Sample records for vivo functional analysis

  1. In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear

    E-print Network

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear Tony compared the expression and function of the Lrigs in the inner ear, which offers a sensitive system in the inner ear throughout development, with Lrig1 and Lrig3 restricted to subsets of cells and Lrig2

  2. Characterization and in vivo functional analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ICLN gene.

    PubMed

    Barbarossa, Adrien; Antoine, Etienne; Neel, Henry; Gostan, Thierry; Soret, Johann; Bordonné, Rémy

    2014-02-01

    During the early steps of snRNP biogenesis, the survival motor neuron (SMN) complex acts together with the methylosome, an entity formed by the pICln protein, WD45, and the PRMT5 methyltransferase. To expand our understanding of the functional relationship between pICln and SMN in vivo, we performed a genetic analysis of an uncharacterized Schizosaccharomyces pombe pICln homolog. Although not essential, the S. pombe ICln (SpICln) protein is important for optimal yeast cell growth. The human ICLN gene complements the ?icln slow-growth phenotype, demonstrating that the identified SpICln sequence is the bona fide human homolog. Consistent with the role of human pICln inferred from in vitro experiments, we found that the SpICln protein is required for optimal production of the spliceosomal snRNPs and for efficient splicing in vivo. Genetic interaction approaches further demonstrate that modulation of ICln activity is unable to compensate for growth defects of SMN-deficient cells. Using a genome-wide approach and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validation tests, we also show that splicing is differentially altered in ?icln cells. Our data are consistent with the notion that splice site selection and spliceosome kinetics are highly dependent on the concentration of core spliceosomal components. PMID:24298023

  3. in vivo analysis of Drosophila deoxyribonucleoside kinase function in cell cycle, cell survival and anti-cancer drugs resistance

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 in vivo analysis of Drosophila deoxyribonucleoside kinase function in cell cycle, cell survival Drosophila, deoxyribonucleoside kinase, dNK, antifolate resistance, apoptosis, proliferation, growth, dE2F1. Knecht and S.Carroll and the Bloomington Drosophila stock center for fly strains and antibodies

  4. In Vivo Analysis of Functional Regions within Yeast Rap1p

    Microsoft Academic Search

    IAN R. GRAHAM; ROBIN A. HAW; KAREN G. SPINK; KATHRYN A. HALDEN; ALISTAIR CHAMBERS

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the in vivo importance of different regions of Rap1p, a yeast transcriptional regulator and telomere binding protein. A yeast strain (SCR101) containing a regulatable RAP1 gene was used to test functional complementation by a range of Rap1p derivatives. These experiments demonstrated that the C terminus of the protein, containing the putative transcriptional activation domain and the regions

  5. In vivo analysis of Kv?2 function in Xenopus embryonic myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lazaroff, Meredith A; Taylor, Alison D; Ribera, Angeles B

    2002-01-01

    Kv1 potassium channels consist of pore-forming ? subunits as well as auxiliary ? subunits. In heterologous systems, Kv1? subunits suffice for induction of voltage-dependent potassium current (IKv). Although Kv1 channels can be expressed without auxiliary subunits in heterologous systems, coexpression with Kv? subunits has dramatic effects on surface expression and kinetic properties. Much less is known about the functional roles of Kv? subunits in vivo, despite their presence in the majority of native Kv1 channel complexes. We used an antisense approach to probe the contribution of Kv?2 subunits to native Kv1 channel function in embryonic myocytes. We compared the effects of antisense Kv?2 treatment on the whole cell IKv to those produced by overexpression of a dominant-negative Kv1? subunit. The reductions in the maximal potassium conductance produced by antisense Kv?2 treatment and elimination of Kv1? subunit function were not significantly different from each other. In addition, simultaneous elimination of Kv1? and Kv?2 subunit function resulted in no further reduction of the maximal conductance. The Kv channel complexes targeted by Kv?2 and/or Kv1? subunit elimination contributed to action potential repolarization because elimination of either or both subunits led to increases in the duration of the action potential. As for potassium conductance, the effects of elimination of both ? and ? subunits on the duration of the action potential were not additive. Taken together, the results suggest that Kv1 potassium channel complexes in vivo have a strong requirement for both ? and ? subunits. PMID:12068032

  6. In vivo analysis of Kvbeta2 function in Xenopus embryonic myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lazaroff, Meredith A; Taylor, Alison D; Ribera, Angeles B

    2002-06-15

    Kv1 potassium channels consist of pore-forming alpha subunits as well as auxiliary beta subunits. In heterologous systems, Kv1alpha subunits suffice for induction of voltage-dependent potassium current (I(Kv)). Although Kv1 channels can be expressed without auxiliary subunits in heterologous systems, coexpression with Kvbeta subunits has dramatic effects on surface expression and kinetic properties. Much less is known about the functional roles of Kvbeta subunits in vivo, despite their presence in the majority of native Kv1 channel complexes. We used an antisense approach to probe the contribution of Kvbeta2 subunits to native Kv1 channel function in embryonic myocytes. We compared the effects of antisense Kvbeta2 treatment on the whole cell I(Kv) to those produced by overexpression of a dominant-negative Kv1alpha subunit. The reductions in the maximal potassium conductance produced by antisense Kvbeta2 treatment and elimination of Kv1alpha subunit function were not significantly different from each other. In addition, simultaneous elimination of Kv1alpha and Kvbeta2 subunit function resulted in no further reduction of the maximal conductance. The Kv channel complexes targeted by Kvbeta2 and/or Kv1alpha subunit elimination contributed to action potential repolarization because elimination of either or both subunits led to increases in the duration of the action potential. As for potassium conductance, the effects of elimination of both alpha and beta subunits on the duration of the action potential were not additive. Taken together, the results suggest that Kv1 potassium channel complexes in vivo have a strong requirement for both alpha and beta subunits. PMID:12068032

  7. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  8. Independent component analysis for the detection of in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; Pattichis, Marios; Abramoff, Michael; T'so, Dan; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Soliz, Peter

    2007-02-01

    To overcome the difficulty in detection of loss of retinal activity, a functional-Retinal Imaging Device (f-RID) was developed. The device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by noise. In this paper, we present a new Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm used to analyze the video sequences from a set of experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats and humans. The ICA algorithm with priors (ICA-P) uses information about the stimulation paradigms to increase the signal detection thresholds when compared to traditional ICA algorithms. The results of the analysis show that we can detect signal levels as low as 0.01% of the total reflected intensity. Also, improvement of up to 30dB in signal detection over traditional ICA algorithms is achieved. The study found that in more than 80% of the in-vivo experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted.

  9. Systematic in vivo structure-function analysis of p300 in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Erin A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Xia, Xiaobo; Davis, Tina N; Rebel, Vivienne I; Kung, Andrew L

    2009-11-26

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are multidomain transcriptional coactivators that help assemble large regulatory complexes at sites of active transcription. Nullizygosity of CBP or p300 results in pervasive defects in hematopoiesis. To systematically assess the structural domains of p300 required for normal hematopoiesis, we used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to create an allelic series of coisogenic embryonic stem cells, each expressing a different mutant of p300 from the endogenous locus. We found that deletion of either the KIX or CH1 domain caused profound and pervasive defects in hematopoiesis, whereas the loss of most other domains had only lineage-restricted effects. When expressed from the p300 locus, an extra copy of CBP largely compensated for a lack of p300. Surprisingly, mutation of the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain had minimal effects on hematopoiesis, and actually increased progenitor and stem cell numbers and proliferative potential. Our results suggest that, in distinct contrast to other organ systems, HAT activity does not provide a critical function for hematopoietic development and emphasizes the importance of enzyme-independent functions of p300. PMID:19822904

  10. Immunolocalization and in vivo Functional Analysis by RNAi of the Aedes Kinin Receptor in Female Mosquitoes of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera, Culicidae)

    E-print Network

    Kersch, Cymon

    2012-02-14

    , such as Anopheles gambiae, Leucophaea maderae, Periplaneta americana, Locusta migratoria, Acheta domesticus, Culex salinarius, Helicoverpa zea, Musca domestica, Drosophila melanogaster, and the tick Boophilus microplus (Blackburn et al., 1995; Cantera and N... IMMUNOLOCALIZATION AND IN VIVO FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS BY RNAI OF THE AEDES KININ RECEPTOR IN FEMALE MOSQUITOES OF AEDES AEGYPTI (L.) (DIPTERA, CULICIDAE) A Thesis by CYMON NICHOLE KERSCH Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  11. In vivo analysis of cellular replication.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, E L; Sternberg, H; Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    The number of previous cell replications that a metaphase cell has undergone in the presence of BrdUrd can be determined by the differential fluorescent patterns of metaphse chromosomes stained with Hoechst dye 33258. To examine if this technique could be applied to analyzing cell cycle kinetics in vivo, we infused Wistar rats with BrdUrd for 7.5-33 hr at concentrations of the nucleotide analog that did not inhibit cellular replication. Examination of the frequency of one, two, and three or more replication cycle cells as a function of BrdUrd infusion time indicates that cell replication times for rat bone marrow cells are relatively homogeneous. Analysis of this data with a computer simulation model produced a mean cell cycle duration of 9.2 hr, which is compatible with the fastest times obtained with radioisotope studies. These results support the potential of nonradioisotope analysis of cell replication in vivo. Images PMID:266724

  12. In vivo determination of RNA Structure-Function relationships: analysis of the 790 loop in ribosomal RNA 1 1 Edited by D. E. Draper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KangSeok Lee; Shikha Varma; John SantaLucia Jr; Philip R. Cunningham

    1997-01-01

    The 790 loop is a conserved hairpin located between positions 786 and 796 of Escherichia coli 16 S rRNA that is required for ribosome function. Using a novel genetic approach, all positions in the loop were simultaneously mutated and functional mutant sequences were selected in vivo. This “instant evolution” experiment revealed that approximately 190 of the 262,144 possible mutant sequences

  13. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  14. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize methods for in vivo imaging.

  15. In Vivo Calcium Imaging of Neural Network Function

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-01

    Spatiotemporal activity patterns in local neural networks are fundamental to brain function. Network activity can now be measured in vivo using two-photon imaging of cell populations that are labeled with fluorescent calcium indicators. In this review, we discuss basic aspects of in vivo calcium imaging and highlight recent developments that will help to uncover operating principles of neural circuits.

  16. In vivo tests of thermodynamic models of transcription repressor function.

    PubMed

    Tungtur, Sudheer; Skinner, Harlyn; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Beckett, Dorothy

    2011-11-01

    One emphasis of the Gibbs Conference on Biothermodynamics is the value of thermodynamic measurements for understanding behaviors of biological systems. In this study, the correlation between thermodynamic measurements of in vitro DNA binding affinity with in vivo transcription repression was investigated for two transcription repressors. In the first system, which comprised an engineered LacI/GalR homolog, mutational changes altered the equilibrium constant for binding DNA. Changes correlated with altered repression, but estimates of in vivo repressor concentration suggest a ?25-fold discrepancy with in vitro conditions. In the second system, changes in ligand binding to BirA altered dimerization and subsequent DNA occupancy. Again, these changes correlate with altered in vivo repression, but comparison with in vitro measurements reveals a ~10-fold discrepancy. Further analysis of each system suggests that the observed discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results reflect the contributions of additional equilibria to the transcription repression process. PMID:21715082

  17. Introduction Functional in vivo studies of the lumbar spine using

    E-print Network

    Blanz, Volker

    Introduction Functional in vivo studies of the lumbar spine using open MRI systems are described in the locomotor system of the lumbar spine and their effects on CSF space and relevant nerve roots has not been-Definition 3D Studies of the Lumbar Spine Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging K. E. W. Eberhardt1 , B. F. Tomandl1

  18. Expansion of the clavulanic acid gene cluster: identification and in vivo functional analysis of three new genes required for biosynthesis of clavulanic acid by Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Khaleeli, N; Townsend, C A

    2000-07-01

    Clavulanic acid is a potent inhibitor of beta-lactamase enzymes and is of demonstrated value in the treatment of infections by beta-lactam-resistant bacteria. Previously, it was thought that eight contiguous genes within the genome of the producing strain Streptomyces clavuligerus were sufficient for clavulanic acid biosynthesis, because they allowed production of the antibiotic in a heterologous host (K. A. Aidoo, A. S. Paradkar, D. C. Alexander, and S. E. Jensen, p. 219-236, In V. P. Gullo et al., ed., Development in industrial microbiology series, 1993). In contrast, we report the identification of three new genes, orf10 (cyp), orf11 (fd), and orf12, that are required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis as indicated by gene replacement and trans-complementation analysis in S. clavuligerus. These genes are contained within a 3.4-kb DNA fragment located directly downstream of orf9 (cad) in the clavulanic acid cluster. While the orf10 (cyp) and orf11 (fd) proteins show homologies to other known CYP-150 cytochrome P-450 and [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin enzymes and may be responsible for an oxidative reaction late in the pathway, the protein encoded by orf12 shows no significant similarity to any known protein. The results of this study extend the biosynthetic gene cluster for clavulanic acid and attest to the importance of analyzing biosynthetic genes in the context of their natural host. Potential functional roles for these proteins are proposed. PMID:10869089

  19. In-Depth Proteome Analysis of Arabidopsis Leaf Peroxisomes Combined with in Vivo Subcellular Targeting Verification Indicates Novel Metabolic and Regulatory Functions of Peroxisomes1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Sigrun; Quan, Sheng; Aung, Kyaw; Yang, Pingfang; Manandhar-Shrestha, Kalpana; Holbrook, Danielle; Linka, Nicole; Switzenberg, Robert; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Olsen, Laura J.; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are metabolically diverse organelles with essential roles in plant development. The major protein constituents of plant peroxisomes are well characterized, whereas only a few low-abundance and regulatory proteins have been reported to date. We performed an in-depth proteome analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf peroxisomes using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. We detected 65 established plant peroxisomal proteins, 30 proteins whose association with Arabidopsis peroxisomes had been previously demonstrated only by proteomic data, and 55 putative novel proteins of peroxisomes. We subsequently tested the subcellular targeting of yellow fluorescent protein fusions for selected proteins and confirmed the peroxisomal localization for 12 proteins containing predicted peroxisome targeting signals type 1 or 2 (PTS1/2), three proteins carrying PTS-related peptides, and four proteins that lack conventional targeting signals. We thereby established the tripeptides SLM> and SKV> (where > indicates the stop codon) as new PTS1s and the nonapeptide RVx5HF as a putative new PTS2. The 19 peroxisomal proteins conclusively identified from this study potentially carry out novel metabolic and regulatory functions of peroxisomes. Thus, this study represents an important step toward defining the complete plant peroxisomal proteome. PMID:19329564

  20. In vivo footprinting and functional analysis of the human c-sis/PDGF B gene promoter provides evidence for two binding sites for transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, R P; Jansen, H J; van Gerven, B; Onnekink, C; Bloemers, H P

    1995-01-01

    By in vivo DMS footprint and reporter gene analyses we identified two transcription factor binding sites in the human c-sis/PDGF B gene promoter. The low basal activity of the PDGF B promoter in HeLa and undifferentiated K562 cells, which express low PDGF B mRNA levels, and in PC3 cells, which express a high PDGF B mRNA level, results from binding of a weak transcriptional activator between positions -64 and -61 relative to the transcription start site. Cytotrophoblast-like JEG-3 cells, which do not express the 3.5 kb PDGF B mRNA, contain a transcriptional activator directed at the -64/-61 sequence, but DNA methylation may render the endogenous promoter inaccessible to this activator. A CCACCCAC element at position -61/-54 was identified as the in vivo binding site for a strong transcriptional activator in phorbol ester-treated megakaryocytic K562 cells, which express a high PDGF B mRNA level. Primary human fibroblasts, which do not transcribe the PDGF B gene, contain a transcriptional activator that recognizes an element between positions -60 and -45 but does not bind to the endogenous unmethylated promoter. Our results show that the complex expression pattern of the human PDGF B gene involves the cell type-specific expression of weak and strong transcriptional activators and regulation of promoter accessibility to these factors. Images PMID:7739890

  1. Biophotonics techniques for structural and functional imaging, in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging is being conducted in a variety of medical applications, including optical breast cancer imaging, functional brain imaging, endoscopy, exercise medicine, and monitoring the photodynamic therapy and progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the past three decades, in vivo diffuse optical breast cancer imaging has shown promising results in cancer detection, and monitoring the progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The use of near infrared spectroscopy for functional brain imaging has been growing rapidly. In fluorescence imaging, the difference between autofluorescence of cancer lesions compared to normal tissues were used in endoscopy to distinguish malignant lesions from normal tissue or inflammation and in determining the boarders of cancer lesions in surgery. Recent advances in drugs targeting specific tumor receptors, such as AntiBodies (MAB), has created a new demand for developing non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for detection of cancer biomarkers, and for monitoring their down regulations during therapy. Targeted treatments, combined with new imaging techniques, are expected to potentially result in new imaging and treatment paradigms in cancer therapy. Similar approaches can potentially be applied for the characterization of other disease-related biomarkers. In this chapter, we provide a review of diffuse optical and fluorescence imaging techniques with their application in functional brain imaging and cancer diagnosis. PMID:22433452

  2. Biophotonics techniques for structural and functional imaging, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging is being conducted in a variety of medical applications, including optical breast cancer imaging, functional brain imaging, endoscopy, exercise medicine, and monitoring the photodynamic therapy and progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the past three decades, in vivo diffuse optical breast cancer imaging has shown promising results in cancer detection, and monitoring the progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The use of near infrared spectroscopy for functional brain imaging has been growing rapidly. In fluorescence imaging, the difference between autofluorescence of cancer lesions compared to normal tissues were used in endoscopy to distinguish malignant lesions from normal tissue or inflammation and in determining the boarders of cancer lesions in surgery. Recent advances in drugs targeting specific tumor receptors, such as AntiBodies (MAB), has created a new demand for developing non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for detection of cancer biomarkers, and for monitoring their down regulations during therapy. Targeted treatments, combined with new imaging techniques, are expected to potentially result in new imaging and treatment paradigms in cancer therapy. Similar approaches can potentially be applied for the characterization of other disease-related biomarkers. In this chapter, we provide a review of diffuse optical and fluorescence imaging techniques with their application in functional brain imaging and cancer diagnosis. PMID:22433452

  3. In vivo bioluminescence for tracking cell fate and function

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Patricia E.; van Rappard, Juliaan R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Tracking the fate and function of cells in vivo is paramount for the development of rational therapies for cardiac injury. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) provides a means for monitoring physiological processes in real time, ranging from cell survival to gene expression to complex molecular processes. In mice and rats, BLI provides unmatched sensitivity because of the absence of endogenous luciferase expression in mammalian cells and the low background luminescence emanating from animals. In the field of stem cell therapy, BLI provides an unprecedented means to monitor the biology of these cells in vivo, giving researchers a greater understanding of their survival, migration, immunogenicity, and potential tumorigenicity in a living animal. In addition to longitudinal monitoring of cell survival, BLI is a useful tool for semiquantitative measurements of gene expression in vivo, allowing a better optimization of drug and gene therapies. Overall, this technology not only enables rapid, reproducible, and quantitative monitoring of physiological processes in vivo but also can measure the influences of therapeutic interventions on the outcome of cardiac injuries. PMID:21666118

  4. Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles as an In Vivo Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Shu; Moritake, Shinji; Hatanaka, Takahiro; Ichiyanagi, Yuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    We developed extremely small functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for use as an in vivo delivery system for pharmaceuticals and biomolecules. We functionalized the MNPs (d = 3 nm) by silanization of amino groups on the particles with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane for subsequent cross-linking with pharmaceuticals and biomolecules. The MNPs were successfully introduced into living cells without any further modification, such as the use of cationic residues, to enhance endocytic internalization. The particles could be incorporated into the subcutaneous tissue of a mouse’s ear through the skin of the ear and could be localized by application of an external magnetic field.

  5. Recent molecular approaches to understanding astrocyte function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Davila, David; Thibault, Karine; Fiacco, Todd A.; Agulhon, Cendra

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are a predominant glial cell type in the nervous systems, and are becoming recognized as important mediators of normal brain function as well as neurodevelopmental, neurological, and neurodegenerative brain diseases. Although numerous potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of astrocytes in the normal and diseased brain, research into the physiological relevance of these mechanisms in vivo is just beginning. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in innovative and powerful molecular approaches, including knockout mouse models, transgenic mouse models, and astrocyte-targeted gene transfer/expression, which have led to advances in understanding astrocyte biology in vivo that were heretofore inaccessible to experimentation. We will examine the recently improved understanding of the roles of astrocytes – with an emphasis on astrocyte signaling – in the context of both the healthy and diseased brain, discuss areas where the role of astrocytes remains debated, and suggest new research directions. PMID:24399932

  6. Zeta Functional Analysis

    E-print Network

    Michael A. Idowu

    2014-10-15

    We intimate deeper connections between the Riemann zeta and gamma functions than often reported and further derive a new formula for expressing the value of $\\zeta(2n+1)$ in terms of zeta at other fractional points. This paper also establishes and presents new expository notes and perspectives on zeta function theory and functional analysis. In addition, a new fundamental result, in form of a new function called omega $\\Omega(s)$, is introduced to analytic number theory for the first time. This new function together with some of its most fundamental properties and other related identities are here disclosed and presented as a new approach to the analysis of sums of generalised harmonic series, related alternating series and polygamma functions associated with Riemann zeta function.

  7. Posterior lymph heart function in two species of anurans: analysis based on both in vivo pressure–volume relationships by conductance manometry and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Dane A.; Hillman, Stanley S.

    2010-01-01

    Rhinella marina and Lithobates catesbeianus have known differences in the capacity to mobilize lymph to stabilize blood volume following dehydration and hemorrhage. The purpose of these experiments was to assess whether there are interspecific differences in basic lymph heart functions. The end diastolic volumes of posterior lymph hearts averaged 10.8 ?l kg–1 in R. marina and 7.9–10.8 ?l kg–1 in L. catesbeianus by conductance manometry, and 9–32 ?l kg–1 in R. marina by ultasound techniques, which correlated with body mass. Stroke volumes were approximately 20% of end diastolic volumes in both species. Peak systolic pressures and stroke work were correlated with the index of contractility (dP/dtmax) in both species. Stroke volume was correlated to stroke work but not peak systolic pressure, end diastolic volume or end diastolic pressure indicating the preload variables do not seem to determine stroke volume as would be predicted from Starling considerations of the blood heart. Renal portal elastance (end systolic pressure/stroke volume) an afterload index did not differ interspecifically, and was equivalent to values for systemic flow indices from mice of equivalent ventricular volume. These data, taken together with predictions derived from mammalian models on the effect of high resistance indicate afterload (renal portal pressure), may be important determinants of posterior lymph heart stroke volume. The shape of the pressure–volume loop is different from an idealized version previously reported, and is influenced by end diastolic volume. Our data indicate that increasing end diastolic pressure and volume can influence the loop shape but not the stroke volume. This indicates that lymph hearts do not behave in a Starling Law manner with increased preload volume. PMID:20952620

  8. Posterior lymph heart function in two species of anurans: analysis based on both in vivo pressure-volume relationships by conductance manometry and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Dane A; Hillman, Stanley S

    2010-11-01

    Rhinella marina and Lithobates catesbeianus have known differences in the capacity to mobilize lymph to stabilize blood volume following dehydration and hemorrhage. The purpose of these experiments was to assess whether there are interspecific differences in basic lymph heart functions. The end diastolic volumes of posterior lymph hearts averaged 10.8 ?l kg?¹ in R. marina and 7.9-10.8 ?l kg?¹ in L. catesbeianus by conductance manometry, and 9-32 ?l kg?¹ in R. marina by ultrasound techniques, which correlated with body mass. Stroke volumes were approximately 20% of end diastolic volumes in both species. Peak systolic pressures and stroke work were correlated with the index of contractility (dP/dt(max)) in both species. Stroke volume was correlated to stroke work but not peak systolic pressure, end diastolic volume or end diastolic pressure indicating the preload variables do not seem to determine stroke volume as would be predicted from Starling considerations of the blood heart. Renal portal elastance (end systolic pressure/stroke volume) an afterload index did not differ interspecifically, and was equivalent to values for systemic flow indices from mice of equivalent ventricular volume. These data, taken together with predictions derived from mammalian models on the effect of high resistance indicate afterload (renal portal pressure), may be important determinants of posterior lymph heart stroke volume. The shape of the pressure-volume loop is different from an idealized version previously reported, and is influenced by end diastolic volume. Our data indicate that increasing end diastolic pressure and volume can influence the loop shape but not the stroke volume. This indicates that lymph hearts do not behave in a Starling Law manner with increased preload volume. PMID:20952620

  9. Functional regionalization of the teleost cerebellum analyzed in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hideaki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Babaryka, Andreas; Köster, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been accumulating evidence for a regionalized organization of the cerebellum, which was mostly deduced from anatomical mapping of axonal projections of cerebellar afferents. A likewise regionalization of the cerebellar output has been suggested from lesion studies and dye-tracer experiments, but its physiological targets as well as the functional relevance of such an output regionalization are less clear. Ideally, such functional regionalization should be proven noninvasively in vivo. We here provide evidence for such a regionalization of the output from the cerebellar cortex by genetically encoded transneuronal mapping of efferent circuits of zebrafish Purkinje neurons. These identified circuits correspond to distinct regionalized Purkinje cell activity patterns in freely behaving zebrafish larvae during the performance of cerebellar-dependent behaviors. Furthermore, optogenetic interrogation of selected Purkinje cell regions during animal behavior confirms the functional regionalization of Purkinje cell efferents and reveals their contribution to behavior control as well as their function in controlling lateralized behavioral output. Our findings reveal how brain compartments serve to fulfill a multitude of functions by dedicating specialized efferent circuits to distinct behavioral tasks. PMID:25002482

  10. NONSTANDARD TRENDS IN FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

    E-print Network

    Kutateladze, Semen Samsonovich

    NONSTANDARD TRENDS IN FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS A. G. Kusraev (Vladikavkaz), S. S. Kutateladze. S. Kutateladze (Novosibirsk) NONSTANDARD TRENDS IN FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS #12;Boolean Valued Analysis (Vladikavkaz), S. S. Kutateladze (Novosibirsk) NONSTANDARD TRENDS IN FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS #12;Boolean Valued

  11. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  12. Use of photoproteins for in-vivo functional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The relative opacity of mammalian tissue permits the transmission of light from internal biological light sources in small laboratory animals. As such internally expressed bioluminescence can be detected externally revealing spatiotemporal information about tagged biological functions. Enzymes that emit light, photoproteins, have been characterized photoproteins have been used as reporters in a variety of in vitro and ex vivo assays and are now being employed as sources of internal biological light that can be eternally monitored in living animals. Using this approach, spatiotemporal changes in patterns of gene expression, infectious disease and tumor cell growth can be revealed in real time. Monitoring light emissions from internal sources provides a powerful method for cellular and molecular analyses in living animals. This approach is particularly well suited for the evaluation of potential therapeutics including the efficacy of novel DNA-based therapies and vaccines.

  13. Protein Polymer MRI Contrast Agents: Longitudinal Analysis of Biomaterials In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Barron, Annelise E.

    Protein Polymer MRI Contrast Agents: Longitudinal Analysis of Biomaterials In Vivo Lindsay S by inadequate techniques for char- acterizing biomaterials in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging is a tomographic- gitudinal noninvasive assessment of biomaterials in vivo. To distinguish biomaterials from surrounding

  14. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  15. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD?/? colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-? and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  16. In Vivo Analysis of Engrafted Adult Hippocampal Neural Progenitors

    E-print Network

    Schaffer, David V.

    and the subventricular zone to olfactory bulb pathway. After engraftment into both regions, cells have differentiated environment of the adult brain rather than in a culture dish. Key words: Neural, Hippocampus, Progenitors, Rat by the deterioration of neural tissue and subsequent loss of function. The in vivo engraftment of neural stem cells

  17. Functional Analysis Overview Spring 2013

    E-print Network

    Rhoads, James

    Engineering: Functional Analysis Module 11 Planetary Defense Level 1 Functional Flow Block Diagram For Threat of the overall system. #12;The Tools of Functional Analysis · Functional Architecture · Functional Flow Block · An example . . . Simple Block Architecture Planetary Defense Program #12;#12;Functional Flow Block Diagrams

  18. In vivo imaging of synaptic function in the central nervous system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Nikolaus; Christina Antke; Hans-Wilhelm Müller

    2009-01-01

    This review gives an overview of those in vivo imaging studies on synaptic neurotransmission, which so far have been performed on patients with movement disorders and\\/or dementia. Thereby, the focus is on disease-related deficiencies within the functional entity of the dopaminergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic or opioid synapse. In vivo investigations have yielded highly consistent results on the dysfunction of

  19. In Vivo Application of Optogenetics for Neural Circuit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optogenetics combines optical and genetic methods to rapidly and reversibly control neural activities or other cellular functions. Using genetic methods, specific cells or anatomical pathways can be sensitized to light through exogenous expression of microbial light activated opsin proteins. Using optical methods, opsin expressing cells can be rapidly and reversibly controlled by pulses of light of specific wavelength. With the high spatial temporal precision, optogenetic tools have enabled new ways to probe the causal role of specific cells in neural computation and behavior. Here, we overview the current state of the technology, and provide a brief introduction to the practical considerations in applying optogenetics in vivo to analyze neural circuit functions. PMID:22896801

  20. Diesel exhaust particulate induces pulmonary and systemic inflammation in rats without impairing endothelial function ex vivo or in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhalation of diesel exhaust impairs vascular function in man, by a mechanism that has yet to be fully established. We hypothesised that pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) would cause endothelial dysfunction in rats as a consequence of pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Methods Wistar rats were exposed to DEP (0.5 mg) or saline vehicle by intratracheal instillation and hind-limb blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in situ 6 or 24 h after exposure. Vascular function was tested by administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh) and the endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in vivo and ex vivo in isolated rings of thoracic aorta, femoral and mesenteric artery from DEP exposed rats. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood plasma were collected to assess pulmonary (cell differentials, protein levels & interleukin-6 (IL-6)) and systemic (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) and C-reactive protein (CRP)) inflammation, respectively. Results DEP instillation increased cell counts, total protein and IL-6 in BALF 6 h after exposure, while levels of IL-6 and TNF? were only raised in blood 24 h after DEP exposure. DEP had no effect on the increased hind-limb blood flow induced by ACh in vivo at 6 or 24 h. However, responses to SNP were impaired at both time points. In contrast, ex vivo responses to ACh and SNP were unaltered in arteries isolated from rats exposed to DEP. Conclusions Exposure of rats to DEP induces both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but does not modify endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Other mechanisms in vivo limit dilator responses to SNP and these require further investigation. PMID:22480168

  1. Selection of antibodies for intracellular function using a two-hybrid in vivo system

    PubMed Central

    Visintin, Michela; Tse, Eric; Axelson, Hakan; Rabbitts, Terence H.; Cattaneo, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    Expression of antibodies inside cells has been used successfully to ablate protein function. This finding suggests that the technology should have an impact on disease treatment and in functional genomics where proteins of unknown function are predicted from genomic sequences. A major hindrance is the paucity of antibodies that function in eukaryotic cells, presumably because the antibodies fold incorrectly in the cytoplasm. To overcome this problem, we have developed an in vivo assay for functional intracellular antibodies using a two-hybrid approach. In this assay, antibody, as single-chain Fv (scFv) linked to a transcriptional transactivation domain, can interact with a target antigen, linked to a LexA-DNA binding domain, and thereby activate a reporter gene. We find that several characterized antibodies can bind their target antigen in eukaryotic cells in this two-hybrid format, and we have been able to isolate intracellular binders from among sets of scFv that can bind antigen in vitro. Furthermore, we show a model selection in which a single scFv was isolated from a mixture of half a million clones, indicating that this is a robust procedure that should facilitate capture of antibody specificities from complex mixtures. The approach can provide the basis for de novo selection of intracellular scFv from libraries, such as those made from spleen RNA after immunization with antigen, for intracellular analysis of protein function based only on genomic or cDNA sequences. PMID:10518517

  2. Ex vivo analysis of pancreatic cancer-infiltrating T lymphocytes reveals that ENO-specific Tregs accumulate in tumor tissue and inhibit Th1/Th17 effector cell functions.

    PubMed

    Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Della Bella, Chiara; Cianchi, Fabio; Bechi, Paolo; Taddei, Antonio; Bencini, Lapo; Farsi, Marco; Cappello, Paola; Prisco, Domenico; Novelli, Francesco; D'Elios, Mario Milco

    2013-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive disease with dismal prognosis. Surgical resection is the recommended treatment for long-term survival, but patients with resectable PC are in the minority (with a 5-year survival rate of 20 %). Therefore, development of novel therapeutic strategies, such as anti-PC immunotherapy, is crucial. ?-Enolase (ENO1) is an enzyme expressed on the surface of pancreatic cancer cells and is able to promote cell migration and cancer metastasis. The capacity of ENO1 to induce an immune response in PC patients renders it a true tumor-associated antigen. In this study, we characterized the effector functions of ENO1-specific T cells isolated from PC patients, and we specifically evaluated the successful role of intra-tumoral T helper 17 (Th17) cells and the inhibitory role of regulatory T (Tregs) cells in respectively promoting or reducing the cancer-specific immune response. In this ex vivo study, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that ENO1-specific Th17 cells have a specific anti-cancer effector function in PC patients, and that there are decreased levels of these cells in cancer compared to healthy mucosa. Conversely, there are elevated levels of ENO1-specific Tregs in PC patients which lead to inhibition of the antigen-specific effector T cells, thus highlighting a possible role in promoting PC progression. These results may be relevant for the design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:23640603

  3. Understanding functional miRNA–target interactions in vivo by site-specific genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Andrew R.; Azzam, Ghows; Wheatley, Lucy; Tibbit, Charlotte; Rajakumar, Timothy; McGowan, Simon; Stanger, Nathan; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Ponting, Chris P.; Liu, Ji-Long; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Fulga, Tudor A.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) target recognition is largely dictated by short ‘seed’ sequences, and single miRNAs therefore have the potential to regulate a large number of genes. Understanding the contribution of specific miRNA–target interactions to the regulation of biological processes in vivo remains challenging. Here we use transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technologies to interrogate the functional relevance of predicted miRNA response elements (MREs) to post-transcriptional silencing in zebrafish and Drosophila. We also demonstrate an effective strategy that uses CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair with short oligonucleotide donors for the assessment of MRE activity in human cells. These methods facilitate analysis of the direct phenotypic consequences resulting from blocking specific miRNA–MRE interactions at any point during development. PMID:25135198

  4. Function Point Analysis Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Martinez, El; Szafran, J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot is a web application originally designed by one of the NE-C3 branch's engineers, Jamie Szafran, and created specifically for the Software Development team of the Launch Control Systems (LCS) project. The application consists of evaluating the work of each developer to be able to get a real estimate of the hours that is going to be assigned to a specific task of development. The Architect Team had made design change requests for the depot to change the schema of the application's information; that information, changed in the database, needed to be changed in the graphical user interface (GUI) (written in Ruby on Rails (RoR and the web service/server side in Java to match the database changes. These changes were made by two interns from NE-C, Ricardo Muniz from NE-C3, who made all the schema changes for the GUI in RoR and Edwin Martinez, from NE-C2, who made all the changes in the Java side.

  5. In vivo analysis of burns in a mouse model using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jason R; Jaedicke, Volker; Medina, Manuel; Levinson, Howard; Selim, Maria Angelica; Brown, William J; Wax, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of biological tissues can provide insight into changes in structure and function due to disease or injury. Depth-resolved spectroscopic measurements can be implemented for tissue imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Here, spectroscopic OCT is applied to in vivo measurement of burn injury in a mouse model. Data processing and analysis methods are compared for their accuracy. Overall accuracy in classifying burned tissue was found to be as high as 91%, producing an area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.97. The origins of the spectral changes are identified by correlation with histopathology. PMID:25360936

  6. In vivo analysis of burns in a mouse model using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Jason R.; Jaedicke, Volker; Medina, Manuel; Levinson, Howard; Selim, Maria Angelica; Brown, William J.; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of biological tissues can provide insight into changes in structure and function due to disease or injury. Depth resolved spectroscopic measurements can be implemented for tissue imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Here spectroscopic OCT is applied to in vivo measurement of burn injury in a mouse model. Data processing and analysis methods are compared for their accuracy. Overall accuracy in classifying burned tissue was found to be as high as 91%, producing an area under the curve of a receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.97. The origins of the spectral changes are identified by correlation with histopathology. PMID:25360936

  7. Behavior of endogenous tumor-associated macrophages assessed in vivo using a functionalized nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Leimgruber, Antoine; Berger, Cedric; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Etzrodt, Martin; Newton, Andita P; Waterman, Peter; Figueiredo, Jose Luiz; Kohler, Rainer H; Elpek, Natalie; Mempel, Thorsten R; Swirski, Filip K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2009-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) invade the tumor stroma in many cancers, yet their role is incompletely understood. To visualize and better understand these critical cells in tumor progression, we screened a portfolio of rationally selected, injectable agents to image endogenous TAMs ubiquitously in three different cancer models (colon carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma). AMTA680, a functionally derivatized magneto-fluorescent nanoparticle, labeled a subset of myeloid cells with an "M2" macrophage phenotype, whereas other neighboring cells, including tumor cells and a variety of other leukocytes, remained unlabeled. We further show that AMTA680-labeled endogenous TAMs are not altered and can be tracked noninvasively at different resolutions and using various imaging modalities, e.g., fluorescence molecular tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and multiphoton and confocal intravital microscopy. Quantitative assessment of TAM distribution and activity in vivo identified that these cells cluster in delimited foci within tumors, show relatively low motility, and extend cytoplasmic protrusions for prolonged physical interactions with neighboring tumor cells. Noninvasive imaging can also be used to monitor TAM-depleting regimen quantitatively. Thus, AMTA680 or related cell-targeting agents represent appropriate injectable vehicles for in vivo analysis of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:19412430

  8. Spline Functions in Data Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svante Wold

    1974-01-01

    The use of spline functions in the analysis of empirical two-dimensional data (yi, xi) is described. The definition of spline functions as piecewise polynomials with continuity conditions give them unique properties as empirical function. They can represent any variation of y with x arbitrarily well over wide intervals of x. Furthermore, due to the local properties of the spline functions,

  9. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-21

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain. PMID:25632958

  10. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  11. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  12. SAHA Enhances Synaptic Function and Plasticity In Vitro but Has Limited Brain Availability In Vivo and Does Not Impact Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jesse E.; La, Hank; Plise, Emile; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Hanania, Taleen; Sabath, Emily V.; Alexandrov, Vadim; Brunner, Dani; Leahy, Emer; Steiner, Pascal; Liu, Lichuan; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) used for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and under consideration for other indications. In vivo studies suggest reducing HDAC function can enhance synaptic function and memory, raising the possibility that SAHA treatment could have neurological benefits. We first examined the impacts of SAHA on synaptic function in vitro using rat organotypic hippocampal brain slices. Following several days of SAHA treatment, basal excitatory but not inhibitory synaptic function was enhanced. Presynaptic release probability and intrinsic neuronal excitability were unaffected suggesting SAHA treatment selectively enhanced postsynaptic excitatory function. In addition, long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synapses was augmented, while long-term depression (LTD) was impaired in SAHA treated slices. Despite the in vitro synaptic enhancements, in vivo SAHA treatment did not rescue memory deficits in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Along with the lack of behavioral impact, pharmacokinetic analysis indicated poor brain availability of SAHA. Broader assessment of in vivo SAHA treatment using high-content phenotypic characterization of C57Bl6 mice failed to demonstrate significant behavioral effects of up to 150 mg/kg SAHA following either acute or chronic injections. Potentially explaining the low brain exposure and lack of behavioral impacts, SAHA was found to be a substrate of the blood brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters Pgp and Bcrp1. Thus while our in vitro data show that HDAC inhibition can enhance excitatory synaptic strength and potentiation, our in vivo data suggests limited brain availability may contribute to the lack of behavioral impact of SAHA following peripheral delivery. These results do not predict CNS effects of SAHA during clinical use and also emphasize the importance of analyzing brain drug levels when interpreting preclinical behavioral pharmacology. PMID:23922875

  13. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  14. Ex Vivo Cytosolic Delivery of Functional Macromolecules to Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartoularos, George C.; Eyerman, Alexandra T.; Lytton-Jean, Abigail; Angin, Mathieu; Sharma, Siddhartha; Poceviciute, Roberta; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Liu, Sophia; Talkar, Tanya; Khan, Omar F.; Addo, Marylyn; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert; Lieberman, Judy; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of biomolecules, such as proteins and siRNAs, into primary immune cells, especially resting lymphocytes, is a challenge. Here we describe the design and testing of microfluidic intracellular delivery systems that cause temporary membrane disruption by rapid mechanical deformation of human and mouse immune cells. Dextran, antibody and siRNA delivery performance is measured in multiple immune cell types and the approach’s potential to engineer cell function is demonstrated in HIV infection studies. PMID:25875117

  15. Application of electrical stimulation for functional tissue engineering in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Milica (Inventor); Park, Hyoungshin (Inventor); Langer, Robert (Inventor); Freed, Lisa (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides new methods for the in vitro preparation of bioartificial tissue equivalents and their enhanced integration after implantation in vivo. These methods include submitting a tissue construct to a biomimetic electrical stimulation during cultivation in vitro to improve its structural and functional properties, and/or in vivo, after implantation of the construct, to enhance its integration with host tissue and increase cell survival and functionality. The inventive methods are particularly useful for the production of bioartificial equivalents and/or the repair and replacement of native tissues that contain electrically excitable cells and are subject to electrical stimulation in vivo, such as, for example, cardiac muscle tissue, striated skeletal muscle tissue, smooth muscle tissue, bone, vasculature, and nerve tissue.

