to assess whether there are interspecific differences in basic lymph heart functions. The end diastolic volumes of posterior lymph hearts averaged 10.8 ?l kg–1 in R. marina and 7.9–10.8 ?l kg–1 in L. catesbeianus by conductance manometry, and 9–32 ?l kg–1 in R. marina by ultasound techniques, which correlated with body mass. Stroke volumes were approximately 20% of end diastolic volumes in both species. Peak systolic pressures and stroke work were correlated with the index of contractility (dP/dtmax) in both species. Stroke volume was correlated to stroke work but not peak systolic pressure, end diastolic volume or end diastolic pressure indicating the preload variables do not seem to determine stroke volume as would be predicted from Starling considerations of the blood heart. Renal portal elastance (end systolic pressure/stroke volume) an afterload index did not differ interspecifically, and was equivalent to values for systemic flow indices from mice of equivalent ventricular volume. These data, taken together with predictions derived from mammalian models on the effect of high resistance indicate afterload (renal portal pressure), may be important determinants of posterior lymph heart stroke volume. The shape of the pressure–volume loop is different from an idealized version previously reported, and is influenced by end diastolic volume. Our data indicate that increasing end diastolic pressure and volume can influence the loop shape but not the stroke volume. This indicates that lymph hearts do not behave in a Starling Law manner with increased preload volume. PMID:20952620

  7. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  8. In Vivo analysis of 14-3-3 proteins 

    E-print Network

    Philip, Nisha

    2000-01-01

    in the mushroom bodies precipitate deficits in negatively reinforced olfactory learning. The homozygous mutants in the leo gene are lethal. This is an in vivo study of 14-3-3[] function by conditional rescue of lethality of homozygous leo mutants by regulated...

  9. In-vivo imaging of the photoreceptor mosaic in retinal dystrophies and correlations with visual function

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S; Doble, N; Hardy, J; Jones, S; Keltner, J; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2005-10-26

    To relate in-vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function assessed with clinical tests in patients with various forms of retinal dystrophies. The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) Fundus Camera was used to acquire in-vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests, consisting of visual field analysis, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), contrast sensitivity and color vision measures, were performed on all subjects. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophies and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were characteristic features in fundi with retinal dystrophies. There was a correlation between functional vision loss and the extent to which the irregularities occurred in retinal images. Cone densities were found to decrease with an associated decrease in retinal function. AO fundus photography is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests give borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors.

  10. In vivo analysis of Yorkie phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Oh, H; Irvine, K D

    2009-04-30

    The co-activator Yorkie (Yki) mediates transcriptional regulation effected by the Drosophila Fat-Warts (Wts)-Hippo (Hpo) pathways. Yki is inhibited by Wts-mediated phosphorylation, and a Wts phosphorylation site at Ser168 has been identified. Here we identify two additional Wts phosphorylation sites on Yki, and examine the respective contribution of all three sites to Yki nuclear localization and activity. Our results show that although Ser168 is the most critical site, all three phosphorylation sites influence Yki localization and activity in vivo, and can be sites of regulation by Wts. Thus, investigations of the role of Yki and its mammalian homolog Yes-associated protein (YAP) in development and oncogenesis should include evaluations of additional sites. The WW domains of Yki are not required for its phosphorylation, but instead are positively required for its activity. We also identify two potential sites of phosphorylation by an unknown kinase, which could influence phosphorylation of Ser168 by Wts, suggesting that there are additional mechanisms for regulating Yki/YAP activity. PMID:19330023

  11. Noninvasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography for structural and functional in vivo imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueding; Pang, Yongjiang; Ku, Geng; Xie, Xueyi; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2003-07-01

    Imaging techniques based on optical contrast analysis can be used to visualize dynamic and functional properties of the nervous system via optical signals resulting from changes in blood volume, oxygen consumption and cellular swelling associated with brain physiology and pathology. Here we report in vivo noninvasive transdermal and transcranial imaging of the structure and function of rat brains by means of laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The advantage of PAT over pure optical imaging is that it retains intrinsic optical contrast characteristics while taking advantage of the diffraction-limited high spatial resolution of ultrasound. We accurately mapped rat brain structures, with and without lesions, and functional cerebral hemodynamic changes in cortical blood vessels around the whisker-barrel cortex in response to whisker stimulation. We also imaged hyperoxia- and hypoxia-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes. This neuroimaging modality holds promise for applications in neurophysiology, neuropathology and neurotherapy. PMID:12808463

  12. Ena/VASP is required for endothelial barrier function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Craig; Sieminski, Alisha L.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Rubinson, Douglas A.; Vasile, Eliza; Bronson, Roderick T.; Fässler, Reinhard; Gertler, Frank B.

    2007-01-01

    Enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) proteins are key actin regulators that localize at regions of dynamic actin remodeling, including cellular protrusions and cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions. Several studies have suggested that Ena/VASP proteins are involved in the formation and function of cellular junctions. Here, we establish the importance of Ena/VASP in endothelial junctions in vivo by analysis of Ena/VASP-deficient animals. In the absence of Ena/VASP, the vasculature exhibits patterning defects and lacks structural integrity, leading to edema, hemorrhaging, and late stage embryonic lethality. In endothelial cells, we find that Ena/VASP activity is required for normal F-actin content, actomyosin contractility, and proper response to shear stress. These findings demonstrate that Ena/VASP is critical for actin cytoskeleton remodeling events involved in the maintenance of functional endothelia. PMID:17998398

  13. Diesel exhaust particulate induces pulmonary and systemic inflammation in rats without impairing endothelial function ex vivo or in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhalation of diesel exhaust impairs vascular function in man, by a mechanism that has yet to be fully established. We hypothesised that pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) would cause endothelial dysfunction in rats as a consequence of pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Methods Wistar rats were exposed to DEP (0.5 mg) or saline vehicle by intratracheal instillation and hind-limb blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in situ 6 or 24 h after exposure. Vascular function was tested by administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh) and the endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in vivo and ex vivo in isolated rings of thoracic aorta, femoral and mesenteric artery from DEP exposed rats. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood plasma were collected to assess pulmonary (cell differentials, protein levels & interleukin-6 (IL-6)) and systemic (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) and C-reactive protein (CRP)) inflammation, respectively. Results DEP instillation increased cell counts, total protein and IL-6 in BALF 6 h after exposure, while levels of IL-6 and TNF? were only raised in blood 24 h after DEP exposure. DEP had no effect on the increased hind-limb blood flow induced by ACh in vivo at 6 or 24 h. However, responses to SNP were impaired at both time points. In contrast, ex vivo responses to ACh and SNP were unaltered in arteries isolated from rats exposed to DEP. Conclusions Exposure of rats to DEP induces both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but does not modify endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Other mechanisms in vivo limit dilator responses to SNP and these require further investigation. PMID:22480168

  14. In vivo function of the craniofacial haft: The interorbital ?pillar?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Callum F. Ross

    2001-01-01

    The craniofacial haft resists forces gener- ated in the face during feeding, but the importance of these forces for the form of the craniofacial haft remains to be determined. In vivo bone strain data were recorded from the medial orbital wall in an owl monkey (Aotus), rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and a galago (Otole- mur) during feeding. These data were

  15. In Vivo Function of the Craniofacial Haft: The Interorbital "Pillar"

    E-print Network

    strain; mastication; biomechanics; evolution ABSTRACT The craniofacial haft resists forces gener- ated to be determined. In vivo bone strain data were recorded from the medial orbital wall in an owl monkey (Aotus; the face is twisting on the brain case during unilateral biting or mastication; the interorbital "pillar

  16. FRATS: Functional Regression Analysis of DTI Tract Statistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongtu Zhu; Martin Styner; Niansheng Tang; Zhexing Liu; Weili Lin; John H. Gilmore

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides important information on the structure of white matter fiber bundles as well as detailed tissue properties along these fiber bundles in vivo. This paper presents a functional regression framework, called FRATS, for the analysis of multiple diffusion properties along fiber bundle as functions in an infinite dimensional space and their association with a set of

  17. In vitro gene regulatory networks predict in vivo function of liver

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evolution of toxicity testing is predicated upon using in vitro cell based systems to rapidly screen and predict how a chemical might cause toxicity to an organ in vivo. However, the degree to which we can extend in vitro results to in vivo activity and possible mechanisms of action remains to be fully addressed. Results Here we use the nitroaromatic 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a model chemical to compare and determine how we might extrapolate from in vitro data to in vivo effects. We found 341 transcripts differentially expressed in common among in vitro and in vivo assays in response to TNT. The major functional term corresponding to these transcripts was cell cycle. Similarly modulated common pathways were identified between in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we uncovered the conserved common transcriptional gene regulatory networks between in vitro and in vivo cellular liver systems that responded to TNT exposure, which mainly contain 2 subnetwork modules: PTTG1 and PIR centered networks. Interestingly, all 7 genes in the PTTG1 module were involved in cell cycle and downregulated by TNT both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions The results of our investigation of TNT effects on gene expression in liver suggest that gene regulatory networks obtained from an in vitro system can predict in vivo function and mechanisms. Inhibiting PTTG1 and its targeted cell cyle related genes could be key machanism for TNT induced liver toxicity. PMID:21073692

  18. Applied Functional Analysis Lecture Notes

    E-print Network

    metric, some of applications of FA to IP and control not so widely found­ 1.2 Functional Analysis and spectral methods) 2 #12;2 Introduction to Functional Analysis 2.1 Goals of this Course In these lectures application examples from biology, electromagnetics and materials/mechanics. 2.2 Uses of Functional Analysis

  19. Tissue-engineered colon exhibits function in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy C. Grikscheit; Jennifer B. Ogilvie; Erin R. Ochoa; Eben Alsberg; David Mooney; Joseph P. Vacanti

    2002-01-01

    Background. Postcolectomy morbidities include important changes in enterohepatic circulation, stool microbiology, and absorption. The surgical substitution of an ileal pouch for the absent colon also has a number of serious complications. We report in vivo colon replacement by tissue-engineered colon (TEC) in lieu of an ileal pouch. Methods. End-ileostomies were created in 22 male Lewis rats. In 11 animals, side-to-side

  20. Blood-Induced Interference of Glucose Sensor Function in Vitro: Implications for in Vivo Sensor Function

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Liu, Zenghe; Ouyang, Tianmei; Cho, Brian; Feldman, Ben; Henning, Timothy P.; Kreutzer, Don

    2007-01-01

    Background Although tissue hemorrhages, with resulting blood clots, are associated with glucose sensor implantation, virtually nothing known is about the impact of red blood cells and red blood cell clots on sensor function in vitro or in vivo. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that blood can directly interfere with glucose sensor function in vitro. Methods To test this hypothesis, heparinized human whole blood (HWB) and nonheparinized human whole blood (WB) were obtained from normal individuals. Aliquots of HWB and WB samples were also fractionated into plasma, serum, and total leukocyte (TL) components. Resulting HWB, WB, and WB components were incubated in vitro with an amperometric glucose sensor for 24 hours at 37°C. During incubation, blood glucose levels were determined periodically using a glucose monitor, and glucose sensor function (GSF) was monitored continuously as nanoampere output. Results Heparinized human whole blood had no significant effect on GSF in vitro, nor did TL, serum, or plasmaderived clots from WB. Sensors incubated with WB displayed a rapid signal loss associated with clot formation at 37°C. The half-life was 0.8 ± 0.2 hours (n = 16) for sensors incubated with WB compared to 3.2 ± 0.5 (n = 12) for sensors incubated with HWB with a blood glucose level of approximately 100 mg/dl. Conclusions These studies demonstrated that human whole blood interfered with GSF in vitro. These studies further demonstrated that this interference was related to blood clot formation, as HWB, serum, plasma-derived clots, or TL did not interfere with GSF in vitro in the same way that WB did. These in vitro studies supported the concept that the formation of blood clots at sites of glucose sensor implantation could have a negative impact on GSF in vivo. PMID:19885155

  1. Behavior of endogenous tumor-associated macrophages assessed in vivo using a functionalized nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Leimgruber, Antoine; Berger, Cedric; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Etzrodt, Martin; Newton, Andita P; Waterman, Peter; Figueiredo, Jose Luiz; Kohler, Rainer H; Elpek, Natalie; Mempel, Thorsten R; Swirski, Filip K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2009-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) invade the tumor stroma in many cancers, yet their role is incompletely understood. To visualize and better understand these critical cells in tumor progression, we screened a portfolio of rationally selected, injectable agents to image endogenous TAMs ubiquitously in three different cancer models (colon carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma). AMTA680, a functionally derivatized magneto-fluorescent nanoparticle, labeled a subset of myeloid cells with an "M2" macrophage phenotype, whereas other neighboring cells, including tumor cells and a variety of other leukocytes, remained unlabeled. We further show that AMTA680-labeled endogenous TAMs are not altered and can be tracked noninvasively at different resolutions and using various imaging modalities, e.g., fluorescence molecular tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and multiphoton and confocal intravital microscopy. Quantitative assessment of TAM distribution and activity in vivo identified that these cells cluster in delimited foci within tumors, show relatively low motility, and extend cytoplasmic protrusions for prolonged physical interactions with neighboring tumor cells. Noninvasive imaging can also be used to monitor TAM-depleting regimen quantitatively. Thus, AMTA680 or related cell-targeting agents represent appropriate injectable vehicles for in vivo analysis of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:19412430

  2. Analysis of the mutations induced by conazole fungicides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Leavitt, Sharon A

    2010-05-01

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the non-tumorigenic conazole myclobutanil was not mutagenic. DNA sequencing of the mutants recovered from each treatment group as well as from animals receiving control diet was conducted to gain additional insight into the mode of action by which tumorigenic conazoles induce mutations. Relative dinucleotide mutabilities (RDMs) were calculated for each possible dinucleotide in each treatment group and then examined by multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of RDM values segregated two independent control groups together, along with the non-tumorigen myclobutanil. The two tumorigenic conazoles clustered together in a distinct grouping. Partitioning around mediods of RDM values into two clusters also groups the triadimefon and propiconazole together in one cluster and the two control groups and myclobutanil together in a second cluster. Principal component analysis of these results identifies two components that account for 88.3% of the variability in the points. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that propiconazole- and triadimefon-induced mutations do not represent clonal expansion of background mutations and support the hypothesis that they arise from the accumulation of reactive electrophilic metabolic intermediates within the liver in vivo. PMID:20064898

  3. The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 affects osteoclast function in vitro and bone mass in vivo.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Lauren S; Ryberg, Erik; Sims, Natalie A; Ridge, Susan A; Mackie, Ken; Greasley, Peter J; Ross, Ruth A; Rogers, Michael J

    2009-09-22

    GPR55 is a G protein-coupled receptor recently shown to be activated by certain cannabinoids and by lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). However, the physiological role of GPR55 remains unknown. Given the recent finding that the cannabinoid receptors CB(1) and CB(2) affect bone metabolism, we examined the role of GPR55 in bone biology. GPR55 was expressed in human and mouse osteoclasts and osteoblasts; expression was higher in human osteoclasts than in macrophage progenitors. Although the GPR55 agonists O-1602 and LPI inhibited mouse osteoclast formation in vitro, these ligands stimulated mouse and human osteoclast polarization and resorption in vitro and caused activation of Rho and ERK1/2. These stimulatory effects on osteoclast function were attenuated in osteoclasts generated from GPR55(-/-) macrophages and by the GPR55 antagonist cannabidiol (CBD). Furthermore, treatment of mice with this non-psychoactive constituent of cannabis significantly reduced bone resorption in vivo. Consistent with the ability of GPR55 to suppress osteoclast formation but stimulate osteoclast function, histomorphometric and microcomputed tomographic analysis of the long bones from male GPR55(-/-) mice revealed increased numbers of morphologically inactive osteoclasts but a significant increase in the volume and thickness of trabecular bone and the presence of unresorbed cartilage. These data reveal a role of GPR55 in bone physiology by regulating osteoclast number and function. In addition, this study also brings to light an effect of both the endogenous ligand, LPI, on osteoclasts and of the cannabis constituent, CBD, on osteoclasts and bone turnover in vivo. PMID:19805329

  4. RECQL4 Regulates p53 Function In Vivo During Skeletogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linchao; Harutyunyan, Karine; Jin, Weidong; Wu, Jianhong; Yang, Tao; Chen, Yuqing; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Bae, Yangjin; Tao, Jianning; Dawson, Brian C; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Wang, Lisa L

    2015-06-01

    RECQ DNA helicases play critical roles in maintaining genomic stability, but their role in development has been less well studied. Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, RAPADILINO, and Baller-Gerold syndrome are rare genetic disorders caused by mutations in the RECQL4 gene. These patients have significant skeletal developmental abnormalities including radial ray, limb and craniofacial defects. To investigate the role of Recql4 in the developing skeletal system, we generated Recql4 conditional knockout mice targeting the skeletal lineage. Inactivation of Recql4 using the Prx1-Cre transgene led to limb abnormalities and craniosynostosis mimicking the major bone findings in human RECQL4 patients. These Prx1-Cre(+) ;Recql4(fl/fl) mice as well as Col2a1-Cre(+) ;Recql4(fl/fl) mice exhibited growth plate defects and an increased p53 response in affected tissues. Inactivation of Trp53 in these Recql4 mutants resulted in genetic rescue of the skeletal phenotypes, indicating an in vivo interaction between Recql4 and Trp53, and p53 activation as an underlying mechanism for the developmental bone abnormalities in RECQL4 disorders. Our findings show that RECQL4 is critical for skeletal development by modulating p53 activity in vivo. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:25556649

  5. In vivo and in vitro HeNe laser effects on phagocyte functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Ricevuti; A. Mazzone; C. Monaia; P. Fratino; R. Degiulio; R. Dell'acqua; G. Leonardi; A. Jucci; S. Sacchi

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of helium-neon (HeNe) laser irradiation on immunocompetent cells. We used the in vivo skin window method and in vitro granulocyte function tests. The study of cellular migration showed a marked decrease in vitro and in vivo in a dose-independent manner. Superoxide release was not modified by laser irradiation. The granulocyte's

  6. Rat parotid cell function in vitro following x irradiation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, L.; Kuyatt, B.L.; Hand, A.R.; Baum, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    The effect of X irradiation on rat parotid acinar cell function was evaluated in vitro 1, 3, and 7 days following in vivo exposure to 2000 R. Several cellular functions were followed: protein secretion (amylase release), ion movement (K/sup +/ efflux and reuptake), amino acid transport (..cap alpha..-amino(/sup 14/C)isobutyric acid), and an intermediary metabolic response ((/sup 14/C)glucose oxidation). In addition both the morphologic appearance and in vivo saliva secretory ability of parotid cells were assessed. Our results demonstrate that surviving rat parotid acinar cells, isolated and studied in vitro 1-7 days following 2000 R, remain functionally intact despite in vivo diminution of secretory function.

  7. Ex vivo expansion of human outgrowth endothelial cells leads to IL-8-mediated replicative senescence and impaired vasoreparative function.

    PubMed

    Medina, Reinhold J; O'Neill, Christina L; O'Doherty, T Michelle; Chambers, Sarah E J; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Neisen, Jessica; Waugh, David J; Simpson, David A; Stitt, Alan W

    2013-08-01

    Harnessing outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) for vasoreparative therapy and tissue engineering requires efficient ex vivo expansion. How such expansion impacts on OEC function is largely unknown. In this study, we show that OECs become permanently cell-cycle arrested after ex vivo expansion, which is associated with enlarged cell size, ?-galactosidase activity, DNA damage, tumor suppressor pathway activation, and significant transcriptome changes. These senescence hallmarks were coupled with low telomerase activity and telomere shortening, indicating replicative senescence. OEC senescence limited their regenerative potential by impairing vasoreparative properties in vitro and in vivo. Integrated transcriptome-proteome analysis identified inflammatory signaling pathways as major mechanistic components of the OEC senescence program. In particular, IL8 was an important facilitator of this senescence; depletion of IL8 in OECs significantly extended ex vivo lifespan, delayed replicative senescence, and enhanced function. While the ability to expand OEC numbers prior to autologous or allogeneic therapy remains a useful property, their replicative senescence and associated impairment of vasorepair needs to be considered. This study also suggests that modulation of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype could be used to optimize OEC therapy. PMID:23629812

  8. In vivo functions of carotenoids in higher plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BARBARA DEMMIG. ADAMS; ADAM M. GILMORE; WILLIAM W. ADAMS

    1996-01-01

    The function of the long-chain, highly unsaturated carotenoids of higher plants in photo- protection is becoming increasingly well understood, while at the same time their function in other proc- esses, such as light collection, needs to be reex- amined. Recent progress in this area has been fueled by more accurate determinations of the photophysi- cal properties of these molecules, as

  9. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  10. In vivo functional imaging of human cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Jonnal, Ravi S.; Rha, Jungtae; Zhang, Yan; Cense, Barry; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluate a novel non-invasive optical technique for observing fast physiological processes, in particular phototransduction, in single photoreceptor cells in the living human eye. The method takes advantage of the interference of multiple reflections within the outer segments (OS) of cones. This self-interference phenomenon is highly sensitive to phase changes such as those caused by variations in refractive index and scatter within the photoreceptor cell. A high-speed (192 Hz) flood-illumination retina camera equipped with adaptive optics (AO) is used to observe individual photoreceptors, and to monitor changes in their reflectance in response to visible stimuli (“scintillation”). AO and high frame rates are necessary for resolving individual cones and their fast temporal dynamics, respectively. Scintillation initiates within 5 to 10 ms after the onset of the stimulus flash, lasts 300 to 400 ms, is observed at visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, and is highly sensitive to the coherence length of the imaging light source. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of in vivo optical imaging of the fast physiological processes that accompany phototransduction in individual photoreceptors. PMID:19606274

  11. In vivo functional imaging of human cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Jonnal, Ravi S.; Rha, Jungtae; Zhang, Yan; Cense, Barry; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate a novel non-invasive optical technique for observing fast physiological processes, in particular phototransduction, in single photoreceptor cells in the living human eye. The method takes advantage of the interference of multiple reflections within the outer segments (OS) of cones. This self-interference phenomenon is highly sensitive to phase changes such as those caused by variations in refractive index and scatter within the photoreceptor cell. A high-speed (192 Hz) flood-illumination retina camera equipped with adaptive optics (AO) is used to observe individual photoreceptors, and to monitor changes in their reflectance in response to visible stimuli (“scintillation”). AO and high frame rates are necessary for resolving individual cones and their fast temporal dynamics, respectively. Scintillation initiates within 5 to 10 ms after the onset of the stimulus flash, lasts 300 to 400 ms, is observed at visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, and is highly sensitive to the coherence length of the imaging light source. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of in vivo optical imaging of the fast physiological processes that accompany phototransduction in individual photoreceptors. PMID:19550903

  12. In vivo Analysis of Choroid Plexus Morphogenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Steven H.; Ye, Zhang-Rui; Korzh, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Background The choroid plexus (ChP), a component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and as a result plays a role in (i) protecting and nurturing the brain as well as (ii) in coordinating neuronal migration during neurodevelopment. Until now ChP development was not analyzed in living vertebrates due to technical problems. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the formation of the fourth ventricle ChP of zebrafish in the GFP-tagged enhancer trap transgenic line SqET33-E20 (Gateways) by a combination of in vivo imaging, histology and mutant analysis. This process includes the formation of the tela choroidea (TC), the recruitment of cells from rhombic lips and, finally, the coalescence of TC resulting in formation of ChP. In Notch-deficient mib mutants the first phase of this process is affected with premature GFP expression, deficient cell recruitment into TC and abnormal patterning of ChP. In Hedgehog-deficient smu mutants the second phase of the ChP morphogenesis lacks cell recruitment and TC cells undergo apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance This study is the first to demonstrate the formation of ChP in vivo revealing a role of Notch and Hedgehog signalling pathways during different developmental phases of this process. PMID:18769618

  13. Ascl1 Converts Dorsal Midbrain Astrocytes into Functional Neurons In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueguang; Miao, Qinglong; Yuan, Jiacheng; Han, Su'e; Zhang, Panpan; Li, Sanlan; Rao, Zhiping; Zhao, Wenlong; Ye, Qian; Geng, Junlan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Cheng, Leping

    2015-06-24

    In vivo induction of non-neuronal cells into neurons by transcription factors offers potential therapeutic approaches for neural regeneration. Although generation of induced neuronal (iN) cells in vitro and in vivo has been reported, whether iN cells can be fully integrated into existing circuits remains unclear. Here we show that expression of achaete-scute complex homolog-like 1 (Ascl1) alone is sufficient to convert dorsal midbrain astrocytes of mice into functional iN cells in vitro and in vivo. Specific expression of Ascl1 in astrocytes by infection with GFAP-adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector converts astrocytes in dorsal midbrain, striatum, and somatosensory cortex of postnatal and adult mice into functional neurons in vivo. These iN cells mature progressively, exhibiting neuronal morphology and markers, action potentials, and synaptic inputs from and output to existing neurons. Thus, a single transcription factor, Ascl1, is sufficient to convert brain astrocytes into functional neurons, and GFAP-AAV is an efficient vector for generating iN cells from astrocytes in vivo. PMID:26109658

  14. Functional dissection of synaptic circuits: in vivo patch-clamp recording in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Can; Zhang, Guangwei; Xiong, Ying; Zhou, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity is dominated by synaptic inputs from excitatory or inhibitory neural circuits. With the development of in vivo patch-clamp recording, especially in vivo voltage-clamp recording, researchers can not only directly measure neuronal activity, such as spiking responses or membrane potential dynamics, but also quantify synaptic inputs from excitatory and inhibitory circuits in living animals. This approach enables researchers to directly unravel different synaptic components and to understand their underlying roles in particular brain functions. Combining in vivo patch-clamp recording with other techniques, such as two-photon imaging or optogenetics, can provide even clearer functional dissection of the synaptic contributions of different neurons or nuclei. Here, we summarized current applications and recent research progress using the in vivo patch-clamp recording method and focused on its role in the functional dissection of different synaptic inputs. The key factors of a successful in vivo patch-clamp experiment and possible solutions based on references and our experiences were also discussed.

  15. Application of electrical stimulation for functional tissue engineering in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Milica (Inventor); Park, Hyoungshin (Inventor); Langer, Robert (Inventor); Freed, Lisa (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides new methods for the in vitro preparation of bioartificial tissue equivalents and their enhanced integration after implantation in vivo. These methods include submitting a tissue construct to a biomimetic electrical stimulation during cultivation in vitro to improve its structural and functional properties, and/or in vivo, after implantation of the construct, to enhance its integration with host tissue and increase cell survival and functionality. The inventive methods are particularly useful for the production of bioartificial equivalents and/or the repair and replacement of native tissues that contain electrically excitable cells and are subject to electrical stimulation in vivo, such as, for example, cardiac muscle tissue, striated skeletal muscle tissue, smooth muscle tissue, bone, vasculature, and nerve tissue.

  16. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  17. Ex Vivo Cytosolic Delivery of Functional Macromolecules to Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartoularos, George C.; Eyerman, Alexandra T.; Lytton-Jean, Abigail; Angin, Mathieu; Sharma, Siddhartha; Poceviciute, Roberta; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Liu, Sophia; Talkar, Tanya; Khan, Omar F.; Addo, Marylyn; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert; Lieberman, Judy; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of biomolecules, such as proteins and siRNAs, into primary immune cells, especially resting lymphocytes, is a challenge. Here we describe the design and testing of microfluidic intracellular delivery systems that cause temporary membrane disruption by rapid mechanical deformation of human and mouse immune cells. Dextran, antibody and siRNA delivery performance is measured in multiple immune cell types and the approach’s potential to engineer cell function is demonstrated in HIV infection studies. PMID:25875117

  18. Anti-CEA-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for examining colorectal tumors in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Lin, In-Tsang; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2013-10-01

    Although the biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in colorectal tumors, the utility of an anti-CEA-functionalized image medium is powerful for in vivo positioning of colorectal tumors. With a risk of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONPs) that is lower for animals than other material carriers, anti-CEA-functionalized SPIONPs were synthesized in this study for labeling colorectal tumors by conducting different preoperatively and intraoperatively in vivo examinations. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the image variation of colorectal tumors reached the maximum at approximately 24 h. However, because MRI requires a nonmetal environment, it was limited to preoperative imaging. With the potentiality of in vivo screening and intraoperative positioning during surgery, the scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device biosusceptometry (SSB) was adopted, showing the favorable agreement of time-varied intensity with MRI. Furthermore, biological methodologies of different tissue staining methods and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) yielded consistent results, proving that the obtained in vivo results occurred because of targeted anti-CEA SPIONPs. This indicates that developed anti-CEA SPIONPs owe the utilities as an image medium of these in vivo methodologies.

  19. A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX

    E-print Network

    Simon, Anne

    A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX College Park College Park, MD 20742, USA The motif1-hairpin (M1H), located on (2)-strands of Turnip, Turnip Crinkle Virus; SELEX, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment; M1H, motif1

  20. NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Monitoring brain function by in vivo 2-photon microscopy

    E-print Network

    Abbondandolo, Alberto

    101) selectively stain and identify a population of brain cells, the astrocytes. The green dyeNEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Monitoring brain function by in vivo 2-photon microscopy 75) transversal reconstruction of a brain neuron. The cell body is placed in cortical layer V at a depth of over

  1. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT. S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA 2 Reproductive T...

  2. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT DURING PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) on Ex Vivo Luteal Function In the Pregnant F344 Rat Susan R. Bielmeier1, Ashley S. Murr2, Deborah S. Best2, Jerome M. Goldman2, and Michael G. Narotsky2 1Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599,...

  3. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT. S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA 2 Reproductive T...

  4. Recent developments in the understanding of astrocyte function in the cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, Tycho M; Kuhn, Bernd

    2010-09-01

    Several studies have contributed to our understanding of astrocytes, especially Bergmann glia, in the cerebellum; but, until recently, none has looked at their function in vivo. Multicell bolus loading of fluorescent calcium indicators in combination with the astrocytic marker SR101 has allowed imaging of up to hundreds of astrocytes at once in the intact cerebellum. In addition, the selective targeting of astrocytes with fluorescent calcium indicator proteins has enabled the study of their function in vivo without the confounding effects of other neuropil signals and with a resolution that surpasses multicell bolus loading and SR101 staining. The two astrocyte types of the cerebellar cortex, Bergmann glia, and velate protoplasmic astrocytes display a diverse signaling repertoire in vivo, which ranges from localized calcium elevations in subcellular processes to waves, triggered by the release of purines and mediated by purinergic receptors that span multiple processes and can involve tens of astrocytes. During locomotor behavior, even larger numbers of astrocytes display calcium increases that are driven by neuronal activity and correlate with global changes in blood flow. In this review, we give an overview of our current understanding of the function of Bergmann glia and velate protoplasmic astrocytes and the promise of the tools used to study their calcium dynamics and function in vivo. PMID:19904577

  5. In vivo neuronal function of the fragile X mental retardation protein is regulated by phosphorylation

    E-print Network

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    November 7, 2011 Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) gene- dependent learning behavior. INTRODUCTION Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic causeIn vivo neuronal function of the fragile X mental retardation protein is regulated

  6. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  7. Effects of ACL Reconstruction on In-Vivo, Dynamic Knee Function

    PubMed Central

    Tashman, Scott; Araki, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The purposes of this article are to discuss key factors for assessing joint function, to present some recent findings and to address the future directions for evaluating the function of the ACL-injured/reconstructed knees. Well-designed studies, using state-of-the art tools to assess knee kinematics under in vivo, dynamic, high-loading conditions, are necessary to evaluate the relative performance of different procedures for restoring normal joint motion. PMID:23177461

  8. In-vivo visualization and functional characterization of primary somatic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Donnelly, David F.; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    In-vivo electrophysiological recordings from cell bodies of primary sensory neurons are used to determine sensory function but are commonly performed blindly and without access to voltage-(patch-clamp) electrophysiology or optical imaging. We present a procedure to visualize and patch-clamp the neuronal cell body in the dorsal root ganglion, in vivo, manipulate its chemical environment, determine its receptive field properties, and remove it either to obtain subsequent molecular analyses or to gain access to deeper lying cells. This method allows the association of the peripheral transduction capacities of a sensory neuron with the biophysical and chemical characteristics of its cell body. PMID:20558205

  9. Mathematical modeling and analysis of insulin clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koschorreck, Markus; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Background Analyzing the dynamics of insulin concentration in the blood is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the effects of insulin in vivo. Insulin removal from the blood has been addressed in many studies. The results are highly variable with respect to insulin clearance and the relative contributions of hepatic and renal insulin degradation. Results We present a dynamic mathematical model of insulin concentration in the blood and of insulin receptor activation in hepatocytes. The model describes renal and hepatic insulin degradation, pancreatic insulin secretion and nonspecific insulin binding in the liver. Hepatic insulin receptor activation by insulin binding, receptor internalization and autophosphorylation is explicitly included in the model. We present a detailed mathematical analysis of insulin degradation and insulin clearance. Stationary model analysis shows that degradation rates, relative contributions of the different tissues to total insulin degradation and insulin clearance highly depend on the insulin concentration. Conclusion This study provides a detailed dynamic model of insulin concentration in the blood and of insulin receptor activation in hepatocytes. Experimental data sets from literature are used for the model validation. We show that essential dynamic and stationary characteristics of insulin degradation are nonlinear and depend on the actual insulin concentration. PMID:18477391

  10. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 K? impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future.

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Rod Photoreceptor Homeostasis Revealed by In Vivo NRL Targetome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hong; Kim, Douglas S.; Klocke, Bernward; Johnson, Kory R.; Cui, Kairong; Gotoh, Norimoto; Zang, Chongzhi; Gregorski, Janina; Gieser, Linn; Peng, Weiqun; Fann, Yang; Seifert, Martin; Zhao, Keji; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP–Seq) data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP–Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP–Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s) for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis. PMID:22511886

  12. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hong; Kim, Douglas S; Klocke, Bernward; Johnson, Kory R; Cui, Kairong; Gotoh, Norimoto; Zang, Chongzhi; Gregorski, Janina; Gieser, Linn; Peng, Weiqun; Fann, Yang; Seifert, Martin; Zhao, Keji; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s) for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis. PMID:22511886

  13. In vivo MR investigation of skeletal muscle function in small animals.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, B; Cozzone, P J; Bendahan, D

    2004-12-01

    In vivo 31P-MRS investigations have been widely used in small animals to study skeletal muscle function under normal and pathological conditions. Paradoxically in these studies, the benefit provided by 31P-MRS in terms of non-invasiveness is lost because of the utilization of experimental setups that integrate invasive devices for inducing muscle contractions and for measuring mechanical performance. These traditional methodologies, which require surgical preparations, have obvious limitations regarding repeatability in the same animal. The purpose of this review is to highlight the technical aspects of the in vivo MR investigations of skeletal muscle function in small animal models. We will more particularly address the issue related to the invasiveness of different procedures used so far in order to show finally that a further step into non-invasiveness can be achieved, in particular with the support of muscle functional 1H-MRI. PMID:15592946

  14. Dissecting the Function and Assembly of Acentriolar Microtubule Organizing Centers in Drosophila Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Janina; Novak, Zsofia Anna; Raff, Jordan W.; Wainman, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs) are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2—the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems). We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs. PMID:26020779

  15. Functional Analysis for Chemical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkrishna, D.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course on functional analysis offered at Purdue University. The course restricts itself to linear problems, specifically analysis of linear operators on vector spaces. Key applications in the course demonstrating the utility of abstract formulations are presented. (BT)

  16. Functional Analysis and its Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter M. Luthy

    2005-01-01

    Functional analysis is, in short, the study of vector spaces with arbitrary dimension. Developed in the early twentieth century, it is an extension and amalgamation of the fields of complex analysis and linear algebra. David Hilbert, Frigyes and Marcel Riesz, and Stefan Banach were some of the noteworthy mathematicians who pushed the early frontiers of the subject. Many of the

  17. Functionalized gold nanoparticles: a detailed in vivo multimodal microscopic brain distribution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Fernanda; Mandal, Subhra; Garrovo, Chiara; Astolfo, Alberto; Bonifacio, Alois; Latawiec, Diane; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Huewel, Sabine; Legname, Giuseppe; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Krol, Silke

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex.In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S6. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00345j

  18. In vivo corneal confocal microscopic analysis in patients with keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Bitirgen, Gulfidan; Ozkagnici, Ahmet; Bozkurt, Banu; Malik, Rayaz A

    2015-01-01

    AIM To quantify corneal ultrastructure using laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) in patients with keratoconus and control subjects. METHODS Unscarred corneas of 78 keratoconic subjects without a history of contact lens use and 36 age-matched control subjects were evaluated with slit-lamp examination (SLE), corneal topography and laser scanning IVCM. One eye was randomly chosen for analysis. Anterior and posterior stromal keratocyte, endothelial cell and basal epithelial cell densities and sub-basal nerve structure were evaluated. RESULTS IVCM qualitatively demonstrated enlarged basal epithelial cells, structural changes in sub-basal and stromal nerve fibers, abnormal stromal keratocytes and keratocyte nuclei, and pleomorphism and enlargement of endothelial cells. Compared with control subjects, significant reductions in basal epithelial cell density (5817±306 cells/mm2 vs 4802±508 cells/mm2, P<0.001), anterior stromal keratocyte density (800±111 cells/mm2 vs 555±115 cells/mm2, P<0.001), posterior stromal keratocyte density (333±34 cells/mm2 vs 270±47 cells/mm2, P<0.001), endothelial cell density (2875±223 cells/mm2 vs 2686±265 cells/mm2, P<0.001), sub-basal nerve fiber density (31.2±8.4 nerves/mm2 vs 18.1±9.2 nerves/mm2, P<0.001), sub-basal nerve fiber length (21.4±3.4 mm/mm2 vs 16.1±5.1 mm/mm2, P<0.001), and sub-basal nerve branch density (median 50.0 (first quartile 31.2 - third quartile 68.7) nerve branches/mm2 vs median 25.0 (first quartile 6.2 - third quartile 45.3) nerve branches/mm2, P<0.001) were observed in patients with keratoconus. CONCLUSION Significant microstructural abnormalities were identified in all corneal layers in the eyes of subjects with keratoconus using IVCM. This non-invasive in vivo technique provides an important means to define and follow progress of microstructural changes in patients with keratoconus. PMID:26086003

  19. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo. PMID:25762151

  20. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo. PMID:25762151

  1. In vivo biodistribution and toxicology of functionalized nano-graphene oxide in mice after oral and intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Gong, Hua; Shi, Xiaoze; Wan, Jianmei; Zhang, Youjiu; Liu, Zhuang

    2013-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and its functionalized derivatives have attracted great attention in biomedicine in recent years. A number of groups including ours have studied the in vivo behaviors of functionalized nano-graphene after intravenous injection or inhalation, and uncovered the surface coating & size dependent biodistribution and toxicology profiles for this type of nanomaterials. However, the fate of GO derivatives in animals after oral feeding and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, which are two other major drug administration routes, remain unclear. Therefore, in this work, we sought to systematically investigate in vivo biodistribution and potential toxicity of as-made GO and a number of polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized GO derivatives with different sizes and surface coatings, after oral and intraperitoneal administration at high doses. It is found that (125)I labeled PEGylated GO derivatives show no obvious tissue uptake via oral administration, indicating the rather limited intestinal adsorption of those nanomaterials. In contrast, high accumulation of PEGyalted GO derivatives, but not as-made GO, in the reticuloendothelial (RES) system including liver and spleen is observed after i.p. injection. Further investigations based on histological examination of organ slices and hematological analysis discover that although GO and PEGylated GO derivatives would retain in the mouse body over a long period of time after i.p. injection, their toxicity to the treated animals is insignificant. Our work is an important fundamental study that offers a deeper understanding of in vivo behaviors and toxicology of functionalized nano-graphene in animals, depending on their different administration routes. PMID:23340196

  2. In Vivo Control of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activation by Nitric Oxide: A Kinetic Analysis

    E-print Network

    George, Steven C.

    In Vivo Control of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activation by Nitric Oxide: A Kinetic Analysis Peter ABSTRACT Free nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), an enzyme, within both pulmonary-sensitive, and that activation in vivo occurs at lower NO concentrations than previously reported. INTRODUCTION Nitric oxide (NO

  3. Compound Ex Vivo and In Silico Method for Hemodynamic Analysis of Stented Arteries

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Compound Ex Vivo and In Silico Method for Hemodynamic Analysis of Stented Arteries Farhad Rikhtegar the coronary arteries of ex vivo porcine hearts, performed vascular corrosion casting, acquired the vessel in detail the stent geometry, arterial tissue prolapse, radial and axial arterial deformation as well

  4. [Detection and analysis of alcohol near-infrared spectrum in vitro and vivo based on wavelet transform].

    PubMed

    Luo, Si-Te; Li, Zeng-Yong; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-06-01

    The near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals of alcohol in vivo are always contaminated by noise. In the present study, wavelet analysis was used to eliminate noise and thereby detecting the NIRS signals of alcohol in vivo. In soft and hard threshold function, the spectral signals were de-noised by default threshold, Birge-Massart threshold and mini&max threshold respectively. Signal noise ratio (SNR) and root mean square error (RMSE) method were used to evaluate the effects of the de-noising. The results show that the default threshold de-noising has the best effects. Therefore, the default threshold de-noising was chosen to perform de-noising analysis in vivo and in vitro. Our result shows that the wavelet transform de-noising is effective in removing noise from NRS signals of alcohol in vivo. With different alcohol concentration, the de-noising spectrua can show evident absorption peaks. Wavelet analysis is an effective method in the non-invasive alcohol testing and quantitative analysis. PMID:22870635

  5. In vivo interrogation of gene function in the mammalian brain using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Swiech, Lukasz; Heidenreich, Matthias; Banerjee, Abhishek; Habib, Naomi; Li, Yinqing; Trombetta, John; Sur, Mriganka; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Probing gene function in the mammalian brain can be greatly assisted with methods to manipulate the genome of neurons in vivo. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9)1 can be used to edit single or multiple genes in replicating eukaryotic cells, resulting in frame-shifting insertion/deletion (indel) mutations and subsequent protein depletion. Here, we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to target single (Mecp2) as well as multiple genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b) in the adult mouse brain in vivo. We characterized the effects of genome modifications in postmitotic neurons using biochemical, genetic, electrophysiological and behavioral readouts. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated SpCas9 genome editing can enable reverse genetic studies of gene function in the brain. PMID:25326897

  6. In vivo MR investigation of skeletal muscle function in small animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Giannesini; P. J. Cozzone; D. Bendahan

    2004-01-01

    In vivo 31P-MRS investigations have been widely used in small animals to study skeletal muscle function under normal and pathological conditions. Paradoxically in these studies, the benefit provided by 31P-MRS in terms of non-invasiveness is lost because of the utilization of experimental setups that integrate invasive devices for inducing muscle contractions and for measuring mechanical performance. These traditional methodologies, which

  7. Recent Developments in the Understanding of Astrocyte Function in the Cerebellum In Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tycho M. Hoogland; Bernd Kuhn

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have contributed to our understanding of astrocytes, especially Bergmann glia, in the cerebellum; but, until\\u000a recently, none has looked at their function in vivo. Multicell bolus loading of fluorescent calcium indicators in combination\\u000a with the astrocytic marker SR101 has allowed imaging of up to hundreds of astrocytes at once in the intact cerebellum. In\\u000a addition, the selective targeting

  8. Functional studies of maturing myeloid cells during ex vivo expansion for treatment of aplasia: feasibility of ex vivo expansion from cryopreserved bone marrow cell samples.

    PubMed

    Neildez-Nguyen, T M; Vétillard, J; Drouet, M; Hérodin, F; Brouard, N; Mestries, J C; Thierry, D

    1998-02-01

    Ex vivo expanded CD34+ progenitor cells from fresh or cryopreserved primate bone marrow, induced to granulocytic differentiation with growth factors, were investigated to determine whether myeloid cells produced in liquid cultures have the normal biologic functions needed for the treatment of patients with neutropenia following high-dose chemotherapy or therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure. Human and simian (baboons or macaques) CD34+ cells were cultured with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-3, and IL-6, and assessed at 14 days of culture for their capacity to respond to different functional tests. Immunostaining revealed that human ex vivo expanded cells contained myeloperoxydase (MPO, 82% +/- 8%) and lactoferrin (LF, 30% +/- 6%) in their granules. Maturation of cultured cells was associated with stimulated chemotactic responsiveness and respiratory burst activity (superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production) in expansions from human, baboon, and macaque CD34+ progenitor cells. Mature cells obtained from ex vivo expansion of selected cryopreserved human bone marrow CD34+ cells presented reduced but significant functional activities (chemotactic responsiveness and hydrogen peroxide production) when compared with human peripheral blood neutrophils. The validation of nonhuman primate ex vivo expansion systems may permit their use as models of irradiation. The feasibility of ex vivo expansion from cryopreserved bone marrow cell samples may offer considerable opportunity for banking bone marrow for autologous transfusion. PMID:9507383

  9. Structured functional principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Greven, Sonja

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  10. Noninvasive Assessment of Gene Transfer and Expression by In Vivo Functional and Morphologic Imaging in a Rabbit Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Ravoori, Murali K.; Han, Lin; Singh, Sheela P.; Dixon, Katherine; Duggal, Jyoti; Liu, Ping; Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Gupta, Sanjay; Wright, Kenneth C.; Kundra, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the importance of morphology in quantifying expression after in vivo gene transfer and to compare gene expression after intra-arterial (IA) and intra-tumoral (IT) delivery of adenovirus expressing a SSTR2-based reporter gene in a large animal tumor model. Materials and Methods Tumor directed IA or IT delivery of adenovirus containing a human somatostatin receptor type 2A (Ad-CMV-HA-SSTR2A) gene chimera or control adenovirus (Ad-CMV-GFP) was performed in VX2 tumors growing in both rabbit thighs. Three days later, 111In-octreotide was administered intravenously after CT imaging using a clinical scanner. 111In-octreotide uptake in tumors was evaluated the following day using a clinical gamma-camera. Gene expression was normalized to tumor weight with and without necrosis. This procedure was repeated on nine additional rabbits to investigate longitudinal gene expression both 5 days and 2 weeks after adenovirus delivery. CT images were used to evaluate tumor morphology and excised tissue samples were analyzed to determine 111In-octreotide biodistribution ex vivo. Results VX2 tumors infected with Ad-CMV-HA-SSTR2 had greater 111In-octreotide uptake than with control virus (P<0.05). Intra-arterial and intra-tumoral routes resulted in similar levels of gene expression. Longitudinally, expression appeared to wane at 2 weeks versus 5 days after delivery. Areas of necrosis did not demonstrate significant uptake ex vivo. Morphology identified areas of necrosis on contrast enhanced CT and upon excluding necrosis, in vivo biodistribution analysis resulted in greater percent injected dose per gram (P<0.01) and corresponded better with ex vivo biodistribution(r?=?0.72, P<0.01, Coefficient of the x-variable?=?.72) at 2 weeks than without excluding necrosis (P<0.01). Conclusion Tumor specificity and high transgene expression can be achieved in tumors via both tumor directed intra-arterial and intra-tumoral delivery in a large animal tumor model. Using clinical machines, morphologic imaging contributes to functional imaging for quantifying SSTR2-based reporter expression in vivo. PMID:23762226

  11. In vivo analysis of cohesin architecture using FRET in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Davis, Trisha N.

    EMBO open In vivo analysis of cohesin architecture using FRET in the budding yeast Saccharomyces resonance energy transfer (FRET) to analyse inter- actions within the cohesin complex in live budding yeast

  12. Relationship between in vivo activity and in vitro measures of function and stability of a protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, W.S.; Schlunk, P.M.; Zabin, H.G. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-19

    The in vivo activities of mutant proteins are readily measured and can potentially be used to estimate changes in in vitro properties such as stability or function, but this connection has not been rigorously established. Gene V protein is a small protein produced by bacteriophage f1 that binds to single-stranded DNA and to RNA and for which fitness can be assayed both in vivo and in vitro. We have assembled a large number of temperature-sensitive mutants of the gene V protein of bacteriophage f1 and measured their ability to support phage growth and replication in vivo. We have also purified many of these mutant gene V proteins and measured their stabilities and ssDNA binding affinities in vitro. Mutations at surface residues frequently yielded temperature-sensitive mutants, but remarkably, no overall correlation between in vivo activity and in vitro measures of either stability or function was found for this group. Mutations at buried residues often lead to the temperature-sensitive phenotype. At buried sites temperature sensitivity was strongly correlated with in vitro stability changes, but not with in vitro ssDNA binding affinity. The implication of these observations for protein engineering efforts is that phenotypes conferred by amino acid substitutions at buried sites can be used to identify mutants whose stabilities fall into ranges of interest, while phenotypes of mutants with surface substitutions may be much less readily interpreted, even in the case of a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein. 54 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The intramembrane proteases signal Peptide peptidase-like 2a and 2b have distinct functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Mentrup, Torben; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Rothaug, Michelle; Engelke, Michael; Dittmann, Kai; Dressel, Ralf; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Wienands, Jürgen; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul; Schröder, Bernd

    2014-04-01

    We reported recently that the presenilin homologue signal peptide peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) is essential for B cell development by cleaving the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of the invariant chain (li, CD74). Based on this, we suggested that pharmacological modulation of SPPL2a may represent a novel approach to deplete B cells in autoimmune disorders. With regard to reported overlapping substrate spectra of SPPL2a and its close homologue, SPPL2b, we investigated the role of SPPL2b in CD74 NTF proteolysis and its impact on B and dendritic cell homeostasis. In heterologous expression experiments, SPPL2b was found to cleave CD74 NTF with an efficiency similar to that of SPPL2a. For in vivo analysis, SPPL2b single-deficient and SPPL2a/SPPL2b double-deficient mice were generated and examined for CD74 NTF turnover/accumulation, B cell maturation and functionality, and dendritic cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that in vivo SPPL2b does not exhibit a physiologically relevant contribution to CD74 proteolysis in B and dendritic cells. Furthermore, we reveal that both proteases exhibit divergent subcellular localizations in B cells and different expression profiles in murine tissues. These findings suggest distinct functions of SPPL2a and SPPL2b and, based on a high abundance of SPPL2b in brain, a physiological role of this protease in the central nervous system. PMID:24492962

  14. The Intramembrane Proteases Signal Peptide Peptidase-Like 2a and 2b Have Distinct Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Mentrup, Torben; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Rothaug, Michelle; Engelke, Michael; Dittmann, Kai; Dressel, Ralf; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Wienands, Jürgen; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We reported recently that the presenilin homologue signal peptide peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) is essential for B cell development by cleaving the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of the invariant chain (li, CD74). Based on this, we suggested that pharmacological modulation of SPPL2a may represent a novel approach to deplete B cells in autoimmune disorders. With regard to reported overlapping substrate spectra of SPPL2a and its close homologue, SPPL2b, we investigated the role of SPPL2b in CD74 NTF proteolysis and its impact on B and dendritic cell homeostasis. In heterologous expression experiments, SPPL2b was found to cleave CD74 NTF with an efficiency simliar to that of SPPL2a. For in vivo analysis, SPPL2b single-deficient and SPPL2a/SPPL2b double-deficient mice were generated and examined for CD74 NTF turnover/accumulation, B cell maturation and functionality, and dendritic cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that in vivo SPPL2b does not exhibit a physiologically relevant contribution to CD74 proteolysis in B and dendritic cells. Furthermore, we reveal that both proteases exhibit divergent subcellular localizations in B cells and different expression profiles in murine tissues. These findings suggest distinct functions of SPPL2a and SPPL2b and, based on a high abundance of SPPL2b in brain, a physiological role of this protease in the central nervous system. PMID:24492962

  15. Alterations at the Cross-Bridge Level Are Associated with a Paradoxical Gain of Muscle Function In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding ?-tropomyosinslow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8–9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occuring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo. PMID:25268244

  16. Dynamic in vivo analysis of drug induced actin cytoskeleton degradation by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnekenburger, Juergen; Bredebusch, Ilona; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Domschke, Wolfram; von Bally, Gert; Kemper, Björn

    2007-07-01

    The actin cytoskeleton mediates a variety of crucial cellular functions as migration, intracellular transport, exocytosis, endocytosis and force generation. The highly dynamic actin fibers are therefore targets for several drugs and toxins. However the study of actin interfering processes by standard microscopy techniques fails in the detailed resolution of dynamic spatial alterations required for a deeper understanding of toxic effects. Here we applied digital holographic microscopy in the online functional analysis of the actin cytoskeleton disrupting marine toxin Latrunculin B. SEM and fluorescence microscopy showed rapid Latrunculin B induced alterations in cell morphology and actin fiber degradation in pancreas tumor cells. The dynamic digital holographic in vivo analysis of the drug dependent cellular processes demonstrated differences in the actin cytoskeleton stability of highly differentiated and dedifferentiated pancreas tumor cell lines. The spatial resolution of the morphological alterations revealed unequal changes in cell morphology. While cells with a low metastatic potential showed Latrunculin B induced cell collapse within 4 h the metastatic tumor cells were increased in cell volume indicating Latrunculin B effects also on cell water content. These data demonstrate that marker free, non-destructive online analysis of cellular morphology and dynamic spatial processes in living cells by digital holography offers new insights in actin dependent cellular mechanisms. Digital holographic microscopy was shown to be a versatile tool in the screening of toxic drug effects and cancer cell biology.