  16. Effect of Processing and Storage on RBC function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, Allan; Spinella, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) transfusion is indicated to improve oxygen delivery to tissue, and for no other purpose. We have come to appreciate that donor RBCs are fundamentally altered during processing and storage, in a fashion that both impairs oxygen transport efficacy and introduces additional risk by perturbing both immune and coagulation systems. The protean biophysical and physiologic changes in RBC function arising from storage are termed the ‘storage lesion’; many have been understood for some time; for example, we know that the oxygen affinity of stored blood rises during the storage period1 and that intracellular allosteric regulators, notably 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid (DPG) and ATP, are depleted during storage. Our appreciation of other storage lesion features has emerged with improved understanding of coagulation, immune and vascular signaling systems. Herein we review key features of the ‘storage lesion’. Additionally, we call particular attention to the newly appreciated role of RBCs in regulating linkage between regional blood flow and regional O2 consumption by regulating the bioavailability of key vasoactive mediators in plasma, as well as discuss how processing and storage disturbs this key signaling function and impairs transfusion efficacy. PMID:22818545

  17. Anti-CEA-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for examining colorectal tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although the biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in colorectal tumors, the utility of an anti-CEA-functionalized image medium is powerful for in vivo positioning of colorectal tumors. With a risk of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONPs) that is lower for animals than other material carriers, anti-CEA-functionalized SPIONPs were synthesized in this study for labeling colorectal tumors by conducting different preoperatively and intraoperatively in vivo examinations. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the image variation of colorectal tumors reached the maximum at approximately 24 h. However, because MRI requires a nonmetal environment, it was limited to preoperative imaging. With the potentiality of in vivo screening and intraoperative positioning during surgery, the scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device biosusceptometry (SSB) was adopted, showing the favorable agreement of time-varied intensity with MRI. Furthermore, biological methodologies of different tissue staining methods and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) yielded consistent results, proving that the obtained in vivo results occurred because of targeted anti-CEA SPIONPs. This indicates that developed anti-CEA SPIONPs owe the utilities as an image medium of these in vivo methodologies. PMID:24103079

  18. Anti-CEA-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for examining colorectal tumors in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Lin, In-Tsang; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2013-10-01

    Although the biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in colorectal tumors, the utility of an anti-CEA-functionalized image medium is powerful for in vivo positioning of colorectal tumors. With a risk of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONPs) that is lower for animals than other material carriers, anti-CEA-functionalized SPIONPs were synthesized in this study for labeling colorectal tumors by conducting different preoperatively and intraoperatively in vivo examinations. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the image variation of colorectal tumors reached the maximum at approximately 24 h. However, because MRI requires a nonmetal environment, it was limited to preoperative imaging. With the potentiality of in vivo screening and intraoperative positioning during surgery, the scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device biosusceptometry (SSB) was adopted, showing the favorable agreement of time-varied intensity with MRI. Furthermore, biological methodologies of different tissue staining methods and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) yielded consistent results, proving that the obtained in vivo results occurred because of targeted anti-CEA SPIONPs. This indicates that developed anti-CEA SPIONPs owe the utilities as an image medium of these in vivo methodologies.

  19. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT DURING PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) on Ex Vivo Luteal Function In the Pregnant F344 Rat Susan R. Bielmeier1, Ashley S. Murr2, Deborah S. Best2, Jerome M. Goldman2, and Michael G. Narotsky2 1Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599,...

  20. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT. S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA 2 Reproductive T...

  1. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT. S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA 2 Reproductive T...

  2. In vivo neuronal function of the fragile X mental retardation protein is regulated by phosphorylation

    E-print Network

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    In vivo neuronal function of the fragile X mental retardation protein is regulated November 7, 2011 Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) gene,7). The X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder is caused by the loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1

  3. A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX

    E-print Network

    Simon, Anne

    A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX College Park College Park, MD 20742, USA The motif1-hairpin (M1H), located on (2)-strands of Turnip, Turnip Crinkle Virus; SELEX, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment; M1H, motif1

  4. Functionalized gold nanoparticles: a detailed in vivo multimodal microscopic brain distribution study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernanda Sousa; Subhra Mandal; Chiara Garrovo; Alberto Astolfo; Alois Bonifacio; Diane Latawiec; Ralf Hendrik Menk; Fulvia Arfelli; Sabine Huewel; Giuseppe Legname; Hans-Joachim Galla; Silke Krol

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection

  5. Effects of ACL Reconstruction on In-Vivo, Dynamic Knee Function

    PubMed Central

    Tashman, Scott; Araki, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The purposes of this article are to discuss key factors for assessing joint function, to present some recent findings and to address the future directions for evaluating the function of the ACL-injured/reconstructed knees. Well-designed studies, using state-of-the art tools to assess knee kinematics under in vivo, dynamic, high-loading conditions, are necessary to evaluate the relative performance of different procedures for restoring normal joint motion. PMID:23177461

  6. Functional Analysis for Chemical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkrishna, D.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course on functional analysis offered at Purdue University. The course restricts itself to linear problems, specifically analysis of linear operators on vector spaces. Key applications in the course demonstrating the utility of abstract formulations are presented. (BT)

  7. In vivo analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans noncoding RNA promoter motifs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; He, Housheng; Wang, Yunfei; Zheng, Haixia; Skogerbø, Geir; Chen, Runsheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play important roles in a variety of cellular processes. Characterizing the transcriptional activity of ncRNA promoters is therefore a critical step toward understanding the complex cellular roles of ncRNAs. Results Here we present an in vivo transcriptional analysis of three C. elegans ncRNA upstream motifs (UM1-3). Transcriptional activity of all three motifs has been demonstrated, and mutational analysis revealed differential contributions of different parts of each motif. We showed that upstream motif 1 (UM1) can drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), and utilized this for detailed analysis of temporal and spatial expression patterns of 5 SL2 RNAs. Upstream motifs 2 and 3 do not drive GFP expression, and termination at consecutive T runs suggests transcription by RNA polymerase III. The UM2 sequence resembles the tRNA promoter, and is actually embedded within its own short-lived, primary transcript. This is a structure which is also found at a few plant and yeast loci, and may indicate an evolutionarily very old dicistronic transcription pattern in which a tRNA serves as a promoter for an adjacent snoRNA. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that the three upstream motifs UM1-3 have promoter activity. The UM1 sequence can drive expression of GFP, which allows for the use of UM1::GFP fusion constructs to study temporal-spatial expression patterns of UM1 ncRNA loci. The UM1 loci appear to act in concert with other upstream sequences, whereas the transcriptional activities of the UM2 and UM3 are confined to the motifs themselves. PMID:18680611

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Rod Photoreceptor Homeostasis Revealed by In Vivo NRL Targetome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hong; Kim, Douglas S.; Klocke, Bernward; Johnson, Kory R.; Cui, Kairong; Gotoh, Norimoto; Zang, Chongzhi; Gregorski, Janina; Gieser, Linn; Peng, Weiqun; Fann, Yang; Seifert, Martin; Zhao, Keji; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP–Seq) data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP–Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP–Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s) for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis. PMID:22511886

  9. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 K? impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future. PMID:22442134

  10. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  11. Defining Uremic Arterial Functional Abnormalities in Patients Recently Started on Haemodialysis: Combined In Vivo and Ex Vivo Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Abushufa, Adil M.; Eldehni, Mohamed T.; Odudu, Aghogho; Evans, Philip D.; O?Sullivan, Saoirse E.; McIntyre, Chris W.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in vascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and haemodialysis (HD) patients exhibit significant vascular abnormalities. To understand this further, we examined how ex vivo intrinsic function in isolated arteries correlates with in vivo assessments of cardiovascular status in HD patients. Abdominal fat biopsies were obtained from 11 HD patients and 26 non-uremic controls. Subcutaneous arteries were dissected and mounted on a wire myograph, and cumulative concentration-response curves to noradrenalin, endothelin-1, a thromboxane A2 agonist (U46619), angiotensin II, vasopressin, bradykinin (BK), acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were constructed. Pulse wave velocity and blood pressure were measured in HD patients. Enhanced (P<0.05?0.0001) maximal contractile responses (Rmax) to all spasmogens (particularly vasopressin) were observed in arteries from HD patients compared to controls, and this effect was more pronounced in arteries with an internal diameter>600 µm. The potency (pEC50) of U46619 (P<0.01) and vasopressin (P<0.001) was also increased in arteries>600 µm of HD patients. The maximal relaxant response to the endothelium-dependent dilators ACh and BK were lower in HD patients (P<0.01-P<0.0001) (worse for ACh than BK); however the endothelium-independent dilator SNP was similar in both groups. PWV was significantly correlated with the vasoconstrictor response to vasopressin (P?=?0.042) in HD patients. HD patients are primed for hypertension and end organ demand ischaemia by a highly sensitised pressor response. The failure of arterial relaxation is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. Intrinsic vascular abnormalities may be important in sensitising HD patients to recurrent cumulative ischaemic end organ injury. PMID:25546407

  12. Morphological analysis of quiescent and activated keratocytes: a review of ex vivo and in vivo findings.

    PubMed

    Hovakimyan, Marina; Falke, Karen; Stahnke, Thomas; Guthoff, Rudolf; Witt, Martin; Wree, Andreas; Stachs, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Keratocytes are specialized, neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells occupying approximately 3% of the corneal stromal volume. They reside between the collagen lamellae and are responsible for the secretion of extracellular matrix macromolecules, thus contributing to the corneal transparency and integrity. During the regeneration process after infection, traumata and refractive surgery, the keratocytes undergo transition into divergent phenotypes, which are referred to as "activated keratocytes". Quite shortly after injury, the keratocytes lose their quiescence, enter into the cell cycle and migrate toward the site of injury. In certain types of injury, which affect the integrity of basement membrane, activated keratocytes also participate in wound closure by production of ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA). Since the activated keratocytes are the major cell type contributing to tissue repair during corneal wound healing, their morphological and biochemical properties have been studied in details in experimental studies using light and electron microscopy. More recently, emerging of in vivo microscopy techniques has opened new possibilities to investigate cornea in vivo. The non-invasive nature of this imaging modality enables repeated examination of the same tissue over time and is an ideal tool to rapidly and accurately investigate corneal wound healing. However, the in vivo data on activated keratocytes are not as uniform as data from experimental ex vivo studies. There is still inconsistency in the literature findings on activated phenotypes, and often the described morphologies cannot be appreciated in in vivo images. In this article, a literature review was performed in order to interpret the morphology of different activated phenotypes, based on biological processes underlying the morphological alterations. PMID:24749788

  13. A Dynamic Real Time In Vivo and Static Ex Vivo Analysis of Granulomonocytic Cell Migration in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Ruth; Rath, Eva; Hladik, Anastasiya; Niederreiter, Birgit; Bonelli, Michael; Frantal, Sophie; Smolen, Josef S.; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC) drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections. GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC. In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time. PMID:22529989

  14. Functionalized gold nanoparticles: a detailed in vivo multimodal microscopic brain distribution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Fernanda; Mandal, Subhra; Garrovo, Chiara; Astolfo, Alberto; Bonifacio, Alois; Latawiec, Diane; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Huewel, Sabine; Legname, Giuseppe; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Krol, Silke

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex.In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S6. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00345j

  15. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo. PMID:25762151

  16. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo. PMID:25762151

  17. Compound Ex Vivo and In Silico Method for Hemodynamic Analysis of Stented Arteries

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Compound Ex Vivo and In Silico Method for Hemodynamic Analysis of Stented Arteries Farhad Rikhtegar the coronary arteries of ex vivo porcine hearts, performed vascular corrosion casting, acquired the vessel in detail the stent geometry, arterial tissue prolapse, radial and axial arterial deformation as well

  18. Comparison of Beam Theory and Finite-Element Analysis With In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Comparison of Beam Theory and Finite-Element Analysis With In Vivo Bone Strain Data From collected in vivo bone strain orientations and magnitudes from the cranium of the American alligator with those extrapolated from a beam model and ex- tracted from an FE model. The strain magnitudes predicted

  19. Structured functional principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Greven, Sonja

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  20. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  1. In vivo generation of a mature and functional artificial skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fuoco, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Biondo, Antonella; Longa, Emanuela; Mascaro, Anna; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Kossovar, Olga; Benedetti, Sara; Salvatori, Maria L; Santoleri, Sabrina; Testa, Stefano; Bernardini, Sergio; Bottinelli, Roberto; Bearzi, Claudia; Cannata, Stefano M; Seliktar, Dror; Cossu, Giulio; Gargioli, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Extensive loss of skeletal muscle tissue results in mutilations and severe loss of function. In vitro-generated artificial muscles undergo necrosis when transplanted in vivo before host angiogenesis may provide oxygen for fibre survival. Here, we report a novel strategy based upon the use of mouse or human mesoangioblasts encapsulated inside PEG-fibrinogen hydrogel. Once engineered to express placental-derived growth factor, mesoangioblasts attract host vessels and nerves, contributing to in vivo survival and maturation of newly formed myofibres. When the graft was implanted underneath the skin on the surface of the tibialis anterior, mature and aligned myofibres formed within several weeks as a complete and functional extra muscle. Moreover, replacing the ablated tibialis anterior with PEG-fibrinogen-embedded mesoangioblasts also resulted in an artificial muscle very similar to a normal tibialis anterior. This strategy opens the possibility for patient-specific muscle creation for a large number of pathological conditions involving muscle tissue wasting. PMID:25715804

  2. In vivo interrogation of gene function in the mammalian brain using CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Swiech, Lukasz; Heidenreich, Matthias; Banerjee, Abhishek; Habib, Naomi; Li, Yinqing; Trombetta, John; Sur, Mriganka; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Probing gene function in the mammalian brain can be greatly assisted with methods to manipulate the genome of neurons in vivo. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be used to edit single or multiple genes in replicating eukaryotic cells, resulting in frame-shifting insertion/deletion (indel) mutations and subsequent protein depletion. Here, we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to target single (Mecp2) as well as multiple genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b) in the adult mouse brain in vivo. We characterized the effects of genome modifications in postmitotic neurons using biochemical, genetic, electrophysiological and behavioral readouts. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated SpCas9 genome editing can enable reverse genetic studies of gene function in the brain. PMID:25326897

  3. Atypical Membrane Topology and Heteromeric Function of Drosophila Odorant Receptors In Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Benton; Silke Sachse; Stephen W. Michnick; Leslie B. Vosshall

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) each express two odorant receptors (ORs): a divergent member of the OR family and the highly conserved, broadly expressed receptor OR83b. OR83b is essential for olfaction in vivo and enhances OR function in vitro, but the molecular mechanism by which it acts is unknown. Here we demonstrate that OR83b heterodimerizes with conventional ORs early in

  4. Space station functional relationships analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tullis, Thomas S.; Bied, Barbra R.

    1988-01-01

    A systems engineering process is developed to assist Space Station designers to understand the underlying operational system of the facility so that it can be physically arranged and configured to support crew productivity. The study analyzes the operational system proposed for the Space Station in terms of mission functions, crew activities, and functional relationships in order to develop a quantitative model for evaluation of interior layouts, configuration, and traffic analysis for any Station configuration. Development of the model involved identification of crew functions, required support equipment, criteria of assessing functional relationships, and tools for analyzing functional relationship matrices, as well as analyses of crew transition frequency, sequential dependencies, support equipment requirements, potential for noise interference, need for privacy, and overall compatability of functions. The model can be used for analyzing crew functions for the Initial Operating Capability of the Station and for detecting relationships among these functions. Note: This process (FRA) was used during Phase B design studies to test optional layouts of the Space Station habitat module. The process is now being automated as a computer model for use in layout testing of the Space Station laboratory modules during Phase C.

  5. Nucleotide Binding by Lhs1p Is Essential for Its Nucleotide Exchange Activity and for Function in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    de Keyzer, Jeanine; Steel, Gregor J.; Hale, Sarah J.; Humphries, Daniel; Stirling, Colin J.

    2009-01-01

    Protein translocation and folding in the endoplasmic reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves two distinct Hsp70 chaperones, Lhs1p and Kar2p. Both proteins have the characteristic domain structure of the Hsp70 family consisting of a conserved N-terminal nucleotide binding domain and a C-terminal substrate binding domain. Kar2p is a canonical Hsp70 whose substrate binding activity is regulated by cochaperones that promote either ATP hydrolysis or nucleotide exchange. Lhs1p is a member of the Grp170/Lhs1p subfamily of Hsp70s and was previously shown to function as a nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) for Kar2p. Here we show that in addition to this NEF activity, Lhs1p can function as a holdase that prevents protein aggregation in vitro. Analysis of the nucleotide requirement of these functions demonstrates that nucleotide binding to Lhs1p stimulates the interaction with Kar2p and is essential for NEF activity. In contrast, Lhs1p holdase activity is nucleotide-independent and unaffected by mutations that interfere with ATP binding and NEF activity. In vivo, these mutants show severe protein translocation defects and are unable to support growth despite the presence of a second Kar2p-specific NEF, Sil1p. Thus, Lhs1p-dependent nucleotide exchange activity is vital for ER protein biogenesis in vivo. PMID:19759005

  6. Functionalized near-infrared quantum dots for in vivo tumor vasculature imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Ding, Hong; Law, Wing-Cheung; Cai, Hongxing; Zhang, Xihe; Vathy, Lisa A; Bergey, Earl J; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we report the use of near-infrared (NIR)-emitting alloyed quantum dots (QDs) as efficient optical probes for high contrast in vivo imaging of tumors. Alloyed CdTe(1 - x)Se(x)/CdS QDs were prepared in the non-aqueous phase using the hot colloidal synthesis approach. Water dispersion of the QDs were accomplished by their encapsulation within polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-grafted phospholipid micelles. For tumor-specific delivery in vivo, the micelle-encapsulated QDs were conjugated with the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide, which targets the alpha(v)beta(3) integrins overexpressed in the angiogenic tumor vasculatures. Using in vivo NIR optical imaging of mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts, implanted both subcutaneously and orthotopically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered cRGD-conjugated QDs, but not the unconjugated ones, can efficiently target and label the tumors with high signal-to-noise ratio. Histopathological analysis of major organs of the treated mice showed no evidence of systemic toxicity associated with these QDs. These experiments suggest that cRGD-conjugated NIR QDs can serve as safe and efficient probes for optical bioimaging of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, by co-encapsulating these QDs and anticancer drugs within these micelles, we have demonstrated a promising theranostic, nanosized platform for both cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:20234074

  7. Functionalized near-infrared quantum dots for in vivo tumor vasculature imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Ding, Hong; Law, Wing-Cheung; Cai, Hongxing; Zhang, Xihe; Vathy, Lisa A.; Bergey, Earl J.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we report the use of near-infrared (NIR)-emitting alloyed quantum dots (QDs) as efficient optical probes for high contrast in vivo imaging of tumors. Alloyed CdTe1 - xSex/CdS QDs were prepared in the non-aqueous phase using the hot colloidal synthesis approach. Water dispersion of the QDs were accomplished by their encapsulation within polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-grafted phospholipid micelles. For tumor-specific delivery in vivo, the micelle-encapsulated QDs were conjugated with the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide, which targets the ?v?3 integrins overexpressed in the angiogenic tumor vasculatures. Using in vivo NIR optical imaging of mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts, implanted both subcutaneously and orthotopically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered cRGD-conjugated QDs, but not the unconjugated ones, can efficiently target and label the tumors with high signal-to-noise ratio. Histopathological analysis of major organs of the treated mice showed no evidence of systemic toxicity associated with these QDs. These experiments suggest that cRGD-conjugated NIR QDs can serve as safe and efficient probes for optical bioimaging of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, by co-encapsulating these QDs and anticancer drugs within these micelles, we have demonstrated a promising theranostic, nanosized platform for both cancer imaging and therapy.

  8. Effects of environmental tobacco smoke in vivo on rhesus monkey semen quality, sperm function, and sperm metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pei-hsuan Hung; Lutz Froenicke; Ching Yu Lin; Leslie A. Lyons; Marion G. Miller; Kent E. Pinkerton; Catherine A. VandeVoort

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use a non-human primate model to examine the effect of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in vivo on semen quality, sperm function, and sperm metabolism. Four adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to ETS for six months, and semen samples were collected every week for evaluation. ETS exposure in vivo did not affect

  9. EVENT PLANNING USING FUNCTION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase; Jodi Grgich

    2011-06-01

    Event planning is expensive and resource intensive. Function analysis provides a solid foundation for comprehensive event planning (e.g., workshops, conferences, symposiums, or meetings). It has been used at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to successfully plan events and capture lessons learned, and played a significant role in the development and implementation of the “INL Guide for Hosting an Event.” Using a guide and a functional approach to planning utilizes resources more efficiently and reduces errors that could be distracting or detrimental to an event. This integrated approach to logistics and program planning – with the primary focus on the participant – gives us the edge.

  10. Structural Determinants of Arabidopsis thaliana Hyponastic Leaves 1 Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burdisso, Paula; Milia, Fernando; Schapire, Arnaldo L.; Bologna, Nicolás G.; Palatnik, Javier F.; Rasia, Rodolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have turned out to be important regulators of gene expression. These molecules originate from longer transcripts that are processed by ribonuclease III (RNAse III) enzymes. Dicer proteins are essential RNAse III enzymes that are involved in the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other small RNAs. The correct function of Dicer relies on the participation of accessory dsRNA binding proteins, the exact function of which is not well-understood so far. In plants, the double stranded RNA binding protein Hyponastic Leaves 1 (HYL1) helps Dicer Like protein (DCL1) to achieve an efficient and precise excision of the miRNAs from their primary precursors. Here we dissected the regions of HYL1 that are essential for its function in Arabidopsis thaliana plant model. We generated mutant forms of the protein that retain their structure but affect its RNA-binding properties. The mutant versions of HYL1 were studied both in vitro and in vivo, and we were able to identify essential aminoacids/residues for its activity. Remarkably, mutation and even ablation of one of the purportedly main RNA binding determinants does not give rise to any major disturbances in the function of the protein. We studied the function of the mutant forms in vivo, establishing a direct correlation between affinity for the pri-miRNA precursors and protein activity. PMID:25409478

  11. Maternal separation affects dopamine transporter function in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat: An in vivo electrochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder characterised by symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a well-characterised model of this disorder and has been shown to exhibit dopamine dysregulation, one of the hypothesised causes of ADHD. Since stress experienced in the early stages of life can have long-lasting effects on behaviour, it was considered that early life stress may alter development of the dopaminergic system and thereby contribute to the behavioural characteristics of SHR. It was hypothesized that maternal separation would alter dopamine regulation by the transporter (DAT) in ways that distinguish SHR from control rat strains. Methods SHR and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected to maternal separation for 3 hours per day from postnatal day 2 to 14. Rats were tested for separation-induced anxiety-like behaviour followed by in vivo chronoamperometry to determine whether changes had occurred in striatal clearance of dopamine by DAT. The rate of disappearance of ejected dopamine was used as a measure of DAT function. Results Consistent with a model for ADHD, SHR were more active than WKY in the open field. SHR entered the inner zone more frequently and covered a significantly greater distance than WKY. Maternal separation increased the time that WKY spent in the closed arms and latency to enter the open arms of the elevated plus maze, consistent with other rat strains. Of note is that, maternal separation failed to produce anxiety-like behaviour in SHR. Analysis of the chronoamperometric data revealed that there was no difference in DAT function in the striatum of non-separated SHR and WKY. Maternal separation decreased the rate of dopamine clearance (k-1) in SHR striatum. Consistent with this observation, the dopamine clearance time (T100) was increased in SHR. These results suggest that the chronic mild stress of maternal separation impaired the function of striatal DAT in SHR. Conclusions The present findings suggest that maternal separation failed to alter the behaviour of SHR in the open field and elevated plus maze. However, maternal separation altered the dopaminergic system by decreasing surface expression of DAT and/or the affinity of DAT for dopamine, increasing the time to clear dopamine from the extracellular fluid in the striatum of SHR. PMID:22133315

  12. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  13. Mathematical Analysis of HIV1 Dynamics in Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan S. Perelson; Patrick W. Nelson

    Mathematical models have proven valuable in understanding the dynamics of HIV-1 in- fection in vivo. By comparing these models to data obtained from patients undergoing antiretroviral drug therapy, it has been possible to determine many quantitative features of the interaction between HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, and the cells that are infected by the virus. The most dramatic nding

  14. In vivo functional microangiography by visible-light optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Although hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) in the microvasculature is an essential physiological parameter of local tissue functions, non-invasive measurement of microvascular sO2 is still challenging. Here, we demonstrated that visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) can simultaneously provide three-dimensional anatomical tissue morphology, visualize microvasculature at the capillary level, and measure sO2 from the microvasculature in vivo. We utilized speckle contrast caused by the moving blood cells to enhance microvascular imaging. We applied a series of short-time inverse Fourier transforms to obtain the spectroscopic profile of blood optical attenuation, from which we quantified sO2. We validated the sO2 measurement in mouse ears in vivo through hypoxia and hyperoxia challenges. We further demonstrated that vis-OCT can continuously monitor dynamic changes of microvascular sO2. PMID:25360376

  15. Dual-selection for evolution of in vivo functional aptazymes as riboswitch parts.

    PubMed

    Goler, Jonathan A; Carothers, James M; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    Both synthetic biology and metabolic engineering are aided by the development of genetic control parts. One class of riboswitch parts that has great potential for sensing and regulation of protein levels is aptamer-coupled ribozymes (aptazymes). These devices are comprised of an aptamer domain selected to bind a particular ligand, a ribozyme domain, and a communication module that regulates the ribozyme activity based on the state of the aptamer. We describe a broadly applicable method for coupling a novel, newly selected aptamer to a ribozyme to generate functional aptazymes via in vitro and in vivo selection. To illustrate this approach, we describe experimental procedures for selecting aptazymes assembled from aptamers that bind p-amino-phenylalanine and a hammerhead ribozyme. Because this method uses selection, it does not rely on sequence-specific design and thus should be generalizable for the generation of in vivo operational aptazymes that respond to any targeted molecules. PMID:24549623

  16. In vivo commitment and functional tissue regeneration using human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Nathaniel S.; Varghese, Shyni; Lee, H. Janice; Zhang, Zijun; Ye, Zhaohui; Bae, Jongwoo; Cheng, Linzhao; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Development of clinically relevant regenerative medicine therapies using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) requires production of a simple and readily expandable cell population that can be directed to form functional 3D tissue in an in vivo environment. We describe an efficient derivation method and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from hESCs (hESCd-MSCs) that have multilineage differentiation potential and are capable of producing fat, cartilage, and bone in vitro. Furthermore, we highlight their in vivo survival and commitment to the chondrogenic lineage in a microenvironment comprising chondrocyte-secreted morphogenetic factors and hydrogels. Normal cartilage architecture was established in rat osteochondral defects after treatment with chondrogenically-committed hESCd-MSCs. In view of the limited available cell sources for tissue engineering applications, these embryonic-derived cells show significant potential in musculoskeletal tissue regeneration applications. PMID:19095799

  17. Structure and function of RNase AS, a polyadenylate-specific exoribonuclease affecting mycobacterial virulence in vivo.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria; van de Weerd, Robert; Brouwer, Femke C C; Roviello, Giovanni N; Lacroix, Ruben; Sparrius, Marion; van den Brink-van Stempvoort, Gunny; Maaskant, Janneke J; van der Sar, Astrid M; Appelmelk, Ben J; Geurtsen, Jeroen J; Berisio, Rita

    2014-05-01

    The cell-envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a key role in bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of regulation of cell-envelope formation. Here, we elucidate functional and structural properties of RNase AS, which modulates M. tuberculosis cell-envelope properties and strongly impacts bacterial virulence in vivo. The structure of RNase AS reveals a resemblance to RNase T from Escherichia coli, an RNase of the DEDD family involved in RNA maturation. We show that RNase AS acts as a 3'-5'-exoribonuclease that specifically hydrolyzes adenylate-containing RNA sequences. Also, crystal structures of complexes with AMP and UMP reveal the structural basis for the observed enzyme specificity. Notably, RNase AS shows a mechanism of substrate recruitment, based on the recognition of the hydrogen bond donor NH2 group of adenine. Our work opens a field for the design of drugs able to reduce bacterial virulence in vivo. PMID:24704253

  18. Relationship between in vivo activity and in vitro measures of function and stability of a protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, W.S.; Schlunk, P.M.; Zabin, H.G. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-19

    The in vivo activities of mutant proteins are readily measured and can potentially be used to estimate changes in in vitro properties such as stability or function, but this connection has not been rigorously established. Gene V protein is a small protein produced by bacteriophage f1 that binds to single-stranded DNA and to RNA and for which fitness can be assayed both in vivo and in vitro. We have assembled a large number of temperature-sensitive mutants of the gene V protein of bacteriophage f1 and measured their ability to support phage growth and replication in vivo. We have also purified many of these mutant gene V proteins and measured their stabilities and ssDNA binding affinities in vitro. Mutations at surface residues frequently yielded temperature-sensitive mutants, but remarkably, no overall correlation between in vivo activity and in vitro measures of either stability or function was found for this group. Mutations at buried residues often lead to the temperature-sensitive phenotype. At buried sites temperature sensitivity was strongly correlated with in vitro stability changes, but not with in vitro ssDNA binding affinity. The implication of these observations for protein engineering efforts is that phenotypes conferred by amino acid substitutions at buried sites can be used to identify mutants whose stabilities fall into ranges of interest, while phenotypes of mutants with surface substitutions may be much less readily interpreted, even in the case of a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein. 54 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dynamic in vivo analysis of drug induced actin cytoskeleton degradation by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnekenburger, Juergen; Bredebusch, Ilona; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Domschke, Wolfram; von Bally, Gert; Kemper, Björn

    2007-07-01

    The actin cytoskeleton mediates a variety of crucial cellular functions as migration, intracellular transport, exocytosis, endocytosis and force generation. The highly dynamic actin fibers are therefore targets for several drugs and toxins. However the study of actin interfering processes by standard microscopy techniques fails in the detailed resolution of dynamic spatial alterations required for a deeper understanding of toxic effects. Here we applied digital holographic microscopy in the online functional analysis of the actin cytoskeleton disrupting marine toxin Latrunculin B. SEM and fluorescence microscopy showed rapid Latrunculin B induced alterations in cell morphology and actin fiber degradation in pancreas tumor cells. The dynamic digital holographic in vivo analysis of the drug dependent cellular processes demonstrated differences in the actin cytoskeleton stability of highly differentiated and dedifferentiated pancreas tumor cell lines. The spatial resolution of the morphological alterations revealed unequal changes in cell morphology. While cells with a low metastatic potential showed Latrunculin B induced cell collapse within 4 h the metastatic tumor cells were increased in cell volume indicating Latrunculin B effects also on cell water content. These data demonstrate that marker free, non-destructive online analysis of cellular morphology and dynamic spatial processes in living cells by digital holography offers new insights in actin dependent cellular mechanisms. Digital holographic microscopy was shown to be a versatile tool in the screening of toxic drug effects and cancer cell biology.

  20. PEG-Mediated Synthesis of Highly Dispersive Multifunctional Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles: Their Physicochemical Properties and Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Conroy; Du, Kim; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Veiseh, Omid; Kivit, Forrest; Stephen, Zachary; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Ratner, Buddy; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been developed for a wide range of applications in nanomedicine, such as serving as tumor targeted drug carriers and molecular imaging agents. To function in vivo, the development of these novel materials must overcome several challenging requirements including biocompatibility, stability in physiological solutions, non-toxicity and the ability to traverse biological barriers. Here we report a PEG-mediated synthesis process to produce well-dispersed, ultrafine, and highly stable iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo applications. Utilizing a biocompatible PEG coating bearing amine functional groups, the produced nanoparticles serve as an effective platform with the ability to incorporate a variety of targeting, therapeutic or imaging ligands. In this study, we demonstrated tumor-specific accumulation of these nanoparticles through both magnetic resonance and optical imaging after conjugation with chlorotoxin, a peptide with high affinity toward tumors of the neuroectodermal origin, and Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Furthermore, we performed preliminary biodistribution and toxicity assessments of these nanoparticles in wild-type mice through histological analysis of clearance organs and hematology assay, and the results demonstrated the relative biocompatibility of these nanoparticles. PMID:20232826

  1. The Intramembrane Proteases Signal Peptide Peptidase-Like 2a and 2b Have Distinct Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Mentrup, Torben; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Rothaug, Michelle; Engelke, Michael; Dittmann, Kai; Dressel, Ralf; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Wienands, Jürgen; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We reported recently that the presenilin homologue signal peptide peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) is essential for B cell development by cleaving the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of the invariant chain (li, CD74). Based on this, we suggested that pharmacological modulation of SPPL2a may represent a novel approach to deplete B cells in autoimmune disorders. With regard to reported overlapping substrate spectra of SPPL2a and its close homologue, SPPL2b, we investigated the role of SPPL2b in CD74 NTF proteolysis and its impact on B and dendritic cell homeostasis. In heterologous expression experiments, SPPL2b was found to cleave CD74 NTF with an efficiency simliar to that of SPPL2a. For in vivo analysis, SPPL2b single-deficient and SPPL2a/SPPL2b double-deficient mice were generated and examined for CD74 NTF turnover/accumulation, B cell maturation and functionality, and dendritic cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that in vivo SPPL2b does not exhibit a physiologically relevant contribution to CD74 proteolysis in B and dendritic cells. Furthermore, we reveal that both proteases exhibit divergent subcellular localizations in B cells and different expression profiles in murine tissues. These findings suggest distinct functions of SPPL2a and SPPL2b and, based on a high abundance of SPPL2b in brain, a physiological role of this protease in the central nervous system. PMID:24492962

  2. In vivo relevance of substrate recognition function of major Arabidopsis ubiquitin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ya-Ling; Fu, Hongyong

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitylation marks proteins for destruction by the 26S proteasome. These signals are deciphered and targeted by distinct direct and indirect pathways involving a set of evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin receptors. Although biochemical and structural studies have revealed the mechanistic complexity of these substrate recognition pathways, conclusive evidence of the in vivo relevance of their substrate recognition function is currently not available. We recently showed that the structural elements involved in substrate recognition are not responsible for the important roles of the ubiquitin receptor RPN10 in vegetative and reproductive growth or for the abundance of the two-capped proteasomes (RP2-CP). Moreover, Arabidopsis plants subjected to severe knockdown or knockout any of the major ubiquitin receptors displayed wild-type phenotypes. Our results clearly suggest a functional redundancy of the major Arabidopsis ubiquitin receptors, and this evolved multiplicity is probably used to secure the substrates delivery. Based on the reduced abundance of RP2-CP in rpn10-2 and a role of RPN10 in lid-base association, a structural role of RPN10 in 26S proteasome stability is likely to be more relevant in vivo. Further efforts using structural and functional analyses in higher-order mutants to identify the specific biological functions of substrate recognition for the major Arabidopsis ubiquitin receptors are described here. PMID:22751321

  3. Biomimetic engineered muscle with capacity for vascular integration and functional maturation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mark; Engelmayr, George C.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Palmer, Gregory M.; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle can serve as a physiological model of natural muscle and a potential therapeutic vehicle for rapid repair of severe muscle loss and injury. Here, we describe a platform for engineering and testing highly functional biomimetic muscle tissues with a resident satellite cell niche and capacity for robust myogenesis and self-regeneration in vitro. Using a mouse dorsal window implantation model and transduction with fluorescent intracellular calcium indicator, GCaMP3, we nondestructively monitored, in real time, vascular integration and the functional state of engineered muscle in vivo. During a 2-wk period, implanted engineered muscle exhibited a steady ingrowth of blood-perfused microvasculature along with an increase in amplitude of calcium transients and force of contraction. We also demonstrated superior structural organization, vascularization, and contractile function of fully differentiated vs. undifferentiated engineered muscle implants. The described in vitro and in vivo models of biomimetic engineered muscle represent enabling technology for novel studies of skeletal muscle function and regeneration. PMID:24706792

  4. Alterations at the Cross-Bridge Level Are Associated with a Paradoxical Gain of Muscle Function In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding ?-tropomyosinslow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8–9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occuring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo. PMID:25268244

  5. Applications of nuclear technologies for in-vivo elemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement facilities developed, to date, include a unique whole-body-counter, (WBC); a total-body neutron-activation facility (TBNAA); and a partial-body activation facility (PBNAA). A variation of the prompt-gamma neutron-activation technique for measuring total-body nitrogen was developed to study body composition of cancer patients and the effect of nutritional regimens on the composition. These new techniques provide data in numerous clinical studies not previously amenable to investigation. The development and perfection of these techniques provide unique applications of radiation and radioisotopes to the early diagnosis of certain diseases and the evaluation of therapeutic programs. The PBNAA technique has been developed and calibrated for in-vivo measurement of metals. Development has gone forward on prompt-gamma neutron activation for the measurement of cadmium, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for measurement of iron. Other techniques are being investigated for in-vivo measurement of metals such as silicon and beryllium.