  17. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  18. Critical Role of Tissue Mast Cells in Controlling Long Term Glucose Sensor Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Kaur, Manjot; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the specific cells, mediators and mechanisms involved in the loss of glucose sensor function (GSF) in vivo. Since mast cells (MC) are known to be key effector cells in inflammation and wound healing, we hypothesized that MC and their products are major contributors to the skin inflammation and wound healing that controls GSF at sites of sensor implantation. To test this hypothesis we utilized a murine model of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo in both normal C57BL/6 mice (mast cell sufficient), as well as mast cell deficient B6.Cg-KitW-sh/HNihrJaeBsmJ (Sash) mice over a 28 day CGM period. As expected, both strains of mice displayed excellent CGM for the first 7 days post sensor implantation (PSI). CGM in the mast cell sufficient C57BL/6 mice was erratic over the remaining 21 days PSI. CGM in the mast cell deficient Sash mice displayed excellent sensor function for the entire 28 day of CGM. Histopathologic evaluation of implantation sites demonstrated that tissue reactions in Sash mice were dramatically less compared to the reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, mast cells were also seen to be consistently associated with the margins of sensor tissue reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Finally, direct injection of bone marrow derived mast cells at sites of sensor implantation induced an acute and dramatic loss of sensor function in both C57BL/6 and Sash mice. These results demonstrate the key role of mast cells in controlling glucose sensor function in vivo. PMID:20226521

  19. In Vivo Imaging of the Photoreceptor Mosaic in Retinal Dystrophies and Correlations with Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan; Hardy, Joseph L.; Jones, Steven M.; Keltner, John L.; Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To relate in vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function in patients who have various forms of retinal dystrophy. Methods The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) fundus camera was used to acquire in vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests consisting of visual fields, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), and contrast sensitivity were measured in all subjects by using stimuli that were coincident with areas imaged. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophy and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. Results In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were apparent in patients with retinal dystrophy. There were significant correlations between functional vision losses and the extent to which these irregularities, quantified by cone density, occurred in retinal images. Conclusions AO fundus imaging is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests provide borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors. PMID:16639019

  20. Multi-functional graphene as an in vitro and in vivo imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Gollavelli, Ganesh; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2012-03-01

    A strategy has been developed for the synthesis of multi-functional graphene (MFG) using green synthetic approach and explored its biomedical application as a promising fluorescent marker for in vitro and in vivo imaging. In-situ microwave-assisted reduction and magnetization process was adopted to convert the graphene oxide into magnetic graphene within 1 min, which was further covalently modified to build a polyacrylic acid (PAA) bridge for linking the fluorescein o-methacrylate (FMA) to yield MFG with water-dispersibility (?2.5 g/l) and fluorescence property (emission maximum at 526 nm). The PAA bridges also functions to prevent graphene-induced fluorescence quenching of conjugated FMA. The extent of reduction, magnetization, and functionalization was confirmed with TEM, AFM, Raman, XPS, FT-IR, TGA, and SQUID measurements. In vitro cytotoxicity study of HeLa cells reveal that MFG could stand as a biocompatible imaging probe with an IC(50) value of ?100 ?g/ml; whereas in vivo zebrafish study does not induce any significant abnormalities nor affects the survival rate after microinjection of MFG. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images reveals that MFG locates only in the cytoplasm region and exhibits excellent co-localization and biodistribution from the head to tail in the zebrafish. Our results demonstrate the applicability of graphene based fluorescence marker for intracellular imaging and, more significantly, as well as whole-animal imaging. Hence, MFG could preferentially serve as a dual functional probe in biomedical diagnostics. PMID:22206596

  1. Microfibril-associated Glycoprotein 2 (MAGP2) Loss of Function Has Pleiotropic Effects in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Michelle D.; Knutsen, Russell H.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Toennies, Holly M.; Brett, Thomas J.; Miller, Chantel A.; Kober, Daniel L.; Craft, Clarissa S.; Atkinson, Jeffrey J.; Shipley, J. Michael; Trask, Barbara C.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Microfibril-associated glycoprotein (MAGP) 1 and 2 are evolutionarily related but structurally divergent proteins that are components of microfibrils of the extracellular matrix. Using mice with a targeted inactivation of Mfap5, the gene for MAGP2 protein, we demonstrate that MAGPs have shared as well as unique functions in vivo. Mfap5?/? mice appear grossly normal, are fertile, and have no reduction in life span. Cardiopulmonary development is typical. The animals are normotensive and have vascular compliance comparable with age-matched wild-type mice, which is indicative of normal, functional elastic fibers. Loss of MAGP2 alone does not significantly alter bone mass or architecture, and loss of MAGP2 in tandem with loss of MAGP1 does not exacerbate MAGP1-dependent osteopenia. MAGP2-deficient mice are neutropenic, which contrasts with monocytopenia described in MAGP1-deficient animals. This suggests that MAGP1 and MAGP2 have discrete functions in hematopoiesis. In the cardiovascular system, MAGP1;MAGP2 double knockout mice (Mfap2?/?;Mfap5?/?) show age-dependent aortic dilation. These findings indicate that MAGPs have shared primary functions in maintaining large vessel integrity. In solid phase binding assays, MAGP2 binds active TGF?1, TGF?2, and BMP2. Together, these data demonstrate that loss of MAGP2 expression in vivo has pleiotropic effects potentially related to the ability of MAGP2 to regulate growth factors or participate in cell signaling. PMID:23963447

  2. Biomimetic engineered muscle with capacity for vascular integration and functional maturation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mark; Engelmayr, George C.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Palmer, Gregory M.; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle can serve as a physiological model of natural muscle and a potential therapeutic vehicle for rapid repair of severe muscle loss and injury. Here, we describe a platform for engineering and testing highly functional biomimetic muscle tissues with a resident satellite cell niche and capacity for robust myogenesis and self-regeneration in vitro. Using a mouse dorsal window implantation model and transduction with fluorescent intracellular calcium indicator, GCaMP3, we nondestructively monitored, in real time, vascular integration and the functional state of engineered muscle in vivo. During a 2-wk period, implanted engineered muscle exhibited a steady ingrowth of blood-perfused microvasculature along with an increase in amplitude of calcium transients and force of contraction. We also demonstrated superior structural organization, vascularization, and contractile function of fully differentiated vs. undifferentiated engineered muscle implants. The described in vitro and in vivo models of biomimetic engineered muscle represent enabling technology for novel studies of skeletal muscle function and regeneration. PMID:24706792

  3. EVENT PLANNING USING FUNCTION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase; Jodi Grgich

    2011-06-01

    Event planning is expensive and resource intensive. Function analysis provides a solid foundation for comprehensive event planning (e.g., workshops, conferences, symposiums, or meetings). It has been used at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to successfully plan events and capture lessons learned, and played a significant role in the development and implementation of the “INL Guide for Hosting an Event.” Using a guide and a functional approach to planning utilizes resources more efficiently and reduces errors that could be distracting or detrimental to an event. This integrated approach to logistics and program planning – with the primary focus on the participant – gives us the edge.

  4. Predicting In Vivo Anti-Hepatofibrotic Drug Efficacy Based on In Vitro High-Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Baixue; Tan, Looling; Mo, Xuejun; Yu, Weimiao; Wang, Yan; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa; Welsch, Roy E.; So, Peter T. C.; Yu, Hanry

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Many anti-fibrotic drugs with high in vitro efficacies fail to produce significant effects in vivo. The aim of this work is to use a statistical approach to design a numerical predictor that correlates better with in vivo outcomes. Methods High-content analysis (HCA) was performed with 49 drugs on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) LX-2 stained with 10 fibrotic markers. ?0.3 billion feature values from all cells in >150,000 images were quantified to reflect the drug effects. A systematic literature search on the in vivo effects of all 49 drugs on hepatofibrotic rats yields 28 papers with histological scores. The in vivo and in vitro datasets were used to compute a single efficacy predictor (Epredict). Results We used in vivo data from one context (CCl4 rats with drug treatments) to optimize the computation of Epredict. This optimized relationship was independently validated using in vivo data from two different contexts (treatment of DMN rats and prevention of CCl4 induction). A linear in vitro-in vivo correlation was consistently observed in all the three contexts. We used Epredict values to cluster drugs according to efficacy; and found that high-efficacy drugs tended to target proliferation, apoptosis and contractility of HSCs. Conclusions The Epredict statistic, based on a prioritized combination of in vitro features, provides a better correlation between in vitro and in vivo drug response than any of the traditional in vitro markers considered. PMID:22073152

  5. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  6. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in Olive baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (Olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5 mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5 mg and 1 mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers. PMID:23684840

  7. Delayed Recovery of Receptor-Mediated Functional Responses to Acetylcholine in Mouse Isolated Carotid Arteries following Endothelial Denudation in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alastair L. Miller; Frances Plane; Jamie Y. Jeremy; Heather J. McKinnon; Christopher L. Jackson

    2003-01-01

    The time-course of endothelial regrowth and functional recovery following polytetrafluoroethylene filament-induced endothelial denudation in vivo was studied in the left common carotid artery of the mouse. This technique does not result in any intimal hyperplasia, enabling the investigation of endothelial function without any confounding effect of intimal thickening. Endothelial coverage was assessed histologically, and functional recovery was assessed as restoration

  8. Genome-Wide Screens for In Vivo Tinman Binding Sites Identify Cardiac Enhancers with Diverse Functional Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong; Stojnic, Robert; Adryan, Boris; Ozdemir, Anil; Stathopoulos, Angelike; Frasch, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The NK homeodomain factor Tinman is a crucial regulator of early mesoderm patterning and, together with the GATA factor Pannier and the Dorsocross T-box factors, serves as one of the key cardiogenic factors during specification and differentiation of heart cells. Although the basic framework of regulatory interactions driving heart development has been worked out, only about a dozen genes involved in heart development have been designated as direct Tinman target genes to date, and detailed information about the functional architectures of their cardiac enhancers is lacking. We have used immunoprecipitation of chromatin (ChIP) from embryos at two different stages of early cardiogenesis to obtain a global overview of the sequences bound by Tinman in vivo and their linked genes. Our data from the analysis of ?50 sequences with high Tinman occupancy show that the majority of such sequences act as enhancers in various mesodermal tissues in which Tinman is active. All of the dorsal mesodermal and cardiac enhancers, but not some of the others, require tinman function. The cardiac enhancers feature diverse arrangements of binding motifs for Tinman, Pannier, and Dorsocross. By employing these cardiac and non-cardiac enhancers in machine learning approaches, we identify a novel motif, termed CEE, as a classifier for cardiac enhancers. In vivo assays for the requirement of the binding motifs of Tinman, Pannier, and Dorsocross, as well as the CEE motifs in a set of cardiac enhancers, show that the Tinman sites are essential in all but one of the tested enhancers; although on occasion they can be functionally redundant with Dorsocross sites. The enhancers differ widely with respect to their requirement for Pannier, Dorsocross, and CEE sites, which we ascribe to their different position in the regulatory circuitry, their distinct temporal and spatial activities during cardiogenesis, and functional redundancies among different factor binding sites. PMID:23326246

  9. Applications of nuclear technologies for in-vivo elemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement facilities developed, to date, include a unique whole-body-counter, (WBC); a total-body neutron-activation facility (TBNAA); and a partial-body activation facility (PBNAA). A variation of the prompt-gamma neutron-activation technique for measuring total-body nitrogen was developed to study body composition of cancer patients and the effect of nutritional regimens on the composition. These new techniques provide data in numerous clinical studies not previously amenable to investigation. The development and perfection of these techniques provide unique applications of radiation and radioisotopes to the early diagnosis of certain diseases and the evaluation of therapeutic programs. The PBNAA technique has been developed and calibrated for in-vivo measurement of metals. Development has gone forward on prompt-gamma neutron activation for the measurement of cadmium, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for measurement of iron. Other techniques are being investigated for in-vivo measurement of metals such as silicon and beryllium.

  10. In vivo and in vitro CT analysis of the occiput

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Hertel; H. Hirschfelder

    1999-01-01

    Arguments concerning the best procedure for occipito-cervical fusion have rarely been based upon occipital bone thickness\\u000a or only based on in vitro studies. To close this gap and to offer an outlook on preoperative evaluation of the patient, 28\\u000a patients were analysed in vivo by means of spiral CT. Ten macerated human skulls were measured by means of CT and

  11. In Vivo image Analysis Using iRFP Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mai Thi Nhu; Tanaka, Junko; Hamada, Michito; Sugiyama, Yuka; Sakaguchi, Shota; Nakamura, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Miwa, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins with light wavelengths within the optical window are one of the improvements in in vivo imaging techniques. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent protein (iRFP) is a stable, nontoxic protein that emits fluorescence within the NIR optical window without the addition of exogenous substrate. However, studies utilizing an in vivo iRFP model have not yet been published. Here, we report the generation of transgenic iRFP mice with ubiquitous NIR fluorescence expression. iRFP expression was observed in approximately 50% of the offspring from a matings between iRFP transgenic and WT mice. The serum and blood cell indices and body weights of iRFP mice were similar to those of WT mice. Red fluorescence with an excitation wavelength of 690 nm and an emission wavelength of 713 nm was detected in both newborn and adult iRFP mice. We also detected fluorescence emission in whole organs of the iRFP mice, including the brain, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, lung, pancreas, bone, testis, thymus, and adipose tissue. Therefore, iRFP transgenic mice may therefore be a useful tool for various types of in vivo imaging. PMID:25077761

  12. Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Woodward, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis for exploring associations among multiple sets of functions. The proposed method includes functional canonical correlation analysis as a special case when only two sets of functions are considered. As in classical multiple-set canonical correlation analysis, computationally, the…

  13. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  14. Effects of canine distemper virus infection on lymphoid function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Krakowka, S; Cockerell, G; Koestner, A

    1975-01-01

    In the present study, the immunodepressive effects of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of dogs on two parameters of lymphocyte function, namely phytomitogen-induced cellular proliferation and skin allograft rejection, were investigated. Infection of susceptible gnotobiotic dogs with virulent R252-CDV resulted in a depression of peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogen response as measured by (3H)thymidine incorporation for up to 10 weeks after inoculation. This effect coincided with the appearance of viral antigen by immunofluorescence in leukocytes but persisted after the virus was no longer detectable. Loss of mitogen reactivity was seen in all infected dogs. However, when these same CDV-infected dogs were challenged with foreign skin allografts, no significant retention of grafts over controls was observed despite the depressed lymphocyte activity. Considering the in vitro and in vivo data it was concluded that, although immunodepressive effects of CDV were demonstrated in vitro, paralled in vivo experiments indicated that less than complete suppression of immune functions occurs during the course of CDV infection. PMID:1091560

  15. Ubiquitination Regulates the Neuroprotective Function of the Deubiquitinase Ataxin-3 in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Wei-Ling; Burr, Aaron A.; Ouyang, Michelle; Blount, Jessica R.; Scaglione, K. Matthew; Todi, Sokol V.

    2013-01-01

    Deubiquitinases (DUBs) are proteases that regulate various cellular processes by controlling protein ubiquitination. Cell-based studies indicate that the regulation of the activity of DUBs is important for homeostasis and is achieved by multiple mechanisms, including through their own ubiquitination. However, the physiological significance of the ubiquitination of DUBs to their functions in vivo is unclear. Here, we report that ubiquitination of the DUB ataxin-3 at lysine residue 117, which markedly enhances its protease activity in vitro, is critical for its ability to suppress toxic protein-dependent degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Compared with ataxin-3 with only Lys-117 present, ataxin-3 that does not become ubiquitinated performs significantly less efficiently in suppressing or delaying the onset of toxic protein-dependent degeneration in flies. According to further studies, the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ataxin-3 in vitro, is dispensable for its ubiquitination in vivo and is not required for the neuroprotective function of this DUB in Drosophila. Our work also suggests that ataxin-3 suppresses degeneration by regulating toxic protein aggregation rather than stability. PMID:24106274

  16. Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging

    E-print Network

    Hall, Lawrence O.

    Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging A. A. Maudsley and spectral data processing methods and benefits from the use of several sources of prior information processing and analysis can involve multiple processing steps and several different data types. In this paper

  17. In vivo imaging of the airway wall in asthma: fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy in relation to histology and lung function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Airway remodelling is a feature of asthma including fragmentation of elastic fibres observed in the superficial elastin network of the airway wall. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM) is a new and non-invasive imaging technique performed during bronchoscopy that may visualize elastic fibres, as shown by in vitro spectral analysis of elastin powder. We hypothesized that FCFM images capture in vivo elastic fibre patterns within the airway wall and that such patterns correspond with airway histology. We aimed to establish the concordance between the bronchial elastic fibre pattern in histology and FCFM. Second, we examined whether elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM were different between asthmatic subjects and healthy controls. Finally, the association between these patterns and lung function parameters was investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional study comprising 16 subjects (8 atopic asthmatic patients with controlled disease and 8 healthy controls) spirometry and bronchoscopy were performed, with recording of FCFM images followed by endobronchial biopsy at the airway main carina. Elastic fibre patterns in histological sections and FCFM images were scored semi-quantitatively. Agreement between histology and FCFM was analysed using linearly weighted kappa ?w. Results The patterns observed in histological sections and FCFM images could be divided into 3 distinct groups. There was good agreement between elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM patterns (?w 0.744). The semi-quantitative pattern scores were not different between asthmatic patients and controls. Notably, there was a significant difference in post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted between the different patterns by histology (p = 0.001) and FCFM (p = 0.048), regardless of asthma or atopy. Conclusion FCFM captures the elastic fibre pattern within the airway wall in humans in vivo. The association between post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted and both histological and FCFM elastic fibre patterns points towards a structure-function relationship between extracellular matrix in the airway wall and lung function. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR1306 PMID:21699692

  18. Selective Small Molecule Targeting ?-Catenin Function Discovered by In Vivo Chemical Genetic Screen

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jijun; Ao, Ada; Zhou, Li; Murphy, Clare K.; Frist, Audrey Y.; Keel, Jessica J.; Thorne, Curtis A.; Kim, Kwangho; Lee, Ethan; Hong, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Canonical Wnt signaling pathway, mediated by the transcription factor ?-catenin, plays critical roles in embryonic development, and represents an important therapeutic target. In a zebrafish-based in vivo screen for small molecules that specifically perturb embryonic dorsoventral patterning, we discovered a novel compound, named windorphen, which selectively blocks the Wnt signal required for ventral development. Windorphen exhibits remarkable specificity toward ?-catenin-1 function, indicating that the two ?-catenin isoforms found in zebrafish are not functionally redundant. We show that windorphen is a selective inhibitor of p300 histone acetyl transferase, a co-activator that associates with ?-catenin. Lastly, windorphen robustly and selectively kills cancer cells that harbor Wnt-activating mutations, supporting the therapeutic potential of this novel Wnt inhibitor class. PMID:24012757

  19. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:25366491

  20. Functional analysis of protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Levy-Cohen, Gal; Blank, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Alterations in the protein ubiquitination can lead to the development of serious pathological conditions and diseases and, therefore, are under extensive investigation. Here we detail the revised/updated version of two approaches for analyzing the functional activities of the ubiquitin transferring system and target protein ubiquitination. These approaches permit the analysis of protein ubiquitination within the cellular environment as well as in a tube when the purified components are used. The updates introduced in the protocols allow both to increase the sensitivity of the assays and to reduce the false positives often experienced in the analyses. PMID:25963895

  1. Metabolic Flux and Compartmentation Analysis in the Brain In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Through significant developments and progresses in the last two decades, in vivo localized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) became a method of choice to probe brain metabolic pathways in a non-invasive way. Beside the measurement of the total concentration of more than 20 metabolites, 1H MRS can be used to quantify the dynamics of substrate transport across the blood-brain barrier by varying the plasma substrate level. On the other hand, 13C MRS with the infusion of 13C-enriched substrates enables the characterization of brain oxidative metabolism and neurotransmission by incorporation of 13C in the different carbon positions of amino acid neurotransmitters. The quantitative determination of the biochemical reactions involved in these processes requires the use of appropriate metabolic models, whose level of details is strongly related to the amount of data accessible with in vivo MRS. In the present work, we present the different steps involved in the elaboration of a mathematical model of a given brain metabolic process and its application to the experimental data in order to extract quantitative brain metabolic rates. We review the recent advances in the localized measurement of brain glucose transport and compartmentalized brain energy metabolism, and how these reveal mechanistic details on glial support to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. PMID:24194729

  2. MS-based metabolomics facilitates the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules with a diversity of biological contexts.

    PubMed

    Yan, Leyu; Nie, Wenna; Parker, Tony; Upton, Zee; Lu, Haitao

    2013-10-01

    In vivo small molecules as necessary intermediates are involved in numerous critical metabolic pathways and biological processes associated with many essential biological functions and events. There is growing evidence that MS-based metabolomics is emerging as a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of functional small molecules that can better our understanding of development, infection, nutrition, disease, toxicity, drug therapeutics, gene modifications and host-pathogen interaction from metabolic perspectives. However, further progress must still be made in MS-based metabolomics because of the shortcomings in the current technologies and knowledge. This technique-driven review aims to explore the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules facilitated by MS-based metabolomics and to highlight the analytic capabilities and promising applications of this discovery strategy. Moreover, the biological significance of the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules with different biological contexts is also interrogated at a metabolic perspective. PMID:24175746

  3. Importance of Interleukin-1 and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist in Short-Term Glucose Sensor Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Liu, Zenghe; Feldman, Ben; Kreutzer, Don

    2010-01-01

    Background The importance of the interleukin (IL)-1 cytokine family in inflammation and immunity is well established as a result of extensive in vitro and in vivo studies. In fact, much of our understanding of the in vivo importance of interleukin-1beta (IL-1B) is the result of research utilizing transgenic mice, such as overexpression or deficiencies of the naturally occurring inhibitor of IL-1 known as interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). For the present studies, we utilized these transgenic mice to determine the role of IL-1B in glucose sensor function in vivo. Methods To investigate the role of IL-1B in glucose sensor function in vivo, we compared glucose sensor function in trans-genic mice that (1) overexpressed IL-1RA [B6.Cg-Tg(II1rn)1Dih/J] and (2) are deficient in IL-1RA (B6.129S-Il1rntm1Dih/J), with mice that have normal levels of IL-1RA (C57BL/6). Results Our studies demonstrated that, during the first 7 days post-sensor implantation (PSI), mice deficient in IL-1RA had extensive inflammation and decreased sensor function when compared to normal or IL-1RA-overexpressing mice. Conclusion These data directly support our hypothesis that the IL-1 family of cytokines and antagonists play a critical role in controlling tissue reactions and thereby sensor function in vivo during the first 7 days PSI. PMID:20920427

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel ferrocyanide functionalized nanopourous silica decorporation agent for cesium in rats.

    PubMed

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert; Addleman, R Shane; Fryxell, Glen E; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO(2)). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium ((137)Cs); therefore, based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Animals in Group I were administered (137)Cs chloride (approximately 40 microg kg(-1)) by intravenous (i.v.) injection or oral gavage; Group II animals were administered pre-bound (137)Cs-SAMMS or sequential Cs chloride + SAMMS (approximately 61 ng kg(-1)) by oral gavage; and Group III was orally administered (137)Cs chloride (approximately 61 ng kg(-1)) followed by either 0.1 g of SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing, the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 h and blood, urine, and fecal samples were collected for (137)Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered (137)Cs chloride was rapidly and well absorbed (approximately 100% relative to i.v. dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces, and tissues) were very comparable to the i.v. dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound (137)Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with approximately 1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the (137)Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS and Prussian blue both effectively captured available (137)Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS outperforms Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low (137)Cs chloride dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize the performance of SAMMS in vivo over a broader range of doses and conditions. PMID:20699707

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Ferrocyanide Functionalized Nanopourous Silica Decorporation Agent for Cesium in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO2). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation, and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium (137Cs); based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Group I was administered 137Cs (~40 ?geq/kg) by intravenous (iv) injection and oral gavage; Group II was administered pre-bound 137Cs-SAMMS and sequential 137Cs + SAMMS (~61 ngeq/kg) by oral gavage; and Group III evaluated orally administered 137Cs (~0.06 ?geq/kg) followed by 0.1 g of either SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 hour and blood, urine and fecal samples were collected for 137Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered 137Cs was rapidly and well absorbed (~100% relative to iv dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces & tissues) were very comparable to the iv dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound 137Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with ~1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the 137Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS & Prussian blue both effectively captured available 137Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS out performs Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low 137Cs dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize SAMMS in vivo performance over a broader range of doses and conditions.

  6. Functional Data Analysis for Sparse Longitudinal Data

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jane-Ling

    Functional Data Analysis for Sparse Longitudinal Data Fang Yao, Hans-Georg M¨uller, and Jane of repeated measurements available per subject is small. In contrast, classical functional data analysis. Functional data analysis for sparse longitudinal data enables prediction of individual smooth trajectories

  7. Demonstration of an in vivo functional beta 3-adrenoceptor in man.

    PubMed Central

    Enocksson, S; Shimizu, M; Lönnqvist, F; Nordenström, J; Arner, P

    1995-01-01

    Although it is well established in several mammalian species that beta 3-adrenoceptors play a major role in regulating lipolysis and thermogenesis in adipose tissue, the functional existence and role of this receptor subtype in man has been controversial. We investigated whether the beta 3-adrenoceptor functionally co-exists with beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in vivo in human adipose tissue. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue of healthy non-obese subjects was microdialyzed with equimolar concentrations of dobutamine (selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist), terbutaline (selective beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), or CGP 12177 (selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist). All three agents caused a rapid, sustained, concentration-dependent and significant elevation of the glycerol level in the microdialysate (lipolysis index). However, only terbutaline stimulated the nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue, as measured by an ethanol escape technique. Dobutamine and CGP 12177 was equally effective in elevating the glycerol level (maximum effect 150% above baseline). Terbutaline was significantly more effective than the other two beta-agonists (maximum effect 200% above baseline). When adipose tissue was pretreated with the beta 1/beta 2-selective adrenoceptor blocker propranolol the glycerol increasing effect of dobutamine or terbutaline was inhibited by 80-85% but the glycerol response to CGP 12177 was not influenced. It is concluded that a functional beta 3-adrenoceptor is present in vivo in man. It co-exists with beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in adipose tissue and may therefore play a role in lipolysis regulation. It appears, however, that the beta 2-adrenoceptor is the most important beta-adrenoceptor subtype for the mobilization of lipids from abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue because of its concomitant stimulatory effect on lipolysis and blood flow. PMID:7738189

  8. Estrogen protects renal endothelial barrier function from ischemia-reperfusion in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Tetsuhiro; Komers, Radko; Herson, Paco S.; Anderson, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that renal endothelial function may be altered in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Acute kidney injury is sexually dimorphic, and estrogen protects renal tubular function after experimental ischemic injury. This study tested the hypothesis that during ischemia-reperfusion, estrogen alters glomerular endothelial function to prevent hyperpermeability. Glomerular endothelial cells were exposed to 8-h oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by 4- and 8-h reoxygenation-glucose repletion. After 4-h reoxygenation-glucose repletion, transendothelial permeability to Ficoll-70 was reduced, and transendothelial resistance increased, by 17?-estradiol vs. vehicle treatment during OGD (OGD-vehicle: 91.0 ± 11.8%, OGD-estrogen: 102.6 ± 10.8%, P < 0.05). This effect was reversed by coadministration of G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) antagonist G15 with 17?-estradiol (OGD-estrogen-G15: 89.5 ± 6.9, P < 0.05 compared with 17?-estradiol). To provide preliminary confirmation of this result in vivo, Ficoll-70 was administered to mice 24 h after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR). Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) in these mice were elevated within 12 h following CA/CPR and reduced at 24 h by pretreatment with 17?-estradiol (BUN/SCr 17?-estradiol: 34 ± 19/0.2 ± 0.1 vehicle: 92 ± 49/0.5 ± 0.3, n = 8–12, P < 0.05). Glomerular sieving of Ficoll 70 was increased by CA/CPR within 2 h of injury and 17?-estradiol treatment (?; 17?-estradiol: 0.74 ± 0.26 vs. vehicle: 1.05 ± 0.53, n = 14–15, P < 0.05). These results suggest that estrogen reduces postischemic glomerular endothelial hyperpermeability at least in part through GPR30 and that estrogen may regulate post CA/CPR glomerular permeability in a similar fashion in vivo. PMID:22622457

  9. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  10. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  11. In Vitro Hematological and In Vivo Vasoactivity Assessment of Dextran Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D.; Frame, Mary D.; Dewar, Anthony M.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    The intravenous, intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration of water solubilized graphene nanoparticles for biomedical applications will result in their interaction with the hematological components and vasculature. Herein, we have investigated the effects of dextran functionalized graphene nanoplatelets (GNP-Dex) on histamine release, platelet activation, immune activation, blood cell hemolysis in vitro, and vasoactivity in vivo. The results indicate that GNP-Dex formulations prevented histamine release from activated RBL-2H3 rat mast cells, and at concentrations ? 7?mg/ml, showed a 12–20% increase in levels of complement proteins. Cytokine (TNF-Alpha and IL-10) levels remained within normal range. GNP-Dex formulations did not cause platelet activation or blood cell hemolysis. Using the hamster cheek pouch in vivo model, the initial vasoactivity of GNP-Dex at concentrations (1–50?mg/ml) equivalent to the first pass of a bolus injection was a brief concentration-dependent dilation in arcade and terminal arterioles. However, they did not induce a pro-inflammatory endothelial dysfunction effect. PMID:24002570

  12. Selective ex-vivo photothermal ablation of human pancreatic cancer with albumin functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Bele, Constantin; Orza, Anamaria Ioana; Lucan, Ciprian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Manaila, Ioana; Iulia, Ferencz; Dana, Iancu; Zaharie, Florin; Osian, Gelu; Vlad, Liviu; Iancu, Cornel

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser-mediated ablation of cancer cells marked with biofunctionalized carbon nanotubes is frequently called “nanophotothermolysis”. We herein present a method of selective nanophotothermolisys of pancreatic cancer (PC) using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with human serum albumin (HSA). With the purpose of testing the therapeutic value of these nanobioconjugates, we have developed an ex-vivo experimental platform. Surgically resected specimens from patients with PC were preserved in a cold medium and kept alive via intra-arterial perfusion. Additionally, the HSA-MWCNTs have been intra-arterially administered in the greater pancreatic artery under ultrasound guidance. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemical staining have confirmed the selective accumulation of HSA-MWCNTs inside the human PC tissue. The external laser irradiation of the specimen has significantly produced extensive necrosis of the malign tissue after the intra-arterial administration of HSA-MWCNTs, without any harmful effects on the surrounding healthy parenchyma. We have obtained a selective photothermal ablation of the malign tissue based on the selective internalization of MWCNTs with HSA cargo inside the pancreatic adenocarcinoma after the ex-vivo intra-arterial perfusion. PMID:21720504

  13. Functional Evaluation of ES–Somatic Cell Hybrids In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kitai; Liu, Jun; Ng, Kitwa; Daley, George Q.; Verma, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have previously been reported to reprogram somatic cells following fusion. The resulting ES–somatic cell hybrids have been shown to adopt the transcriptional profile of ESCs, suggesting that the pluripotent program is dominant. ES–somatic cell hybrids have most characteristics of pluripotent cells in vitro; however, it remains unclear whether the somatic genome is an active partner in the hybrid cells or simply retained predominately as silent cargo. Furthermore, the functional properties of ES–somatic cell hybrids in vivo have been limited to studies on their contribution to teratomas and developing embryos/chimeras. The extent of their pluripotency remains largely unclear. Here we determined that the somatic genome is actively transcribed by generating ES–somatic cell hybrids using Rag2-deficient ESCs fused to autologous wild-type somatic cells. Rag2 expression was detected during in vitro differentiation, suggesting that the somatic genome follows the correct temporal cues during differentiation. Furthermore, ES–somatic cell hybrids maintain their tetraploid state following 4 weeks of differentiation in vivo and are immune tolerated when transferred into matched individuals. The ES–somatic cell hybrids can efficiently differentiate into hematopoietic precursors in both myeloid and lymphoid lineages in vitro, suggesting that the somatic genome is actively transcribed following cell fusion based reprogramming. However, the ES–somatic cell hybrids showed an altered hematopoietic potential following in vitro differentiation and were unable to show hematopoietic engraftment in a mouse model. PMID:24787484

  14. An In Vivo Cardiac Assay to Determine the Functional Consequences of Putative Long QT Syndrome Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Chuanchau J.; Barnett, Spencer M.; Bian, Jian-Tao; Weng, H. Cindy; Sheng, Xiaoming; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Genetic testing for Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is now a standard and integral component of clinical cardiology. A major obstacle to the interpretation of genetic findings is the lack of robust functional assays to determine the pathogenicity of identified gene variants in a high throughput manner. Objective The goal of this study was to design and test a high throughput in vivo cardiac assay to distinguish between disease-causing and benign KCNH2 (hERG1) variants, using the zebrafish as a model organism. Methods and Results We tested the ability of previously characterized LQTS hERG1 mutations and polymorphisms to restore normal repolarization in the kcnh2-knockdown embryonic zebrafish. The cardiac assay correctly identified a benign variant in 9 of 10 cases (negative predictive value 90%) while correctly identifying a disease-causing variant in 39/39 cases (positive predictive value 100%). Conclusion The in vivo zebrafish cardiac assay approaches the accuracy of the current benchmark in vitro assay for the detection of disease-causing mutations and is far superior in terms of throughput rate. Together with emerging algorithms for interpreting a positive LQTS genetic test, the zebrafish cardiac assay provides an additional tool for the final determination of pathogenicity of gene variants identified in LQTS genetic screening. PMID:23303164

  15. In Vivo Evaluation of Vena Caval Filters: Can Function Be Linked to Design Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, Mary C. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Hospitals, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0346 (United States); Cho, Kyung J. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospitals, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0346 (United States); Greenfield, Lazar J. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Hospitals, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0346 (United States)

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the five vena caval filters marketed in the United States and one investigational vena caval filter and to determine whether there is an association between their design and their in vivo function.Methods: Four of each type of filter-Simon Nitinol (SN), Bird's Nest (BN), Vena Tech (VT), Greenfield stainless steel (PSGF), Greenfield titanium (TGF), and the investigational stent cone filter (NGF)-were studied for 60 days in 12 sheep. Radiographic and pathologic outcomes to be assessed included clot capture and resolution, vena caval penetration, position of the filter, thrombogenicity, and vessel wall reaction.Results: Filters differed with respect to the number of clot-trapping levels and the interdependence of the legs. All devices were successfully placed. Intentionally embolized clot was captured. One VT and two SN filters migrated in response to clot capture. Resolution of thrombus was variable, and related to the design of the device. Fibrin webbing was widely present with the VT, BN, and SN filters but limited in the others. The VT and NGF filters demonstrated the most stable filter base diameter.Conclusions: The performance of vena caval filters differs with respect to clot resolution and mechanical stability. Interdependent filter limbs and single-stage conical capture sites appear to result in more favorable performance in in vivo studies.

  16. Relationship between in vitro sperm functional tests and in vivo fertility of rams following cervical artificial insemination of ewes with frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    O' Meara, C M; Hanrahan, J P; Prathalingam, N S; Owen, J S; Donovan, A; Fair, S; Ward, F; Wade, M; Evans, A C O; Lonergan, P

    2008-03-01

    Several procedures have been proposed to assess structural and functional characteristics of cryopreserved ram semen but none so far have yielded consistent relationships with in vivo fertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate several sperm function tests as potential markers of in vivo ram fertility (determined by pregnancy rate in ewes) using frozen-thawed semen. In experiment 1, frozen-thawed straws (n=3 per ram) of semen from three high and three low fertility rams were assessed using fluorescent microscopy for (1) progressive motility, (2) viability and, (3) acrosomal status. In experiment 2, frozen-thawed straws (n=3 per ram) of semen from 18 rams of known fertility were analysed using either computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) for eight motion characteristics or flow cytometric staining for: (1) viability and acrosomal status, (2) plasma membrane status and capacitation-like changes, and (3) live cells following an osmotic resistance test (ORT). In experiment 3, platelet-activating factor (PAF) was isolated from straws (n=2 per ram) of semen using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantified using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry for 18 rams. In experiment 1, no association was found between motility, viability (% live) or acrosomal status (% damaged, % intact and % reacted) and in vivo fertility. In experiment 2, no correlation was found between motility (CASA), viability (% live), acrosomal status (% live, % live intact and % reacted), capacitation status (% capacitated, % non-capacitated), plasma membrane stability (% dead) and % live cells following ORT and ram in vivo fertility. In experiment 3, there was no relationship between PAF content in spermatozoa and ram fertility. In conclusion, we were unable to relate the in vivo fertility of rams with in vitro functional tests of their frozen-thawed semen and suggest that the fertility of a given semen sample cannot easily be quantified using available in vitro tests. PMID:18248736

  17. Flexible and general synthesis of functionalized phosphoisoprenoids for the study of prenylation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Debapratim; Tnimov, Zakir; Nguyen, Uyen T T; Thimmaiah, Govindaraju; Lo, Harriet; Abankwa, Daniel; Wu, Yaowen; Goody, Roger S; Waldmann, Herbert; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2012-03-19

    Protein modification with isoprenoid lipids affects hundreds of signaling proteins in eukaryotic cells. Modification of isoprenoids with reporter groups is the main approach for the creation of probes for the analysis of protein prenylation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a new strategy for the synthesis of functionalized phosphoisoprenoids that uses an aminederivatized isoprenoid scaffold as a starting point for the synthesis of functionalized phosphoisoprenoid libraries. This overcomes a long-standing problem in the field, where multistep synthesis had to be carried out for each individual isoprenoid analogue. The described approach enabled us to synthesize a range of new compounds, including two novel fluorescent isoprenoids that previously could not be generated by conventional means. The fluorescent probes that were developed using the described approach possess significant spectroscopic advantages to all previously generated fluorescent isoprenoid analogue. Using these analogues for flow cytometry and cell imaging, we analyzed the uptake of isoprenoids by mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, we demonstrate that derivatization of the scaffold can be coupled in a one-pot reaction to enzymatic incorporation of the resulting isoprenoid group into proteins. This enables rapid evaluation of functional groups for compatibility with individual prenyltransferases and identification of the prenyltransferase specific substrates. PMID:22351497

  18. Functional specificity of the homeodomain protein fushi tarazu: the role of DNA-binding specificity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms determining the functional specificity of Drosophila homeodomain proteins are largely unknown. Here, the role of DNA-binding specificity for the in vivo function of the homeodomain protein fushi tarazu (ftz) is analyzed. We find that specific DNA binding is an important but not sufficient determinant of the functional specificity of ftz in vivo: The ftz DNA-binding specificity mutant ftzQ50K retains partial ftz wild-type activity in gene activation and phenotypic rescue assays. Furthermore, specificity mutations in a ftz-in vivo binding site only partially reduce enhancer activity as compared to null mutations of this site. Despite bicoid-like DNA-binding specificity ftzQ50K does not activate natural or artificial bcd target genes in the realms of ftz. These results are discussed in the light of recent observations on the mechanism of action of the yeast homeodomain protein alpha 2. Images PMID:8434005

  19. In vivo exposure to bicarbonate/lactate- and bicarbonate-buffered peritoneal dialysis fluids improves ex vivo peritoneal macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, R K; Jones, S; Moseley, A; Holmes, C J; Argyle, R; Williams, J D; Coles, G A; Pu, K; Faict, D; Topley, N

    2000-01-01

    The impact on peritoneal macrophage (PMO) function of acidic lactate-buffered (Lac-PDF [PD4]; 40 mmol/L of lactate; pH 5.2) and neutral-pH, bicarbonate-buffered (TB; 38 mmol/L of bicarbonate; pH 7. 3) and bicarbonate/lactate-buffered (TBL; 25 mmol/L of bicarbonate/15 mmol/L of lactate; pH 7.3) peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) was compared during a study of continuous therapy with PD4, TB, or TBL. During a run-in phase of 6 weeks when all patients (n = 15) were treated with their regular dialysis regimen with Lac-PDF, median PMO tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) release values were 203.6, 89.9, and 115.5 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO in the patients subsequently randomized to the PD4, TB, and TBL treatment groups, respectively. Median stimulated TNFalpha values (serum-treated zymosan [STZ], 10 microgram/mL) were 1,894.6, 567.3, and 554.5 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO in the same groups, respectively. During the trial phase of 12 weeks, when the three groups of patients (n = 5 per group) were randomized to continuous treatment with PD4, TB, or TBL, median constitutive TNFalpha release values were 204.7, 131.4, and 155.4 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO, respectively. Stimulated TNFalpha values (STZ, 10 microgram/mL) were 1,911, 1,832, and 1,378 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO in the same groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of variance comparing the run-in phase with the trial phase showed that PMO TNFalpha release was significantly elevated in patients treated with both TB (P = 0.040) and TBL (P = 0.014) but not in patients treated with Lac-PDF (P = 0. 795). These data suggest that patients continuously exposed to bicarbonate- and bicarbonate/lactate-buffered PDFs might have better preserved PMO function and thus improved host defense status. PMID:10620552

  20. Harmonic Analysis of Polynomial Threshold Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jehoshua Bruck

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of linear threshold Boolean functions has recently attracted the attention of those interested in circuit complexity as well as of those interested in neural networks. Here a generalization of linear threshold functions is defined, namely, polynomial threshold functions, and its relation to the class of linear threshold functions is investigated. A Boolean function is polynomial threshold if it

  1. Artemisia scoparia Enhances Adipocyte Development and Endocrine Function In Vitro and Enhances Insulin Action In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Allison J.; Fuller, Scott; Fedorcenco, Veaceslav; Beyl, Robbie; Burris, Thomas P.; Mynatt, Randall; Ribnicky, David M.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Failure of adipocytes to expand during periods of energy excess can result in undesirable metabolic consequences such as ectopic fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Blinded screening studies have indicated that Artemisia scoparia (SCO) extracts can enhance adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation in cultured adipocytes. The present study tested the hypothesis that SCO treatment modulates fat cell development and function in vitro and insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue in vivo. Methods In vitro experiments utilized a Gal4-PPAR? ligand binding domain (LBD) fusion protein-luciferase reporter assay to examine PPAR? activation. To investigate the ability of SCO to modulate adipogenesis and mature fat cell function in 3T3-L1 cells, neutral lipid accumulation, gene expression, and protein secretion were measured by Oil Red O staining, qRT-PCR, and immunoblotting, respectively. For the in vivo experiments, diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD containing 1% w/w SCO for four weeks. Body weight and composition, food intake, and fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured. Phospho-activation and expression of insulin-sensitizing proteins in epididymal adipose tissue (eWAT) were measured by immunoblotting. Results Ethanolic extracts of A. scoparia significantly activated the PPAR? LBD and enhanced lipid accumulation in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. SCO increased the transcription of several PPAR? target genes in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells and rescued the negative effects of tumor necrosis factor ? on production and secretion of adiponectin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in fully differentiated fat cells. DIO mice treated with SCO had elevated adiponectin levels and increased phosphorylation of AMPK? in eWAT when compared to control mice. In SCO-treated mice, these changes were also associated with decreased fasting insulin and glucose levels. Conclusion SCO has metabolically beneficial effects on adipocytes in vitro and adipose tissue in vivo, highlighting its potential as a metabolically favorable botanical supplement. PMID:24915004

  2. In vivo function and comparative genomic analyses of the Drosophila gut microbiota identify candidate symbiosis factors.

    PubMed

    Newell, Peter D; Chaston, John M; Wang, Yiping; Winans, Nathan J; Sannino, David R; Wong, Adam C N; Dobson, Adam J; Kagle, Jeanne; Douglas, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis is often characterized by co-evolutionary changes in the genomes of the partners involved. An understanding of these changes can provide insight into the nature of the relationship, including the mechanisms that initiate and maintain an association between organisms. In this study we examined the genome sequences of bacteria isolated from the Drosophila melanogaster gut with the objective of identifying genes that are important for function in the host. We compared microbiota isolates with con-specific or closely related bacterial species isolated from non-fly environments. First the phenotype of germ-free Drosophila (axenic flies) was compared to that of flies colonized with specific bacteria (gnotobiotic flies) as a measure of symbiotic function. Non-fly isolates were functionally distinct from bacteria isolated from flies, conferring slower development and an altered nutrient profile in the host, traits known to be microbiota-dependent. Comparative genomic methods were next employed to identify putative symbiosis factors: genes found in bacteria that restore microbiota-dependent traits to gnotobiotic flies, but absent from those that do not. Factors identified include riboflavin synthesis and stress resistance. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify protein coding genes for which fly-isolate sequences were more similar to each other than to other sequences, reasoning that these genes may have a shared function unique to the fly environment. This method identified genes in Acetobacter species that cluster in two distinct genomic loci: one predicted to be involved in oxidative stress detoxification and another encoding an efflux pump. In summary, we leveraged genomic and in vivo functional comparisons to identify candidate traits that distinguish symbiotic bacteria. These candidates can serve as the basis for further work investigating the genetic requirements of bacteria for function and persistence in the Drosophila gut. PMID:25408687

  3. Improving the signal analysis for in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhenyu; Yang, Ping; Wei, Dan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    At early stage of cancer, a small number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear in the blood circulation. Thus, early detection of malignant circulating tumor cells has great significance for timely treatment to reduce the cancer death rate. We have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of CTCs and record the signals from target cells. Information of target cells which is helpful to the early therapy would be obtained through analyzing and processing the signals. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The PAFC technique can detect signals from circulating tumor cells or other particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly.

  4. Atypical Membrane Topology and Heteromeric Function of Drosophila Odorant Receptors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard; Sachse, Silke; Michnick, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) each express two odorant receptors (ORs): a divergent member of the OR family and the highly conserved, broadly expressed receptor OR83b. OR83b is essential for olfaction in vivo and enhances OR function in vitro, but the molecular mechanism by which it acts is unknown. Here we demonstrate that OR83b heterodimerizes with conventional ORs early in the endomembrane system in OSNs, couples these complexes to the conserved ciliary trafficking pathway, and is essential to maintain the OR/OR83b complex within the sensory cilia, where odor signal transduction occurs. The OR/OR83b complex is necessary and sufficient to promote functional reconstitution of odor-evoked signaling in sensory neurons that normally respond only to carbon dioxide. Unexpectedly, unlike all known vertebrate and nematode chemosensory receptors, we find that Drosophila ORs and OR83b adopt a novel membrane topology with their N-termini and the most conserved loops in the cytoplasm. These loops mediate direct association of ORs with OR83b. Our results reveal that OR83b is a universal and integral part of the functional OR in Drosophila. This atypical heteromeric and topological design appears to be an insect-specific solution for odor recognition, making the OR/OR83b complex an attractive target for the development of highly selective insect repellents to disrupt olfactory-mediated host-seeking behaviors of insect disease vectors. PMID:16402857

  5. Presenilin controls kinesin-1 and dynein function during APP-vesicle transport in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shermali; Yang, Ge; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-10-01

    Neurons and other cells require intracellular transport of essential components for viability and function. Previous work has shown that while net amyloid precursor protein (APP) transport is generally anterograde, individual vesicles containing APP move bi-directionally. This discrepancy highlights our poor understanding of the in vivo regulation of APP-vesicle transport. Here, we show that reduction of presenilin (PS) or suppression of gamma-secretase activity substantially increases anterograde and retrograde velocities for APP vesicles. Strikingly, PS deficiency has no effect on an unrelated cargo vesicle class containing synaptotagmin, which is powered by a different kinesin motor. Increased velocities caused by PS or gamma-secretase reduction require functional kinesin-1 and dynein motors. Together, our findings suggest that a normal function of PS is to repress kinesin-1 and dynein motor activity during axonal transport of APP vesicles. Furthermore, our data suggest that axonal transport defects induced by loss of PS-mediated regulatory effects on APP-vesicle motility could be a major cause of neuronal and synaptic defects observed in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) pathogenesis. Thus, perturbations of APP/PS transport could contribute to early neuropathology observed in AD, and highlight a potential novel therapeutic pathway for early intervention, prior to neuronal loss and clinical manifestation of disease. PMID:23710041

  6. Structure predicts function: Combining non-invasive electrophysiology with in-vivo histology

    PubMed Central

    Helbling, Saskia; Teki, Sundeep; Callaghan, Martina F.; Sedley, William; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Barnes, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach for combining high resolution MRI-based myelin mapping with functional information from electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The main contribution to the primary currents detectable with EEG and MEG comes from ionic currents in the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, aligned perpendicularly to the local cortical surface. We provide evidence from an in-vivo experiment that the variation in MRI-based myeloarchitecture measures across the cortex predicts the variation of the current density over individuals and thus is of functional relevance. Equivalent current dipole locations and moments due to pitch onset evoked response fields (ERFs) were estimated by means of a variational Bayesian algorithm. The myeloarchitecture was estimated indirectly from individual high resolution quantitative multi-parameter maps (MPMs) acquired at 800 ?m isotropic resolution. Myelin estimates across cortical areas correlated positively with dipole magnitude. This correlation was spatially specific: regions of interest in the auditory cortex provided significantly better models than those covering whole hemispheres. Based on the MPM data we identified the auditory cortical area TE1.2 as the most likely origin of the pitch ERFs measured by MEG. We can now proceed to exploit the higher spatial resolution of quantitative MPMs to identify the cortical origin of M/EEG signals, inform M/EEG source reconstruction and explore structure–function relationships at a fine structural level in the living human brain. PMID:25529007

  7. Reconstruction of functional endometrium-like tissue in vitro and in vivo using cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Soichi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Kuramoto, Goro; Ishitani, Ken; Matsui, Hideo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-03-28

    Uterus is a female specific reproductive organ and plays critical roles in allowing embryo to grow. Therefore, the endometrial disorders lead to female infertility. Hence, the regeneration of endometrium allowing fertilized ovum to implant might be valuable in the field of fertility treatment. Recently, cell sheet engineering using a temperature-responsive culture dish has advanced in regenerative medicine. With this technology, endometrial cells were harvested as a contiguous cell sheet by reducing temperature. Firstly, mouse endometrial cell sheets were re-cultured for 3 days to evaluate the function. Histological analyses revealed that endometrial epithelial cell-specific cytokeratin 18 and female-specific hormone receptors, estrogen receptor ? and progesterone receptor, were expressed. Furthermore, endometrial epithelial cells constructed epithelial layer at the apical side. Then, endometrial cell sheets from green-fluorescent-protein rat cells were transplanted onto the buttock muscle of nude rat for evaluating the function in vivo. Histological analyses showed that endometrial cell sheets reconstructed endometrium-like tissue, which was found to form uterus-specific endometrial glands having hormonal receptor to estrogen. In this study, endometrial cell sheets were speculated to contribute to the regeneration of functional endometrium as a new therapy. PMID:24602616

  8. Genome-scale analysis of in vivo spatiotemporal promoter activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Dupuy; Nicolas Bertin; César A Hidalgo; Kavitha Venkatesan; Domena Tu; David Lee; Jennifer Rosenberg; Nenad Svrzikapa; Aurélie Blanc; Alain Carnec; Anne-Ruxandra Carvunis; Rock Pulak; Jane Shingles; John Reece-Hoyes; Rebecca Hunt-Newbury; Ryan Viveiros; William A Mohler; Murat Tasan; Frederick P Roth; Christian Le Peuch; Ian A Hope; Robert Johnsen; Donald G Moerman; Albert-László Barabási; David Baillie; Marc Vidal

    2007-01-01

    Differential regulation of gene expression is essential for cell fate specification in metazoans. Characterizing the transcriptional activity of gene promoters, in time and in space, is therefore a critical step toward understanding complex biological systems. Here we present an in vivo spatiotemporal analysis for ?900 predicted C. elegans promoters (?5% of the predicted protein-coding genes), each driving the expression of

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Peristaltic and Segmental Motion In Vivo in the Rat Small Intestine Using Dynamic

    E-print Network

    Brasseur, James G.