  6. In vivo and in vitro CT analysis of the occiput

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Hertel; H. Hirschfelder

    1999-01-01

    Arguments concerning the best procedure for occipito-cervical fusion have rarely been based upon occipital bone thickness\\u000a or only based on in vitro studies. To close this gap and to offer an outlook on preoperative evaluation of the patient, 28\\u000a patients were analysed in vivo by means of spiral CT. Ten macerated human skulls were measured by means of CT and

  7. Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Woodward, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis for exploring associations among multiple sets of functions. The proposed method includes functional canonical correlation analysis as a special case when only two sets of functions are considered. As in classical multiple-set canonical correlation analysis, computationally, the…

  8. A method for in vivo quantitative occlusal strain and stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Arcan, M; Zandman, F

    1984-01-01

    A method to evaluate in vivo dental occlusal relationships by measuring strains and stresses, memorized in a thin wafer during occlusion, is presented. The method is based on the property of some polymers to memorize mechanical birefringence (the photoplastic phenomenon); it provides and records static and kinematic patterns related to the sequence of contacts during occlusion. This sequence determines the intensity levels of contacts according to impressions on the memorizing sheet. The method consists of observing and measuring, with an optical instrument, birefringence patterns appearing on a special memory sheet upon which a patient has occluded according to specific instructions. Two ways may be considered: the strain analysis and the stress analysis approach. The goal of the strain analysis approach is mostly clinical: to help attain harmonization of the static and kinematic occlusal patterns by detecting and eliminating prematurities and interferences through a step-by-step improvement of the strain uniformity. Other clinical uses include: Relating occlusal strain patterns to traumatic occlusion, bruxism or other functional disturbances. Diagnosing pain-dysfunction syndrome of supporting tissues in subjects with removable complete or partial dentures. Substantiating the comparative effect of supporting implants in combination with natural teeth in bridges, etc. The goal of the stress analysis approach is both clinical and theoretical, providing help in understanding the temporo-mandibular mechanical relationship. PMID:6725296

  9. Adult-Derived Liver Stem Cells Acquire a Cardiomyocyte Structural and Functional Phenotype ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Muller-Borer, Barbara J.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Anderson, Page A.W.; Snowwaert, John N.; Frye, James R.; Desai, Niyati; Esch, Gwyn L.; Brackham, Joe A.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Coleman, William B.; Grisham, Joe W.; Malouf, Nadia N.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the differentiation potential of an adult liver stem cell line (WB F344) in a cardiac microenvironment, ex vivo. WB F344 cells were established from a single cloned nonparenchymal epithelial cell isolated from a normal male adult rat liver. Genetically modified, WB F344 cells that express ?-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein or only ?-galactosidase were co-cultured with dissociated rat or mouse neonatal cardiac cells. After 4 to 14 days, WB F344-derived cardiomyocytes expressed cardiac-specific proteins and exhibited myofibrils, sarcomeres, and a nascent sarcoplasmic reticulum. Further, rhythmically beating WB F344-derived cardiomyocytes displayed calcium transients. Fluorescent recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that WB F344-derived cardiomyocytes were coupled with adjacent neonatal cardiomyocytes and other WB F344-derived cardiomyocytes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments suggested that fusion between WB F344 cells and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes did not take place. Collectively, these results support the conclusion that these adult-derived liver stem cells respond to signals generated in a cardiac microenvironment ex vivo acquiring a cardiomyocyte phenotype and function. The identification ex vivo of microenvironmental signals that appear to cross germ layer and species specificities should prove valuable in understanding the molecular basis of adult stem cell differentiation and phenotypic plasticity. PMID:15215169

  10. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in Olive baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (Olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5 mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5 mg and 1 mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers. PMID:23684840

  11. TYK2 Kinase Activity Is Required for Functional Type I Interferon Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Semper, Christian; Lassnig, Caroline; Wallner, Barbara; Gausterer, Christian; Teppner-Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Kobolak, Julianna; Müller, Simone; Kolbe, Thomas; Karaghiosoff, Marina; Dinnyés, Andras; Rülicke, Thomas; Leitner, Nicole R.; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a member of the Janus kinase (JAK) family and is involved in cytokine signalling. In vitro analyses suggest that TYK2 also has kinase-independent, i.e., non-canonical, functions. We have generated gene-targeted mice harbouring a mutation in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase domain. The Tyk2 kinase-inactive (Tyk2K923E) mice are viable and show no gross abnormalities. We show that kinase-active TYK2 is required for full-fledged type I interferon- (IFN) induced activation of the transcription factors STAT1-4 and for the in vivo antiviral defence against viruses primarily controlled through type I IFN actions. In addition, TYK2 kinase activity was found to be required for the protein’s stability. An inhibitory function was only observed upon over-expression of TYK2K923E in vitro. Tyk2K923E mice represent the first model for studying the kinase-independent function of a JAK in vivo and for assessing the consequences of side effects of JAK inhibitors. PMID:22723949

  12. The unusual mycobacterial chaperonins: evidence for in vivo oligomerization and specialization of function.

    PubMed

    Fan, MingQi; Rao, Tara; Zacco, Elsa; Ahmed, M Tabish; Shukla, Anshuman; Ojha, Anil; Freeke, Joanna; Robinson, Carol V; Benesch, Justin L; Lund, Peter A

    2012-09-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonins, one (Cpn60.1) dispensable and one (Cpn60.2) essential. These proteins have been reported not to form oligomers despite the fact that oligomerization of chaperonins is regarded as essential for their function. We show here that the Cpn60.2 homologue from Mycobacterium smegmatis also fails to oligomerize under standard conditions. However, we also show that the Cpn60.2 proteins from both organisms can replace the essential groEL gene of Escherichia coli, and that they can function with E. coli GroES cochaperonin, as well as with their cognate cochaperonin proteins, strongly implying that they form oligomers in vivo. We show that the Cpn60.1 proteins, but not the Cpn60.2 proteins, can complement for loss of the M. smegmatis cpn60.1 gene. We investigated the oligomerization of the Cpn60.2 proteins using analytical ultracentrifugation and mass spectroscopy. Both form monomers under standard conditions, but they form higher order oligomers in the presence of kosmotropes and ADP or ATP. Under these conditions, their ATPase activity is significantly enhanced. We conclude that the essential mycobacterial chaperonins, while unstable compared to many other bacterial chaperonins, do act as oligomers in vivo, and that there has been specialization of function of the mycobacterial chaperonins following gene duplication. PMID:22834700

  13. Non invasive in vivo investigation of hepatobiliary structure and function in STII medaka (Oryzias latipes): methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Ron C; Kullman, Seth W; Hinton, David E

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel transparent stock of medaka (Oryzias latipes; STII), recessive for all pigments found in chromatophores, permits transcutaneous imaging of internal organs and tissues in living individuals. Findings presented describe the development of methodologies for non invasive in vivo investigation in STII medaka, and the successful application of these methodologies to in vivo study of hepatobiliary structure, function, and xenobiotic response, in both 2 and 3 dimensions. Results Using brightfield, and widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy, coupled with the in vivo application of fluorescent probes, structural and functional features of the hepatobiliary system, and xenobiotic induced toxicity, were imaged at the cellular level, with high resolution (< 1 ?m), in living individuals. The findings presented demonstrate; (1) phenotypic response to xenobiotic exposure can be investigated/imaged in vivo with high resolution (< 1 ?m), (2) hepatobiliary transport of solutes from blood to bile can be qualitatively and quantitatively studied/imaged in vivo, (3) hepatobiliary architecture in this lower vertebrate liver can be studied in 3 dimensions, and (4) non invasive in vivo imaging/description of hepatobiliary development in this model can be investigated. Conclusion The non-invasive in vivo methodologies described are a unique means by which to investigate biological structure, function and xenobiotic response with high resolution in STII medaka. In vivo methodologies also provide the future opportunity to integrate molecular mechanisms (e.g., genomic, proteomic) of disease and toxicity with phenotypic changes at the cellular and system levels of biological organization. While our focus has been the hepatobiliary system, other organ systems are equally amenable to in vivo study, and we consider the potential for discovery, within the context of in vivo investigation in STII medaka, as significant. PMID:18838008

  14. Photoacoustics and fluorescence based nanoprobes towards functional and structural imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha

    Imaging of chemical analytes and structural properties related to physiological activities within biological systems is of great bio-medical interest; it can contribute to the fundamental understanding of biological systems and can be applied to the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases, especially tumors. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development and application of polymeric nanoprobe aided optical imaging of chemical analytes (Oxygen, pH) and structural properties in live cells and animal models. To this end, specific nanoprobes, based on the polyacrylamide nanoplatform, bearing both appropriate targeting functionalities, and high concentrations of sensing and contrast agents, have been developed. The nanoprobes presented here are biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic, rendering them safe for in vivo use. Furthermore the nanoprobes are designed to have variable optical properties that are dependent on the local concentration of the specific analyte of interest. Optical imaging techniques that are particularly suited for deep tissue applications, such as two-photon fluorescence and photoacoustics, were applied for non-invasive real-time imaging and sensing in cancer cells, tumor spheroids and animal models. Our results demonstrate that this technique enables high sensitive detection of chemical analytes with a sensitivity of <5 Torr for oxygen and <0.1 pH units in vivo, which is better than the currently available in vivo functional imaging techniques. This non-invasive and non-ionizing, yet low cost, method will enable morphological and functional evaluation across any tissue, with both high spatial and temporal resolution but without eliciting short- or long-term tissue damage. Currently no gold standard exists for such xii functional imaging. The approach presented here can be used for early detection and diagnosis of tumors, as well as for monitoring the progression of disease and therapy. This technique will also enable observing phenomena at the cellular level in vivo that would lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases as well as the disease onset, progression, and response to therapy.

  15. Warped functional analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Gervini, Daniel; Carter, Patrick A

    2014-04-29

    This article presents an Analysis of Variance model for functional data that explicitly incorporates phase variability through a time-warping component, allowing for a unified approach to estimation and inference in presence of amplitude and time variability. The focus is on single-random-factor models but the approach can be easily generalized to more complex ANOVA models. The behavior of the estimators is studied by simulation, and an application to the analysis of growth curves of flour beetles is presented. Although the model assumes a smooth latent process behind the observed trajectories, smootheness of the observed data is not required; the method can be applied to irregular time grids, which are common in longitudinal studies. PMID:24779611

  16. Models in palaeontological functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Philip S. L.; Bright, Jen A.; Gill, Pamela G.; Palmer, Colin; Rayfield, Emily J.

    2012-01-01

    Models are a principal tool of modern science. By definition, and in practice, models are not literal representations of reality but provide simplifications or substitutes of the events, scenarios or behaviours that are being studied or predicted. All models make assumptions, and palaeontological models in particular require additional assumptions to study unobservable events in deep time. In the case of functional analysis, the degree of missing data associated with reconstructing musculoskeletal anatomy and neuronal control in extinct organisms has, in the eyes of some scientists, rendered detailed functional analysis of fossils intractable. Such a prognosis may indeed be realized if palaeontologists attempt to recreate elaborate biomechanical models based on missing data and loosely justified assumptions. Yet multiple enabling methodologies and techniques now exist: tools for bracketing boundaries of reality; more rigorous consideration of soft tissues and missing data and methods drawing on physical principles that all organisms must adhere to. As with many aspects of science, the utility of such biomechanical models depends on the questions they seek to address, and the accuracy and validity of the models themselves. PMID:21865242

  17. Metabolic Flux and Compartmentation Analysis in the Brain In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Through significant developments and progresses in the last two decades, in vivo localized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) became a method of choice to probe brain metabolic pathways in a non-invasive way. Beside the measurement of the total concentration of more than 20 metabolites, 1H MRS can be used to quantify the dynamics of substrate transport across the blood-brain barrier by varying the plasma substrate level. On the other hand, 13C MRS with the infusion of 13C-enriched substrates enables the characterization of brain oxidative metabolism and neurotransmission by incorporation of 13C in the different carbon positions of amino acid neurotransmitters. The quantitative determination of the biochemical reactions involved in these processes requires the use of appropriate metabolic models, whose level of details is strongly related to the amount of data accessible with in vivo MRS. In the present work, we present the different steps involved in the elaboration of a mathematical model of a given brain metabolic process and its application to the experimental data in order to extract quantitative brain metabolic rates. We review the recent advances in the localized measurement of brain glucose transport and compartmentalized brain energy metabolism, and how these reveal mechanistic details on glial support to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. PMID:24194729

  18. Optical Diffuse Imaging of an Ex Vivo Model Cancerous Human Breast Using Independent Component Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Xu; Mohammad Alrubaiee; S. K. Gayen; R. R. Alfano

    2008-01-01

    Optical imaging using independent component analysis (OPTICA) has been used for detection, 3D localization, and cross-section imaging of a tumor inside a model human breast composed of ex vivo human breast tissues. OPTICA uses a multisource target illumination and multidetector signal acquisition scheme to obtain multiple spatial and angular views of the sample for target localization. Independent component analysis of

  19. Murine CD83-positive T cells mediate suppressor functions in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Simon; Eckhardt, Jenny; Kuhnt, Christine; Stein, Marcello; Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Tucher, Christine; Knippertz, Ilka; Becker, Christoph; Günther, Claudia; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Lechmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    The CD83 molecule (CD83) is a well-known surface marker present on mature dendritic cells (mDC). In this study, we show that CD83 is also expressed on a subset of T cells which mediate regulatory T cell (Treg)-like suppressor functions in vitro and in vivo. Treg-associated molecules including CD25, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related gene (GITR), Helios and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) as well as forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) were specifically expressed by these CD83(+) T cells. In contrast, CD83(-) T cells showed a naive T cell phenotype with effector T cell properties upon activation. Noteworthy, CD83(-) T cells were not able to upregulate CD83 despite activation. Furthermore, CD83(+) T cells suppressed the proliferation and inflammatory cytokine release of CD83(-) T cells in vitro. Strikingly, stimulated CD83(+) T cells released soluble CD83 (sCD83), which has been reported to possess immunosuppressive properties. In vivo, using the murine transfer colitis model we could show that CD83(+) T cells were able to suppress colitis symptoms while CD83(-) T cells possessed effector functions. In addition, this CD83 expression is also conserved on expanded human Treg. Thus, from these studies we conclude that CD83(+) T cells share important features with regulatory T cells, identifying CD83 as a novel lineage marker to discriminate between different T cell populations. PMID:25151500

  20. Allele compensation in tip60+/- mice rescues white adipose tissue function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Hamers, Nicole; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Berger, Ruud; Lough, John; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a key regulator of energy homestasis. The amount of adipose tissue is largely determined by adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis), a process that is regulated by the concerted actions of multiple transcription factors and cofactors. Based on in vitro studies in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and human primary preadipocytes, the transcriptional cofactor and acetyltransferase Tip60 was recently identified as an essential adipogenic factor. We therefore investigated the role of Tip60 on adipocyte differentiation and function, and possible consequences on energy homeostasis, in vivo. Because homozygous inactivation results in early embryonic lethality, Tip60+/- mice were used. Heterozygous inactivation of Tip60 had no effect on body weight, despite slightly higher food intake by Tip60+/- mice. No major effects of heterozygous inactivation of Tip60 were observed on adipose tissue and liver, and Tip60+/- displayed normal glucose tolerance, both on a low fat and a high fat diet. While Tip60 mRNA was reduced to 50% in adipose tissue, the protein levels were unaltered, suggesting compensation by the intact allele. These findings indicate that the in vivo role of Tip60 in adipocyte differentiation and function cannot be properly addressed in Tip60+/- mice, but requires the generation of adipose tissue-specific knock out animals or specific knock-in mice. PMID:24870614

  1. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.

  2. PET and SPECT Radiotracers to Assess Function and Expression of ABC Transporters in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Erker, Thomas; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) are expressed in high concentrations at various physiological barriers (e.g. blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, blood-tumor barrier), where they impede the tissue accumulation of various drugs by active efflux transport. Changes in ABC transporter expression and function are thought to be implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The availability of a non-invasive imaging method which allows for measuring ABC transporter function or expression in vivo would be of great clinical use in that it could facilitate the identification of those patients that would benefit from treatment with ABC transporter modulating drugs. To date three different kinds of imaging probes have been described to measure ABC transporters in vivo: i) radiolabelled transporter substrates ii) radiolabelled transporter inhibitors and iii) radiolabelled prodrugs which are enzymatically converted into transporter substrates in the organ of interest (e.g. brain). The design of new imaging probes to visualize efflux transporters is inter alia complicated by the overlapping substrate recognition pattern of different ABC transporter types. The present article will describe currently available ABC transporter radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and critically discuss strengths and limitations of individual probes and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21434859

  3. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:25366491

  4. The synthesis and in vivo assembly of functional antibodies in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Clive R.; Boss, Michael A.; Kenten, John H.; Calvert, Jane E.; Roberts, Nicola A.; Emtage, J. Spencer

    1985-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can synthesize, process and secrete higher eukaryotic proteins1-5. We have investigated the expression of immunoglobulin chains in yeast and demonstrate here (1) the synthesis, processing and secretion of light and heavy chains, (2) the glycosylation of heavy chain, (3) the intracellular localization of these foreign proteins by immunofluorescence, and (4) the detection of functional antibodies in cells co-expressing both chains. This may provide the basis of a microbial fermentation process for the production of monoclonal antibodies. The co-expression of light and heavy chains in Escherichia coli has been reported but functional antibodies were not assembled in vivo6,7. Furthermore, only low-level assembly of these chains was found in vitro.

  5. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  6. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  7. Exposure-in-vivo containing interventions to improve work functioning of workers with anxiety disorder: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Noordik; Jac JL van der Klink; Elmer F Klingen; Karen Nieuwenhuijsen; Frank JH van Dijk

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are associated with functional disability, sickness absence, and decreased productivity. Effective treatments of anxiety disorders can result in remission of symptoms. However the effects on work related outcomes are largely unknown. Exposure in vivo is potentially well fit to improve work-related outcomes. This study systematically reviews the effectiveness of exposure-in-vivo containing interventions in reducing work-related adverse outcomes

  8. Body adiposity dictates different mechanisms of increased coronary reactivity related to improved in vivo cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Saturated fatty acid-rich high fat (HF) diets trigger abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiac dysfunction. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of nascent obesity on the cardiac function of animals fed a high-fat diet and at analyzing the mechanisms by which these alterations occurred at the level of coronary reserve. Materials and methods Rats were fed a control (C) or a HF diet containing high proportions of saturated fatty acids for 3 months. Thereafter, their cardiac function was evaluated in vivo using a pressure probe inserted into the cavity of the left ventricle. Their heart was isolated, perfused iso-volumetrically according to the Langendorff mode and the coronary reserve was evaluated by determining the endothelial-dependent (EDV) and endothelial-independent (EIV) vasodilatations in the absence and presence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (L-NAME and indomethacin). The fatty acid composition of cardiac phospholipids was then evaluated. Results Although all the HF-fed rats increased their abdominal adiposity, some of them did not gain body weight (HF- group) compared to the C group whereas other ones had a higher body weight (HF+). All HF rats displayed a higher in vivo cardiac activity associated with an increased EDV. In the HF- group, the improved EDV was due to an increase in the endothelial cell vasodilatation activity whereas in the HF+?group, the enhanced EDV resulted from an improved sensitivity of coronary smooth muscle cells to nitric oxide. Furthermore, in the HF- group the main pathway implicated in the EDV was the NOS pathway while in the HF+?group the COX pathway. Conclusions Nascent obesity-induced improvement of cardiac function may be supported by an enhanced coronary reserve occurring via different mechanisms. These mechanisms implicate either the endothelial cells activity or the smooth muscle cells sensitivity depending on the body adiposity of the animals. PMID:24572210

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Ferrocyanide Functionalized Nanopourous Silica Decorporation Agent for Cesium in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO2). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation, and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium (137Cs); based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Group I was administered 137Cs (~40 ?geq/kg) by intravenous (iv) injection and oral gavage; Group II was administered pre-bound 137Cs-SAMMS and sequential 137Cs + SAMMS (~61 ngeq/kg) by oral gavage; and Group III evaluated orally administered 137Cs (~0.06 ?geq/kg) followed by 0.1 g of either SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 hour and blood, urine and fecal samples were collected for 137Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered 137Cs was rapidly and well absorbed (~100% relative to iv dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces & tissues) were very comparable to the iv dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound 137Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with ~1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the 137Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS & Prussian blue both effectively captured available 137Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS out performs Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low 137Cs dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize SAMMS in vivo performance over a broader range of doses and conditions.

  10. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel ferrocyanide functionalized nanopourous silica decorporation agent for cesium in rats.

    PubMed

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert; Addleman, R Shane; Fryxell, Glen E; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO(2)). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium ((137)Cs); therefore, based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Animals in Group I were administered (137)Cs chloride (approximately 40 microg kg(-1)) by intravenous (i.v.) injection or oral gavage; Group II animals were administered pre-bound (137)Cs-SAMMS or sequential Cs chloride + SAMMS (approximately 61 ng kg(-1)) by oral gavage; and Group III was orally administered (137)Cs chloride (approximately 61 ng kg(-1)) followed by either 0.1 g of SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing, the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 h and blood, urine, and fecal samples were collected for (137)Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered (137)Cs chloride was rapidly and well absorbed (approximately 100% relative to i.v. dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces, and tissues) were very comparable to the i.v. dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound (137)Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with approximately 1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the (137)Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS and Prussian blue both effectively captured available (137)Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS outperforms Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low (137)Cs chloride dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize the performance of SAMMS in vivo over a broader range of doses and conditions. PMID:20699707

  11. Congenital Heart Disease–Causing Gata4 Mutation Displays Functional Deficits In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Chaitali; Sachan, Nita; McNally, Caryn Rothrock; Koenig, Sara N.; Nichols, Haley A.; Guggilam, Anuradha; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Pu, William T.; Srivastava, Deepak; Garg, Vidu

    2012-01-01

    Defects of atrial and ventricular septation are the most frequent form of congenital heart disease, accounting for almost 50% of all cases. We previously reported that a heterozygous G296S missense mutation of GATA4 caused atrial and ventricular septal defects and pulmonary valve stenosis in humans. GATA4 encodes a cardiac transcription factor, and when deleted in mice it results in cardiac bifida and lethality by embryonic day (E)9.5. In vitro, the mutant GATA4 protein has a reduced DNA binding affinity and transcriptional activity and abolishes a physical interaction with TBX5, a transcription factor critical for normal heart formation. To characterize the mutation in vivo, we generated mice harboring the same mutation, Gata4 G295S. Mice homozygous for the Gata4 G295S mutant allele have normal ventral body patterning and heart looping, but have a thin ventricular myocardium, single ventricular chamber, and lethality by E11.5. While heterozygous Gata4 G295S mutant mice are viable, a subset of these mice have semilunar valve stenosis and small defects of the atrial septum. Gene expression studies of homozygous mutant mice suggest the G295S protein can sufficiently activate downstream targets of Gata4 in the endoderm but not in the developing heart. Cardiomyocyte proliferation deficits and decreased cardiac expression of CCND2, a member of the cyclin family and a direct target of Gata4, were found in embryos both homozygous and heterozygous for the Gata4 G295S allele. To further define functions of the Gata4 G295S mutation in vivo, compound mutant mice were generated in which specific cell lineages harbored both the Gata4 G295S mutant and Gata4 null alleles. Examination of these mice demonstrated that the Gata4 G295S protein has functional deficits in early myocardial development. In summary, the Gata4 G295S mutation functions as a hypomorph in vivo and leads to defects in cardiomyocyte proliferation during embryogenesis, which may contribute to the development of congenital heart defects in humans. PMID:22589735

  12. Selective ex-vivo photothermal ablation of human pancreatic cancer with albumin functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Bele, Constantin; Orza, Anamaria Ioana; Lucan, Ciprian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Manaila, Ioana; Iulia, Ferencz; Dana, Iancu; Zaharie, Florin; Osian, Gelu; Vlad, Liviu; Iancu, Cornel

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser-mediated ablation of cancer cells marked with biofunctionalized carbon nanotubes is frequently called "nanophotothermolysis". We herein present a method of selective nanophotothermolisys of pancreatic cancer (PC) using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with human serum albumin (HSA). With the purpose of testing the therapeutic value of these nanobioconjugates, we have developed an ex-vivo experimental platform. Surgically resected specimens from patients with PC were preserved in a cold medium and kept alive via intra-arterial perfusion. Additionally, the HSA-MWCNTs have been intra-arterially administered in the greater pancreatic artery under ultrasound guidance. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemical staining have confirmed the selective accumulation of HSA-MWCNTs inside the human PC tissue. The external laser irradiation of the specimen has significantly produced extensive necrosis of the malign tissue after the intra-arterial administration of HSA-MWCNTs, without any harmful effects on the surrounding healthy parenchyma. We have obtained a selective photothermal ablation of the malign tissue based on the selective internalization of MWCNTs with HSA cargo inside the pancreatic adenocarcinoma after the ex-vivo intra-arterial perfusion. PMID:21720504

  13. In Vivo Evaluation of Vena Caval Filters: Can Function Be Linked to Design Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, Mary C. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Hospitals, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0346 (United States); Cho, Kyung J. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospitals, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0346 (United States); Greenfield, Lazar J. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Hospitals, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0346 (United States)

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the five vena caval filters marketed in the United States and one investigational vena caval filter and to determine whether there is an association between their design and their in vivo function.Methods: Four of each type of filter-Simon Nitinol (SN), Bird's Nest (BN), Vena Tech (VT), Greenfield stainless steel (PSGF), Greenfield titanium (TGF), and the investigational stent cone filter (NGF)-were studied for 60 days in 12 sheep. Radiographic and pathologic outcomes to be assessed included clot capture and resolution, vena caval penetration, position of the filter, thrombogenicity, and vessel wall reaction.Results: Filters differed with respect to the number of clot-trapping levels and the interdependence of the legs. All devices were successfully placed. Intentionally embolized clot was captured. One VT and two SN filters migrated in response to clot capture. Resolution of thrombus was variable, and related to the design of the device. Fibrin webbing was widely present with the VT, BN, and SN filters but limited in the others. The VT and NGF filters demonstrated the most stable filter base diameter.Conclusions: The performance of vena caval filters differs with respect to clot resolution and mechanical stability. Interdependent filter limbs and single-stage conical capture sites appear to result in more favorable performance in in vivo studies.

  14. In Vitro Hematological and In Vivo Vasoactivity Assessment of Dextran Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D.; Frame, Mary D.; Dewar, Anthony M.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    The intravenous, intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration of water solubilized graphene nanoparticles for biomedical applications will result in their interaction with the hematological components and vasculature. Herein, we have investigated the effects of dextran functionalized graphene nanoplatelets (GNP-Dex) on histamine release, platelet activation, immune activation, blood cell hemolysis in vitro, and vasoactivity in vivo. The results indicate that GNP-Dex formulations prevented histamine release from activated RBL-2H3 rat mast cells, and at concentrations ? 7?mg/ml, showed a 12–20% increase in levels of complement proteins. Cytokine (TNF-Alpha and IL-10) levels remained within normal range. GNP-Dex formulations did not cause platelet activation or blood cell hemolysis. Using the hamster cheek pouch in vivo model, the initial vasoactivity of GNP-Dex at concentrations (1–50?mg/ml) equivalent to the first pass of a bolus injection was a brief concentration-dependent dilation in arcade and terminal arterioles. However, they did not induce a pro-inflammatory endothelial dysfunction effect. PMID:24002570

  15. Novel Functional Complexity of Polycystin-1 by GPS Cleavage In Vivo: Role in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Kim, Hyunho; Xu, Hangxue; Yu, Shengqiang; Cruanès, Julie; Maser, Robin L.; Boletta, Alessandra; Trudel, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Polycystin-1 (Pc1) cleavage at the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) proteolytic site (GPS) is required for normal kidney morphology in humans and mice. We found a complex pattern of endogenous Pc1 forms by GPS cleavage. GPS cleavage generates not only the heterodimeric cleaved full-length Pc1 (Pc1cFL) in which the N-terminal fragment (NTF) remains noncovalently associated with the C-terminal fragment (CTF) but also a novel (Pc1) form (Pc1deN) in which NTF becomes detached from CTF. Uncleaved Pc1 (Pc1U) resides primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas both Pc1cFL and Pc1deN traffic through the secretory pathway in vivo. GPS cleavage is not a prerequisite, however, for Pc1 trafficking in vivo. Importantly, Pc1deN is predominantly found at the plasma membrane of renal epithelial cells. By functional genetic complementation with five Pkd1 mouse models, we discovered that CTF plays a crucial role in Pc1deN trafficking. Our studies support GPS cleavage as a critical regulatory mechanism of Pc1 biogenesis and trafficking for proper kidney development and homeostasis. PMID:24958103

  16. Selective ex-vivo photothermal ablation of human pancreatic cancer with albumin functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Bele, Constantin; Orza, Anamaria Ioana; Lucan, Ciprian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Manaila, Ioana; Iulia, Ferencz; Dana, Iancu; Zaharie, Florin; Osian, Gelu; Vlad, Liviu; Iancu, Cornel

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser-mediated ablation of cancer cells marked with biofunctionalized carbon nanotubes is frequently called “nanophotothermolysis”. We herein present a method of selective nanophotothermolisys of pancreatic cancer (PC) using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with human serum albumin (HSA). With the purpose of testing the therapeutic value of these nanobioconjugates, we have developed an ex-vivo experimental platform. Surgically resected specimens from patients with PC were preserved in a cold medium and kept alive via intra-arterial perfusion. Additionally, the HSA-MWCNTs have been intra-arterially administered in the greater pancreatic artery under ultrasound guidance. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemical staining have confirmed the selective accumulation of HSA-MWCNTs inside the human PC tissue. The external laser irradiation of the specimen has significantly produced extensive necrosis of the malign tissue after the intra-arterial administration of HSA-MWCNTs, without any harmful effects on the surrounding healthy parenchyma. We have obtained a selective photothermal ablation of the malign tissue based on the selective internalization of MWCNTs with HSA cargo inside the pancreatic adenocarcinoma after the ex-vivo intra-arterial perfusion. PMID:21720504

  17. Enzymatic activity is required for the in vivo functions of CARM1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehoon; Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Li, Jia; Carter, Carla; Richie, Ellen; Bedford, Mark T

    2010-01-01

    CARM1 is one of nine protein arginine methyltransferases that methylate arginine residues in proteins. CARM1 is recruited by many different transcription factors as a positive regulator. Gene targeting of CARM1 in mice has been performed, and knock-out mice, which are smaller than their wild-type littermates, die just after birth. It has been proposed that CARM1 has functions that are independent of its enzymatic activity. Indeed, CARM1 is found to interact with a number of proteins and may have a scaffolding function in this context. However, CARM1 methylates histone H3, PABP1, AIB1, and a number of splicing factors, which strongly suggests that its impact on transcription and splicing is primarily through its ability to modify these substrates. To unequivocally establish the importance of CARM1 enzymatic activity in vivo, we generated an enzyme-dead knock-in of this protein arginine methyltransferase. We determined that knock-in cells and mice have defects similar to those seen in their knock-out counterparts with respect to the time of embryo lethality, T cell development, adipocyte differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator activity. CARM1 requires its enzymatic activity for all of its known cellular functions. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of CARM1 will incapacitate all of the enzyme's cellular functions. PMID:19897492

  18. Dimerization is essential for 14-3-3zeta stability and function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Messaritou, Georgia; Grammenoudi, Sofia; Skoulakis, Efthimios M C

    2010-01-15

    Members of the conserved 14-3-3 protein family spontaneously self-assemble as homo- and heterodimers via conserved sequences in the first four (alphaA-alphaD) of the nine helices that comprise them. Dimeric 14-3-3s bind conserved motifs in diverse protein targets involved in multiple essential cellular processes including signaling, intracellular trafficking, cell cycle regulation, and modulation of enzymatic activities. However, recent mostly in vitro evidence has emerged, suggesting functional and regulatory roles for monomeric 14-3-3s. We capitalized on the simplicity of the 14-3-3 family in Drosophila to investigate in vivo 14-3-3zeta monomer properties and functionality. We report that dimerization is essential for the stability and function of 14-3-3zeta in neurons. Moreover, we reveal the contribution of conserved amino acids in helices A and D to homo- and heterodimerization and their functional consequences on the viability of animals devoid of endogenous 14-3-3zeta. Finally, we present evidence suggesting endogenous homeostatic adjustment of the levels of the second family member in Drosophila, D14-3-3epsilon, to transgenic monomeric and dimerization-competent 14-3-3zeta. PMID:19920133

  19. Dimerization Is Essential for 14-3-3? Stability and Function in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Messaritou, Georgia; Grammenoudi, Sofia; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the conserved 14-3-3 protein family spontaneously self-assemble as homo- and heterodimers via conserved sequences in the first four (?A-?D) of the nine helices that comprise them. Dimeric 14-3-3s bind conserved motifs in diverse protein targets involved in multiple essential cellular processes including signaling, intracellular trafficking, cell cycle regulation, and modulation of enzymatic activities. However, recent mostly in vitro evidence has emerged, suggesting functional and regulatory roles for monomeric 14-3-3s. We capitalized on the simplicity of the 14-3-3 family in Drosophila to investigate in vivo 14-3-3? monomer properties and functionality. We report that dimerization is essential for the stability and function of 14-3-3? in neurons. Moreover, we reveal the contribution of conserved amino acids in helices A and D to homo- and heterodimerization and their functional consequences on the viability of animals devoid of endogenous 14-3-3?. Finally, we present evidence suggesting endogenous homeostatic adjustment of the levels of the second family member in Drosophila, D14-3-3?, to transgenic monomeric and dimerization-competent 14-3-3?. PMID:19920133

  20. Elevation of transcription factor Islet-1 levels in vivo increases ?-cell function but not ?-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingxuan; Walp, Erik R; May, Catherine Lee

    2012-01-01

    A decrease in the expression of Islet-1 (Isl-1), an islet transcription factor, has been reported in several physiological settings of reduced ?-cell function. Here, we investigate whether an increased level of Isl-1 in islet cells can enhance ?-cell function and/or mass. We demonstrate that transgenic mice with Isl-1 overexpression display improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin secretion without significant changes in ? cell mass. From our microarray study, we identify approximately 135 differentially expressed genes in the islets of Isl-1 overexpressing mice that have been implicated to function in numerous biological processes including protein trafficking, metabolism and differentiation. Using real-time PCR we have confirmed upregulation of Caps2, Sec14l4, Slc2a10, P2rx7, Afamin, and Neurogenin 3 that may in part mediate the observed improved insulin secretion in Isl-1 overexpressing mice. These findings show for the first time that Isl-1 is a key factor in regulating adult ? cell function in vivo, and suggest that Isl-1 elevation could be beneficial to improve glucose homeostasis. PMID:22595886

  1. Elevation of transcription factor Islet-1 levels in vivo increases ?-cell function but not ?-cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingxuan; Walp, Erik R.; May, Catherine Lee

    2012-01-01

    A decrease in the expression of Islet-1 (Isl-1), an islet transcription factor, has been reported in several physiological settings of reduced ?-cell function. Here, we investigate whether an increased level of Isl-1 in islet cells can enhance ?-cell function and/or mass. We demonstrate that transgenic mice with Isl-1 overexpression display improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin secretion without significant changes in ? cell mass. From our microarray study, we identify approximately 135 differentially expressed genes in the islets of Isl-1 overexpressing mice that have been implicated to function in numerous biological processes including protein trafficking, metabolism and differentiation. Using real-time PCR we have confirmed upregulation of Caps2, Sec14l4, Slc2a10, P2rx7, Afamin, and Neurogenin 3 that may in part mediate the observed improved insulin secretion in Isl-1 overexpressing mice. These findings show for the first time that Isl-1 is a key factor in regulating adult ? cell function in vivo, and suggest that Isl-1 elevation could be beneficial to improve glucose homeostasis. PMID:22595886

  2. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  3. In vivo fluoroscopic analysis of the normal human knee.

    PubMed

    Komistek, Richard D; Dennis, Douglas A; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2003-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to use fluoroscopy and computed tomography to accurately determine the three-dimensional, in vivo, weightbearing kinematics of five normal knees. Three-dimensional computer-aided design models of each subject's femur and tibia were recreated from the three-dimensional computed tomography bone density data. Three-dimensional motions for each subject then were determined for five weightbearing activities. During gait, the lateral condyle experienced -4.3 mm (range, -1.9--10.3 mm) of average motion, whereas the medial condyle moved only -0.9 mm (range, 3.4--5.8 mm). One subject experienced 5.8 mm of medial condyle motion. On average, during deep flexion activities, subjects experienced -12.7 mm (range, 1.4--29.8 mm) of lateral condyle motion, whereas the medial condyle motion only was -2.9 mm (range, 3.0--9.0 mm). One subject experienced 5.8 and 9.0 mm of medial condyle motion during gait and a deep knee bend, respectively leading to the occurrence of a lateral pivot motion. During the deep flexion activities, the subjects experienced significantly more axial rotation (> 13 degrees) than gait (< 5 degrees). During all five activities, the lateral condyle experienced significantly more anteroposterior translation, leading to axial rotation of the tibia relative to the femur. PMID:12771818

  4. Predicting in vivo responses to biomaterials via combined in vitro and in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew T; Vodovotz, Yoram; Tottey, Stephen; Brown, Bryan N; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    The host response to both synthetic and biologically derived biomaterials is a temporally regulated, complex process that involves multiple interacting cell types. This complexity has classically limited the efficacy of in vitro assays for predicting the in vivo outcome, necessitating the use of costly animal models for biomaterial development. The present study addressed these challenges by developing an in vitro assay that characterized the dynamic inflammatory response of human monocyte-derived-macrophages to biomaterials, coupled with quasi-mechanistic analysis in silico analysis: principal component analysis (PCA) and dynamic network analysis (DyNA). Synthetic and extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived materials were evaluated using this method, and were then associated with the in vivo remodeling and macrophage polarization response in a rodent skeletal muscle injury model. PCA and DyNA revealed a distinct in vitro macrophage response to ECM materials that corresponded to constructive remodeling and an increased M2 macrophage presence in vivo. In contrast, PCA and DyNA suggested a response to crosslinked ECM and synthetic materials characteristic of a foreign body reaction and dominant M1 macrophage response. These results suggest that in silico analysis of an in vitro macrophage assay may be useful as a predictor for determining the in vivo host response to implanted biomaterials. PMID:24980950

  5. In vivo exposure to bicarbonate/lactate- and bicarbonate-buffered peritoneal dialysis fluids improves ex vivo peritoneal macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, R K; Jones, S; Moseley, A; Holmes, C J; Argyle, R; Williams, J D; Coles, G A; Pu, K; Faict, D; Topley, N

    2000-01-01

    The impact on peritoneal macrophage (PMO) function of acidic lactate-buffered (Lac-PDF [PD4]; 40 mmol/L of lactate; pH 5.2) and neutral-pH, bicarbonate-buffered (TB; 38 mmol/L of bicarbonate; pH 7. 3) and bicarbonate/lactate-buffered (TBL; 25 mmol/L of bicarbonate/15 mmol/L of lactate; pH 7.3) peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) was compared during a study of continuous therapy with PD4, TB, or TBL. During a run-in phase of 6 weeks when all patients (n = 15) were treated with their regular dialysis regimen with Lac-PDF, median PMO tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) release values were 203.6, 89.9, and 115.5 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO in the patients subsequently randomized to the PD4, TB, and TBL treatment groups, respectively. Median stimulated TNFalpha values (serum-treated zymosan [STZ], 10 microgram/mL) were 1,894.6, 567.3, and 554.5 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO in the same groups, respectively. During the trial phase of 12 weeks, when the three groups of patients (n = 5 per group) were randomized to continuous treatment with PD4, TB, or TBL, median constitutive TNFalpha release values were 204.7, 131.4, and 155.4 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO, respectively. Stimulated TNFalpha values (STZ, 10 microgram/mL) were 1,911, 1,832, and 1,378 pg TNFalpha/10(6) PMO in the same groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of variance comparing the run-in phase with the trial phase showed that PMO TNFalpha release was significantly elevated in patients treated with both TB (P = 0.040) and TBL (P = 0.014) but not in patients treated with Lac-PDF (P = 0. 795). These data suggest that patients continuously exposed to bicarbonate- and bicarbonate/lactate-buffered PDFs might have better preserved PMO function and thus improved host defense status. PMID:10620552

  6. Effects of environmental tobacco smoke in vivo on rhesus monkey semen quality, sperm function, and sperm metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pei-Hsuan; Froenicke, Lutz; Lin, Ching Yu; Lyons, Leslie A; Miller, Marion G; Pinkerton, Kent E; VandeVoort, Catherine A

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to use a non-human primate model to examine the effect of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in vivo on semen quality, sperm function, and sperm metabolism. Four adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to ETS for six months, and semen samples were collected every week for evaluation. ETS exposure in vivo did not affect semen quality and sperm function. The sperm X:Y chromosome ratio remained unchanged after ETS exposure. The sex ratio of the embryos fertilized by ETS-exposed males was not different from the control male. However, sperm showed changes in metabolome detected by NMR during the ETS exposure. We concluded that with the duration and level of ETS exposure in this study, semen quality and sperm function were not affected, whereas sperm did undergo metabolic changes with ETS exposure in vivo. PMID:19159676

  7. Formulation/Preparation of Functionalized Nanoparticles for In Vivo Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Frank; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    Targeted cancer therapy allows the delivery of therapeutic agents to cancer cells without incurring undesirable side effects on the neighboring healthy tissues. Over the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in the development of advanced cancer therapeutics using targeted nanoparticles. Here we describe the preparation of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles formulated with biocompatible and biodegradable poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) copolymer and surface functionalized with the A10 2-fluoropyrimidine ribonucleic acid aptamers that recognize the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a well-characterized antigen expressed on the surface of prostate cancer cells. We show that the self-assembled nanoparticles can selectively bind to PSMA-targeted prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This formulation method may contribute to the development of highly selective and effective cancer therapeutic and diagnostic devices.

  8. In vivo neuronal function of the fragile X mental retardation protein is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Coffee, R Lane; Williamson, Ashley J; Adkins, Christopher M; Gray, Marisa C; Page, Terry L; Broadie, Kendal

    2012-02-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) gene product (FMRP), is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. It has been long hypothesized that the phosphorylation of serine 500 (S500) in human FMRP controls its function as an RNA-binding translational repressor. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we employed neuronally targeted expression of three human FMR1 transgenes, including wild-type (hFMR1), dephosphomimetic (S500A-hFMR1) and phosphomimetic (S500D-hFMR1), in the Drosophila FXS disease model to investigate phosphorylation requirements. At the molecular level, dfmr1 null mutants exhibit elevated brain protein levels due to loss of translational repressor activity. This defect is rescued for an individual target protein and across the population of brain proteins by the phosphomimetic, whereas the dephosphomimetic phenocopies the null condition. At the cellular level, dfmr1 null synapse architecture exhibits increased area, branching and bouton number. The phosphomimetic fully rescues these synaptogenesis defects, whereas the dephosphomimetic provides no rescue. The presence of Futsch-positive (microtubule-associated protein 1B) supernumerary microtubule loops is elevated in dfmr1 null synapses. The human phosphomimetic restores normal Futsch loops, whereas the dephosphomimetic provides no activity. At the behavioral level, dfmr1 null mutants exhibit strongly impaired olfactory associative learning. The human phosphomimetic targeted only to the brain-learning center restores normal learning ability, whereas the dephosphomimetic provides absolutely no rescue. We conclude that human FMRP S500 phosphorylation is necessary for its in vivo function as a neuronal translational repressor and regulator of synaptic architecture, and for the manifestation of FMRP-dependent learning behavior. PMID:22080836

  9. In vivo function and comparative genomic analyses of the Drosophila gut microbiota identify candidate symbiosis factors

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Chaston, John M.; Wang, Yiping; Winans, Nathan J.; Sannino, David R.; Wong, Adam C. N.; Dobson, Adam J.; Kagle, Jeanne; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis is often characterized by co-evolutionary changes in the genomes of the partners involved. An understanding of these changes can provide insight into the nature of the relationship, including the mechanisms that initiate and maintain an association between organisms. In this study we examined the genome sequences of bacteria isolated from the Drosophila melanogaster gut with the objective of identifying genes that are important for function in the host. We compared microbiota isolates with con-specific or closely related bacterial species isolated from non-fly environments. First the phenotype of germ-free Drosophila (axenic flies) was compared to that of flies colonized with specific bacteria (gnotobiotic flies) as a measure of symbiotic function. Non-fly isolates were functionally distinct from bacteria isolated from flies, conferring slower development and an altered nutrient profile in the host, traits known to be microbiota-dependent. Comparative genomic methods were next employed to identify putative symbiosis factors: genes found in bacteria that restore microbiota-dependent traits to gnotobiotic flies, but absent from those that do not. Factors identified include riboflavin synthesis and stress resistance. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify protein coding genes for which fly-isolate sequences were more similar to each other than to other sequences, reasoning that these genes may have a shared function unique to the fly environment. This method identified genes in Acetobacter species that cluster in two distinct genomic loci: one predicted to be involved in oxidative stress detoxification and another encoding an efflux pump. In summary, we leveraged genomic and in vivo functional comparisons to identify candidate traits that distinguish symbiotic bacteria. These candidates can serve as the basis for further work investigating the genetic requirements of bacteria for function and persistence in the Drosophila gut. PMID:25408687

  10. In vivo function and comparative genomic analyses of the Drosophila gut microbiota identify candidate symbiosis factors.

    PubMed

    Newell, Peter D; Chaston, John M; Wang, Yiping; Winans, Nathan J; Sannino, David R; Wong, Adam C N; Dobson, Adam J; Kagle, Jeanne; Douglas, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis is often characterized by co-evolutionary changes in the genomes of the partners involved. An understanding of these changes can provide insight into the nature of the relationship, including the mechanisms that initiate and maintain an association between organisms. In this study we examined the genome sequences of bacteria isolated from the Drosophila melanogaster gut with the objective of identifying genes that are important for function in the host. We compared microbiota isolates with con-specific or closely related bacterial species isolated from non-fly environments. First the phenotype of germ-free Drosophila (axenic flies) was compared to that of flies colonized with specific bacteria (gnotobiotic flies) as a measure of symbiotic function. Non-fly isolates were functionally distinct from bacteria isolated from flies, conferring slower development and an altered nutrient profile in the host, traits known to be microbiota-dependent. Comparative genomic methods were next employed to identify putative symbiosis factors: genes found in bacteria that restore microbiota-dependent traits to gnotobiotic flies, but absent from those that do not. Factors identified include riboflavin synthesis and stress resistance. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify protein coding genes for which fly-isolate sequences were more similar to each other than to other sequences, reasoning that these genes may have a shared function unique to the fly environment. This method identified genes in Acetobacter species that cluster in two distinct genomic loci: one predicted to be involved in oxidative stress detoxification and another encoding an efflux pump. In summary, we leveraged genomic and in vivo functional comparisons to identify candidate traits that distinguish symbiotic bacteria. These candidates can serve as the basis for further work investigating the genetic requirements of bacteria for function and persistence in the Drosophila gut. PMID:25408687

  11. Identification of in-vivo vibration modes of human tibiae by modal analysis.

    PubMed

    Van der Perre, G; Van Audekercke, R; Martens, M; Mulier, J C

    1983-08-01

    When attempting to evaluate the mechanical properties of human bones in vivo by mechanical vibration analysis, some essential requirements must be met. A quantitative relation between measured vibration parameters (e.g., natural frequency) and mechanical bone properties must be available, in-vivo vibration modes should correctly be identified and the associated natural frequencies reproducibly and accurately measured, the influence of joints and soft tissues must be known. These problems were addressed by modal analysis (i.e., experimental determination of natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) of human tibiae in the following situations: 1) dry excised tibiae, 2) fresh excised tibiae, 3) in-vivo tibiae, 4) tibiae in an amputated leg, in different steps of dissection. In the in-vivo measuring conditions used by the authors, the tibia vibration is practically free-free. Two single bending modes (at +/- 270 Hz and +/- 340 Hz, respectively), each of them corresponding with one principal direction for bending, were identified. The difference between the natural frequencies observed in vivo and those of fresh excised tibiae is almost completely caused by the effect of muscles (added mass and damping), whereas joints and skin play only a minor role. Frequency differences between fresh and dry excised tibiae are largely accounted for by the absence of bone marrow in the latter. PMID:6632826

  12. Recovery of macular pigment spectrum in vivo using hyperspectral image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fawzi, Amani A.; Lee, Noah; Acton, Jennifer H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a novel method for hyperspectral mapping of macular pigment (MP) in vivo. Six healthy subjects were recruited for noninvasive imaging using a snapshot hyperspectral system. The three-dimensional full spatial-spectral data cube was analyzed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), wherein the data was decomposed to give spectral signatures and spatial distribution, in search for the MP absorbance spectrum. The NMF was initialized with the in vitro MP spectrum and rank 4 spectral signature decomposition was used to recover the MP spectrum and optical density in vivo. The recovered MP spectra showed two peaks in the blue spectrum, characteristic of MP, giving a detailed in vivo demonstration of these absorbance peaks. The peak MP optical densities ranged from 0.08 to 0.22 (mean 0.15+/?0.05) and became spatially negligible at diameters 1100 to 1760 ?m (4 to 6 deg) in the normal subjects. This objective method was able to exploit prior knowledge (the in vitro MP spectrum) in order to extract an accurate in vivo spectral analysis and full MP spatial profile, while separating the MP spectra from other ocular absorbers. Snapshot hyperspectral imaging in combination with advanced mathematical analysis provides a simple cost-effective approach for MP mapping in vivo. PMID:22029355

  13. Analysis of in vivo dynamics of influenza virus infection in mice using a GFP reporter virus

    E-print Network

    Analysis of in vivo dynamics of influenza virus infection in mice using a GFP reporter virus Balaji for review December 30, 2009) Influenza A virus is being extensively studied because of its major impact on human and animal health. However, the dynamics of influenza virus infection and the cell types infected

  14. In-vivo assessment of patellofemoral joint stress using a finite-element analysis approach.

    E-print Network

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    In-vivo assessment of patellofemoral joint stress using a finite-element analysis approach. J of pain receptors from high stresses in the cartilage · Finite-element modeling of the patellofemoral of the subject's knee were obtained with the knee at 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. · Sliceomatic software

  15. Stress analysis of carotid plaque rupture based on in vivo high resolution MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi-Yong Li; Simon Howarth; Rikin A. Trivedi; Jean M. U-King-Im; Martin J. Graves; Andrew Brown; Liqun Wang; Jonathan H. Gillard

    2006-01-01

    Atheromatous carotid plaque rupture is responsible for the majority of ischaemic strokes in the developed world. Plaque rupture has been associated with plaque morphology, plaque components’ properties, inflammation and local stress concentration. High resolution multi-spectral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has allowed the plaque components to be visualized in vivo. This study combined the recent advances in finite element analysis (FEA)

  16. Evaluation of in vivo Liver Tissue Characterization with Spectral RF Analysis versus Elasticity

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evaluation of in vivo Liver Tissue Characterization with Spectral RF Analysis versus Elasticity to assess, under active mechanical constraints, the elas- ticity of the liver, correlating with fibrosis at differ- ent locations in the liver. This paper presents a thorough evaluation of passive- mode RF

  17. ANALYSIS OF IN VITRO AND IN VIVO DNA STRAND BREAKS INDUCED BY TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of In Vitro and In Vivo DNA Strand Breaks Induced by Trihalomethanes (TRMs) The THMs are the most widely distributed and the most concentrated of the cWorine disinfection by-products (D BPs) found in finished drinking water. All of the THMs, cWoroform (CHCI3), br...

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Peristaltic and Segmental Motion In Vivo in the Rat Small Intestine Using Dynamic

    E-print Network

    Brasseur, James G.

    Quantitative Analysis of Peristaltic and Segmental Motion In Vivo in the Rat Small Intestine Using of nutrients that takes place within the small intestine. The normal processes of the small intestine are known been used extensively to study segments of the intestine that have been exteriorized from animals

  19. Structure predicts function: Combining non-invasive electrophysiology with in-vivo histology

    PubMed Central

    Helbling, Saskia; Teki, Sundeep; Callaghan, Martina F.; Sedley, William; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Barnes, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach for combining high resolution MRI-based myelin mapping with functional information from electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The main contribution to the primary currents detectable with EEG and MEG comes from ionic currents in the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, aligned perpendicularly to the local cortical surface. We provide evidence from an in-vivo experiment that the variation in MRI-based myeloarchitecture measures across the cortex predicts the variation of the current density over individuals and thus is of functional relevance. Equivalent current dipole locations and moments due to pitch onset evoked response fields (ERFs) were estimated by means of a variational Bayesian algorithm. The myeloarchitecture was estimated indirectly from individual high resolution quantitative multi-parameter maps (MPMs) acquired at 800 ?m isotropic resolution. Myelin estimates across cortical areas correlated positively with dipole magnitude. This correlation was spatially specific: regions of interest in the auditory cortex provided significantly better models than those covering whole hemispheres. Based on the MPM data we identified the auditory cortical area TE1.2 as the most likely origin of the pitch ERFs measured by MEG. We can now proceed to exploit the higher spatial resolution of quantitative MPMs to identify the cortical origin of M/EEG signals, inform M/EEG source reconstruction and explore structure–function relationships at a fine structural level in the living human brain. PMID:25529007

  20. Atypical Membrane Topology and Heteromeric Function of Drosophila Odorant Receptors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard; Sachse, Silke; Michnick, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) each express two odorant receptors (ORs): a divergent member of the OR family and the highly conserved, broadly expressed receptor OR83b. OR83b is essential for olfaction in vivo and enhances OR function in vitro, but the molecular mechanism by which it acts is unknown. Here we demonstrate that OR83b heterodimerizes with conventional ORs early in the endomembrane system in OSNs, couples these complexes to the conserved ciliary trafficking pathway, and is essential to maintain the OR/OR83b complex within the sensory cilia, where odor signal transduction occurs. The OR/OR83b complex is necessary and sufficient to promote functional reconstitution of odor-evoked signaling in sensory neurons that normally respond only to carbon dioxide. Unexpectedly, unlike all known vertebrate and nematode chemosensory receptors, we find that Drosophila ORs and OR83b adopt a novel membrane topology with their N-termini and the most conserved loops in the cytoplasm. These loops mediate direct association of ORs with OR83b. Our results reveal that OR83b is a universal and integral part of the functional OR in Drosophila. This atypical heteromeric and topological design appears to be an insect-specific solution for odor recognition, making the OR/OR83b complex an attractive target for the development of highly selective insect repellents to disrupt olfactory-mediated host-seeking behaviors of insect disease vectors. PMID:16402857

  1. Effect of naftazone on in vivo platelet function in the rat.

    PubMed

    McGregor, L; Chignier, E; Bloy, C; Rousselle, C; Peltier-Pujol, F; McGregor, J L

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of 50 mg/kg (i.p.) naftazone or ticlopidine on platelet functions in the rat. An automated isotope monitoring system (Aims plus) was used to determine the height of platelet aggregation and disaggregation (measured by the area under the curve, AUC) of 111indium-labelled platelets activated by ADP (10 microg/kg i.v.) or collagen (50 microg/kg i.v.). Fibrinogen-binding experiments were carried out with activated platelets in whole blood and measured by flow cytometry. Naftazone reduced the height of platelet aggregation induced by ADP compared with controls (P = 0.024). Ticlopidine-treated rats gave similar results (P = 0.008). Platelet disaggregation, following the aggregation induced by collagen, was significantly increased in naftazone-treated rats compared with controls (P = 0.003). Similar results were observed with ticlopidine-treated rats (P = 0.002). Fibrinogen binding to 2.5 or 5 microM ADP-stimulated platelets, from naftazone-treated rats, were significantly reduced compared with controls (P = 0.05 and 0.04 respectively). These results show that naftazone has similar inhibitory effects on rat platelet functions as ticloplidine. In conclusion, naftazone could be a useful agent to modulate platelet function in patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:16801074

  2. Minireview: In Vivo Analysis of Wnt Signaling in Bone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald A. Glass II; Gerard Karsenty

    Bone remodeling requires osteoblasts and osteoclasts work- ing in concert to maintain a constant bone mass. The dys- regulation of signaling pathways that affect osteoblast or os- teoclast differentiation or function leads to either osteopenia or high bone mass. The discovery that activating and inacti- vating mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, a putative Wnt coreceptor, led to high

  3. Characterization of the RND family of multidrug efflux pumps: in silico to in vivo confirmation of four functionally distinct subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Patricia; Molina?Henares, Antonio J.; De La Torre, Jesús; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We have developed a generalized profile that identifies members of the root?nodulation?cell?division (RND) family of efflux pumps and classifies them into four functional subfamilies. According to Z?score values, efflux pumps can be grouped by their metabolic function, thus making it possible to distinguish pumps involved in antibiotic resistance (group 1) from those involved in metal resistance (group 3). In silico data regarding efflux pumps in group 1 were validated after identification of RND efflux pumps in a number of environmental microbes that were isolated as resistant to ethidium bromide. Analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 genome identified efflux pumps in all groups. A collection of mutants in efflux pumps and a screening platform consisting of 50 drugs were created to assign a function to the efflux pumps. We validated in silico data regarding efflux pumps in groups 1 and 3 using 9 different mutants. Four mutants belonging to group 2 were found to be more sensitive than the wild?type to oxidative stress?inducing agents such as bipyridyl and methyl viologen. The two remaining mutants belonging to group 4 were found to be more sensitive than the parental to tetracycline and one of them was particularly sensitive to rubidium and chromate. By effectively combining in vivo data with generalized profiles and gene annotation data, this approach allowed the assignment, according to metabolic function, of both known and uncharacterized RND efflux pumps into subgroups, thereby providing important new insight into the functions of proteins within this family. PMID:21255364

  4. Ex vivo magnetofection: A novel strategy for the study of gene function in mouse organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svingen, Terje; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Combes, Alexander N.; Hosking, Brett; Harley, Vincent R.; Sinclair, Andrew H.; Koopman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Gene function during mouse development is often studied through the production and analysis of transgenic and knock-out models. However, these techniques are time- and resource-consuming, and require specialized equipment and expertise. We have established a new protocol for functional studies that combines organ culture of explanted fetal tissues with micro-injection and magnetically-induced transfection (“magnetofection”) of gene expression constructs. As proof-of-principle, we magnetofected cDNA constructs into genital ridge tissue as a means of gain-of-function analysis, and shRNA constructs for loss-of-function analysis. Ectopic expression of Sry induced female-to-male sex-reversal, whereas knockdown of Sox9 expression caused male-to-female sex-reversal, consistent with the known functions of these genes. Further, ectopic expression of Tmem184a, a gene of unknown function, in female genital ridges, resulted in failure of gonocytes to enter meiosis. This technique will likely be applicable to the study of gene function in a broader range of developing organs and tissues. PMID:19301396

  5. Transcriptome Analysis in Chicken Cecal Epithelia upon Infection by Eimeria tenella In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aijiang; Cai, Jianping; Gong, Wei; Yan, Hongbin; Luo, Xuenong; Tian, Guangfu; Zhang, Shaohua; Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    Coccidiosis, caused by various Eimeria species, is a major parasitic disease in chickens. However, our understanding on how chickens respond to coccidian infection is highly limited at both molecular and cellular levels. The present study employed the Affymetrix chicken genome array and performed transcriptome analysis on chicken cecal epithelia in response to infection for 4.5 days in vivo by the cecal-specific species E. tenella. By Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM), we have identified 7,099 probe sets with q-values at <0.05, in which 4,033 and 3,066 genes were found to be up- or down-regulated in response to parasite infection. The reliability of the microarray data were validated by real-time qRT-PCR of 20 genes with varied fold changes in expression (i.e., correlation coefficient between microarray and qRT-PCR datasets: R2?=?0.8773, p<0.0001). Gene ontology analysis, KEGG pathway mapping and manual annotations of regulated genes indicated that up-regulated genes were mainly involved in immunity/defense, responses to various stimuli, apoptosis/cell death and differentiation, signal transduction and extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas down-regulated genes were mainly encoding general metabolic enzymes, membrane components, and some transporters. Chickens mustered complex cecal eipthelia molecular and immunological responses in response to E. tenella infection, which included pathways involved in cytokine production and interactions, natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity, and intestinal IgA production. In response to the pathogenesis and damage caused by infection, chicken cecal epithelia reduced general metabolism, DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, and mitochondrial functions. PMID:23737974

  6. Rapid Biocompatibility Analysis of Materials via In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Mouse Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaitlin M. Bratlie; Tram T. Dang; Stephen Lyle; Matthias Nahrendorf; Ralph Weissleder; Robert Langer; Daniel G. Anderson; Raquel Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundMany materials are unsuitable for medical use because of poor biocompatibility. Recently, advances in the high throughput synthesis of biomaterials has significantly increased the number of potential biomaterials, however current biocompatibility analysis methods are slow and require histological analysis.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsHere we develop rapid, non-invasive methods for in vivo quantification of the inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials. Materials were placed subcutaneously

  7. In-vivo blood flow analysis and animation for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang-Zhong; Burger, Peter; Mohiaddin, Raad H.

    1990-07-01

    The accurate quantitative assessment of variations in coronary arterial dimensions and explicit visualization of the flowing blood in vivo is fundamental to early diagnosis of occlusive vascular diseases. In Magnetic Resonance Velocity Imaging the velocity of flow is usually represented by intensity maps of the three spatial components of velocity which are difficult to use for diagnostic purposes. A technique for analysing the in vivo flow in arteries from MR imaging data is presented. This method uses a specific flow related enhancement process to extract and localize the flow field within the image which is followed by global flow analysis that reveals the underlying oriented structures of the flow field. By animation our method can provide various ways of visualizing the in vivo flow and its variation towards different vessel structures and lesions. Both lateral and cross-sectional views are animated and video tapes of the operation of the on-line animation package demonstrate the effectiveness of this diagnostic tool. 1.

  8. The past, present, and future of x-ray technology for in vivo imaging of function and form

    SciTech Connect

    Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.; Hourigan, K. [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia) and Fluids Laboratory for Aeronautical and Industrial Research, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kitchen, M. J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lewis, R. A. [Monash Center for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Hooper, S. B. [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    Scientists and clinicians have a keen interest in studying not just the structure of physiological systems, but their motion also, or more generally their form and function. This paper focuses on the technologies that underpin in vivo measurements of form and function of the human body for both research and medical treatment. A concise literature review of x-ray imaging, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, laser Doppler velocimetry, and particle image velocimetry is presented. Additionally, a more detailed review of in vivo x-ray imaging is presented. Finally, two techniques, which the authors believe are representative of the present and future of in vivo x-ray imaging techniques, are presented.

  9. Impact of hydrogel nanoparticle size and functionalization on in vivo behavior for lung imaging and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongjian; Ibricevic-Richardson, Aida; Cohen, Joel A.; Cohen, Jessica L.; Gunsten, Sean P.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Walter, Michael J.; Welch, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer chemistry offers the possibility of synthesizing multifunctional nanoparticles which incorporate moieties that enhance diagnostic and therapeutic targeting of cargo delivery to the lung. However, since rules for predicting particle behavior following modification are not well defined, it is essential that probes for tracking fate in vivo are also included. Accordingly, we designed polyacrylamide-based hydrogel particles of differing sizes, functionalized with a nona-arginine cell-penetrating peptide (Arg9), and labeled with imaging components to assess lung retention and cellular uptake after intratracheal administration. Radiolabeled microparticles (1–5 µm diameter) and nanoparticles (20–40 nm diameter) without and with Arg9 showed diffuse airspace distribution by positron emission tomography imaging. Biodistribution studies revealed that particle clearance and extrapulmonary distribution was, in part, size dependent. Microparticles were rapidly cleared by mucociliary routes but unexpectedly, also through the circulation. In contrast, nanoparticles had prolonged lung retention enhanced by Arg9 and were significantly restricted to the lung. For all particle types, uptake was predominant in alveolar macrophages, and, to a lesser extent, lung epithelial cells. In general, particles did not induce local inflammatory responses, with the exception of microparticles bearing Arg9. Whereas microparticles may be advantageous for short-term applications, nano-sized particles constitute an efficient high-retention and non-inflammatory vehicle for the delivery of diagnostic imaging agents and therapeutics to lung airspaces and alveolar macrophages that can be enhanced by Arg9. Importantly, our results show that minor particle modifications may significantly impact in vivo behavior within the complex environments of the lung, underscoring the need for animal modeling. PMID:19852512

  10. In vivo estimation of the glenohumeral joint centre by functional methods: accuracy and repeatability assessment.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Mathieu; Leboeuf, Fabien; Brochard, Sylvain; Rousset, Jean; Burdin, Valérie; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2010-01-19

    Several algorithms have been proposed for determining the centre of rotation of ball joints. These algorithms are used rather to locate the hip joint centre. Few studies have focused on the determination of the glenohumeral joint centre. However, no studies have assessed the accuracy and repeatability of functional methods for glenohumeral joint centre. This paper aims at evaluating the accuracy and the repeatability with which the glenohumeral joint rotation centre (GHRC) can be estimated in vivo by functional methods. The reference joint centre is the glenohumeral anatomical centre obtained by medical imaging. Five functional methods were tested: the algorithm of Gamage and Lasenby (2002), bias compensated (Halvorsen, 2003), symmetrical centre of rotation estimation (Ehrig et al., 2006), normalization method (Chang and Pollard, 2007), helical axis (Woltring et al., 1985). The glenohumeral anatomical centre (GHAC) was deduced from the fitting of the humeral head. Four subjects performed three cycles of three different movements (flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and circumduction). For each test, the location of the glenohumeral joint centre was estimated by the five methods. Analyses focused on the 3D location, on the repeatability of location and on the accuracy by computing the Euclidian distance between the estimated GHRC and the GHAC. For all the methods, the error repeatability was inferior to 8.25 mm. This study showed that there are significant differences between the five functional methods. The smallest distance between the estimated joint centre and the centre of the humeral head was obtained with the method of Gamage and Lasenby (2002). PMID:19875120

  11. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  12. Polyglycerolsulfate Functionalized Gold Nanorods as Optoacoustic Signal Nanoamplifiers for In Vivo Bioimaging of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vonnemann, Jonathan; Beziere, Nicolas; Böttcher, Christoph; Riese, Sebastian B.; Kuehne, Christian; Dernedde, Jens; Licha, Kai; von Schacky, Claudio; Kosanke, Yvonne; Kimm, Melanie; Meier, Reinhard; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We have synthesized a targeted imaging agent for rheumatoid arthritis based on polysulfated gold nanorods. The CTAB layer on gold nanorods was first replaced with PEG-thiol and then with dendritic polyglycerolsulfate at elevated temperature, which resulted in significantly reduced cytotoxicity compared to polyanionic gold nanorods functionalized by non-covalent approaches. In addition to classical characterization methods, we have established a facile UV-VIS based BaCl2 agglomeration assay to confirm a quantitative removal of unbound ligand. With the help of a competitive surface plasmon resonance-based L-selectin binding assay and a leukocyte adhesion-based flow cell assay, we have demonstrated the high inflammation targeting potential of the synthesized gold nanorods in vitro. In combination with the surface plasmon resonance band of AuNRs at 780 nm, these findings permitted the imaging of inflammation in an in vivo mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis with high contrast using multispectral optoacoustic tomography. The study offers a robust method for otherwise difficult to obtain covalently functionalized polyanionic gold nanorods, which are suitable for biological applications as well as a low-cost, actively targeted, and high contrast imaging agent for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. This paves the way for further research in other inflammation associated pathologies, in particular, when photothermal therapy can be applied. PMID:24723984

  13. A transcription blocker isolated from a designed repeat protein combinatorial library by in vivo functional screen

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonova, Elena B.; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Su, Yue; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Xie, Shicong; Guan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    A highly diverse DNA library coding for ankyrin seven-repeat proteins (ANK-N5C) was designed and constructed by a PCR-based combinatorial assembly strategy. A bacterial melibiose fermentation assay was adapted for in vivo functional screen. We isolated a transcription blocker that completely inhibits the melibiose-dependent expression of ?-galactosidase (MelA) and melibiose permease (MelB) of Escherichia coli by specifically preventing activation of the melAB operon. High-resolution crystal structural determination reveals that the designed ANK-N5C protein has a typical ankyrin fold, and the specific transcription blocker, ANK-N5C-281, forms a domain-swapped dimer. Functional tests suggest that the activity of MelR, a DNA-binding transcription activator and a member of AraC family of transcription factors, is inhibited by ANK-N5C-281 protein. All ANK-N5C proteins are expected to have a concave binding area with negative surface potential, suggesting that the designed ANK-N5C library proteins may facilitate the discovery of binders recognizing structural motifs with positive surface potential, like in DNA-binding proteins. Overall, our results show that the established library is a useful tool for the discovery of novel bioactive reagents. PMID:25627011

  14. Twins, quadruplexes, and more: functional aspects of native and engineered RNA self-assembly in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Richard A.; Arluison, Véronique; Lavelle, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The primacy and power of RNA in governing many processes of life has begun to be more fully appreciated in both the discovery and inventive sciences. A variety of RNA interactions regulate gene expression, and structural self-assembly underlies many of these processes. The understanding sparked by these discoveries has inspired and informed the engineering of novel RNA structures, control elements, and genetic circuits in cells. Many of these engineered systems are built up fundamentally from RNA–RNA interactions, often combining modular, rational design with functional selection and screening. It is therefore useful to review the particular class of RNA-based regulatory mechanisms that rely on RNA self-assembly either through homomeric (self–self) or heteromeric (self–nonself) RNA–RNA interactions. Structures and sequence elements within individual RNAs create a basis for the pairing interactions, and in some instances can even lead to the formation of RNA polymers. Example systems of dimers, multimers, and polymers are reviewed in this article in the context of natural systems, wherein the function and impact of self-assemblies are understood. Following this, a brief overview is presented of specific engineered RNA self-assembly systems implemented in vivo, with lessons learned from both discovery and engineering approaches to RNA–RNA self-assembly. PMID:23914307

  15. Expression of Fc?RIIB Tempers Memory CD8 T-cell Function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel R.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Barber, Daniel L.; Harty, John T.

    2013-01-01

    During re-infection high-affinity IgG antibodies form complexes with both soluble antigen and antigen displayed on the surface of infected cells. These interactions regulate cellular activation of both innate cells and B cells, which express specific combinations of activating Fc gamma receptors (Fc?RI, Fc?RIII, Fc?RIV) and/or the inhibitory Fc gamma receptor (Fc?RIIB). Direct proof for functional expression of Fc?R by antigen-specific CD8 T-cells is lacking. Here, we show that the majority of memory CD8 T-cells generated by bacterial or viral infection express only Fc?RIIB and that Fc?RIIB could be detected on previously activated human CD8 T-cells. Of note, Fc?R stimulation during in vivo antigen challenge not only inhibited the cytotoxicity of memory CD8 T-cells against peptide-loaded or virus-infected targets, but Fc?RIIB blockade during homologous virus challenge enhanced the secondary CD8 T-cell response. Thus, memory CD8 T-cells intrinsically express a functional Fc?RIIB, permitting antigen-antibody complexes to regulate secondary CD8 T-cell responses. PMID:24285839

  16. Heat shock protein hsp90 regulates dioxin receptor function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, M L; McGuire, J; Picard, D; Gustafsson, J A; Poellinger, L

    1995-01-01

    The dioxin (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor is a ligand-dependent basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor that binds to xenobiotic response elements of target promoters upon heterodimerization with the bHLH partner factor Arnt. Here we have replaced the bHLH motif of the dioxin receptor with a heterologous DNA-binding domain to create fusion proteins that mediate ligand-dependent transcriptional enhancement in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Previously, our experiments indicated that the ligand-free dioxin receptor is stably associated with the 90-kDa heat shock protein, hsp90. To investigate the role of hsp90 in dioxin signaling we have studied receptor function in a yeast strain where hsp90 expression can be down-regulated to about 5% relative to wild-type levels. At low levels of hsp90, ligand-dependent activation of the chimeric dioxin receptor construct was almost completely inhibited, whereas the activity of a similar chimeric construct containing the structurally related Arnt factor was not affected. Moreover, a chimeric dioxin receptor construct lacking the central ligand- and hsp90-binding region of the receptor showed constitutive transcriptional activity in yeast that was not impaired upon down-regulation of hsp90 expression levels. Thus, these data suggest that hsp90 is a critical determinant of conditional regulation of dioxin receptor function in vivo via the ligand-binding domain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753824

  17. Functional Brain Image Analysis Using Joint Function-Structure Priors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Schultz, Robert T.; Duncan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for context-driven analysis of functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) that incorporates spatial relationships between functional parameter clusters and anatomical structure directly for the first time. We design a parametric scheme that relates functional and structural spatially-compact regions in a single unified manner. Our method is motivated by the fact that the fMRI and anatomical MRI (aMRI) have consistent relations that provide configurations and context that aid in fMRI analysis. We develop a statistical decision-making strategy to estimate new fMRI parameter images (based on a General Linear Model-GLM) and spatially-clustered zones within these images. The analysis is based on the time-series data and contextual information related to appropriate spatial grouping of parameters in the functional data and the relationship of this grouping to relevant gray matter structure from the anatomical data. We introduce a representation for the joint prior of the functional and structural information, and define a joint probability distribution over the variations of functional clusters and the related structure contained in a set of training images. We estimate the Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) functional parameters, formulating the function-structure model in terms of level set functions. Results from 3D fMRI and aMRI show that this context-driven analysis potentially extracts more meaningful information than the standard GLM approach. PMID:20543899

  18. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13?mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  19. Transport by Populations of Fast and Slow Kinesins Uncovers Novel Family-Dependent Motor Characteristics Important for In Vivo Function

    E-print Network

    Hancock, William O.

    Article Transport by Populations of Fast and Slow Kinesins Uncovers Novel Family-Dependent Motor Characteristics Important for In Vivo Function Go¨ker Arpag,1 Shankar Shastry,2 William O. Hancock,2,* and Erkan ABSTRACT Intracellular cargo transport frequently involves multiple motor types, either having opposite

  20. Transdifferentiation of Fast Skeletal Muscle Into Functional Endothelium in Vivo by Transcription Factor Etv2

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Gustavo A.; Lindgren, Anne G.; Huang, Haigen; Yang, Hanshuo; Yao, Shaohua; Martin, Benjamin L.; Kimelman, David; Lin, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    Etsrp/Etv2 (Etv2) is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator of vascular development in vertebrates. Etv2 deficiency prevents the proper specification of the endothelial cell lineage, while its overexpression causes expansion of the endothelial cell lineage in the early embryo or in embryonic stem cells. We hypothesized that Etv2 alone is capable of transdifferentiating later somatic cells into endothelial cells. Using heat shock inducible Etv2 transgenic zebrafish, we demonstrate that Etv2 expression alone is sufficient to transdifferentiate fast skeletal muscle cells into functional blood vessels. Following heat treatment, fast skeletal muscle cells turn on vascular genes and repress muscle genes. Time-lapse imaging clearly shows that muscle cells turn on vascular gene expression, undergo dramatic morphological changes, and integrate into the existing vascular network. Lineage tracing and immunostaining confirm that fast skeletal muscle cells are the source of these newly generated vessels. Microangiography and observed blood flow demonstrated that this new vasculature is capable of supporting circulation. Using pharmacological, transgenic, and morpholino approaches, we further establish that the canonical Wnt pathway is important for induction of the transdifferentiation process, whereas the VEGF pathway provides a maturation signal for the endothelial fate. Additionally, overexpression of Etv2 in mammalian myoblast cells, but not in other cell types examined, induced expression of vascular genes. We have demonstrated in zebrafish that expression of Etv2 alone is sufficient to transdifferentiate fast skeletal muscle into functional endothelial cells in vivo. Given the evolutionarily conserved function of this transcription factor and the responsiveness of mammalian myoblasts to Etv2, it is likely that mammalian muscle cells will respond similarly. PMID:23853546

  1. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  2. Effect of topically applied dexpanthenol on epidermal barrier function and stratum corneum hydration. Results of a human in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Gehring, W; Gloor, M

    2000-07-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study the effect of topical dexpanthenol (CAS 81-13-0) formulated in two different lipophilic vehicles on epidermal barrier function in vivo was carried out. Seven days' treatment with dexpanthenol improved stratum corneum hydration and reduced transepidermal water loss. Active treatment was statistically different from the vehicle control on both measures. Our results suggest that topical dexpanthenol formulated in either lipophilic vehicle stabilizes the skin barrier function. PMID:10965426

  3. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-06-01

    Near-infrared imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, yet the imaging capabilities of this approach have yet to be quantitatively characterized. We seek to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for lymphatic disease. Imaging is performed in a tissue phantom for sensitivity analysis and in hairless rats for in vivo testing. To demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging approach to quantifying immediate functional changes in lymphatics, we investigate the effects of a topically applied nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate ointment. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being 150 ?g/mL ICG and 60 g/L albumin. ICG fluorescence can be detected at a concentration of 150 ?g/mL as deep as 6 mm with our system, but spatial resolution deteriorates below 3 mm, skewing measurements of vessel geometry. NO treatment slows lymphatic transport, which is reflected in increased transport time, reduced packet frequency, reduced packet velocity, and reduced effective contraction length. NIR imaging may be an alternative to invasive procedures measuring lymphatic function in vivo in real time.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, yet the imaging capabilities of this approach have yet to be quantitatively characterized. We seek to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for lymphatic disease. Imaging is performed in a tissue phantom for sensitivity analysis and in hairless rats for in vivo testing. To demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging approach to quantifying immediate functional changes in lymphatics, we investigate the effects of a topically applied nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate ointment. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being 150???g/mL ICG and 60??g/L albumin. ICG fluorescence can be detected at a concentration of 150???g/mL as deep as 6 mm with our system, but spatial resolution deteriorates below 3 mm, skewing measurements of vessel geometry. NO treatment slows lymphatic transport, which is reflected in increased transport time, reduced packet frequency, reduced packet velocity, and reduced effective contraction length. NIR imaging may be an alternative to invasive procedures measuring lymphatic function in vivo in real time. PMID:22734775

  5. Development of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for in vivo Functional Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin

    Optical coherence tomography is a rapidly developing optical imaging modality capable of noninvasively providing depth resolved information of biological tissue at micrometer scale. In this thesis, we described several OCT technologies that can be used to double the imaging depth, realize functional vasculature imaging of biological tissue and increase the imaging speed of OCT system. Aim 1: Use of a scanner to introduce spatial frequency modulation to OCT spectral interferograms for in vivo full-range Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. A novel method was developed that could easily introduce a modulation frequency onto the X-direction (i.e., B-scan) of the FDOCT scanning system, enabling full-range Fourier-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (frFDOCT). Compared to the conventional FDOCT system, the newly developed frFDOCT system can provide increased system sensitivity and deeper imaging depth. The previous technology that can achieve frFDOCT either needed multiple steps for data capturing, which is time consuming, or required additional components which increased the system's complexity. The newly developed method generates a modulation spatial frequency in the spectral interferogram by simply offsetting the probe beam at the X-scanner. Aim 2: Using optical micro-angiography to achieve in vivo volumetric imaging of vascular perfusion within human retina and choroids. Optical Micro-Angiography (OMAG) is a functional extension of FDOCT technology. It can achieve visualization of vasculature network of biological tissue. In order to apply the OMAG method to image vasculature map of human retina and choroid, a phase compensation algorithm was developed, which could minimize the motion artifacts generated by the movements of human eye and head. Aim 3: Developing ultrahigh sensitive optical micro-angiography to achieve micro vasculature imaging of biological tissue. To improve the vasculature image quality, we developed ultrahigh sensitive OMAG (UHS-OMAG). Unlike conventional OMAG, UHS-OMAG applied the OMAG algorithm onto the slow direction of FDOCT scan (Y-direction). Because the time interval between adjacent B-frames is much longer than that between adjacent A-lines, UHS-OMAG can achieve much higher flow sensitivity compared to the conventional OMAG. In addition, the UHS-OMAG usually employed high frame rate (typically 300 frames per second) to achieve 3D scan, it cost much less time to finish one 3D scan compared to the traditional OMAG. However, when it was applied to visualize vasculature map of human tissue, the motion artifacts caused by the inevitable movements is still the biggest challenge. Based on the phase difference calculated from two adjacent B-frames, a new phase compensation algorithm was developed. Aim 4: Developing ultrahigh speed Spectral Domain OCT system through sequentially controlling two high speed line scan CMOS cameras. Two identical high speed line cameras were employed to build two home build high speed spectrometers. Through sequentially controlling the reading time period of two cameras, the imaging speed of the whole system could reach twice higher than the single camera system. The newly built 800 nm SDOCT system which can work at 500, 000 Hz A-lines capturing speed was then used to achieve in vivo 3D imaging in both high speed and large field of view mode. In addition, through combining with the OMAG algorithm, the newly developed system is capable of providing detailed micro-vasculature imaging of human retina and optic nerve head. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Functional Techniques for Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, John R.