    Quantitative Analysis of Peristaltic and Segmental Motion In Vivo in the Rat Small Intestine Using of nutrients that takes place within the small intestine. The normal processes of the small intestine are known been used extensively to study segments of the intestine that have been exteriorized from animals

  10. Monitoring of in vivo function of superparamagnetic iron oxide labelled murine dendritic cells during anti-tumour vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tavaré, Richard; Sagoo, Pervinder; Varama, Gopal; Tanriver, Yakup; Warely, Alice; Diebold, Sandra S; Southworth, Richard; Schaeffter, Tobias; Lechler, Robert I; Razavi, Reza; Lombardi, Giovanna; Mullen, Gregory E D

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) generated in vitro to present tumour antigens have been injected in cancer patients to boost in vivo anti-tumour immune responses. This approach to cancer immunotherapy has had limited success. For anti-tumour therapy, delivery and subsequent migration of DCs to lymph nodes leading to effective stimulation of effector T cells is thought to be essential. The ability to non-invasively monitor the fate of adoptively transferred DCs in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical tool to correlate their in vivo behavior with response to treatment. Previous reports of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) labelling of different cell types, including DCs, have indicated varying detrimental effects on cell viability, migration, differentiation and immune function. Here we describe an optimised labelling procedure using a short incubation time and low concentration of clinically used SPIO Endorem to successfully track murine DC migration in vivo using MRI in a mouse tumour model. First, intracellular labelling of bone marrow derived DCs was monitored in vitro using electron microscopy and MRI relaxometry. Second, the in vitro characterisation of SPIO labelled DCs demonstrated that viability, phenotype and functions were comparable to unlabelled DCs. Third, ex vivo SPIO labelled DCs, when injected subcutaneously, allowed for the longitudinal monitoring by MR imaging of their migration in vivo. Fourth, the SPIO DCs induced the proliferation of adoptively transferred CD4(+) T cells but, most importantly, they primed cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell responses to protect against a B16-Ova tumour challenge. Finally, using anatomical information from the MR images, the immigration of DCs was confirmed by the increase in lymph node size post-DC injection. These results demonstrate that the SPIO labelling protocol developed in this study is not detrimental for DC function in vitro and in vivo has potential clinical application in monitoring therapeutic DCs in patients with cancer. PMID:21637760

  11. Application of spectral decomposition analysis to in vivo quantification of aluminum by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Comsa, D C; Prestwich, W V; McNeill, F E; Byun, S H

    2004-12-01

    The toxic effects of aluminum are cumulative and result in painful forms of renal osteodystrophy, most notably adynamic bone disease and osteomalacia, but also other forms of disease. The Trace Element Group at McMaster University has developed an accelerator-based in vivo procedure for detecting aluminum body burden by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Further refining of the method was necessary for increasing its sensitivity. In this context, the present study proposes an improved algorithm for data analysis, based on spectral decomposition. A new minimum detectable limit (MDL) of (0.7+/-0.1)mg Al was reached for a local dose of (20+/-1)mSv. The study also addresses the feasibility of a new data acquisition technique, the electronic rejection of the coincident events detected by a NaI(Tl) system. It is expected that the application of this technique, together with spectral decomposition analysis, would provide an acceptable MDL for the method to be valuable in a clinical setting. PMID:15388133

  12. In VivoFunctional Imaging of Intrinsic Scattering Changes in the Human Retina with High-speed Ultrahigh Resolution OCT

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, V. J.; Chen, Y.; Duker, J. S.; Fujimoto, J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive methods of probing retinal function are of interest for the early detection of retinal disease. While retinal function is traditionally directly measured with the electroretinogram (ERG), recently functional optical imaging of the retina has been demonstrated. In this manuscript, stimulus-induced, intrinsic optical scattering changes in the human retina are measured in vivo with high-speed, ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) operating at 50,000 axial scans per second and ?3.3 micron axial resolution. A stimulus and measurement protocol that enables measurement of functional OCT retinal signals is described. OCT signal changes in the photoreceptors are demonstrated. Two distinct responses having different temporal and spatial properties are reported. These results are discussed in the context of optical intrinsic signals measured previously in the retina by fundus imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Finally, challenges associated with in vivo functional retinal imaging in human subjects are discussed. PMID:19259228

  13. Pyrimidine motif triple helix in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA pseudoknot is essential for function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Darian D.; Cohen-Zontag, Osnat; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Shefer, Kinneret; Brown, Yogev; Ulyanov, Nikolai B.; Tzfati, Yehuda; Feigon, Juli

    2013-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3? ends of linear chromosomes. The specialized telomerase reverse transcriptase requires a multidomain RNA (telomerase RNA, TER), which includes an integral RNA template and functionally important template-adjacent pseudoknot. The structure of the human TER pseudoknot revealed that the loops interact with the stems to form a triple helix shown to be important for activity in vitro. A similar triple helix has been predicted to form in diverse fungi TER pseudoknots. The solution NMR structure of the Kluyveromyces lactis pseudoknot, presented here, reveals that it contains a long pyrimidine motif triple helix with unexpected features that include three individual bulge nucleotides and a C+•G-C triple adjacent to a stem 2–loop 2 junction. Despite significant differences in sequence and base triples, the 3D shape of the human and K. lactis TER pseudoknots are remarkably similar. Analysis of the effects of nucleotide substitutions on cell growth and telomere lengths provides evidence that this conserved structure forms in endogenously assembled telomerase and is essential for telomerase function in vivo. PMID:23776224

  14. Systematic in vivo RNAi analysis identifies IAPs as NEDD8-E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Broemer, Meike; Tenev, Tencho; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Hempel, Sophie; Blagoev, Blagoy; Silke, John; Ditzel, Mark; Meier, Pascal

    2010-12-10

    The intimate relationship between mediators of the ubiquitin (Ub)-signaling system and human diseases has sparked profound interest in how Ub influences cell death and survival. While the consequence of Ub attachment is intensely studied, little is known with regards to the effects of other Ub-like proteins (UBLs), and deconjugating enzymes that remove the Ub or UBL adduct. Systematic in vivo RNAi analysis identified three NEDD8-specific isopeptidases that, when knocked down, suppress apoptosis. Consistent with the notion that attachment of NEDD8 prevents cell death, genetic ablation of deneddylase 1 (DEN1) suppresses apoptosis. Unexpectedly, we find that Drosophila and human inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins can function as E3 ligases of the NEDD8 conjugation pathway, targeting effector caspases for neddylation and inactivation. Finally, we demonstrate that DEN1 reverses this effect by removing the NEDD8 modification. Altogether, our findings indicate that IAPs not only modulate cellular processes via ubiquitylation but also through attachment of NEDD8, thereby extending the complexity of IAP-mediated signaling. PMID:21145488

  15. In vivo mapping of the functional regions of the DEAD-box helicase Vasa.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mehrnoush; Lasko, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The maternally expressed Drosophila melanogaster DEAD-box helicase Vasa (Vas) is necessary for many cellular and developmental processes, including specification of primordial germ cells (pole cells), posterior patterning of the embryo, piRNA-mediated repression of transposon-encoded mRNAs, translational activation of gurken (grk) mRNA, and completion of oogenesis itself. Vas protein accumulates in the perinuclear nuage in nurse cells soon after their specification, and then at stage 10 Vas translocates to the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte. We produced a series of transgenic constructs encoding eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations affecting different regions of the protein, and analyzed in vivo which Vas functions each could support. We identified novel domains in the N- and C-terminal regions of the protein that are essential for localization, transposon repression, posterior patterning, and pole cell specification. One such functional region, the most C-terminal seven amino acids, is specific to Vas orthologues and is thus critical to distinguishing Vas from other closely related DEAD-box helicases. Surprisingly, we also found that many eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations that would be expected to abrogate DEAD-box helicase function localized to the nuage and posterior pole, and retained the capacity to support oogenesis, although they did not function in embryonic patterning, pole cell specification, grk activation, or transposon repression. We conclude from these experiments that Vas, a multifunctional protein, uses different domains and different molecular associations to carry out its various cellular and developmental roles. PMID:25795910

  16. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  17. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B; Linden, Matthew D; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L; Michelson, Alan D

    2012-04-26

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  18. Humanized large-scale expanded endothelial colony–forming cells function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reinisch, Andreas; Hofmann, Nicole A.; Obenauf, Anna C.; Kashofer, Karl; Rohde, Eva; Schallmoser, Katharina; Flicker, Karin; Lanzer, Gerhard; Linkesch, Werner; Speicher, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are critically involved in essential biologic processes, such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. Endothelial colony–forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial progenitor cells with robust proliferative potential. Their profound vessel-forming capacity makes them a promising tool for innovative experimental, diagnostic, and therapeutic strategies. Efficient and safe methods for their isolation and expansion are presently lacking. Based on the previously established efficacy of animal serum–free large-scale clinical-grade propagation of mesenchymal stromal cells, we hypothesized that endothelial lineage cells may also be propagated efficiently following a comparable strategy. Here we demonstrate that human ECFCs can be recovered directly from unmanipulated whole blood. A novel large-scale animal protein-free humanized expansion strategy preserves the progenitor hierarchy with sustained proliferation potential of more than 30 population doublings. By applying large-scale propagated ECFCs in various test systems, we observed vascular networks in vitro and perfused vessels in vivo. After large-scale expansion and cryopreservation phenotype, function, proliferation, and genomic stability were maintained. For the first time, proliferative, functional, and storable ECFCs propagated under humanized conditions can be explored in terms of their therapeutic applicability and risk profile. PMID:19321860

  19. Group I PAKs function downstream of Rac to promote podosome invasion during myoblast fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Rui; Jin, Peng; Luo, Fengbao; Zhang, Guofeng; Anderson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) play essential roles in diverse cellular processes and are required for cell proliferation, apoptosis, polarity establishment, migration, and cell shape changes. Here, we have identified a novel function for the group I PAKs in cell–cell fusion. We show that the two Drosophila group I PAKs, DPak3 and DPak1, have partially redundant functions in myoblast fusion in vivo, with DPak3 playing a major role. DPak3 is enriched at the site of fusion colocalizing with the F-actin focus within a podosome-like structure (PLS), and promotes actin filament assembly during PLS invasion. Although the small GTPase Rac is involved in DPak3 activation and recruitment to the PLS, the kinase activity of DPak3 is required for effective PLS invasion. We propose a model whereby group I PAKs act downstream of Rac to organize the actin filaments within the PLS into a dense focus, which in turn promotes PLS invasion and fusion pore initiation during myoblast fusion. PMID:23007650

  20. A transcription blocker isolated from a designed repeat protein combinatorial library by in vivo functional screen

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonova, Elena B.; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Su, Yue; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Xie, Shicong; Guan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    A highly diverse DNA library coding for ankyrin seven-repeat proteins (ANK-N5C) was designed and constructed by a PCR-based combinatorial assembly strategy. A bacterial melibiose fermentation assay was adapted for in vivo functional screen. We isolated a transcription blocker that completely inhibits the melibiose-dependent expression of ?-galactosidase (MelA) and melibiose permease (MelB) of Escherichia coli by specifically preventing activation of the melAB operon. High-resolution crystal structural determination reveals that the designed ANK-N5C protein has a typical ankyrin fold, and the specific transcription blocker, ANK-N5C-281, forms a domain-swapped dimer. Functional tests suggest that the activity of MelR, a DNA-binding transcription activator and a member of AraC family of transcription factors, is inhibited by ANK-N5C-281 protein. All ANK-N5C proteins are expected to have a concave binding area with negative surface potential, suggesting that the designed ANK-N5C library proteins may facilitate the discovery of binders recognizing structural motifs with positive surface potential, like in DNA-binding proteins. Overall, our results show that the established library is a useful tool for the discovery of novel bioactive reagents. PMID:25627011

  1. Tolerogenic Function of Dimeric Forms of HLA-G Recombinant Proteins: A Comparative Study In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Caumartin, Julien; Daouya, Marina; Horuzsko, Anatolij; Carosella, Edgardo D.; LeMaoult, Joel

    2011-01-01

    HLA-G is a natural tolerogenic molecule involved in the best example of tolerance to foreign tissues there is: the maternal-fetal tolerance. The further involvement of HLA-G in the tolerance of allogeneic transplants has also been demonstrated and some of its mechanisms of action have been elucidated. For these reasons, therapeutic HLA-G molecules for tolerance induction in transplantation are actively investigated. In the present study, we studied the tolerogenic functions of three different HLA-G recombinant proteins: HLA-G heavy chain fused to ?2-microglobulin (B2M), HLA-G heavy chain fused to B2M and to the Fc portion of an immunoglobulin, and HLA-G alpha-1 domain either fused to the Fc part of an immunoglobulin or as a synthetic peptide. Our results demonstrate the tolerogenic function of B2M-HLA-G fusion proteins, and especially of B2M-HLA-G5, which were capable of significantly delaying allogeneic skin graft rejection in a murine in vivo transplantation model. The results from our studies suggest that HLA-G recombinant proteins are relevant candidates for tolerance induction in human transplantation. PMID:21779321

  2. Development of topical functionalized formulations added with propolis extract: stability, cutaneous absorption and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Marquele-Oliveira, F; Fonseca, Y M; de Freitas, O; Fonseca, M J V

    2007-09-01

    Propolis, which is a natural product widely consumed in the folk medicine, is a serious candidate to be applied topically due to its outstanding antioxidant properties. So, the purpose of this study was to develop stable topical formulations added with propolis extract in an attempt to prevent and/or treat the diseases occurring in skin caused by UV radiation. The antioxidant activity using a chemiluminescent method was used to evaluate the functional stability and the permeation/retention in skin of these formulations. In the long-term stability study, the formulations were stored at 25+/-2 degrees C/AH and at 40+/-2 degrees C/70% RH for 360 days. It was found in this study, that the formulations prepared with Polawax showed functional and physical stability in the period of study. In addition, this formulation presented good results in the percutaneous study, allowing the antioxidant compounds present in the propolis extract to reach lower layers in pig ear skin and in the whole hairless mice skin (retention=0.12 and 0.13 microL of propolis/g of skin, respectively). In the in vivo study, it was also suggested that this formulation may be effective in protecting skin from UVB photodamage, nevertheless other assays need to be done in order to have a complete understanding of the protective effect of formulations added with propolis extract. PMID:17600647

  3. Expression of Fc?RIIB Tempers Memory CD8 T-cell Function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel R.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Barber, Daniel L.; Harty, John T.

    2013-01-01

    During re-infection high-affinity IgG antibodies form complexes with both soluble antigen and antigen displayed on the surface of infected cells. These interactions regulate cellular activation of both innate cells and B cells, which express specific combinations of activating Fc gamma receptors (Fc?RI, Fc?RIII, Fc?RIV) and/or the inhibitory Fc gamma receptor (Fc?RIIB). Direct proof for functional expression of Fc?R by antigen-specific CD8 T-cells is lacking. Here, we show that the majority of memory CD8 T-cells generated by bacterial or viral infection express only Fc?RIIB and that Fc?RIIB could be detected on previously activated human CD8 T-cells. Of note, Fc?R stimulation during in vivo antigen challenge not only inhibited the cytotoxicity of memory CD8 T-cells against peptide-loaded or virus-infected targets, but Fc?RIIB blockade during homologous virus challenge enhanced the secondary CD8 T-cell response. Thus, memory CD8 T-cells intrinsically express a functional Fc?RIIB, permitting antigen-antibody complexes to regulate secondary CD8 T-cell responses. PMID:24285839

  4. Polyglycerolsulfate Functionalized Gold Nanorods as Optoacoustic Signal Nanoamplifiers for In Vivo Bioimaging of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vonnemann, Jonathan; Beziere, Nicolas; Böttcher, Christoph; Riese, Sebastian B.; Kuehne, Christian; Dernedde, Jens; Licha, Kai; von Schacky, Claudio; Kosanke, Yvonne; Kimm, Melanie; Meier, Reinhard; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We have synthesized a targeted imaging agent for rheumatoid arthritis based on polysulfated gold nanorods. The CTAB layer on gold nanorods was first replaced with PEG-thiol and then with dendritic polyglycerolsulfate at elevated temperature, which resulted in significantly reduced cytotoxicity compared to polyanionic gold nanorods functionalized by non-covalent approaches. In addition to classical characterization methods, we have established a facile UV-VIS based BaCl2 agglomeration assay to confirm a quantitative removal of unbound ligand. With the help of a competitive surface plasmon resonance-based L-selectin binding assay and a leukocyte adhesion-based flow cell assay, we have demonstrated the high inflammation targeting potential of the synthesized gold nanorods in vitro. In combination with the surface plasmon resonance band of AuNRs at 780 nm, these findings permitted the imaging of inflammation in an in vivo mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis with high contrast using multispectral optoacoustic tomography. The study offers a robust method for otherwise difficult to obtain covalently functionalized polyanionic gold nanorods, which are suitable for biological applications as well as a low-cost, actively targeted, and high contrast imaging agent for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. This paves the way for further research in other inflammation associated pathologies, in particular, when photothermal therapy can be applied. PMID:24723984

  5. Effects of altered ventilatory patterns of rabbit pulmonary endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme function, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Catravas, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Because alveolar pressure can influence pulmonary blood flow, volume and surface area, the authors have studied the effects of airway pressure on endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) function in rabbit lungs in vivo, utilizing indicator dilution techniques with /sup 3/H-Benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (BPAP) as substate. Static inclation of the lungs to a pressure of 0 or 5 mmHg did not change percent transpulmonary metabolism and Amax/Km ratio in comparison to control measurements during conventional mechanical ventilation. When the inflation pressure was increased to 10 mmHg, percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP remained unaltered but Amax/Km decreased over 40% from control. This decrease was in close relation to the reduction in pulmonary blood flow. Addition of 5 cm H/sub 2/O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the mechanical ventilation also decreased Amax/Km values and pulmonary blood flow but did not influence percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP. These results suggest that the detected alterations in ACE kinetics were more likely due to hemodynamic changes than enzyme dysfunction. The authors propose that high static alveolar pressures as well as PEEP did not affect angiotensin converting enzyme function, but reduced the fraction of perfused microvessels reflected in changes in Amax/Km ratios.

  6. Group I PAKs function downstream of Rac to promote podosome invasion during myoblast fusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duan, Rui; Jin, Peng; Luo, Fengbao; Zhang, Guofeng; Anderson, Nathan; Chen, Elizabeth H

    2012-10-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) play essential roles in diverse cellular processes and are required for cell proliferation, apoptosis, polarity establishment, migration, and cell shape changes. Here, we have identified a novel function for the group I PAKs in cell-cell fusion. We show that the two Drosophila group I PAKs, DPak3 and DPak1, have partially redundant functions in myoblast fusion in vivo, with DPak3 playing a major role. DPak3 is enriched at the site of fusion colocalizing with the F-actin focus within a podosome-like structure (PLS), and promotes actin filament assembly during PLS invasion. Although the small GTPase Rac is involved in DPak3 activation and recruitment to the PLS, the kinase activity of DPak3 is required for effective PLS invasion. We propose a model whereby group I PAKs act downstream of Rac to organize the actin filaments within the PLS into a dense focus, which in turn promotes PLS invasion and fusion pore initiation during myoblast fusion. PMID:23007650

  7. Conserved Fate and Function of Ferumoxides-Labeled Neural Precursor Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mikhal E.; Muja, Naser; Fainstein, Nina; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in cell therapy research for brain diseases has raised the need for non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells. For therapeutic application in multiple sclerosis, transplanted cells need to be tracked both spatially and temporally, in order to assess their migration and survival in the host tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of superparamagnetic iron oxide-(SPIO)-labeled cells has been widely used for high resolution monitoring of the biodistribution of cells after transplantation into the central nervous system (CNS). Here we labeled mouse glial-committed neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the clinically approved SPIO contrast agent ferumoxides and examined their survival and differentiation in vitro, as well as their functional response to environmental signals present within the inflamed brain of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice in vivo. We show that ferumoxides labeling does not affect NPC survival and pluripotency in vitro. Following intracerebroventricular (ICV) transplantation in EAE mice, ferumoxides-labeled NPCs responded to inflammatory cues in a similar fashion as unlabeled cells. Ferumoxides-labeled NPCs migrated over comparable distances in white matter tracts and differentiated equally into the glial lineages. Furthermore, ferumoxides-labeled NPCs inhibited lymph node cell proliferation in vitro, similarly to non-labeled cells, suggesting a preserved immunomodulatory function. These results demonstrate that ferumoxides-based MRI cell tracking is well suited for non-invasive monitoring of NPC transplantation. PMID:19885865

  8. In Vivo Function of PTEX88 in Malaria Parasite Sequestration and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Costa Nunes, Jean; Stenzel, Werner; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-06-01

    Malaria pathology is linked to remodeling of red blood cells by eukaryotic Plasmodium parasites. Central to host cell refurbishment is the trafficking of parasite-encoded virulence factors through the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX). Much of our understanding of its function is based on experimental work with cultured Plasmodium falciparum, yet direct consequences of PTEX impairment during an infection remain poorly defined. Using the murine malaria model parasite Plasmodium berghei, it is shown here that efficient sequestration to the pulmonary, adipose, and brain tissue vasculature is dependent on the PTEX components thioredoxin 2 (TRX2) and PTEX88. While TRX2-deficient parasites remain virulent, PTEX88-deficient parasites no longer sequester in the brain, correlating with abolishment of cerebral complications in infected mice. However, an apparent trade-off for virulence attenuation was spleen enlargement, which correlates with a strongly reduced schizont-to-ring-stage transition. Strikingly, general protein export is unaffected in PTEX88-deficient mutants that mature normally in vitro. Thus, PTEX88 is pivotal for tissue sequestration in vivo, parasite virulence, and preventing exacerbation of spleen pathology, but these functions do not correlate with general protein export to the host erythrocyte. The presented data suggest that the protein export machinery of Plasmodium parasites and their underlying mechanistic features are considerably more complex than previously anticipated and indicate challenges for targeted intervention strategies. PMID:25820521

  9. Multiple In Vivo Biological Processes Are Mediated by Functionally Redundant Activities of Drosophila mir-279 and mir-996

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kailiang; Jee, David; de Navas, Luis F.; Duan, Hong; Lai, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    While most miRNA knockouts exhibit only subtle defects, a handful of miRNAs are profoundly required for development or physiology. A particularly compelling locus is Drosophila mir-279, which was reported as essential to restrict the emergence of CO2-sensing neurons, to maintain circadian rhythm, and to regulate ovarian border cells. The mir-996 locus is located near mir-279 and bears a similar seed, but they otherwise have distinct, conserved, non-seed sequences, suggesting their evolutionary maintenance for separate functions. We generated single and double deletion mutants of the mir-279 and mir-996 hairpins, and cursory analysis suggested that miR-996 was dispensable. However, discrepancies in the strength of individual mir-279 deletion alleles led us to uncover that all extant mir-279 mutants are deficient for mature miR-996, even though they retain its genomic locus. We therefore engineered a panel of genomic rescue transgenes into the double deletion background, allowing a pure assessment of miR-279 and miR-996 requirements. Surprisingly, detailed analyses of viability, olfactory neuron specification, and circadian rhythm indicate that miR-279 is completely dispensable. Instead, an endogenous supply of either mir-279 or mir-996 suffices for normal development and behavior. Sensor tests of nine key miR-279/996 targets showed their similar regulatory capacities, although transgenic gain-of-function experiments indicate partially distinct activities of these miRNAs that may underlie that co-maintenance in genomes. Altogether, we elucidate the unexpected genetics of this critical miRNA operon, and provide a foundation for their further study. More importantly, these studies demonstrate that multiple, vital, loss-of-function phenotypes can be rescued by endogenous expression of divergent seed family members, highlighting the importance of this miRNA region for in vivo function. PMID:26042831

  10. In vivo analysis of human nucleoporin repeat domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), assembled from ?30 proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), mediates selective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. A subset of nucleoporins bear a domain with multiple phenylalanine–glycine (FG) motifs. As binding sites for transport receptors, FG Nups are critical in translocation through the NPC. Certain FG Nups are believed to associate via low-affinity, cohesive interactions to form the permeability barrier of the pore, although the form and composition of this functional barrier are debated. We used green fluorescent protein–Nup98/HoxA9 constructs with various numbers of repeats and also substituted FG domains from other nucleoporins for the Nup98 domain to directly compare cohesive interactions in live cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We find that cohesion is a function of both number and type of FG repeats. Glycine–leucine–FG (GLFG) repeat domains are the most cohesive. FG domains from several human nucleoporins showed no interactions in this assay; however, Nup214, with numerous VFG motifs, displayed measurable cohesion by FRAP. The cohesive nature of a human nucleoporin did not necessarily correlate with that of its yeast orthologue. The Nup98 GLFG domain also functions in pore targeting through binding to Nup93, positioning the GLFG domain in the center of the NPC and supporting a role for this nucleoporin in the permeability barrier. PMID:23427268

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of "Mind Reading" and In Vivo Rehearsal for High-Functioning Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomeer, Marcus L.; Smith, Rachael A.; Lopata, Christopher; Volker, Martin A.; Lipinski, Alanna M.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; McDonald, Christin A.; Lee, Gloria K.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a computer software (i.e., "Mind Reading") and in vivo rehearsal treatment on the emotion decoding and encoding skills, autism symptoms, and social skills of 43 children, ages 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). Children in treatment (n = 22)…

  12. Issues on functional analysis in behavioral assessment.

    PubMed

    Cone, J D

    1997-03-01

    The rebirth of interest in functional analysis is described. Clarification among conflicting terms is offered as a way of facilitating research in the area. Three phases of functional approach to assessment are identified: (a) descriptive, (b) interpretive, and (c) verification. Five assessment methods common to assessment, generally, are shown to be useful in both descriptive and verification phases. Evaluation of functional approaches requires attention to the psychometric adequacy of these methods. Accuracy, reliability, and validity concepts are reviewed briefly and their application to functional strategies is described. The use of treatment validity in the functional analysis of functional analysis is mentioned as the ultimate strategy for evaluating the adequacy of this assessment approach. The paper ends with a discussion of problems of multiple control of behavior, behavioral classification systems, training parents and other mediators in the functional approach, cost-effectiveness, and the place of functional analysis in a reorganized health care delivery system. PMID:9125107

  13. Functional data analysis: classification and regression 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ho-Jin

    2005-11-01

    Functional data refer to data which consist of observed functions or curves evaluated at a finite subset of some interval. In this dissertation, we discuss statistical analysis, especially classification and regression ...

  14. Functional Analysis of Pathogenicity Proteins of the Potato Cyst Nematode Globodera rostochiensis Using RNAi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qing Chen; S. Rehman; G. Smant; John T. Jones

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used widely as a tool for examining gene function and a method that allows its use with plant-parasitic nematodes recently has been described. Here, we use a modified method to analyze the function of secreted ß-1,4, endoglucanases of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis, the first in vivo functional analysis of a pathogenicity protein of

  15. In vitro and in vivo analysis of microtubule destabilizing kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Stumpff, Jason; Cooper, Jeremy; Domnitz, Sarah; Moore, Ayana; Rankin, Kathleen; Wagenbach, Mike; Wordeman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Cellular microtubules are rigid in comparison to other cytoskeletal elements [1, 2]. To facilitate cytoplasmic remodeling and timely responses to cell signaling events, microtubules depolymerize and repolymerize rapidly at their ends [3]. These dynamic properties are critically important for many cellular functions, such as spindle assembly, the capture and segregation of chromosomes during cell division and cell motility. Microtubule dynamics are spatially and temporally controlled in the cell by accessory proteins. Molecular motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily that act to destabilize microtubules play important roles in this regulation [4]. PMID:17951709

  16. Functional Analysis Topics discussed per day

    E-print Network

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    about integral operators and the linear algebra-functional analysis analogy (the `Rosetta Stone (Schroedinger equation); Stone's theorem on (strongly continuous) one parameter groups of unitary operators

  17. Hippocampal Surface Analysis using Spherical Harmonic Functions

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yalin

    Hippocampal Surface Analysis using Spherical Harmonic Functions Applied to Surface Conformal Laplacian is Spherical harmonic analysis applied to conforaml mapping Let be a conformal homeomorphism of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA. The spherical harmonic descriptors should

  18. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  19. Preconditioning of skeletal myoblast-based engineered tissue constructs enables functional coupling to myocardium in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Treskes, Philipp; Neef, Klaus; Srinivasan, Sureshkumar Perumal; Halbach, Marcel; Stamm, Christof; Cowan, Douglas; Scherner, Maximilian; Madershahian, Navid; Wittwer, Thorsten; Hescheler, Jürgen; Wahlers, Thorsten; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Skeletal myoblasts fuse to form functional syncytial myotubes as an integral part of the skeletal muscle. During this differentiation process, expression of proteins for mechanical and electrical integration is seized, which is a major drawback for the application of skeletal myoblasts in cardiac regenerative cell therapy, because global heart function depends on intercellular communication. Methods Mechanically preconditioned engineered tissue constructs containing neonatal mouse skeletal myoblasts were transplanted epicardially. A Y-chromosomal specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was undertaken up to 10 weeks after transplantation to confirm the presence of grafted cells. Histologic and electrophysiologic analyses were carried out 1 week after transplantation. Results Cells within the grafted construct expressed connexin 43 at the interface to the host myocardium, indicating electrical coupling, confirmed by sharp electrode recordings. Analyses of the maximum stimulation frequency (5.65 ± 0.37 Hz), conduction velocity (0.087 ± 0.011 m/s) and sensitivity for pharmacologic conduction block (0.736 ± 0.080 mM 1-heptanol) revealed effective electrophysiologic coupling between graft and host cells, although significantly less robust than in native myocardial tissue (maximum stimulation frequency, 11.616 ± 0.238 Hz, P<.001; conduction velocity, 0.300 ± 0.057 m/s, P<.01; conduction block, 1.983 ± 0.077 mM 1-heptanol, P<.001). Conclusions Although untreated skeletal myoblasts cannot couple to cardiomyocytes, we confirm that mechanical preconditioning enables transplanted skeletal myoblasts to functionally interact with cardio-myocytes in vivo and, thus, reinvigorate the concept of skeletal myoblast-based cardiac cell therapy. PMID:25439779

  20. Drug-based modulation of endogenous stem cells promotes functional remyelination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Najm, Fadi J; Madhavan, Mayur; Zaremba, Anita; Shick, Elizabeth; Karl, Robert T; Factor, Daniel C; Miller, Tyler E; Nevin, Zachary S; Kantor, Christopher; Sargent, Alex; Quick, Kevin L; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Tang, Hong; Papoian, Ruben; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B; Jadhav, Ajit; Robinson, Andrew P; Podojil, Joseph R; Miller, Stephen D; Miller, Robert H; Tesar, Paul J

    2015-06-11

    Multiple sclerosis involves an aberrant autoimmune response and progressive failure of remyelination in the central nervous system. Prevention of neural degeneration and subsequent disability requires remyelination through the generation of new oligodendrocytes, but current treatments exclusively target the immune system. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are stem cells in the central nervous system and the principal source of myelinating oligodendrocytes. These cells are abundant in demyelinated regions of patients with multiple sclerosis, yet fail to differentiate, thereby representing a cellular target for pharmacological intervention. To discover therapeutic compounds for enhancing myelination from endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, we screened a library of bioactive small molecules on mouse pluripotent epiblast stem-cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Here we show seven drugs function at nanomolar doses selectively to enhance the generation of mature oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells in vitro. Two drugs, miconazole and clobetasol, are effective in promoting precocious myelination in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures, and in vivo in early postnatal mouse pups. Systemic delivery of each of the two drugs significantly increases the number of new oligodendrocytes and enhances remyelination in a lysolecithin-induced mouse model of focal demyelination. Administering each of the two drugs at the peak of disease in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis results in striking reversal of disease severity. Immune response assays show that miconazole functions directly as a remyelinating drug with no effect on the immune system, whereas clobetasol is a potent immunosuppressant as well as a remyelinating agent. Mechanistic studies show that miconazole and clobetasol function in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells through mitogen-activated protein kinase and glucocorticoid receptor signalling, respectively. Furthermore, both drugs enhance the generation of human oligodendrocytes from human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in vitro. Collectively, our results provide a rationale for testing miconazole and clobetasol, or structurally modified derivatives, to enhance remyelination in patients. PMID:25896324

  1. Relationship between in vitro sperm functional tests and in vivo fertility of rams following cervical artificial insemination of ewes with frozen-thawed semen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. O’ Meara; J. P. Hanrahan; N. S. Prathalingam; J. S. Owen; A. Donovan; S. Fair; F. Ward; M. Wade; A. C. O. Evans; P. Lonergan

    2008-01-01

    Several procedures have been proposed to assess structural and functional characteristics of cryopreserved ram semen but none so far have yielded consistent relationships with in vivo fertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate several sperm function tests as potential markers of in vivo ram fertility (determined by pregnancy rate in ewes) using frozen-thawed semen. In experiment 1, frozen-thawed

  2. A dynamic analysis of a functional brace for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank F. Cook; James E. Tibone; Fredrick C. Redfern

    1989-01-01

    A dynamic, in vivo, functional analysis of braces de signed for ACL insufficiency has never been reported. In this study, 14 athletes who had arthroscopically proven absent ACLs were evaluated in the Biomechan ics Laboratory at the Centinela Hospital Medical Center. None of the ligaments were repaired or reconstructed. Footswitch, high speed photography, and force place data were recorded while

  3. Inflammation and Glucose Sensors: Use of Dexamethasone to Extend Glucose Sensor Function and Life Span in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Kaur, Manjot; Montrose, David C.; Kreutzer, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been generally accepted that the acute loss of sensor function is the consequence of sensor biofouling as a result of inflammation induced at sites of sensor implantation, as well as tissue trauma induced by the sensor and its implantation. Because anti-inflammatory therapies are used routinely to control inflammation in a wide variety of diseases, we hypothesized that anti-inflammatory therapy would likely extend glucose sensor function in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we utilized our recently developed mouse model of implantable glucose sensors and the potent anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone (DEX). Method For this study, glucose sensors were implanted subcutaneously into the head and neck area of mice and sensor function was determined up to 14 days postimplantation. These mice received a daily intraperitoneal injection of DEX at a dose of 1, 6, or 10 mg/kg body weight. Results Mice not treated with DEX lost sensor functionality very rapidly, usually within the first 24 hours postimplantation. Mice treated with DEX at the various doses had an increased sensor life span of up to 2 weeks postimplantation. Additionally, sensitivity was maintained in DEX-treated mice as compared to control mice (non-DEX treated). Histologic evaluation of tissue surrounding the site of sensor implantation had almost no inflammatory cells in DEX-treated mice, whereas control mice had an intense band of inflammation surrounding the site of sensor implantation. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first study directly demonstrating that anti-inflammatory therapy can extend glucose sensor function in vivo and supports the key role of inflammation in loss of sensor function in vivo, as well as the uses of anti-inflammatory therapy as a potential key adjuvant in enhancing glucose sensor function and life span in vivo. PMID:19885112

  4. In vivo Analysis of Tissue Response to Plasma-Treated Collagen-I-Coated Titanium Alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hauser; A. Ring; A. Schaffran; L. Henrich; S. A. Esenwein; H. U. Steinau; I. Stricker; S. Langer

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo tissue response to low-pressure plasma-pretreated collagen-I-coated titanium implant in a middle-term mouse model. Methods: Plasma-treated collagen-coated titanium implants were transplanted into the dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB\\/c mice. Untreated, regular titanium implant material served as control. The neovascularization (functional vessel density) of the implant border zone and of

  5. In vivo analysis of synaptonemal complex formation during yeast meiosis.

    PubMed Central

    White, Eric J; Cowan, Carrie; Cande, W Zacheus; Kaback, David B

    2004-01-01

    During meiotic prophase a synaptonemal complex (SC) forms between each pair of homologous chromosomes and is believed to be involved in regulating recombination. Studies on SCs usually destroy nuclear architecture, making it impossible to examine the relationship of these structures to the rest of the nucleus. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the meiosis-specific Zip1 protein is found throughout the entire length of each SC. To analyze the formation and structure of SCs in living cells, a functional ZIP1::GFP fusion was constructed and introduced into yeast. The ZIP1::GFP fusion produced fluorescent SCs and rescued the spore lethality phenotype of zip1 mutants. Optical sectioning and fluorescence deconvolution light microscopy revealed that, at zygotene, SC assembly was initiated at foci that appeared uniformly distributed throughout the nuclear volume. At early pachytene, the full-length SCs were more likely to be localized to the nuclear periphery while at later stages the SCs appeared to redistribute throughout the nuclear volume. These results suggest that SCs undergo dramatic rearrangements during meiotic prophase and that pachytene can be divided into two morphologically distinct substages: pachytene A, when SCs are perinuclear, and pachytene B, when SCs are uniformly distributed throughout the nucleus. ZIP1::GFP also facilitated the enrichment of fluorescent SC and the identification of meiosis-specific proteins by MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. PMID:15166136

  6. Computer-aided segmentation and 3D analysis of in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; Behrends, Johannes; Hoole, Phil; Leinsinger, Gerda L.; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2008-03-01

    We developed, tested, and evaluated a 3D segmentation and analysis system for in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation. For this purpose, six professionally trained speakers, age 22-34y, were examined using a standardized MRI protocol (1.5 T, T1w FLASH, ST 4mm, 23 slices, acq. time 21s). The volunteers performed a prolonged (>=21s) emission of sounds of the German phonemic inventory. Simultaneous audio tape recording was obtained to control correct utterance. Scans were made in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes each. Computer-aided quantitative 3D evaluation included (i) automated registration of the phoneme-specific data acquired in different slice orientations, (ii) semi-automated segmentation of oropharyngeal structures, (iii) computation of a curvilinear vocal tract midline in 3D by nonlinear PCA, (iv) computation of cross-sectional areas of the vocal tract perpendicular to this midline. For the vowels /a/,/e/,/i/,/o/,/ø/,/u/,/y/, the extracted area functions were used to synthesize phoneme sounds based on an articulatory-acoustic model. For quantitative analysis, recorded and synthesized phonemes were compared, where area functions extracted from 2D midsagittal slices were used as a reference. All vowels could be identified correctly based on the synthesized phoneme sounds. The comparison between synthesized and recorded vowel phonemes revealed that the quality of phoneme sound synthesis was improved for phonemes /a/ and /y/, if 3D instead of 2D data were used, as measured by the average relative frequency shift between recorded and synthesized vowel formants (p<0.05, one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test). In summary, the combination of fast MRI followed by subsequent 3D segmentation and analysis is a novel approach to examine human phonation in vivo. It unveils functional anatomical findings that may be essential for realistic modelling of the human vocal tract during speech production.

  7. Localization of recombination proteins and Srs2 reveals anti-recombinase function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Lisby, Michael; Altmannova, Veronika; Krejci, Lumir; Sung, Patrick; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-06-15

    Homologous recombination (HR), although an important DNA repair mechanism, is dangerous to the cell if improperly regulated. The Srs2 "anti-recombinase" restricts HR by disassembling the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament, an intermediate preceding the exchange of homologous DNA strands. Here, we cytologically characterize Srs2 function in vivo and describe a novel mechanism for regulating the initiation of HR. We find that Srs2 is recruited separately to replication and repair centers and identify the genetic requirements for recruitment. In the absence of Srs2 activity, Rad51 foci accumulate, and surprisingly, can form in the absence of Rad52 mediation. However, these Rad51 foci do not represent repair-proficient filaments, as determined by recombination assays. Antagonistic roles for Rad52 and Srs2 in Rad51 filament formation are also observed in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Srs2 removes Rad51 indiscriminately from DNA, while the Rad52 protein coordinates appropriate filament reformation. This constant breakdown and rebuilding of filaments may act as a stringent quality control mechanism during HR. PMID:19506039

  8. Neurotrophic Factor Artemin Promotes Invasiveness and Neurotrophic Function of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Bo, Haiji; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the neurotrophic factor Artemin on neuroplasticity and perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods Artemin expressions were detected in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Artemin overexpression and RNA interference in the pancreatic cancer cell lines were performed to evaluate the effects of Artemin on cell proliferation, invasion, and neurotrophic activity in vitro and in nude orthotopic transplantation tumor models. Results Artemin expression in pancreatic cancer tissues was related to the incidence of lymphatic metastasis and perineural invasion as well as the mean density and total area of nerve fibers. Overexpression of Artemin in pancreatic cancer cell lines improved colony formation, cell migration, matrigel invasion, and neurotrophic activity in vitro. This overexpression also increased the volume of nude orthotopic transplantation tumors; promoted cancer cell invasion of the peripheral organs, nerves, vessels, and lymph nodes; and stimulated the proliferation of peritumoral nerve fibers. Artemin depletion by RNA interference had an inhibitory effect mentioned previously. Conclusions Artemin could promote invasiveness and neurotrophic function of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, Artemin could be used as a new therapeutic target of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:25243385

  9. In vivo effects of Eurycoma longifolia Jack (Tongkat Ali) extract on reproductive functions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M C; Erasmus, N; Henkel, R R

    2014-05-01

    An aqueous extract of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali; TA) roots is traditionally used to enhance male sexuality. Because previous studies are limited to only few sperm parameters or testosterone concentration, this study investigated the in vivo effects of TA on body and organ weight as well as functional sperm parameters in terms of safety and efficacy in the management of male infertility. Forty-two male rats were divided into a control, low-dose (200 mg kg(-1) BW) and high-dose (800 mg kg(-1) BW) group (n = 14). Rats were force-fed for 14 days and then sacrificed. Total body and organ weights of the prostate, testes, epididymides, gastrocnemius muscle and the omentum were recorded. Moreover, testosterone concentration, sperm concentration, motility, velocity, vitality, acrosome reaction and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were assessed. Whilst TA decreased BW by 5.7% (P = 0.0276) and omentum fat by 31.9% (P = 0.0496), no changes in organ weights were found for the prostate, testes and epididymides. Testosterone concentration increased by 30.2% (P = 0.0544). Muscle weight also increased, yet not significantly. Whilst sperm concentration, total and progressive motility and vitality increased significantly, MMP improved markedly (P = 0.0765) by 25.1%. Because no detrimental effect could be observed, TA appears safe for possible treatment of male infertility and ageing male problems. PMID:23464350

  10. In vivo and in vitro effects of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine on selected immune functions.

    PubMed

    Tarr, M J; Olsen, R G; Jacobs, D L

    1982-04-01

    The in vivo phase of the experiments reported here include the evaluation of immune function after short-or long-term treatment of mice with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH). Long-term exposure (3 injections/week for 14 weeks) resulted in increased numbers of Jerne plaque-forming cells, a trend toward decreased induction of suppressor cell activity by concanavalin A (Con A), and no effects on mitogen-induced lymphocyte blast transformation (LBT), compared to saline-treated control mice. These effects were greatest at doses of 10 or 50 mg/kg, while higher doses had less of an effect. In vitro experiments were performed by adding UDMH to normal murine splenocytes in the LBT assay and con A-induced suppressor cell assay. The UDMH induced a significant enhanced response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 10 and 50 micrograms/ml, and a suppressed response to both Con A and LPS at higher concentrations. The UDMH also caused a decrease in suppressor cell activity at 25 micrograms/ml. Selective abrogation of suppressor activity or alteration of the suppressor cell-helper ratio were suggested as possible mechanisms for the enhancement effect associated with UDMH. PMID:6211418

  11. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-06-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  12. Functional integrity of the interrenal tissue of yellow perch from contaminated sites tested in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, C.; Brodeur, J.C.; Hontela, A. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The normal activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) in response to capture is disrupted in fish subjected to life-long exposure to heavy metals, PCBs and PAHs. The ability to increase plasma cortisol in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from sites contaminated by heavy metals and organic compounds, and from a reference site was assessed by the Capture stress test and by the ACTH Challenge test, a new standardized in vivo method designed for field studies. The effects of seasonal factors, such as temperature and gonadal maturity on these tests were investigated. Measures of liver and muscle glycogen and histopathology were made to further characterize the biochemical and structural changes that may occur along with hormonal changes. The Capture stress test showed that an acute source of stress induced a lower cortisol response in fish from the highly contaminated site compared to the reference site, revealing a functional impairment of the HPI axis. The ACTH Challenge test showed that the hormonal responsiveness of the cortisol-secreting interrenal tissue, stimulated by a standard dose of ACTH injected i.p., was lower in fish from the highly contaminated site than the reference site. Spring is the season during which the impairment was the most evident. The possibility of using the reduced capacity of feral fish to respond to a standardized ACTH Challenge as an early bioindicator of toxic stress is discussed.

  13. [In vivo studies of the main functional systems in the heteronemertean pilidium larva].

    PubMed

    Za?tseva, O V; Fliachinskaia, L P

    2010-01-01

    There is performed in vivo morphological study of the White Sea heteronemerteans belonging to the type of pilidium pyramidale (conussoidale). Based on the layer-by-layer microshooting with subsequent computer processing, development of the pilidium digestive, nervous, and muscle systems is described from the stage following at once the gastrula to the premetamorphose larva. Peculiarities of structural organization of the main functional systems are revealed depending on the larva size and the stage of formation of imaginal discs. It is first shown that even in the not completely formed pilidium, neurons are located not only in integuments and wall of the digestive tract, but also in the depth of cupola along the central muscle retractor. Their processes are distributed between the main body parts and organs by seeming to perform connections of the apical organ and central muscle retractor with the digestive tract, blades, and the nerve plexus of the cupola wall. In the digestive tract between pharynx and stomach in the formed pilidium, the sphincter is first revealed. It has been shown that in the course of larva development, the non-orderly arranged and poorly developed muscle fibers gradually form in the blade the fan-like, whereas in the cupola wall, the net-like structure. PMID:20799611

  14. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin. PMID:24445121

  15. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Mata, D; Amaral, M; Fernandes, A J S; Colaço, B; Gama, A; Paiva, M C; Gomes, P S; Silva, R F; Fernandes, M H

    2015-05-28

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats. PMID:25928241

  16. An analytical model for elucidating tendon tissue structure and biomechanical function from in vivo cellular confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, J G; Pelled, G; Zilberman, Y; Ben Arav, A; Huber, E; Müller, R; Gazit, D

    2009-01-01

    Fibered confocal laser scanning microscopes have given us the ability to image fluorescently labeled biological structures in vivo and at exceptionally high spatial resolutions. By coupling this powerful imaging modality with classic optical elastography methods, we have developed novel techniques that allow us to assess functional mechanical integrity of soft biological tissues by measuring the movements of cells in response to externally applied mechanical loads. Using these methods we can identify minute structural defects, monitor the progression of certain skeletal tissue disease states, and track subsequent healing following therapeutic intervention in the living animal. Development of these methods using a murine Achilles tendon model has revealed that the hierarchical and composite anatomical structure of the tendon presents various technical challenges that can confound a mechanical analysis of local material properties. Specifically, interfascicle gliding can yield complex cellular motions that must be interpreted within the context of an appropriate anatomical model. In this study, we explore the various classes of cellular images that may result from fibered confocal microscopy of the murine Achilles tendon, and introduce a simple two-fascicle model to interpret the images in terms of mechanical strains within the fascicles, as well as the relative gliding between fascicles. PMID:19122452

  17. Isolation and functional characterization of human erythroblasts at distinct stages: implications for understanding of normal and disordered erythropoiesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jingping; Liu, Jing; Xue, Fumin; Halverson, Gregory; Reid, Marion; Guo, Anqi; Chen, Lixiang; Raza, Azra; Galili, Naomi; Jaffray, Julie; Lane, Joseph; Chasis, Joel Anne; Taylor, Naomi; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-01-01

    Terminal erythroid differentiation starts from morphologically recognizable proerythroblasts that proliferate and differentiate to generate red cells. Although this process has been extensively studied in mice, its characterization in humans is limited. By examining the dynamic changes of expression of membrane proteins during in vitro human terminal erythroid differentiation, we identified band 3 and ?4 integrin as optimal surface markers for isolating 5 morphologically distinct populations at successive developmental stages. Functional analysis revealed that these purified cell populations have distinct mitotic capacity. Use of band 3 and ?4 integrin enabled us to isolate erythroblasts at specific developmental stages from primary human bone marrow. The ratio of erythroblasts at successive stages followed the predicted 1:2:4:8:16 pattern. In contrast, bone marrows from myelodysplastic syndrome patients exhibited altered terminal erythroid differentiation profiles. Thus, our findings not only provide new insights into the genesis of the red cell membrane during human terminal erythroid differentiation but also offer a means of isolating and quantifying each developmental stage during terminal erythropoiesis in vivo. Our findings should facilitate a comprehensive cellular and molecular characterization of each specific developmental stage of human erythroblasts and should provide a powerful means of identifying stage-specific defects in diseases associated with pathological erythropoiesis. PMID:23422750

  18. Isolation and functional characterization of human erythroblasts at distinct stages: implications for understanding of normal and disordered erythropoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingping; Liu, Jing; Xue, Fumin; Halverson, Gregory; Reid, Marion; Guo, Anqi; Chen, Lixiang; Raza, Azra; Galili, Naomi; Jaffray, Julie; Lane, Joseph; Chasis, Joel Anne; Taylor, Naomi; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2013-04-18

    Terminal erythroid differentiation starts from morphologically recognizable proerythroblasts that proliferate and differentiate to generate red cells. Although this process has been extensively studied in mice, its characterization in humans is limited. By examining the dynamic changes of expression of membrane proteins during in vitro human terminal erythroid differentiation, we identified band 3 and ?4 integrin as optimal surface markers for isolating 5 morphologically distinct populations at successive developmental stages. Functional analysis revealed that these purified cell populations have distinct mitotic capacity. Use of band 3 and ?4 integrin enabled us to isolate erythroblasts at specific developmental stages from primary human bone marrow. The ratio of erythroblasts at successive stages followed the predicted 1:2:4:8:16 pattern. In contrast, bone marrows from myelodysplastic syndrome patients exhibited altered terminal erythroid differentiation profiles. Thus, our findings not only provide new insights into the genesis of the red cell membrane during human terminal erythroid differentiation but also offer a means of isolating and quantifying each developmental stage during terminal erythropoiesis in vivo. Our findings should facilitate a comprehensive cellular and molecular characterization of each specific developmental stage of human erythroblasts and should provide a powerful means of identifying stage-specific defects in diseases associated with pathological erythropoiesis. PMID:23422750

  19. Functional Anatomy of the Thalamus as a Model of Integrated Structural and Functional Connectivity of the Human Brain In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Mastropasqua, Chiara; Bozzali, Marco; Spanò, Barbara; Koch, Giacomo; Cercignani, Mara

    2015-07-01

    While methods of measuring non-invasively both, functional and structural brain connectivity are available, the degree of overlap between them is still unknown. In this paper this issue is addressed by investigating the connectivity pattern of a brain structure with many, well characterized structural connections, namely the thalamus. Diffusion-weighted and resting state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) data were collected in a group of 38 healthy participants. Probabilistic tractography was performed to parcellate the thalamus into regions structurally connected to different cortical areas. The resulting regions were used as seeds for seed-based analysis of RS fMRI data. The tractographic parcellation was thus cross-validated against functional connectivity data by evaluating the overlap between the functional and structural thalamo-cortical connections originating from the parcellated regions. Our data show only a partial overall correspondence between structural and functional connections, in the same group of healthy individuals, thus suggesting that the two approaches provide complementary and not overlapping information. Future studies are warranted to extend the results we obtained in the thalamus to other structures, and to confirm that the mechanisms behind functional connectivity are more complex than just expressing structural connectivity. PMID:25549779

  20. The effect of glycerol-containing peritoneal dialysis fluid on peritoneal macrophage function in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Fijter, C W; Verbrugh, H A; Oe, P L; Peters, E D; van der Meulen, J; Donker, A J; Verhoef, J; Lameire, N

    1991-01-01

    Though glucose is universally applied as osmotic agent in CAPD, there is great interest in the use of alternative osmotic agents. Glycerol-containing peritoneal dialysis fluids (G-PDF) have been used in an attempt to minimize the metabolic effects of long-term exposure to glucose, especially in patients with diabetes. Since data were lacking, we studied the effect of G-PDF on peritoneal macrophage (PMO) function. In a randomized cross-over setting eight stable diabetic CAPD patients performed the third and fourth exchange of the day with either G-PDF or with glucose-containing PDF (D-PDF) of comparable osmolality. The next day the patients who had used G-PDF were switched to D-PDF and vice versa. PMO were isolated from the effluents and tested for their phagocytic capacity and chemiluminescence response. No differences were encountered in total and differential white cell counts between G-PDF and D-PDF effluents. PMO phagocytic capacity for both S. epidermidis (SE) and E. coli (EC) was significantly depressed after the instillation of G-PDF as compared to D-PDF (SE: 52 +/- 2.7 vs 69 +/- 5.0%, p less than 0.02, and EC: 44 +/- 5.7 vs 63 +/- 6.7%, p less than 0.02). The same held true for peak chemiluminescence response (5.3 +/- 1.36 vs 7.2 +/- 1.43% of control cells, p less than 0.005). Thus, G-PDF may compromise PMO function in vivo more than D-PDF despite its more favourable metabolic profile as compared to D-PDF for diabetic patients. PMID:1680414

  1. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Bartolome, Maria Visitacion [Department of Physiology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente [Department of Physiology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain); Stefanon, Ivanita [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Vassallo, Dalton Valentim, E-mail: daltonv2@terra.com.br [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Health Science Center of Vitoria-EMESCAM, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small concentrations constitutes environmental cardiovascular risk factor.

  2. Microtubule depolymerization normalizes in vivo myocardial contractile function in dogs with pressure-overload left ventricular hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Hamawaki, M.; Narishige, T.; Sato, H.; Nemoto, S.; DeFreyte, G.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper G, I. V.; Carabello, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because initially compensatory myocardial hypertrophy in response to pressure overloading may eventually decompensate to myocardial failure, mechanisms responsible for this transition have long been sought. One such mechanism established in vitro is densification of the cellular microtubule network, which imposes a viscous load that inhibits cardiocyte contraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the present study, we extended this in vitro finding to the in vivo level and tested the hypothesis that this cytoskeletal abnormality is important in the in vivo contractile dysfunction that occurs in experimental aortic stenosis in the adult dog. In 8 dogs in which gradual stenosis of the ascending aorta had caused severe left ventricular (LV) pressure overloading (gradient, 152+/-16 mm Hg) with contractile dysfunction, LV function was measured at baseline and 1 hour after the intravenous administration of colchicine. Cardiocytes obtained by biopsy before and after in vivo colchicine administration were examined in tandem. Microtubule depolymerization restored LV contractile function both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These and additional corroborative data show that increased cardiocyte microtubule network density is an important mechanism for the ventricular contractile dysfunction that develops in large mammals with adult-onset pressure-overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  3. Functional Techniques for Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, John R.

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation develops a new general method of solving Prony's problem. Two special cases of this new method have been developed previously. They are the Matrix Pencil and the Osculatory Interpolation. The dissertation shows that they are instances of a more general solution type which allows a wide ranging class of linear functional to be used in the solution of the problem. This class provides a continuum of functionals which provide new methods that can be used to solve Prony's problem.

  4. Energy function analysis for power system stability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Pai

    1989-01-01

    Energy Function Analysis for Power System Stability presents the concept of energy function, which has found wide-spread applications for power systems in recent years. The most recent advances in five distinct areas are reviewed: Development of energy functions for structure preserving models, which can incorporate non-linear load models; energy functions which include a detailed model of the generating unit (i.e.

  5. Design and analysis of a novel mechanical loading machine for dynamic in vivo axial loading.

    PubMed

    Macione, James; Nesbitt, Sterling; Pandit, Vaibhav; Kotha, Shiva

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the construction of a loading machine for performing in vivo, dynamic mechanical loading of the rodent forearm. The loading machine utilizes a unique type of electromagnetic actuator with no mechanically resistive components (servotube), allowing highly accurate loads to be created. A regression analysis of the force created by the actuator with respect to the input voltage demonstrates high linear correlation (R(2) = 1). When the linear correlation is used to create dynamic loading waveforms in the frequency (0.5-10 Hz) and load (1-50 N) range used for in vivo loading, less than 1% normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) is computed. Larger NRMSE is found at increased frequencies, with 5%-8% occurring at 40 Hz, and reasons are discussed. Amplifiers (strain gauge, linear voltage displacement transducer (LVDT), and load cell) are constructed, calibrated, and integrated, to allow well-resolved dynamic measurements to be recorded at each program cycle. Each of the amplifiers uses an active filter with cutoff frequency at the maximum in vivo loading frequencies (50 Hz) so that electronic noise generated by the servo drive and actuator are reduced. The LVDT and load cell amplifiers allow evaluation of stress-strain relationships to determine if in vivo bone damage is occurring. The strain gauge amplifier allows dynamic force to strain calibrations to occur for animals of different sex, age, and strain. Unique features are integrated into the loading system, including a weightless mode, which allows the limbs of anesthetized animals to be quickly positioned and removed. Although the device is constructed for in vivo axial bone loading, it can be used within constraints, as a general measurement instrument in a laboratory setting. PMID:22380131

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  7. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  8. In vivo skin biophysical behaviour and surface topography as a function of ageing.

    PubMed

    Pailler-Mattei, C; Debret, R; Vargiolu, R; Sommer, P; Zahouani, H

    2013-12-01

    Normal skin ageing is characterised by an alteration of the underlying connective tissue with measurable consequences on global skin biophysical properties. The cutis laxa syndrome, a rare genetic disorder, is considered as an accelerated ageing process since patients appear prematurely aged due to alterations of dermal elastic fibres. In the present study, we compared the topography and the biomechanical parameters of normal aged skin with an 17 year old cutis laxa patient. Skin topography analyses were conducted on normal skin at different ages. The results indicate that the skin relief highly changes as a function of ageing. The cutaneous lines change from a relatively isotropic orientation to a highly anisotropic orientation. This reorganisation of the skin relief during the ageing process might be due to a modification of the skin mechanical properties, and particularly to a modification of the dermis mechanical properties. A specific bio-tribometer, based on the indentationtechnique under light load, has been developed to study the biophysical properties of the human skin in vivo through two main parameters: the physico-chemical properties of the skin surface, by measuring the maximum adhesion force between the skin and the bio-tribometer; and the bulk mechanical properties. Our results show that the pull-off force between the skin and the biotribometer as well as the skin Young's modulus decrease with age. In the case of the young cutis laxa patient, the results obtained were similar to those observed for aged individuals. These results are very interesting and encouraging since they would allow the monitoring of the cutis laxa skin in a standardised and non-invasive way to better characterize either the evolution of the disease or the benefit of a treatment. PMID:23664827

  9. Enzymatic Characterization and In Vivo Function of Five Terminal Oxidases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takuro; Osamura, Tatsuya; Hirai, Takehiro; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has five aerobic terminal oxidases: bo3-type quinol oxidase (Cyo), cyanide-insensitive oxidase (CIO), aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase (aa3), and two cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases (cbb3-1 and cbb3-2). These terminal oxidases are differentially regulated under various growth conditions and are thought to contribute to the survival of this microorganism in a wide variety of environmental niches. Here, we constructed multiple mutant strains of P. aeruginosa that express only one aerobic terminal oxidase to investigate the enzymatic characteristics and in vivo function of each enzyme. The Km values of Cyo, CIO, and aa3 for oxygen were similar and were 1 order of magnitude higher than those of cbb3-1 and cbb3-2, indicating that Cyo, CIO, and aa3 are low-affinity enzymes and that cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 are high-affinity enzymes. Although cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 exhibited different expression patterns in response to oxygen concentration, they had similar Km values for oxygen. Both cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 utilized cytochrome c4 as the main electron donor under normal growth conditions. The electron transport chains terminated by cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 generate a proton gradient across the cell membrane with similar efficiencies. The electron transport chain of aa3 had the highest proton translocation efficiency, whereas that of CIO had the lowest efficiency. The enzymatic properties of the terminal oxidases reported here are partially in agreement with their regulatory patterns and may explain the environmental adaptability and versatility of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25182500

  10. Up date on IGFBP-4: regulation of IGFBP-4 levels and functions, in vitro and in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Mazerbourg; Isabelle Callebaut; Jürgen Zapf; Subburaman Mohan; Michael Overgaard; Philippe Monget

    2004-01-01

    Of the six known high affinity insulin-like growth factor binding-proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-4 appears to be unique in that it is the only IGFBP that functions mostly like a traditional binding protein. In this regard, none of the IGF independent effects that have been ascribed for other IGFBPs have been described for IGFBP-4. However, recent in vitro and in vivo studies,

  11. Fucoidan Can Function as an Adjuvant In Vivo to Enhance Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function and Promote Antigen-Specific T Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jun-O; Zhang, Wei; Du, Jiang-Yuan; Wong, Ka-Wing; Oda, Tatsuya; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, including promoting antigen uptake and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of fucoidan in vivo, especially its adjuvant effect on in vivo anti-tumor immune responses, was not fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the function of spleen dendritic cells (DCs) and its adjuvant effect in vivo. Systemic administration of fucoidan induced up-regulation of CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-? in spleen cDCs. Fucoidan also promoted the generation of IFN-?-producing Th1 and Tc1 cells in an IL-12-dependent manner. When used as an adjuvant in vivo with ovalbumin (OVA) antigen, fucoidan promoted OVA-specific antibody production and primed IFN-? production in OVA-specific T cells. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced OVA-induced up-regulation of MHC class I and II on spleen cDCs and strongly prompted the proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, OVA immunization with fucoidan as adjuvant protected mice from the challenge with B16-OVA tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that fucoidan can function as an adjuvant to induce Th1 immune response and CTL activation, which may be useful in tumor vaccine development. PMID:24911024

  12. Functional characterization of the 180-kD ribosome receptor in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the 180-kD canine ribosome receptor (RRp) was cloned and sequenced. The deduced primary structure indicates three distinct domains: an NH2-terminal stretch of 28 uncharged amino acids representing the membrane anchor, a basic region (pI = 10.74) comprising the remainder of the NH2-terminal half and an acidic COOH- terminal half (pI = 4.99). The most striking feature of the amino acid sequence is a 10-amino acid consensus motif, NQGKKAEGAP, repeated 54 times in tandem without interruption in the NH2-terminal positively charged region. We postulate that this repeated sequence represents a ribosome binding domain which mediates the interaction between the ribosome and the ER membrane. To substantiate this hypothesis, recombinant full-length ribosome receptor and two truncated versions of this protein, one lacking the potential ribosome binding domain, and one lacking the COOH terminus, were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Morphological and biochemical analyses showed all proteins were targeted to, and oriented correctly in the ER membrane. In vitro ribosome binding assays demonstrated that yeast microsomes containing the full-length canine receptor or one lacking the COOH-terminal domain were able to bind two to four times as many human ribosomes as control membranes lacking a recombinant protein or microsomes containing a receptor lacking the NH2-terminal basic domain. Electron micrographs of these cells revealed that the expression of all receptor constructs led to a proliferation of perinuclear ER membranes known as "karmellae." Strikingly, in those strains which expressed cDNAs encoding a receptor containing the putative ribosome binding domain, the induced ER membranes (examined in situ) were richly studded with ribosomes. In contrast, karmellae resulting from the expression of receptor cDNA lacking the putative ribosome binding domain were uniformly smooth and free of ribosomes. Cell fractionation and biochemical analyses corroborated the morphological characterization. Taken together these data provide further evidence that RRp functions as a ribosome receptor in vitro, provide new evidence indicating its functionality in vivo, and in both cases indicate that the NH2-terminal basic domain is essential for ribosome binding. PMID:7790375

  13. FRATS: Functional Regression Analysis of DTI Tract Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Styner, Martin; Tang, Niansheng; Liu, Zhexing; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides important information on the structure of white matter fiber bundles as well as detailed tissue properties along these fiber bundles in vivo. This paper presents a functional regression framework, called FRATS, for the analysis of multiple diffusion properties along fiber bundle as functions in an infinite dimensional space and their association with a set of covariates of interest, such as age, diagnostic status and gender, in real applications. The functional regression framework consists of four integrated components: the local polynomial kernel method for smoothing multiple diffusion properties along individual fiber bundles, a functional linear model for characterizing the association between fiber bundle diffusion properties and a set of covariates, a global test statistic for testing hypotheses of interest, and a resampling method for approximating the p-value of the global test statistic. The proposed methodology is applied to characterizing the development of five diffusion properties including fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and the three eigenvalues of diffusion tensor along the splenium of the corpus callosum tract and the right internal capsule tract in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. Significant age and gestational age effects on the five diffusion properties were found in both tracts. The resulting analysis pipeline can be used for understanding normal brain development, the neural bases of neuropsychiatric disorders, and the joint effects of environmental and genetic factors on white matter fiber bundles. PMID:20335089

  14. FRATS: Functional Regression Analysis of DTI Tract Statistics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongtu; Styner, Martin; Tang, Niansheng; Liu, Zhexing; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H

    2010-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides important information on the structure of white matter fiber bundles as well as detailed tissue properties along these fiber bundles in vivo. This paper presents a functional regression framework, called FRATS, for the analysis of multiple diffusion properties along fiber bundle as functions in an infinite dimensional space and their association with a set of covariates of interest, such as age, diagnostic status and gender, in real applications. The functional regression framework consists of four integrated components: the local polynomial kernel method for smoothing multiple diffusion properties along individual fiber bundles, a functional linear model for characterizing the association between fiber bundle diffusion properties and a set of covariates, a global test statistic for testing hypotheses of interest, and a resampling method for approximating the p-value of the global test statistic. The proposed methodology is applied to characterizing the development of five diffusion properties including fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and the three eigenvalues of diffusion tensor along the splenium of the corpus callosum tract and the right internal capsule tract in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. Significant age and gestational age effects on the five diffusion properties were found in both tracts. The resulting analysis pipeline can be used for understanding normal brain development, the neural bases of neuropsychiatric disorders, and the joint effects of environmental and genetic factors on white matter fiber bundles. PMID:20335089

  15. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details on the preparation of HNO3 functionalized CNTs and supplementary analyses (?-Raman, TG, EDS, acid-base titration, FTIR, roughness measurements, SEM and optical images) are shown. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01829c

  16. Multivariate Analysis of Functional Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.; Bailey, Barbara A.; Tuba, Imre; Akhter, Sajia; McNair, Katelyn; Schmieder, Robert; Apkarian, Naneh; Creek, Michelle; Guan, Eric; Hernandez, Mayra; Isaacs, Katherine; Peterson, Chris; Regh, Todd; Ponomarenko, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics is a primary tool for the description of microbial and viral communities. The sheer magnitude of the data generated in each metagenome makes identifying key differences in the function and taxonomy between communities difficult to elucidate. Here we discuss the application of seven different data mining and statistical analyses by comparing and contrasting the metabolic functions of 212 microbial metagenomes within and between 10 environments. Not all approaches are appropriate for all questions, and researchers should decide which approach addresses their questions. This work demonstrated the use of each approach: for example, random forests provided a robust and enlightening description of both the clustering of metagenomes and the metabolic processes that were important in separating microbial communities from different environments. All analyses identified that the presence of phage genes within the microbial community was a predictor of whether the microbial community was host-associated or free-living. Several analyses identified the subtle differences that occur with environments, such as those seen in different regions of the marine environment. PMID:23579547

  17. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  18. Different in vivo functions of the two catalytic domains of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Billet, Sandrine; Okwan-Duodu, Derick; Ong, Frank S.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) can cleave angiotensin I, bradykinin, neurotensin and many other peptide substrates in vitro. In part, this is due to the structure of ACE, a protein composed of two independent catalytic domains. Until very recently, little was known regarding the specific in vivo role of each ACE domain, and they were commonly regarded as equivalent. This is not true, as shown by mouse models with a genetic inactivation of either the ACE N- or C-domains. In vivo, most angiotensin II is produced by the ACE C-domain. Some peptides, such as the anti-fibrotic peptide AcSDKP, are substrates only of the ACE N-domain. Knowing the in vivo role of each ACE domain has great significance for developing ACE domain-specific inhibitors and for understanding the full effects of the anti-ACE pharmaceuticals in widespread clinical use. PMID:21130035

  19. FAD: A FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS AND DESIGN METHODOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Kent, University of

    FAD: A FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS AND DESIGN METHODOLOGY a thesis submitted to The University of Kent methodology FAD. By func- tional we mean that it naturally supports software development within the functional- ous pictorial representations of a system. FAD's modelling language provides the typical elements

  20. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  1. In vivo Visuotopic Brain Mapping with Manganese-Enhanced MRI and Resting-State Functional Connectivity MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kevin C.; Fan, Shu-Juan; Chan, Russell W.; Cheng, Joe S.; Zhou, Iris Y.; Wu, Ed X.

    2014-01-01

    The rodents are an increasingly important model for understanding the mechanisms of development, plasticity, functional specialization and disease in the visual system. However, limited tools have been available for assessing the structural and functional connectivity of the visual brain network globally, in vivo and longitudinally. There are also ongoing debates on whether functional brain connectivity directly reflects structural brain connectivity. In this study, we explored the feasibility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) via 3 different routes of Mn2+ administration for visuotopic brain mapping and understanding of physiological transport in normal and visually deprived adult rats. In addition, resting-state functional connectivity MRI (RSfcMRI) was performed to evaluate the intrinsic functional network and structural-functional relationships in the corresponding anatomical visual brain connections traced by MEMRI. Upon intravitreal, subcortical, and intracortical Mn2+ injection, different topographic and layer-specific Mn enhancement patterns could be revealed in the visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei along retinal, callosal, cortico-subcortical, transsynaptic and intracortical horizontal connections. Loss of visual input upon monocular enucleation to adult rats appeared to reduce interhemispheric polysynaptic Mn2+ transfer but not intra- or inter-hemispheric monosynaptic Mn2+ transport after Mn2+ injection into visual cortex. In normal adults, both structural and functional connectivity by MEMRI and RSfcMRI was stronger interhemispherically between bilateral primary/secondary visual cortex (V1/V2) transition zones (TZ) than between V1/V2 TZ and other cortical nuclei. Intrahemispherically, structural and functional connectivity was stronger between visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei than between visual cortex and other subcortical nuclei. The current results demonstrated the sensitivity of MEMRI and RSfcMRI for assessing the neuroarchitecture, neurophysiology and structural-functional relationships of the visual brains in vivo. These may possess great potentials for effective monitoring and understanding of the basic anatomical and functional connections in the visual system during development, plasticity, disease, pharmacological interventions and genetic modifications in future studies. PMID:24394694

  2. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-09-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  3. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  4. In Vivo Risk Analysis of Pancreatic Cancer Through Optical Characterization of Duodenal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Konda, Vani; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Waxman, Irving; Goldberg, Michael J.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Gould, Bradley; Eshein, Adam; Upadhye, Sudeep; Koons, Ann; Gonzalez-Haba Ruiz, Mariano; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To reduce pancreatic cancer mortality, a paradigm shift in cancer screening is needed. Our group pioneered the use of low-coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS) spectroscopy to predict the presence of pancreatic cancer by interrogating the duodenal mucosa. A previous ex vivo study (n = 203) demonstrated excellent diagnostic potential: sensitivity, 95%; specificity, 71%; and accuracy, 85%. The objective of the current case-control study was to evaluate this approach in vivo. Methods We developed a novel endoscope-compatible fiber-optic probe to measure LEBS in the periampullary duodenum of 41 patients undergoing upper endoscopy. This approach enables minimally invasive detection of the ultrastructural consequences of pancreatic field carcinogenesis. Results The LEBS parameters and optical properties were significantly altered in patients harboring adenocarcinomas (including early-stage) throughout the pancreas relative to healthy controls. Test performance characteristics were excellent with sensitivity = 78%, specificity = 85%, and accuracy = 81%. Moreover, the LEBS prediction rule was not confounded by patients’ demographics. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo measurement of histologically normal duodenal mucosa to predict the presence of adenocarcinoma throughout the pancreas. This represents the next step in establishing duodenal LEBS analysis as a prescreening technique that identifies clinically asymptomatic patients who are at elevated risk of PC. PMID:25906443

  5. Integrating EMR-Linked and In Vivo Functional Genetic Data to Identify New Genotype-Phenotype Associations

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Jonathan D.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Weeke, Peter E.; Delaney, Jessica T.; Wells, Quinn S.; Bastarache, Lisa; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Josh C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of electronic medical records (EMR) with genetic data has created the potential for implementing reverse genetic approaches in humans, whereby the function of a gene is inferred from the shared pattern of morbidity among homozygotes of a genetic variant. We explored the feasibility of this approach to identify phenotypes associated with low frequency variants using Vanderbilt's EMR-based BioVU resource. We analyzed 1,658 low frequency non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) with a minor allele frequency (MAF)<10% collected on 8,546 subjects. For each nsSNP, we identified diagnoses shared by at least 2 minor allele homozygotes and with an association p<0.05. The diagnoses were reviewed by a clinician to ascertain whether they may share a common mechanistic basis. While a number of biologically compelling clinical patterns of association were observed, the frequency of these associations was identical to that observed using genotype-permuted data sets, indicating that the associations were likely due to chance. To refine our analysis associations, we then restricted the analysis to 711 nsSNPs in genes with phenotypes in the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) or knock-out mouse phenotype databases. An initial comparison of the EMR diagnoses to the known in vivo functions of the gene identified 25 candidate nsSNPs, 19 of which had significant genotype-phenotype associations when tested using matched controls. Twleve of the 19 nsSNPs associations were confirmed by a detailed record review. Four of 12 nsSNP-phenotype associations were successfully replicated in an independent data set: thrombosis (F5,rs6031), seizures/convulsions (GPR98,rs13157270), macular degeneration (CNGB3,rs3735972), and GI bleeding (HGFAC,rs16844401). These analyses demonstrate the feasibility and challenges of using reverse genetics approaches to identify novel gene-phenotype associations in human subjects using low frequency variants. As increasing amounts of rare variant data are generated from modern genotyping and sequence platforms, model organism data may be an important tool to enable discovery. PMID:24949630

  6. In vivo function of the orphan nuclear receptor NR2E3 in establishing photoreceptor identity during mammalian retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hong; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Khanna, Ritu; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Swaroop, Anand

    2006-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors in mammalian retina are generated from common pool(s) of neuroepithelial progenitors. NRL, CRX and NR2E3 are key transcriptional regulators that control photoreceptor differentiation. Mutations in NR2E3, a rod-specific orphan nuclear receptor, lead to loss of rods, increased density of S-cones and supernormal S-cone-mediated vision in humans. To better understand its in vivo function, NR2E3 was expressed ectopically in the Nrl?/? retina, where post-mitotic precursors fated to be rods develop into functional S-cones similar to the human NR2E3 disease. Expression of NR2E3 in the Nrl?/? retina completely suppressed cone differentiation and resulted in morphologically rod-like photoreceptors, which were however not functional. Gene profiling of FACS-purified photoreceptors confirmed the role of NR2E3 as a strong suppressor of cone genes but an activator of only a subset of rod genes (including rhodopsin) in vivo. Ectopic expression of NR2E3 in cone precursors and differentiating S-cones of wild-type retina also generated rod-like cells. The dual regulatory function of NR2E3 was not dependent upon the presence of NRL and/or CRX, but on the timing and level of its expression. Our studies reveal a critical role of NR2E3 in establishing functional specificity of NRL-expressing photoreceptor precursors during retinal neurogenesis. PMID:16868010

  7. Isolation and ex vivo characterization of the immunophenotype and function of microglia/macrophage populations in normal dog retina.

    PubMed

    Genini, Sem; Beltran, William A; Stein, Veronika M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the primary resident immune cells of the retina and are involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases. In this study, we optimized experimental conditions to isolate microglia from canine retinas and characterized ex vivo their immunophenotype and function using flow cytometry (FACS). The most suitable protocol included a mechanical dissociation of the retina and an enzymatic digestion using DNAse and collagenase. Extraction was carried out by density gradient centrifugation, and retinal microglia accumulated on distinct interfaces of 1.072 and 1.088 g/mL of a Percoll gradient. Immunophenotypical characterization was performed with monoclonal antibodies CD11b, CD11c, CD18, CD45, CD44, B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), CD1c, ICAM-1 (CD54), CD14, MHCI, MHCII, CD68, CD3, CD4, CD8?, and CD21. The most prevalent microglia population in the normal canine retina is CD11b(high)CD45(low). Functionally, retinal microglia exhibited phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation activities. To conclude, ex vivo examinations of retinal microglia are feasible and possibly reflect the in vivo conditions, avoiding artifacts observed in tissue culture. The established method will be relevant to examine microglia from diseased canine retinas in order to elucidate their roles in degenerative processes. PMID:24664716

  8. In Vitro Matured Oocytes Are More Susceptible than In Vivo Matured Oocytes to Mock ICSI Induced Functional and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Salian, Sujit Raj; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of ICSI have been intensified recently due to increased risk of birth defects in ICSI born children. Although fertilization rate is significantly higher in ICSI cycles, studies have failed to demonstrate the benefits of ICSI in improving the pregnancy rate. Poor technical skill, and suboptimal in vitro conditions may account for the ICSI results however, there is no report on the effects of oocyte manipulations on the ICSI outcome. Objective The present study elucidates the influence of mock ICSI on the functional and genetic integrity of the mouse oocytes. Methods Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) level, mitochondrial status, and phosphorylation of H2AX were assessed in the in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI. Results A significant increase in ROS level was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P<0.05-0.001) whereas unique mitochondrial distribution pattern was found only in IVM oocytes (P<0.01-0.001). Importantly, differential H2AX phosphorylation was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P <0.001). Conclusion The data from this study suggests that mock ICSI can alter genetic and functional integrity in oocytes and IVM oocytes are more vulnerable to mock ICSI induced changes. PMID:25786120

  9. Surface Characterization by Structure Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, T.; Burke, J.; Bergmann, R. B.

    2014-08-01

    The structure function is a tool for characterizing technical surfaces which exhibits a number of advantages over Fourier-based analysis methods. So it is optimally suited for analyzing the height distributions of surfaces measured by full-field non-contacting methods. After the definition of line- and area-structure function and offering effective procedures for their calculation this tutorial paper presents examples using simulated and measured data of machined surfaces as well as optical components. Comparisons with the results of Fourier-based evaluations clearly prove the advantages of structure function analysis.

  10. Kinetic Analysis and Quantification of [(11)C]Martinostat for in Vivo HDAC Imaging of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A; Logan, Jean; Price, Julie C; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-05-20

    Epigenetic mechanisms mediated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been implicated in a wide-range of CNS disorders and may offer new therapeutic opportunities. In vivo evaluation of HDAC density and drug occupancy has become possible with [(11)C]Martinostat, which exhibits selectivity for a subset of class I/IIb HDAC enzymes. In this study, we characterize the kinetic properties of [(11)C]Martinostat in the nonhuman primate (NHP) brain in preparation for human neuroimaging studies. The goal of this work was to determine whether classic compartmental analysis techniques were appropriate and to further determine if arterial plasma is required for future NHP studies. Using an arterial plasma input function, several analysis approaches were evaluated for robust outcome measurements. [(11)C]Martinostat showed high baseline distribution volume (VT) ranging from 29.9 to 54.4 mL/cm(3) in the brain and large changes in occupancy (up to 99%) with a blocking dose approaching full enzyme saturation. An averaged nondisplaceable tissue uptake (VND) of 8.6 ± 3.7 mL/cm(3) suggests high specific binding of [(11)C]Martinostat. From a two-tissue compartment model, [(11)C]Martinostat exhibits a high K1 (averaged K1 of 0.65 mL/cm(3)/min) and a small k4 (average of 0.0085 min(-1)). Our study supports that [(11)C]Martinostat can be used to detect changes in HDAC density and occupancy in vivo and that simplified analysis not using arterial blood could be appropriate. PMID:25768025

  11. In-Vivo functional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with stimulated Raman scattering fiber-laser source

    PubMed Central

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a multi-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system using stimulated Raman scattering is demonstrated for both phantom and in vivo imaging. A 1-ns pulse width ytterbium-doped fiber laser is coupled into a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber. Discrete Raman-shifted wavelength peaks extending to nearly 800 nm are generated with pulse energies sufficient for OR-PAM imaging. Bandpass filters are used to select imaging wavelengths. A dual-mirror galvanometer system was used to scan the focused outputs across samples of carbon fiber networks, 200?m dye-filled tubes, and Swiss Webster mouse ears. Photoacoustic signals were collected in transmission mode and used to create maximum amplitude projection C-scan images. Double dye experiments and in vivo oxygen saturation estimation confirmed functional imaging potential. PMID:24575346

  12. Surface loop resonator design for in vivo EPR tooth dosimetry using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jennifer D; Williams, Benjamin B; Sidabras, Jason W; Grinberg, Oleg; Salikhov, Ildar; Lesniewski, Piotr; Kmiec, Maciej; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    Finite element analysis is used to evaluate and design L-band surface loop resonators for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth dosimetry. This approach appears to be practical and useful for the systematic examination and evaluation of resonator configurations to enhance the precision of dose estimates. The effects of loop positioning in the mouth are examined, and it is shown that the sensitivity to loop position along a row of molars is decreased as the loop is moved away from the teeth. PMID:20065703

  13. Phasor analysis of multiphoton spectral images distinguishes autofluorescence components of in vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Bader, Arjen N; Colonna, Anne; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-08-01

    Skin contains many autofluorescent components that can be studied using spectral imaging. We employed a spectral phasor method to analyse two photon excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation images of in vivo human skin. This method allows segmentation of images based on spectral features. Various structures in the skin could be distinguished, including Stratum Corneum, epidermal cells and dermis. The spectral phasor analysis allowed investigation of their fluorescence composition and identification of signals from NADH, keratin, FAD, melanin, collagen and elastin. Interestingly, two populations of epidermal cells could be distinguished with different melanin content. PMID:23576407

  14. Functional analysis of colonic bacterial metabolism: relevant to health?

    PubMed

    Hamer, Henrike M; De Preter, Vicky; Windey, Karen; Verbeke, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    With the use of molecular techniques, numerous studies have evaluated the composition of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease. However, it is of major interest to supplement this with a functional analysis of the microbiota. In this review, the different approaches that have been used to characterize microbial metabolites, yielding information on the functional end products of microbial metabolism, have been summarized. To analyze colonic microbial metabolites, the most conventional way is by application of a hypothesis-driven targeted approach, through quantification of selected metabolites from carbohydrate (e.g., short-chain fatty acids) and protein fermentation (e.g., p-cresol, phenol, ammonia, or H(2)S), secondary bile acids, or colonic enzymes. The application of stable isotope-labeled substrates can provide an elegant solution to study these metabolic pathways in vivo. On the other hand, a top-down approach can be followed by applying metabolite fingerprinting techniques based on (1)H-NMR or mass spectrometric analysis. Quantification of known metabolites and characterization of metabolite patterns in urine, breath, plasma, and fecal samples can reveal new pathways and give insight into physiological regulatory processes of the colonic microbiota. In addition, specific metabolic profiles can function as a diagnostic tool for the identification of several gastrointestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Nevertheless, future research will have to evaluate the relevance of associations between metabolites and different disease states. PMID:22016433

  15. Multiscale analysis of T cell activation: correlating in vitro and in vivo analysis of the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    Recently implemented fluorescence imaging techniques, such as total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and two-photon laser scanning microscopy, have made possible multiscale analysis of the immune response from single molecules in an interface to cells moving in lymphoid tissues and tumors. In this review, we consider components of T cell sensitivity: the immunological synapse, the coordination of migration, and antigen recognition in vivo. Potency, dose, and detection threshold for peptide-MHC determine T cell sensitivity. The immunological synapse incorporates T cell receptor microclusters that initiate and sustain signaling, and it also determines the positional stability of the T cells through symmetry and symmetry breaking. In vivo decisions by T cells on stopping or migration are based on antigen stop signals and environmental go signals that can sometimes prevent arrest of T cells altogether, and thus can change the outcome of antigen encounters. PMID:19521681

  16. Functional analysis of the SRV-1 RNA frameshifting pseudoknot

    PubMed Central

    Olsthoorn, René C. L.; Reumerman, Richard; Hilbers, Cornelis W.; Pleij, Cornelis W. A.; Heus, Hans A.

    2010-01-01

    Simian retrovirus type-1 uses programmed ribosomal frameshifting to control expression of the Gag-Pol polyprotein from overlapping gag and pol open-reading frames. The frameshifting signal consists of a heptanucleotide slippery sequence and a downstream-located 12-base pair pseudoknot. The solution structure of this pseudoknot, previously solved by NMR [Michiels,P.J., Versleijen,A.A., Verlaan,P.W., Pleij,C.W., Hilbers,C.W. and Heus,H.A. (2001) Solution structure of the pseudoknot of SRV-1 RNA, involved in ribosomal frameshifting. J. Mol. Biol., 310, 1109–1123] has a classical H-type fold and forms an extended triple helix by interactions between loop 2 and the minor groove of stem 1 involving base–base and base–sugar contacts. A mutational analysis was performed to test the functional importance of the triple helix for ?1 frameshifting in vitro. Changing bases in L2 or base pairs in S1 involved in a base triple resulted in a 2- to 5-fold decrease in frameshifting efficiency. Alterations in the length of L2 had adverse effects on frameshifting. The in vitro effects were well reproduced in vivo, although the effect of enlarging L2 was more dramatic in vivo. The putative role of refolding kinetics of frameshifter pseudoknots is discussed. Overall, the data emphasize the role of the triple helix in ?1 frameshifting. PMID:20639537

  17. Novel functional profiling approach combining reverse phase protein microarrays and human 3-D ex vivo tissue cultures: expression of apoptosis-related proteins in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Pirnia, Farzaneh; Pawlak, Michael; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Gierke, Berthold; Templin, Markus F; Kappeler, Andi; Betticher, Daniel C; Gloor, Beat; Borner, Markus M

    2009-07-01

    Cancer is caused by a complex pattern of molecular perturbations. To understand the biology of cancer, it is thus important to look at the activation state of key proteins and signaling networks. The limited amount of available sample material from patients and the complexity of protein expression patterns make the use of traditional protein analysis methods particularly difficult. In addition, the only approach that is currently available for performing functional studies is the use of serial biopsies, which is limited by ethical constraints and patient acceptance. The goal of this work was to establish a 3-D ex vivo culture technique in combination with reverse-phase protein microarrays (RPPM) as a novel experimental tool for use in cancer research. The RPPM platform allows the parallel profiling of large numbers of protein analytes to determine their relative abundance and activation level. Cancer tissue and the respective corresponding normal tissue controls from patients with colorectal cancer were cultured ex vivo. At various time points, the cultured samples were processed into lysates and analyzed on RPPM to assess the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 24 proteins involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The methodology displayed good robustness and low system noise. As a proof of concept, CEA expression was significantly higher in tumor compared with normal tissue (p<0.0001). The caspase 9 expression signal was lower in tumor tissue than in normal tissue (p<0.001). Cleaved Caspase 8 (p=0.014), Bad (p=0.007), Bim (p=0.007), p73 (p=0.005), PARP (p<0.001), and cleaved PARP (p=0.007) were differentially expressed in normal liver and normal colon tissue. We demonstrate here the feasibility of using RPPM technology with 3-D ex vivo cultured samples. This approach is useful for investigating complex patterns of protein expression and modification over time. It should allow functional proteomics in patient samples with various applications such as pharmacodynamic analyses in drug development. PMID:19609961

  18. Fluorescence-surface enhanced Raman scattering co-functionalized gold nanorods as near-infrared probes for purely optical in vivo imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Qian; Li Jiang; Fuhong Cai; Dan Wang; Sailing He

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) have been widely used for bio-imaging. However, GNRs assisted optical in vivo deep tissue imaging is severely restricted due to signal attenuation, low contrast, complex process or low real-timing. To overcome these problems, we functionalized GNRs with both near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and utilized these co-functionalized GNRs for purely optical in vivo

  19. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Corneal Nerves: Analysis and Clinical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Cruzat, Andrea; Pavan-Langston, Deborah; Hamrah, Pedram

    2011-01-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy is a growing technique for the study of the cornea at the cellular level, providing images comparable to ex vivo histochemical methods. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) has an enormous potential, being a noninvasive procedure that images the living cornea, to study both its physiological and pathological states. Corneal nerves are of great interest to clinicians and scientists due to their important roles in regulating corneal sensation, epithelial integrity, proliferation, wound healing, and for their protective functions. IVCM enables the noninvasive examination of corneal nerves, allowing the study of nerve alterations in different ocular diseases, after corneal surgery, and in systemic diseases. To date, the correlation of sub-basal corneal nerves and their function has been studied in normal eyes, keratoconus, dry eye, contact lens wearers, and in neurotrophic keratopathy, among others. Further, the effect of corneal surgery on nerves has been studied, demonstrating the regenerative capacity of corneal nerves and the recovery of sensation. Moreover, IVCM has been applied in the diagnosis of peripheral diabetic neuropathy and the assessment of progression in this systemic disease. The purpose of this review is to describe the principles, applications, and clinical correlation of IVCM in the study of corneal nerves in different ocular and systemic diseases. PMID:21090996

  20. Validation protocol for assessing the upper cervical spine kinematics and helical axis: An in vivo preliminary analysis for axial rotation, modeling, and motion representation

    PubMed Central

    Dugailly, Pierre-Michel; Sobczak, Stéphane; Lubansu, Alphonse; Rooze, Marcel; Jan, SergeVan Sint; Feipel, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Context: The function of the upper cervical spine (UCS) is essential in the kinematics of the whole cervical spine. Specific motion patterns are described at the UCS during head motions to compensate coupled motions occurring at the lower cervical segments. Aims: First, two methods for computing in vitro UCS discrete motions were compared to assess three-dimensional (3D) kinematics. Secondly, the same protocol was applied to assess the feasibility of the procedure for in vivo settings. Also, this study attempts to expose the use of anatomical modeling for motion representation including helical axis. Settings and Design: UCS motions were assessed to verify the validity of in vitro 3D kinematics and to present an in vivo procedure for evaluating axial rotation. Materials and Methods: In vitro kinematics was sampled using a digitizing technique and computed tomography (CT) for assessing 3D motions during flexion extension and axial rotation. To evaluate the feasibility of this protocol in vivo, one asymptomatic volunteer performed an MRI kinematics evaluation of the UCS for axial rotation. Data processing allowed integrating data into UCS 3D models for motion representation, discrete joint behavior, and motion helical axis determination. Results: Good agreement was observed between the methods with angular displacement differences ranging from 1° to 1.5°. Helical axis data were comparable between both methods with axis orientation differences ranging from 3° to 6°. In vivo assessment of axial rotation showed coherent kinematics data compared to previous studies. Helical axis data were found to be similar between in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Conclusions: The present protocol confirms agreement of methods and exposes its feasibility to investigate in vivo UCS kinematics. Moreover, combining motion analysis, helical axis representation, and anatomical modeling, constitutes an innovative development to provide new insights for understanding motion behaviors of the UCS. PMID:24381450

  1. Convex Analysis and Optimization with Submodular Functions: a Tutorial

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Convex Analysis and Optimization with Submodular Functions: a Tutorial Francis Bach INRIA - Willow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 10.2 Cut functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. Role of vascular networks in extending glucose sensor function: Impact of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis on continuous glucose monitoring in vivo.

    PubMed

    Klueh, Ulrike; Antar, Omar; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L

    2014-10-01

    The concept of increased blood vessel (BV) density proximal to glucose sensors implanted in the interstitial tissue increases the accuracy and lifespan of sensors is accepted, despite limited existing experimental data. Interestingly, there is no previous data or even conjecture in the literature on the role of lymphatic vessels (LV) alone, or in combination with BV, in enhancing continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo. To investigate the impact of inducing vascular networks (BV and LV) at sites of glucose sensor implantation, we utilized adenovirus based local gene therapy of vascular endothelial cell growth factor-A (VEGF-A) to induce vessels at sensor implantation sites. The results of these studies demonstrated that (1) VEGF-A based local gene therapy increases vascular networks (blood vessels and lymphatic vessels) at sites of glucose sensor implantation; and (2) this local increase of vascular networks enhances glucose sensor function in vivo from 7 days to greater than 28 days postsensor implantation. This data provides "proof of concept" for the effective usage of local angiogenic factor (AF) gene therapy in mammalian models in an effort to extend CGM in vivo. It also supports the practice of a variety of viral and nonviral vectors as well as gene products (e.g. anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis genes) to engineer "implant friendly tissues" for the usage with implantable glucose sensors as well as other implantable devices. PMID:24243850

  3. Analysis of in vivo DNA repair rates of alkylpurines in defined segments of human DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.W.; Weiss, R.B.; Gallagher, P.E. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Simple alkylating agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate or dimethyl sulfate, react with DNA bases to yield 7-methylguanine as the major product, with 3-methyladenine and O{sup 6}-methylguanine in lesser amounts. It has been shown that these alkylated bases are actively repaired in vivo in both bacteria and mammalian cells. The authors have employed a polymerase chain reaction assay to examine the in vivo formation and repair rates of alkylpurines in a defined segment of the human dihydrofolate reductase gene. Human lymphoblasts were treated with varying doses of dimethyl sulfate and a limiting concentration of the isolated DNA was used in the amplification reactions. Alkylation resulted in a dose-dependent loss of primer extension, presumably due to 3-methyladenine blockage of the Taq polymerase. Analysis of the amplified reaction products by radioautography following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the prematurely truncated amplified products terminated at adenines as compared to DNA sequencing fragments. Heat treatment of the amplified DNAs prior to gel analysis resulted in fragments that terminated at adenines and guanines. The lymphoblast DNA was isolated at various times after alkylation and the repair rate of alkyladenine in the DHFR fragment was found to be more efficient than that of the overall genome.

  4. Partial recovery of in vivo function by improved incubation conditions of isolated renal proximal tubule

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Müller-Berger; S. Coppola; I. Samaržija; G. Seki; E. Frömter

    1997-01-01

    Isolated microperfused rabbit renal proximal tubule S2 segments, if incubated in conventional substrate containing HCO3\\u000a –Ringer solution, exhibit lower cell membrane potentials (V\\u000a b) and elevated intracellular Na+ concentrations ([Na]i) compared to rat tubules in vivo. Assuming that these and other differences reflect insufficient metabolic and\\/or hormonal\\u000a stimulation of the cells, we have used microelectrode techniques to test whether improving

  5. 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of human endothelial progenitor cells and contributes to angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G; Falck, John R; Arbab, Ali S; Scicli, A Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L; Yang, Jing; Guo, Austin M

    2014-03-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F-20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F-20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ~1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A-20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  6. Fluorescence-surface enhanced Raman scattering co-functionalized gold nanorods as near-infrared probes for purely optical in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Jiang, Li; Cai, Fuhong; Wang, Dan; He, Sailing

    2011-02-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) have been widely used for bio-imaging. However, GNRs assisted optical in vivo deep tissue imaging is severely restricted due to signal attenuation, low contrast, complex process or low real-timing. To overcome these problems, we functionalized GNRs with both near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and utilized these co-functionalized GNRs for purely optical in vivo imaging of live mice. Our proposed technology has the combined advantages of high real-timing, high imaging contrast and deep detection ability. The distribution and excretion of intravenously injected GNRs in deep tissues of live mice were observed in vivo for the first time through purely optical imaging. We also demonstrated successfully in vivo biomedical applications of the co-functionalized GNRs to sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and tumor targeting of mice. The present technology has great future potentials for disease diagnosis and clinical therapies. PMID:21106233

  7. Long-Term Persistence of Functional Thymic Epithelial Progenitor Cells In Vivo under Conditions of Low FOXN1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Nowell, Craig S.; Ulyanchenko, Svetlana; Stenhouse, Frances H.; Blackburn, C. Clare

    2014-01-01

    Normal thymus function reflects interactions between developing T-cells and several thymic stroma cell types. Within the stroma, key functions reside in the distinct cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cell (TEC) types. It has been demonstrated that, during organogenesis, all TECs can be derived from a common thymic epithelial progenitor cell (TEPC). The properties of this common progenitor are thus of interest. Differentiation of both cTEC and mTEC depends on the epithelial-specific transcription factor FOXN1, although formation of the common TEPC from which the TEC lineage originates does not require FOXN1. Here, we have used a revertible severely hypomorphic allele of Foxn1, Foxn1R, to test the stability of the common TEPC in vivo. By reactivating Foxn1 expression postnatally in Foxn1R/? mice we demonstrate that functional TEPCs can persist in the thymic rudiment until at least 6 months of age, and retain the potential to give rise to both cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs and mTECs). These data demonstrate that the TEPC-state is remarkably stable in vivo under conditions of low Foxn1 expression, suggesting that manipulation of FOXN1 activity may prove a valuable method for long term maintenance of TEPC in vitro. PMID:25531271

  8. Surface-Functionalized Nanoparticles by Olefin Metathesis: A Chemoselective Approach for In Vivo Characterization of Atherosclerosis Plaque.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Beatriz; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Benito, Marina; Herranz, Fernando

    2015-07-13

    The use of click chemistry reactions for the functionalization of nanoparticles is particularly useful to modify the surface in a well-defined manner and to enhance the targeting properties, thus facilitating clinical translation. Here it is demonstrated that olefin metathesis can be used for the chemoselective functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with three different examples. This approach enables, in one step, the synthesis and functionalization of different water-stable magnetite-based particles from oleic acid-coated counterparts. The surface of the nanoparticles was completely characterized showing how the metathesis approach introduces a large number of hydrophilic molecules on their coating layer. As an example of the possible applications of these new nanocomposites, a focus was taken on atherosclerosis plaques. It is also demonstrated how the in vitro properties of one of the probes, particularly its Ca(2+) -binding properties, mediate their final in vivo use; that is, the selective accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. This opens promising new applications to detect possible microcalcifications associated with plaque vulnerability. The accumulation of the new imaging tracers is demonstrated by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of carotids and aorta in the ApoE(-/-) mouse model and the results were confirmed by histology. PMID:26096657

  9. Measuring stem cell frequency in epidermis: A quantitative in vivo functional assay for long-term repopulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T. E.; Barland, C.; Alex, A. M.; Mancianti, M. L.; Lu, Y.; Cleaver, J. E.; Lawrence, H. J.; Ghadially, R.

    2003-09-01

    Epidermal stem cells play a central role in tissue homeostasis, wound repair, tumor initiation, and gene therapy. A major impediment to the purification and molecular characterization of epidermal stem cells is the lack of a quantitative assay for cells capable of long-term repopulation in vivo, such as exists for hematopoietic cells. The tremendous strides made in the characterization and purification of hematopoietic stem cells have been critically dependent on the availability of competitive transplantation assays, because these assays permit the accurate quantitation of long-term repopulating cells in vivo. We have developed an analogous functional assay for epidermal stem cells, and have measured the frequency of functional epidermal stem cells in interfollicular epidermis. These studies indicate that cells capable of long-term reconstitution of a squamous epithelium reside in the interfollicular epidermis. We find that the frequency of these long-term repopulating cells is 1 in 35,000 total epidermal cells, or in the order of 1 in 104 basal epidermal cells, similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and much lower than previously estimated in epidermis. Furthermore, these studies establish a novel functional assay that can be used to validate immunophenotypic markers and enrichment strategies for epidermal stem cells, and to quantify epidermal stem cells in various keratinocyte populations. Thus further studies using this type of assay for epidermis should aid in the progress of cutaneous stem cell-targeted gene therapy, and in more basic studies of epidermal stem cell regulation and differentiation.

  10. In vivo assessment of cardiac metabolism and function in the abdominal aortic banding model of compensated cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Vicky; Miller, Jack J.; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to chronic mechanical overload and can lead to functional deterioration and heart failure. Changes in cardiac energy metabolism are considered as key to the hypertrophic remodelling process. The concurrence of obesity and hypertrophy has been associated with contractile dysfunction, and this work therefore aimed to investigate the in vivo structural, functional, and metabolic remodelling that occurs in the hypertrophied heart in the setting of a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western diet (WD). Methods and results Following induction of cardiac hypertrophy through abdominal aortic banding, male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to either a standard diet or a WD (containing 45% fat and 16% sucrose) for up to 14 weeks. Cardiac structural and functional characteristics were determined by CINE MRI, and in vivo metabolism was investigated using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled pyruvate. Cardiac hypertrophy was observed at all time points, irrespective of dietary manipulation, with no evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Pyruvate dehydrogenase flux was unchanged in the hypertrophied animals at any time point, but increased incorporation of the 13C label into lactate was observed by 9 weeks and maintained at 14 weeks, indicative of enhanced glycolysis. Conclusion Hypertrophied hearts revealed little evidence of a switch towards increased glucose oxidation but rather an uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism from glucose oxidation. This was maintained under conditions of dietary stress provided by a WD but, at this compensated phase of hypertrophy, did not result in any contractile dysfunction. PMID:25750189

  11. The neurexin ligands, neuroligins and leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins, perform convergent and divergent synaptic functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Soler-Llavina, Gilberto J; Fuccillo, Marc V; Ko, Jaewon; Südhof, Thomas C; Malenka, Robert C

    2011-10-01

    Synaptic cell adhesion molecules, including the neurexin ligands, neuroligins (NLs) and leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins (LRRTMs), are thought to organize synapse assembly and specify synapse function. To test the synaptic role of these molecules in vivo, we performed lentivirally mediated knockdown of NL3, LRRTM1, and LRRTM2 in CA1 pyramidal cells of WT and NL1 KO mice at postnatal day (P)0 (when synapses are forming) and P21 (when synapses are largely mature). P0 knockdown of NL3 in WT or NL1 KO neurons did not affect excitatory synaptic transmission, whereas P0 knockdown of LRRTM1 and LRRTM2 selectively reduced AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents. P0 triple knockdown of NL3 and both LRRTMs in NL1 KO mice yielded greater reductions in AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents, suggesting functional redundancy between NLs and LRRTMs during early synapse development. In contrast, P21 knockdown of LRRTMs did not alter excitatory transmission, whereas NL manipulations supported a role for NL1 in maintaining NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. These results show that neurexin ligands in vivo form a dynamic synaptic cell adhesion network, with compensation between NLs and LRRTMs during early synapse development and functional divergence upon synapse maturation. PMID:21953696

  12. Pineal Function: Impact of Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David C.; Bailey, Michael J.; Carter, David A.; Kim, Jong-so; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony; Chik, Constance; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Weller, Joan L.; Coon, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-hour schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology, RNA splicing, and the role the pineal gland plays in the immune/inflammation response. The new foundation that microarray analysis has provided will broadly support future research on pineal function. PMID:19622385

  13. In vivo wear and migration of highly cross-linked polyethylene cups a radiostereometry analysis study.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Stephan; Nivbrant, Bo; Mingguo, Li; Hewitt, Ben

    2005-06-01

    In 50 cemented hip arthroplasties, wear and migration of the polyethylene (PE) cups were measured with radiostereometric analysis for a period of 2 years. Twenty had a normal gamma-in-air-sterilized PE, another 20 had a PE sterilized with 30000 Gy followed by heat stabilization (Duration; Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ), and 10 had highly cross-linked PE cups irradiated with 100000 Gy (Crossfire; Stryker Orthopaedics). In the initial 2 months, head penetration (creep) was 63 microm on average for the 3 groups. From 2 to 24 months, the mean proximal head penetration (wear) was 156 microm for standard PE, 138 microm for stabilized PE (P = .45), and 23 microm for highly cross-linked PE (P < .001; analysis of variance). The low in vivo wear rate for highly cross-linked cups was not at the expense of higher migration or less favorable clinical outcome and looks promising. PMID:16124954

  14. Stochastic precision analysis of 2D cardiac strain estimation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bunting, E A; Provost, J; Konofagou, E E

    2014-11-21

    Ultrasonic strain imaging has been applied to echocardiography and carries great potential to be used as a tool in the clinical setting. Two-dimensional (2D) strain estimation may be useful when studying the heart due to the complex, 3D deformation of the cardiac tissue. Increasing the framerate used for motion estimation, i.e. motion estimation rate (MER), has been shown to improve the precision of the strain estimation, although maintaining the spatial resolution necessary to view the entire heart structure in a single heartbeat remains challenging at high MERs. Two previously developed methods, the temporally unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) and the diverging beam sequence (DBS), have been used in the past to successfully estimate in vivo axial strain at high MERs without compromising spatial resolution. In this study, a stochastic assessment of 2D strain estimation precision is performed in vivo for both sequences at varying MERs (65, 272, 544, 815?Hz for TUAS; 250, 500, 1000, 2000?Hz for DBS). 2D incremental strains were estimated during left ventricular contraction in five healthy volunteers using a normalized cross-correlation function and a least-squares strain estimator. Both sequences were shown capable of estimating 2D incremental strains in vivo. The conditional expected value of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (E(SNRe|?)) was used to compare strain estimation precision of both sequences at multiple MERs over a wide range of clinical strain values. The results here indicate that axial strain estimation precision is much more dependent on MER than lateral strain estimation, while lateral estimation is more affected by strain magnitude. MER should be increased at least above 544?Hz to avoid suboptimal axial strain estimation. Radial and circumferential strain estimations were influenced by the axial and lateral strain in different ways. Furthermore, the TUAS and DBS were found to be of comparable precision at similar MERs. PMID:25330746

  15. Stochastic precision analysis of 2D cardiac strain estimation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunting, E. A.; Provost, J.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic strain imaging has been applied to echocardiography and carries great potential to be used as a tool in the clinical setting. Two-dimensional (2D) strain estimation may be useful when studying the heart due to the complex, 3D deformation of the cardiac tissue. Increasing the framerate used for motion estimation, i.e. motion estimation rate (MER), has been shown to improve the precision of the strain estimation, although maintaining the spatial resolution necessary to view the entire heart structure in a single heartbeat remains challenging at high MERs. Two previously developed methods, the temporally unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) and the diverging beam sequence (DBS), have been used in the past to successfully estimate in vivo axial strain at high MERs without compromising spatial resolution. In this study, a stochastic assessment of 2D strain estimation precision is performed in vivo for both sequences at varying MERs (65, 272, 544, 815?Hz for TUAS; 250, 500, 1000, 2000?Hz for DBS). 2D incremental strains were estimated during left ventricular contraction in five healthy volunteers using a normalized cross-correlation function and a least-squares strain estimator. Both sequences were shown capable of estimating 2D incremental strains in vivo. The conditional expected value of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (E(SNRe|?)) was used to compare strain estimation precision of both sequences at multiple MERs over a wide range of clinical strain values. The results here indicate that axial strain estimation precision is much more dependent on MER than lateral strain estimation, while lateral estimation is more affected by strain magnitude. MER should be increased at least above 544?Hz to avoid suboptimal axial strain estimation. Radial and circumferential strain estimations were influenced by the axial and lateral strain in different ways. Furthermore, the TUAS and DBS were found to be of comparable precision at similar MERs.

  16. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    E-print Network

    Yaung, Stephanie J.

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics ...

  17. Induction and functional significance of the heme oxygenase system in pathological shear stress in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lu; Hillestad, Matthew L; Grande, Joseph P; Croatt, Anthony J; Barry, Michael A; Farrugia, Gianrico; Katusic, Zvonimir S; Nath, Karl A

    2015-06-01

    The present study examined the heme oxygenase (HO) system in an in vivo murine model of pathological shear stress induced by partial carotid artery ligation. In this model, along with upregulation of vasculopathic genes, HO-1 is induced in the endothelium and adventitia, whereas HO-2 is mainly upregulated in the endothelium. Within minutes of ligation, NF-?B, a transcription factor that upregulates vasculopathic genes and HO-1, is activated. Failure to express either HO-1 or HO-2 exaggerates the reduction in carotid blood flow and exacerbates vascular injury. After artery ligation, comparable induction of HO-2 occurred in HO-1(+/+) and HO-1(-/-) mice, whereas HO-1 induction was exaggerated in HO-2(-/-) mice compared with HO-2(+/+) mice. Upregulation of HO-1 by an adeno-associated viral vector increased vascular HO-1 expression and HO activity and augmented blood flow in both ligated and contralateral carotid arteries. Acute inhibition of HO activity decreased flow in the ligated carotid artery, whereas a product of HO, carbon monoxide (CO), delivered by CO-releasing molecule-3, increased carotid blood flow. In conclusion, in the partial carotid artery ligation model of pathological shear stress, this study provides the first demonstration of 1) upregulation and vasoprotective effects of HO-1 and HO-2 and the vasorelaxant effects of CO as well as 2) vascular upregulation of HO-1 in vivo by an adeno-associated viral vector that is attended by a salutary vascular response. Induction of HO-1 may reside in NF-?B activation, and, along with induced HO-2, such upregulation of HO-1 provides a countervailing vasoprotective response in pathological shear stress in vivo. PMID:25820397

  18. Political Advertising in Kuwait A Functional Analysis

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Political Advertising in Kuwait A Functional Analysis Jasem Alqaseer Abstract: Most political advertising studies focus on the U.S. or other western democracies like the U.K. and other European countries (Kaid, 2006). In general, political advertising studies focused on the content of political advertising

  19. Systematic functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Ahringe, Julie

    in C. elegans by RNAi, we constructed a library of bacterial strains, each capable of expressing dsSystematic functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome using RNAi Ravi S. Kamath to share transcriptional profiles. Our resulting data set and reusable RNAi library of 16,757 bacterial

  20. A functional analysis of binge-eating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GIenn Waller

    1995-01-01

    Previous attempts at formulating binge-eating (usually as part of the syndrome of bulimia nervosa) are reviewed and common themes are extracted from the literature. Two main themes in formulations of bingeing are highlighted — that bingeing may result from eating behavior or from emotional difficulties. A functional analysis paradigm is utilized to integrate this information in a clinically useful manner.