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation develops a new general method of solving Prony's problem. Two special cases of this new method have been developed previously. They are the Matrix Pencil and the Osculatory Interpolation. The dissertation shows that they are instances of a more general solution type which allows a wide ranging class of linear functional to be used in the solution of the problem. This class provides a continuum of functionals which provide new methods that can be used to solve Prony's problem.

  7. Orthogonal analysis of C\\/EBP targets in vivo during liver proliferation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua R. Friedman; Brian Larris; Phillip P. Le; T. Harshani Peiris; Athanasios Arsenlis; Jonathan Schug; John W. Tobias; Klaus H. Kaestner; Linda E. Greenbaum

    2004-01-01

    CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C\\/EBP), a basic-leucine zipper transcription factor, is an important effector of signals in physiologic growth and cancer. The identification of direct C\\/EBP targets in vivo has been limited by functional compensation by other C\\/EBP family proteins and the low stringency of the consensus sequence. Here we use the combined power of expression profiling and high-throughput chromatin immunoprecipitation

  8. In vivo Analysis of Tissue Response to Plasma-Treated Collagen-I-Coated Titanium Alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hauser; A. Ring; A. Schaffran; L. Henrich; S. A. Esenwein; H. U. Steinau; I. Stricker; S. Langer

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo tissue response to low-pressure plasma-pretreated collagen-I-coated titanium implant in a middle-term mouse model. Methods: Plasma-treated collagen-coated titanium implants were transplanted into the dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB\\/c mice. Untreated, regular titanium implant material served as control. The neovascularization (functional vessel density) of the implant border zone and of

  9. Fuzzy Modeling for Function Points Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osias De Souza Lima Júnior; Pedro Porfírio Muniz Farias; Arnaldo Dias Belchior

    2003-01-01

    Function Point Analysis (FPA) is a largely used technique to estimate the size of development project, enhancement project or applications already installed. During the point counting process that represents the dimension of a project or an application, each function is classified according to its relative functional complexity. Several studies resulted in FPA extensions, and most of them are mainly aimed

  10. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin. PMID:24445121

  11. Functional integrity of the interrenal tissue of yellow perch from contaminated sites tested in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, C.; Brodeur, J.C.; Hontela, A. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The normal activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) in response to capture is disrupted in fish subjected to life-long exposure to heavy metals, PCBs and PAHs. The ability to increase plasma cortisol in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from sites contaminated by heavy metals and organic compounds, and from a reference site was assessed by the Capture stress test and by the ACTH Challenge test, a new standardized in vivo method designed for field studies. The effects of seasonal factors, such as temperature and gonadal maturity on these tests were investigated. Measures of liver and muscle glycogen and histopathology were made to further characterize the biochemical and structural changes that may occur along with hormonal changes. The Capture stress test showed that an acute source of stress induced a lower cortisol response in fish from the highly contaminated site compared to the reference site, revealing a functional impairment of the HPI axis. The ACTH Challenge test showed that the hormonal responsiveness of the cortisol-secreting interrenal tissue, stimulated by a standard dose of ACTH injected i.p., was lower in fish from the highly contaminated site than the reference site. Spring is the season during which the impairment was the most evident. The possibility of using the reduced capacity of feral fish to respond to a standardized ACTH Challenge as an early bioindicator of toxic stress is discussed.

  12. In vivo effects of Eurycoma longifolia Jack (Tongkat Ali) extract on reproductive functions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M C; Erasmus, N; Henkel, R R

    2014-05-01

    An aqueous extract of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali; TA) roots is traditionally used to enhance male sexuality. Because previous studies are limited to only few sperm parameters or testosterone concentration, this study investigated the in vivo effects of TA on body and organ weight as well as functional sperm parameters in terms of safety and efficacy in the management of male infertility. Forty-two male rats were divided into a control, low-dose (200 mg kg(-1) BW) and high-dose (800 mg kg(-1) BW) group (n = 14). Rats were force-fed for 14 days and then sacrificed. Total body and organ weights of the prostate, testes, epididymides, gastrocnemius muscle and the omentum were recorded. Moreover, testosterone concentration, sperm concentration, motility, velocity, vitality, acrosome reaction and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were assessed. Whilst TA decreased BW by 5.7% (P = 0.0276) and omentum fat by 31.9% (P = 0.0496), no changes in organ weights were found for the prostate, testes and epididymides. Testosterone concentration increased by 30.2% (P = 0.0544). Muscle weight also increased, yet not significantly. Whilst sperm concentration, total and progressive motility and vitality increased significantly, MMP improved markedly (P = 0.0765) by 25.1%. Because no detrimental effect could be observed, TA appears safe for possible treatment of male infertility and ageing male problems. PMID:23464350

  13. Functionalization of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with targeting ligands: their physicochemical properties and in vivo behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chen; Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest; Bhattarai, Narayan; Wang, Freddy; Stephen, Zach; Li, Chun; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Aims To develop and evaluate two tumor-specific nanoprobes by functionalization of a PEG-immobilized nanoparticle with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) or chlorotoxin (CTX) ligand that targets ?v?3 integrin and MMP-2 receptors, respectively. Materials and Methods The nanoprobes were made of iron oxide cores, biocompatible polymer coating, and surface-conjugated RGD or CTX peptide. The tumor-targeting specificity of the nanoprobes was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Results and Discussion Both nanoprobes were highly dispersive and exhibited excellent long-term stability in cell culture media. The RGD-conjugated nanoprobe displayed a strong initial accumulation near neovasculatures in tumors followed by quick clearance. Conversely, the CTX-enabled nanoprobe exhibited sustained accumulation throughout the tumor. Conclusion These findings revealed the influence of the targeting ligands on the intratumoral distribution of the ligand-enabled nanoprobes. With flexible surface chemistry, our nanoparticle platform can be used in a modular fashion to conjugate biomolecules for intended applications. PMID:21128719

  14. In Vivo Characterization of Traumatic Brain Injury Neuropathology with Structural and Functional Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    LEVINE, BRIAN; FUJIWARA, ESTHER; O’CONNOR, CHARLENE; RICHARD, NADINE; KOVACEVIC, NATASA; MANDIC, MARINA; RESTAGNO, ADRIANA; EASDON, CRAIG; ROBERTSON, IAN H.; GRAHAM, SIMON J.; CHEUNG, GORDON; GAO, FUQIANG; SCHWARTZ, MICHAEL L.; BLACK, SANDRA E.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative neuroimaging is increasingly used to study the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on brain structure and function. This paper reviews quantitative structural and functional neuroimaging studies of patients with TBI, with an emphasis on the effects of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), the primary neuropathology in TBI. Quantitative structural neuroimaging has evolved from simple planometric measurements through targeted region-of-interest analyses to whole-brain analysis of quantified tissue compartments. Recent studies converge to indicate widespread volume loss of both gray and white matter in patients with moderate-to-severe TBI. These changes can be documented even when patients with focal lesions are excluded. Broadly speaking, performance on standard neuropsychological tests of speeded information processing are related to these changes, but demonstration of specific brain-behavior relationships requires more refined experimental behavioral measures. The functional consequences of these structural changes can be imaged with activation functional neuroimaging. Although this line of research is at an early stage, results indicate that TBI causes a more widely dispersed activation in frontal and posterior cortices. Further progress in analysis of the consequences of TBI on neural structure and function will require control of variability in neuropathology and behavior. PMID:17020478

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis (FSA) detects quantitative changes in atherosclerotic plaque collagen and elastin content In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Alexander M.; Dai, Erbin; Liu, Liying; Guan, Haiyan; Bernards, Mark A.; Cavers, Paul B.; Susko, David; Lucas, Alexandra

    2002-05-01

    In order to assess the capacity for in vivo fluorescence spectroscopi8c analysis of arterial collagen and elastin, fluorescence emission intensity was recorded form rabbit aorta after angioplasty and stent implant, and correlated with extracted elastin and collagen content. FEI from saline treated rabbits after stent implant was higher between 485 and 500 nm than after anti-inflammatory treatment. FEI was significantly decreased after implantation of shorter stents at 476-500 nm. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated an excellent correlation between FEI and elastin and HPLC- measured collagen content at 486-500 nm and 476-480 nm respectively. Conclusions: FEI recorded in vivo form arterial intimal surface, can be successfully used for quantitative assessment of compositional changes in connective tissue. Stent implant can induce changes in intimal arterial structure at discrete sites distant from the stent implant site.

  16. Corneal Viscoelastic Properties from Finite-Element Analysis of In Vivo Air-Puff Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Sabine; Bekesi, Nandor; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Pascual, Daniel; Marcos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical properties are an excellent health marker of biological tissues, however they are challenging to be measured in-vivo. Non-invasive approaches to assess tissue biomechanics have been suggested, but there is a clear need for more accurate techniques for diagnosis, surgical guidance and treatment evaluation. Recently air-puff systems have been developed to study the dynamic tissue response, nevertheless the experimental geometrical observations lack from an analysis that addresses specifically the inherent dynamic properties. In this study a viscoelastic finite element model was built that predicts the experimental corneal deformation response to an air-puff for different conditions. A sensitivity analysis reveals significant contributions to corneal deformation of intraocular pressure and corneal thickness, besides corneal biomechanical properties. The results show the capability of dynamic imaging to reveal inherent biomechanical properties in vivo. Estimates of corneal biomechanical parameters will contribute to the basic understanding of corneal structure, shape and integrity and increase the predictability of corneal surgery. PMID:25121496

  17. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Bartolome, Maria Visitacion [Department of Physiology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente [Department of Physiology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain); Stefanon, Ivanita [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Vassallo, Dalton Valentim, E-mail: daltonv2@terra.com.br [Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Health Science Center of Vitoria-EMESCAM, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small concentrations constitutes environmental cardiovascular risk factor.

  18. Multilevel Functional Clustering Analysis Nicoleta Serban1

    E-print Network

    Serban, Nicoleta

    Multilevel Functional Clustering Analysis Nicoleta Serban1 H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial of repeated measurements or subunits per unit. We demonstrate the applicability of the clustering analysis patterns are identified by clustering the expression profiles using our multilevel clustering analysis

  19. A simplified technique for in vivo analysis of sister-chromatid exchanges using 5-bromodeoxyuridine tablets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Allen; C. F. Shuler; R. W. Mendes; S. A. Latt

    1977-01-01

    A small tablet of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), implanted subcutaneously in a mouse, provides sustained release of base analog sufficient to effect substitution of DNA throughout an entire replication period. As illustrated by studies of mouse bone-marrow and spleen cells in the presence or absence of cyclophosphamide, this depot method of BrdU administration greatly simplifies in vivo analysis of sister-chromatid-exchange formation.Copyright ©

  20. Energy function analysis for power system stability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Pai

    1989-01-01

    Energy Function Analysis for Power System Stability presents the concept of energy function, which has found wide-spread applications for power systems in recent years. The most recent advances in five distinct areas are reviewed: Development of energy functions for structure preserving models, which can incorporate non-linear load models; energy functions which include a detailed model of the generating unit (i.e.

  1. Detection of low-amplitude in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; T'so, Dan; Pattichis, Marios; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Abramoff, Michael; Soliz, Peter

    2006-02-01

    In the early stages of some retinal diseases, such as glaucoma, loss of retinal activity may be difficult to detect with today's clinical instruments. Many of today's instruments focus on detecting changes in anatomical structures, such as the nerve fiber layer. Our device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. The functional imager uses a patterned stimulus at wavelength of 535nm. An intrinsic functional signal is collected at a near infrared wavelength. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by imaging system noise. In this paper, we analyze the video sequences from a set of 60 experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats. Using a set of statistical techniques known as Independent Component Analysis (ICA), we estimate the signals present in the videos. Through controlled simulation experiments, we quantify the limits of signal strength in order to detect the physiological signal of interest. The results of the analysis show that, in principle, signal levels of 0.1% (-30dB) can be detected. The study found that in 86% of the animal experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted. The analysis of the different responses extracted from the videos can give an insight of the functional processes present during the stimulation of the retina.

  2. Microtubule depolymerization normalizes in vivo myocardial contractile function in dogs with pressure-overload left ventricular hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Hamawaki, M.; Narishige, T.; Sato, H.; Nemoto, S.; DeFreyte, G.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper G, I. V.; Carabello, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because initially compensatory myocardial hypertrophy in response to pressure overloading may eventually decompensate to myocardial failure, mechanisms responsible for this transition have long been sought. One such mechanism established in vitro is densification of the cellular microtubule network, which imposes a viscous load that inhibits cardiocyte contraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the present study, we extended this in vitro finding to the in vivo level and tested the hypothesis that this cytoskeletal abnormality is important in the in vivo contractile dysfunction that occurs in experimental aortic stenosis in the adult dog. In 8 dogs in which gradual stenosis of the ascending aorta had caused severe left ventricular (LV) pressure overloading (gradient, 152+/-16 mm Hg) with contractile dysfunction, LV function was measured at baseline and 1 hour after the intravenous administration of colchicine. Cardiocytes obtained by biopsy before and after in vivo colchicine administration were examined in tandem. Microtubule depolymerization restored LV contractile function both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These and additional corroborative data show that increased cardiocyte microtubule network density is an important mechanism for the ventricular contractile dysfunction that develops in large mammals with adult-onset pressure-overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  3. Optogenetic analysis of synaptic function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jana F Liewald; Martin Brauner; Greg J Stephens; Magali Bouhours; Christian Schultheis; Mei Zhen; Alexander Gottschalk

    2008-01-01

    We introduce optogenetic investigation of neurotransmission (OptIoN) for time-resolved and quantitative assessment of synaptic function via behavioral and electrophysiological analyses. We photo-triggered release of acetylcholine or ?-aminobutyric acid at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions using targeted expression of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Channelrhodopsin-2. In intact Channelrhodopsin-2 transgenic worms, photostimulation instantly induced body elongation (for ?-aminobutyric acid) or contraction (for acetylcholine), which we analyzed

  4. Design and analysis of a novel mechanical loading machine for dynamic in vivo axial loading.

    PubMed

    Macione, James; Nesbitt, Sterling; Pandit, Vaibhav; Kotha, Shiva

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the construction of a loading machine for performing in vivo, dynamic mechanical loading of the rodent forearm. The loading machine utilizes a unique type of electromagnetic actuator with no mechanically resistive components (servotube), allowing highly accurate loads to be created. A regression analysis of the force created by the actuator with respect to the input voltage demonstrates high linear correlation (R(2) = 1). When the linear correlation is used to create dynamic loading waveforms in the frequency (0.5-10 Hz) and load (1-50 N) range used for in vivo loading, less than 1% normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) is computed. Larger NRMSE is found at increased frequencies, with 5%-8% occurring at 40 Hz, and reasons are discussed. Amplifiers (strain gauge, linear voltage displacement transducer (LVDT), and load cell) are constructed, calibrated, and integrated, to allow well-resolved dynamic measurements to be recorded at each program cycle. Each of the amplifiers uses an active filter with cutoff frequency at the maximum in vivo loading frequencies (50 Hz) so that electronic noise generated by the servo drive and actuator are reduced. The LVDT and load cell amplifiers allow evaluation of stress-strain relationships to determine if in vivo bone damage is occurring. The strain gauge amplifier allows dynamic force to strain calibrations to occur for animals of different sex, age, and strain. Unique features are integrated into the loading system, including a weightless mode, which allows the limbs of anesthetized animals to be quickly positioned and removed. Although the device is constructed for in vivo axial bone loading, it can be used within constraints, as a general measurement instrument in a laboratory setting. PMID:22380131

  5. Design and analysis of a novel mechanical loading machine for dynamic in vivo axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macione, James; Nesbitt, Sterling; Pandit, Vaibhav; Kotha, Shiva

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the construction of a loading machine for performing in vivo, dynamic mechanical loading of the rodent forearm. The loading machine utilizes a unique type of electromagnetic actuator with no mechanically resistive components (servotube), allowing highly accurate loads to be created. A regression analysis of the force created by the actuator with respect to the input voltage demonstrates high linear correlation (R2 = 1). When the linear correlation is used to create dynamic loading waveforms in the frequency (0.5-10 Hz) and load (1-50 N) range used for in vivo loading, less than 1% normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) is computed. Larger NRMSE is found at increased frequencies, with 5%-8% occurring at 40 Hz, and reasons are discussed. Amplifiers (strain gauge, linear voltage displacement transducer (LVDT), and load cell) are constructed, calibrated, and integrated, to allow well-resolved dynamic measurements to be recorded at each program cycle. Each of the amplifiers uses an active filter with cutoff frequency at the maximum in vivo loading frequencies (50 Hz) so that electronic noise generated by the servo drive and actuator are reduced. The LVDT and load cell amplifiers allow evaluation of stress-strain relationships to determine if in vivo bone damage is occurring. The strain gauge amplifier allows dynamic force to strain calibrations to occur for animals of different sex, age, and strain. Unique features are integrated into the loading system, including a weightless mode, which allows the limbs of anesthetized animals to be quickly positioned and removed. Although the device is constructed for in vivo axial bone loading, it can be used within constraints, as a general measurement instrument in a laboratory setting.

  6. In vivo analysis of a fluorescent SUMO fusion in transgenic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bocksberger, Marion; Karch, François; Gibert, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Sumoylation, the covalent attachment of SUMO, a 90 amino acid peptide related to ubiquitin, is a major modulator of protein functions. Fluorescent SUMO protein fusions have been used in cell cultures to visualize SUMO in vivo but not in multicellular organisms. We generated a transgenic line of Drosophila expressing an mCherry-SUMO fusion. We analyzed its pattern in vivo in salivary gland nuclei expressing Venus-HP1 to recognize the different chromatin components (Chromocenter, chromosome IV). We compared it to SUMO immunostaining on squashed polytene chromosomes and observed similar patterns. In addition to the previously reported SUMO localizations (chromosome arms and chromocenter), we identify 2 intense binding sites: the fourth chromosome telomere and the DAPI-bright band in the region 81F. PMID:25483255

  7. In vivo function of airway epithelial TLR2 in host defense against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Jiang, Di; Minor, Maisha N; Martin, Richard J; Chu, Hong Wei

    2011-04-01

    Decreased Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) expression has been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in a murine asthma model, which may predispose the hosts to bacterial infections, leading to disease exacerbations. Since airway epithelial cells serve as the first line of respiratory mucosal defense, the present study aimed to reveal the role of airway epithelial TLR2 signaling to lung bacterial [i.e., Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp)] clearance. In vivo TLR2 gene transfer via intranasal inoculation of adenoviral vector was performed to reconstitute TLR2 expression in airway epithelium of TLR2(-/-) BALB/c mice, with or without ensuing Mp infection. TLR2 and lactotransferrin (LTF) expression in airway epithelial cells and lung Mp load were assessed. Adenovirus-mediated TLR2 gene transfer to airway epithelial cells of TLR2(-/-) mice reconstituted 30-40% TLR2 expression compared with TLR2(+/+) cells. Such airway epithelial TLR2 reconstitution in TLR2(-/-) mice significantly reduced lung Mp load (an appropriate 45% reduction), coupled with elevated LTF expression. LTF expression in mice was shown to be mainly dependent on TLR2 signaling in response to Mp infection. Exogenous human LTF protein dose-dependently decreased lung bacterial load in Mp-infected TLR2(-/-) mice. In addition, human LTF protein directly dose-dependently decreased Mp levels in vitro. These data indicate that reconstitution of airway epithelial TLR2 signaling in TLR2(-/-) mice significantly restores lung defense against bacteria (e.g., Mp) via increased lung antimicrobial protein LTF production. Our findings may offer a deliverable approach to attenuate bacterial infections in airways of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with impaired TLR2 function. PMID:21239529

  8. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS AND TREATMENT OF COPROPHAGIA

    PubMed Central

    Ing, Anna D; Roane, Henry S; Veenstra, Rebecca A

    2011-01-01

    In the current investigation, functional analysis results suggested that coprophagia, the ingestion of fecal matter, was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Providing noncontingent access to alternative stimuli decreased coprophagia, and the intervention was generalized to two settings. PMID:21541128

  9. In vivo neutron activation analysis: body composition studies in health and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo analysis of body elements by neutron activation is an important tool in medical research. It has provided a direct quantitative measure of body composition of human beings in vivo. Basic physiological differences related to age, sex, race, and body size have been assessed by this noninvasive technique. The diagnosis and management of patients with various metabolic disorders and diseases has also been demonstrated. Two major facilities at Brookhaven are being utilized exclusively for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, chlorine, nitrogen, hydrogen, and potassium. These elements serve as the basis for a four compartment model of body composition: protein, water, mineral ash, and fat. Variations in these compartments are demonstrated in clinical research programs investigating obesity, anorexia, cancer, renal failure, osteoporosis, and normal aging. IVNAA continues to provide a unique approach to the evaluation of clinical diagnosis, efficacy of therapeutic regimens, and monitoring of the aging process. Classical balance studies usually require the patient to be admitted to a hospital for extended periods of confinement. IVNAA, however, allows for clinical management of the patient on an out-patient basis, an important aspect for treatment of chronic diseases. 25 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Compound Ex Vivo and In Silico Method for Hemodynamic Analysis of Stented Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Pacheco, Fernando; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S.; Ge, Heng; Choo, Ryan J.; Ferrari, Aldo; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic factors such as low wall shear stress have been shown to influence endothelial healing and atherogenesis in stent-free vessels. However, in stented vessels, a reliable quantitative analysis of such relations has not been possible due to the lack of a suitable method for the accurate acquisition of blood flow. The objective of this work was to develop a method for the precise reconstruction of hemodynamics and quantification of wall shear stress in stented vessels. We have developed such a method that can be applied to vessels stented in or ex vivo and processed ex vivo. Here we stented the coronary arteries of ex vivo porcine hearts, performed vascular corrosion casting, acquired the vessel geometry using micro-computed tomography and reconstructed blood flow and shear stress using computational fluid dynamics. The method yields accurate local flow information through anatomic fidelity, capturing in detail the stent geometry, arterial tissue prolapse, radial and axial arterial deformation as well as strut malapposition. This novel compound method may serve as a unique tool for spatially resolved analysis of the relationship between hemodynamic factors and vascular biology. It can further be employed to optimize stent design and stenting strategies. PMID:23516442

  11. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further, it evidences zebrafish's potential for in vivo efficacy or toxicity screening of ubiquinone analogues or antiparasitic mitochondria-targeted drugs. PMID:23758163

  12. Error analysis for the in-vivo measurement of radionuclides in wounds: Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A S M Sabbir; Capello, Kevin; Sabourin, Trevor; Kramer, Gary H

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes calculation of error associated with the direct in-vivo measurements of radionuclides in a wound. A typical radiation injury to a hand with Am radionuclide is illustrated for error analysis. A Monte Carlo model was developed and the detector pulse spectrum studied with a custom-designed HPGe detector. A pinhole collimator was designed, and its performance with a wide area detector was studied. The results show that significant errors might propagate if the lowest energy peaks of Am are used during in vivo measurements of the wound. In comparison to that, less uncertainty was found for 26.3 and 59.5 keV gamma peaks, and those levels are recommended for estimation of wound depth and activity. PMID:21068594

  13. In vivo skin capacitive imaging analysis by using grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM).

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiang; Pan, Wei; Xiao, Perry

    2014-01-01

    We present our latest work on in vivo skin capacitive imaging analysis by using grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The in vivo skin capacitive images were taken by a capacitance based fingerprint sensor, the skin capacitive images were then analysed by GLCM. Four different GLCM feature vectors, angular second moment (ASM), entropy (ENT), contrast (CON) and correlation (COR), are selected to describe the skin texture. The results show that angular second moment increases as age increases, and entropy decreases as age increases. The results also suggest that the angular second moment values and the entropy values reflect more about the skin texture, whilst the contrast values and the correlation values reflect more about the topically applied solvents. The overall results shows that the GLCM is an effective way to extract and analyse the skin texture information, which can potentially be a valuable reference for evaluating effects of medical and cosmetic treatments. PMID:24188984

  14. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  15. In vivo elemental analysis by counting neutron-induced gamma rays for medical and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Ma, Ruimei; Zhuang, Hong; Moore, Robert; Dowling, Lisa

    1995-03-01

    Non-invasive in vivo elemental analysis is a technique used to assess human body composition which is indicative of nutritional status and health condition. The in vivo measurement of the body's major elements is used for a variety of medical studies requiring the determination of the body's compartments (protein, fat, water, bone). Whole body gamma-ray counters, consisting of Nal(Tl) crystal detectors in a shielded room, are used for measuring in vivo the body's Ca, Cl, Na and P by delayed neutron activation analysis. Thermal neutrons from a moderated 238Pu-Be source are used for the measurement of total body nitrogen (and thus protein) and chlorine at low radiation exposure (0.80 mSv). The resulting high energy prompt gamma-rays from nitrogen (10.83 MeV) and chlorine (6.11 MeV) are detected simultaneously with the irradiation. Body fat (the main energy store) and fat distribution (which relates to risk for cardiovascular disease) are measured by detecting C and O in vivo through fast neutron inelastic scattering. A small sealed D-T neutron generator is used for the pulsed (4 - 8 KHz) production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen are detected by counting the 4.44 and 6.13 MeV gamma-rays resulting from the inelastic scattering of the fast neutrons from the 12C and 16O nuclei, respectively. One use of this method is the systematic study of the mechanisms driving the age-associated depletion of the metabolizing, oxygen-consuming cellular compartment of the body. The understanding of this catabolism may suggest ways to maintain lean tissue and thus to preserve quality of life for the very old.

  16. In Vivo Image Analysis of BoHV-4-Based Vector in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Valentina; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Mangia, Carlo; Jacca, Sarah; Lavrentiadou, Sophia; Cavirani, Sandro; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Due to its biological characteristics bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) has been considered as an appropriate gene delivery vector. Its genomic clone, modified as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), is better genetically manipulable and can be used as an efficient gene delivery and vaccine vector. Although a large amount of data have been accumulated in vitro on this specific aspect, the same cannot be asserted for the in vivo condition. Therefore, here we investigated the fate of a recombinant BoHV-4 strain expressing luciferase (BoHV-4-A-CMVluc?TK) after intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation in mice, by generating a novel recombinant BoHV-4 expressing luciferase (BoHV-4-A-CMVluc?TK) and by following the virus replication through in vivo imaging analysis. BoHV-4-A-CMVluc?TK was first characterized in vitro where it was shown, on one hand that its replication properties are identical to those of the parental virus, and on the other that the transduced/infected cells strongly express luciferase. When BoHV-4-A-CMVluc?TK was inoculated in mice, either intraperitoneally or intravenously, BoHV-4-A-CMVluc?TK infection/transduction was exclusively localized to the liver, as detected by in vivo image analysis, and in particular almost exclusively in the hepatocytes, as determined by immuno-histochemistry. These data, that add a new insight on the biology of BoHV-4 in vivo, provide the first indication for the potential use of a BoHV-4-based vector in gene-transfer in the liver. PMID:24752229

  17. Functional Data Analysis for Sparse Longitudinal Data

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jane-Ling

    , and the estimation of the variance of the measurement er- rors. The eigenfunction basis is estimated from the data, and functional principal component score estimates are obtained by a conditioning step. This conditional expectations. We demonstrate that this extends the applicability of functional principal components analysis

  18. Characterization of In Vivo Dlg1 Deletion on T Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tomassian, Tamar; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Humbert, Patrick O.; Silva, Oscar; Round, June L.; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The polarized reorganization of the T cell membrane and intracellular signaling molecules in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement has been implicated in the modulation of T cell development and effector responses. In siRNA-based studies Dlg1, a MAGUK scaffold protein and member of the Scribble polarity complex, has been shown to play a role in T cell polarity and TCR signal specificity, however the role of Dlg1 in T cell development and function in vivo remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the combined data from three independently-derived dlg1-knockout mouse models; two germline deficient knockouts and one conditional knockout. While defects were not observed in T cell development, TCR-induced early phospho-signaling, actin-mediated events, or proliferation in any of the models, the acute knockdown of Dlg1 in Jurkat T cells diminished accumulation of actin at the IS. Further, while Th1-type cytokine production appeared unaffected in T cells derived from mice with a dlg1germline-deficiency, altered production of TCR-dependent Th1 and Th2-type cytokines was observed in T cells derived from mice with a conditional loss of dlg1 expression and T cells with acute Dlg1 suppression, suggesting a differential requirement for Dlg1 activity in signaling events leading to Th1 versus Th2 cytokine induction. The observed inconsistencies between these and other knockout models and siRNA strategies suggest that 1) compensatory upregulation of alternate gene(s) may be masking a role for dlg1 in controlling TCR-mediated events in dlg1 deficient mice and 2) the developmental stage during which dlg1 ablation begins may control the degree to which compensatory events occur. Conclusions/Significance These findings provide a potential explanation for the discrepancies observed in various studies using different dlg1-deficient T cell models and underscore the importance of acute dlg1 ablation to avoid the upregulation of compensatory mechanisms for future functional studies of the Dlg1 protein. PMID:23028902

  19. Fucoidan Can Function as an Adjuvant In Vivo to Enhance Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function and Promote Antigen-Specific T Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jun-O; Zhang, Wei; Du, Jiang-Yuan; Wong, Ka-Wing; Oda, Tatsuya; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, including promoting antigen uptake and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of fucoidan in vivo, especially its adjuvant effect on in vivo anti-tumor immune responses, was not fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the function of spleen dendritic cells (DCs) and its adjuvant effect in vivo. Systemic administration of fucoidan induced up-regulation of CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-? in spleen cDCs. Fucoidan also promoted the generation of IFN-?-producing Th1 and Tc1 cells in an IL-12-dependent manner. When used as an adjuvant in vivo with ovalbumin (OVA) antigen, fucoidan promoted OVA-specific antibody production and primed IFN-? production in OVA-specific T cells. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced OVA-induced up-regulation of MHC class I and II on spleen cDCs and strongly prompted the proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, OVA immunization with fucoidan as adjuvant protected mice from the challenge with B16-OVA tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that fucoidan can function as an adjuvant to induce Th1 immune response and CTL activation, which may be useful in tumor vaccine development. PMID:24911024

  20. Analysis of Conflicts among Non-Functional Requirements Using Integrated Analysis of Functional and Non-Functional Requirements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vishal Sadana; Xiaoqing Frank Liu

    2007-01-01

    Conflicts among non-functional requirements are often identified subjectively and there is a lack of conflict analysis in practice. Current approaches fail to capture the nature of conflicts among non-functional requirements, which makes the task of conflict resolution difficult. In this paper, a framework has been provided for the analysis of conflicts among non-functional requirements using the integrated analysis of functional

  1. In Vivo Persistence of Codominant Human CD8+ T Cell Clonotypes Is Not Limited by Replicative Senescence or Functional Alteration.

    PubMed

    Derré, Laurent; Bruyninx, Marc; Baumgaertner, Petra; Devevre, Estelle; Corthesy, Patricia; Touvrey, Cédric; Mahnke, Yolanda D; Pircher, Hanspeter; Voelter, Verena; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2007-08-15

    T cell responses to viral epitopes are often composed of a small number of codominant clonotypes. In this study, we show that tumor Ag-specific T cells can behave similarly. In a melanoma patient with a long lasting HLA-A2/NY-ESO-1-specific T cell response, reaching 10% of circulating CD8 T cells, we identified nine codominant clonotypes characterized by individual TCRs. These clonotypes made up almost the entire pool of highly differentiated effector cells, but only a fraction of the small pool of less differentiated "memory" cells, suggesting that the latter serve to maintain effector cells. The different clonotypes displayed full effector function and expressed TCRs with similar functional avidity. Nevertheless, some clonotypes increased, whereas others declined in numbers over the observation period of 6 years. One clonotype disappeared from circulating blood, but without preceding critical telomere shortening. In turn, clonotypes with increasing frequency had accelerated telomere shortening, correlating with strong in vivo proliferation. Interestingly, the final prevalence of the different T cell clonotypes in circulation was anticipated in a metastatic lymph node withdrawn 2 years earlier, suggesting in vivo clonotype selection driven by metastases. Together, these data provide novel insight in long term in vivo persistence of T cell clonotypes associated with continued cell turnover but not replicative senescence or functional alteration. PMID:17675498

  2. RNAi-based biosynthetic pathway screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites such as lipids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Abraham, Nessy; Khan, Liakot A; Gobel, Verena

    2015-05-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to catalog new compounds, but their functional analysis remains technically challenging, and roles beyond metabolism are largely unknown. Unbiased genetic/RNAi screens are powerful tools to identify the in vivo functions of protein-encoding genes, but not of nonproteinaceous compounds such as lipids. They can, however, identify the biosynthetic enzymes of these compounds-findings that are usually dismissed, as these typically synthesize multiple products. Here, we provide a method using follow-on biosynthetic pathway screens to identify the endpoint biosynthetic enzyme and thus the compound through which they act. The approach is based on the principle that all subsequently identified downstream biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the synthesis of at least this one end product. We describe how to systematically target lipid biosynthetic pathways; optimize targeting conditions; take advantage of pathway branchpoints; and validate results by genetic assays and biochemical analyses. This approach extends the power of unbiased genetic/RNAi screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites beyond their metabolic roles. It will typically require several months to identify a metabolic end product by biosynthetic pathway screens, but this time will vary widely depending, among other factors, on the end product's location in the pathway, which determines the number of screens required for its identification. PMID:25837419

  3. Surface Characterization by Structure Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, T.; Burke, J.; Bergmann, R. B.

    2014-08-01

    The structure function is a tool for characterizing technical surfaces which exhibits a number of advantages over Fourier-based analysis methods. So it is optimally suited for analyzing the height distributions of surfaces measured by full-field non-contacting methods. After the definition of line- and area-structure function and offering effective procedures for their calculation this tutorial paper presents examples using simulated and measured data of machined surfaces as well as optical components. Comparisons with the results of Fourier-based evaluations clearly prove the advantages of structure function analysis.

  4. Relations among Functional Systems in Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes that an organism's integrated repertoire of operant behavior has the status of a biological system, similar to other biological systems, like the nervous, cardiovascular, or immune systems. Evidence from a number of sources indicates that the distinctions between biological and behavioral events is often misleading, engendering counterproductive explanatory controversy. A good deal of what is viewed as biological (often thought to be inaccessible or hypothetical) can become publicly measurable variables using currently available and developing technologies. Moreover, such endogenous variables can serve as establishing operations, discriminative stimuli, conjoint mediating events, and maintaining consequences within a functional analysis of behavior and need not lead to reductionistic explanation. I suggest that explanatory misunderstandings often arise from conflating different levels of analysis and that behavior analysis can extend its reach by identifying variables operating within a functional analysis that also serve functions in other biological systems. PMID:17575907

  5. Dose-response analysis of heavy metal toxicants in man. Direct in vivo assessment of body burden

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.

    1985-06-01

    Differences in uptake, metabolism, and excretion of heavy metals makes selection of a suitable biological media as a monitor of body burden very difficult. Exposure assessments based on body fluid levels can provide, at best, only general population estimates. The most frequently monitored media are blood, urine, nail or hair clippings, sweat, and saliva. Unfortunately each of these tissues can be influenced by recent exposure conditions and are not accurate indices of the total dose or body burden. However, direct in vivo measurements of body burden in humans, have recently been performed. This nuclear technique has focused on the measurements of kidney and liver cadmium (Cd) by neutron activation analysis and bone lead (Pb) determinations using x-ray fluorescence. The dose-response relationship for renal dysfunction based on the direct in vivo body burden for Cd is presented. The most probable Cd value for the kidney associated with renal impairment is approximately 35 mg. Approximately 10% of the subjects with 20 mg Cd in the kidney will have moderately elevated ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, an early indicator of potential renal functional changes. 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  7. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  8. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-09-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns with Encapsulated Metallofullerenes and Exohedrally Functionalized Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfei [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ge, Jiechao [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Shultz, M.D. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Chung, Eunna [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Singh, Gurpreet [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Shu, Chunying [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Deck, Paul [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Fatouros, Panos [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Henderson, Scott [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Corwin, Frank [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Gibson, Harry W [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dorn, Harry C [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) are new carbonaceous materials. In this paper, we report the first successful preparation of SWNHs encapsulating trimetallic nitride template endohedral metallofullerenes (TNT-EMFs). The resultant materials were functionalized by a high-speed vibration milling method and conjugated with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The successful encapsulation of TNT-EMFs and external functionalization with QDs provide a dual diagnostic platform for in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications of these new carbonaceous materials.