  1. Principal components analysis of FT-Raman spectra of ex vivo basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Airton A.; Bitar Carter, Renata A.; de Oliveira Nunes, Lilian; Loschiavo Arisawa, Emilia A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2004-07-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy is a modern analytical tool and it is believed that its use for skin cancer diagnosis will lead to several advantages for patients, e.g., faster results and a minimization of invasivity. This article reports results of an ex Vivo study of the FT-Raman spectra regarding differentiation between non-diseased and malignant human skin lesions, Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC). A Nd: YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman, RFS 100/S Spectrometer, Bruker. Thirty-nine sets of human skin samples, 18 histopathologically diagnosed as non-diseased, and 21 as BCC, were obtained during routine therapeutic procedures required by the primary disease. No sample preparation was needed to promote the FT-Raman spectra collection. The main spectral features, which may differentiate the sample, were found in the shift region of Amide I (1640 to 1680 cm-1), Amide III (1220 to 1330cm-1), proteins and lipids (1400 to 1500 cm-1), amino acids (939 to 940 cm-1) and deoxyribonucleic acid (1600 to 1620cm-1). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was applied to FT-Raman spectra of Basal Cell Carcinoma. Analysis was performed on mean-normalized and mean-centered data of the non-diseased skin and BCC spectra. The dynamic loading of PCA was expanded into 2D contour by calculating a variance-covariance matrix. PCA was used to verify the statistical differences in the sample. This technique applied over all samples identified tissue type within 83% of sensitivity and 100% specificity. The PCA technique proved efficient for analysis in skin tissue ex vivo, results were significant and coherent.

  2. In vivo imaging of cell proliferation for a dynamic, whole body, analysis of undesired drug effects.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Nicoletta; Manni, Isabella; Vantaggiato, Cristina; Delledonne, Giacomo Andrea; Gentileschi, Maria Pia; Maggi, Adriana; Piaggio, Giulia; Ciana, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Noninvasive in vivo imaging offers a novel approach to preclinical studies opening the possibility of investigating biological events in the spatiotemporal dimension (eg, in any district of the body in time). Toxicological analysis may benefit from this novel approach through precise identification of the time and the target organs of toxicity manifestations, and assessment of the reversibility of toxic insults. The current limitation for routine application of this technology is the lack of appropriate surrogate markers for imaging toxicological events. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo imaging of a proliferation marker is capable of measuring the reduction of cell proliferation due to genotoxic/apoptotic agents, ? rays or antineoplastic drugs, or the increased proliferation associated with the inflammatory and regenerative reactions occurring after a toxic insult. A number of tools are currently available for imaging proliferation in preclinical and clinical settings, however our data provide a novel way to translate the evidence of toxic effects obtained in preclinical animal studies, by the direct, noninvasive measure of dividing cells in humans. PMID:25766884

  3. Delayed near-infrared analysis permits visualization of rodent retinal pigment epithelium layer in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankova, Natalie; Zhao, Xu; Liang, Huiyuan; Baek, David Sung Hyeon; Wang, Hai; Boyd, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    Patches of atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have not been described in rodent models of retinal degeneration, as they have the clinical setting using fundus autofluorescence. We hypothesize that prelabeling the RPE would increase contrast and allow for improved visualization of RPE loss in vivo. Here, we demonstrate a new technique termed "delayed near-infrared analysis (DNIRA)" that permits ready detection of rat RPE, using optical imaging in the near-infrared (IR) spectrum with aid of indocyanine green (ICG) dye. Using DNIRA, we demonstrate a fluorescent RPE signal that is detected using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy up to 28 days following ICG injection. This signal is apparent only after ICG injection, is dose dependent, requires the presence of the ICG filters (795/810 nm excitation/emission), does not appear in the IR reflectance channel, and is eliminated in the presence of sodium iodate, a toxin that causes RPE loss. Rat RPE explants confirm internalization of ICG dye. Together with normal retinal electrophysiology, these findings demonstrate that DNIRA is a new and safe noninvasive optical imaging technique for in vivo visualization of the RPE in models of retinal disease.

  4. A critical analysis of current in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays

    PubMed Central

    Staton, Carolyn A; Reed, Malcolm W R; Brown, Nicola J

    2009-01-01

    The study of angiogenesis has grown exponentially over the past 40 years with the recognition that angiogenesis is essential for numerous pathologies and, more recently, with the advent of successful drugs to inhibit angiogenesis in tumours. The main problem with angiogenesis research remains the choice of appropriate assays to evaluate the efficacy of potential new drugs and to identify potential targets within the angiogenic process. This selection is made more complex by the recognition that heterogeneity occurs, not only within the endothelial cells themselves, but also within the specific microenvironment to be studied. Thus, it is essential to choose the assay conditions and cell types that most closely resemble the angiogenic disease being studied. This is especially important when aiming to translate data from in vitro to in vivo and from preclinical to the clinic. Here we critically review and highlight recent advances in the principle assays in common use including those for endothelial cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and co-culture with fibroblasts and mural cells in vitro, vessel outgrowth from organ cultures and in vivo assays such as chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), zebrafish, sponge implantation, corneal, dorsal air sac, chamber and tumour angiogenesis models. Finally, we briefly discuss the direction likely to be taken in future studies, which include the use of increasingly sophisticated imaging analysis systems for data acquisition. PMID:19563606

  5. The rare DAT coding variant Val559 perturbs DA neuron function, changes behavior, and alters in vivo responses to psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Mergy, Marc A.; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Gresch, Paul J.; Gantz, Stephanie C.; Williams, John; Davis, Gwynne L.; Wheeler, C. Austin; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Hahn, Maureen K.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the critical role of the presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) in DA clearance and psychostimulant responses, evidence that DAT dysfunction supports risk for mental illness is indirect. Recently, we identified a rare, nonsynonymous Slc6a3 variant that produces the DAT substitution Ala559Val in two male siblings who share a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with other studies identifying the variant in subjects with bipolar disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previously, using transfected cell studies, we observed that although DAT Val559 displays normal total and surface DAT protein levels, and normal DA recognition and uptake, the variant transporter exhibits anomalous DA efflux (ADE) and lacks capacity for amphetamine (AMPH)-stimulated DA release. To pursue the significance of these findings in vivo, we engineered DAT Val559 knock-in mice, and here we demonstrate in this model the presence of elevated extracellular DA levels, altered somatodendritic and presynaptic D2 DA receptor (D2R) function, a blunted ability of DA terminals to support depolarization and AMPH-evoked DA release, and disruptions in basal and psychostimulant-evoked locomotor behavior. Together, our studies demonstrate an in vivo functional impact of the DAT Val559 variant, providing support for the ability of DAT dysfunction to impact risk for mental illness. PMID:25331903

  6. Single cell electroporation for longitudinal imaging of synaptic structure and function in the adult mouse neocortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Stéphane; Cane, Michele; Randall, Jérôme; Capello, Luca; Holtmaat, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies of neuronal structures in vivo have revealed rich dynamics in dendritic spines and axonal boutons. Spines and boutons are considered to be proxies for synapses. This implies that synapses display similar dynamics. However, spines and boutons do not always bear synapses, some may contain more than one, and dendritic shaft synapses have no clear structural proxies. In addition, synaptic strength is not always accurately revealed by just the size of these structures. Structural and functional dynamics of synapses could be studied more reliably using fluorescent synaptic proteins as markers for size and function. These proteins are often large and possibly interfere with circuit development, which renders them less suitable for conventional transfection or transgenesis methods such as viral vectors, in utero electroporation, and germline transgenesis. Single cell electroporation (SCE) has been shown to be a potential alternative for transfection of recombinant fluorescent proteins in adult cortical neurons. Here we provide proof of principle for the use of SCE to express and subsequently image fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins over days to weeks in vivo. PMID:25904849

  7. Biocompatible near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles for macro and microscopic in vivo functional bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Liliang; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Kanghui; Xi, Wang; Zhao, Xinyuan; Qian, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging technology has been widely used for biomedical research and applications, since it can achieve deep penetration in biological tissues due to less absorption and scattering of NIR light. In our research, polymer nanoparticles with NIR fluorophores doped were synthesized. The morphology, absorption/emission features and chemical stability of the fluorescent nanoparticles were characterized, separately. NIR fluorescent nanoparticles were then utilized as bright optical probes for macro in vivo imaging of mice, including sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping, as well as distribution and excretion monitoring of nanoparticles in animal body. Furthermore, we applied the NIR fluorescent nanoparticles in in vivo microscopic bioimaging via a confocal microscope. Under the 635 nm-CW excitation, the blood vessel architecture in the ear and the brain of mice, which were administered with nanoparticles, was visualized very clearly. The imaging depth of our one-photon microscopy, which was assisted with NIR fluorescent nanoprobes, can reach as deep as 500 ?m. Our experiments show that NIR fluorescent nanoparticles have great potentials in various deep-tissue imaging applications. PMID:25426331

  8. Probing cell type-specific functions of Gi in vivo identifies GPCR regulators of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Regard, Jean B; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Cano, David A; Camerer, Eric; Yin, Liya; Zheng, Yao-Wu; Scanlan, Thomas S; Hebrok, Matthias; Coughlin, Shaun R

    2007-12-01

    The in vivo roles of the hundreds of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are incompletely understood. To explore these roles, we generated mice expressing the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin, a known inhibitor of G(i/o) signaling, under the control of the ROSA26 locus in a Cre recombinase-dependent manner (ROSA26(PTX)). Crossing ROSA26(PTX) mice to mice expressing Cre in pancreatic beta cells produced offspring with constitutive hyperinsulinemia, increased insulin secretion in response to glucose, and resistance to diet-induced hyperglycemia. This phenotype underscored the known importance of G(i/o) and hence of GPCRs for regulating insulin secretion. Accordingly, we quantified mRNA for each of the approximately 373 nonodorant GPCRs in mouse to identify receptors highly expressed in islets and examined the role of several. We report that 3-iodothyronamine, a thyroid hormone metabolite, could negatively and positively regulate insulin secretion via the G(i)-coupled alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor and the G(s)-coupled receptor Taar1, respectively, and protease-activated receptor-2 could negatively regulate insulin secretion and may contribute to physiological regulation of glucose metabolism. The ROSA26(PTX) system used in this study represents a new genetic tool to achieve tissue-specific signaling pathway modulation in vivo that can be applied to investigate the role of G(i/o)-coupled GPCRs in multiple cell types and processes. PMID:17992256

  9. Probing cell type–specific functions of Gi in vivo identifies GPCR regulators of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Regard, Jean B.; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Cano, David A.; Camerer, Eric; Yin, Liya; Zheng, Yao-Wu; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Hebrok, Matthias; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo roles of the hundreds of mammalian G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are incompletely understood. To explore these roles, we generated mice expressing the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin, a known inhibitor of Gi/o signaling, under the control of the ROSA26 locus in a Cre recombinase–dependent manner (ROSA26PTX). Crossing ROSA26PTX mice to mice expressing Cre in pancreatic ? cells produced offspring with constitutive hyperinsulinemia, increased insulin secretion in response to glucose, and resistance to diet-induced hyperglycemia. This phenotype underscored the known importance of Gi/o and hence of GPCRs for regulating insulin secretion. Accordingly, we quantified mRNA for each of the approximately 373 nonodorant GPCRs in mouse to identify receptors highly expressed in islets and examined the role of several. We report that 3-iodothyronamine, a thyroid hormone metabolite, could negatively and positively regulate insulin secretion via the Gi-coupled ?2A-adrenergic receptor and the Gs-coupled receptor Taar1, respectively, and protease-activated receptor–2 could negatively regulate insulin secretion and may contribute to physiological regulation of glucose metabolism. The ROSA26PTX system used in this study represents a new genetic tool to achieve tissue-specific signaling pathway modulation in vivo that can be applied to investigate the role of Gi/o-coupled GPCRs in multiple cell types and processes. PMID:17992256

  10. Lipopolysaccharide enhances Fc?R-dependent functions in vivo through CD11b/CD18 up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, C; Miliani De Marval, P; Vermeulen, M; Isturiz, M A; Palermo, M S

    1999-01-01

    Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (IgG) (Fc?R) mediate several defence mechanisms in the course of inflammatory and infectious diseases. In Gram-negative infections, cellular wall lipopolysaccharides (LPS) modulate different immune responses. We have recently demonstrated that murine LPS in vivo treatment significantly increases Fc?R-dependent clearance of immune complexes (IC). In addition, we and others have reported the induction of adhesion molecules on macrophages and neutrophils by LPS in vivo and by tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) in vitro. The aim of this paper was to investigate CD11b/CD18 participation in LPS enhancing effects on Fc?-dependent functionality of tissue macrophages. Our results have demonstrated that LPS can enhance antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and IC-triggered cytotoxicity (IC-Ctx), two reactions which involve the Fc?-receptor but different lytic mechanisms. In vitro incubation of splenocytes from LPS-treated mice with anti-CD11b/CD18 abrogated ADCC and IC-Ctx enhancement, without affecting Fc?R expression. Similar results were obtained with physiological concentrations of fibrinogen. In this way cytotoxic values of LPS-splenocytes decreased to the basal levels of control mice. Time and temperature requirements for such inhibition strongly suggested that anti-CD11b/CD18 could modulate intracellular signals leading to downregulation of Fc?R functionality. Data presented herein support the hypothesis that functional and/or physical associations between integrins and Fc?R could be critical for the modulation of effector functions during an inflammatory response. PMID:10447764

  11. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  12. A model of stem cell population dynamics: in silico analysis and in vivo validation

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Yaki; Dalfó, Diana; Korta, Dorota Z.; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Kugler, Hillel

    2012-01-01

    The proper renewal and maintenance of tissues by stem cell populations is simultaneously influenced by anatomical constraints, cell proliferation dynamics and cell fate specification. However, their relative influence is difficult to examine in vivo. To address this difficulty we built, as a test case, a cell-centered state-based computational model of key behaviors that govern germline development in C. elegans, and used it to drive simulations of cell population dynamics under a variety of perturbations. Our analysis provided unexpected possible explanations for laboratory observations, including certain ‘all-or-none’ phenotypes and complex differentiation patterns. The simulations also offered insights into niche-association dynamics and the interplay between cell cycle and cell fate. Subsequent experiments validated several predictions generated by the simulations. Notably, we found that early cell cycle defects influence later maintenance of the progenitor cell population. This general modeling approach is potentially applicable to other stem cell systems. PMID:22147952

  13. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  14. ASSOCIATION OF MARGINAL FOLATE DEPLETION WITH INCREASED HUMAN CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE IN VIVO: DEMONSTRATION BY ANALYSIS OF MICRONUCLEATED ERYTHROCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated that in the absence of spleen function, frequencies of micronuclei (Howell-Jolly bodies) in peripheral rbcs can be used to measure in vivo cytogenetic damage. mong 20 subjects studied 6 months after splenectomy 1 had a frequency of micronucleated ...

  15. Tissue Engineering Special Feature: A macroporous hydrogel for the coculture of neural progenitor and endothelial cells to form functional vascular networks in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Millicent C. Ford; James P. Bertram; Sara Royce Hynes; Michael Michaud; Qi Li; Michael Young; Steven S. Segal; Joseph A. Madri; Erin B. Lavik

    2006-01-01

    A microvascular network is critical for the survival and function of most tissues. We have investigated the potential of neural progenitor cells to augment the formation and stabilization of microvascular networks in a previously uncharacterized three-dimensional macroporous hydrogel and the ability of this engineered system to develop a functional microcirculation in vivo. The hydrogel is synthesized by cross-linking polyethylene glycol

  16. Photoinactivation of functional photosystem II and D1-protein synthesis in vivo are independent of the modulation of the photosynthetic apparatus by growth irradiance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youn-Il Park; Jan M. Anderson; Wah Soon Chow

    1996-01-01

    To investigate whether the in-vivo photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII) function by excess light is an intrinsic property of PSII, the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv\\/Fm) and the content of functional PSII (measured by repetitive flash yield of oxygen evolution) were determined in leaves of pea (Pisum sativum L.), grown in 50 (low light), 250 (medium light), and 650

  17. Regulation and functional involvement of macrophage scavenger receptor MARCO in clearance of bacteria in vivo.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, L J; Döpp, E A; Haworth, R; Pikkarainen, T; Kangas, M; Elomaa, O; Dijkstra, C D; Gordon, S; Tryggvason, K; Kraal, G

    1999-01-15

    The scavenger receptors expressed by macrophages are thought to play an important role in the immune response against bacteria by mediating binding and phagocytosis. A novel member of the class A scavenger receptor family, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), has recently been identified. In this study we have generated a panel of mAbs with specificities for different domains of this receptor. Two of those reacting with the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain block ligand binding of MARCO. The in vivo expression of this murine receptor is normally restricted to distinct populations of macrophages in the spleen and lymph nodes. During bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection, during bacterial sepsis, or after the injection of purified LPS, however, the expression of MARCO is rapidly induced on macrophages in other tissues, including Kupffer cells in the liver. Using the mouse macrophage cell line J774.2, it was shown that LPS stimulation up-regulates surface expression of MARCO in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma had little or no effect. Using inhibitory mAbs, the relevance of MARCO for the clearance of circulating bacteria in vivo was determined. Although the overall elimination of live Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus from the blood did not appear to be affected by treatment with these Abs, the capturing of heat-killed bacteria by macrophages in the marginal zone areas of the spleen was clearly inhibited. This study suggests a role for MARCO in the host antibacterial defense. PMID:9916718

  18. Optimizing relativistic energy density functionals: covariance analysis

    E-print Network

    Tamara Niksic; Nils Paar; Paul-Gerhard Reinhard; Dario Vretenar

    2014-07-02

    The stability of model parameters for a class of relativistic energy density functionals, characterized by contact (point-coupling) effective inter-nucleon interactions and density-dependent coupling parameters, is analyzed using methods of statistical analysis. A set of pseudo-observables in infinite and semi-infinite nuclear matter is used to define a quality measure $\\chi^2$ for subsequent analysis. We calculate uncertainties of model parameters and correlation coefficients between parameters, and determine the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the matrix of second derivatives of $\\chi^2$ at the minimum. This allows to examine the stability of the density functional in nuclear matter, and to deduce weakly and strongly constrained combinations of parameters. In addition, we also compute uncertainties of observables that are not included in the calculation of $\\chi^2$: binding energy of asymmetric nuclear matter, surface thickness of semi-infinite nuclear matter, binding energies and charge radii of finite nuclei.

  19. Fracture Analysis of Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ch.; Gao, X. W.; Sladek, J.; Sladek, V.

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports our recent research works on crack analysis in continuously non-homogeneous and linear elastic functionally graded materials. A meshless boundary element method is developed for this purpose. Numerical examples are presented and discussed to demonstrate the efficiency and the accuracy of the present numerical method, and to show the effects of the material gradation on the crack-opening-displacements and the stress intensity factors.

  20. Functional suppression of integrin beta 4-mediated adhesion caused by in vivo sequential selection for cancer cell intravasation.

    PubMed

    Ota, T; Maeda, M; Tanino, M; Tatsuka, M

    2001-01-01

    Intravasation is essential for hematogenous metastasis in cancer cells, but its cellular determinants have not been well elucidated because of a lack of suitable experimental cell systems. Int-3LL was originally developed by in vivo sequential selection for intravasation from Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) cells. Here, we found that these variant cells showed a highly penetrating ability in vitro as well as an augmented intravasating potential in vivo. In three-dimensional collagen-gel, Int-3LL cells formed diffusive colonies with less plating efficiency than their parental cells. Despite these properties, Int-3LL cells showed an ability of invasive migration in vitro similar to parental cells. On the other hand, a reduced adhesiveness and less spreading on extracellular matrices were revealed in Int-3LL cells. Analyses using anti-integrin antibodies indicated that the dysadhesion phenotype in Int-3LL cells was associated with integrin beta 4 dysfunction, which is known to produce epithelial detachment. Also, the types and the levels of integrins were not indistinguishable between Int-3LL and parental 3LL cells. Thus, the impaired function of integrin beta 4-mediated adhesion is considered to be an important factor in intravasation during metastasis. PMID:11299736

  1. Extensive Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human Erythroid Precursors Established From Umbilical Cord Blood Cells by Defined Factors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaosong; Shah, Siddharth; Wang, Jing; Ye, Zhaohui; Dowey, Sarah N; Tsang, Kit Man; Mendelsohn, Laurel G; Kato, Gregory J; Kickler, Thomas S; Cheng, Linzhao

    2014-01-01

    There is a constant shortage of red blood cells (RBCs) from sufficiently matched donors for patients who need chronic transfusion. Ex vivo expansion and maturation of human erythroid precursors (erythroblasts) from the patients or optimally matched donors could represent a potential solution. Proliferating erythroblasts can be expanded from umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CB MNCs) ex vivo for 106–107-fold (in ~50 days) before proliferation arrest and reaching sufficient number for broad application. Here, we report that ectopic expression of three genetic factors (Sox2, c-Myc, and an shRNA against TP53 gene) associated with iPSC derivation enables CB-derived erythroblasts to undergo extended expansion (~1068-fold in ~12 months) in a serum-free culture condition without change of cell identity or function. These expanding erythroblasts maintain immature erythroblast phenotypes and morphology, a normal diploid karyotype and dependence on a specific combination of growth factors for proliferation throughout expansion period. When being switched to a terminal differentiation condition, these immortalized erythroblasts gradually exit cell cycle, decrease cell size, accumulate hemoglobin, condense nuclei and eventually give rise to enucleated hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes that can bind and release oxygen. Our result may ultimately lead to an alternative approach to generate unlimited numbers of RBCs for personalized transfusion medicine. PMID:24002691

  2. Structure–function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins. PMID:23630077

  3. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Choong Yong Ung; Siew Hong Lam; Mya Myintzu Hlaing; Cecilia Lanny Winata; Svetlana Korzh; Sinnakaruppan Mathavan; Zhiyuan Gong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mercury is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes detrimental effects to human health. Although the liver has been known to be a main target organ, there is limited information on in vivo molecular mechanism of mercury-induced toxicity in the liver. By using transcriptome analysis, phenotypic anchoring and validation of targeted gene expression in zebrafish, mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated and

  4. Quantitative analysis of the effect of supersaturation on in vivo drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Takano, Ryusuke; Takata, Noriyuki; Saito, Ryoichi; Furumoto, Kentaro; Higo, Shoichi; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Machida, Minoru; Aso, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Shinji

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effects of intestinal drug supersaturation on solubility-limited nonlinear absorption. Oral absorption of a novel farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI-2600) from its crystalline free base and its HCl salt was determined in dogs. To clarify the contribution of supersaturation on improving drug absorption, in vivo intraluminal concentration of FTI-2600 after oral administration was estimated from the pharmacokinetics data using a physiologically based model. Dissolution and precipitation characteristics of FTI-2600 in a biorelevant media were investigated in vitro using a miniscale dissolution test and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. In the in vitro study, the HCl salt immediately dissolved but precipitated rapidly. The metastable amorphous free base precipitant, which did not convert into the stable crystalline free base in the simulated intestinal fluids for several hours, generated a 5-fold increase in dissolved concentration compared to the equilibrium solubility of the crystalline free base. By computer simulation, the intraluminal drug concentration after administration of the free base was estimated to reach the saturated solubility, indicating solubility-limited absorption. On the other hand, administration of the HCl salt resulted in an increased intraluminal concentration and the plasma concentration was 400% greater than that after administration of the free base. This in vivo/in vitro correlation of the increased drug concentrations in the small intestine provide clear evidence that not only the increase in the dissolution rate, but also the supersaturation phenomenon, improved the solubility-limited absorption of FTI-2600. These results indicate that formulation technologies that can induce supersaturation may be of great assistance to the successful development of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:20704264

  5. Microarray analysis in rat liver slices correctly predicts in vivo hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L. [Department of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Delivery, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.G.L.Elferink@rug.nl; Olinga, P.; Draaisma, A.L.; Merema, M.T. [Department of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Delivery, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J. [Molecular Design and Informatics, NV Organon part of Schering-Plough Corporation, Oss (Netherlands); Schoonen, W.G. [Pharmacology, NV Organon part of Schering-Plough Corporation, Oss (Netherlands); Groothuis, G.M.M. [Department of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Delivery, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    The microarray technology, developed for the simultaneous analysis of a large number of genes, may be useful for the detection of toxicity in an early stage of the development of new drugs. The effect of different hepatotoxins was analyzed at the gene expression level in the rat liver both in vivo and in vitro. As in vitro model system the precision-cut liver slice model was used, in which all liver cell types are present in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process involving not only hepatocytes but also other cell types such as Kupffer and stellate cells. As model toxic compounds lipopolysaccharide (LPS, inducing inflammation), paracetamol (necrosis), carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}, fibrosis and necrosis) and gliotoxin (apoptosis) were used. The aim of this study was to validate the rat liver slice system as in vitro model system for drug-induced toxicity studies. The results of the microarray studies show that the in vitro profiles of gene expression cluster per compound and incubation time, and when analyzed in a commercial gene expression database, can predict the toxicity and pathology observed in vivo. Each toxic compound induces a specific pattern of gene expression changes. In addition, some common genes were up- or down-regulated with all toxic compounds. These data show that the rat liver slice system can be an appropriate tool for the prediction of multi-cellular liver toxicity. The same experiments and analyses are currently performed for the prediction of human specific toxicity using human liver slices.

  6. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption ?a and reduced scattering coefficient ?s' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of ?a and ?s' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that ?a ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and ?s' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  7. Hybrid fusions show that inter-monomer electron transfer robustly supports cytochrome bc1 function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ekiert, Robert; Czapla, Monika; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Electronic connection between Qo and Qi quinone catalytic sites of dimeric cytochrome bc1 is a central feature of the energy-conserving Q cycle. While both the intra- and inter-monomer electron transfers were shown to connect the sites in the enzyme, mechanistic and physiological significance of the latter remains unclear. Here, using a series of mutated hybrid cytochrome bc1-like complexes, we show that inter-monomer electron transfer robustly sustains the function of the enzyme in vivo, even when the two subunits in a dimer come from different species. This indicates that minimal requirement for bioenergetic efficiency is to provide a chain of cofactors for uncompromised electron flux between the catalytic sites, while the details of protein scaffold are secondary. PMID:25089001

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial of Mind Reading and In Vivo Rehearsal for High-Functioning Children with ASD.

    PubMed

    Thomeer, Marcus L; Smith, Rachael A; Lopata, Christopher; Volker, Martin A; Lipinski, Alanna M; Rodgers, Jonathan D; McDonald, Christin A; Lee, Gloria K

    2015-07-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a computer software (i.e., Mind Reading) and in vivo rehearsal treatment on the emotion decoding and encoding skills, autism symptoms, and social skills of 43 children, ages 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). Children in treatment (n = 22) received the manualized protocol over 12 weeks. Primary analyses indicated significantly better posttest performance for the treatment group (compared to controls) on 3 of the 4 measures of emotion decoding and encoding and these were maintained at 5-week follow-up. Analyses of secondary measures favored the treatment group for 1 of the 2 measures; specifically, ASD symptoms were significantly lower at posttest and follow-up. PMID:25643864

  9. DNAM-1-based chimeric antigen receptors enhance T cell effector function and exhibit in vivo efficacy against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; Alcon, Andre; Sentman, Charles L

    2015-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies hold great potential for treating cancers, and new CARs that can target multiple tumor types and have the potential to target non-hematological malignancies are needed. In this study, the tumor recognition ability of a natural killer cell-activating receptor, DNAM-1 was harnessed to design CARs that target multiple tumor types. DNAM-1 ligands, PVR and nectin-2, are expressed on primary human leukemia, myeloma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. DNAM-1 CARs exhibit high tumor cell cytotoxicity but low IFN-? secretion in vitro. In contrast to other CAR designs, co-stimulatory domains did not improve the expression and function of DNAM-1 CARs. A DNAM-1/CD3zeta CAR reduced tumor burden in a murine melanoma model in vivo. In conclusion, DNAM-1-based CARs may have the potential to treat PVR and nectin-2 expressing hematological and solid tumors. PMID:25549845

  10. Rapid experience-dependent plasticity of synapse function and structure in ferret visual cortex in vivo

    E-print Network

    Yu, Hongbo

    The rules by which visual experience influences neuronal responses and structure in the developing brain are not well understood. To elucidate the relationship between rapid functional changes and dendritic spine remodeling ...

  11. Exploring Functional beta-Cell Heterogeneity In Vivo Using PSA-NCAM as a Specific Marker

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melis Karaca; Julien Castel; Cécile Tourrel-Cuzin; Manuel Brun; Anne Géant; Mathilde Dubois; Sandra Catesson; Marianne Rodriguez; Serge Luquet; Pierre Cattan; Brian Lockhart; Jochen Lang; Alain Ktorza; Christophe Magnan; Catherine Kargar; Kathrin Maedler

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundThe mass of pancreatic ?-cells varies according to increases in insulin demand. It is hypothesized that functionally heterogeneous ?-cell subpopulations take part in this process. Here we characterized two functionally distinct groups of ?-cells and investigated their physiological relevance in increased insulin demand conditions in rats.MethodsTwo rat ?-cell populations were sorted by FACS according to their PSA-NCAM surface expression, i.e.

  12. A synthetic icosahedral DNA-based host-cargo complex for functional in vivo imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dhiraj Bhatia; Sunaina Surana; Saikat Chakraborty; Sandhya P. Koushika; Yamuna Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    The encapsulation of molecular cargo within well-defined supramolecular architectures is highly challenging. Synthetic hosts are desirable because of their well-defined nature and addressability. Encapsulation of biomacromolecules within synthetic hosts is especially challenging because of the former's large size, sensitive nature, retention of functionality post-encapsulation and demonstration of control over the cargo. Here we encapsulate a fluorescent biopolymer that functions as

  13. Mitochondrial function and increased convective O2 transport: implications for the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Haseler, Luke J.; Trinity, Joel D.; Hart, Corey R.; Liu, Xin; Le Fur, Yann; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Although phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS)-based evidence suggests that in vivo peak mitochondrial respiration rate in young untrained adults is limited by the intrinsic mitochondrial capacity of ATP synthesis, it remains unknown whether a large, locally targeted increase in convective O2 delivery would alter this interpretation. Consequently, we examined the effect of superimposing reactive hyperemia (RH), induced by a period of brief ischemia during the last minute of exercise, on oxygen delivery and mitochondrial function in the calf muscle of nine young adults compared with free-flow conditions (FF). To this aim, we used an integrative experimental approach combining 31P-MRS, Doppler ultrasound imaging, and near-infrared spectroscopy. Limb blood flow [area under the curve (AUC), 1.4 ± 0.8 liters in FF and 2.5 ± 0.3 liters in RH, P < 0.01] and convective O2 delivery (AUC, 0.30 ± 0.16 liters in FF and 0.54 ± 0.05 liters in RH, P < 0.01), were significantly increased in RH compared with FF. RH was also associated with significantly higher capillary blood flow (P < 0.05) and faster tissue reoxygenation mean response times (70 ± 15 s in FF and 24 ± 15 s in RH, P < 0.05). This resulted in a 43% increase in estimated peak mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate (29 ± 13 mM/min in FF and 41 ± 14 mM/min in RH, P < 0.05) whereas the phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery time constant in RH was not significantly different (P = 0.22). This comprehensive assessment of local skeletal muscle O2 availability and utilization in untrained subjects reveals that mitochondrial function, assessed in vivo by 31P-MRS, is limited by convective O2 delivery rather than an intrinsic mitochondrial limitation. PMID:23813526

  14. Chromosome mechanics in vivo: quantitative analysis of nonrigid 3D chromosome motion in Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Agard, David A.; Sedat, John W.

    1996-05-01

    Chromosomes are often arranged into specific configurations. One example is the metaphase plate of the Drosophila embryo in which chromosomes are arranged into a parallel bundle. How is this configuration established and maintained? Quantitative analysis of chromosomes motion in vivo should help answer this question by providing a measure of the relevant mechanical properties of the chromosomes themselves. In addition, motion analysis will allow us to study interactions of chromosomes with the mitotic spindle. In order to analyze moving mitotic chromosomes, we acquire time-lapse 3D images of chromosomes in living Drosophila embryos, and then interactively model the chromosome configuration at each time point. A model-based motion estimation algorithm is then applied. From the motion estimate, we can visualize trajectories of different regions on the chromosomes, such as centromeres and telomeres, during metaphase and during prometaphase congression. In addition, quantitative estimates of mechanical properties such as mobility and flexibility can be computed. In this preliminary report we describe computational tools for tracking and visualizing 3D chromosome motion, and for detecting oscillations in position along the mitotic spindle.

  15. Automated in vivo change analysis of tumor vasculature from two-photon confocal image time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Karim, Muhammad-Amri; Al-Kofahi, Omar; Brown, Edward B., III; Jain, Rakesh K.; Al-Kofahi, Khalid; Roysam, Badrinath

    2003-07-01

    Automated methods are described for in vivo quantitation of changes in tumor vasculature. The tumor subsurface is imaged non-invasively over time with two-photon confocal microscopy aided by a variety of chronic animal window preparations. This results in time series of three-dimensional (3-D) image stacks for each specimen at high resolution (768x512x32 voxels, 8 bits/voxel, every 24 hours for 7 days), imaging depth and signal-to-background ratio. Next, automated image analysis allows detection and quantitation of vascular changes in a rapid and objective manner without manual tedium. We describe a fast new algorithm for fully automated 3-D tracing (50 seconds to trace a 10 MB stack on a Dell 1 GHz Pentium III personal computer). A variety of measurements including tortuosity, length, thickness, and branching order are generated and analyzed. Quantitative validation of the performance of the tracing algorithm against manual tracing resulted in 81% concordance. This enables a broader set of change analysis studies including testing the efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapies and deriving vessel growth parameters that may be correlated with physiological and gene expression profiles in tumor.

  16. Quantification of Human Brain Metabolites from in Vivo1H NMR Magnitude Spectra Using Automated Artificial Neural Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Yrjö; Kaartinen, Jouni; Pulkkinen, Juhani; Häkkinen, Anna-Maija; Lundbom, Nina; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2002-01-01

    Long echo time (TE=270 ms) in vivo proton NMR spectra resembling human brain metabolite patterns were simulated for lineshape fitting (LF) and quantitative artificial neural network (ANN) analyses. A set of experimental in vivo1H NMR spectra were first analyzed by the LF method to match the signal-to-noise ratios and linewidths of simulated spectra to those in the experimental data. The performance of constructed ANNs was compared for the peak area determinations of choline-containing compounds (Cho), total creatine (Cr), and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) signals using both manually phase-corrected and magnitude spectra as inputs. The peak area data from ANN and LF analyses for simulated spectra yielded high correlation coefficients demonstrating that the peak areas quantified with ANN gave similar results as LF analysis. Thus, a fully automated ANN method based on magnitude spectra has demonstrated potential for quantification of in vivo metabolites from long echo time spectroscopic imaging.

  17. Functional analysis of inappropriate mealtime behaviors.

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Brown, Kimberly A; Shore, Bridget A; Patel, Meeta R; Katz, Richard M; Sevin, Bart M; Gulotta, Charles S; Blakely-Smith, Audrey

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to apply the functional analysis described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982/1994) to the inappropriate mealtime behaviors of 15 children who had been referred to an intensive program for the assessment and treatment of severe feeding disorders. During Study 1, we conducted descriptive assessments of children and parents during meals. The results of Study 1 showed that parents used the following consequences for inappropriate mealtime behaviors: coaxing and reprimanding, allowing the child to periodically take a break from or avoid eating, and giving the child preferred food or toys following inappropriate behavior. The effects of these consequences were tested systematically in Study 2 when we conducted analogue functional analyses with the children. During alternating meals, one of the consequences typically used by parents consistently followed inappropriate child behavior. Results indicated that these consequences actually worsened behavior for 10 of the 15 children (67%). These results suggested that the analogue functional analysis described by Iwata et al. may be useful in identifying the environmental events that play a role in feeding disorders. PMID:12858984

  18. Analysis of human mandibular mechanics based on screw theory and in vivo data.

    PubMed

    Gal, J A; Gallo, L M; Palla, S; Murray, G; Klineberg, I

    2004-09-01

    In this paper the mechanics of human mandibular function is described in terms of the associated screws. The two distinct, yet related features of jaw mechanics, involving the motion itself as well as the forces, are both functions of the anatomical constraints, namely the contact areas that exist within the temporomandibular joint, and the forces of the muscles and tendons that allow motion to occur. The relationships that exist between these two aspects of jaw-motion are identified in this paper showing that muscle forces can be uniquely represented in terms of the action screw. This new approach to analyzing the mechanics of jaw-motion also incorporates the previously studied motion screw or helical axis. A consistent dynamic model is formulated where the action screw is used to represent the action of the closing muscle forces while the moment arms of the muscle forces are determined about the motion screw representing mandibular kinematics. The action screw formulation is verified using in vivo motion data and MR image information for a single asymptomatic subject. The results confirm the feasibility of the method and its application in dental research. A general increase in the mechanical advantage of most muscles, in the distance between action and motion screws as well as in the expended energy towards the end of the jaw-closing phase was observed. Asymmetries in the distribution of muscle force magnitudes appeared to influence the resultant force and moment of the action screw but had little effect on its spatial location. The method presented is intended to facilitate understanding of mandibular function and dysfunction. PMID:15275848

  19. Solubilization and functional analysis of the lambda holin 

    E-print Network

    Deaton, John Franklin

    2004-11-15

    the cell wall. In this study, a zwitterionic detergent Empigen BB, was used to extract and purify the lambda holin S. In Empigen BB, CD analysis on S gave 54% alpha helical content, consistent with 3 TM domains, which has been reported by other in vivo...

  20. Endogenous cannabinoid system regulates intestinal barrier function in vivo through cannabinoid type 1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zoppi, Silvia; Madrigal, José L M; Pérez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Caso, Javier R; Alou, Luis; García-Bueno, Borja; Colón, Arturo; Manzanares, Jorge; Gómez-Lus, M Luisa; Menchén, Luis; Leza, Juan C

    2012-03-01

    The deleterious effects of stress on the gastrointestinal tract seem to be mainly mediated by the induction of intestinal barrier dysfunction and subsequent subtle mucosal inflammation. Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) is expressed in the mammalian gut under physiological circumstances. The aim of this investigation is to study the possible role of CB1R in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis after stress exposure. CB1R knockout mice (CB1R(-/-)) and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were exposed to immobilization and acoustic (IA) stress for 2 h per day during 4 consecutive days. Colonic protein expression of the inducible forms of the nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase (NOS2 and COX2), IgA production, permeability to (51)Cr-EDTA, and bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes were evaluated. Stress exposure induced greater expression of proinflammatory enzymes NOS2 and COX2 in colonic mucosa of CB1R(-/-) mice when compared with WT animals. These changes were related with a greater degree of colonic barrier dysfunction in CB1R(-/-) animals determined by 1) a significantly lower IgA secretion, 2) higher paracellular permeability to (51)Cr-EDTA, and 3) higher bacterial translocation, both under basal conditions and after IA stress exposure. Pharmacological antagonism with rimonabant reproduced stress-induced increase of proinflammatory enzymes in the colon described in CB1R(-/-) mice. In conclusion, CB1R exerts a protective role in the colon in vivo through the regulation of intestinal secretion of IgA and paracellular permeability. Pharmacological modulation of cannabinoid system within the gastrointestinal tract might be therapeutically useful in conditions on which intestinal inflammation and barrier dysfunction takes place after exposure to stress. PMID:22135307

  1. The ex-vivo intestinal absorption rate of uranium is a two-phase function of supply.

    PubMed

    Konietzka, Rainer; Heinze, Rita; Seiwert, Margarete; Dieter, Hermann H

    2014-07-01

    The concentration-dependent absorption behaviour of uranium was investigated with surviving intestinal segments of rat jejunums, using an ex-vivo model. The results showed a monotonic slightly nonlinear increase in absorption as uranium concentrations increased. This trend was observed over the entire concentration range tested. In the lower concentration range a slower linear ascent was observed while a steeper linear ascent was found for the higher concentration range. Statistical fit was only slightly poorer for an exponential function in the range of lower values and a logarithmic function in the range of higher values. The proportion of uranium absorbed expressed as percent of uranium concentrations in the perfusion solutions followed a monotonically increasing trend from 20 to around 200 ?g/l uranium in the perfusion solutions, which thereafter appears to reach a plateau, as further increase towards concentrations around 400 ?g/l is not substantial. The uranium concentration administered had no effect on the vitality and consequently the functionality of the intestinal segments, measured in terms of active glucose transport. The results imply that uranium concentrations of more than 20 ?g/l in drinking water, for example, could lead to elevated absorption rates and thus to higher internal exposures to consider when setting of Guideline values in this concentration range. PMID:24793262

  2. Proliferation of Functional Hair Cells in Vivo in the Absence of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Cyrille; Huang, Mingqian; Karimi, Kambiz; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Hinds, Philip W.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.; Corey, David P.; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2005-02-01

    In mammals, hair cell loss causes irreversible hearing and balance impairment because hair cells are terminally differentiated and do not regenerate spontaneously. By profiling gene expression in developing mouse vestibular organs, we identified the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) as a candidate regulator of cell cycle exit in hair cells. Differentiated and functional mouse hair cells with a targeted deletion of Rb1 undergo mitosis, divide, and cycle, yet continue to become highly differentiated and functional. Moreover, acute loss of Rb1 in postnatal hair cells caused cell cycle reentry. Manipulation of the pRb pathway may ultimately lead to mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  3. Work function analysis of vegetarian entrée production.

    PubMed

    Maloney, S; Zolber, K; Burke, K; Connell, B; Shavlik, G

    1986-02-01

    Data on labor time for food production can be used as an effective management tool. It is essential for foodservice managers to know how labor time is being used (1). A continuous time study was conducted to determine total labor time for the production of eight vegetarian entrées in a hospital foodservice system. Two work areas were observed: the ingredient assembly area and the cooks' production area. Times were recorded by work function to identify how labor time was distributed. Results showed (a) observed frequency for each work function, (b) time expended in seconds per portion for each work function, (c) percentage distribution of labor time by work function, (d) total time for each employee involved in entrée production, and (e) percentage of total time in which each employee was involved in the production of each entrée. Total labor time varied by type of entrée, ranging from 39.97 to 19.33 seconds per portion. Entrées with the highest labor time required the largest amount of hand labor. A one-way analysis of variance indicated significant differences in mean labor time among the eight vegetarian entrées for direct labor time (p = .0009), and total labor time (p = .0018). No significant differences were found among entrées for indirect labor or delay time. PMID:3944394

  4. A functional analysis of hair pulling.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, J T; Miltenberger, R G; Galensky, T L; Ellingson, S A; Long, E S

    1999-01-01

    We experimentally assessed the functions of hair pulling and hair manipulation of a 19-year-old woman (Kris) with moderate mental retardation and cerebral palsy. In Phase 1 a functional analysis revealed that Kris pulled and manipulated hair for the greatest amount of time in the alone condition, suggesting that the behaviors were maintained by some form of automatic reinforcement (Vaughan & Michael, 1982). In Phase 2 we assessed the nature of the sensory stimulation that maintained hair pulling by providing continuous access to previously pulled or cut hair and, thereafter, by having Kris wear a rubber glove. The results suggested that hair pulling was maintained by digital-tactile stimulation (automatic positive reinforcement). These findings are discussed, and recommendations for further analyses of automatically reinforced habit behaviors are provided. PMID:10513028

  5. In vitro and in vivo correlation of buserelin release from biodegradable implants using statistical moment analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gesine Schliecker; Carsten Schmidt; Stefan Fuchs; Andreas Ehinger; Jürgen Sandow; Thomas Kissel

    2004-01-01

    Here we investigated the possibility to develop different levels of correlation between in vitro drug release profiles and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters for three Buserelin implant formulations. The in vitro and in vivo data were analyzed using model-independent and model-dependent methods. Since diffusion, dissolution and erosion effects influence drug release in most cases a simple kinetic model is unlikely to

  6. In Vivo Correlation Between Stratum Corneum Reservoir Function and Percutaneous Absorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andre Rougier; Didier Dupuis; Claire Lotte; Roland Roguet; Hans Schaefer

    1983-01-01

    A relationship between stratum corneum reservoir function and percutaneous absorption has been established in the hairless rat. Two hundred nanomoles of 10 substances that have a wide range of chemical structures were topically applied for 30 min and the total body distribution was measured after 96 h. The quantity of substance present in the stratum corneum reservoir after 30-min application

  7. Biosignals analysis for kidney function effect analysis of fennel aromatherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Uk; Seo, Ssang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Human effort in order to enjoy a healthy life is diverse. IT technology to these analyzes, the results of development efforts, it has been applied. Therefore, I use the care and maintenance diagnostic health management and prevention than treatment. In particular, the aromatherapy treatment easy to use without the side effects there is no irritation, are widely used in modern society. In this paper, we measured the aroma effect by applying a biosignal analysis techniques; an experiment was performed to analyze. In particular, we design methods and processes of research based on the theory aroma that affect renal function. Therefore, in this paper, measuring the biosignals and after fennel aromatherapy treatment prior to the enforcement of the mutual comparison, through the analysis, studies were carried out to analyze the effect of fennel aromatherapy therapy on kidney function. PMID:25977696

  8. Biosignals Analysis for Kidney Function Effect Analysis of Fennel Aromatherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Uk; Seo, Ssang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Human effort in order to enjoy a healthy life is diverse. IT technology to these analyzes, the results of development efforts, it has been applied. Therefore, I use the care and maintenance diagnostic health management and prevention than treatment. In particular, the aromatherapy treatment easy to use without the side effects there is no irritation, are widely used in modern society. In this paper, we measured the aroma effect by applying a biosignal analysis techniques; an experiment was performed to analyze. In particular, we design methods and processes of research based on the theory aroma that affect renal function. Therefore, in this paper, measuring the biosignals and after fennel aromatherapy treatment prior to the enforcement of the mutual comparison, through the analysis, studies were carried out to analyze the effect of fennel aromatherapy therapy on kidney function. PMID:25977696

  9. FFTF Plant transition function analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.P.; FFTF Working Group

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and function hierarchy charts that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate FFTF.

  10. Structural and functional recovery of electropermeabilized skeletal muscle in-vivo after treatment with surfactant poloxamer 188.

    PubMed

    Collins, John M; Despa, Florin; Lee, Raphael C

    2007-05-01

    A critical requirement for cell survival after trauma is sealing of breaks in the cell membrane [M. Bier, S.M. Hammer, D.J. Canaday, R.C Lee, Kinetics of sealing for transient electropores in isolated mammalian skeletal muscle cells, Bioelectromagnetics 20 (1999) 194-201; R.C. Lee, D.C. Gaylor, D. Bhatt, D.A. Israel, Role of cell membrane rupture in the pathogenesis of electrical trauma, J. Surg. Res. 44 (1988) 709-719; R.C. Lee, J.F. Burke, E.G. Cravalho (Eds.), Electrical Trauma: The Pathophysiology, Manifestations, and Clinical Management, Cambridge University Press, 1992; B.I. Tropea, R.C. Lee, Thermal injury kinetics in electrical trauma, J. Biomech. Engr. 114 (1992) 241-250; F. Despa, D.P. Orgill, J. Newalder, R.C Lee, The relative thermal stability of tissue macromolecules and cellular structure in burn injury, Burns 31 (2005) 568-577; T.A. Block, J.N. Aarsvold, K.L. Matthews II, R.A. Mintzer, L.P. River, M. Capelli-Schellpfeffer, R.L. Wollman, S. Tripathi, C.T. Chen, R.C. Lee, The 1995 Lindberg Award. Nonthermally mediated muscle injury and necrosis in electrical trauma, J. Burn Care and Rehabil. 16 (1995) 581-588; K. Miyake, P.L. McNeil, Mechanical injury and repair of cells, Crit. Care Med. 31 (2003) S496-S501; R.C. Lee, L.P. River, F.S. Pan, R.L. Wollmann, Surfactant-induced sealing of electropermeabilized skeletal muscle membranes in vivo, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 89 (1992) 4524-4528; J.D. Marks, C.Y. Pan, T. Bushell, W. Cromie, R.C. Lee, Amphiphilic, tri-block copolymers provide potent membrane-targeted neuroprotection, FASEB J. 15 (2001) 1107-1109; B. Greenebaum, K. Blossfield, J. Hannig, C.S. Carrillo, M.A. Beckett, R.R. Weichselbaum, R.C. Lee, Poloxamer 188 prevents acute necrosis of adult skeletal muscle cells following high-dose irradiation, Burns 30 (2004) 539-547; G. Serbest, J. Horwitz, K. Barbee, The effect of poloxamer-188 on neuronal cell recovery from mechanical injury, J. Neurotrauma 22 (2005) 119-132]. The triblock copolymer surfactant Poloxamer 188 (P188) is known to increase the cell survival after membrane electroporation [R.C. Lee, L.P. River, F.S. Pan, R.L. Wollmann, Surfactant-induced sealing of electropermeabilized skeletal muscle membranes in vivo, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 89 (1992) 4524-4528; Z. Ababneh, H. Beloeil, C.B. Berde, G. Gambarota, S.E. Maier, R.V. Mulkern, Biexponential parametrization of T2 and diffusion decay curves in a rat muscle edema model: Decay curve components and water compartments, Magn. Reson. Med. 54 (2005) 524-531]. Here, we use a rat hind-limb model of electroporation injury to determine if the intravenous administration of P188 improves the recovery of the muscle function. Rat hind-limbs received a sequence of either 0, 3, 6, 9, or 12 electrical current pulses (2 A, 4 ms duration, 10 s duty cycle). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis, muscle water content and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were compared. Electroporation injury manifested edema formation and depression of the CMAP amplitudes. P188 (one bolus of 1 mg/ml of blood) was administrated 30 or 60 min after injury. Animals receiving P188 exhibited reduced tissue edema (p<0.05) and increased CMAP amplitudes (p<0.03). By comparison, treatment with 10 kDa neutral dextran, which produces similar serum osmotic effects as P188, had no effect on post-electroporation recovery. Noteworthy, the present results suggest that a single intravenous dose of P188 is effective to restore the structural integrity of damaged tissues with intact circulation. PMID:17382288

  11. Leucocyte function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: quantitative in-vivo leucocyte mobilisation and in-vitro functions of blood and exudate leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wandall, J H

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative leucocyte mobilisation in vivo and the in-vitro random migration, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and oxidative metabolic activity were studied in 15 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients mobilised leucocytes to chambers covering skin windows to the same degree as control subjects, and the mobilisation correlated with the blood leucocyte numbers and serum concentration of alpha-l-antitrypsin. Peripheral blood leucocytes showed slightly reduced migration in Boyden chambers but increased phagocytosis and increased unstimulated reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium. Exudate leucocytes from patients with RA showed migratory and phagocytic activity which did not differ from that of control subjects, but unstimulated exudate leucocytes reduced nitroblue tetrazolium more actively than leucocytes from control subjects. The observations indicate that leucocyte accumulation at an experimental inflammatory lesion and the function of these exudate leucocytes are not impaired in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:4051592

  12. Functional Analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans Kinome

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Osmani, Aysha H.; Andrews, Peter; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungi are an ecologically important group of organisms which also have important industrial applications but devastating effects as pathogens and agents of food spoilage. Protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of virtually all biological processes but how they regulate filamentous fungal specific processes is not understood. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has long been utilized as a powerful molecular genetic system and recent technical advances have made systematic approaches to study large gene sets possible. To enhance A. nidulans functional genomics we have created gene deletion constructs for 9851 genes representing 93.3% of the encoding genome. To illustrate the utility of these constructs, and advance the understanding of fungal kinases, we have systematically generated deletion strains for 128 A. nidulans kinases including expanded groups of 15 histidine kinases, 7 SRPK (serine-arginine protein kinases) kinases and an interesting group of 11 filamentous fungal specific kinases. We defined the terminal phenotype of 23 of the 25 essential kinases by heterokaryon rescue and identified phenotypes for 43 of the 103 non-essential kinases. Uncovered phenotypes ranged from almost no growth for a small number of essential kinases implicated in processes such as ribosomal biosynthesis, to conditional defects in response to cellular stresses. The data provide experimental evidence that previously uncharacterized kinases function in the septation initiation network, the cell wall integrity and the morphogenesis Orb6 kinase signaling pathways, as well as in pathways regulating vesicular trafficking, sexual development and secondary metabolism. Finally, we identify ChkC as a third effector kinase functioning in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. The identification of many previously unknown functions for kinases through the functional analysis of the A. nidulans kinome illustrates the utility of the A. nidulans gene deletion constructs. PMID:23505451

  13. Comparison of airway and blood eosinophil function after in vivo antigen challenge.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, J B; Calhoun, W J; Vrtis, R F; Bates, M E; McAllister, P K; Busse, W W

    1992-12-01

    Eosinophils (EOS) are important effector cells in allergic diseases and asthma. However, functional characteristics of the EOS have been derived primarily from studies of blood cells, and it is unlikely that such assessments reflect events occurring in tissues or airways. To establish more precisely the function of airway EOS, segmental Ag challenge was used to elicit and isolate large numbers of these cells. Airway, as well as blood, EOS were isolated from allergic patients 48 h after segmental Ag challenge. Both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) EOS were fractionated over Percoll density gradients; by using this protocol, three density-distinct populations of pure (>90%) EOS were obtained from BAL fluid (1.100, 1.095, and 1.090 g/ml) and one from blood (1.100 g/ml). The functions of these various populations were compared by measuring superoxide generation, adherence to collagen and endothelial cell monolayers, cell surface receptors, and in vitro survival. BAL EOS of all three densities had greater superoxide generation and adherence with FMLP activation than did corresponding blood EOS. In contrast, blood and airway EOS responded similarly to PMA. BAL EOS also had increased expression of CD11b/CD18 and HLA-DR. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured with the fluorescent marker indo-1/acetoxymethyl ester. FMLP caused a greater and more sustained increase in [Ca2+]i with BAL than blood EOS. EGTA blocked the sustained component of the [Ca2+]i response to FMLP. Our findings indicate that BAL EOS have an enhanced [Ca2+]i response to activation that may contribute to their functional up-regulation. PMID:1358975