  10. In vivo biodistribution of amino-functionalized ceria nanoparticles in rats using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Santiago; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Abad, Sergio; Buaki-Sogo, Mireia; Victor, Victor M; Garcia, Hermenegildo; Herance, Jose Raúl

    2012-12-01

    A variety of nanoparticles have been proposed for several biomedical applications. To gauge the therapeutic potential of these nanoparticles, in vivo biodistribution is essential and mandatory. In the present study, ceria nanoparticles (5 nm average particle size) were labeled with (18)F to study their in vivo biodistribution in rats by positron emission tomography (PET). The (18)F isotope was anchored by reaction of N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ((18)F-SFB) with a modified nanoparticle surface obtained by silylation with 3-aminopropylsilyl. Radiolabeled ceria nanoparticles accumulated mainly in lungs, spleen, and liver. Metabolic products of the radiolabeled nanoparticulate material were excreted into the urinary tract. PMID:23140442

  11. INFANT SIGN TRAINING AND FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Matthew P; Machado, Mychal A; Hustyi, Kristin M; Morley, Allison J

    2011-01-01

    We taught manual signs to typically developing infants using a reversal design and caregiver-nominated stimuli. We delivered the stimuli on a time-based schedule during baseline. During the intervention, we used progressive prompting and reinforcement, described by Thompson et al. (2004, 2007), to establish mands. Following sign training, we conducted functional analyses and verified that the signs functioned as mands. These results provide preliminary validation for the verbal behavior functional analysis methodology and further evidence of the functional independence of verbal operants. PMID:21709786

  12. In vivo transcriptional profile analysis reveals RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling as prominent processes for adult neurogenesis

    E-print Network

    In vivo transcriptional profile analysis reveals RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling as prominent of transcriptional analysis experiments using Affymetrix GeneChips: (1) comparison of adult mouse SVZ and Ob gene validated the transcriptional profile data with Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. The data

  13. In vivo visuotopic brain mapping with manganese-enhanced MRI and resting-state functional connectivity MRI.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin C; Fan, Shu-Juan; Chan, Russell W; Cheng, Joe S; Zhou, Iris Y; Wu, Ed X

    2014-04-15

    The rodents are an increasingly important model for understanding the mechanisms of development, plasticity, functional specialization and disease in the visual system. However, limited tools have been available for assessing the structural and functional connectivity of the visual brain network globally, in vivo and longitudinally. There are also ongoing debates on whether functional brain connectivity directly reflects structural brain connectivity. In this study, we explored the feasibility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) via 3 different routes of Mn(2+) administration for visuotopic brain mapping and understanding of physiological transport in normal and visually deprived adult rats. In addition, resting-state functional connectivity MRI (RSfcMRI) was performed to evaluate the intrinsic functional network and structural-functional relationships in the corresponding anatomical visual brain connections traced by MEMRI. Upon intravitreal, subcortical, and intracortical Mn(2+) injection, different topographic and layer-specific Mn enhancement patterns could be revealed in the visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei along retinal, callosal, cortico-subcortical, transsynaptic and intracortical horizontal connections. Loss of visual input upon monocular enucleation to adult rats appeared to reduce interhemispheric polysynaptic Mn(2+) transfer but not intra- or inter-hemispheric monosynaptic Mn(2+) transport after Mn(2+) injection into visual cortex. In normal adults, both structural and functional connectivity by MEMRI and RSfcMRI was stronger interhemispherically between bilateral primary/secondary visual cortex (V1/V2) transition zones (TZ) than between V1/V2 TZ and other cortical nuclei. Intrahemispherically, structural and functional connectivity was stronger between visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei than between visual cortex and other subcortical nuclei. The current results demonstrated the sensitivity of MEMRI and RSfcMRI for assessing the neuroarchitecture, neurophysiology and structural-functional relationships of the visual brains in vivo. These may possess great potentials for effective monitoring and understanding of the basic anatomical and functional connections in the visual system during development, plasticity, disease, pharmacological interventions and genetic modifications in future studies. PMID:24394694

  14. Integrating EMR-Linked and In Vivo Functional Genetic Data to Identify New Genotype-Phenotype Associations

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Jonathan D.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Weeke, Peter E.; Delaney, Jessica T.; Wells, Quinn S.; Bastarache, Lisa; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Josh C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of electronic medical records (EMR) with genetic data has created the potential for implementing reverse genetic approaches in humans, whereby the function of a gene is inferred from the shared pattern of morbidity among homozygotes of a genetic variant. We explored the feasibility of this approach to identify phenotypes associated with low frequency variants using Vanderbilt's EMR-based BioVU resource. We analyzed 1,658 low frequency non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) with a minor allele frequency (MAF)<10% collected on 8,546 subjects. For each nsSNP, we identified diagnoses shared by at least 2 minor allele homozygotes and with an association p<0.05. The diagnoses were reviewed by a clinician to ascertain whether they may share a common mechanistic basis. While a number of biologically compelling clinical patterns of association were observed, the frequency of these associations was identical to that observed using genotype-permuted data sets, indicating that the associations were likely due to chance. To refine our analysis associations, we then restricted the analysis to 711 nsSNPs in genes with phenotypes in the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) or knock-out mouse phenotype databases. An initial comparison of the EMR diagnoses to the known in vivo functions of the gene identified 25 candidate nsSNPs, 19 of which had significant genotype-phenotype associations when tested using matched controls. Twleve of the 19 nsSNPs associations were confirmed by a detailed record review. Four of 12 nsSNP-phenotype associations were successfully replicated in an independent data set: thrombosis (F5,rs6031), seizures/convulsions (GPR98,rs13157270), macular degeneration (CNGB3,rs3735972), and GI bleeding (HGFAC,rs16844401). These analyses demonstrate the feasibility and challenges of using reverse genetics approaches to identify novel gene-phenotype associations in human subjects using low frequency variants. As increasing amounts of rare variant data are generated from modern genotyping and sequence platforms, model organism data may be an important tool to enable discovery. PMID:24949630

  15. Functional analysis of colonic bacterial metabolism: relevant to health?

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Henrike M.; De Preter, Vicky; Windey, Karen

    2012-01-01

    With the use of molecular techniques, numerous studies have evaluated the composition of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease. However, it is of major interest to supplement this with a functional analysis of the microbiota. In this review, the different approaches that have been used to characterize microbial metabolites, yielding information on the functional end products of microbial metabolism, have been summarized. To analyze colonic microbial metabolites, the most conventional way is by application of a hypothesis-driven targeted approach, through quantification of selected metabolites from carbohydrate (e.g., short-chain fatty acids) and protein fermentation (e.g., p-cresol, phenol, ammonia, or H2S), secondary bile acids, or colonic enzymes. The application of stable isotope-labeled substrates can provide an elegant solution to study these metabolic pathways in vivo. On the other hand, a top-down approach can be followed by applying metabolite fingerprinting techniques based on 1H-NMR or mass spectrometric analysis. Quantification of known metabolites and characterization of metabolite patterns in urine, breath, plasma, and fecal samples can reveal new pathways and give insight into physiological regulatory processes of the colonic microbiota. In addition, specific metabolic profiles can function as a diagnostic tool for the identification of several gastrointestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Nevertheless, future research will have to evaluate the relevance of associations between metabolites and different disease states. PMID:22016433

  16. Coupling of vesicle tethering and Rab binding is required for in vivo functionality of the golgin GMAP-210

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keisuke; Roboti, Peristera; Mironov, Alexander A.; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are extended coiled-coil proteins believed to participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi apparatus. However, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering remains poorly defined, and alternative functions for golgins have been proposed. Moreover, although golgins bind to Rab GTPases, the functional significance of Rab binding has yet to be determined. In this study, we show that depletion of the golgin GMAP-210 causes a loss of Golgi cisternae and accumulation of numerous vesicles. GMAP-210 function in vivo is dependent upon its ability to tether membranes, which is mediated exclusively by the amino-terminal ALPS motif. Binding to Rab2 is also important for GMAP-210 function, although it is dispensable for tethering per se. GMAP-210 length is also functionally important in vivo. Together our results indicate a key role for GMAP-210–mediated membrane tethering in maintaining Golgi structure and support a role for Rab2 binding in linking tethering with downstream docking and fusion events at the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25473115

  17. Coupling of vesicle tethering and Rab binding is required for in vivo functionality of the golgin GMAP-210.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisuke; Roboti, Peristera; Mironov, Alexander A; Lowe, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Golgins are extended coiled-coil proteins believed to participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi apparatus. However, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering remains poorly defined, and alternative functions for golgins have been proposed. Moreover, although golgins bind to Rab GTPases, the functional significance of Rab binding has yet to be determined. In this study, we show that depletion of the golgin GMAP-210 causes a loss of Golgi cisternae and accumulation of numerous vesicles. GMAP-210 function in vivo is dependent upon its ability to tether membranes, which is mediated exclusively by the amino-terminal ALPS motif. Binding to Rab2 is also important for GMAP-210 function, although it is dispensable for tethering per se. GMAP-210 length is also functionally important in vivo. Together our results indicate a key role for GMAP-210-mediated membrane tethering in maintaining Golgi structure and support a role for Rab2 binding in linking tethering with downstream docking and fusion events at the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25473115

  18. Prostate stem cell antigen-targeted nanoparticles with dual functional properties: in vivo imaging and cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Luo, Yun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Pang, Jun; Liao, Chengde; Lu, Hanlun; Fang, Youqiang

    2012-01-01

    Background: We designed dual-functional nanoparticles for in vivo application using a modified electrostatic and covalent layer-by-layer assembly strategy to address the challenge of assessment and treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Methods: Core-shell nanoparticles were formulated by integrating three distinct functional components, ie, a core constituted by poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), docetaxel, and hydrophobic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals (SPIONs), a multilayer shell formed by poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and two different sized poly(ethylene glycol) molecules, and a single-chain prostate stem cell antigen antibody conjugated to the nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery. Results: Drug release profiles indicated that the dual-function nanoparticles had a sustained release pattern over 764 hours, and SPIONs could facilitate the controlled release of the drug in vitro. The nanoparticles showed increased antitumor efficiency and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in vitro through targeted delivery of docetaxel and SPIONs to PC3M cells. Moreover, in nude mice bearing PC3M xenografts, the nanoparticles provided MRI negative contrast enhancement, as well as halting and even reversing tumor growth during the 76-day study duration, and without significant systemic toxicity. The lifespan of the mice treated with these targeted dual-function nanoparticles was significantly increased (Chi-square = 22.514, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This dual-function nanomedical platform may be a promising candidate for tumor imaging and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in vivo. PMID:22888241

  19. Functional analysis in MR urography - made simple.

    PubMed

    Khrichenko, Dmitry; Darge, Kassa

    2010-02-01

    MR urography (MRU) has proved to be a most advantageous imaging modality of the urinary tract in children, providing one-stop comprehensive morphological and functional information, without the utilization of ionizing radiation. The functional analysis of the MRU scan still requires external post-processing using relatively complex software. This has proved to be a limiting factor in widespread routine implementation of MRU functional analysis and use of MRU functional parameters similar to nuclear medicine. We present software, developed in a pediatric radiology department, that not only enables comprehensive automated functional analysis, but is also very user-friendly, fast, easily operated by the average radiologist or MR technician and freely downloadable at www.chop-fmru.com . A copy of IDL Virtual Machine is required for the installation, which is obtained at no charge at www.ittvis.com . The analysis software, known as "CHOP-fMRU," has the potential to help overcome the obstacles to widespread use of functional MRU in children. PMID:20012602

  20. Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human UCB-HSCs/HPCs by Coculture with AFT024-hkirre Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muti ur Rehman; Ali, Ijaz; Jiao, Wei; Wang, Yun; Masood, Saima; Yousaf, Muhammad Zubair; Javaid, Aqeel; Ahmad, Shafique; Feng, Meifu

    2014-01-01

    Kiaa1867 (human Kirre, hKirre) has a critical role in brain development and/or maintenance of the glomerular slit diaphragm in kidneys. Murine homolog of this gene, mKirre expressed in OP9 and AFT024 cells could support hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells (HSC/HPC) expansion in vitro. HKirre is also expressed in human FBMOB-hTERT cell line and fetal liver fibroblast-like cells but its function has remained unclear. In this paper, we cloned a hKirre gene from human fetal liver fibroblast-like cells and established a stably overexpressing hKirre-AFT024 cell line. Resultant cells could promote self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSCs/HPCs significantly higher than AFT024-control cells transformed with mock plasmid. The Expanded human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) CD34+ cells retained the capacity of multipotent differentiation as long as 8 weeks and successfully repopulated the bone marrow of sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, which demonstrated the expansion of long-term primitive transplantable HSCs/HPCs. Importantly, hkirre could upregulate the expressions of Wnt-5A, BMP4, and SDF-1 and downregulate TGF-? with other hematopoietic growth factors. By SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis, a ~89?kDa protein in total lysate of AFT024-hKirre was identified. Supernatants from AFT024-hkirre could also support CD34+CD38? cells expansion. These results demonstrated that the AFT024-hKirre cells have the ability to efficiently expand HSCs/HPCs. PMID:24719861

  1. In Vitro Matured Oocytes Are More Susceptible than In Vivo Matured Oocytes to Mock ICSI Induced Functional and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Salian, Sujit Raj; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of ICSI have been intensified recently due to increased risk of birth defects in ICSI born children. Although fertilization rate is significantly higher in ICSI cycles, studies have failed to demonstrate the benefits of ICSI in improving the pregnancy rate. Poor technical skill, and suboptimal in vitro conditions may account for the ICSI results however, there is no report on the effects of oocyte manipulations on the ICSI outcome. Objective The present study elucidates the influence of mock ICSI on the functional and genetic integrity of the mouse oocytes. Methods Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) level, mitochondrial status, and phosphorylation of H2AX were assessed in the in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI. Results A significant increase in ROS level was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P<0.05-0.001) whereas unique mitochondrial distribution pattern was found only in IVM oocytes (P<0.01-0.001). Importantly, differential H2AX phosphorylation was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P <0.001). Conclusion The data from this study suggests that mock ICSI can alter genetic and functional integrity in oocytes and IVM oocytes are more vulnerable to mock ICSI induced changes. PMID:25786120

  2. Spectral analysis of photo-induced delayed luminescence from human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Francesco; Lanzanò, Luca; Privitera, Simona; Tudisco, Salvatore; Scordino, Agata

    2007-07-01

    The UVA induced Delayed Luminescence (DL), has been measured in vivo in the forearm skin of some healthy volunteers of different sex and age during several periods of the year. An innovative instrument able to detect, in single photon counting mode, the spectrum and the time trend of the DL emission has been used. The measured differences in the time trends of the spectral components may be related to the sex and the age. The potential development of a new analysis technique based on this phenomenon is discussed.

  3. Functional analysis of the SRV-1 RNA frameshifting pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Olsthoorn, René C L; Reumerman, Richard; Hilbers, Cornelis W; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Heus, Hans A

    2010-11-01

    Simian retrovirus type-1 uses programmed ribosomal frameshifting to control expression of the Gag-Pol polyprotein from overlapping gag and pol open-reading frames. The frameshifting signal consists of a heptanucleotide slippery sequence and a downstream-located 12-base pair pseudoknot. The solution structure of this pseudoknot, previously solved by NMR [Michiels,P.J., Versleijen,A.A., Verlaan,P.W., Pleij,C.W., Hilbers,C.W. and Heus,H.A. (2001) Solution structure of the pseudoknot of SRV-1 RNA, involved in ribosomal frameshifting. J. Mol. Biol., 310, 1109-1123] has a classical H-type fold and forms an extended triple helix by interactions between loop 2 and the minor groove of stem 1 involving base-base and base-sugar contacts. A mutational analysis was performed to test the functional importance of the triple helix for -1 frameshifting in vitro. Changing bases in L2 or base pairs in S1 involved in a base triple resulted in a 2- to 5-fold decrease in frameshifting efficiency. Alterations in the length of L2 had adverse effects on frameshifting. The in vitro effects were well reproduced in vivo, although the effect of enlarging L2 was more dramatic in vivo. The putative role of refolding kinetics of frameshifter pseudoknots is discussed. Overall, the data emphasize the role of the triple helix in -1 frameshifting. PMID:20639537

  4. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis of rectal motor function and offers the potential for characterizing abnormal mechanical properties of the rectal wall in disease.

  5. Regulation of cytoplasmic dynein function in vivo by the Drosophila Glued complex

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila Glued gene product shares sequence homology with the p150 component of vertebrate dynactin. Dynactin is a multiprotein complex that stimulates cytoplasmic dynein-mediated vesicle motility in vitro. In this report, we present biochemical, cytological, and genetic evidence that demonstrates a functional similarity between the Drosophila Glued complex and vertebrate dynactin. We show that, similar to the vertebrate homologues in dynactin, the Glued polypeptides are components of a 20S complex. Our biochemical studies further reveal differential expression of the Glued polypeptides, all of which copurify as microtubule-associated proteins. In our analysis of the Glued polypeptides encoded by the dominant mutation, Glued, we identify a truncated polypeptide that fails to assemble into the wild-type 20S complex, but retains the ability to copurify with microtubules. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Glued complex during oogenesis is shown by immunocytochemistry methods to be identical to the pattern previously described for cytoplasmic dynein. Significantly, the pattern of Glued distribution in oogenesis is dependent on dynein function, as well as several other gene products known to be required for proper dynein localization. In genetic complementation studies, we find that certain mutations in the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain gene Dhc64C act as dominant suppressors or enhancers of the rough eye phenotype of the dominant Glued mutation. Furthermore, we show that a mutation that was previously isolated as a suppressor of the Glued mutation is an allele of Dhc64C. Together with the observed dependency of Glued localization on dynein function, these genetic interactions demonstrate a functional association between the Drosophila dynein motor and Glued complexes. PMID:7593168

  6. In vivo enhancer analysis of human conserved non-coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Len A; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M; Prabhakar, Shyam; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B; Visel, Axel; Rubin, Edward M

    2006-11-23

    Identifying the sequences that direct the spatial and temporal expression of genes and defining their function in vivo remains a significant challenge in the annotation of vertebrate genomes. One major obstacle is the lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, we made use of extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter to identify putative gene regulatory elements, and characterized the in vivo enhancer activity of a large group of non-coding elements in the human genome that are conserved in human-pufferfish, Takifugu (Fugu) rubripes, or ultraconserved in human-mouse-rat. We tested 167 of these extremely conserved sequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay. Here we report that 45% of these sequences functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers of gene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While directing expression in a broad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the 75 enhancers directed expression to various regions of the developing nervous system. We identified sequence signatures enriched in a subset of these elements that targeted forebrain expression, and used these features to rank all approximately 3,100 non-coding elements in the human genome that are conserved between human and Fugu. The testing of the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a threefold enrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These data dramatically expand the catalogue of human gene enhancers that have been characterized in vivo, and illustrate the utility of such training sets for a variety of biological applications, including decoding the regulatory vocabulary of the human genome. PMID:17086198

  7. Multilevel sparse functional principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Di, Chongzhi; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Jank, Wolfgang S.

    2014-01-01

    We consider analysis of sparsely sampled multilevel functional data, where the basic observational unit is a function and data have a natural hierarchy of basic units. An example is when functions are recorded at multiple visits for each subject. Multilevel functional principal component analysis (MFPCA; Di et al. 2009) was proposed for such data when functions are densely recorded. Here we consider the case when functions are sparsely sampled and may contain only a few observations per function. We exploit the multilevel structure of covariance operators and achieve data reduction by principal component decompositions at both between and within subject levels. We address inherent methodological differences in the sparse sampling context to: 1) estimate the covariance operators; 2) estimate the functional principal component scores; 3) predict the underlying curves. Through simulations the proposed method is able to discover dominating modes of variations and reconstruct underlying curves well even in sparse settings. Our approach is illustrated by two applications, the Sleep Heart Health Study and eBay auctions. PMID:24872597

  8. Therapeutic nanomedicine based on dual-intelligent functionalized gold nanoparticles for cancer imaging and therapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hai; Xu, Xiao-Ding; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Lei, Qi; Luo, Guo-Feng; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-11-01

    A novel strategy to construct a therapeutic system based on functionalized AuNPs which can specifically respond to tumor microenvironment was reported. In the therapeutic system, doxorubicin was conjugated to AuNPs via thiol-Au bond by using a peptide substrate, CPLGLAGG, which can be specifically cleaved by the protease. In vivo study shows that after injection of the functionalized AuNPs to the tumor-bearing mice, the over-expressed protease of MMP-2 in tumor tissue and intracellular GSH can lead to the rapid release of the anti-tumor drug (doxorubicin) from the functionalized AuNPs to inhibit tumor growth and realize fluorescently imaging simultaneously. The functionalized AuNPs with tumor-triggered drug release property can further improve the efficacy and reduce side effects significantly. PMID:23932289

  9. High-mobility group box 1 is dispensable for autophagy, mitochondrial quality control, and organ function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huebener, Peter; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Quinzii, Catarina M; Friedman, Richard; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Trent, Chad M; Mederacke, Ingmar; Zhao, Enpeng; Dapito, Dianne H; Lin, Yuxi; Goldberg, Ira J; Czaja, Mark J; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated a critical role for high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in autophagy and the autophagic clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria, resulting in severe mitochondrial fragmentation and profound disturbances of mitochondrial respiration in HMGB1-deficient cells. Here, we investigated the effects of HMGB1 deficiency on autophagy and mitochondrial function in vivo, using conditional Hmgb1 ablation in the liver and heart. Unexpectedly, deletion of Hmgb1 in hepatocytes or cardiomyocytes, two cell types with abundant mitochondria, did not alter mitochondrial structure or function, organ function, or long-term survival. Moreover, hepatic autophagy and mitophagy occurred normally in the absence of Hmgb1, and absence of Hmgb1 did not significantly affect baseline and glucocorticoid-induced hepatic gene expression. Collectively, our findings suggest that HMGB1 is dispensable for autophagy, mitochondrial quality control, the regulation of gene expression, and organ function in the adult organism. PMID:24606906

  10. In vivo Comet assay--statistical analysis and power calculations of mice testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Merete Kjær; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Dybdahl, Marianne; Boberg, Julie; Kulahci, Murat

    2014-11-01

    The in vivo Comet assay is a sensitive method for evaluating DNA damage. A recurrent concern is how to analyze the data appropriately and efficiently. A popular approach is to summarize the raw data into a summary statistic prior to the statistical analysis. However, consensus on which summary statistic to use has yet to be reached. Another important consideration concerns the assessment of proper sample sizes in the design of Comet assay studies. This study aims to identify a statistic suitably summarizing the % tail DNA of mice testicular samples in Comet assay studies. A second aim is to provide curves for this statistic outlining the number of animals and gels to use. The current study was based on 11 compounds administered via oral gavage in three doses to male mice: CAS no. 110-26-9, CAS no. 512-56-1, CAS no. 111873-33-7, CAS no. 79-94-7, CAS no. 115-96-8, CAS no. 598-55-0, CAS no. 636-97-5, CAS no. 85-28-9, CAS no. 13674-87-8, CAS no. 43100-38-5 and CAS no. 60965-26-6. Testicular cells were examined using the alkaline version of the Comet assay and the DNA damage was quantified as % tail DNA using a fully automatic scoring system. From the raw data 23 summary statistics were examined. A linear mixed-effects model was fitted to the summarized data and the estimated variance components were used to generate power curves as a function of sample size. The statistic that most appropriately summarized the within-sample distributions was the median of the log-transformed data, as it most consistently conformed to the assumptions of the statistical model. Power curves for 1.5-, 2-, and 2.5-fold changes of the highest dose group compared to the control group when 50 and 100 cells were scored per gel are provided to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. PMID:25440908

  11. A novel human ex vivo model for the analysis of molecular events during lung cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Dagmar S; Droemann, Daniel; Schultz, Holger; Branscheid, Detlev; Martin, Christian; Ressmeyer, Anne R; Zabel, Peter; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Goldmann, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) causes most of cancer related deaths in humans and is characterized by poor prognosis regarding efficiency of chemotherapeutical treatment and long-term survival of the patients. The purpose of the present study was the development of a human ex vivo tissue culture model and the analysis of the effects of conventional chemotherapy, which then can serve as a tool to test new chemotherapeutical regimens in NSCLC. Methods In a short-term tissue culture model designated STST (Short-Term Stimulation of Tissues) in combination with the novel *HOPE-fixation and paraffin embedding method we examined the responsiveness of 41 human NSCLC tissue specimens to the individual cytotoxic drugs carboplatin, vinorelbine or gemcitabine. Viability was analyzed by LIFE/DEAD assay, TUNEL-staining and colorimetric MTT assay. Expression of Ki-67 protein and of BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine) uptake as markers for proliferation and of cleaved (activated) effector caspase-3 as indicator of late phase apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Transcription of caspase-3 was analyzed by RT-PCR. Flow cytometry was utilized to determine caspase-3 in human cancer cell lines. Results Viability, proliferation and apoptosis of the tissues were moderately affected by cultivation. In human breast cancer, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and human cell lines (CPC-N, HEK) proliferative capacity was clearly reduced by all 3 chemotherapeutic agents in a very similar manner. Cleavage of caspase-3 was induced in the chemo-sensitive types of cancer (breast cancer, SCLC). Drug-induced effects in human NSCLC tissues were less evident than in the chemo-sensitive tumors with more pronounced effects in adenocarcinomas as compared to squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusion Although there was high heterogeneity among the individual tumor tissue responses as expected, we clearly demonstrate specific multiple drug-induced effects simultaneously. Thus, STST provides a useful human model to study numerous aspects of mechanisms underlying tumor responsiveness towards improved anticancer treatment. The results presented here shall serve as a base for multiple functional tests of novel chemotherapeutic approaches to NSCLC in the future. *Hepes – Glutamic acid buffer mediated Organic solvent Protection Effect PMID:17567922

  12. Functional analysis and intervention for chronic rumination.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kathryn E; Luiselli, James K; Tomassone, Shanon

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a functional analysis and treatment evaluation of chronic rumination in a 19-year-old man with intellectual disabilities. Outcomes of the functional analysis suggested that rumination was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results of the intervention evaluation suggested that (a) noncontingent access to food after meals reduced rumination more effectively than did noncontingent access to inedible stimuli, (b) a particular type of food was associated with lower levels of rumination than other types of food, and (c) both presession and continuous access to food reduced levels of rumination more effectively than did fixed-time access to food. PMID:24114108

  13. TRAF binding is required for a distinct subset of in vivo B cell functions of the oncoprotein LMP1.

    PubMed

    Arcipowski, Kelly M; Bishop, Gail A

    2012-12-01

    EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is important for EBV contributions to B cell transformation and many EBV-associated malignancies, as well as EBV-mediated exacerbation of autoimmunity. LMP1 functionally mimics TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamily member CD40, but LMP1 signals and downstream effects are amplified and sustained compared with CD40. CD40 and LMP1 both use TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) adaptor proteins, but in distinct ways. LMP1 functions require TRAFs 3, 5, and 6, which interact with LMP1. However, TRAFs can also contribute to signaling in the absence of direct interactions with cell surface receptors, so we investigated whether their roles in LMP1 in vivo functions require direct association. We show in this study that the LMP1 TRAF binding site was required for LMP1-mediated autoantibody production, the germinal center response to immunization, and optimal production of several isotypes of Ig, but not LMP1-dependent enlargement of secondary lymphoid organs in transgenic mice. Thus, LMP1 in vivo effects can be mediated via both TRAF binding-dependent and -independent pathways. Together with our previous findings, these results indicate that TRAF-dependent receptor functions may not always require TRAF-receptor binding. These data suggest that TRAF-mediated signaling pathways, such as those of LMP1, may be more diverse than previously appreciated. This finding has significant implications for receptor and TRAF-targeted therapies. PMID:23109728

  14. Functional properties of neurons derived from fetal mouse neurospheres are compatible with those of neuronal precursors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Francesca; Lauro, Clotilde; Fucile, Sergio; Catalano, Myriam; Limatola, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Grassi, Francesca

    2006-06-01

    Neural stem cells can be propagated in culture as neurospheres, yielding neurons and glial cells upon differentiation. Although the neurosphere model is widely used, the functional properties of the neurosphere-derived neurons have been only partially characterized, and it is unclear whether repeated passaging alters their functional properties. In this study, we analyzed voltage- and transmitter-gated responses in neuron-like cells obtained by differentiating fetal mouse neurospheres at increasing passages in culture. We report that neurons fire overshooting action potentials in response to depolarizing currents up to passage 10 but loose this capability at later passages, as the density of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) currents decreases. In contrast, the immunoreactivity for the neuronal marker beta-tubulin remains unaltered up to passage 21, indicating that this marker is not representative of cell function. In almost all neurons, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) evoked bicuculline-sensitive whole-cell currents, resulting from the activation of GABA(A) receptors, which appeared to be excitatory, insofar as the reversal potential of GABA-gated current was about -50 mV. Much smaller currents were elicited by the glutamatergic agonist AMPA, and only occasional responses to glycine were detected. In these functional aspects, neurosphere-derived neurons are similar to immature neurons differentiating in vivo. Therefore, at least for a limited number of passages in vitro, neurospheres provide an adequate model of in vivo neurogenesis. PMID:16547970

  15. Phenotyping mouse pulmonary function in vivo with the lung diffusing capacity.

    PubMed

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Fallica, Jonathan; Ramakrishnan, Amritha; Datta, Kausik; Gabrielson, Matthew; Horton, Maureen; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is now the primary animal used to model a variety of lung diseases. To study the mechanisms that underlie such pathologies, phenotypic methods are needed that can quantify the pathologic changes. Furthermore, to provide translational relevance to the mouse models, such measurements should be tests that can easily be done in both humans and mice. Unfortunately, in the present literature few phenotypic measurements of lung function have direct application to humans. One exception is the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, which is a measurement that is routinely done in humans. In the present report, we describe a means to quickly and simply measure this diffusing capacity in mice. The procedure involves brief lung inflation with tracer gases in an anesthetized mouse, followed by a 1 min gas analysis time. We have tested the ability of this method to detect several lung pathologies, including emphysema, fibrosis, acute lung injury, and influenza and fungal lung infections, as well as monitoring lung maturation in young pups. Results show significant decreases in all the lung pathologies, as well as an increase in the diffusing capacity with lung maturation. This measurement of lung diffusing capacity thus provides a pulmonary function test that has broad application with its ability to detect phenotypic structural changes with most of the existing pathologic lung models. PMID:25590416

  16. Transparent adult zebrafish as a tool for in vivo transplantation analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard Mark; Sessa, Anna; Burke, Christopher; Bowman, Teresa; LeBlanc, Jocelyn; Ceol, Craig; Bourque, Caitlin; Dovey, Michael; Goessling, Wolfram; Burns, Caroline Erter; Zon, Leonard I.

    2008-01-01

    The zebrafish is a useful model for understanding normal and cancer stem cells, but analysis has been limited to embryogenesis due to the opacity of the adult fish. To address this, we have created a transparent adult zebrafish in which we transplanted either hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells or tumor cells. In a hematopoiesis radiation recovery assay, transplantation of GFP-labeled marrow cells allowed for striking in vivo visual assessment of engraftment from 2 hours-5 weeks post transplant. Using FACS analysis, both transparent and wild-type fish had equal engraftment, but this could only be visualized in the transparent recipient. In a tumor engraftment model, transplantation of RAS-melanoma cells allowed for visualization of tumor engraftment, proliferation and distant metastases in as little as 5 days, which is not seen in wild-type recipients until 3-4 weeks. This transparent adult zebrafish serves as the ideal combination of both sensitivity and resolution for in vivo stem cell analyses. PMID:18371439

  17. In vivo and in vitro analysis of topographic changes secondary to DSAEK venting incisions

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Lependu, Monette T; Church, Dane; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) venting incisions may induce irregular corneal astigmatism. The study examines in vivo and in vitro astigmatic effects of venting incisions. Patients and methods In vivo analysis examined eleven eyes of eleven patients who had received DSAEK with venting incisions. A chart review of the eleven eyes including assessment of pre and postoperative refraction and topography was performed. In vitro analysis examined three cadaver eyes which received topographic imaging followed by venting incisions at 4 mm, 6 mm, and 7 mm optical zones. Topographic imaging was then performed again after the incisions. Results Postoperative topographies of eleven eyes demonstrated localized flattening at incision sites and cloverleaf pattern astigmatism. There was a significant difference in corneal irregularity measurement (P = 0.03), but no significant difference in shape factor or change of topographic cylinder. The cloverleaf pattern was found in cadaver eyes with incisions placed at 4 mm and 6 mm optical zones but not at the 7 mm zone. Conclusion DSAEK venting incisions can cause irregular corneal astigmatism that may affect visual outcomes. The authors recommend placement of venting incisions near the 7 mm optical zone. PMID:21966185

  18. In vivo resistance to bacterial biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes as a function of tube material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    IYAD S SAIDI; JOHN F BIEDLINGMAIER; PHILIP WHELAN

    1999-01-01

    Adherent bacterial biofilms have been implicated in the irreversible contamination of implanted medical devices. We evaluated the resistance of various tympanostomy (pressure equalization [PE]) tube materials to biofilm formation using an in vivo model. PE tubes of silicone, silver oxide–impregnated silicone, fluoroplastic, silver oxide–impregnated fluoroplastic, and ion-bombarded silicone were inserted into the tympanic membranes of 18 Hartley guinea pigs. Staphylococcus

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Functional Inhibitory Networks on the Mauthner Cell of Larval Zebrafish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaharu Takahashi; Madoka Narushima; Yoichi Od

    2002-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo calcium imaging was used to observe and characterize inhibitory circuitry in intact larval zebrafish. In the teleost hindbrain, the inhibitory network onto the major pair of reticulospinal neurons known as Mauthner cells (M-cells) has been described in detail. There are three sources of inhibition onto M-cells: recurrent inhibition mediated by an ipsilateral collateral of the M-cell axon,

  20. Epigenetic modulation of human breast cancer by metallofullerenol nanoparticles: in vivo treatment and in vitro analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Xing, Jianmin; Wang, Yingze; Lu, Juan; Zhao, Yuliang; Gao, Xueyun; Wang, Paul C.; Jia, Lee; Liang, Xingjie

    2011-11-01

    Multi-hydroxylated endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles possess the general physico-chemical characteristics of most nanoparticles. They also exhibit uniquely low toxicity and antineoplastic efficacy. In the current study, the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic characteristics of the antineoplastic action of these nanoparticles are explored. Human breast cancer MCF-7 and human umbilical vein endothelial ECV304 cell lines were used. Cell viability assay, cell hierarchical cluster analysis by cDNA microarray, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were conducted to investigate the changes in molecular and cellular signaling pathways caused by [Gd@C82(OH)22]n. The results demonstrated the high antitumor activity and low cytotoxicity of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles both in vivo and in vitro. Their possible anti-tumor mechanisms were also discussed. The present study may provide new insight into the mechanism of action of these nanoparticles.

  1. In Vivo Assessment of Endothelial Function in Human Lower Extremity Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Vikram S.; Lakin, Ryan O.; Feiten, Lindsay E.; Bishop, Paul; Sarac, Timur P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial function has been measured in preclinical studies, in human brachial and coronary arteries, but not in lower extremity arteries affected by atherosclerosis. We describe a novel, first-in-man, evaluation of endothelial function of the superficial femoral arteries (SFA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods Patients with PAD (n=25) requiring lower extremity angiography were enrolled. Endothelial dependent relaxation (EDR) was measured using intravascular ultrasound and a Doppler Flow wire after the infusion of acetylcholine (Ach). IVUS derived virtual histology (IVUS-VH) of the same vessel was calculated. Endothelial independent relaxation (EIR) was measured with infusion of nitroglycerin (NTG, 200 µg). Levels of nitric oxide (NOx) and serum metabolites were determined by laboratory analysis. Results Patients (mean age 62, 48% male) had a history of hypertension (80%), coronary disease (36%), and diabetes (40%). The mean SFA diameter was 5.2 ± 1 mm (range 3.2–6.9 mm). Patients tolerated Ach infusion with no side effects or adverse events. EDR increased over baseline for all patients with Ach infusion 10?6-10?4. Diameter (0.5% at Ach 10?4) and area (1.8% at Ach 10?4) changes in the diseased SFA were modest and insignificant. But, average peak velocity of blood flow (APV) significantly increased 26, 46 and 63% with Ach infusion 10?6-10?4. Calculations of limb volumetric flow (Q, mL/s, 68%, Ach 10?4) were significantly increased after Ach infusion. Lower extremity NOx levels were slightly lower than systemic venous levels (P = .04). NTG infusion indicated normal smooth muscle responsiveness (3% diameter, 9% area, and 116% velocity change over baseline). IVUS-VH plaque stratification indicated predominantly fibrous morphology (46%; necrotic core, 29%; calcium, 18%). Atheroma burden was 14.9 ± 5.5 mm3/cm and did not correlate with endothelial responsiveness. Conclusions Endothelial function can be measured directly in human lower extremity arteries at the sites of vascular disease. Despite extensive atherosclerosis, endothelial function is still intact. These data support the application of regional endothelial-specific biological therapies in patients with PAD. PMID:23830159

  2. Interference with Ca(2+) release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel function delays T-cell arrest in vivo.