  14. Context-Dependent Functional Divergence of the Notch Ligands DLL1 and DLL4 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Preuße, Kristina; Tveriakhina, Lena; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Gaspar, Cláudia; Rosa, Alexandra Isabel; Henrique, Domingos; Gossler, Achim; Stauber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Notch signalling is a fundamental pathway that shapes the developing embryo and sustains adult tissues by direct communication between ligand and receptor molecules on adjacent cells. Among the ligands are two Delta paralogues, DLL1 and DLL4, that are conserved in mammals and share a similar structure and sequence. They activate the Notch receptor partly in overlapping expression domains where they fulfil redundant functions in some processes (e.g. maintenance of the crypt cell progenitor pool). In other processes, however, they appear to act differently (e.g. maintenance of foetal arterial identity) raising the questions of how similar DLL1 and DLL4 really are and which mechanism causes the apparent context-dependent divergence. By analysing mice that conditionally overexpress DLL1 or DLL4 from the same genomic locus (Hprt) and mice that express DLL4 instead of DLL1 from the endogenous Dll1 locus (Dll1Dll4ki), we found functional differences that are tissue-specific: while DLL1 and DLL4 act redundantly during the maintenance of retinal progenitors, their function varies in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) where somites form in a Notch-dependent process. In the anterior PSM, every cell expresses both Notch receptors and ligands, and DLL1 is the only activator of Notch while DLL4 is not endogenously expressed. Transgenic DLL4 cannot replace DLL1 during somitogenesis and in heterozygous Dll1Dll4ki/+ mice, the Dll1Dll4ki allele causes a dominant segmentation phenotype. Testing several aspects of the complex Notch signalling system in vitro, we found that both ligands have a similar trans-activation potential but that only DLL4 is an efficient cis-inhibitor of Notch signalling, causing a reduced net activation of Notch. These differential cis-inhibitory properties are likely to contribute to the functional divergence of DLL1 and DLL4. PMID:26114479

  15. The novel costimulatory pathway PDL1: B7.1 is functional in inhibiting alloimmune responses in vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Riella, Leonardo V.; Chock, Susanne; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yuan, Xueli; Paterson, Alison M.; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Vanguri, Vijay; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Blazar, Bruce R.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Rodig, Scott J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Chandraker, Anil; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2011-01-01

    The PDL1: PD1 costimulatory pathway plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses as well as in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. It has recently been demonstrated that PDL1 can also bind B7.1 to inhibit T cell responses in vitro. Using the bm12 into B6 heart transplant model, we investigated the functional significance of this interaction in alloimmune responses in vivo. PD1 blockade unlike PDL1 blockade failed to accelerate bm12 allograft rejection suggesting a role for an additional binding partner for PDL1 other than PD1 in transplant rejection. PDL1 blockade was able to accelerate allograft rejection in B7.2-deficient recipients but not B7.1-deficient recipients, indicating that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 was important in inhibiting rejection. Administration of the novel 2H11 anti-PDL1 mAb, which only blocks PDL1: B7.1 interaction, aggravated chronic injury of bm12 allografts in B6 recipients. Aggravated chronic injury was associated with an increased frequency of alloreactive IFN-?-, IL-4-, and IL-6-producing splenocytes and a decreased percentage of regulatory T cells in the recipients. Using an in vitro cell culture assay, blockade of the interaction of PDL1 on dendritic cells with B7.1 on T cells increased IFN-? production from alloreactive CD4+ T cells, whereas blockade of dendritic cell B7.1 interaction with T cell PDL1 did not. These data indicate that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses in vivo and suggests a dominant direction for PDL1 and B7.1 interaction. PMID:21697455

  16. The novel costimulatory programmed death ligand 1/B7.1 pathway is functional in inhibiting alloimmune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Riella, Leonardo V; Chock, Susanne; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yuan, Xueli; Paterson, Alison M; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Vanguri, Vijay; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rodig, Scott J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Chandraker, Anil; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2011-08-01

    The programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1)/programmed death 1 (PD1) costimulatory pathway plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses as well as in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. It has been demonstrated recently that PDL1 also can bind B7.1 to inhibit T cell responses in vitro. Using the bm12 into B6 heart transplant model, we investigated the functional significance of this interaction in alloimmune responses in vivo. PD1 blockade unlike PDL1 blockade failed to accelerate bm12 allograft rejection, suggesting a role for an additional binding partner for PDL1 other than PD1 in transplant rejection. PDL1 blockade was able to accelerate allograft rejection in B7.2-deficient recipients but not B7.1-deficient recipients, indicating that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 was important in inhibiting rejection. Administration of the novel 2H11 anti-PDL1 mAb, which only blocks the PDL1-B7.1 interaction, aggravated chronic injury of bm12 allografts in B6 recipients. Aggravated chronic injury was associated with an increased frequency of alloreactive IFN-?-, IL-4-, and IL-6-producing splenocytes and a decreased percentage of regulatory T cells in the recipients. Using an in vitro cell culture assay, blockade of the interaction of PDL1 on dendritic cells with B7.1 on T cells increased IFN-? production from alloreactive CD4(+) T cells, whereas blockade of dendritic cell B7.1 interaction with T cell PDL1 did not. These data indicate that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses in vivo and suggests a dominant direction for PDL1 and B7.1 interaction. PMID:21697455

  17. Hepatic sirtuin 1 is dispensable for fibrate-induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonzo, Jessica A.; Brocker, Chad; Jiang, Changtao; Wang, Rui-Hong; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) mediates metabolic remodeling, resulting in enhanced mitochondrial and peroxisomal ?-oxidation of fatty acids. In addition to the physiological stimuli of fasting and high-fat diet, PPAR? is activated by the fibrate class of drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an important regulator of energy homeostasis, was downregulated in fibrate-treated wild-type mice, suggesting PPAR? regulation of Sirt1 gene expression. The impact of SIRT1 loss on PPAR? functionality in vivo was assessed in hepatocyte-specific knockout mice that lack the deacetylase domain of SIRT1 (Sirt1?Liv). Knockout mice were treated with fibrates or fasted for 24 h to activate PPAR?. Basal expression of the PPAR? target genes Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14 was reduced in Sirt1?Liv mice compared with wild-type mice. However, no difference was observed between wild-type and Sirt1?Liv mice in either fasting- or fibrate-mediated induction of PPAR? target genes. Similar to the initial results, there was no difference in fibrate-activated PPAR? gene induction. To assess the relationship between SIRT1 and PPAR? in a pathophysiological setting, Sirt1?Liv mice were maintained on a high-fat diet for 14 wk, followed by fibrate treatment. Sirt1?Liv mice exhibited increased body mass compared with control mice. In the context of a high-fat diet, Sirt1?Liv mice did not respond to the cholesterol-lowering effects of the fibrate treatment. However, there were no significant differences in PPAR? target gene expression. These results suggest that, in vivo, SIRT1 deacetylase activity does not significantly impact induced PPAR? activity. PMID:24496310

  18. Creation of Nonischemic Functional Mitral Regurgitation by Annular Dilatation and Nonplanar Modification in a Chronic In Vivo Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Haruo; Feins, Eric N.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Shimada, Shogo; Zurakowski, David; del Nido, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanisms and treatments of nonischemic functional mitral regurgitation (NIMR) are not fully established in part due to a lack of proper large animal models. We developed a novel technique of NIMR creation in a swine model by making multiple small incisions in the mitral annulus. Methods and Results Ex-vivo experiments using isolated swine hearts (n=10) showed a 15% increase in annular area (6.8 to 7.8cm2) after 16 incisions were made along the posterior mitral annulus of a pressurized left ventricle (LV). In an in vivo swine model (n=7, 46.4±2.2kg) NIMR was created by making 14-26 2mm incisions in the atrial aspect of the mitral annulus using a cardioport video-assisted imaging system in the beating heart. Animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks (n=4) and 6 weeks (n=3). Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography was obtained before and immediately after NIMR creation, and at euthanasia; vena contracta area (VCA), mitral annular dimension, LV volume, and inter-papillary muscle distance were measured. The mitral annular incisions resulted in mild-moderate mitral regurgitation and an increased VCA. NIMR creation altered mitral valve (MV) geometry by decreasing mitral annular nonplanarity and increasing annular area, primarily in the anteroposterior dimension. NIMR creation did not significantly change LV volume or inter-papillary muscle distance. Longer follow-up period did not significantly affect these outcomes. Conclusions NIMR can successfully be created in a beating-heart swine model and results in dilatation and 3D changes in mitral annular geometry. This model can enhance the experimental validation of new valve repair devices and techniques. PMID:24030417

  19. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Taro; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which dopamine signaling causes these phenotypes requires an understanding of the dynamics of dopamine release. Here we report the effects of dDAT expression on behavioral traits. We show that dDAT expression in a subset of dopaminergic neurons is sufficient for normal sleep. dDAT expression in other cell types such as Kenyon cells and glial cells can also rescue the short sleep phenotype of dDAT mutants. dDAT mutants also show a down-regulation of the D1-like dopamine receptor dDA1, and this phenotype is rescued when dDAT is expressed in the same cell types in which it rescues sleep. On the other hand, dDAT overexpression in mushroom bodies, which are the target of memory forming dopamine neurons, abolishes olfactory aversive memory. Our data demonstrate that expression of extrasynaptic dopamine transporters can rescue some aspects of dopamine signaling in dopamine transporter mutants. These results provide novel insights into regulatory systems that modulate dopamine signaling. PMID:25232310

  20. In vivo functional photoacoustic microscopy of cutaneous microvasculature in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    Microcirculation is an important component of the cardiovascular system and can be used to assess systemic cardiovascular health. Numerous studies have investigated cutaneous microcirculation as an indicator of cardiovascular related diseases. Such research has shown promising results; however, there are many limitations regarding the employed measurement techniques, such as poor depth and spatial resolution and measurement versatility. Here we show the results of functional cutaneous microvascular experiments measured with photoacoustic microscopy, which provides high spatial resolution and multiparameter measurements. In a set of experiments, microvascular networks located in the palms of volunteers were perturbed by periodic ischemic events, and the subsequent hemodynamic response to the stimulus was recorded. Results indicate that during periods of arterial occlusion, the relative oxygen saturation of the capillary vessels decreased below resting levels, and temporarily increased above resting levels immediately following the occlusion. Furthermore, a hyperemic reaction to the occlusions was measured, and the observation agreed well with similar measurements using more conventional imaging techniques. Due to its exceptional capability to functionally image vascular networks with high spatial resolution, photoacoustic microscopy could be a beneficial biomedical tool to assess microvascular functioning and applied to patients with diseases that affect cardiovascular health. © 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. PMID:21361688

  1. Functional analysis of 11 novel GBA alleles

    PubMed Central

    Malini, Erika; Grossi, Serena; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Parini, Rossella; Dominisini, Silvia; Cariati, Roberta; Zampieri, Stefania; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficiency of the acid ?-glucosidase, encoded by the GBA gene. In this study, we report the structural and functional characterization of 11 novel GBA alleles. Seven single missense alleles, P159S, N188I, E235K, P245T, W312S, S366R and W381C, and two alleles carrying in cis mutations, (N188S; G265R) and (E326K; D380N), were studied for enzyme activity in transiently transfected cells. All mutants were inactive except the P159S, which retained 15% of wild-type activity. To further characterize the alleles carrying two in cis mutations, we expressed constructs bearing singly each mutation. The presence of G265R or D380N mutations completely abolished enzyme activity, while N188S and E326K mutants retained 25 and 54% of wild-type activity, respectively. Two mutations, affecting the acceptor splice site of introns 5 (c.589-1G>A) and 9 (c.1389-1G>A), led to the synthesis of aberrant mRNA. Unpredictably, family studies showed that two alleles resulted from germline or ‘de novo' mutations. These results strengthen the importance of performing a complete and accurate molecular analysis of the GBA gene in order to avoid misleading conclusions and provide a comprehensive functional analysis of new GBA mutations. PMID:24022302

  2. Host defense peptides for treatment of colorectal carcinoma – a comparative in vitro and in vivo analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maletzki, Claudia; Klier, Ulrike; Marinkovic, Samuel; Klar, Ernst; Andrä, Jörg; Linnebacher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) constitute effector molecules of the innate immune system. Besides acting against microbia and fungi, they exhibit broad and selective oncolytic activity. The underlying mechanism is at least partially attributable to elevated surface-exposed levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on tumor targets. In this study, comprehensive analysis of NK-2-based derivatives (C7A, C7A-D21K, and C7A-?) was done on patient-derived ultra-low passage colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cell lines. Peptides were designed to improve antitumoral potential. Mellitin was used as positive control and a non-toxic peptide (NK11) served as negative control. Subsequently, effectiveness of local HDP application was determined in xenopatients. Generally, CRC lines displayed a heterogeneous pattern of surface-exposed PS, which was usually below standard CRC cells. Of note, five out of seven cell lines were susceptible towards HDP-mediated lysis (lytic activity of peptides: C7A-D21K > C7A-?= C7A). Oncolytic activity correlated mostly with surface-exposed PS levels. Apoptosis as well as necrosis were involved in killing. In an in vivo experiment, substantial growth inhibition of HROC24 xenografts was observed after HDP therapy and, surprisingly, also after NK11 treatment. These promising data underline the high potential of HDPs for oncolytic therapies and may provide a rationale for optimizing preclinical treatment schedules based on NK-2. PMID:24962950

  3. Flux analysis of cholesterol biosynthesis in vivo reveals multiple tissue and cell-type specific pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Hobbs, Helen H; Cohen, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Two parallel pathways produce cholesterol: the Bloch and Kandutsch-Russell pathways. Here we used stable isotope labeling and isotopomer analysis to trace sterol flux through the two pathways in mice. Surprisingly, no tissue used the canonical K–R pathway. Rather, a hybrid pathway was identified that we call the modified K–R (MK–R) pathway. Proportional flux through the Bloch pathway varied from 8% in preputial gland to 97% in testes, and the tissue-specificity observed in vivo was retained in cultured cells. The distribution of sterol isotopomers in plasma mirrored that of liver. Sterol depletion in cultured cells increased flux through the Bloch pathway, whereas overexpression of 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) enhanced usage of the MK–R pathway. Thus, relative use of the Bloch and MK–R pathways is highly variable, tissue-specific, flux dependent, and epigenetically fixed. Maintenance of two interdigitated pathways permits production of diverse bioactive sterols that can be regulated independently of cholesterol. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07999.001 PMID:26114596

  4. In vivo degradation of orthodontic miniscrew implants: surface analysis of as-received and retrieved specimens.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Masahiro; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated in vivo degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy miniscrew implants. Miniscrew implants were placed in patients, and the surfaces were studied upon retrieval by scanning electron microscopy, microscale X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis and nanoindentation testing. Bone-like structures were formed on the retrieved specimens. The hardness and elastic modulus of the surfaces of the retrieved specimens were significantly lower than the as-received specimens, although no statistically significant differences were observed for the hardness and elastic modulus in the bulk region. Thick organic over-layer containing carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, with the thickness greater than 50 nm, covered the retrieved specimens, and higher concentrations of hydrogen were detected in the retrieved specimens compared with the as-received specimens. Minimal degradation of the bulk mechanical properties of miniscrew implants was observed after clinical use, although precipitation of bone-like structures, formation of a carbonaceous contamination layer, and hydrogen absorption were observed on the surfaces of miniscrew implants. PMID:25631268

  5. Compositional analysis and in vivo anti-diabetic activity of wild Algerian Marrubium vulgare L. infusion.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Amel; Henchiri, Cherifa; Siracusa, Laura; Sari, Madani; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae) is a plant traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Algeria. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusion revealed the presence of fifteen metabolites, all belonging to the class of polyphenols. Particularly, seven flavonoids have been detected, together with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid in small amounts; the extract is dominated by the presence of a series of complex molecules, characterized as verbascoside (acteoside) derivatives. Concerning the anti-diabetic effectiveness a series of in vivo experiments were carried out on albinos Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced in the animals by intra-peritoneal injection of alloxane; they were treated twice a day with aqueous extract from aerial part infusion (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight) and glibenclamide (5mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Oral administration of 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight of aqueous extract the Marrubium vulgare induced an significant effect antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic (dose-dependent effect). A decrease in blood glucose by 50% for the dose 100 mg/kg and more than 60% for doses 200 and 300 mg/kg, as well as a significant lowering of total lipids, triglycerides, and total cholesterol levels in treated animals, compared with diabetic controls group (p<0.001), have been observed. Glibenclamide was used as reference and showed similar effects. PMID:22100836

  6. Methods of preparation of multifunctional microbubbles and their in vitro / in vivo assessment of stability, functional and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Francesca; Zhou, Meifang; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Lucilla, Baldassarri; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-01-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) are ultrasound responsive colloidal particles with a strong potential to become theranostic agents, combining the contrast agent activity with therapeutic functionality. In the last decades, MBs have played a significant role as ultrasound contrast agents in diagnostic imaging. MBs have also shown great potential in applications such as molecular imaging, drug delivery, gene therapy and sonothrombolysis. A full understanding of all physical processes underlying the MBs' stability and acoustic behavior is available in the literature. Efforts have been now addressed to the study of chemical and biological features of multifunctional lipid, protein, or polymer shelled MBs. A number of methods of preparation of "smart" MBs for ultrasound image-guided therapy have been recently developed. In this review, different approaches utilized in preparing multifunctional MBs are discussed with specific attention to the current strategies adopted to design MBs with specialized functions. In vitro / in vivo assessment of MBs' stability and activity will be discussed with a particular emphasis on the emerging applications of MBs for the multiple imaging modalities, the effective opening of blood brain barrier, BBB, and for the therapeutic treatment of antimicrobial films. PMID:22352769

  7. Functional assessment of disease-associated regulatory variants in vivo using a versatile dual colour transgenesis strategy in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T; Foster, Robert G; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heyningen, Veronica van; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2015-06-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  8. In vivo studies of silk based gold nano-composite conduits for functional peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Das, Suradip; Sharma, Manav; Saharia, Dhiren; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Sarma, Monalisa Goswami; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Bora, Utpal

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel silk-gold nanocomposite based nerve conduit successfully tested in a neurotmesis grade sciatic nerve injury model in rats over a period of eighteen months. The conduit was fabricated by adsorbing gold nanoparticles onto silk fibres and transforming them into a nanocomposite sheet by electrospinning which is finally given a tubular structure by rolling on a stainless steel mandrel of chosen diameter. The conduits were found to promote adhesion and proliferation of Schwann cells in vitro and did not elicit any toxic or immunogenic responses in vivo. We also report for the first time, the monitoring of muscular regeneration post nerve conduit implantation by recording motor unit potentials (MUPs) through needle electromyogram. Pre-seeding the conduits with Schwann cells enhanced myelination of the regenerated tissue. Histo-morphometric and electrophysiological studies proved that the nanocomposite based conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells performed best in terms of structural and functional regeneration of severed sciatic nerves. The near normal values of nerve conduction velocity (50 m/sec), compound muscle action potential (29.7 mV) and motor unit potential (133 ?V) exhibited by the animals implanted with Schwann cell loaded nerve conduits in the present study are superior to those observed in previous reports with synthetic materials as well as collagen based nerve conduits. Animals in this group were also able to perform complex locomotory activities like stretching and jumping with excellent sciatic function index (SFI) and led a normal life. PMID:26026910

  9. Cilia localization is essential for in vivo functions of the Joubert syndrome protein Arl13b/Scorpion

    PubMed Central

    Duldulao, Neil A.; Lee, Sunjin; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2009-01-01

    arl13b was initially cloned as the novel cystic kidney gene scorpion (sco) in zebrafish and was shown to be required for cilia formation in the kidney duct. In mouse, a null mutant of Arl13b shows abnormal ultrastructure of the cilium and defective sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Importantly, a recent study linked mutations in ARL13B to a classical form of Joubert syndrome (JS), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a distinctive cerebellar malformation. In this study, we analyzed the zebrafish arl13b (sco) mutant and gene products in detail. We first demonstrate that Arl13b is a protein that is highly enriched in the cilium and is required for cilia formation in multiple organs in zebrafish, and that knockdown of arl13b leads to multiple cilia-associated phenotypes. We additionally show that multiple regions of Arl13b are required for its localization to the cilium. By means of rescuing experiments with a series of deletion and point mutants, we further demonstrate that the ciliary localization is crucial for the in vivo function of Arl13b. Together, these results strongly support the hypothesis that JS-related disease (JSRD) is a ciliopathy, or a disease caused by ciliary defects, and that Arl13b functions mainly through the cilium. PMID:19906870

  10. Functional Assessment of Disease-Associated Regulatory Variants In Vivo Using a Versatile Dual Colour Transgenesis Strategy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T.; Foster, Robert G.; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  11. A yeast mitochondrial leader peptide functions in vivo as a dual targeting signal for both chloroplasts and mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Hack, E; Thornburg, R W; Myers, A M

    1990-01-01

    A fusion protein was expressed in transgenic tobacco and yeast cells to examine the functional conservation of mechanisms for importing precursor proteins from the cytosol into mitochondria and chloroplasts. The test protein consisted of the mitochondrial leader peptide from the yeast precursor to cytochrome oxidase subunit Va (prC5) fused to the reporter protein chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. This protein, denoted prC5/CAT, was transported into the mitochondrial interior in yeast and tobacco cells. In both organisms, the mitochondrial form of prC5/CAT was smaller than the primary translation product, suggesting that proteolytic processing occurred during the transport process. prC5/CAT also was translocated into chloroplasts in vivo, accumulating to approximately the same levels as in plant mitochondria. However, accumulation of prC5/CAT in chloroplasts relative to mitochondria varied with the conditions under which plants were grown. The chloroplast form of prC5/CAT also appeared to have been proteolytically processed, yielding a mature protein of the same apparent size as that seen in mitochondria of either tobacco or yeast. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase lacking a mitochondrial targeting peptide did not associate with either chloroplasts or mitochondria. The results demonstrated that in plant cells a single leader peptide can interact functionally with the protein translocation systems of both chloroplasts and mitochondria, and raised the possibility that certain native proteins might be shared between these two organelles. PMID:1967076

  12. An active artificial cornea with the function of inducing new corneal tissue generation in vivo---a new approach to corneal tissue engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yao-Xiong Huang; Qin-Hua Li

    2007-01-01

    An active artificial cornea which can perform the function of inducing new cornea generation in vivo but does not need culture cells in vitro and which has similar optical and mechanical properties to those of the human cornea was constructed. An animal keratoplasty experiment using the artificial cornea as the implant showed that the animals' corneas could keep smooth surface

  13. EFFECT OF OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLE BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS ON EX VIVO VASCULAR FUNCTION OF AORTAS RECOVERED FROM NORMAL AND TYPE 2 DIABETIC RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Oil Combustion Particle Bioavailable Constituents on Ex Vivo Vascular Function of Aortae Recovered from Healthy and Early Type 2 Diabetic Rats KL Dreher1, SE Kelly2, SD Proctor2, and JC Russell2. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, US EPA, RTP, NC;...

  14. Automation and uncertainty analysis of a method for in-vivo range verification in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, K.; Unholtz, D.; Bauer, J.; Debus, J.; Min, C. H.; Bortfeld, T.; Paganetti, H.; Parodi, K.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce the automation of the range difference calculation deduced from particle-irradiation induced ?+-activity distributions with the so-called most-likely-shift approach, and evaluate its reliability via the monitoring of algorithm- and patient-specific uncertainty factors. The calculation of the range deviation is based on the minimization of the absolute profile differences in the distal part of two activity depth profiles shifted against each other. Depending on the workflow of positron emission tomography (PET)-based range verification, the two profiles under evaluation can correspond to measured and simulated distributions, or only measured data from different treatment sessions. In comparison to previous work, the proposed approach includes an automated identification of the distal region of interest for each pair of PET depth profiles and under consideration of the planned dose distribution, resulting in the optimal shift distance. Moreover, it introduces an estimate of uncertainty associated to the identified shift, which is then used as weighting factor to ‘red flag’ problematic large range differences. Furthermore, additional patient-specific uncertainty factors are calculated using available computed tomography (CT) data to support the range analysis. The performance of the new method for in-vivo treatment verification in the clinical routine is investigated with in-room PET images for proton therapy as well as with offline PET images for proton and carbon ion therapy. The comparison between measured PET activity distributions and predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations or measurements from previous treatment fractions is performed. For this purpose, a total of 15 patient datasets were analyzed, which were acquired at Massachusetts General Hospital and Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center with in-room PET and offline PET/CT scanners, respectively. Calculated range differences between the compared activity distributions are reported in a 2D map in beam-eye-view. In comparison to previously proposed approaches, the new most-likely-shift method shows more robust results for assessing in-vivo the range from strongly varying PET distributions caused by differing patient geometry, ion beam species, beam delivery techniques, PET imaging concepts and counting statistics. The additional visualization of the uncertainties and the dedicated weighting strategy contribute to the understanding of the reliability of observed range differences and the complexity in the prediction of activity distributions. The proposed method promises to offer a feasible technique for clinical routine of PET-based range verification.

  15. Effects of GC7101, a Novel Prokinetic Agent on Gastric Motor Function: Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da Hyun; Choi, Eun Ju; Jeon, Han Ho; Lee, Young Ho; Park, Hyojin

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims GC7101, an extract of Lonicera Flos, is a novel developing drug for reflux esophagitis and functional dyspepsia. However, the drug’s exact pharmacological mechanism of action remains unclear. This study assessed the effects of GC7101 on gastrointestinal (GI) motor function. Methods We used male guinea pigs to evaluate the effects of GC7101 on GI motility. The contraction of antral circular muscle in the presence of different doses of GC7101 was measured in a tissue bath. The prokinetic effects of GC7101 were tested using the charcoal transit assay from the pylorus to the most distal point of migration of charcoal mixture. To clarify the mechanism of action of GC7101, atropine, dopamine and the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor antagonist, GR113808 were used. Results The maximal amplitude of circular muscle contraction was induced by 5 mg mL?1 GC7101. The area under the curve of contraction was significantly increased at 5 mg mL?1 GC7101. Addition of 10?6 M atropine, 10?8 M dopamine or 10?7 M GR 113808 to GC7101 5 mg mL?1 decreased the amplitude and area under curve compared to GC7101 5 mg mL?1 alone. GC7101 accelerated GI transit in a dose dependent manner except 100 mg kg?1. Delayed GI transit caused by atropine, dopamine and GR 113808 was restored by GC7101 50 mg kg?1. Conclusions GC7101, an extract of Lonicera Flos, exerts a gastric prokinetic effect in guinea pig through cholinergic, antidopaminergic and serotonergic mechanisms. Therefore, GC7101 might be a novel drug for the treatment of functional dyspepsia. PMID:25273117

  16. In vivo evaluation of the inhibitory capacity of human plasma on exogenous surfactant function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Lachmann; E. P. Eijking; K. L. So; D. Gommers

    1994-01-01

    Objective  The adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are characterized by high\\u000a permeability pulmonary edema which contains plasma-derived proteins inhibiting pulmonary surfactant function. Currently, discussion\\u000a continues as to what dose of surfactant is required for treatment of these syndromes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design  The purpose of this study was to investigate the amount of exogenous surfactant needed to overcome the

  17. In Vivo Gene Modification Elucidates Subtype-Specific Functions of a2Adrenergic Receptors 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOSEPH W. KABLE; L. CHARLES MURRIN; DAVID B. BYLUND

    Mice with altered a2-adrenergic receptor genes have become important tools in elucidating the subtype-specific functions of the three a2-adrenergic receptor subtypes because of the lack of sufficiently subtype-selective pharmacological agents. Mice with a deletion (knockout) of the a2A-, a2B-, or a2C-gene as well as a point mutation of the a2A-gene (a2A-D79N) and a 3-fold overexpression of the a2C-gene have been

  18. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šnjari?, Damir; ?arija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kova?evi?, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  19. Ex vivo functional responses to HLA-G differ between blood and decidual NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Richard; Sharkey, Andrew; Gardner, Lucy; Male, Victoria; Kennedy, Pippa; Masters, Leanne; Farrell, Lydia; Jones, Des; Thomas, Rasmi; Moffett, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Restricted expression of human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) to fetal extravillous trophoblast cells, which invade the decidua during implantation, suggests a role for HLA-G in placentation. In this study, we have investigated several aspects of HLA-G expression and function. Surface levels of HLA-G expression were measured in 70 normal pregnancies. We show the dimeric conformation that is unique to HLA-G forms after passage through the Golgi apparatus. Differences were found in the receptor repertoire of decidual natural killer (dNK) cells that express the leucocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B1 (LILRB1), which binds dimeric HLA-G strongly. We then measured functional responses of dNK cells with LILRB1, when stimulated by HLA-G in both monomeric and dimeric conformations. Degranulation, interferon-? and interleukin-8 production by dNK cells freshly isolated from the first trimester implantation site were either undetected or not affected by HLA-G. These findings should be considered when inferring the activity of tissue NK cells from results obtained with cell lines, peripheral NK or cultured dNK cells. PMID:21471023

  20. Islet cell transplantation: in vivo and in vitro functional assessment of nonhuman primate pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Ranuncoli, A; Cautero, N; Ricordi, C; Masetti, M; Molano, R D; Inverardi, L; Alejandro, R; Kenyon, N S

    2000-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans as a therapeutic approach for treatment of type I diabetes offers an alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. Normalization of blood glucose levels by transplanted islets may prevent the development of diabetes-related complications. Problems related to rejection, recurrence of autoimmunity, and local inflammation upon transplantation of islets into the liver need to be solved before the implementation of islet cell transplantation can be viewed as a justifiable procedure in a large cohort of patients. Islet cell isolation has been quite successful in small animals, but the translation of this approach to nonhuman primates has been less rewarding. One of the main problems encountered in nonhuman primate models is the difficulty of isolating an adequate number of functional islets for transplantation. The aim of the present study was to develop a method for isolating a sufficient number of viable islets from nonhuman primates to allow for reversal of diabetes. By implementing minor modifications in the automated method for human islet isolation we were able to obtain viable, functional islets that responded normally to glucose stimulation in vitro. These islets were also able to reverse diabetes in immunocompromised nude mice, rendered diabetic by streptozotocin. This method of islet cell isolation has enabled us to proceed with protocols of allogeneic islet cell transplantation in preclinical, nonhuman primate models. PMID:10972339

  1. In vivo effects of Aspalathus linearis (rooibos) on male rat reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Opuwari, C S; Monsees, T K

    2014-10-01

    Aspalathus linearis (rooibos tea) may improve sperm function owing to its antioxidant properties. To test this hypothesis, male rats were given 2% or 5% rooibos tea for 52 days. No significant alterations were observed in body and reproductive organs weight, serum antioxidant capacity and testosterone level. Seminiferous tubules displayed complete spermatogenesis. However, a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in tubule diameter and germinal epithelial height was observed. Epithelial height of caput epididymides showed a significant increase. Unfermented rooibos significantly enhanced sperm concentration, viability and motility. Fermented rooibos also significantly improved sperm vitality (P < 0.01), but caused a significant increase in spontaneous acrosome reaction (P < 0.05), whereas unfermented did not. Creatinine was significantly enhanced in all treated rats, consistent with significant higher kidney weights. Rooibos significantly reduced alanine transaminase level, while 2% fermented rooibos significantly decreased aspartate transaminase level (P < 0.01). In conclusion, treatment with rooibos improved sperm concentration, viability and motility, which might be attributed to its high level of antioxidants. However, prolonged exposure of rooibos might result in subtle structural changes in the male reproductive system and may induce acrosome reaction, which can impair fertility. Intake of large amounts of rooibos may also harm liver and kidney function. PMID:24007336

  2. An investigation into the usefulness of generalized regression neural network analysis in the development of level A in vitro–in vivo correlation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jelena Paroj?i?; Svetlana Ibri?; Zorica Djuri?; Milica Jovanovi?; Owen I. Corrigan

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative correlations between in vivo and in vitro data (IVIVC) reduce the number of human in vivo studies, thus decreasing the overall time and expenses necessary for the development of optimal drug product formulation. Although linear regression analysis represents the simplest relationship, it is recognized that IVIVC should not be limited to linear relationship. With regards to the implementation of

  3. In vivo imaging and biochemical characterization of protease function using fluorescent activity-based probes

    PubMed Central

    Edgington, Laura E.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Activity-based probes (ABPs) are reactive small molecules that covalently bind to active enzymes. When tagged with a fluorophore, ABPs serve as powerful tools to investigate enzymatic activity across a wide variety of applications. In this article, we will provide detailed protocols for using fluorescent ABPs to biochemically characterize the activity of proteases in vitro. Furthermore, we will describe how these probes can be applied to image protease activity in live animals and tissues along with subsequent analysis by histology, flow cytometry, and SDS-PAGE. PMID:23788323

  4. Functional optical coherence tomography enables in vivo physiological assessment of retinal rod and cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Messinger, Jeffrey D; Curcio, Christine A; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-01-01

    Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) changes have been observed in retinal photoreceptors, suggesting a unique biomarker for eye disease detection. However, clinical deployment of IOS imaging is challenging due to unclear IOS sources and limited signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Here, by developing high spatiotemporal resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and applying an adaptive algorithm for IOS processing, we were able to record robust IOSs from single-pass measurements. Transient IOSs, which might reflect an early stage of light phototransduction, are consistently observed in the photoreceptor outer segment almost immediately (<4 ms) after retinal stimulation. Comparative studies of dark- and light-adapted retinas have demonstrated the feasibility of functional OCT mapping of rod and cone photoreceptors, promising a new method for early disease detection and improved treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye diseases that can cause photoreceptor damage. PMID:25901915

  5. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography Enables In Vivo Physiological Assessment of Retinal Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-01

    Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) changes have been observed in retinal photoreceptors, suggesting a unique biomarker for eye disease detection. However, clinical deployment of IOS imaging is challenging due to unclear IOS sources and limited signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Here, by developing high spatiotemporal resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and applying an adaptive algorithm for IOS processing, we were able to record robust IOSs from single-pass measurements. Transient IOSs, which might reflect an early stage of light phototransduction, are consistently observed in the photoreceptor outer segment almost immediately (<4 ms) after retinal stimulation. Comparative studies of dark- and light-adapted retinas have demonstrated the feasibility of functional OCT mapping of rod and cone photoreceptors, promising a new method for early disease detection and improved treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye diseases that can cause photoreceptor damage.

  6. In Vivo Studies on Nonmuscle Myosin II Expression and Function in Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II-B (NM II-B) plays an important role in cardiac development and function. Genetic ablation of NM II-B in mice results in both cellular and structural defects involving cardiac myocytes. These abnormalities include a ventricular septal defect, double outlet of the right ventricle, myocyte hypertrophy and premature onset of myocyte binucleation due to abnormalities in cytokinesis. The mice die by embryonic day (E) 14.5 due to defects in heart development. Conditional ablation of NM II-B in cardiac myocytes after E11.5 allows study of NM II-B function in adult myocytes. B?MHC/B?MHC mice are born with enlarged cardiac myocytes, some of which are multinucleated. Between 6–10 months of age they develop a cardiomyopathy. Many of these mice develop a marked widening of the intercalated discs. The loss of NM II-B from the intercalated discs primarily affects the adhesion junctions rather than the gap junctions and desmosomes. Interestingly, the loss of NM II-B results in a decrease in the actin binding protein mXin which also has been shown to cause disruption of the intercalated disc in addition to cardiac arrhythmias (Gustafson-Wagner et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2007, 293:H2680-92). Finally we review the evidence showing that ablation of NM II-C (which also localizes to the intercalated disc) in mouse hearts deficient in NM II-B expression results in destabilization of N-cadherin and ?-catenin in the intercalated disc. PMID:22201759

  7. Brain basis of early parent–infant interactions: psychology, physiology, and in vivo functional neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P.; Kose, Samet; Strathearn, Lane

    2015-01-01

    Parenting behavior critically shapes human infants’ current and future behavior. The parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social experiences, forming templates of what they can expect from others and how to best meet others’ expectations. In this review, we focus on the neurobiology of parenting behavior, including our own functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain imaging experiments of parents. We begin with a discussion of background, perspectives and caveats for considering the neurobiology of parent–infant relationships. Then, we discuss aspects of the psychology of parenting that are significantly motivating some of the more basic neuroscience research. Following that, we discuss some of the neurohormones that are important for the regulation of social bonding, and the dysregulation of parenting with cocaine abuse. Then, we review the brain circuitry underlying parenting, proceeding from relevant rodent and nonhuman primate research to human work. Finally, we focus on a study-by-study review of functional neuroimaging studies in humans. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support aspects of parent response to infants, including the emotion, attention, motivation, empathy, decision-making and other thinking that are required to navigate the complexities of parenting. Specifically, infant stimuli activate basal forebrain regions, which regulate brain circuits that handle specific nurturing and caregiving responses and activate the brain’s more general circuitry for handling emotions, motivation, attention, and empathy – all of which are crucial for effective parenting. We argue that an integrated understanding of the brain basis of parenting has profound implications for mental health. PMID:17355399

  8. Correspondence between Traditional Models of Functional Analysis and a Functional Analysis of Manding Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, Robert H.; Sloman, Kimberly N.; Weiss, Mary Jane; Delmolino, Lara; Hansford, Amy; Szalony, Jill; Madigan, Ryan; Lambright, Nathan M.

    2011-01-01

    Functional analysis procedures have been effectively used to determine the maintaining variables for challenging behavior and subsequently develop effective interventions. However, fear of evoking dangerous topographies of maladaptive behavior and concerns for reinforcing infrequent maladaptive behavior present challenges for people working in…

  9. In vivo boron-10 analysis for the pre-screening of compounds for BNCS

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Xuping, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    An in vivo boron-10 screening technique was developed to analyze the boron biodistribution in a rabbit knee for the pre-screening of compounds for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). Three approaches were investigated: ...

  10. Automated In Vivo Platform for the Discovery of Functional Food Treatments of Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Littleton, Robert M.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Tang, Hong; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Nelson, Sandra; Hove, Jay R.

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model system for both automated drug discovery and investigating hypercholesterolemia. Here we combine these aspects and for the first time develop an automated high-content confocal assay for treatments of hypercholesterolemia. We also create two algorithms for automated analysis of cardiodynamic data acquired by high-speed confocal microscopy. The first algorithm computes cardiac parameters solely from the frequency-domain representation of cardiodynamic data while the second uses both frequency- and time-domain data. The combined approach resulted in smaller differences relative to manual measurements. The methods are implemented to test the ability of a methanolic extract of the hawthorn plant (Crataegus laevigata) to treat hypercholesterolemia and its peripheral cardiovascular effects. Results demonstrate the utility of these methods and suggest the extract has both antihypercholesterolemic and postitively inotropic properties. PMID:23349685

  11. Effect of tomato industrial processing (different hybrids, paste, and pomace) on inhibition of platelet function in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0 g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0 g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  12. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing (Different Hybrids, Paste, and Pomace) on Inhibition of Platelet Function In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0?g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0?g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  13. RGS-Insensitive G Proteins as In Vivo Probes of RGS Function.

    PubMed

    Neubig, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the inhibitory (Gi/o) class play critical physiological roles and the receptors that activate them are important therapeutic targets (e.g., mu opioid, serotonin 5HT1a, etc.). Gi/o proteins are negatively regulated by regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins. The redundant actions of the 20 different RGS family members have made it difficult to establish their overall physiological role. A unique G protein mutation (G184S in G?i/o) prevents RGS binding to the G? subunit and blocks all RGS action at that particular G? subunit. The robust phenotypes of mice expressing these RGS-insensitive (RGSi) mutant G proteins illustrate the profound action of RGS proteins in cardiovascular, metabolic, and central nervous system functions. Specifically, the enhanced G?i2 signaling through the RGSi G?i2(G184S) mutant knock-in mice shows protection against cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury and potentiation of serotonin-mediated antidepressant actions. In contrast, the RGSi G?o mutant knock-in produces enhanced mu-opioid receptor-mediated analgesia but also a seizure phenotype. These genetic models provide novel insights into potential therapeutic strategies related to RGS protein inhibitors and/or G protein subtype-biased agonists at particular GPCRs. PMID:26123300

  14. Genetic Variation Determines PPAR? Function and Anti-diabetic Drug Response In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Soccio, Raymond E; Chen, Eric R; Rajapurkar, Satyajit R; Safabakhsh, Pegah; Marinis, Jill M; Dispirito, Joanna R; Emmett, Matthew J; Briggs, Erika R; Fang, Bin; Everett, Logan J; Lim, Hee-Woong; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Steger, David J; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Voight, Benjamin F; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2015-07-01

    SNPs affecting disease risk often reside in non-coding genomic regions. Here, we show that SNPs are highly enriched at mouse strain-selective adipose tissue binding sites for PPAR?, a nuclear receptor for anti-diabetic drugs. Many such SNPs alter binding motifs for PPAR? or cooperating factors and functionally regulate nearby genes whose expression is strain selective and imbalanced in heterozygous F1 mice. Moreover, genetically determined binding of PPAR? accounts for mouse strain-specific transcriptional effects of TZD drugs, providing proof of concept for personalized medicine related to nuclear receptor genomic occupancy. In human fat, motif-altering SNPs cause differential PPAR? binding, provide a molecular mechanism for some expression quantitative trait loci, and are risk factors for dysmetabolic traits in genome-wide association studies. One PPAR? motif-altering SNP is associated with HDL levels and other metabolic syndrome parameters. Thus, natural genetic variation in PPAR? genomic occupancy determines individual disease risk and drug response. PMID:26140591

  15. Structural basis for the MukB-topoisomerase IV interaction and its functional implications in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M; Stewart, Nichole K; Oakley, Martha G; Berger, James M

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome partitioning in Escherichia coli is assisted by two interacting proteins, topoisomerase (topo) IV and MukB. MukB stimulates the relaxation of negative supercoils by topo IV; to understand the mechanism of their action and to define this functional interplay, we determined the crystal structure of a minimal MukB–topo IV complex to 2.3?Å resolution. The structure shows that the so-called ‘hinge' region of MukB forms a heterotetrameric assembly with a C-terminal DNA binding domain (CTD) on topo IV's ParC subunit. Biochemical studies show that the hinge stimulates topo IV by competing for a site on the CTD that normally represses activity on negatively supercoiled DNA, while complementation tests using mutants implicated in the interaction reveal that the cellular dependency on topo IV derives from a joint need for both strand passage and MukB binding. Interestingly, the configuration of the MukB·topo IV complex sterically disfavours intradimeric interactions, indicating that the proteins may form oligomeric arrays with one another, and suggesting a framework by which MukB and topo IV may collaborate during daughter chromosome disentanglement. PMID:24097060

  16. In vivo selection of lethal mutations reveals two functional domains in arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Geslain, R; Martin, F; Delagoutte, B; Cavarelli, J; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    2000-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and a genetic screening in yeast, we isolated 26 mutations that inactivate Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS). The mutations were identified and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding proteins were tested after purification of the expression products in Escherichia coli. The effects were interpreted in the light of the crystal structure of ArgRS. Eighteen functional residues were found around the arginine-binding pocket and eight others in the carboxy-terminal domain of the enzyme. Mutations of these residues all act by strongly impairing the rates of tRNA charging and arginine activation. Thus, ArgRS and tRNA(Arg) can be considered as a kind of ribonucleoprotein, where the tRNA, before being charged, is acting as a cofactor that activates the enzyme. Furthermore, by using different tRNA(Arg) isoacceptors and heterologous tRNA(Asp), we highlighted the crucial role of several residues of the carboxy-terminal domain in tRNA recognition and discrimination. PMID:10744027

  17. Superantigen-induced anergy of V beta 8+ CD4+ T cells induces functional but non-proliferative T cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gaus, H; Miethke, T; Wagner, H; Heeg, K

    1994-01-01

    The response profile of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-primed murine V beta 8+ CD4+ and V beta 8+ CD8+ T cells was analysed upon rechallenge in vitro. While in vitro responses to secondary stimulation with SEB were reduced to background levels, the in vivo reactivity after rechallenge with SEB was retained, in that SEB-primed mice succumbed to lethal T-cell shock, lymphokines [interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-2, Il-4, IL-6, IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)], and lymphokine-specific mRNA accumulation could be detected in V beta 8+ CD4+ and V beta 8+ CD8+ T cells. However, V beta 8+ CD4+ T cells failed to enter the cell cycle. While the phenotype of V beta 8+ CD8+ T cells was indistinguishable from that of their counterparts from naive mice, V beta 8+ CD4+ T cells exhibited in vivo an unusual phenotype as non-proliferative but functional T cells. We conclude that in vitro-defined anergy does not disclose the functional abilities of ligand-reactive V beta 8+ T cells in vivo, and that priming with superantigen (SAg) induces in vivo a differentiation of SEB-reactive V beta 8+ CD4+ T cells into a non-proliferative but functional phenotype. PMID:7835956

  18. Functional analysis of problem behavior: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Gregory P; Iwata, Brian A; McCord, Brandon E

    2003-01-01

    Functional analysis methodology focuses on the identification of variables that influence the occurrence of problem behavior and has become a hallmark of contemporary approaches to behavioral assessment. In light of the widespread use of pretreatment functional analyses in articles published in this and other journals, we reviewed the literature in an attempt to identify best practices and directions for future research. Studies included in the present review were those in which (a) a pretreatment assessment based on (b) direct observation and measurement of (c) problem behavior was conducted under (d) at least two conditions involving manipulation of an environmental variable in an attempt (e) to demonstrate a relation between the environmental event and behavior. Studies that met the criteria for inclusion were quantified and critically evaluated along a number of dimensions related to subject and setting characteristics, parametric and qualitative characteristics of the methodology, types of assessment conditions, experimental designs, topographies of problem behaviors, and the manner in which data were displayed and analyzed. PMID:12858983

  19. Human milk metagenome: a functional capacity analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human milk contains a diverse population of bacteria that likely influences colonization of the infant gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies, however, have been limited to characterization of this microbial community by 16S rRNA analysis. In the present study, a metagenomic approach using Illumina sequencing of a pooled milk sample (ten donors) was employed to determine the genera of bacteria and the types of bacterial open reading frames in human milk that may influence bacterial establishment and stability in this primal food matrix. The human milk metagenome was also compared to that of breast-fed and formula-fed infants’ feces (n?=?5, each) and mothers’ feces (n?=?3) at the phylum level and at a functional level using open reading frame abundance. Additionally, immune-modulatory bacterial-DNA motifs were also searched for within human milk. Results The bacterial community in human milk contained over 360 prokaryotic genera, with sequences aligning predominantly to the phyla of Proteobacteria (65%) and Firmicutes (34%), and the genera of Pseudomonas (61.1%), Staphylococcus (33.4%) and Streptococcus (0.5%). From assembled human milk-derived contigs, 30,128 open reading frames were annotated and assigned to functional categories. When compared to the metagenome of infants’ and mothers’ feces, the human milk metagenome was less diverse at the phylum level, and contained more open reading frames associated with nitrogen metabolism, membrane transport and stress response (P?functionality of the human milk metagenome are warranted. PMID:23705844

  20. A model for personalized in vivo analysis of human immune responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kalscheuer, Hannes; Danzl, Nichole; Onoe, Takashi; Faust, Ted; Winchester, Robert; Goland, Robin; Greenberg, Ellen; Spitzer, Thomas R; Savage, David G.; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Choi, Goda; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human immune diseases are generally limited to the analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of heterogenous patient populations. Improved models are needed to allow analysis of fundamental immunologic abnormalities predisposing to disease and in which to assess immunotherapies. Immunodeficient mice receiving human fetal thymus grafts and fetal CD34+ cells i.v. produce robust human immune systems, allowing analysis of human T cell development and function. However, to use humanized mice to study human immune-mediated disorders, immune sytsems must be generated from adult hematopoietic cells. Here, we demonstrated robust immune reconstitution in mice with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) aspirated from bone marrow of adults with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and healthy control volunteers. In these humanized mice, cryopreservation of HLA allele-matched fetal thymic tissue prevented allogeneic adult HSC rejection. Newly generated T cells, which included regulatory T cells, were functional, self-tolerant, and had a diverse repertoire. The immune recognition of these mice mimicked that of the adult CD34+ cell donor, but the T cell phenotypes were more predominantly “naïve” than those of the adult donors. HSCs from T1D and control donors generated similar numbers of natural Tregs intrathymically; however, peripheral T cells from T1D subjects showed increased proportions of activated or memory cells compared to controls, suggesting possible HSC-intrinsic differences in T cell homeostasis that might underly immune pathology in T1D. This “Personalized Immune” (PI) mouse provides a new model for individualized analysis of human immune responses that may provide new insights into not only T1D, but other forms of immune function and dysfunction as well. PMID:22422991

  1. In vivo assay of p53 function in homologous recombination between simian virus 40 chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmüller, L; Cammenga, J; Deppert, W W

    1996-01-01

    To investigate a possible role of p53 in DNA exchange mechanisms, we have developed a model system which allows us to quantify homologous recombination rates in eukaryotic cells. We generated two types of simian virus 40 (SV40) whose genomes were mutated in such a way that upon double infection of monkey cells, virus particles can be released only after interchromosomal exchange of genetic material. This test system allowed us to determine recombination rates in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-6) for chromatin-associated SV40 genomes. To study the role of p53-T-antigen (T-Ag) complexes in this process, we designed viral test genomes with an additional mutation leading to a single amino acid exchange in T-Ag (D402H) and specifically blocking T-Ag-p53 interactions. Analysis of primary rhesus monkey cells endogenously expressing wild-type p53 showed a decreased recombination rate upon loss of efficient T-Ag-p53 complex formation. However, cells expressing mutant p53 (LLC-MK2 cells), the introduction of mutant T-Ag did not affect the DNA exchange rates. Our data are interpreted to indicate an inhibitory role of wild-type p53 in recombination. In agreement with this hypothesis, p53-T-Ag complex formation alleviates the inhibitory effect of wild-type p53. PMID:8551610

  2. Function of the C-terminal Domain of the DEAD-Box Protein Mss116p Analyzed In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Georg; Del Campo, Mark; Mohr, Sabine; Yang, Quansheng; Jia, Huijue; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    The DEAD-box proteins CYT-19 in Neurospora crassa and Mss116p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are general RNA chaperones that function in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns and in translational activation. Both proteins consist of a conserved ATP-dependent RNA helicase core region linked to N- and C-terminal domains, the latter with a basic tail similar to many other DEAD-box proteins. In CYT-19, this basic tail was shown to contribute to non-specific RNA binding that helps tether the core helicase region to structured RNA substrates. Here, multiple sequence alignments and secondary structure predictions indicate that CYT-19 and Mss116p belong to distinct subgroups of DEAD-box proteins, whose C-terminal domains have a defining extended ?-helical region preceding the basic tail. We find that mutations or C-terminal truncations in the predicted ?-helical region of Mss116p strongly inhibit RNA-dependent ATPase activity, leading to loss of function in both translational activation and RNA splicing. These findings suggest that the ?-helical region may stabilize and/or regulate the activity of the RNA helicase core. By contrast, a truncation that removes only the basic tail leaves high RNA-dependent ATPase activity and causes only a modest reduction in translation and RNA splicing efficiency in vivo and in vitro. Biochemical analysis shows that deletion of the basic tail leads to weaker non-specific binding of group I and group II intron RNAs, and surprisingly, also impairs RNA-unwinding at saturating protein concentrations and nucleotide-dependent tight binding of single-stranded RNAs by the RNA helicase core. Together, our results indicate that the two subregions of Mss116p’s C-terminal domain act in different ways to support and modulate activities of the core helicase region, whose RNA-unwinding activity is critical for both the translation and RNA splicing functions. PMID:18096186

  3. In vivo and in vitro analyses of amygdalar function reveal a role for copper.

    PubMed

    Gaier, E D; Rodriguiz, R M; Zhou, J; Ralle, M; Wetsel, W C; Eipper, B A; Mains, R E

    2014-05-01

    Mice with a single copy of the peptide amidating monooxygenase (Pam) gene (PAM(+/-)) are impaired in contextual and cued fear conditioning. These abnormalities coincide with deficient long-term potentiation (LTP) at excitatory thalamic afferent synapses onto pyramidal neurons in the lateral amygdala. Slice recordings from PAM(+/-) mice identified an increase in GABAergic tone (Gaier ED, Rodriguiz RM, Ma XM, Sivaramakrishnan S, Bousquet-Moore D, Wetsel WC, Eipper BA, Mains RE. J Neurosci 30: 13656-13669, 2010). Biochemical data indicate a tissue-specific deficit in Cu content in the amygdala; amygdalar expression of Atox-1 and Atp7a, essential for transport of Cu into the secretory pathway, is reduced in PAM(+/-) mice. When PAM(+/-) mice were fed a diet supplemented with Cu, the impairments in fear conditioning were reversed, and LTP was normalized in amygdala slice recordings. A role for endogenous Cu in amygdalar LTP was established by the inhibitory effect of a brief incubation of wild-type slices with bathocuproine disulfonate, a highly selective, cell-impermeant Cu chelator. Interestingly, bath-applied CuSO? had no effect on excitatory currents but reversibly potentiated the disynaptic inhibitory current. Bath-applied CuSO? was sufficient to potentiate wild-type amygdala afferent synapses. The ability of dietary Cu to affect signaling in pathways that govern fear-based behaviors supports an essential physiological role for Cu in amygdalar function at both the synaptic and behavioral levels. This work is relevant to neurological and psychiatric disorders in which disturbed Cu homeostasis could contribute to altered synaptic transmission, including Wilson's, Menkes, Alzheimer's, and prion-related diseases. PMID:24554785