    PubMed

    Waite, Janelle C; Vardhana, Santosh; Shaw, Patrick J; Jang, Jung-Eun; McCarl, Christie-Ann; Cameron, Thomas O; Feske, Stefan; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    Entry of lymphocytes into secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) involves intravascular arrest and intracellular calcium ion ([Ca(2+)]i) elevation. TCR activation triggers increased [Ca(2+)]i and can arrest T-cell motility in vitro. However, the requirement for [Ca(2+)]i elevation in arresting T cells in vivo has not been tested. Here, we have manipulated the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel pathway required for [Ca(2+)]i elevation in T cells through genetic deletion of stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 or by expression of a dominant-negative ORAI1 channel subunit (ORAI1-DN). Interestingly, the absence of CRAC did not interfere with homing of naïve CD4(+) T cells to SLOs and only moderately reduced crawling speeds in vivo. T cells expressing ORAI1-DN lacked TCR activation induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation, yet arrested motility similar to control T cells in vitro. In contrast, antigen-specific ORAI1-DN T cells had a twofold delayed onset of arrest following injection of OVA peptide in vivo. CRAC channel function is not required for homing to SLOs, but enhances spatiotemporal coordination of TCR signaling and motility arrest. PMID:23939929

  3. Stochastic precision analysis of 2D cardiac strain estimation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunting, E. A.; Provost, J.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic strain imaging has been applied to echocardiography and carries great potential to be used as a tool in the clinical setting. Two-dimensional (2D) strain estimation may be useful when studying the heart due to the complex, 3D deformation of the cardiac tissue. Increasing the framerate used for motion estimation, i.e. motion estimation rate (MER), has been shown to improve the precision of the strain estimation, although maintaining the spatial resolution necessary to view the entire heart structure in a single heartbeat remains challenging at high MERs. Two previously developed methods, the temporally unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) and the diverging beam sequence (DBS), have been used in the past to successfully estimate in vivo axial strain at high MERs without compromising spatial resolution. In this study, a stochastic assessment of 2D strain estimation precision is performed in vivo for both sequences at varying MERs (65, 272, 544, 815?Hz for TUAS; 250, 500, 1000, 2000?Hz for DBS). 2D incremental strains were estimated during left ventricular contraction in five healthy volunteers using a normalized cross-correlation function and a least-squares strain estimator. Both sequences were shown capable of estimating 2D incremental strains in vivo. The conditional expected value of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (E(SNRe|?)) was used to compare strain estimation precision of both sequences at multiple MERs over a wide range of clinical strain values. The results here indicate that axial strain estimation precision is much more dependent on MER than lateral strain estimation, while lateral estimation is more affected by strain magnitude. MER should be increased at least above 544?Hz to avoid suboptimal axial strain estimation. Radial and circumferential strain estimations were influenced by the axial and lateral strain in different ways. Furthermore, the TUAS and DBS were found to be of comparable precision at similar MERs.

  4. Quantitative pharmacological analysis of antagonist binding kinetics at CRF1 receptors in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Simeon J; Attkins, Neil J; Fish, Rebecca; van der Graaf, Piet H

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A series of novel non-peptide corticotropin releasing factor type-1 receptor (CRF1) antagonists were found to display varying degrees of insurmountable and non-competitive behaviour in functional in vitro assays. We describe how we attempted to relate this behaviour to ligand receptor-binding kinetics in a quantitative manner and how this resulted in the development and implementation of an efficient pharmacological screening method based on principles described by Motulsky and Mahan. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A non-equilibrium binding kinetic assay was developed to determine the receptor binding kinetics of non-peptide CRF1 antagonists. Nonlinear, mixed-effects modelling was used to obtain estimates of the compounds association and dissociation rates. We present an integrated pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PKPD) approach, whereby the time course of in vivo CRF1 receptor binding of novel compounds can be predicted on the basis of in vitro assays. KEY RESULTS The non-competitive antagonist behaviour appeared to be correlated to the CRF1 receptor off-rate kinetics. The integrated PKPD model suggested that, at least in a qualitative manner, the in vitro assay can be used to triage and select compounds for further in vivo investigations. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study provides evidence for a link between ligand offset kinetics and insurmountable/non-competitive antagonism at the CRF1 receptor. The exact molecular pharmacological nature of this association remains to be determined. In addition, we have developed a quantitative framework to study and integrate in vitro and in vivo receptor binding kinetic behaviour of CRF1 receptor antagonists in an efficient manner in a drug discovery setting. PMID:21449919

  5. Political Advertising in Kuwait A Functional Analysis

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Political Advertising in Kuwait A Functional Analysis Jasem Alqaseer Abstract: Most political advertising studies focus on the U.S. or other western democracies like the U.K. and other European countries (Kaid, 2006). In general, political advertising studies focused on the content of political advertising

  6. Reliability analysis of MURR safety functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malliakos

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated use of improved methods of reliability analysis (over those used in the WASH-1400 report) in reactor safety studies. The methods of event and fault trees that are used to analyze the accident sequences and the safety functions are described. Most importantly, an improvement over the current methods is used to construct the correct mathematical relationship between a

  7. A functional analysis of binge-eating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GIenn Waller

    1995-01-01

    Previous attempts at formulating binge-eating (usually as part of the syndrome of bulimia nervosa) are reviewed and common themes are extracted from the literature. Two main themes in formulations of bingeing are highlighted — that bingeing may result from eating behavior or from emotional difficulties. A functional analysis paradigm is utilized to integrate this information in a clinically useful manner.

  8. 20-HETE Regulates the Angiogenic Functions of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Contributes to Angiogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H.; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G.; Falck, John R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Scicli, A. Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F–20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F–20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ?1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A–20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  9. NEX-TRAP, a novel method for in vivo analysis of nuclear export of proteins.

    PubMed

    Raschbichler, Verena; Lieber, Diana; Bailer, Susanne M

    2012-10-01

    Transport of proteins between cytoplasm and nucleus is mediated by transport factors of the importin ?- and ?-families and occurs along a gradient of the small GTPase Ran. To date, in vivo analysis as well as prediction of protein nuclear export remain tedious and difficult. We generated a novel bipartite assay called NEX-TRAP (Nuclear EXport Trapped by RAPamycin) for in vivo analysis of protein nuclear export. The assay is based on the rapamycin-induced dimerization of the modules FRB (FK506-rapamycin (FR)-binding domain) and FKBP (FK506-binding protein-12): a potential nuclear export cargo is fused to FRB, to EYFP for direct visualization as well as to an SV40-derived nuclear localization signal (NLS) for constitutive nuclear import. An integral membrane protein that resides at the trans Golgi network (TGN) is fused to a cytoplasmically exposed FKBP and serves as reporter. EYFP-NLS-FRB fusion proteins with export activity accumulate in the nucleus at steady state but continuously shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Rapamycin-induced dimerization of FRB and FKBP at the TGN traps the shuttling protein outside of the nucleus, making nuclear export permanent. Using several example cargoes, we show that the NEX-TRAP is superior to existing assays owing to its ease of use, its sensitivity and accuracy. Analysis of large numbers of export cargoes is facilitated by recombinational cloning. The NEX-TRAP holds the promise of applicability in automated fluorescence imaging for systematic analysis of nuclear export, thereby improving in silico prediction of nuclear export sequences. PMID:22708827

  10. In vivo direct reprogramming of reactive glial cells into functional neurons after brain injury and in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ziyuan; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Chen, Yuchen; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gong

    2014-02-01

    Loss of neurons after brain injury and in neurodegenerative disease is often accompanied by reactive gliosis and scarring, which are difficult to reverse with existing treatment approaches. Here, we show that reactive glial cells in the cortex of stab-injured or Alzheimer's disease (AD) model mice can be directly reprogrammed into functional neurons in vivo using retroviral expression of a single neural transcription factor, NeuroD1. Following expression of NeuroD1, astrocytes were reprogrammed into glutamatergic neurons, while NG2 cells were reprogrammed into glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Cortical slice recordings revealed both spontaneous and evoked synaptic responses in NeuroD1-converted neurons, suggesting that they integrated into local neural circuits. NeuroD1 expression was also able to reprogram cultured human cortical astrocytes into functional neurons. Our studies therefore suggest that direct reprogramming of reactive glial cells into functional neurons in vivo could provide an alternative approach for repair of injured or diseased brain. PMID:24360883

  11. Long-Term Persistence of Functional Thymic Epithelial Progenitor Cells In Vivo under Conditions of Low FOXN1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Nowell, Craig S.; Ulyanchenko, Svetlana; Stenhouse, Frances H.; Blackburn, C. Clare

    2014-01-01

    Normal thymus function reflects interactions between developing T-cells and several thymic stroma cell types. Within the stroma, key functions reside in the distinct cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cell (TEC) types. It has been demonstrated that, during organogenesis, all TECs can be derived from a common thymic epithelial progenitor cell (TEPC). The properties of this common progenitor are thus of interest. Differentiation of both cTEC and mTEC depends on the epithelial-specific transcription factor FOXN1, although formation of the common TEPC from which the TEC lineage originates does not require FOXN1. Here, we have used a revertible severely hypomorphic allele of Foxn1, Foxn1R, to test the stability of the common TEPC in vivo. By reactivating Foxn1 expression postnatally in Foxn1R/? mice we demonstrate that functional TEPCs can persist in the thymic rudiment until at least 6 months of age, and retain the potential to give rise to both cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs and mTECs). These data demonstrate that the TEPC-state is remarkably stable in vivo under conditions of low Foxn1 expression, suggesting that manipulation of FOXN1 activity may prove a valuable method for long term maintenance of TEPC in vitro. PMID:25531271

  12. In vivo imaging and quantitative analysis of changes in axon length using transgenic zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Lantz, Susan; Paule, Merle G

    2011-01-01

    We describe an imaging procedure to measure axon length in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated fluorescent image acquisition was performed with the ImageXpress Micro high content screening reader and further analysis of axon lengths was performed on archived images using AcuityXpress software. We utilized the Neurite Outgrowth Application module with a customized protocol (journal) to measure the axons. Since higher doses of ethanol (2-2.5%, v/v) have been shown to deform motor neurons and axons during development, here we used ethanol to treat transgenic [hb9:GFP (green fluorescent protein)] zebrafish embryos at 28 hpf (hours post-fertilization). These embryos express GFP in the motor neurons and their axons. Embryos after ethanol treatment were arrayed in 384-well plates for automated fluorescent image acquisition in vivo. Average axon lengths of high dose ethanol-treated embryos were significantly lower than the control. Another experiment showed that there was no significant difference in the axon lengths between the embryos grown for 24h at 22°C and 28.5°C. These test experiments demonstrate that using axon development as an end-point, compound screening can be performed in a time-efficient manner. PMID:21903162

  13. Delayed near-infrared analysis permits visualization of rodent retinal pigment epithelium layer in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankova, Natalie; Zhao, Xu; Liang, Huiyuan; Baek, David Sung Hyeon; Wang, Hai; Boyd, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    Patches of atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have not been described in rodent models of retinal degeneration, as they have the clinical setting using fundus autofluorescence. We hypothesize that prelabeling the RPE would increase contrast and allow for improved visualization of RPE loss in vivo. Here, we demonstrate a new technique termed "delayed near-infrared analysis (DNIRA)" that permits ready detection of rat RPE, using optical imaging in the near-infrared (IR) spectrum with aid of indocyanine green (ICG) dye. Using DNIRA, we demonstrate a fluorescent RPE signal that is detected using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy up to 28 days following ICG injection. This signal is apparent only after ICG injection, is dose dependent, requires the presence of the ICG filters (795/810 nm excitation/emission), does not appear in the IR reflectance channel, and is eliminated in the presence of sodium iodate, a toxin that causes RPE loss. Rat RPE explants confirm internalization of ICG dye. Together with normal retinal electrophysiology, these findings demonstrate that DNIRA is a new and safe noninvasive optical imaging technique for in vivo visualization of the RPE in models of retinal disease.

  14. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  15. Analysis of platelet function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jurk, K

    2015-02-10

    Although platelets act as central players of haemostasis only their cross-talk with other blood cells, plasma factors and the vascular compartment enables the formation of a stable thrombus. Multiple activation processes and complex signalling networks are responsible for appropriate platelet function. Thus, a variety of platelet function tests are available for platelet research and diagnosis of platelet dysfunction. However, universal platelet function tests that are sensitive to all platelet function defects do not exist and therefore diagnostic algorithms for suspected platelet function disorders are still recommended in clinical practice. Based on the current knowledge of human platelet activation this review evaluates point-of-care related screening tests in comparison with specific platelet function assays and focuses on their diagnostic utility in relation to severity of platelet dysfunction. Further, systems biology-based platelet function methods that integrate global and specific analysis of platelet vessel wall interaction (advanced flow chamber devices) and post-translational modifications (platelet proteomics) are presented and their diagnostic potential is addressed. PMID:25482925

  16. Structurally-informed Bayesian functional connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Hinne, Max; Ambrogioni, Luca; Janssen, Ronald J; Heskes, Tom; van Gerven, Marcel A J

    2014-02-01

    Functional connectivity refers to covarying activity between spatially segregated brain regions and can be studied by measuring correlation between functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series. These correlations can be caused either by direct communication via active axonal pathways or indirectly via the interaction with other regions. It is not possible to discriminate between these two kinds of functional interaction simply by considering the covariance matrix. However, the non-diagonal elements of its inverse, the precision matrix, can be naturally related to direct communication between brain areas and interpreted in terms of partial correlations. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian model for functional connectivity analysis which allows estimation of a posterior density over precision matrices, and, consequently, allows one to quantify the uncertainty about estimated partial correlations. In order to make model estimation feasible it is assumed that the sparseness structure of the precision matrices is given by an estimate of structural connectivity obtained using diffusion imaging data. The model was tested on simulated data as well as resting-state fMRI data and compared with a graphical lasso analysis. The presented approach provides a theoretically solid foundation for quantifying functional connectivity in the presence of uncertainty. PMID:24121202

  17. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  18. Biocompatible near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles for macro and microscopic in vivo functional bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Liliang; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Kanghui; Xi, Wang; Zhao, Xinyuan; Qian, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging technology has been widely used for biomedical research and applications, since it can achieve deep penetration in biological tissues due to less absorption and scattering of NIR light. In our research, polymer nanoparticles with NIR fluorophores doped were synthesized. The morphology, absorption/emission features and chemical stability of the fluorescent nanoparticles were characterized, separately. NIR fluorescent nanoparticles were then utilized as bright optical probes for macro in vivo imaging of mice, including sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping, as well as distribution and excretion monitoring of nanoparticles in animal body. Furthermore, we applied the NIR fluorescent nanoparticles in in vivo microscopic bioimaging via a confocal microscope. Under the 635 nm-CW excitation, the blood vessel architecture in the ear and the brain of mice, which were administered with nanoparticles, was visualized very clearly. The imaging depth of our one-photon microscopy, which was assisted with NIR fluorescent nanoprobes, can reach as deep as 500 ?m. Our experiments show that NIR fluorescent nanoparticles have great potentials in various deep-tissue imaging applications. PMID:25426331

  19. Biocompatible near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles for macro and microscopic in vivo functional bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liliang; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Kanghui; Xi, Wang; Zhao, Xinyuan; Qian, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging technology has been widely used for biomedical research and applications, since it can achieve deep penetration in biological tissues due to less absorption and scattering of NIR light. In our research, polymer nanoparticles with NIR fluorophores doped were synthesized. The morphology, absorption/emission features and chemical stability of the fluorescent nanoparticles were characterized, separately. NIR fluorescent nanoparticles were then utilized as bright optical probes for macro in vivo imaging of mice, including sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping, as well as distribution and excretion monitoring of nanoparticles in animal body. Furthermore, we applied the NIR fluorescent nanoparticles in in vivo microscopic bioimaging via a confocal microscope. Under the 635 nm-CW excitation, the blood vessel architecture in the ear and the brain of mice, which were administered with nanoparticles, was visualized very clearly. The imaging depth of our one-photon microscopy, which was assisted with NIR fluorescent nanoprobes, can reach as deep as 500 ?m. Our experiments show that NIR fluorescent nanoparticles have great potentials in various deep-tissue imaging applications. PMID:25426331

  20. The BRAF Pseudogene Functions as a Competitive Endogenous RNA and Induces Lymphoma In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Karreth, Florian A; Reschke, Markus; Ruocco, Anna; Ng, Christopher; Chapuy, Bjoern; Léopold, Valentine; Sjoberg, Marcela; Keane, Thomas M; Verma, Akanksha; Ala, Ugo; Tay, Yvonne; Wu, David; Seitzer, Nina; Velasco-Herrera, Martin Del Castillo; Bothmer, Anne; Fung, Jacqueline; Langellotto, Fernanda; Rodig, Scott J; Elemento, Olivier; Shipp, Margaret A; Adams, David J; Chiarle, Roberto; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Research over the past decade has suggested important roles for pseudogenes in physiology and disease. In vitro experiments demonstrated that pseudogenes contribute to cell transformation through several mechanisms. However, in vivo evidence for a causal role of pseudogenes in cancer development is lacking. Here, we report that mice engineered to overexpress either the full-length murine B-Raf pseudogene Braf-rs1 or its pseudo "CDS" or "3' UTR" develop an aggressive malignancy resembling human diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We show that Braf-rs1 and its human ortholog, BRAFP1, elicit their oncogenic activity, at least in part, as competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) that elevate BRAF expression and MAPK activation in vitro and in vivo. Notably, we find that transcriptional or genomic aberrations of BRAFP1 occur frequently in multiple human cancers, including B cell lymphomas. Our engineered mouse models demonstrate the oncogenic potential of pseudogenes and indicate that ceRNA-mediated microRNA sequestration may contribute to the development of cancer. PMID:25843629

  1. Directed dimerization: an in vivo expression system for functional studies of type II phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Sharrock, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Type II phytochromes (phy) in Arabidopsis form homodimers and heterodimers, resulting in a diverse collection of light-stable red/far-red (R/FR) sensing photoreceptors. We describe an in vivo protein engineering system and its use in characterizing the activities of these molecules. Using a phyB null mutant background, singly and doubly transgenic plants were generated that express fusion proteins containing the phyB-phyE N-terminal photosensory regions (NB-NE PSRs), a nuclear localization sequence, and small yeast protein domains that mediate either homodimerization or heterodimerization. Activity of NB/NB homodimers but not monomeric NB subunits in control of seedling and adult plant responses to R light is demonstrated. Heterodimers of the NB sequence with the chromophoreless NB(C357S) sequence, which mimic phyB Pfr/Pr photo-heterodimers, mediate R sensitivity in leaves and petioles but not hypocotyls. Homodimerization of the NC, ND and NE sequences and directed heterodimerization of these photosensory regions with the NB region reveal form-specific R-induced activities for different type II phy dimers. The experimental approach developed here of directed assembly of defined protein dimer combinations in vivo may be applicable to other systems. PMID:23738620

  2. Single cell electroporation for longitudinal imaging of synaptic structure and function in the adult mouse neocortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Cane, Michele; Randall, Jérôme; Capello, Luca; Holtmaat, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies of neuronal structures in vivo have revealed rich dynamics in dendritic spines and axonal boutons. Spines and boutons are considered to be proxies for synapses. This implies that synapses display similar dynamics. However, spines and boutons do not always bear synapses, some may contain more than one, and dendritic shaft synapses have no clear structural proxies. In addition, synaptic strength is not always accurately revealed by just the size of these structures. Structural and functional dynamics of synapses could be studied more reliably using fluorescent synaptic proteins as markers for size and function. These proteins are often large and possibly interfere with circuit development, which renders them less suitable for conventional transfection or transgenesis methods such as viral vectors, in utero electroporation, and germline transgenesis. Single cell electroporation (SCE) has been shown to be a potential alternative for transfection of recombinant fluorescent proteins in adult cortical neurons. Here we provide proof of principle for the use of SCE to express and subsequently image fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins over days to weeks in vivo.

  3. Goserelin can inhibit ovarian cancer proliferation and simultaneously protect ovarian function from cisplatin: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ding, Jing Xin; Tao, Xiang; Lu, Zhi Ying; Wang, Jia Jia; Feng, Wei Wei; Hua, Ke Qin

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates whether goserelin can inhibit ovarian cancer proliferation and protect ovarian function from cisplatin (CDDP). We evaluated proliferation and AKT phosphorylation in goserelin-treated ES-2 and SKOV3-ip ovarian cancer cells. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in human granulosa cells (hGCs) cotreated with goserelin and CDDP was measured by ELISA. Tumour volumes, Ki-67 expression, estrus, follicles, ovarian volumes, and serum AMH were compared in nude mice bearing transplanted tumours treated with goserelin and/or CDDP. Our results showed that goserelin inhibited cellular proliferation and AKT phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibited tumour growth and Ki-67 expression in vivo. Goserelin and CDDP cotreatment decreased the estrus cycles of the nude mice and prolonged estrus duration. Goserelin abrogated the CDDP-induced down-regulation of primary and preantral follicle percentage and ovarian volume. Goserelin increased AMH secretion in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, goserelin inhibited ovarian cancer proliferation and simultaneously protected ovarian function from CDDP. PMID:23684357

  4. Coassembly of amphiphilic peptide EAK16-II with histidinylated analogues and implications for functionalization of ?-sheet fibrils in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yi; Roudebush, Shana L; Buckholtz, Gavin A; Goehring, Thomas R; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S; Meng, Wilson S

    2014-06-01

    EAK16-II (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK) is one of the first building blocks of environmentally responsive materials. This self-assembling peptide undergoes solution-to-gel transition when transferred from a low to high ionic strength environment. Previously we have demonstrated the histidinylated analogue EAKIIH6 (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAKHHHHHH) coassembles with the parent peptide to render His-tags as a functionalization mechanism in vitro and in vivo. The present study aimed to understand the pathways by which the analogue coassembles with EAK16-II. The results presented herein suggested two competing but not mutually exclusive events in the coassembly. Atomic force microscopic and gel electrophoretic data showed that EAKIIH6 self-sorted to high molecular weight species without EAK16-II. Self-sorting of EAKIIH6 was inhibited by the parent peptide in a concentration dependent manner. Injecting mixtures containing EAKIIH6 subcutaneously rendered His-tags detectable in live mice for at least 312 h, despite diluting the histidinylated analogue by 10-50 folds compared to a previous formulation. The study provided a formulation by which in vivo display of His-tags was attained without excess amphiphilic peptides. By increasing coassembling efficiency, the likelihood of generating immunogenic aggregates outside the main fibrils could be minimized. These findings provide insights for rational functionalization of in situ self-gelling materials. PMID:24680662

  5. Regulatory functions of self-restricted MHC class II allopeptide-specific Th2 clones in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Waaga, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E.; Najafian, Nader; Müller, Angelika; Vella, John P.; Womer, Karl L.; Chandraker, Anil; Khoury, Samia J.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2001-01-01

    We studied T-cell clones generated from grafts of rejecting and tolerant animals and investigated the regulatory function of Th2 clones in vitro and in vivo. To prevent allograft rejection, we treated LEW strain recipient rats of WF strain kidney grafts with CTLA4Ig to block CD28-B7 costimulation. We then isolated epitope-specific T-cell clones from the engrafted tissue, using a donor-derived immunodominant class II MHC allopeptide presented by recipient antigen-presenting cells. Acutely rejected tissue from untreated animals yielded self-restricted, allopeptide-specific T-cell clones that produced IFN-?, whereas clones from tolerant animals produced IL-4 and IL-10. Adoptive transfer into naive recipients of Th1 clones, but not Th2 clones, induced alloantigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. In addition, Th2 clones suppressed DTH responses mediated by Th1 clones in vivo and blocked Th1 cell proliferation and IFN-? production in vitro. A pilot human study showed that HLA-DR allopeptide-specific T-cell clones generated from patients with chronic rejection secrete Th1 cytokines, whereas those from patients with stable graft function produce Th2 cytokines in response to donor-specific HLA-DR allopeptides. We suggest that self-restricted alloantigen-specific Th2 clones may regulate the alloimmune responses and promote long-term allograft survival and tolerance. PMID:11285310

  6. Targeting Stat3 in the myeloid compartment drastically improves the in vivo antitumor functions of adoptively transferred T cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andreas; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Reckamp, Karen; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Lin; Kowolik, Claudia; Deng, Jiehui; Robert, Figlin; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Improving effector T cell functions is highly desirable for preventive or therapeutic interventions of diverse diseases. Stat3 in the myeloid compartment constrains Th-1 type immunity, dampening natural and induced antitumor immune responses. We have recently developed an in vivo siRNA delivery platform by conjugating a TLR9 agonist with siRNA that efficiently targets myeloid and B cells. Here we show that either ablating the Stat3 alleles in the myeloid compartment and B cells combined with CpG triggering or administrating the CpG-Stat3siRNA conjugates drastically augments effector functions of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells. Specifically, we demonstrate that both approaches are capable of increasing dendritic cell and CD8+ T cell engagement in tumor draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, both approaches can significantly activate the transferred CD8+ T cells in vivo, upregulating effector molecules such as perforin, granzyme B and IFN-?. Intravital multiphoton microscopy reveals that Stat3 silencing combined with CpG triggering greatly increases killing activity and tumor infiltration of transferred T cells. These results suggest the use of CpG-Stat3siRNA, and possibly other Stat3 inhibitors, as a potent adjuvant to improve T cell therapies. PMID:20841481

  7. Functional Data Analysis of Tree Data Objects

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dan; Shen, Haipeng; Bhamidi, Shankar; Maldonado, Yolanda Muñoz; Kim, Yongdai; Marron, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Data analysis on non-Euclidean spaces, such as tree spaces, can be challenging. The main contribution of this paper is establishment of a connection between tree data spaces and the well developed area of Functional Data Analysis (FDA), where the data objects are curves. This connection comes through two tree representation approaches, the Dyck path representation and the branch length representation. These representations of trees in Euclidean spaces enable us to exploit the power of FDA to explore statistical properties of tree data objects. A major challenge in the analysis is the sparsity of tree branches in a sample of trees. We overcome this issue by using a tree pruning technique that focuses the analysis on important underlying population structures. This method parallels scale-space analysis in the sense that it reveals statistical properties of tree structured data over a range of scales. The effectiveness of these new approaches is demonstrated by some novel results obtained in the analysis of brain artery trees. The scale space analysis reveals a deeper relationship between structure and age. These methods are the first to find a statistically significant gender difference. PMID:25346588

  8. The feasibility of accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, J M; Blackburn, B W; Chichester, D L; Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C

    2001-12-01

    The feasibility of accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis of nitrogen has been investigated. It was found that a moderated neutron flux from approximately 10 microA of 2.5 MeV protons on a 9Be target performed as well as, and possibly slightly better than the existing isotope-based approach in terms of net counts per unit subject dose. Such a system may be an attractive alternative to the widespread use of (238,239)Pu/Be or 252Cf neutron sources, since there is more flexibility in the energy spectrum generated by accelerator-based neutron sources. From a radiation safety standpoint, accelerators have the advantage in that they only produce radiation when in operation. Furthermore, an accelerator beam can be pulsed, to reduce background detected in the prompt-gamma measurement, and such a device has a wide range of additional biological and medical applications. PMID:11761098

  9. Kidney function after in vivo gene silencing of uncoupling protein-2 in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Persson, Malou Friederich; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Kidney uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) increases in streptozotocin-induced diabetes, resulting in mitochondria uncoupling, i.e., increased oxygen consumption unrelated to active transport. The present study aimed to investigate the role of UCP-2 for normal and diabetic kidney function utilizing small interference RNA (siRNA) to reduce protein expression. Diabetic animals had increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney oxygen consumption, resulting in decreased oxygen tension and transported sodium per consumed oxygen. UCP-2 protein levels decreased 2 and 50% after UCP-2 siRNA administration in control and diabetic animals respectively. Kidney function was unaffected by in vivo siRNA-mediated gene silencing of UCP-2. The reason for the lack of effect of reducing UCP-2 is presently unknown but may involve compensatory mitochondrial uncoupling by the adenosine nucleotide transporter. PMID:22879036

  10. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations and In Vivo Insulin Sensitivity and ?-Cell Function Relative to Insulin Sensitivity in Black and White Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rajakumar, Kumaravel; de las Heras, Javier; Lee, SoJung; Holick, Michael F.; Arslanian, Silva A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the relationships between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and in vivo insulin sensitivity and ?-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), in black and white youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were analyzed in banked specimens in healthy youth aged 8 to 18 years who had existing data on hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamp to assess insulin sensitivity and secretion, and measurements of body composition, and abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). RESULTS A total of 183 research volunteers (mean ± SD; age, 12.6 ± 2.2 years; 98 white, 98 male, 92 obese) were studied. Analysis of HbA1c, fasting glucose and insulin, insulin sensitivity, and DI across quartiles of plasma 25(OH)D revealed no differences among whites. In blacks, the observed significance of higher insulin sensitivity and DI in the highest quartile of 25(OH)D disappeared after adjusting for any of the adiposity measures (BMI or fat mass or VAT or SAT). The difference in insulin sensitivity (9.4 ± 1.2 vs. 5.6 ± 0.5 mg/kg/min per ?U/mL; P = 0.006) between 25(OH)D nondeficient (?20 ng/mL) versus deficient (<20 ng/mL) black youth also was negated when adjusted for adiposity. CONCLUSIONS In healthy youth, plasma 25(OH)D concentrations bear no independent relationship to parameters of glucose homeostasis and in vivo insulin sensitivity and ?-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity. It remains to be determined whether in youth with dysglycemia the relationships are different and whether vitamin D optimization enhances insulin sensitivity and ?-cell function. PMID:22238280

  11. The Functional Analysis of Quantum Information Theory

    E-print Network

    Ved Prakash Gupta; Prabha Mandayam; V. S. Sunder

    2014-11-03

    This book is a compilation of notes from a two-week international workshop on the "The Functional Analysis of Quantum Information Theory" that was held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences during 26/12/2011-06/01/2012. The workshop was devoted to the mathematical framework of quantized functional analysis (QFA), and aimed at illustrating its applications to problems in quantum communication. The lectures were given by Gilles Pisier (Pierre and Marie Curie University and Texas A&M), K.R. Parthasarathy (ISI Delhi), Vern Paulsen (University of Houston), and Andreas Winter (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona). Topics discussed include Operator Spaces and Completely bounded maps, Schmidt number and Schmidt rank of bipartite entangled states, Operator Systems and Completely Positive Maps, and, Operator Methods in Quantum Information.

  12. Optimizing relativistic energy density functionals: covariance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikši?, T.; Paar, N.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vretenar, D.

    2015-03-01

    The stability of model parameters for a class of relativistic energy density functionals, characterized by contact (point-coupling) effective inter-nucleon interactions and density-dependent coupling parameters, is analyzed using methods of statistical analysis. A set of pseudo-observables in infinite and semi-infinite nuclear matter (SINM) is used to define a quality measure ?2 for subsequent analysis. Uncertainties of model parameters and correlation coefficients between parameters are computed, and the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the matrix of second derivatives of ?2 at the minimum are evaluated. Using these quantities, the stability of the density functional in nuclear matter is examined, and weakly and strongly constrained combinations of parameters are determined. In addition, uncertainties of observables that are not included in the calculation of ?2 are analyzed: binding energy of asymmetric nuclear matter, surface thickness of SINM, binding energies and charge radii of finite nuclei.

  13. The relationship between the diameter of chemically-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their organ biodistribution profiles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Julie T-W; Fabbro, Chiara; Venturelli, Enrica; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Chaloin, Olivier; Da Ros, Tatiana; Methven, Laura; Nunes, Antonio; Sosabowski, Jane K; Mather, Stephen J; Robinson, Martyn K; Amadou, Julien; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2014-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit unique properties which have led to their applications in the biomedical field as novel delivery systems for diagnosis and therapy purposes. We have previously reported that the degree of functionalization of CNTs is a key factor determining their biological behaviour. The present study broadens the spectrum by investigating the impact of the diameter of CNTs using two series of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs) with distinct differences in their diameters. Both MWNTs were doubly functionalized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and amidation reactions, allowing the appended functional groups to be further conjugated with radionuclide chelating moieties and antibodies or antibody fragments. All constructs possessed comparable degree of functionalization and were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance. The MWNT conjugates were radio-labelled with indium-111, which thereby enabled in vivo single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and organ biodistribution study using ?-scintigraphy. The narrow MWNTs (average diameter: 9.2 nm) demonstrated enhanced tissue affinity including non-reticular endothelial tissues compared to the wider MWNTs (average diameter: 39.5 nm). The results indicate that the higher aspect ratio of narrow MWNTs may be beneficial for their future biological applications due to higher tissue accumulation. PMID:25168822

  14. Fracture Analysis of Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ch. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Gao, X. W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Sladek, J.; Sladek, V. [Institute of Construction and Architecture, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 84503 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-05-21

    This paper reports our recent research works on crack analysis in continuously non-homogeneous and linear elastic functionally graded materials. A meshless boundary element method is developed for this purpose. Numerical examples are presented and discussed to demonstrate the efficiency and the accuracy of the present numerical method, and to show the effects of the material gradation on the crack-opening-displacements and the stress intensity factors.

  15. Development of an Ex Vivo Model for the Study of Cerebrovascular Function Utilizing Isolated Mouse Olfactory Artery

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Hans H.; Han, Byung Hee; Zipfel, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cerebral vessels, such as intracerebral perforating arterioles isolated from rat brain, have been widely used as an ex vivo model to study the cerebrovascular function associated with cerebrovascular disorders and the therapeutic effects of various pharmacological agents. These perforating arterioles, however, have demonstrated differences in the vascular architecture and reactivity compared with a larger leptomeningeal artery which has been commonly implicated in cerebrovascular disease. In this study, therefore, we developed the method for studying cerebrovascular function utilizing the olfactory artery isolated from the mouse brain. Methods The olfactory artery (OA) was isolated from the C57/BL6 wild-type mouse brain. After removing connective tissues, one side of the isolated vessel segment (approximately -500 µm in length) was cannulated and the opposite end of the vessel was completely sealed while being viewed with an inverted microscope. After verifying the absence of pressure leakage, we examined the vascular reactivity to various vasoactive agents under the fixed intravascular pressure (60 mm Hg). Results We found that the isolated mouse OAs were able to constrict in response to vasoconstrictors, including KCl, phenylephrine, endothelin-1, and prostaglandin PGH2. Moreover, this isolated vessel demonstrated vasodilation in a dose-dependent manner when vasodilatory agents, acetylcholine and bradykinin, were applied. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the isolated olfactory artery would provide as a useful ex vivo model to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms of vascular function underlying cerebrovascular disorders and the direct effects of such disease-modifying pathways on cerebrovascular function utilizing pharmacological agents and genetically modified mouse models. PMID:25674336

  16. In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function: Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Jeffrey J.; Char, Jessica E.; Chen, Jonathan; Cho, Hyung-ju; Dunn, Colleen; Frisbee, Eric; Joo, Nam Soo; Milla, Carlos; Modlin, Sara E.; Park, Il-Ho; Thomas, Ewart A. C.; Tran, Kim V.; Verma, Rohan; Wolfe, Marlene H.

    2013-01-01

    To assess CFTR function in vivo, we developed a bioassay that monitors and compares CFTR-dependent and CFTR-independent sweat secretion in parallel for multiple (?50) individual, identified glands in each subject. Sweating was stimulated by intradermally injected agonists and quantified by optically measuring spherical sweat bubbles in an oil-layer that contained dispersed, water soluble dye particles that partitioned into the sweat bubbles, making them highly visible. CFTR-independent secretion (M-sweat) was stimulated with methacholine, which binds to muscarinic receptors and elevates cytosolic calcium. CFTR-dependent secretion (C-sweat) was stimulated with a ?-adrenergic cocktail that elevates cytosolic cAMP while blocking muscarinic receptors. A C-sweat/M-sweat ratio was determined on a gland-by-gland basis to compensate for differences unrelated to CFTR function, such as gland size. The average ratio provides an approximately linear readout of CFTR function: the heterozygote ratio is ?0.5 the control ratio and for CF subjects the ratio is zero. During assay development, we measured C/M ratios in 6 healthy controls, 4 CF heterozygotes, 18 CF subjects and 4 subjects with ‘CFTR-related’ conditions. The assay discriminated all groups clearly. It also revealed consistent differences in the C/M ratio among subjects within groups. We hypothesize that these differences reflect, at least in part, levels of CFTR expression, which are known to vary widely. When C-sweat rates become very low the C/M ratio also tended to decrease; we hypothesize that this nonlinearity reflects ductal fluid absorption. We also discovered that M-sweating potentiates the subsequent C-sweat response. We then used potentiation as a surrogate for drugs that can increase CFTR-dependent secretion. This bioassay provides an additional method for assessing CFTR function in vivo, and is well suited for within-subject tests of systemic, CFTR-directed therapeutics. PMID:24204751

  17. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  18. ASSOCIATION OF MARGINAL FOLATE DEPLETION WITH INCREASED HUMAN CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE IN VIVO: DEMONSTRATION BY ANALYSIS OF MICRONUCLEATED ERYTHROCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated that in the absence of spleen function, frequencies of micronuclei (Howell-Jolly bodies) in peripheral rbcs can be used to measure in vivo cytogenetic damage. mong 20 subjects studied 6 months after splenectomy 1 had a frequency of micronucleated ...