  4. Isolevuglandins covalently modify phosphatidylethanolamines in vivo: detection and quantitative analysis of hydroxylactam adducts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Laird, James M.; Lu, Liang; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Nagy, Laura E.; Zhou, Rong; Crabb, John W.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Levuglandins (LGs) and isolevuglandins (isoLGs, also called “isoketals” or “isoKs”) are extraordinarily reactive products of cyclooxygenase and free radical-induced oxidation of arachidonates. We now report the detection in vivo and quantitative analysis of LG/isoLG adducts that incorporate the amino group of phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) into LG/isoLG-hydroxylactams. Notably, LC-MS/MS detection of these hydroxylactams is achieved with samples that are an order of magnitude smaller and sample processing is much simpler and less time-consuming than required for measuring protein-derived LG/isoLG-lysyl-lactams. A key feature of our protocol is treatment of biological phospholipid extracts with phospholipase A2 to generate mainly 1-palmitoyl-2-lysoPE-hydroxylactams from heterogeneous mixtures of phospholipids with a variety of acyl groups on the 2-position. Over 160% higher mean levels of LG/isoLG-PE-hydroxylactam (P < 0.001) were detected in liver from chronic ethanol-fed mice (32.4 ± 6.3 ng/g, n = 6) compared to controls (12.1 ± 1.5 ng/g, n = 4), and mean levels in plasma from patients with age-related macular degeneration (5.2 ± 0.4 ng/ml, n = 15) were elevated ~53% (P < 0.0001) compared to healthy volunteers (3.4 ± 0.1 ng/ml, n = 15). Just as LG/isoLG-protein adducts provide a dosimeter of oxidative injury, this study suggests that LG/isoLG-PE-hydroxylactams are potential biomarkers for assessing risk for oxidative stress-stimulated diseases. PMID:19751823

  5. A Numerical Analysis Model for the Interpretation of In Vivo Platelet Consumption Data

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Ted S.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike anemias, most thrombocytopenias cannot be separated into those due to impaired production and those due to accelerated consumption. While rapid clearance of labeled platelets from the bloodstream can be followed in thrombocytopenic individuals, no model exists for quantitatively inferring from autologous or allogeneic platelet consumption data what changes in random consumption, lifespan dependent consumption, and platelet production rate may have caused the thrombocytopenia. Here we describe a numerical analysis model which resolves these issues. The model applies three parameter values (a random consumption rate constant, a lognormally-distributed platelet lifespan, and the standard deviation of the latter) to a matrix comprising a series of platelet cohorts which are sequentially produced and fractionally consumed in a series of time intervals. The cohort platelet counts achieved after equilibration of production and consumption both enumerate the population age distribution and sum to the population platelet count. Continued platelet consumption after production is halted then serves to model in vivo platelet consumption data, with consumption rate in the first such interval defining the equilibrium platelet production rate. We use a least squares fitting procedure to find parameter values which best fit observed platelet consumption data obtained in WT and thrombocytopenic WASP(-) mice. Equilibrium platelet age distributions are then ‘grafted’ into the matrix to allow modeling of the consumption of WT platelets in WASP(-) recipients, and vice versa. The optimal parameter values obtained indicate that random WT platelet consumption accounts for a larger fraction of platelet turnover than was previously suspected. Platelet WASP deficiency accelerates random consumption, and a trans effect of recipient WASP deficiency contributes to this. Application of the model to clinical data will allow distinctions to be made between thrombocytopenias due primarily to impaired platelet production and those due to acceleration of random or lifespan-dependent platelet consumption. PMID:23383066

  6. BMP2-encapsulated chitosan coatings on functionalized Ti surfaces and their performance in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Lin, Hong; Lu, Xiong; Zhi, Wei; Wang, Ke-Feng; Meng, Fan-Zhi; Jiang, Ou

    2014-07-01

    Bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP2)-encapsulated chitosan (CS) coatings were prepared to immobilize BMP2 on titanium (Ti) surfaces. The Ti substrates were functionalized through a three-step process: alkali treatment, silanization with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and aldehydation with glutaraldehyde (GA). BMP2-encapsulated CS coatings (BMP2-CS) were bonded to Ti surfaces through reactions between the aldehyde groups of GA and the amine groups of CS. Direct BMP2 immobilization on aldehyde-treated Ti (BMP2-Ti) and pure CS coatings (CS-Ti) were used as controls. The release rate of BMP2-CS-Ti was half of that of BMP2-Ti at initial stage, which indicates that the CS coatings are suitable carriers for sustained BMP2 release. The osteoinductivities of BMP2-CS-Ti, BMP2-Ti, CS-Ti and pristine Ti were examined by both in vitro cell tests and in vivo experiments. Bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) culture indicated that BMP2-CS-Ti is more potent in stimulating the differentiation of the adhering BMSC than the three other groups. Rabbit femur implantation revealed the excellent osteoinductivity of BMP2-CS-coated Ti implants. These results demonstrate that the BMP2-encapsulated CS coatings are stable osteoinductive coatings that realize the sustained release of BMP2 and maintain the activity of the protein. PMID:24857458

  7. In vivo assessment of protease dynamics in cutaneous wound healing by degradomics analysis of porcine wound exudates.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Fabio; Hermes, Olivia; Egli, Fabian E; Kockmann, Tobias; Schlage, Pascal; Croizat, Pierre; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Smola, Hans; auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Proteases control complex tissue responses by modulating inflammation, cell proliferation and migration, and matrix remodeling. All these processes are orchestrated in cutaneous wound healing to restore the skin's barrier function upon injury. Altered protease activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of healing impairments, and proteases are important targets in diagnosis and therapy of this pathology. Global assessment of proteolysis at critical turning points after injury will define crucial events in acute healing that might be disturbed in healing disorders. As optimal biospecimens, wound exudates contain an ideal proteome to detect extracellular proteolytic events, are noninvasively accessible, and can be collected at multiple time points along the healing process from the same wound in the clinics. In this study, we applied multiplexed Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) to globally assess proteolysis in early phases of cutaneous wound healing. By quantitative analysis of proteins and protein N termini in wound fluids from a clinically relevant pig wound model, we identified more than 650 proteins and discerned major healing phases through distinctive abundance clustering of markers of inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization. TAILS revealed a high degree of proteolysis at all time points after injury by detecting almost 1300 N-terminal peptides in ?450 proteins. Quantitative positional proteomics mapped pivotal interdependent processing events in the blood coagulation and complement cascades, temporally discerned clotting and fibrinolysis during the healing process, and detected processing of complement C3 at distinct time points after wounding and by different proteases. Exploiting data on primary cleavage specificities, we related candidate proteases to cleavage events and revealed processing of the integrin adapter protein kindlin-3 by caspase-3, generating new hypotheses for protease-substrate relations in the healing skin wound in vivo. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifier PXD001198. PMID:25516628

  8. Differential pharmacokinetic analysis of in vivo erythropoietin receptor interaction with erythropoietin and continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in sheep

    PubMed Central

    El-Komy, Mohammed H.; Schmidt, Robert L.; Widness, John A.; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The two erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs), short acting recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) and long acting continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA), have been hypothesized to share an in vivo elimination pathway that involves binding to erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and subsequent internalization. A physiologically based recirculation model and a pharmacokinetic tracer interaction methodology (TIM) were used to compare the in vivo interaction kinetics with EPOR between the two ESAs in adult sheep. Animals treated with EPO experienced a greater EPOR up-regulation than those treated with CERA, as evidenced by an eightfold-higher initial EPOR normalized production rate constant, ksyn/R0, versus a twofold-larger EPOR degradation rate constant, kdeg. In agreement with in vitro studies, EPO had a lower in vivo equilibrium dissociation constant from EPOR than CERA (KD = 6 versus 88.4 pmol/l, respectively, p < 0.01). The internalization and/or degradation of the EPO–EPOR complex was faster than that of the CERA–EPOR complex (kint = 24 versus 2.41 h?1, respectively, p < 0.01). The adopted model enables a mechanism-based explanation for CERA’s slower elimination and greater erythropoietic activity in vivo. As predicted by the model, the slower elimination of CERA is due to: (1) less EPOR up-regulation induced by CERA administration; (2) slower binding of CERA to EPOR; and (3) reduced internalization and/or degradation rate of surface-bound CERA. Slower CERA/EPOR complex elimination explains the greater in vivo erythropoiesis reported for CERA, despite its lower affinity to EPOR. A sensitivity analysis showed that the model parameters were reliably estimated using the TIM methodology. PMID:21678432

  9. Regulation of Epithelial Cell Morphology and Functions Approaching To More In Vivo-Like by Modifying Polyethylene Glycol on Polysulfone Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Zhang, Guoliang; Meng, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Cytocompatibility is critically important in design of biomaterials for application in tissue engineering. However, the currently well-accepted “cytocompatible" biomaterials are those which promote cells to sustain good attachment/spreading. The cells on such materials usually lack the self-assembled cell morphology and high cell functions as in vivo. In our view, biomaterials that can promote the ability of cells to self-assemble and demonstrate cell-specific functions would be cytocompatible. This paper examined the interaction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified polysulfone (PSf) membranes with four epithelial cell types (primary liver cells, a liver tumor cell line, and two renal tubular cell lines). Our results show that PSf membranes modified with proper PEG promoted the aggregation of both liver and renal cells, but the liver cells more easily formed aggregates than the renal tubular cells. The culture on PEG-modified PSf membranes also enhanced cell-specific functions. In particular, the cells cultured on F127 membranes with the proper PEG content mimicked the in vivo ultrastructure of liver cells or renal tubules cells and displayed the highest cell functions. Gene expression data for adhesion proteins suggest that the PEG modification impaired cell-membrane interactions and increased cell-cell interactions, thus facilitating cell self-assembly. In conclusion, PEG-modified membrane could be a cytocompatible material which regulates the morphology and functions of epithelial cells in mimicking cell performance in vivo. PMID:22558349

  10. Identification of a farnesol analog as a Ras function inhibitor using both an in vivo Ras activation sensor and a phenotypic screening approach.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Subramanian, Thangaiah; Spielmann, H Peter; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in Ras isoforms such as K-Ras, N-Ras, and H-Ras contribute to roughly 85, 15, and 1% of human cancers, respectively. Proper membrane targeting of these Ras isoforms, a prerequisite for Ras activity, requires farnesylation or geranylgeranylation at the C-terminal CAAX box. We devised an in vivo screening strategy based on monitoring Ras activation and phenotypic physiological outputs for assaying synthetic Ras function inhibitors (RFI). Ras activity was visualized by the translocation of RBD Raf1 -GFP to activated Ras at the plasma membrane. By using this strategy, we screened one synthetic farnesyl substrate analog (AGOH) along with nine putative inhibitors and found that only m-CN-AGOH inhibited Ras activation. Phenotypic analysis of starving cells could be used to monitor polarization, motility, and the inability of these treated cells to aggregate properly during fruiting body formation. Incorporation of AGOH and m-CN-AGOH to cellular proteins was detected by western blot. These screening assays can be incorporated into a high throughput screening format using Dictyostelium discoideum and automated microscopy to determine effective RFIs. These RFI candidates can then be further tested in mammalian systems. PMID:24194124

  11. Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes to An Unmutated Tumor Rejection Antigen P1A: Normal Development but Restrained Effector Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Supria; Guo, Yong; Guilloux, Yannik; Lee, Cheng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Liu, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Unmutated tumor antigens are chosen as primary candidates for tumor vaccine because of their expression on multiple lineages of tumors. A critical issue is whether unmutated tumor antigens are expressed in normal cells, and if so, whether such expression imposes special restrictions on cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. In this study, we use a transgenic approach to study the development and effector function of T cells specific for P1A, a prototypical unmutated tumor antigen. We report here that although P1A is expressed at low levels in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, the P1A-specific transgenic T cells develop normally and remain highly responsive to the P1A antigen. The fact that transgenic expression of P1A antigen in the thymus induces T cell clonal deletion demonstrates that normal hematopoietic cells can process and present the P1A antigen and that P1A-specific T cells are susceptible to clonal deletion. By inference, P1A-specific T cells must have escaped clonal deletion due to low expression of P1A in the thymus. Interestingly, despite the fact that an overwhelming majority of T cells in the T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)–transgenic mice are specific for P1A, these mice are no more resistant to a P1A-expressing plasmocytoma than nontransgenic littermates. Moreover, when the same TCR-transgenic mice were challenged simultaneously with B7-1+ and B7-1? tumors, only B7-1+ tumors were rejected. Therefore, even though P1A can be a tumor rejection antigen, the effector function of P1A-specific CTL is restrained in vivo. These results have important implications for the strategy of tumor immunotherapy. PMID:10049945

  12. Potential electron mediators to extract electron energies of RBC glycolysis for prolonged in vivo functional lifetime of hemoglobin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kettisen, Karin; Bülow, Leif; Sakai, Hiromi

    2015-04-15

    Developing a functional blood substitute as an alternative to donated blood for clinical use is believed to relieve present and future blood shortages, and to reduce the risks of infection and blood type mismatching. Hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) encapsulates a purified and concentrated human-derived Hb solution in a phospholipid vesicle (liposome). The in vivo safety and efficacy of HbV as a transfusion alternative have been clarified. Auto-oxidation of ferrous Hb in HbV gradually increases the level of ferric methemoglobin (metHb) and impairs the oxygen transport capabilities. The extension of the functional half-life of HbV has recently been proposed using an electron mediator, methylene blue (MB), which acts as a shuttle between red blood cells (RBC) and HbV. MB transfers electron energies of NAD(P)H, produced by RBC glycolysis, to metHb in HbV. Work presented here focuses on screening of 15 potential electron mediators, with appropriate redox potential and water solubility, for electron transfer from RBC to HbV. The results are assessed with regard to the chemical properties of the candidates. The compounds examined in this study were dimethyl methylene blue (DMB), methylene green, azure A, azure B, azure C, toluidine blue (TDB), thionin acetate, phenazine methosulfate, brilliant cresyl blue, cresyl violet, gallocyanine, toluylene blue, indigo carmine, indigotetrasulfonate, and MB. Six candidates were found to be unsuitable because of their insufficient diffusion across membranes, or overly high or nonexistent reactivity with relevant biomolecules. However, 9 displayed favorable metHb reduction. Among the suitable candidates, phenothiazines DMB and TDB exhibited effectiveness like MB did. In comparison to MB, they showed faster reduction by electron-donating NAD(P)H, coupled with showing a lower rate of reoxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen. Ascertaining the best electron mediator can provide a pathway for extending the lifetime and efficiency of potential blood substitutes. PMID:25734688

  13. Induction of functional anaphylatoxin C5a receptors on hepatocytes by in vivo treatment of rats with IL-6.

    PubMed

    Schieferdecker, H L; Schlaf, G; Koleva, M; Götze, O; Jungermann, K

    2000-05-15

    In normal rat liver, anaphylatoxin C5a receptors (C5aR) are only expressed by nonparenchymal cells, mainly Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells, but not by parenchymal cells, i.e., hepatocytes (HC). Nevertheless, C5a stimulates glucose output by HC. This HC-specific defense reaction is induced indirectly via prostanoids secreted by the C5aR-expressing Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells. It is shown here that under inflammatory conditions simulated by in vivo treatment of rats with IL-6 C5aR mRNA and protein were induced in HC in a time-dependent manner. Maximal mRNA and protein expression were observed at 4-8 h and 8-10 h, respectively, after IL-6 injection. The newly expressed receptors were functional, because recombinant rat C5a significantly activated glycogen phosphorylase in HC isolated from IL-6-treated but not in HC from control rats. In perfused livers of IL-6-treated animals in contrast to control animals, recombinant rat C5a-induced glucose output was not impaired by inhibition of prostanoid synthesis and function with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the thromboxane receptor antagonist daltroban. These results indicate that HC-specific defense reactions might be differently regulated under normal and inflammatory conditions as shown here for the indirect prostanoid-dependent or direct C5a-induced activation of hepatocellular glycogen phyosphorylase and glucose output in control or IL-6-treated rats, respectively. PMID:10799912

  14. Reversible electropermeabilisation of human and rat blood platelets: evaluation of morphological and functional integrity 'in vitro' and 'in vivo'.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K; Crawford, N

    1989-06-01

    A high-voltage discharge procedure has been developed for permeabilising the plasma membranes of both human and rat blood platelets. The cells can be resealed by incubation at 37 degrees C, show less than 4% loss of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) implying minimal cell lysis and also have well maintained morphological and functional integrity. The prototype apparatus used at field strengths between 6 and 8 kV/cm produces membrane pores which allow free diffusion of low molecular weight substances such as adenine nucleotides, inositol phosphate and fluorescent dyes. Two properties, namely Ca2+-induced secretion of granule stored 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced release of intracellularly sequestered 45Ca, which are both well expressed immediately after permeabilisation, are essentially abolished after resealing. The efficiency of permeabilisation and resealing can be simply monitored by shifts in 'apparent platelet volume' using a resistive particle counter (Coulter). Permeabilised platelets show a shift in modal volumes from a control range 4-7 fl to 10-15 fl. Resealing restores these modal volumes to the original control range. Encapsulation of the fluorochrome, Lucifer yellow (Mr 550), during permeabilisation revealed that after resealing greater than 85% of rat platelets, and close to 100% human platelets, contained the encapsulated dye. The initial rates and % aggregation responses of both human and rat platelets to collagen, thrombin and the thromboxane A2-mimetic U46619 remained essentially normal after permeabilisation and resealing further illustrating the maintenance of functional competence following treatment. Resealed rat platelets reinfused into the circulation after labelling with [111In]indium oxine gave survival curves similar to those of control platelets. Therefore, this reversible permeabilisation procedure may allow the use of autologous or heterologous platelets as carrier vehicles for the delivery of drugs and other agents 'in vivo'. PMID:2730905

  15. Structure-Function Analysis of Nel, a Thrombospondin-1-like Glycoprotein Involved in Neural Development and Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ritsuko; Nakamoto, Chizu; Obama, Hiroya; Durward, Elaine; Nakamoto, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Nel (neural epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like molecule) is a multimeric, multimodular extracellular glycoprotein with heparin-binding activity and structural similarities to thrombospondin-1. Nel is predominantly expressed in the nervous system and has been implicated in neuronal proliferation and differentiation, retinal axon guidance, synaptic functions, and spatial learning. The Nel protein contains an N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP-N) domain, five cysteine-rich domains, and six EGF-like domains. However, little is known about the functions of specific domains of the Nel protein. In this study, we have performed structure-function analysis of Nel, by using a series of expression constructs for different regions of the Nel protein. Our studies demonstrate that the TSP-N domain is responsible for homo-multimer formation of Nel and its heparin-binding activity. In vivo, Nel and related Nell1 are expressed in several regions of the mouse central nervous system with partly overlapping patterns. When they are expressed in the same cells in vitro, Nel and Nell1 can form hetero-multimers through the TSP-N domain, but they do not hetero-oligomerize with thrombospondin-1. Whereas both the TSP-N domain and cysteine-rich domains can bind to retinal axons in vivo, only the latter causes growth cone collapse in cultured retinal axons, suggesting that cysteine-rich domains interact with and activate an inhibitory axon guidance receptor. These results suggest that Nel interacts with a range of molecules through its different domains and exerts distinct functions. PMID:22157752

  16. In Vivo and In Vitro Analysis of Rat Lumbar Spine Mechanics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew E. Cunningham; Jocelyn M. Beach; Serkan Bilgic; Oheneba Boachie-Adjei; Chisa Hidaka

    2010-01-01

    Background  Rodent lumbar and caudal (tail) spine segments provide useful in vivo and in vitro models for human disc research. In vivo\\u000a caudal models allow characterization of the effect of static and dynamic loads on disc mechanics of individual animals with\\u000a time, but the lumbar models have required sacrifice of the animals for in vitro mechanical testing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  We therefore developed a

  17. Functional analysis of the nuclear LIM domain interactor NLI.

    PubMed Central

    Jurata, L W; Gill, G N

    1997-01-01

    LIM homeodomain and LIM-only (LMO) transcription factors contain two tandemly arranged Zn2+-binding LIM domains capable of mediating protein-protein interactions. These factors have restricted patterns of expression, are found in invertebrates as well as vertebrates, and are required for cell type specification in a variety of developing tissues. A recently identified, widely expressed protein, NLI, binds with high affinity to the LIM domains of LIM homeodomain and LMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. In this study, a 38-amino-acid fragment of NLI was found to be sufficient for the association of NLI with nuclear LIM domains. In addition, NLI was shown to form high affinity homodimers through the amino-terminal 200 amino acids, but dimerization of NLI was not required for association with the LIM homeodomain protein Lmxl. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed higher-order complexes containing multiple NLI molecules bound to Lmx1, indicating that dimerization of NLI does not interfere with LIM domain interactions. Additionally, NLI formed complexes with Lmx1 on the rat insulin I promoter and inhibited the LIM domain-dependent synergistic transcriptional activation by Lmx1 and the basic helix-loop-helix protein E47 from the rat insulin I minienhancer. These studies indicate that NLI contains at least two functionally independent domains and may serve as a negative regulator of synergistic transcriptional responses which require direct interaction via LIM domains. Thus, NLI may regulate the transcriptional activity of LIM homeodomain proteins by determining specific partner interactions. PMID:9315627

  18. Prefrontal Cortex and Executive Functions in Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analysis of Structural Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng; Raz, Naftali

    2014-01-01

    Lesion studies link the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to executive functions. However, the evidence from in vivo investigations in healthy people is mixed, and there are no quantitative estimates of the association strength. To examine the relationship between PFC volume and cortical thickness with executive cognition in healthy adults, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that assessed executive functions and PFC volume (31 samples,) and PFC thickness (10 samples) in vivo, N=3272 participants. We found that larger PFC volume and greater PFC thickness were associated with better executive performance. Stronger associations between executive functions and PFC volume were linked to greater variance in the sample age but was unrelated to the mean age of a sample. Strength of association between cognitive and neuroanatomical indices depended on the executive task used in the study. PFC volume correlated stronger with Wisconsin Card Sorting Test than with digit backwards span, Trail Making Test and verbal fluency. Significant effect size was observed in lateral and medial but not orbital PFC. The results support the “bigger is better” hypothesis of brain-behavior relation in healthy adults and suggest different neural correlates across the neuropsychological tests used to assess executive functions. PMID:24568942

  19. The Analysis of a#nely Equivalent Boolean Functions #

    E-print Network

    ­variable bent functions. Keywords: boolean functions, a#ne equivalent, a#ne general group 1 IntroductionThe Analysis of a#nely Equivalent Boolean Functions # Qing­shu Meng Min Yang Huan­guo Zhang Yuzhen get two results: first a general algorithm which can be used to judge if two boolean functions are a

  20. Geochip-Based Functional Gene Analysis of Anodophilic

    E-print Network

    Geochip-Based Functional Gene Analysis of Anodophilic Communities in Microbial Electrolysis Cells. A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a bioelectrochemical the microbial community functional structure in MECs initially operated under different conditions. We found

  1. Faithful in vivo transcription termination of Xenopus laevis rDNA. Correlation of electron microscopic spread preparations with S1 transcript analysis.

    PubMed

    Meissner, B; Hofmann, A; Steinbeisser, H; Spring, H; Miller, O L; Trendelenburg, M F

    1991-12-01

    DNA sequencing and subsequent functional in vitro analysis of the Xenopus laevis rDNA transcription termination has led to the identification of three transcription termination sequence elements: T1, located at the 3' end of the 28S rDNA; T2, a putative processing site 235 bp downstream of T1; T3, the principal terminator positioned 215 bp upstream of the gene promoter. As demonstrated for nuclear run-off assays, T3 was found to be the main terminator for Xenopus rDNA transcription. These in vitro data are in obvious contradiction to results obtained by electron microscopic (EM) spread preparations from rapidly isolated amplified oocyte nucleoli, i.e., an rDNA chromatin probe thought to represent the in vivo situation, indicative of transcription termination at sites T1-2. However, most interestingly, T3 had--again by the EM method--been identified as the exclusive terminator for NTS spacer transcription units. In order to answer the question of whether read-through transcription of the complete rDNA spacer sequence is obligatory for 40S pre-rRNA in vivo transcription, we analyzed several hundreds of spread rRNA genes from Xenopus oocyte nucleoli in great detail, applying two different spreading procedures, e.g., dispersal of amplified oocyte nucleoli shortly in detergent-free or detergent containing low-salt media prior to the EM spreading technique. Quantitation of EM spreads resulted in the finding that read-through rDNA spacer transcription beyond T1-2 termination sites (i.e., indicative of T3 transcription termination) can be visualized for the in vivo situation at a frequency of less than 3% of rRNA genes analyzed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1773661

  2. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo Defective Interfering-Like RNA of Influenza A H1N1 Pandemic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Saira, Kazima; Lin, Xudong; DePasse, Jay V.; Halpin, Rebecca; Twaddle, Alan; Stockwell, Timothy; Angus, Brian; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Delfino, Marina; Dugan, Vivien; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Freiberg, Matthew; Horban, Andrzej; Losso, Marcelo; Lynfield, Ruth; Wentworth, Deborah N.; Holmes, Edward C.; Davey, Richard; Wentworth, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus defective interfering (DI) particles are naturally occurring noninfectious virions typically generated during in vitro serial passages in cell culture of the virus at a high multiplicity of infection. DI particles are recognized for the role they play in inhibiting viral replication and for the impact they have on the production of infectious virions. To date, influenza virus DI particles have been reported primarily as a phenomenon of cell culture and in experimentally infected embryonated chicken eggs. They have also been isolated from a respiratory infection of chickens. Using a sequencing approach, we characterize several subgenomic viral RNAs from human nasopharyngeal specimens infected with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The distribution of these in vivo-derived DI-like RNAs was similar to that of in vitro DIs, with the majority of the defective RNAs generated from the PB2 (segment 1) of the polymerase complex, followed by PB1 and PA. The lengths of the in vivo-derived DI-like segments also are similar to those of known in vitro DIs, and the in vivo-derived DI-like segments share internal deletions of the same segments. The presence of identical DI-like RNAs in patients linked by direct contact is compatible with transmission between them. The functional role of DI-like RNAs in natural infections remains to be established. PMID:23678180

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Flavobacterium psychrophilum cultured In Vivo and In Iron-Limited Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease and the pathogenic mechanisms of this important fish pathogen are not fully understood. Identifying bacterial components expressed in vivo may lead to a better understanding of pathogenesis and provide targets for va...

  4. Protein Polymer MRI Contrast Agents: Longitudinal Analysis of Biomaterials In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Barron, Annelise E.

    of bioma- terials in vivo. As MRI is sensitive to the chemical and physical environment of water molecules,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- 1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid [Gd(III)-DOTA], have limited sensitivity (18). Attachment of multiple has been used to image multiple properties of hydrogels in tissue engi- neering that include promotion

  5. In vivo analysis of mechanical wall stress and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark F. Fillinger; M. L. Raghavan; Steven P. Marra; Jack L. Cronenwett; Francis E. Kennedy

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to calculate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall stresses in vivo for ruptured, symptomatic, and electively repaired AAAs with three-dimensional computer modeling techniques, computed tomographic scan data, and blood pressure and to compare wall stress with current clinical indices related to rupture risk. Methods: CT scans were analyzed for 48 patients with AAAs: 18

  6. Quantitative Analysis Reveals Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Repopulating Cells After Short-term Ex Vivo Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mickie Bhatia; Dominique Bonnet; Ursula Kapp; Jean C. Y. Wang; Barbara Murdoch; John E. Dick

    Summary Ex vivo culture of human hematopoietic cells is a crucial component of many therapeutic ap- plications. Although current culture conditions have been optimized using quantitative in vitro progenitor assays, knowledge of the conditions that permit maintenance of primitive human repopulating cells is lacking. We report that primitive human cells capable of repopulating nonobese diabetic (NOD)\\/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice

  7. Analysis of leaky viral translation termination codons in vivo by transient expression of improved ?-glucuronidase vectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James M. Skuzeski; Lindy M. Nichols; Raymond F. Gesteland

    1990-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses commonly exploit leaky translation termination signals in order to express internal protein coding regions. As a first step to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which ribosomes bypass leaky stop codons in vivo, we have devised a system in which readthrough is coupled to the transient expression of ß-glucuronidase (GUS) in tobacco protoplasts. GUS vectors that contain the stop

  8. Proteomic analysis of Flavobacterium psychrophilum cultured in vivo and in iron-limited media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease, and the pathogenic mechanisms of this important fish pathogen are not fully understood. Identifying bacterial genes of F. psychrophilum differentially expressed in vivo may lead to a better understanding of pathogen...

  9. Proteomic analysis of Flavobacterium psychrophilum cultured in vivo and in iron-limited media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease and the pathogenic mechanisms of this important fish pathogen are not fully understood. Identifying bacterial components expressed in vivo may lead to a better understanding of pathogenesis and provide targets for va...

  10. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  11. In Vivo Analysis Reveals That the Interdomain Region of the Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Is Important for DNA Replication and DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Amin, N. S.; Holm, C.

    1996-01-01

    To identify the regions of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) that are important for function in vivo, we used random mutagenesis to isolate 10 cold-sensitive (Cs(-)) and 31 methyl methanesulfonate-sensitive (Mms(s)) mutations of the PCNA gene (POL30) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unlike the Mms(s) mutations, the Cs(-) mutations are strikingly clustered in the interdomain region of the three-dimensional PCNA monomer structure. At the restrictive temperature, the Cs(-) pol30 mutants undergo a RAD9-dependent arrest as large-budded cells with a 2c DNA content. Defects in DNA synthesis are suggested by a significant delay in the progression of synchronized pol30 cells through S phase at the restrictive temperature. DNA repair defects are revealed by the observation that Cs(-) pol30 mutants are very sensitive to the alkylating agent MMS and mildly sensitive to ultraviolet radiation, although they are not sensitive to gamma radiation. Finally, analysis of the chromosomal DNA in pol30 cells by velocity sedimentation gradients shows that pol30 cells accumulate single-stranded DNA breaks at the restrictive temperature. Thus, our results show that PCNA plays an essential role in both DNA replication and DNA repair in vivo. PMID:8889514

  12. Longitudinal, 3D in vivo imaging of sebaceous glands by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy –normal function and response to cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yookyung; Tam, Joshua; Jalian, H. Ray; Anderson, R. Rox; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous glands perform complex functions, and are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Current techniques for studying sebaceous glands are mostly static in nature, whereas the gland’s main function – excretion of sebum via the holocrine mechanism – can only be evaluated over time. We present a longitudinal, real-time alternative – the in vivo, label-free imaging of sebaceous glands using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy, which is used to selectively visualize lipids. In mouse ears, CARS microscopy revealed dynamic changes in sebaceous glands during the holocrine secretion process, as well as in response to damage to the glands caused by cooling. Detailed gland structure, plus the active migration of individual sebocytes and cohorts of sebocytes were measured. Cooling produced characteristic changes in sebocyte structure and migration. This study demonstrates that CARS microscopy is a promising tool for studying the sebaceous gland and its associated disorders in three-dimensions in vivo. PMID:25026458

  13. Angiotensin II impairs endothelial progenitor cell number and function in vitro and in vivo: implications for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Endtmann, Cathleen; Ebrahimian, Talin; Czech, Thomas; Arfa, Omar; Laufs, Ulrich; Fritz, Mathias; Wassmann, Kerstin; Werner, Nikos; Petoumenos, Vasileios; Nickenig, Georg; Wassmann, Sven

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to endothelial regeneration. Angiotensin II (Ang II) through Ang II type 1 receptor (AT(1)-R) activation plays an important role in vascular damage. The effect of Ang II on EPCs and the involved molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Stimulation with Ang II decreased the number of cultured human early outgrowth EPCs, which express both AT(1)-R and Ang II type 2 receptor, mediated through AT(1)-R activation and induction of oxidative stress. Ang II redox-dependently induced EPC apoptosis through increased apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation; decreased Bcl-2 and increased Bax expression; and activation of caspase 3 but had no effect on the low cell proliferation. In addition, Ang II impaired colony-forming and migratory capacities of early outgrowth EPCs. Ang II infusion diminished numbers and functional capacities of EPCs in wild-type (WT) but not AT(1)a-R knockout mice (AT(1)a(-/-)). Reendothelialization after focal carotid endothelial injury was decreased during Ang II infusion. Salvage of reendothelialization by intravenous application of spleen-derived progenitor cells into Ang II-treated WT mice was pronounced with AT(1)a(-/-) cells compared with WT cells, and transfusion of Ang II-pretreated WT cells into WT mice without Ang II infusion was associated with less reendothelialization. Transplantation of AT(1)a(-/-) bone marrow reduced atherosclerosis development in cholesterol-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice compared with transplantation of apolipoprotein E-deficient or WT bone marrow. Randomized treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease with the AT(1)-R blocker telmisartan significantly increased the number of circulating CD34/KDR-positive EPCs. Ang II through AT(1)-R activation, oxidative stress, and redox-sensitive apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1-dependent proapoptotic pathways impairs EPCs in vitro and in vivo, resulting in diminished vascular regeneration. PMID:21825227

  14. Optimal T Cell Activation and B Cell Antibody Responses In Vivo Require the Interaction between Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 and Kindlin-3.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Vicky Louise; Uotila, Liisa M; Llort Asens, Marc; Savinko, Terhi; Fagerholm, Susanna Carola

    2015-07-01

    Kindlin-3 is an important integrin regulator that is mutated in the rare genetic disorder, leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III, a disorder characterized by defective neutrophil trafficking and platelet function, leading to recurrent bacterial infections and bleeding. Kindlin-3 is also known to regulate T cell adhesion in vitro and trafficking in vivo, but whether the integrin/kindlin interaction regulates T or B cell activation in vivo is unclear. In this study, we used TTT/AAA ?2-integrin knock-in (KI) mice and TCR-transgenic (OT-II) KI mice, in which the integrin/kindlin connection is disrupted, to investigate the role of the integrin/kindlin interaction in T cell activation. We show that basal T cell activation status in these animals in vivo is normal, but they display reduced T cell activation by wild-type Ag-loaded dendritic cells in vitro. In addition, T cell activation in vivo is reduced. We also show that basal Ab levels are normal in TTT/AAA ?2-integrin KI mice, but B cell numbers in lymph nodes and IgG and IgM production after immunization are reduced. In conclusion, we show that the integrin/kindlin interaction is required for trafficking of immune cells, as well as for T cell activation and B cell Ab responses in vivo. These results imply that the immunodeficiency found in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III patients, in addition to being caused by defects in neutrophil function, may be due, in part, to defects in lymphocyte trafficking and activation. PMID:25987740

  15. Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Functional Communication Training in an Early Childhood Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Irvin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Problem behavior is common in early childhood special education classrooms. Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) may reduce problem behavior but requires identification of its function. The trial-based functional analysis (FA) is a method that can be used to identify problem behavior function in schools. We conducted…

  16. Stochastic multiscale models for fracture analysis of functionally graded materials

    E-print Network

    Rahman, Sharif

    -intensity factors or accurate probability of fracture initiation. The concurrent multiscale model is sufficientlyStochastic multiscale models for fracture analysis of functionally graded materials Arindam three multiscale models, including sequential, invasive, and concurrent models, for fracture analysis

  17. a New System for Estimating Sclerosis of IN VIVO Common Carotid Artery by Ultrasound B-Mode Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogata, Fumio; Yokota, Yasunari; Kawamura, Yoko; Walsh, W. R.

    2009-08-01

    A new system has been developed for estimating sclerosis of in vivo common carotid artery by ultrasound B-mode (Brightness-mode) image analysis. The method is based on in vivo stiffness, Eth, calculated from the variation of carotid-duct-diameter with changing of systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In addition from the results of tensile and internal pressure burst test using in vitro human and animal arteries specimens, we found a correlation between in vitro Eths estimated from stress-strain curve of radial and tensile tests by subjecting step by step loads. Thus, using a correlation curve a technique for estimating in vivo Eth as well as tensile strength of carotid artery can be predicted. Then, to be a simple routine medical examination, a prototype software was developed, which is capable to measure the diameter changes by the image processing based on 30-image/s and one pixel size data (in case of the report, 0.0713 mm/pixel) of an ultrasound device. The total examination time for both sides of the common carotid arteries was within 300 seconds. To examine the validity of this technique, some clinical data is presented. The result indicated that the stiffness (Eth), strength, and critical burst pressure are useful symptom indices for arterial sclerosis, especially for finding the beginning sclerosis that would start early twenties.

  18. The impact of ex vivo clinical grade activation protocols on human T cell phenotype and function for the generation of genetically modified cells for adoptive cell transfer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Koya, Richard C.; Chodon, Thinle; Graham, Nicholas A.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Ribas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Optimized conditions for the ex vivo activation, genetic manipulation, and expansion of human lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy (ACT) may lead to protocols that maximize their in vivo function. We analyzed the effects of four clinical grade activation and expansion protocols over three weeks on cell proliferative rate, immunophenotype, cell metabolism, and transduction efficiency of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Peak lentiviral transduction efficiency was early (days 2 to 4), at a time when cells demonstrated a larger size, maximal uptake of metabolic substrates, and the highest level of proximal TCR signaling engagement. Anti-CD2/3/28 activation beads induced greater proliferation rate and skewed PBMCs early on to a CD4 phenotype when compared to the cells cultured in OKT3. Multicolor surface phenotyping demonstrated that changes in T cell surface markers that define T cell functional phenotypes were dependent on the time spent in culture as opposed to the particular activation protocol. In conclusion, ex vivo activation of human PBMCs for ACT demonstrate defined immunophenotypic and functional signatures over time, with cells early on showing larger sizes, higher transduction efficiency, maximal metabolic activity and ZAP-70 activation. PMID:20842061

  19. Reactive astrocytes as neural stem or progenitor cells: In vivo lineage, In vitro potential, and Genome-wide expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Götz, Magdalena; Sirko, Swetlana; Beckers, Johannes; Irmler, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Here, we review the stem cell hallmarks of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) during development and in some niches of the adult mammalian brain to then compare these with reactive astrocytes acquiring stem cell hallmarks after traumatic and ischemic brain injury. Notably, even endogenous NSCs including the earliest NSCs, the neuroepithelial cells, generate in most cases only a single type of progeny and self-renew only for a rather short time in vivo. In vitro, however, especially cells cultured under neurosphere conditions reveal a larger potential and long-term self-renewal under the influence of growth factors. This is rather well comparable to reactive astrocytes in the traumatic or ischemic brain some of which acquire neurosphere-forming capacity including multipotency and long-term self-renewal in vitro, while they remain within their astrocyte lineage in vivo. Both reactive astrocytes and endogenous NSCs exhibit stem cell hallmarks largely in vitro, but their lineage differs in vivo. Both populations generate largely a single cell type in vivo, but endogenous NSCs generate neurons and reactive astrocytes remain in the astrocyte lineage. However, at some early postnatal stages or in some brain regions reactive astrocytes can be released from this fate restriction, demonstrating that they can also enact neurogenesis. Thus, reactive astrocytes and NSCs share many characteristic hallmarks, but also exhibit key differences. This conclusion is further substantiated by genome-wide expression analysis comparing NSCs at different stages with astrocytes from the intact and injured brain parenchyma. GLIA 2015;63:1452-1468. PMID:25965557

  20. Effect of Perinatal secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on in vivo and intrinsic airway structure/function in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)], E-mail: jesse.joad@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Infants exposed to second hand smoke (SHS) experience more problems with wheezing. This study was designed to determine if perinatal SHS exposure increases intrinsic and/or in vivo airway responsiveness to methacholine and whether potential structural/cellular alterations in the airway might explain the change in responsiveness. Pregnant rhesus monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA) or SHS (1 mg/m{sup 3} total suspended particulates) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week starting at 50 days gestational age. The mother/infant pairs continued the SHS exposures postnatally. At 3 months of age each infant: 1) had in vivo lung function measurements in response to inhaled methacholine, or 2) the right accessory lobe filled with agarose, precision-cut to 600 {mu}m slices, and bathed in increasing concentrations of methacholine. The lumenal area of the central airway was determined using videomicrometry followed by fixation and histology with morphometry. In vivo tests showed that perinatal SHS increases baseline respiratory rate and decreases responsiveness to methacholine. Perinatal SHS did not alter intrinsic airway responsiveness in the bronchi. However in respiratory bronchioles, SHS exposure increased airway responsiveness at lower methacholine concentrations but decreased it at higher concentrations. Perinatal SHS did not change eosinophil profiles, epithelial volume, smooth muscle volume, or mucin volume. However it did increase the number of alveolar attachments in bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In general, as mucin increased, airway responsiveness decreased. We conclude that perinatal SHS exposure alters in vivo and intrinsic airway responsiveness, and alveolar attachments.

  1. Analysis of ECs and related compounds in plasma: artifactual isomerization and ex vivo enzymatic generation of 2-MGs[S

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Antoni; Farré, Magí; Fitó, Montserrat; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of peripheral endocannabinoids (ECs) is a good biomarker of the EC system. Their concentrations, from clinical studies, strongly depend on sample collection and time processing conditions taking place in clinical and laboratory settings. The analysis of 2-monoacylglycerols (MGs) (i.e., 2-arachidonoylglycerol or 2-oleoylglycerol) is a particularly challenging issue because of their ex vivo formation and chemical isomerization that occur after blood sample collection. We provide evidence that their ex vivo formation can be minimized by adding Orlistat, an enzymatic lipase inhibitor, to plasma. Taking into consideration the low cost of Orlistat, we recommend its addition to plasma collecting tubes while maintaining sample cold chain until storage. We have validated a method for the determination of the EC profile of a range of MGs and N-acylethanolamides in plasma that preserves the original isomer ratio of MGs. Nevertheless, the chemical isomerization of 2-MGs can only be avoided by an immediate processing and analysis of samples due to their instability during conservation. We believe that this new methodology can aid in the harmonization of the measurement of ECs and related compounds in clinical samples. PMID:24610889

  2. Generalized Correlation Analysis of Vectorial Boolean Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude Carlet; Khoongming Khoo; Chu-wee Lim; Chuan-wen Loe

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the security of n-bit to m-bit vectorial Boolean functions in stream ciphers. Such stream ciphers have higher through- put than those using single-bit output Boolean functions. However, as shown by Zhang and Chan at Crypto 2000, linear approximations based on composing the vector output with any Boolean functions have higher bias than those based on the usual correlation

  3. Analysis of affinely equivalent Boolean functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qingshu Meng; Huanguo Zhang; Min Yang; Zhangyi Wang

    2007-01-01

    By some basic transforms and invariant theory, we give two results: 1) an algorithm, which can be used to judge if two Boolean\\u000a functions are affinely equivalent and to obtain the equivalence relationship if they are equivalent. This is useful in studying\\u000a Boolean functions and in engineering. For example, we classify all 8-variable homogeneous bent functions of degree 3 into

  4. Status Epilepticus Induced Spontaneous Dentate Gyrus Spikes: In Vivo Current Source Density Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sean P.; Barrier, Sylvain; Scott, Rod C.; Lenck- Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Holmes, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is considered to function as an inhibitory gate limiting excitatory input to the hippocampus. Following status epilepticus (SE), this gating function is reduced and granule cells become hyper-excitable. Dentate spikes (DS) are large amplitude potentials observed in the dentate gyrus (DG) of normal animals. DS are associated with membrane depolarization of granule cells, increased activity of hilar interneurons and suppression of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell firing. Therefore, DS could act as an anti-excitatory mechanism. Because of the altered gating function of the dentate gyrus following SE, we sought to investigate how DS are affected following pilocarpine-induced SE. Two weeks following lithium-pilocarpine SE induction, hippocampal EEG was recorded in male Sprague-Dawley rats with 16-channel silicon probes under urethane anesthesia. Probes were placed dorso-ventrally to encompass either CA1-CA3 or CA1-DG layers. Large amplitude spikes were detected from EEG recordings and subject to current source density analysis. Probe placement was verified histologically to evaluate the anatomical localization of current sinks and the origin of DS. In 9 of 11 pilocarpine-treated animals and two controls, DS were confirmed with large current sinks in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. DS frequency was significantly increased in pilocarpine-treated animals compared to controls. Additionally, in pilocarpine-treated animals, DS displayed current sinks in the outer, middle and/or inner molecular layers. However, there was no difference in the frequency of events when comparing between layers. This suggests that following SE, DS can be generated by input from medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, or within the dentate gyrus. DS were associated with an increase in multiunit activity in the granule cell layer, but no change in CA1. These results suggest that following SE there is an increase in DS activity, potentially arising from hyperexcitability along the hippocampal-entorhinal pathway or within the dentate gyrus itself. PMID:26148195

  5. Quantitative Analysis of ()-N-11C-Propyl- Norapomorphine In Vivo Binding in Nonhuman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajesh Narendran; Yiyun Huang; Mark Slifstein; Peter S. Talbot; Yasuhiko Sudo; Bart N. Van Berckel; Lawrence S. Kegeles; Diana Martinez; Marc Laruelle

    ()-N-11C-propyl-norapomorphine (11C-NPA) is a new dopa- mine agonist PET radiotracer that holds potential for imaging the high-affinity states of dopamine D2-like receptors in the living brain. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate analytic strategies to derive in vivo 11C-NPA binding parame- ters. Methods: Two baboons were scanned 4 times after 11C- NPA injections. The metabolite-corrected arterial

  6. Comparative in vitro-in vivo correlation analysis with pioglitazone tablets

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sajal Kumar; Chowdhury, A. K. Azad; Bachar, Sitesh Chandra; Das, Sreedam Chandra; Kuddus, Ruhul H.; Uddin, Md Aftab

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the in vitro-in vivo correlation of immediate release formulation of pioglitazone 30 mg film coated tablet. Methods In vitro release data were obtained for test and reference formulation using the USP paddle method (Apparatus 2) at 50 r/min and with the temperature of 37 °C in the dissolution medium of 0.1 mol/L hydrochloric acid of pH 1.2. Twelve healthy volunteers were administered both test and reference pioglitazone 30 mg tablet orally and blood samples were collected over 24 h period. In vivo drug concentrations were analyzed by a simple, fast and precise reverse phase binary HPLC method with UV detection to establish a correlation between in vitro release and in vivo absorption data. Results Similarity factor (f2) and dissimilarity factor (f1) were determined for the time intervals of 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 min and the obtained values were 65.17%, 59.37%, 63.62%, 66.61%, 68.89%, 70.73%, 72.27%, 73.59%, 74.65% and 75.67% for f2 and 9.43%, 9.00%, 5.42%, 3.86%, 3.07%, 2.56%, 2.20%, 1.94%, 1.82% and 1.65% for f1 at respective time intervals. Mean dissolution time for test and reference products were obtained at 3.06 and 3.40 min respectively. f2 and f1 values obtained were within the acceptable range f2 (50%-100%) and f1 (<15%). Conclusions Comparison of dissolution profiles corroborate that the test and reference formulations are similar and there is no linear in vitro-in vivo correlation.

  7. Principal components analysis of FT-Raman spectra of ex vivo basal cell carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Airton A. Martin; Renata A. Bitar Carter; Lilian de Oliveira Nunes; Emilia A. Loschiavo Arisawa; Landulfo Silveira Jr.

    2004-01-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy is a modern analytical tool and it is believed that its use for skin cancer diagnosis will lead to several advantages for patients, e.g., faster results and a minimization of invasivity. This article reports results of an ex Vivo study of the FT-Raman spectra regarding differentiation between non-diseased and malignant human skin lesions, Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC). A

  8. Patient dose analysis in total body irradiation through in vivo dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, K; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Muthukumaran, M; Bhuvaneshwari, N; Velmurugan, J

    2012-10-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is a special radiotherapy technique, administered prior to bone marrow transplantation. Due to the complex nature of the treatment setup, in vivo dosimetry for TBI is mandatory to ensure proper delivery of the intended radiation dose throughout the body. Lithium fluoride (LiF) TLD-100 chips are used for the TBI in vivo dosimetry. Results obtained from the in vivo dosimetry of 20 patients are analyzed. Results obtained from forehead, abdomen, pelvis, and mediastinum showed a similar pattern with the average measured dose from 96 to 97% of the prescription dose. Extremities and chest received a dose greater than the prescription dose in many instances (more than 20% of measurements). Homogeneous dose delivery to the whole body is checked by calculating the mean dose with standard deviation for each fraction. Reasons for the difference between prescription dose and measured dose for each site are discussed. Dose homogeneity within ±10% is achieved using our in-house TBI protocol. PMID:23293453

  9. A quantitative look inside the body: minimally invasive infrared analysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vran?i?, Christian; Kröger, Niels; Gretz, Norbert; Neudecker, Sabine; Pucci, Annemarie; Petrich, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Today's minimally invasive biosensors are often based on chemical reagents and suffer from, e.g., oxygen dependence, toxic reaction products, excess analyte consumption, and/or degradation of the reagents. Here, we show the first successful analyte quantification by means of a minimally invasive sensor in vivo, which does not use chemical reactions. The concentration of glucose is determined continuously in vivo using transcutaneous, fiber-based mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. When comparing the infrared data measured in vivo with the 127 reference readings of glucose obtained in vitro, an overall standard deviation of 17.5% and a median of the absolute values of the relative deviations of 11.0% are achieved. The encouraging results open up the path toward a reagent-free long-term implant for the continuous surveillance of metabolites. In addition, the high sampling rate facilitates important research in body metabolism as well as its application outside the field of medicine such as real-time analyte sensing during fermentation. PMID:25329042

  10. Studying articulatory variability using Functional Data Analysis Laura L. Koenig*

    E-print Network

    Lucero, Jorge Carlos

    motor system. Here, we assess speech production variability using Functional Data Analysis (FDA). In FDA is not fully known. Current theories of motor control [7] suggest that knowing the regions of variabilityStudying articulatory variability using Functional Data Analysis Laura L. Koenig* , Jorge C. Lucero

  11. Multiscale Voice Morphing Using Radial Basis Function Analysis

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Multiscale Voice Morphing Using Radial Basis Function Analysis Christina Orphanidou12 , Irene M voice morphing algorithm using radial basis function (RBF) analysis is presented in this paper in voice morphing. The aim of this algorithm is to transform one person's speech pattern so

  12. The alteration of profile analysis to accommodate testing functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a methodology was studied for testing differences among several pilot functions, where the data points represent averages at various frequencies. Topics discussed include: basic assumptions, hypothesis, profile analysis, alteration of profile analysis to accommodate testing functions, test and procedures, and power of tests.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Jesus

    Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis Ildefonso M. De la glycolysis. Citation: De la Fuente IM, Cortes JM (2012) Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis. PLoS ONE 7(2): e30162. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0030162 Editor: Christos A

  14. Analysis of Computer Intrusions Using Sequences of Function Calls

    E-print Network

    Bishop, Matt

    that have previously occurred [1]. The problem of computer forensics is not simply finding a needleAnalysis of Computer Intrusions Using Sequences of Function Calls Sean Peisert, Student Member demonstrates the value of analyzing sequences of function calls for forensic analysis. Although this approach

  15. In vivo topographic analysis of lumbar facet joint space width distribution in healthy and symptomatic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Peter; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Andersson, Gunnar B. J.; An, Howard S.; Inoue, Nozomu

    2013-01-01

    Study Design In vivo three-dimensional facet joint space width measurement. Objective To determine lumbar facet joint space width within clinically relevant topographical zones in vivo and its correlations with age, level and presence of lower back pain symptoms. Summary of Background Data Narrowing of the facet joint gap, articular cartilage thinning, and subarticular cortical bone hypertrophy are frequently observed age-related changes. Facet joint space width is a well-defined parameter to evaluate osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no other study that quantifies three-dimensional facet joint space width distribution in vivo. Methods Three-dimensional measurement to quantify facet joint space width distribution based on five clinically relevant topographic zones in a cohort of healthy and symptomatic low-back-pain volunteers using subject-based three-dimensional CT models with respect to spinal level, subject age, gender and presence/absence of lower back pain. Results Facet joint space width was 1.93±0.51 (mean ± standard deviation) mm for the central zone, 1.75±0.48 mm for the superior zone, 1.63±0.49 mm for the inferior zone, 1.48±0.44 mm for the medial and 1.65±0.48 mm for the lateral zone, respectively. There were no significant differences between right and left facet joints. Males showed larger space width than females. Overall, space width of symptomatic subjects was significantly narrower when compared against the asymptomatic group. Facet joints in the peripheral zones were narrower than in the central zone. Age-group comparisons showed local narrowing occurring as early as in the third decade at the inferior zone of L5/S1 with all the remaining zones implicated after the fourth decade. Conclusions This in vivo study shows variations in facet joint space width narrowing with spinal level and region within the facet joint and in vivo evidence of localized, age-influenced facet cartilage thinning. Techniques developed in this study may be applied in the detection of early osteoarthritis-related changes in the facet joints. PMID:22433501

  16. Microfluidic Chip for High Efficiency Electrophoretic Analysis of Segmented Flow from a Microdialysis Probe and in Vivo Chemical Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Roman, Gregory T.; Perry, Maura L.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An effective method for in vivo chemical monitoring is to couple sampling probes, such as microdialysis, to on-line analytical methods. A limitation of this approach is that in vivo chemical dynamics may be distorted by flow and diffusion broadening during transfer from sampling probe to analytical system. Converting a homogenous sample stream to segmented flow can prevent such broadening. We have developed a system for coupling segmented microdialysis flow with chip-based electrophoresis. In this system, the dialysis probe is integrated with a PDMS chip that merges dialysate with fluorogenic reagent and segments the flow into 8–10 nL plugs at 0.3–0.5 Hz separated by perfluorodecalin. The plugs flow to a glass chip where they are extracted to an aqueous stream and analyzed by electrophoresis with fluorescence detection. The novel extraction system connects the segmented flow to an electrophoresis sampling channel by a shallow and hydrophilic extraction bridge that removes the entire aqueous droplet from the oil stream. With this approach, temporal resolution was 35 s and independent of distance between sampling and analysis. Electrophoretic analysis produced separation with 223,000 ± 21,000 theoretical plates, 4.4% RSD in peak height, and detection limits of 90–180 nM for six amino acids. This performance was made possible by three key elements: 1) reliable transfer of plug flow to a glass chip; 2) efficient extraction of aqueous plugs from segmented flow; and 3) electrophoretic injection suitable for high efficiency separation with minimal dilution of sample. The system was used to detect rapid concentration changes evoked by infusing glutamate uptake inhibitor into the striatum of anesthetized rats. These results demonstrate the potential of incorporating segmented flow into separations-based sensing schemes for studying chemical dynamics in vivo with improved temporal resolution. PMID:19803495

  17. [Effects and mechanisms of hyperoside on vascular endothelium function in middle cerebral arteries of rats ex vivo].

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Xuan, Jia-li; Hu, Hao-ran; Chen, Zhi-wu

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of hyperoside (Hyp) on the vascular endothelium function in middle cerebral artery (MCA) ex vivo in rats. Isolated arterial segments from MCAs of rats were used for surveying vasomotoricity in a pressurized chamber. Transmembrane potential was recorded by using glass microelectrodes to evaluate hyperpolarization. Hyp (1 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-4) mol . L-1) was utilized to observe the effect on 1 x 10(-7) mol . L-1 U46619-preconstricted MCA in rats. The results showed that 1 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-4) mol . L-1 Hyp significantly induced concentration-dependent vasodilatation and hyperpolarization, leading to the maximal diastolic ratio of (73. 2 ± 6. 1)% and maximal changes in membrane potentials of (-13. 2 ± 2. 2) mV. Hyp still elicited vasorelaxation and hyperpolarization by removal of endothelium in MCA of rat, which was notably attenuated as compared with vascular endothelium-intact group (P <0. 01). In the MCAs preconstricted by U46619 (1 x 10(-7) mol . L-1), Hyp (1 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-4) mol . L-1) produced concentration-dependent vasorelaxation and hyperpolarizition that were partially attenuated by 3 x 10(-5) mol . L-1 L-NAME(a NOS inhibitor) plus 1 x 10(-5) mol . L-1 PGI2 ,(a synthetase inhibitor). The residual effects were further decreased by 1 x 10(-3) mol . L-1 TEA (an inhibitor of Ca2+-activated potassium channel) or 1 x 10(-5) mol . L-1 PPG (a blocker of endogenous H2S synthese-CSE). Similarly, 1 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-3) mol . L-1 NaHS (a donor of exogenous H2S) or 1 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-3) mol . L-1 L-Cys (the substrate of endogenous H2S synthesis) obviously evoked dose-dependent vasodilatation and hyperpolarization of MCA in rats. These findings indicated that Hyp may induce endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent responses. And the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation may be related to the increases of endogenous H2S that has been promoted Hyp in the endotheliocyte of MCAs, and activated Kca and opening of Kca channels, resulting in the hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle cell membrane and subsequent reduction of Ca2+ influx and vasodilation. PMID:25898590

  18. Penalized spline models for functional principal component analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fang Yao; Thomas C. M. Lee

    2006-01-01

    We propose an iterative estimation procedure for performing functional principal component analysis. The procedure aims at functional or longitudinal data where the repeated measurements from the same subject are correlated. An increasingly popular smoothing approach, penalized spline regression, is used to represent the mean function. This allows straightforward incorporation of covariates and simple implementation of approximate inference procedures for coefficients.

  19. Functional Analysis of Separate Topographies of Aberrant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, K. Mark; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A functional analysis of distinct topographies of aberrant behavior displayed by 4 individuals (ages 6-28) with moderate to profound mental retardation indicated that hypotheses of separate functions for distinct behaviors can be generated using both extended and brief functional analyses when results are graphed in the aggregate and separated by…

  20. Measures of Boolean Function Complexity Based on Harmonic Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Bernasconi; Bruno Codenotti

    1994-01-01

    In this paper We study some measures of complexity for Boolean functions based on Abstract Harmonic Analysis. More precisely, we extend the notion of average sensitivity of Boolean functions and introduce the generalized sensitivity (or k-sensitivity) which accounts for the changes in the function value when k input bits are flipped. We find the connection between k-sensitivity and Fourier coefficients.

  1. Energy function analysis of dynamic programming neural networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chinchuan Chiu; Chia-Yiu Maa; Michael A. Shanblatt

    1991-01-01

    All analytical examination of the energy function associated with a dynamic programming neural network is presented. The analysis is carried out in two steps. First, the locations and numbers of the minimum states for different components of the energy function are investigated in the extreme cases. A clearer insight into the energy function can be gained through the minimum states

  2. The Evaluation Report of SHA256 Crypt Analysis Hash Function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Selvakumar; C. S. Ganadhas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the study of cryptographic hash functions, one of the most important classes of primitives used in recent techniques in cryptography. The main aim is the development of recent crypt analysis hash function. We present different approaches to defining security properties more formally and present basic attack on hash function. We recall Merkle-Damgard security properties of iterated

  3. CLASSROOM APPLICATION OF A TRIAL-BASED FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Sarah E; Iwata, Brian A; Fritz, Jennifer N; Roscoe, Eileen M; Carreau, Abbey B

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated a trial-based approach to conducting functional analyses in classroom settings. Ten students referred for problem behavior were exposed to a series of assessment trials, which were interspersed among classroom activities throughout the day. Results of these trial-based functional analyses were compared to those of more traditional functional analyses. Outcomes of both assessments showed correspondence in 6 of the 10 cases and partial correspondence in a 7th case. Results of the standard functional analysis suggested reasons for obtained differences in 2 cases of noncorrespondence, which were verified when portions of the trial-based functional analyses were modified and repeated. These results indicate that a trial-based functional analysis may be a viable assessment method when resources needed to conduct a standard functional analysis are unavailable. Implications for classroom-based assessment methodologies and future directions for research are discussed. PMID:21541140

  4. Task Analysis and the Design of Functionality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Kieras

    1997-01-01

    Task analysis is the process of understanding the user's task thoroughly enough to help design a computer system that will effectively support users in doing the task. By task is meant the user's job or work activities, what the user is attempting to accomplish. By analysis is meant a relatively systematic approach to understanding the user's task that goes beyond

  5. Mutational and functional analysis reveals ADAMTS18 metalloproteinase as a novel driver in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaomu; Prickett, Todd D; Viloria, Cristina G; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lin, Jimmy C; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Cruz, Pedro; Rosenberg, Steven A; Davies, Michael A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; López-Otín, Carlos; Samuels, Yardena

    2010-11-01

    The disintegrin-metalloproteinases with thrombospondin domains (ADAMTS) genes have been suggested to function as tumor suppressors as several have been found to be epigenetically silenced in various cancers. We performed a mutational analysis of the ADAMTS gene family in human melanoma and identified a large fraction of melanomas to harbor somatic mutations. To evaluate the functional consequences of the most commonly mutated gene, ADAMTS18, six of its mutations were biologically examined. ADAMTS18 mutations had little effect on melanoma cell growth under standard conditions, but reduced cell dependence on growth factors. ADAMTS18 mutations also reduced adhesion to laminin and increased migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Melanoma cells expressing mutant ADAMTS18 had reduced cell migration after short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of ADAMTS18, suggesting that ADAMTS18 mutations promote growth, migration, and metastasis in melanoma. PMID:21047771

  6. Fetal Calf Serum-Free Generation of Functionally Active Murine Dendritic Cells Suitable for In Vivo Therapeutic Approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Müller; Anke Müller; Helmut Jonuleit; Kerstin Steinbrink; Claudia Szalma; Lydia Paragnik; Karen Lingnau; Edgar Schmidt; Jürgen Knop; Alexander H. Enk

    2000-01-01

    Standard protocols to generate mouse dendritic cells (DC) generally use culture medium supplemented with fetal calf serum; however, reinjection in vivo of DC cultured in fetal calf serum results in priming to xenogeneic proteins that clearly limits the use of such DC. We therefore established a fetal calf serum-free culture system for the generation of murine DC from bone marrow

  7. Ex vivo promoter analysis of antiviral heat shock cognate 70B gene in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seokyoung; Sim, Cheolho; Byrd, Brian D; Collins, Frank H; Hong, Young S

    2008-01-01

    Background The Anopheles gambiae heat shock cognate gene (hsc70B) encodes a constitutively expressed protein in the hsp70 family and it functions as a molecular chaperone for protein folding. However, the expression of hsc70B can be further induced by certain stimuli such as heat shock and infection. We previously demonstrated that the An. gambiae hsc70B is induced during o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV) infection and subsequently suppresses ONNV replication in the mosquito. To further characterize the inducibility of hsc70B by ONNV infection in An. gambiae, we cloned a 2.6-kb region immediately 5' upstream of the starting codon of hsc70B into a luciferase reporter vector (pGL3-Basic), and studied its promoter activity in transfected Vero cells during infection with o'nyong-nyong, West Nile and La Crosse viruses. Results Serial deletion analysis of the hsc70B upstream sequence revealed that the putative promoter is likely located in a region 1615–2150 bp upstream of the hsc70B starting codon. Sequence analysis of this region revealed transcriptional regulatory elements for heat shock element-binding protein (HSE-bind), nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), dorsal (Dl) and fushi-tarazu (Ftz). Arbovirus infection, regardless of virus type, significantly increased the hsc70B promoter activity in transfected Vero cells. Conclusion Our results further validate the transcriptional activation of hsc70B during arbovirus infection and support the role of specific putative regulatory elements. Induction by three taxonomically distinct arboviruses suggests that the HSC70B protein may be expressed to cope with cellular stress imposed during infection. PMID:18986525

  8. In vivo effects of cyclic administration of 15-deoxyspergualin on leucocyte function in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Kälsch, A-I; Schmitt, W H; Breedijk, A; Marinaki, S; Weigerding, S; Nebe, T C; Nemoto, K; van der Woude, F J; Yard, B A; Birck, R

    2006-12-01

    15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an alternative treatment modality for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) patients refractory to conventional treatment. Nevertheless, it is unclear how DSG modulates disease activity in these patients. This study was conducted to investigate which parameters of adaptive and acquired immunity were influenced during two subsequent cycles of DSG treatment. Emphasis was put upon T cell and monocyte activation, neutrophil function and surface expression of proteinase-3 (PR-3). Anti-CD3/anti-CD28 and interleukin (IL)-15/IL-7-mediated T cell proliferation were assessed by fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis using carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CSFE) labelling. Interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-10 production were determined in the supernatants of these cultures by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Monocyte activation was assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood, using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha as read-out. Neutrophil function was determined by measuring oxidative burst, chemotaxis and phagocytosis. T cell activation markers and PR3 expression were measured by FACS. All parameters were determined directly before and after each DSG cycle. Anti-CD3/anti-CD28-mediated T cell proliferation was reduced directly after DSG treatment. Directly before a subsequent cycle of DSG was started, T cell proliferation was increased. Similar findings were observed for IFN-gamma and IL-10 production by T cells. DSG did not influence IL-15/IL-7-mediated T cell proliferation. LPS-mediated TNF-alpha production was also impaired directly after DSG treatment. No influence on T cell activation markers, neutrophil function and surface PR-3 expression was observed in peripheral blood of these patients. Our data demonstrate that DSG influences T cell and monocyte activation in a reversible fashion. Although DSG causes neutropenia in these patients, it does not influence neutrophil function. PMID:17100765

  9. An ANOVA-Like Rasch Analysis of Differential Item Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung

    The conventional two-group differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is extended to an analysis of variance-like (ANOVA-like) DIF analysis where multiple factors with multiple groups are compared simultaneously. Moreover, DIF is treated as a parameter to be estimated rather than simply a sign to be detected. This proposed approach allows the…

  10. Measuring system for in vivo recording of force systems in orthodontic treatment-concept and analysis of accuracy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, D; Rosarius, N; Rau, G; Diedrich, P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of our developments is three-dimensional in vivo recording of those orthodontic force systems inducing tooth movements during treatment with fixed appliances. The concept presented here is the first to permit the forces and torques of these statically multiply undetermined systems to be recorded in vivo. For this purpose the force systems transmitted to the teeth from the archwire are isolated from the respective tooth by means of divisible special-design brackets and introduced into a 3D force torque sensor via a gripping appliance. The sensor is fixed with a purpose-developed device relative to the patient's dental arch. The patient's head is positioned relative to the system by means of a bite fork as well as a forehead and chin support. Electrical measurement of the mechanical quantities is carried out by a six-axis force torque sensor with semiconductor strain gauge elements, an electronical evaluator and a mobile measuring computer (PC). Extensive calibration of the sensor system has shown that the measuring uncertainty of the electrical measuring is less than 2%. Precise spatial fixing of bracket slot and archwire in the therapeutic position is crucial to the measuring accuracy of the system, as even minimum displacements affect the force system to be measured. Movements of the measuring system up to 0.04 mm result from a therapeutic force of 1.5 N. The results of extensive in vitro studies have already demonstrated that the system developed by us is suitable for the specified in vivo measuring function. PMID:10050954

  11. Lambert W-function in Statistical Distributions and Reliability Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. N. Rathie

    Lambert W-function is relatively a new special function with applications in various areas of mathematics and engineering. In this paper, some new applications of W-function are given for logarithmic series and generalized gamma (one and two sided) distributions and for optimal maintenance time for repairable systems in Reliability Analysis. Computation of W-function, with good precision, is already available in Mathematica

  12. Functional Analysis for Double Shell Tank (DST) Subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, D.F.

    2000-08-22

    This functional analysis identifies the hierarchy and describes the subsystem functions that support the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System described in HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System. Because of the uncertainty associated with the need for upgrades of the existing catch tanks supporting the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission, catch tank functions are not addressed in this document. The functions identified herein are applicable to the Phase 1 WFD mission only.

  13. Preserved endothelium-dependent dilatation of the coronary microvasculature at the early phase of diabetes mellitus despite the increased oxidative stress and depressed cardiac mechanical function ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been accumulating evidence associating diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular dysfunctions. However, most of the studies are focused on the late stages of diabetes and on the function of large arteries. This study aimed at characterizing the effects of the early phase of diabetes mellitus on the cardiac and vascular function with focus on the intact coronary microvasculature and the oxidative stress involved. Materials and methods Zucker diabetic fatty rats and their lean littermates fed with standard diet A04 (Safe) were studied at the 11th week of age. Biochemical parameters such as glucose, insulin and triglycerides levels as well as their oxidative stress status were measured. Their hearts were perfused ex vivo according to Langendorff and their cardiac activity and coronary microvascular reactivity were evaluated. Results Zucker fatty rats already exhibited a diabetic state at this age as demonstrated by the elevated levels of plasma glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin and triglycerides. The ex vivo perfusion of their hearts revealed a decreased cardiac mechanical function and coronary flow. This was accompanied by an increase in the overall oxidative stress of the organs. However, estimation of the active form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and coronary reactivity indicated a preserved function of the coronary microvessels at this phase of the disease. Diabetes affected also the cardiac membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition by increasing the arachidonic acid and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids levels. Conclusions The presence of diabetes, even at its beginning, significantly increased the overall oxidative stress of the organs resulting to decreased cardiac mechanical activity ex vivo. However, adaptations were adopted at this early phase of the disease regarding the preserved coronary microvascular reactivity and the associated cardiac phospholipid composition in order to provide a certain protection to the heart. PMID:23530768

  14. Drosophila melanogaster dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: the N-terminus is important for biological function in vivo but not for catalytic properties in vitro.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Monika; Knecht, Wolfgang; Rawls, John; Ullrich, Alexandra; Dietz, Carsten

    2002-09-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.99.11), the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis, is an integral flavoprotein of the inner mitchondrial membrane and is functionally connected to the respiratory chain. Here, experiments have been directed toward determining the roles of the N-terminal sequence motifs both in enzymatic properties of insect DHODH produced in vitro and the in vivo function of the protein. Full-length and three N-terminal truncated derivatives of the Drosophila melanogaster enzyme were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. For identification on Western blots of recombinant DHODH as well as the native enzyme from flies polyclonal anti-DHODH immunoglobulins were generated and affinity-purified. The enzymatic characteristics of the four versions of DHODH were very similar, indicating that the N-terminus of the enzyme does not influence its catalytic function or its susceptibility to prominent DHODH inhibitors: A77-1726, brequinar, dichloroallyl-lawsone and redoxal. Whereas the efficacy of A77-1726 and dichloroallyl-lawsone were similar with Drosophila and human DHODH, that of brequinar and redoxal differed significantly. The differences in responses of insect DHODH and the enzyme from other species may allow the design of new agents that will selectively control insect growth, due to pyrimidine nucleotide limitation. In vivo expression of the full-length and N-truncated DHODHs from engineered transgenes revealed that the truncated proteins could not support normal de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis during development of the fly (i.e., failure to complement dhod-null mutations), apparently due to instability of the truncated proteins. It is concluded that the proper intracellular localization, directed by the N-terminal targeting and transmembrane motifs, is required for stability and subsequent proper biological function in vivo. PMID:12213251

  15. Tissue Engineering Special Feature: A macroporous hydrogel for the coculture of neural progenitor and endothelial cells to form functional vascular networks in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Millicent C.; Bertram, James P.; Royce Hynes, Sara; Michaud, Michael; Li, Qi; Young, Michael; Segal, Steven S.; Madri, Joseph A.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2006-02-01

    A microvascular network is critical for the survival and function of most tissues. We have investigated the potential of neural progenitor cells to augment the formation and stabilization of microvascular networks in a previously uncharacterized three-dimensional macroporous hydrogel and the ability of this engineered system to develop a functional microcirculation in vivo. The hydrogel is synthesized by cross-linking polyethylene glycol with polylysine around a salt-leached polylactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold that is degraded in a sodium hydroxide solution. An open macroporous network is formed that supports the efficient formation of tubular structures by brain endothelial cells. After subcutaneous implantation of hydrogel cocultures in mice, blood flow in new microvessels was apparent at 2 weeks with perfused networks established on the surface of implants at 6 weeks. Compared to endothelial cells cultured alone, cocultures of endothelial cells and neural progenitor cells had a significantly greater density of tubular structures positive for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 at the 6-week time point. In implant cross sections, the presence of red blood cells in vessel lumens confirmed a functional microcirculation. These findings indicate that neural progenitor cells promote the formation of endothelial cell tubes in coculture and the development of a functional microcirculation in vivo. We demonstrate a previously undescribed strategy for creating stable microvascular networks to support engineered tissues of desired parenchymal cell origin. microvasculature | neural stem cells | polymer | scaffold

  16. miR-31 Functions as a Negative Regulator of Lymphatic Vascular Lineage-Specific Differentiation In Vitro and Vascular Development In Vivo? †

    PubMed Central

    Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M.; Karpanen, Terhi; Dabouras, Vasilios; Jurisic, Giorgia; van de Hoek, Glenn; Shin, Jay W.; Marino, Daniela; Kälin, Roland E.; Leidel, Sebastian; Cinelli, Paolo; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Brändli, André W.; Detmar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system maintains tissue fluid homeostasis, helps mediate afferent immune responses, and promotes cancer metastasis. To address the role microRNAs (miRNAs) play in the development and function of the lymphatic vascular system, we defined the in vitro miRNA expression profiles of primary human lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and blood vascular endothelial cells (BVECs) and identified four BVEC signature and two LEC signature miRNAs. Their vascular lineage-specific expression patterns were confirmed in vivo by quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. Functional characterization of the BVEC signature miRNA miR-31 identified a novel BVEC-specific posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism that inhibits the expression of lymphatic lineage-specific transcripts in vitro. We demonstrate that suppression of lymphatic differentiation is partially mediated via direct repression of PROX1, a transcription factor that functions as a master regulator of lymphatic lineage-specific differentiation. Finally, in vivo studies of Xenopus and zebrafish demonstrated that gain of miR-31 function impaired venous sprouting and lymphatic vascular development, thus highlighting the importance of miR-31 as a negative regulator of lymphatic development. Collectively, our findings identify miR-31 is a potent regulator of vascular lineage-specific differentiation and development in vertebrates. PMID:20479124

  17. Proteomic Analysis of the Human Skin Proteome after In Vivo Treatment with Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Erika; Skipp, Paul; Aleksic, Maja; Garrow, Andrew; Dadd, Tony; Hughes, Michael; Clough, Geraldine; O?Connor, C. David

    2014-01-01

    Background Skin has a variety of functions that are incompletely understood at the molecular level. As the most accessible tissue in the body it often reveals the first signs of inflammation or infection and also represents a potentially valuable source of biomarkers for several diseases. In this study we surveyed the skin proteome qualitatively using gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) and quantitatively using an isobaric tagging strategy (iTRAQ) to characterise the response of human skin following exposure to sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Results A total of 653 skin proteins were assigned, 159 of which were identified using GeLC-MS/MS and 616 using iTRAQ, representing the most comprehensive proteomic study in human skin tissue. Statistical analysis of the available iTRAQ data did not reveal any significant differences in the measured skin proteome after 4 hours exposure to the model irritant SDS. Conclusions This study represents the first step in defining the critical response to an irritant at the level of the proteome and provides a valuable resource for further studies at the later stages of irritant exposure. PMID:24849295

  18. Modal analysis of the human neck in vivo as a criterion for crash test dummy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willinger, R.; Bourdet, N.; Fischer, R.; Le Gall, F.

    2005-10-01

    Low speed rear impact remains an acute automative safety problem because of a lack of knowledge of the mechanical behaviour of the human neck early after impact. Poorly validated mathematical models of the human neck or crash test dummy necks make it difficult to optimize automotive seats and head rests. In this study we have constructed an experimental and theoretical modal analysis of the human head-neck system in the sagittal plane. The method has allowed us to identify the mechanical properties of the neck and to validate a mathematical model in the frequency domain. The extracted modal characteristics consist of a first natural frequency at 1.3±0.1 Hz associated with head flexion-extension motion and a second mode at 8±0.7 Hz associated with antero-posterior translation of the head, also called retraction motion. Based on this new validation parameters we have been able to compare the human and crash test dummy frequency response functions and to evaluate their biofidelity. Three head-neck systems of current test dummies dedicated for use in rear-end car crash accident investigations have been evaluated in the frequency domain. We did not consider any to be acceptable, either because of excessive rigidity of their flexion-extension mode or because they poorly reproduce the head translation mode. In addition to dummy evaluation, this study provides new insight into injury mechanisms when a given natural frequency can be linked to a specific neck deformation.

  19. Euclidean analysis of the entropy functional formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Silva, Pedro J. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) and Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies (IFAE), E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    The attractor mechanism implies that the supersymmetric black hole near-horizon solution is defined only in terms of the conserved charges and is therefore independent of asymptotic moduli. Starting only with the near-horizon geometry, Sen's entropy functional formalism computes the entropy of an extreme black hole by means of a Legendre transformation where the electric fields are defined as conjugated variables to the electric charges. However, traditional Euclidean methods require the knowledge of the full geometry to compute the black hole thermodynamic quantities. We establish the connection between the entropy functional formalism and the standard Euclidean formalism taken at zero-temperature. We find that Sen's entropy function f (on-shell) matches the zero-temperature limit of the Euclidean action. Moreover, Sen's near-horizon angular and electric fields agree with the chemical potentials that are defined from the zero-temperature limit of the Euclidean formalism.

  20. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    E-print Network

    Nicolas Schunck; Jordan D. McDonnell; Jason Sarich; Stefan M. Wild; Dave Higdon

    2014-07-11

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  1. Error analysis in nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  2. Human CD68 promoter GFP transgenic mice allow analysis of monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asif J.; McNeill, Eileen; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Norman, Sophie; Burd, Sarah; Smart, Nicola; Machemer, Daniel E. W.; Stylianou, Elena; McShane, Helen; Channon, Keith M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of monocytes and their differentiation into macrophages at sites of inflammation are key events in determining the outcome of the inflammatory response and initiating the return to tissue homeostasis. To study monocyte trafficking and macrophage differentiation in vivo, we have generated a novel transgenic reporter mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the human CD68 promoter. CD68-GFP mice express high levels of GFP in both monocyte and embryo-derived tissue resident macrophages in adult animals. The human CD68 promoter drives GFP expression in all CD115+ monocytes of adult blood, spleen, and bone marrow; we took advantage of this to directly compare the trafficking of bone marrow–derived CD68-GFP monocytes to that of CX3CR1GFP monocytes in vivo using a sterile zymosan peritonitis model. Unlike CX3CR1GFP monocytes, which downregulate GFP expression on differentiation into macrophages in this model, CD68-GFP monocytes retain high-level GFP expression for 72 hours after differentiation into macrophages, allowing continued cell tracking during resolution of inflammation. In summary, this novel CD68-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource for analyzing monocyte mobilization and monocyte trafficking as well as studying the fate of recruited monocytes in models of acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:25030063

  3. Performance analysis of the beam shaping method on optical auditory neural stimulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxuan; Xia, Ming; Lu, Jianren; Li, Chen; Tian, Xu; Tian, Lan

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has shown that infrared neural stimulation (INS) could be an alternative approach to evoke auditory neural activities. The laser beam property of the fiber output is a considerable aspect of INS, and the corresponding effects on auditory responses in vivo deserve further discussions. The paper presents a beam-shaped infrared laser stimulation method of auditory nerves. Pulsed 980-nm fiber-coupled laser systems were used as the radiant sources. The gradient reflective index (GRIN) lens was added at the port of the optical fiber as a beam shaping structure. The laser spot sizes and properties between the beam-shaped output and the bare fiber output were preliminarily analyzed by a laser beam profiler. And further experiments in vivo with four deafened adult guinea pigs were conducted. Optically evoked auditory brainstem responses (OABRs) of the animal samples were recorded and compared under the two output configurations. The results show a decrease of the beam divergence compared to a bare output fiber, and the INS with a beam shaping design evokes above 13 % increase on OABR amplitudes than the bare fiber output, especially when enlarging the distance between the optical fiber and the nerve tissue. The beam shaping design can enhance the effect of INS for evoking auditory nerves, and it could be an optimized design in the future implementation of optical cochlear implants. PMID:25947304

  4. Hybrid System for Ex Vivo Hemorheological and Hemodynamic Analysis: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Jun Kang, Yang; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurement of biophysical properties is important to understand the relation between these properties and the outbreak of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, a systematic measurement for these biophysical parameters under in vivo conditions is nearly impossible because of complex vessel shape and limited practicality. In vitro measurements can provide more biophysical information, but in vitro exposure changes hemorheological properties. In this study, a hybrid system composed of an ultrasound system and microfluidic device is proposed for monitoring hemorheological and hemodynamic properties under more reasonable experimental conditions. Biophysical properties including RBC aggregation, viscosity, velocity, and pressure of blood flows are simultaneously measured under various conditions to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this measurement system. The proposed technique is applied to a rat extracorporeal loop which connects the aorta and jugular vein directly. As a result, the proposed system is found to measure biophysical parameters reasonably without blood collection from the rat and provided more detailed information. This hybrid system, combining ultrasound imaging and microfluidic techniques to ex vivo animal models, would be useful for monitoring the variations of biophysical properties induced by chemical agents. It can be used to understand the relation between biophysical parameters and CVDs. PMID:26090816

  5. Hybrid System for Ex Vivo Hemorheological and Hemodynamic Analysis: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Jun Kang, Yang; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurement of biophysical properties is important to understand the relation between these properties and the outbreak of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, a systematic measurement for these biophysical parameters under in vivo conditions is nearly impossible because of complex vessel shape and limited practicality. In vitro measurements can provide more biophysical information, but in vitro exposure changes hemorheological properties. In this study, a hybrid system composed of an ultrasound system and microfluidic device is proposed for monitoring hemorheological and hemodynamic properties under more reasonable experimental conditions. Biophysical properties including RBC aggregation, viscosity, velocity, and pressure of blood flows are simultaneously measured under various conditions to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this measurement system. The proposed technique is applied to a rat extracorporeal loop which connects the aorta and jugular vein directly. As a result, the proposed system is found to measure biophysical parameters reasonably without blood collection from the rat and provided more detailed information. This hybrid system, combining ultrasound imaging and microfluidic techniques to ex vivo animal models, would be useful for monitoring the variations of biophysical properties induced by chemical agents. It can be used to understand the relation between biophysical parameters and CVDs. PMID:26090816

  6. In vitro and in vivo analysis of antimicrobial agents alone and in combination against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    He, Songzhe; He, Hui; Chen, Yi; Chen, Yueming; Wang, Wei; Yu, Daojun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods: An in vitro susceptibility test of 101 A. baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities. Results: Multi-drug resistant A. baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition), polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition), and minocycline (74.2% inhibition). However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC) counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin) and D (minocycline + rifampicin) were significantly higher than in groups A (tigecycline) and B (polymyxin B) (P < 0.05), after administration of the drugs 24 h post-infection. Lung tissue inflammation gradually increased in the model group during the first 24 h after ultrasonic atomization infection; vasodilation, congestion with hemorrhage were observed 48 h post infection. After 3 days of anti-infective therapy in groups A, B, C, and D, lung tissue inflammation in each group gradually recovered with clear structures. The mortality rates in drug combination groups(groups C and D) were much lower than in groups A and B. Conclusion: The combination of minocycline with either rifampicin or amikacin is more effective against multi-drug resistant A. baumannii than single-agent tigecycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the mouse lung infection by ultrasonic atomization is a suitable model for drug screening and analysis of infection mechanism. PMID:26074898

  7. A functional analysis of task analysis procedures for instuctional design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Kennedy; Timm Esque; Jerry Novak

    1983-01-01

    Representative examples of task analysis procedures were examined for common components, methods, and terminology. Resulting\\u000a generic components were categorized into two phases of task analysis: task description and instructional analysis. Task description\\u000a included the components of task inventory, ordering, and refinement. Instructional analysis was comprised of the specification\\u000a of needs, goals, objectives, learning hierarchy, learning taxonomy, training considerations, and product

  8. RNA Interference for Wheat Functional Gene Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells. In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species, this appr...

  9. Some extremal functions in Fourier analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey D. Vaaler

    1985-01-01

    We obtain extremal majorants and minorants of exponential type for a class of even functions on R which includes log|x| and |x|?, where 1 < ? < 1. We also give periodic versions of these results in which the ma- jorants and minorants are trigonometric polynomials of bounded degree. As applications we obtain optimal estimates for certain Hermitian forms, which

  10. Implementing Groundness Analysis with Definite Boolean Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacob M. Howe; Andy King

    2000-01-01

    The domain of definite Boolean functions, Def , can be used to express the groundness of, and trace grounding dependencies between, program variables in (constraint) logic programs. In this paper, previously unexploited computational properties of Def are utilised to develop an efficient and succinct groundness analyser that can be coded in Prolog. In particular, entailment checking is used to prevent

  11. Simulation analysis of intermodal sodium channel function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shangyou Zeng; Peter Jung

    2008-01-01

    Although most sodium ion channels clustered in nodes of Ranvier provide the physiological basis for saltatory conduction, sodium ion channels cannot be excluded from internodal regions completely. The density of internodal sodium ion channels is of the order of 10\\/mum2 . The function of internodal sodium ion channels has been neglected for a long time; however, experimental and theoretical results

  12. Functional analysis of ion channels: Planar patch

    E-print Network

    Mayer, Michael

    molecular details of channel function and for ®nding new medicines. Electrical recordings of ion channel of diseases could be attributed to a malfunction of ion channels: cystic ®brosis, epilepsy, anxiety, cardiac are increasingly import- ant as targets for new medicines (6). Patch clamp measurements rely on a stable

  13. Clustered components analysis for functional MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sea Chen; Charles A. Bouman; Mark J. Lowe

    2004-01-01

    A common method of increasing SNR in functional magnetic resonance imaging is to average signal timecourses across voxels. This technique is potentially problematic because the hemodynamic response may vary across the brain. Such averaging may destroy signican t features in the temporal evolution of the fMRI response that stem from either dierences in vascular coupling to neural tissue or actual

  14. Genetic Manipulation in ?ku80 Strains for Functional Genomic Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Rommereim, Leah M.; Hortua Triana, Miryam A.; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L.; Guevara, Rebekah B.; Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein1,2. The ?ku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The ?ku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale1-4. Here, we report methods for using type I and type II ?ku80?hxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in ?ku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human pathogens that cause malaria (Plasmodium sp.) and cryptosporidiosis (Cryptosporidium). PMID:23892917

  15. High resolution mapping of Twist to DNA in Drosophila embryos: Efficient functional analysis and evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Anil; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Pepke, Shirley; Samanta, Manoj; Dunipace, Leslie; McCue, Kenneth; Zeng, Lucy; Ogawa, Nobuo; Wold, Barbara J; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-04-01

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) function by binding sequence specific transcription factors, but the relationship between in vivo physical binding and the regulatory capacity of factor-bound DNA elements remains uncertain. We investigate this relationship for the well-studied Twist factor in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by analyzing genome-wide factor occupancy and testing the functional significance of Twist occupied regions and motifs within regions. Twist ChIP-seq data efficiently identified previously studied Twist-dependent CRMs and robustly predicted new CRM activity in transgenesis, with newly identified Twist-occupied regions supporting diverse spatiotemporal patterns (>74% positive, n = 31). Some, but not all, candidate CRMs require Twist for proper expression in the embryo. The Twist motifs most favored in genome ChIP data (in vivo) differed from those most favored by Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) (in vitro). Furthermore, the majority of ChIP-seq signals could be parsimoniously explained by a CABVTG motif located within 50 bp of the ChIP summit and, of these, CACATG was most prevalent. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that different Twist E-box motif types are not fully interchangeable, suggesting that the ChIP-derived consensus (CABVTG) includes sites having distinct regulatory outputs. Further analysis of position, frequency of occurrence, and sequence conservation revealed significant enrichment and conservation of CABVTG E-box motifs near Twist ChIP-seq signal summits, preferential conservation of ±150 bp surrounding Twist occupied summits, and enrichment of GA- and CA-repeat sequences near Twist occupied summits. Our results show that high resolution in vivo occupancy data can be used to drive efficient discovery and dissection of global and local cis-regulatory logic. PMID:21383317

  16. Analysis of spectra using correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method is presented for the quantitative analysis of spectra based on the properties of the cross correlation between a real spectrum and either a numerical synthesis or laboratory simulation. A new goodness-of-fit criterion called the heteromorphic coefficient H is proposed that has the property of being zero when a fit is achieved and varying smoothly through zero as the iteration proceeds, providing a powerful tool for automatic or near-automatic analysis. It is also shown that H can be rendered substantially noise-immune, permitting the analysis of very weak spectra well below the apparent noise level and, as a byproduct, providing Doppler shift and radial velocity information with excellent precision. The technique is in regular use in the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) project and operates in an interactive, realtime computing environment with turn-around times of a few seconds or less.

  17. A Salmonella Typhimurium-Typhi Genomic Chimera: A Model to Study Vi Polysaccharide Capsule Function In Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela M. Jansen; Lindsay J. Hall; Simon Clare; David Goulding; Kathryn E. Holt; Andrew J. Grant; Piero Mastroeni; Gordon Dougan; Robert A. Kingsley

    2011-01-01

    The Vi capsular polysaccharide is a virulence-associated factor expressed by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi but absent from virtually all other Salmonella serotypes. In order to study this determinant in vivo, we characterised a Vi-positive S. Typhimurium (C5.507 Vi+), harbouring the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-7, which encodes the Vi locus. S. Typhimurium C5.507 Vi+ colonised and persisted in mice at similar

  18. Radial distribution function analysis of coir fibre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Mahato; B. K. Mathur; S. Bhattacherjee

    1993-01-01

    Radial distribution analysis of X-ray intensities diffracted by natural coir fibre subjected to various thermal and mercerization treatments has been carried out. Interatomic distances, mean square displacements and interatomic coupling constants have been obtained from the radial distribution curves. As coir fibre finds its various applications in its natural form, its study has been carried out without disturbing the configuration

  19. Functional Foods Baseline and Requirements Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, M. R.; Bermudez-Aguirre, L. D.; Douglas, G.

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight foods were evaluated to determine if their nutrient profile supports positioning as a functional food and if the stability of the bioactive compound within the food matrix over an extended shelf-life correlated with the expected storage duration during the mission. Specifically, the research aims were: Aim A. To determine the amount of each nutrient in representative spaceflight foods immediately after processing and at predetermined storage time to establish the current nutritional state. Aim B. To identify the requirements to develop foods that stabilize these nutrients such that required concentrations are maintained in the space food system throughout long duration missions (up to five years). Aim C. To coordinate collaborations with health and performance groups that may require functional foods as a countermeasure.

  20. Neural network analysis of ex-vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiubo; Liu, Tianqing; Li, Xiangqin; Liu, Yang; Ma, Xuehu; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2007-08-01

    The shortage of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) greatly limits their widespread clinical applications. Few studies however, investigated the relationship between the cellular expansion and the influencing factors although wide variety results of the ex-vivo expansion of HSCs existed in literature. Here, a back-propagation (BP) neural network model was employed to evaluate the ex-vivo expansions of nuclear cells (NCs), CD34(+) cells, and colony-forming units (CFU-Cs), where the output was the cellular expansion folds and the inputs include inoculated density, cytokines, resources, serum, stroma, culture time, and bioreactor types. Around 124, 86, and 90 samples were used to train the neural network for the expansion evaluations of NCs, CD34(+ )cells, and CFU-Cs, respectively, while 17, 14, and 10 samples were applied to predict respectively. The results show that for the training of network, the interval accuracy of the expansion folds for the different cells is 85.5, 86.1, and 86.7%, respectively, while the truth-value accuracy is still up to 59.7, 50.0, and 62.2%, respectively within a relative error (RE) of +/-20%. For the prediction of network, the interval accuracy can be up to 82.4, 71.4, and 70%, respectively, while the truth-value accuracy is only 29.4, 14.3, and 50.0%, respectively (RE = +/-20%). Moreover, six verification experiments were carried out based on our interval predicted values and the results proved that the five group predicted conditions lead to the correct expansion of the HSCs with the accuracy more than 80%. Considering the complexity of HSC expansion and complicated wide range of the experimental data, such relatively high interval accuracy for training and prediction as well as verification are satisfied. Therefore this nonlinear modeling makes it possible to describe quantitatively the effects of the culture conditions on the HSC expansion and to predict the optimal culture conditions for higher ex-vivo expansion of HSCs. PMID:17417736

  1. Functional analysis of fungal polyketide biosynthesis genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isao Fujii

    2010-01-01

    Fungal polyketides have huge structural diversity from simple aromatics to highly modified complex reduced-type compounds. Despite such diversty, single modular iterative type I polyketide synthases (iPKSs) are responsible for their carbon skeleton construction. Using heterologous expression systems, we have studied on ATX, a 6-methylsalicylic acid synthase from Aspergillus terreus as a model iPKS. In addition, iPKS functions involved in fungal

  2. Functionalized glass substrate for microarray analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca L. DeRosa; Jean A. Cardinale; Ashleigh Cooper

    2007-01-01

    A series of glass treatments were investigated to develop a miniaturized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay microarray sensor with covalently immobilized antibody. Two glass compositions were photo-hydrolytically treated and functionalized with an amino- or mercapto-silane. Surface characterization was done using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy data. Antibody binding efficiency was statistically compared between treatments and glass compositions.Photo-hydrolytic treatment

  3. RNA interference for wheat functional gene analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daolin Fu; Cristobal Uauy; Ann Blechl; Jorge Dubcovsky

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells.\\u000a In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species,\\u000a this approach is in its early stages, but has great potential since multiple homoeologous copies can be simultaneously

  4. Harmonic analysis and Boolean function complexity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bernasconi

    1998-01-01

    :  Any attempt to find connections between mathematical properties of functions and their computational complexity has strong\\u000a relevance to theory of computation. Indeed, there is the hope that developing new mathematical techniques could lead to discovering\\u000a properties that might be responsible for lower bounds. The current situation is that none of the known techniques has yet\\u000a led to lower bounds in

  5. A benchmarked MCNP model of the in vivo detection of gadolinium by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, J. L.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.

    2010-08-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are a valuable diagnostic aid for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amount of free Gd deposited in tissues following contrast enhanced MRI is of toxicological concern. The McMaster University in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been adapted for the detection of Gd in the kidney, liver, and the leg muscle. A simple model of the HPGe detector used for detection of the prompt ?-rays following Gd neutron capture has been created using Monte Carlo simulation. A separate simulation describing the neutron collimation and shielding apparatus has been modified to determine the neutron capture rate in the Gd phantoms. The MCNP simulation results have been confirmed by experimental measurement. The deviations between MCNP and the experiment were between 1% and 18%, with an average deviation of 3.8 ± 6.7%. The validated MCNP model is to be used to improve the Gd in vivo measurement sensitivity by determining the best neutron moderator/reflector arrangement.

  6. Comparative analysis between Chamomilla recutita and corticosteroids on wound healing. An in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Manoela Domingues; Marques, Márcia Martins; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Pavesi, Vanessa Christina Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos

    2009-02-01

    The comparison of chamomile and corticosteroids for treating ulcers was done in vitro and in vivo. The experimental groups were: control; chamomile recutita; triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate. For the in vitro study the cell viability of fibroblasts cultured for 24 h in media conditioned by the substances was obtained by the MTT reduction analysis. For the in vivo study, 125 male rats were submitted to experimental ulcers treated or not (control) by the substances tested. At 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days later 5 animals of each group were sacrificed. The lesions were analyzed by means of clinical observation and histological wound-healing grading. Data were compared by ANOVA (p

  7. Statistical analysis of bidirectional reflectance distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubiaga, Carlos J.; Belcour, Laurent; Bosch, Carles; Muñoz, Adolfo; Barla, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) are commonly employed in Computer Graphics and Computer Vision to model opaque materials. On the one hand, a BRDF is a complex 4D function of both light and view directions, which should ensure reciprocity and energy conservation laws. On the other hand, when computing radiance reaching the eye from a surface point, the view direction is held fixed. In this respect, we are only interested in a 2D BRDF slice that acts as a filter on the local environment lighting. The goal of our work is to understand the statistical properties of such a filter as a function of viewing elevation. To this end, we have conducted a study of measured BRDFs where we have computed statistical moments for each viewing angle. We show that some moments are correlated together across dimensions and orders, while some others are close to zero and may safely be discarded. Our study opens the way to novel applications such as moment-based manipulation of measured BRDFs, material estimation and image-based material editing. It also puts empirical and physically-based material models in a new perspective, by revealing their effect as view-dependent filters.

  8. Functional analysis of the Fusarium graminearum phosphatome.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yingzi; Liu, Zunyong; Yin, Yanni; Jiang, Jinhua; Chen, Yun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-07-01

    Phosphatases are known to play important roles in the regulation of various cellular processes in eukaryotes. However, systematic characterization of the phosphatome has not been reported in phytopathogenic fungi. The wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum contains 82 putative phosphatases. The biological functions of each phosphatase were investigated in this study. Although 11 phosphatase genes appeared to be essential, deletion mutants of the other 71 phosphatase genes were obtained and characterized for changes in 15 phenotypes, including vegetative growth, nutrient response and virulence. Overall, the deletion of 63 phosphatase genes resulted in changes in at least one of the phenotypes assayed. Interestingly, the deletion of four genes (Fg06297, Fg03333, Fg03826 and Fg07932) did not dramatically affect hyphal growth, but led to strongly reduced virulence. Western blot analyses showed that three phosphatases (Fg10516, Fg03333 and Fg12867) functioned as negative regulators of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. In addition, we found, for the first time, that FgCdc14 is dispensable for growth, but plays an important role in ribosome biogenesis. Overall, in this first functional characterization of the fungal phosphatome, phosphatases important for various aspects of hyphal growth, development, plant infection and secondary metabolism were identified in the phytopathogenic fungus F. graminearum. PMID:25758923

  9. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its applicationto detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K.; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-04-01

    Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development.

  10. Endothelial Microparticles (EMP) for the Assessment of Endothelial Function: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study on Possible Interference of Plasma Lipids

    PubMed Central

    van Ierssel, Sabrina H.; Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Jorens, Philippe G.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMP) reflect the condition of the endothelium and are of increasing interest in cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Recently, increased numbers of EMP following oral fat intake, possibly due to acute endothelial injury, have been reported. On the other hand, the direct interference of lipids with the detection of EMP has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of lipid-rich solutions, commonly administered in clinical practice, on the detection, both in vitro and in vivo, of EMP. Methods For the in vitro assessment, several lipid-rich solutions were added to whole blood of healthy subjects (n?=?8) and patients with coronary heart disease (n?=?5). EMP (CD31+/CD42b?) were detected in platelet poor plasma by flow cytometry. For the in vivo study, healthy volunteers were evaluated on 3 different study-days: baseline evaluation, following lipid infusion and after a NaCl infusion. EMP quantification, lipid measurements and peripheral arterial tonometry were performed on each day. Results Both in vitro addition and in vivo administration of lipids significantly decreased EMP (from 198.6 to 53.0 and from 272.6 to 90.6/µl PPP, respectively, p?=?0.001 and p?=?0.012). The EMP number correlated inversely with the concentration of triglycerides, both in vitro and in vivo (r?=??0.707 and ?0.589, p<0.001 and p?=?0.021, respectively). The validity of EMP as a marker of endothelial function is supported by their inverse relationship with the reactive hyperemia index (r?=??0.758, p?=?0.011). This inverse relation was confounded by the intravenous administration of lipids. Conclusion The confounding effect of high circulating levels of lipids, commonly found in patients that receive intravenous lipid-based solutions, should be taken into account when flow cytometry is used to quantify EMP. PMID:22359595

  11. Analysis of the Flexion Gap on In Vivo Knee Kinematics Using Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ito, Hiromu; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Komistek, Richard D; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on the relationships between postoperative knee laxity and in vivo knee kinematics. The correlations were analyzed in 22 knees with axial radiographs and fluoroscopy based 3D model fitting approach after a tri-condylar total knee arthroplasty. During deep knee bend activities, the medial flexion gap had significant correlations with the medial contact point (r=0.529, P=0.011) and axial rotation at full extension. During kneeling activities, a greater medial flexion gap caused larger anterior translation at complete contact (r=0.568, P=0.011). Meanwhile, the lateral flexion gap had less effect. In conclusion, laxity of the medial collateral ligament should be avoided because the magnitude of medial flexion stability was crucial for postoperative knee kinematics. PMID:25680453

  12. Multimodal contrast agents for in vivo neuroanatomical analysis of monosynaptic connections.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Giuseppe; Engelmann, Jörn; Tei, Lorenzo; Botta, Mauro; Logothetis, Nikos K; Mamedov, Ilgar

    2013-09-01

    We developed and examined the applicability of two multimodal paramagnetic contrast agents for the longitudinal in vivo investigations of the brain projections. The classical dextran based neuroanatomical tracer was conjugated with mono- and bimetal Gd(3+) complexes and an optical reporter. Relaxometric studies of both tracer molecules were performed in vitro followed by in cellulo MR and microscopy investigations. Finally, tracers were injected into the motor cortex of the rat brain; uptake and transporting properties were compared by MRI. The advantage of the multimodal approach was taken and histological studies were performed on the same animals. The histology results confirm the MRI studies demonstrating that the applied tracers labelled anterogradely the regions known for their connections with the motor cortex of the rat brain. PMID:23790308

  13. In vivo analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO nuclease recognition site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Singer, J D; Heffron, F

    1990-01-01

    HO nuclease introduces a specific double-strand break in the mating-type locus (MAT) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, initiating mating-type interconversion. To define the sequence recognized by HO nuclease, random mutations were produced in a 30-base-pair region homologous to either MAT alpha or MATa by a chemical synthesis procedure. The mutant sites were introduced into S. cerevisiae on a shuttle vector and tested for the ability to stimulate recombination in an assay that mimics mating-type interconversion. The results suggest that a core of 8 noncontiguous bases near the Y-Z junction of MAT is essential for HO nuclease to bind and cleave its recognition site. Other contacts must be required because substrates that contain several mutations outside an intact core reduce or eliminate cleavage in vivo. The results show that HO site recognition is a complex phenomenon, similar to promoter-polymerase interactions. Images PMID:2406563

  14. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology. PMID:25335545

  15. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  16. In vivo analysis of the contribution of bone resorption to the control of glucose metabolism in mice?

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, Julie; Karsenty, Gerard; Ferron, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Osteocalcin is a hormone produced in bones by osteoblasts and regulating energy metabolism. While osteocalcin exists in two forms, ?-carboxylated and undercarboxylated only the latter appears to function as a hormone in vivo. It has been proposed recently that osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, are responsible of decarboxylating, i.e. activating osteocalcin. To address the role of osteoclasts in the maintenance of energy metabolism we analyzed mutant mouse strains harboring either an increase or a decrease in osteoclasts number. Osteoprotegerin-deficient mice that are characterized by an increase in the number of osteoclasts demonstrate an increase in serum levels of undercarboxylated osteocalcin and are significantly more glucose tolerant than WT animals. Conversely, osteoclasts ablation in mice results in a decrease in serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin levels and in reduced glucose tolerance. These results support the notion that osteoclasts are controlling glucose metabolism at least in part through the regulation of osteocalcin decarboxylation. PMID:24327965

  17. Analysis of the penetration of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Schanzer, S.; Klenk, A.; Sterry, W.; Patzelt, A.

    2010-02-01

    In previous in vitro investigations, it was demonstrated that caffeine is able to stimulate the hair growth. Therefore, a penetration of caffeine into the hair follicle is necessary. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to investigate the penetration and storage of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles. It was shown that a 2-min contact time of the shampoo with the skin was enough to accumulate significant parts of the shampoo in the hair follicles. A penetration of the shampoo up to a depth of approx. 200 ?m could be detected, which represents the detection limit of the LSM. At this depth, the close network of the blood capillaries surrounding the hair follicles commences. Even after 24 h, the substance was still detectable in the hair follicles. This demonstrates the long-term reservoir function of the hair follicles for topically applied substances such as caffeine.

  18. [Integration of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics based on the in vivo analysis of drug-receptor binding].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

      As I was deeply interested in the effects of drugs on the human body, I chose pharmacology as the subject of special study when I became a 4th year student at Shizuoka College of Pharmacy. I studied abroad as a postdoctoral fellow for two years, from 1978, under the tutelage of Professor Henry I. Yamamura (pharmacology) in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, USA. He taught me a variety of valuable skills such as the radioreceptor binding assay, which represented the most advanced technology developed in the US at that time. After returning home, I engaged in clarifying receptor abnormalities in pathological conditions, as well as in drug action mechanisms, by making the best use of this radioreceptor binding assay. In 1989, following the founding of the University of Shizuoka, I was invited by Professor Ryohei Kimura to join the Department of Pharmacokinetics. This switch in discipline provided a good opportunity for me to broaden my perspectives in pharmaceutical sciences. I worked on evaluating drug-receptor binding in vivo as a combined index for pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effect manifestation, with the aim of bridging pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. In fact, by focusing on data from in vivo receptor binding, it became possible to clearly rationalize the important consideration of drug dose-concentration-action relationships, and to study quantitative and kinetic analyses of relationships among pharmacokinetics, receptor binding and pharmacological effects. Based on this concept, I was able to demonstrate the utility of dynamic analyses of drug-receptor binding in drug discovery, drug fostering, and the proper use of pharmacokinetics with regard to many drugs. PMID:25743911

  19. Analysis of Circulating MicroRNAs In Vivo following Administration of Dexamethasone and Adrenocorticotropin

    PubMed Central

    Igaz, Ivan; Nyír?, Gábor; Nagy, Zoltán; Butz, Henriett; Nagy, Zsolt; Perge, Pál; Sahin, Peter; Tóth, Miklós; Rácz, Károly; Igaz, Peter; Patócs, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The interaction of hormones of the pituitary-adrenal axis and adrenal cortex-associated circulating microRNAs is mostly unknown. We have studied the effects of dexamethasone and adrenocorticotropin on the expression of five circulating microRNAs (hsa-miR-27a, hsa-miR-200b, hsa-miR-214, hsa-miR-483-5p, and hsa-miR-503) reported to be related to the adrenal cortex in plasma samples. Methods. Expression of microRNAs was studied in plasma samples of 10 individuals examined by 1?mg dexamethasone suppression test and another 10 individuals stimulated by 250??g tetracosactide (adrenocorticotropin). Total RNA was isolated and microRNA expression was analyzed by real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction normalized to cel-miR-39 as reference. Results. Only circulating hsa-miR-27a proved to be significantly modulated in vivo by hormonal treatments: its expression was upregulated by dexamethasone whereas it was suppressed by adrenocorticotropin. Secreted hsa-miR-27a was significantly induced by dexamethasone in vitro in NCI-H295R cells, as well. The expression of hsa-miR-483-5p proposed as diagnostic marker for adrenocortical malignancy was not affected by dexamethasone or tetracosactide administration. Conclusions. hsa-miR-27a expression is modulated by hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis both in vitro and in vivo. The biological relevance of hsa-miR-27a modulation by hormones is unclear, but the responsiveness of circulating microRNAs to hormones of the pituitary-adrenal axis is noteworthy. PMID:26161091

  20. Targeted Resequencing and Systematic In Vivo Functional Testing Identifies Rare Variants in MEIS1 as Significant Contributors to Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Eva C.; Kousi, Maria; Tan, Perciliz L.; Tilch, Erik; Knauf, Franziska; Lichtner, Peter; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Berger, Klaus; Fietze, Ingo; Hornyak, Magdolna; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Bachmann, Cornelius G.; Zimprich, Alexander; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic condition characterized by nocturnal dysesthesias and an urge to move, affecting the legs. RLS is a complex trait, for which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common susceptibility alleles of modest (OR 1.2–1.7) risk at six genomic loci. Among these, variants in MEIS1 have emerged as the largest risk factors for RLS, suggesting that perturbations in this transcription factor might be causally related to RLS susceptibility. To establish this causality, direction of effect, and total genetic burden of MEIS1, we interrogated 188 case subjects and 182 control subjects for rare alleles not captured by previous GWASs, followed by genotyping of ?3,000 case subjects and 3,000 control subjects, and concluded with systematic functionalization of all discovered variants using a previously established in vivo model of neurogenesis. We observed a significant excess of rare MEIS1 variants in individuals with RLS. Subsequent assessment of all nonsynonymous variants by in vivo complementation revealed an excess of loss-of-function alleles in individuals with RLS. Strikingly, these alleles compromised the function of the canonical MEIS1 splice isoform but were irrelevant to an isoform known to utilize an alternative 3? sequence. Our data link MEIS1 loss of function to the etiopathology of RLS, highlight how combined sequencing and systematic functional annotation of rare variation at GWAS loci can detect risk burden, and offer a plausible explanation for the specificity of phenotypic expressivity of loss-of-function alleles at a locus broadly necessary for neurogenesis and neurodevelopment. PMID:24995868