  19. DMP1 Depletion Decreases Bone Mineralization In Vivo: An FTIR Imaging Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yunfeng; Rios, Hector F; Myers, Elizabeth R; Lu, Yongbo; Feng, Jian Q; Boskey, Adele L

    2006-01-01

    The role of DMP1 in mineralization was analyzed by comparing bone mineral and matrix properties in dmp1-null female mice to heterozygous and wildtype controls by FTIR imaging spectroscopy. The observed decreased mineral content in dmp1 null mice indicates a key role for dmp1 in bone mineralization. Indirect effects of DMP1 on other systems also determine the KO phenotype. Introduction Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), an acidic phosphorylated extracellular matrix protein, is highly expressed in mineralized tissues. In vitro, DMP1 peptides can promote or inhibit mineralization depending on the extent of phosphorylation, the peptide size, and concentration. To clarify the biological function of DMP1 protein on in vivo mineralization, this study analyzed bone properties of dmp1 knockout (KO) mice compared with heterozygous (HET) and wildtype (WT) controls. Materials and Methods Tibias from dmp1 KO and age-, sex-, and background-matched HET and WT mice at 4 and 16 weeks (Ntotal = 60) were examined by Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI), histology (n = 6 per genotype and age; N = 36), and geometry by ?CT (n = 4 per genotype and age; N = 24). Serum ionic calcium and phosphate concentrations were also determined. Results The mineral-to-matrix ratios (spectroscopic parameter of relative mineral content) were significantly lower in dmp1 KO mice tibias compared with WT and HET at 4 and 16 weeks. The mineral crystallinity (crystal size/perfection) was significantly increased in dmp1 KO and HET mice relative to WT. Collagen cross-link ratios (a spectroscopic parameter related to the relative amounts of nonreducible/reducible collagen cross-links) in dmp1 KO were not significantly different from WT and HET. Based on ?CT, cortical bone cross-sectional areas at 16 but not 4 weeks were significantly reduced in the KO compared with controls. Maximum, minimum, and polar cross-sectional moments of inertia were significantly lower in dmp1 KO than in HET at 16 weeks but not at 4 weeks. Histological analysis and ?CT 3-D images suggested that dmp1 KO mice had osteomalacia. Dmp1 KO mice had significantly lower ionic calcium and phosphate concentrations relative to WT, whereas in the HET, values for phosphate were equivalent, and calcium values were decreased relative to WT values. Conclusions The findings of decreased mineral-to-matrix ratio and increased crystal size in bones of dmp1 KO mice suggest that DMP1 has multiple roles (both direct and indirect) in the regulation of postnatal mineralization. We suggest that direct effects on mineral formation, crystal growth, and indirect effects on regulation of Ca × P concentrations and matrix turnover all contribute to the dominant phenotype in the dmp1 KO mouse. PMID:16294270

  20. Ex vivo culture of chimeric antigen receptor T cells generates functional CD8+ T cells with effector and central memory-like phenotype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Neeson; A Shin; K M Tainton; P Guru; H M Prince; S J Harrison; S Peinert; M J Smyth; J A Trapani; M H Kershaw; P K Darcy; D S Ritchie

    2010-01-01

    The anti-tumor efficacy of adoptively transferred T cells requires their in vivo persistence and memory polarization. It is unknown if human chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells can also undergo memory polarization. We examined the functional status of CAR CD8+ T cells, re-directed to Lewis Y antigen (LeY-T), throughout a period of ex vivo expansion. Immediately before culture CD8+ T

  1. Ageing alters perivascular nerve function of mouse mesenteric arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Segal, Steven S

    2013-03-01

    Abstract? Mesenteric arteries (MAs) are studied widely in vitro but little is known of their reactivity in vivo. Transgenic animals have enabled Ca(2+) signalling to be studied in isolated MAs but the reactivity of these vessels in vivo is undefined. We tested the hypothesis that ageing alters MA reactivity to perivascular nerve stimulation (PNS) and adrenoreceptor (AR) activation during blood flow control. First- (1A), second- (2A) and third-order (3A) MAs of pentobarbital-anaesthetized Young (3-6 months) and Old (24-26 months) male and female Cx40(BAC)-GCaMP2 transgenic mice (C57BL/6 background; positive or negative for the GCaMP2 transgene) were studied with intravital microscopy. A segment of jejunum was exteriorized and an MA network was superfused with physiological salt solution (pH 7.4, 37°C). Resting tone was 10% in MAs of Young and Old mice; diameters were ?5% (1A), 20% (2A) and 40% (3A) smaller (P 0.05) in Old mice. Throughout MA networks, vasoconstriction increased with PNS frequency (1-16 Hz) but was ?20% less in Young vs. Old mice (P 0.05) and was inhibited by tetrodotoxin (1 ?m). Capsaicin (10 ?m; to inhibit sensory nerves) enhanced MA constriction to PNS (P 0.05) by ?20% in Young but not Old mice. Phenylephrine (an ?1AR agonist) potency was greater in Young mice (P 0.05) with similar efficacy (?60% constriction) across ages and MA branches. Constrictions to UK14304 (an ?2AR agonist) were less (?20%; P 0.05) and were unaffected by ageing. Irrespective of sex or transgene expression, ageing consistently reduced the sensitivity of MAs to ?1AR vasoconstriction while blunting the attenuation of sympathetic vasoconstriction by sensory nerves. These findings imply substantive alterations in splanchnic blood flow control with ageing. PMID:23247111

  2. Characterization of a CREB Gain-of-Function Mutant with Constitutive Transcriptional Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Du, Keyong; Asahara, Hiroshi; Jhala, Ulupi S.; Wagner, Brandee L.; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive factor CREB promotes cellular gene expression, following its phosphorylation at Ser133, via recruitment of the coactivator paralogs CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300. CBP and p300, in turn, appear to mediate target gene induction via their association with RNA polymerase II complexes and via intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activities that mobilize promoter-bound nucleosomes. In addition to cAMP, a wide variety of stimuli, including hypoxia, UV irradiation, and growth factor addition, induce Ser133 phosphorylation with stoichiometry and kinetics comparable to those induced by cAMP. Yet a number of these signals are incapable of promoting target gene activation via CREB phosphorylation per se, suggesting the presence of additional regulatory events either at the level of CREB-CBP complex formation or in the subsequent recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we characterize a Tyr134Phe CREB mutant that behaves as a constitutive activator in vivo. Like protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated wild-type CREB, the Tyr134Phe polypeptide was found to stimulate target gene expression via the Ser133-dependent recruitment of CBP and p300. Biochemical studies reveal that mutation of Tyr134 to Phe lowers the Km for PKA phosphorylation and thereby induces high levels of constitutive Ser133 phosphorylation in vivo. Consistent with its constitutive activity, Tyr134Phe CREB strongly promoted differentiation of PC12 cells in concert with suboptimal doses of nerve growth factor. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Ser133 phosphorylation is sufficient for cellular gene activation and that additional signal-dependent modifications of CBP or p300 are not required for recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus to the promoter. PMID:10825195

  3. Bombesin functionalized gold nanoparticles show in vitro and in vivo cancer receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Nripen; Kattumuri, Vijaya; Shukla, Ravi; Zambre, Ajit; Katti, Kavita; Upendran, Anandhi; Kulkarni, Rajesh R; Kan, Para; Fent, Genevieve M; Casteel, Stan W; Smith, C Jeffrey; Boote, Evan; Robertson, J David; Cutler, Cathy; Lever, John R; Katti, Kattesh V; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2010-05-11

    Development of cancer receptor-specific gold nanoparticles will allow efficient targeting/optimum retention of engineered gold nanoparticles within tumors and thus provide synergistic advantages in oncology as it relates to molecular imaging and therapy. Bombesin (BBN) peptides have demonstrated high affinity toward gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors in vivo that are overexpressed in prostate, breast, and small-cell lung carcinoma. We have synthesized a library of GRP receptor-avid nanoplatforms by conjugating gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with BBN peptides. Cellular interactions and binding affinities (IC(50)) of AuNP-BBN conjugates toward GRP receptors on human prostate cancer cells have been investigated in detail. In vivo studies using AuNP-BBN and its radiolabeled surrogate (198)AuNP-BBN, exhibiting high binding affinity (IC(50) in microgram ranges), provide unequivocal evidence that AuNP-BBN constructs are GRP-receptor-specific showing accumulation with high selectivity in GRP-receptor-rich pancreatic acne in normal mice and also in tumors in prostate-tumor-bearing, severe combined immunodeficient mice. The i.p. mode of delivery has been found to be efficient as AuNP-BBN conjugates showed reduced RES organ uptake with concomitant increase in uptake at tumor targets. The selective uptake of this new generation of GRP-receptor-specific AuNP-BBN peptide analogs has demonstrated realistic clinical potential in molecular imaging via x-ray computed tomography techniques as the contrast numbers in prostate tumor sites are severalfold higher as compared to the pretreatment group (Hounsfield unit = 150). PMID:20410458

  4. Bombesin functionalized gold nanoparticles show in vitro and in vivo cancer receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Nripen; Kattumuri, Vijaya; Shukla, Ravi; Zambre, Ajit; Katti, Kavita; Upendran, Anandhi; Kulkarni, Rajesh R.; Kan, Para; Fent, Genevieve M.; Casteel, Stan W.; Smith, C. Jeffrey; Boote, Evan; Robertson, J. David; Cutler, Cathy; Lever, John R.; Katti, Kattesh V.; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2010-01-01

    Development of cancer receptor-specific gold nanoparticles will allow efficient targeting/optimum retention of engineered gold nanoparticles within tumors and thus provide synergistic advantages in oncology as it relates to molecular imaging and therapy. Bombesin (BBN) peptides have demonstrated high affinity toward gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors in vivo that are overexpressed in prostate, breast, and small-cell lung carcinoma. We have synthesized a library of GRP receptor-avid nanoplatforms by conjugating gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with BBN peptides. Cellular interactions and binding affinities (IC50) of AuNP–BBN conjugates toward GRP receptors on human prostate cancer cells have been investigated in detail. In vivo studies using AuNP–BBN and its radiolabeled surrogate 198AuNP–BBN, exhibiting high binding affinity (IC50 in microgram ranges), provide unequivocal evidence that AuNP–BBN constructs are GRP-receptor-specific showing accumulation with high selectivity in GRP-receptor-rich pancreatic acne in normal mice and also in tumors in prostate-tumor-bearing, severe combined immunodeficient mice. The i.p. mode of delivery has been found to be efficient as AuNP–BBN conjugates showed reduced RES organ uptake with concomitant increase in uptake at tumor targets. The selective uptake of this new generation of GRP-receptor-specific AuNP–BBN peptide analogs has demonstrated realistic clinical potential in molecular imaging via x-ray computed tomography techniques as the contrast numbers in prostate tumor sites are severalfold higher as compared to the pretreatment group (Hounsfield unit = 150). PMID:20410458

  5. Semen analysis and sperm function testing

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Daniel R; Oehninger, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Despite controversy regarding the clinical value of semen analysis, male fertility investigation still relies on a standardized analysis of the semen parameters. This is especially true for infertility clinics in both developing and developed countries. Other optional tests or sophisticated technologies have not been widely applied. The current review addresses important changes in the analysis of semen as described in the new World Health Organization (WHO) manual for semen analysis. The most important change in the manual is the use of evidence-based publications as references to determine cutoff values for normality. Apart from the above mentioned changes, the initial evaluation and handling methods remain, in most instances, the same as in previous editions. Furthermore, the review evaluates the importance of quality control in andrology with emphasis on the evaluation of sperm morphology. WHO sperm morphology training programmes for Sub-Saharan countries were initiated at Tygerberg Hospital in 1995. The external quality control programme has ensured that the majority of participants have maintained their morphological reading skills acquired during initial training. This review reports on current sperm functional tests, such as the induced acrosome reaction, and sperm–zona pellucida binding assays, as well as the impact of sperm quality in terms of DNA integrity, and the relationship of sperm function tests to sperm morphology. PMID:22179512

  6. Analysis of in situ and ex vivo ?V?3 integrin expression during experimental carotid atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuyu; Jiang, Yibo; Sheng, Zulong; Zhang, Yi; An, Yanli; Yan, Fengdi; Ma, Genshan; Liu, Naifeng; Teng, Gaojun; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Objective Mural inflammation has been shown to contribute to the development of plaque, with the ?V?3 integrin highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. We herein examined ?V?3 integrin expression as a function of carotid atherosclerosis formation in the apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE?/?) mouse. Methods and results Constrictive collars were placed around the left common carotid arteries of apo E?/? mice maintained on a high-fat diet (n = 14). Before and 21 days following collar placement, in vivo serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of the carotid aortic diameter were performed using a 7T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Near- infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging was performed (n = 6) using an in vivo imaging system 0–24 hours following administration of 1.0 nmol c(RGDyK)-Cy5.5 via the tail vein. A competition experiment was performed by the co-injection of a saturating dose of bicyclic RGD peptide H-Glu[cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys)]2 (n = 3). Following image acquisition and sacrifice at 24 hours after injection, carotid arteries were harvested for histological analyses. Neointima formation and arterial remodeling in the carotid arteries of apoE?/? mice were induced by the placement of a constrictive collar. Significantly greater fluorescent signals were obtained from constrictive collar left common carotid arteries as compared to uninvolved aortic segments in constrictive collar mice. Binding to stenotic lesions was efficiently blocked in competition experiments. Immunostaining confirmed the presence of mural ?V?3 integrin expression in macrophages in the neointima. Signal intensity increased in a macrophage density-dependent fashion in the stenotic segments. Conclusion Mural ?V?3 integrin expression, as determined using RGD-Cy5.5 near-infrared optical imaging, was increased in carotid arteries with constrictive collars in experimental mice. This expression can estimate the macrophage-bound inflammatory activity of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22334786

  7. Pharmacokinetic and toxicological evaluation of multi-functional thiol-6-fluoro-6-deoxy-d-glucose gold nanoparticles in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Wilson; Xiong, Yeping; Chen, Jie; Yang, Xiaoyan; Song, Kun; Yang, Xiaohong; Kong, Beihua; Wilson, John; Xing, James Z.

    2012-09-01

    We synthesized a novel, multi-functional, radiosensitizing agent by covalently linking 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-d-glucose (6-FDG) to gold nanoparticles (6-FDG-GNPs) via a thiol functional group. We then assessed the bio-distribution and pharmacokinetic properties of 6-FDG-GNPs in vivo using a murine model. At 2 h, following intravenous injection of 6-FDG-GNPs into the murine model, approximately 30% of the 6-FDG-GNPs were distributed to three major organs: the liver, the spleen and the kidney. PEGylation of the 6-FDG-GNPs was found to significantly improve the bio-distribution of 6-FDG-GNPs by avoiding unintentional uptake into these organs, while simultaneously doubling the cellular uptake of GNPs in implanted breast MCF-7 adenocarcinoma. When combined with radiation, PEG-6-FDG-GNPs were found to increase the apoptosis of the MCF-7 breast adenocarinoma cells by radiation both in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that GNPs reach their maximal concentrations at a time window of two to four hours post-injection, during which optimal radiation efficiency can be achieved. PEG-6-FDG-GNPs are thus novel nanoparticles that preferentially accumulate in targeted cancer cells where they act as potent radiosensitizing agents. Future research will aim to substitute the 18F atom into the 6-FDG molecule so that the PEG-6-FDG-GNPs can also function as radiotracers for use in positron emission tomography scanning to aid cancer diagnosis and image guided radiation therapy planning.

  8. In-vivo assessment of patellofemoral joint stress using a finite-element analysis , S. Farrokhi2

    E-print Network

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    and bone. A mesh is then created for the components that allows a finite-element software packageIn-vivo assessment of patellofemoral joint stress using a finite-element analysis approach. J: Subject-specific finite-element models of the patellofemoral joint are used to quantitatively evaluate

  9. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Choong Yong Ung; Siew Hong Lam; Mya Myintzu Hlaing; Cecilia Lanny Winata; Svetlana Korzh; Sinnakaruppan Mathavan; Zhiyuan Gong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mercury is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes detrimental effects to human health. Although the liver has been known to be a main target organ, there is limited information on in vivo molecular mechanism of mercury-induced toxicity in the liver. By using transcriptome analysis, phenotypic anchoring and validation of targeted gene expression in zebrafish, mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated and

  10. The development of a facility for partial body in vivo activation analysis using californium-252 neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Boddy; Ian Robertson; Dimitris Glaros

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the nuclear and physical properties of 252Cf, which is spontaneously fissile, suggests that it is a very suitable radioisotopic source of neutrons for partial body i n vivo activation analysis. A facility is described, which has been developed for use in the clinical environment, and is both simple in construction and operation and economical. The performance in the

  11. P-31-NMR analysis of in vivo metabolic events in lymphoma during RIT

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-05-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is potentially a powerful method for treatment of cancer. The efficacy of radioimmunopharmaceuticals on target tissue were measured serially, in vivo, in the human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RAJI tumor) using P-31 surface coil NMR. During application of a pulse dosage at curative levels I-131-labeled monoclonal antibody (Lym-1) specific for this tumor, approximately 10,000 rads were delivered to the tumor and 3,000 to the kidney. ATP/Pi ratios and tissue pH were determined in these tumors during therapy and correlated with tumor volumes and radiation-induced tissue damage. During the course of these experiments, the authors noted that the effects of the radiation dose, calculated to be curative, are non-uniform throughout the tissue mass. Therefore, regions of the sample have been distinguished on the basis of differing magnetization precessional rates around the spatially dependent B/sub 1/ field. Two-dimensional FT processing yielded a metabolite map as a set of spectra deployed as a function of mapping distance from the surface coil. In this fashion, metabolites within the tissue slice can be spatially defined. This noninvasive determination of metabolic function appears useful in characterizing the extent of radiation-induced necrosis, spontaneous recurrence of tumor tissue, and sequential evaluation of various dose modalities. These data will be useful in optimization of human RIT regimens.

  12. Structure–function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins. PMID:23630077

  13. Optimization of a Model Corrected Blood Input Function from Dynamic FDG-PET Images of Small Animal Heart In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of mouse heart in vivo is challenging due to the small size of the heart and limited intrinsic spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Here, we optimized a compartment model which can simultaneously correct for spill over and partial volume effects for both blood pool and the myocardium, compute kinetic rate parameters and generate model corrected blood input function (MCBIF) from ordered subset expectation maximization – maximum a posteriori (OSEM-MAP) cardiac and respiratory gated 18F-FDG PET images of mouse heart with attenuation correction in vivo, without any invasive blood sampling. Arterial blood samples were collected from a single mouse to indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. In order to establish statistical significance, venous blood samples from n=6 mice were obtained at 2 late time points, when SP contamination from the tissue to the blood is maximum. We observed that correct bounds and initial guesses for the PV and SP coefficients accurately model the wash-in and wash-out dynamics of the tracer from mouse blood. The residual plot indicated an average difference of about 1.7% between the blood samples and MCBIF. The downstream rate of myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki (0.15±0.03 min?1), compared well with Ki obtained from arterial blood samples (P=0.716). In conclusion, the proposed methodology is not only quantitative but also reproducible. PMID:24741130

  14. In Vivo Regulation of NGF-Mediated Functions by Nedd4-2 Ubiquitination of TrkA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Calvo, Laura; Anta, Begoña; López-Benito, Saray; López-Bellido, Roger; Vicente-García, Cristina; Tessarollo, Lino; Rodriguez, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Trk neurotrophin receptor ubiquitination in response to ligand activation regulates signaling, trafficking, and degradation of the receptors. However, the in vivo consequences of Trk ubiquitination remain to be addressed. We have developed a mouse model with a mutation in the TrkA neurotrophin receptor (P782S) that results in reduced ubiquitination due to a lack of binding to the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4-2. In vivo analyses of TrkAP782S indicate that defective ubiquitination of the TrkA mutant results in an altered trafficking and degradation of the receptor that affects the survival of sensory neurons. The dorsal root ganglia from the TrkAP782S knock-in mice display an increased number of neurons expressing CGRP and substance P. Moreover, the mutant mice show enhanced sensitivity to thermal and inflammatory pain. Our results indicate that the ubiquitination of the TrkA neurotrophin receptor plays a critical role in NGF-mediated functions, such as neuronal survival and sensitivity to pain. PMID:24760869

  15. In vivo assessment of corneal barrier function through non-invasive impedance measurements using a flexible probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimera, A.; Illa, X.; Traver, E.; Marchan, S.; Herrero, C.; Lagunas, C.; Maldonado, M. J.; Ivorra, A.; Villa, R.

    2013-04-01

    The cornea is a transparent structure composed of three layers: the epithelium, the stroma and the endothelium. To maintain its ransparency the stroma remains in a constant state of dehydration. Consequently, any ion flow disorder through the covering layers can compromise the barrier function and, therefore the corneal homeostasis. Since ionic permeability has a fundamental impact on the passive electrical properties of living tissues, in this work it is proposed and demonstrated a diagnosis method based on tetrapolar impedance measurements performed by electrodes placed on the corneal surface. The contribution of each cornea layer to the total measured impedance has been analysed over a frequency range. Following the obtained guidelines, a flexible probe with integrated electrodes has been developed and manufactured using SU-8 photoresin. The feasibility of the proposed method has been evaluated in vivo by monitoring corneal epithelium wound healing. Obtained impedance measurements have been compared with measurements of permeability to sodium fluorescein from different excised corneas. Successful results demonstrate the feasibility of this novel flexible sensor and its capability to quantify corneal permeability in vivo in a noninvasive way.

  16. Toll-like receptor 3 regulates cord blood-derived endothelial cell function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grelier, Aurore; Cras, Audrey; Balitrand, Nicole; Delmau, Catherine; Lecourt, Séverine; Lepelletier, Yves; Riesterer, Hélène; Freida, Delphine; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Lebousse-Kerdiles, Marie-Caroline; Cuccini, Wendy; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Uzan, Georges; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie

    2013-10-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPC) are capable of homing to neovascularisation sites, in which they proliferate and differentiate into endothelial cells. Transplantation of cEPC-derived cells, in particular those isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB), has emerged as a promising approach in the treatment of cardio-vascular diseases. After in vivo transplantation, these cells may be exposed to local or systemic inflammation or pathogens, of which they are a common target. Because Toll-like receptors (TLR) are critical in detecting pathogens and in initiating inflammatory responses, we hypothesized that TLR may govern UCB cEPC-derived cells function. While these cells expressed almost all TLR, we found that only TLR3 dramatically impaired cell properties. TLR3 activation inhibited cell proliferation, modified cell cycle entry, impaired the in vitro angiogenic properties and induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The anti-angiogenic effect of TLR3 activation was confirmed in vivo in a hind-limb ischemic mice model. Moreover, TLR3 activation consistently leads to an upregulation of miR-29b, -146a and -155 and to a deregulation of cytoskeleton and cell cycle regulator. Hence, TLR3 activation is likely to be a key regulator of cEPC-derived cells properties. PMID:23748743

  17. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ward

    2009-03-31

    Sucrose is the main photosynthetic product that is transported in the vasculature of plants. The long-distance transport of carbohydrates is required to support the growth and development of net-importing (sink) tissues such as fruit, seeds and roots. This project is focused on understanding the transport mechanism sucrose transporters (SUTs). These are proton-coupled sucrose uptake transporters (membrane proteins) that are required for transport of sucrose in the vasculature and uptake into sink tissues. The accomplishments of this project included: 1) the first analysis of substrate specificity for any SUT. This was accomplished using electrophysiology to analyze AtSUC2, a sucrose transporter from companion cells in Arabidopsis. 2) the first analysis of the transport activity for a monocot SUT. The transport kinetics and substrate specificity of HvSUT1 from barley were studied. 3) the first analysis of a sucrose transporter from sugarcane. and 4) the first analysis of transport activity of a sugar alcohol transporter homolog from plants, AtPLT5. During this period four primary research papers, funded directly by the project, were published in refereed journals. The characterization of several sucrose transporters was essential for the current effort in the analysis of structure/function for this gene family. In particular, the demonstration of strong differences in substrate specificity between type I and II SUTs was important to identify targets for site-directed mutagenesis.

  18. Functional analysis of inappropriate mealtime behaviors.

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Brown, Kimberly A; Shore, Bridget A; Patel, Meeta R; Katz, Richard M; Sevin, Bart M; Gulotta, Charles S; Blakely-Smith, Audrey

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to apply the functional analysis described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982/1994) to the inappropriate mealtime behaviors of 15 children who had been referred to an intensive program for the assessment and treatment of severe feeding disorders. During Study 1, we conducted descriptive assessments of children and parents during meals. The results of Study 1 showed that parents used the following consequences for inappropriate mealtime behaviors: coaxing and reprimanding, allowing the child to periodically take a break from or avoid eating, and giving the child preferred food or toys following inappropriate behavior. The effects of these consequences were tested systematically in Study 2 when we conducted analogue functional analyses with the children. During alternating meals, one of the consequences typically used by parents consistently followed inappropriate child behavior. Results indicated that these consequences actually worsened behavior for 10 of the 15 children (67%). These results suggested that the analogue functional analysis described by Iwata et al. may be useful in identifying the environmental events that play a role in feeding disorders. PMID:12858984

  19. Antisense peptide nucleic acid-functionalized cationic nanocomplex for in vivo mRNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuefei; Shrestha, Ritu; Ibricevic, Aida; Gunsten, Sean P.; Welch, Michael J.; Wooley, Karen L.; Brody, Steven L.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Liu, Yongjian

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complex syndrome with many aetiologies, resulting in the upregulation of inflammatory mediators in the host, followed by dyspnoea, hypoxemia and pulmonary oedema. A central mediator is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) that drives the production of NO and continued inflammation. Thus, it is useful to have diagnostic and therapeutic agents for targeting iNOS expression. One general approach is to target the precursor iNOS mRNA with antisense nucleic acids. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have many advantages that make them an ideal platform for development of antisense theranostic agents. Their membrane impermeability, however, limits biological applications. Here, we report the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabelled antisense PNA-YR9 · oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) hybrid and a cationic shell-cross-linked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK). The Y (tyrosine) residue was used for 123I radiolabelling, whereas the R9 (arginine9) peptide was included to facilitate cell exit of untargeted PNA. Complete binding of the antisense PNA-YR9 · ODN hybrid to the cSCK was achieved at an 8 : 1 cSCK amine to ODN phosphate (N/P) ratio by a gel retardation assay. The antisense PNA-YR9 · ODN · cSCK nanocomplexes efficiently entered RAW264.7 cells, whereas the PNA-YR9 · ODN alone was not taken up. Low concentrations of 123I-labelled antisense PNA-YR9 · ODN complexed with cSCK showed significantly higher retention of radioactivity when iNOS was induced in lipopolysaccharide+interferon-?-activated RAW264.7 cells when compared with a mismatched PNA. Moreover, statistically, greater retention of radioactivity from the antisense complex was also observed in vivo in an iNOS-induced mouse lung after intratracheal administration of the nanocomplexes. This study demonstrates the specificity and sensitivity by which the radiolabelled nanocomplexes can detect iNOS mRNA in vitro and in vivo and their potential for early diagnosis of ALI. PMID:24427537

  20. Microarray analysis in rat liver slices correctly predicts in vivo hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L. [Department of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Delivery, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.G.L.Elferink@rug.nl; Olinga, P.; Draaisma, A.L.; Merema, M.T. [Department of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Delivery, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J. [Molecular Design and Informatics, NV Organon part of Schering-Plough Corporation, Oss (Netherlands); Schoonen, W.G. [Pharmacology, NV Organon part of Schering-Plough Corporation, Oss (Netherlands); Groothuis, G.M.M. [Department of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Delivery, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    The microarray technology, developed for the simultaneous analysis of a large number of genes, may be useful for the detection of toxicity in an early stage of the development of new drugs. The effect of different hepatotoxins was analyzed at the gene expression level in the rat liver both in vivo and in vitro. As in vitro model system the precision-cut liver slice model was used, in which all liver cell types are present in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process involving not only hepatocytes but also other cell types such as Kupffer and stellate cells. As model toxic compounds lipopolysaccharide (LPS, inducing inflammation), paracetamol (necrosis), carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}, fibrosis and necrosis) and gliotoxin (apoptosis) were used. The aim of this study was to validate the rat liver slice system as in vitro model system for drug-induced toxicity studies. The results of the microarray studies show that the in vitro profiles of gene expression cluster per compound and incubation time, and when analyzed in a commercial gene expression database, can predict the toxicity and pathology observed in vivo. Each toxic compound induces a specific pattern of gene expression changes. In addition, some common genes were up- or down-regulated with all toxic compounds. These data show that the rat liver slice system can be an appropriate tool for the prediction of multi-cellular liver toxicity. The same experiments and analyses are currently performed for the prediction of human specific toxicity using human liver slices.

  1. Inverse computational analysis of in vivo corneal elastic modulus change after collagen crosslinking for keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Sinha Roy, Abhijit; Rocha, Karol M.; Randleman, J. Bradley; Stulting, R. Doyle; Dupps, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal collagen crosslinking with riboflavin photosensitization and ultraviolet irradiation is a novel approach to limiting the progression of keratoconus in patients by increasing the elastic modulus of the degenerate cornea. Beneficial reductions in corneal steepness and aberrations after crosslinking also frequently occur. In a previous study, we described a computational modeling approach to simulating topographic progression in keratoconus and regression of disease with corneal collagen crosslinking. In the current study, this model has been expanded and applied to the inverse problem of estimating longitudinal time-dependent changes in the corneal elastic modulus after crosslinking using in vivo measurements from 16 human eyes. Topography measured before crosslinking was used to construct a patient-specific finite element model with assumed hyperelastic properties. Then the properties of the cornea were altered using an inverse optimization method to minimize the difference between the model-predicted and in vivo corneal shape after crosslinking. Effects of assumptions regarding sclera-to-cornea elastic modulus ratio and spatial attenuation of treatment effect due to ultraviolet beam characteristics on the predicted change in elastic modulus were also investigated. Corneal property changes computed by inverse finite element analysis provided excellent geometric agreement with clinical topography measurements in patient eyes post-crosslinking. Over all post-treatment time points, the estimated increase in corneal elastic modulus was 110.8±48.1%, and slightly less stiffening was required to produce the same amount of corneal topographic regression of disease when the sclera-to-cornea modulus ratio was increased. Including the effect of beam attenuation resulted in greater estimates of stiffening in the anterior cornea. Corneal shape responses to crosslinking varied considerably and emphasize the importance of a patient-specific approach. PMID:23664859

  2. The N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea-Induced Goldenticket Mouse Mutant Reveals an Essential Function of Sting in the In Vivo Interferon Response to Listeria monocytogenes and Cyclic Dinucleotides ?

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, John-Demian; Sotelo-Troha, Katia; von Moltke, Jakob; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Rae, Chris S.; Brubaker, Sky W.; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Woodward, Joshua J.; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Vance, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are central regulators of the innate and adaptive immune responses to viral and bacterial infections. Type I IFNs are induced upon cytosolic detection of microbial nucleic acids, including DNA, RNA, and the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). In addition, a recent study demonstrated that the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes stimulates a type I IFN response due to cytosolic detection of bacterially secreted c-di-AMP. The transmembrane signaling adaptor Sting (Tmem173, Mita, Mpys, Eris) has recently been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs in response to cytosolic DNA and/or RNA. However, the role of Sting in response to purified cyclic dinucleotides or during in vivo L. monocytogenes infection has not been addressed. In order to identify genes important in the innate immune response, we have been conducting a forward genetic mutagenesis screen in C57BL/6 mice using the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Here we describe a novel mutant mouse strain, Goldenticket (Gt), that fails to produce type I IFNs upon L. monocytogenes infection. By genetic mapping and complementation experiments, we found that Gt mice harbor a single nucleotide variant (T596A) of Sting that functions as a null allele and fails to produce detectable protein. Analysis of macrophages isolated from Gt mice revealed that Sting is absolutely required for the type I interferon response to both c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Additionally, Sting is required for the response to c-di-GMP and L. monocytogenes in vivo. Our results provide new functions for Sting in the innate interferon response to pathogens. PMID:21098106

  3. Genome-scale functional characterization of Drosophila developmental enhancers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kvon, Evgeny Z; Kazmar, Tomas; Stampfel, Gerald; Yáñez-Cuna, J Omar; Pagani, Michaela; Schernhuber, Katharina; Dickson, Barry J; Stark, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are crucial regulators of gene expression and animal development and the characterization of their genomic organization, spatiotemporal activities and sequence properties is a key goal in modern biology. Here we characterize the in vivo activity of 7,705 Drosophila melanogaster enhancer candidates covering 13.5% of the non-coding non-repetitive genome throughout embryogenesis. 3,557 (46%) candidates are active, suggesting a high density with 50,000 to 100,000 developmental enhancers genome-wide. The vast majority of enhancers display specific spatial patterns that are highly dynamic during development. Most appear to regulate their neighbouring genes, suggesting that the cis-regulatory genome is organized locally into domains, which are supported by chromosomal domains, insulator binding and genome evolution. However, 12 to 21 per cent of enhancers appear to skip non-expressed neighbours and regulate a more distal gene. Finally, we computationally identify cis-regulatory motifs that are predictive and required for enhancer activity, as we validate experimentally. This work provides global insights into the organization of an animal regulatory genome and the make-up of enhancer sequences and confirms and generalizes principles from previous studies. All enhancer patterns are annotated manually with a controlled vocabulary and all results are available through a web interface (http://enhancers.starklab.org), including the raw images of all microscopy slides for manual inspection at arbitrary zoom levels. PMID:24896182

  4. Ex vivo generation of functional immune cells by mitochondria-targeted photosensitization of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marrache, Sean; Tundup, Smanla; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the immune system for potent immune therapy against cancer is potentially a revolutionary method to eradicate cancer. Tumors stimulated with photosensitizers (PSs) not only kill cancer cells but also help to boost the immune system. We recently reported that tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generated by delivery of a mitochondria-acting PS zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to MCF-7 breast cancer cells followed by laser irradiation can lead to ex vivo stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). The antigens generated from the breast cancer cells were also found to cause significant DC maturation and the activated DCs were able to stimulate T cells to cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. In this protocol, we describe methods to engineer a mitochondria-targeted biodegradable nanoparticle (NP) formulation, T-ZnPc-NPs for delivery of ZnPc to the mitochondria of MCF-7 cells, subsequent photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a long wavelength laser irradiation to produce TAAs, DC stimulation by the TAAs to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-?), and matured DC-driven T-cell activation. PMID:25634271

  5. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption ?a and reduced scattering coefficient ?s' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of ?a and ?s' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that ?a ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and ?s' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  6. Real-time molecular profiling of photochemically induced rat thrombosis in vivo through quantitative Raman analysis of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. M.; Shen, A. G.; Yao, H. L.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Hu, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    A device of an animal thrombosis model in vivo coupled with a Raman system for near-surface blood vessels is proposed in this letter. The dual-function set up is capable of simultaneously establishing a photochemically induced artificial thrombus model and collecting in vivo Raman data of both arterial and venous blood, and it provides the first observation of rat thrombosis under the physiological conditions from the beginning to the final form. The real-time and quantitative molecular profiling of flowing blood and the spectra of blood cells in the process of thrombosis provides an insight into the occurring mechanism of thrombosis and a promising method for the in vivo screening of new antithrombotic and thrombolytic drugs.

  7. Polymer Fiber Probes Enable Optical Control of Spinal Cord and Muscle Function In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Lu, Chi

    Restoration of motor and sensory functions in paralyzed patients requires the development of tools for simultaneous recording and stimulation of neural activity in the spinal cord. In addition to its complex neurophysiology, ...

  8. Measurement and analysis of chemically changed mineral fibers after experiments in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Spurny, K R

    1983-01-01

    Asbestos, as well as other natural and man-made mineral fibers used for in vitro and in vivo experiments, must be described and defined physically and chemically as exactly as possible before any application. The interactions of fibers with the physical, chemical (air, water, etc.) and biological (cells, tissues, etc.) environments cause important changes in fiber chemistry and crystalline structure. Also, these should be detected as precisely as possible after each experiment. Our recent investigations dealt with the development of a complex analytical system for such measurements and with some applications of these analytical procedures for fibrous material sampled in the environment and from biological materials. Chemical and physical microanalyses of asbestos and glass fibers obtained by environmental sampling (air, water) and from human and animal tissue have shown chemical and crystalline changes in these particles. Scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and mass spectrometry analysis were used in these investigations. A partial or total leakage of elements could be observed. The leakage of elements in fibers is of a statistical nature. Some fibers remained chemically unchanged; in some fibers some elements were partially leached; and in some fibers the majority of metallic elements were leached. The potential meaning of this effect is also discussed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 12. PMID:6315377

  9. Hybrid fusions show that inter-monomer electron transfer robustly supports cytochrome bc1 function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ekiert, Robert; Czapla, Monika; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Electronic connection between Qo and Qi quinone catalytic sites of dimeric cytochrome bc1 is a central feature of the energy-conserving Q cycle. While both the intra- and inter-monomer electron transfers were shown to connect the sites in the enzyme, mechanistic and physiological significance of the latter remains unclear. Here, using a series of mutated hybrid cytochrome bc1-like complexes, we show that inter-monomer electron transfer robustly sustains the function of the enzyme in vivo, even when the two subunits in a dimer come from different species. This indicates that minimal requirement for bioenergetic efficiency is to provide a chain of cofactors for uncompromised electron flux between the catalytic sites, while the details of protein scaffold are secondary. PMID:25089001

  10. DNAM-1-based chimeric antigen receptors enhance T cell effector function and exhibit in vivo efficacy against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; Alcon, Andre; Sentman, Charles L

    2015-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies hold great potential for treating cancers, and new CARs that can target multiple tumor types and have the potential to target non-hematological malignancies are needed. In this study, the tumor recognition ability of a natural killer cell-activating receptor, DNAM-1 was harnessed to design CARs that target multiple tumor types. DNAM-1 ligands, PVR and nectin-2, are expressed on primary human leukemia, myeloma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. DNAM-1 CARs exhibit high tumor cell cytotoxicity but low IFN-? secretion in vitro. In contrast to other CAR designs, co-stimulatory domains did not improve the expression and function of DNAM-1 CARs. A DNAM-1/CD3zeta CAR reduced tumor burden in a murine melanoma model in vivo. In conclusion, DNAM-1-based CARs may have the potential to treat PVR and nectin-2 expressing hematological and solid tumors. PMID:25549845

  11. Spin dependent fragmentation functions analysis at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, A. [RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Seidl, R. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1100 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Hasuko, K. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2007-06-13

    The chiral-odd fragmentation functions (FF) play an important role in the understanding of the transverse structure of the nucleon. Additionally the so-called Collins FF seems to be closely connected to the QCD vacuum itself. HERMES has given a first hint that this FF is nonzero, however in order to measure the quark transversity one needs these FFs to be precisely known. We have updated the previous analysis from 29.0 fb-1 to 547 fb-1 of data collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e+e- collider to measure azimuthal asymmetries for different charge combinations of pion pairs and thus access the Collins FF.

  12. Downregulation of the Antigen Presenting Cell Function(s) of Pulmonary Dendritic Cells In Vivo by Resident Alveolar Macrophages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick G. Holt; Jane Oliver; Natalie Bilyk; Christine McMenamin; Paul G. McMenamin; Georg Kraal

    1993-01-01

    Sllnllnal~ Class II major histocompatibility complex (Ia)-bearing dendritic cells (DC) from airway epithelium and lung parenchyma express low-moderate antigen presenting cell (APC) activity when freshly isolated. However, this function is markedly upregulated during overnight culture in a manner analogous to epidermal Langerhans cells. The in vitro \\

  13. FFTF Plant transition function analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.P.; FFTF Working Group

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and function hierarchy charts that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate FFTF.

  14. Enhanced Control of In Vivo Bone Formation with Surface Functionalized Alginate Microbeads Incorporating Heparin and Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Liu, Jing; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a surface functionalization delivery platform incorporating heparin onto strontium alginate microbeads surfaces would convert this “naive carriers” into “mini-reservoirs” for localized in vivo delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) that will induce functional bone regeneration. In vitro evaluation confirmed that (1) heparin incorporation could immobilize and prolong rhBMP-2 release for approximately 3 weeks; (2) a significant decrease (p<0.01) in rhBMP-2 burst release is attainable depending on initial protein load; and (3) rhBMP-2 released from surface functionalized microbeads retained bioactivity and stimulated higher alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured C2C12 cells when compared with daily administration of fresh bolus rhBMP-2. Subsequently, surface functionalized microbeads were used for in vivo delivery of rhBMP-2 at local sites of posterolateral spinal fusion surgery in rats. The microbeads were loaded into the pores of medical-grade polyepsilone caprolactone-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds before implantation. Results revealed robust bone formation and a biomechanically solid fusion after 6 weeks. When compared with a control group consisting of an equivalent amount of rhBMP-2 that was directly adsorbed onto bare-surfaced microbeads with no heparin, a 5.3-fold increase in bone volume fraction and a 2.6-fold increase in bending stiffness (flexion/extension) were observed. When compared with collagen sponge carriers of rhBMP-2, a 1.5-fold and a 1.3-fold increase in bone volume fraction and bending stiffness were observed, respectively. More importantly, 3D micro-computed tomography images enabled the visualization of a well-contained newly formed bone at ipsilateral implant sites with surface functionalized rhBMP-2 delivery. This was absent with collagen sponge carriers where newly formed bone tissue was poorly contained and crossed over the posterior midline to contralateral implants. These findings are important because of complications with current rhBMP-2 delivery method, including excessive, uncontrolled bone formation. PMID:22894570

  15. In Vivo Inflammatory Effects of Ceria Nanoparticles on CD-1 Mouse: Evaluation by Hematological, Histological, and TEM Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poma, Anna; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; de Lapuente, Joaquin; Ramos, David; Borras, Miquel; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Santucci, Sandro; De Marzi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The attention on CeO2-NPs environmental and in vivo effects is due to their presence in diesel exhaust and in diesel filters that release a more water-soluble form of ceria NPs, as well as to their use for medical applications. In this work, acute and subacute in vivo toxicity assays demonstrate no lethal effect of these NPs. Anyhow, performing in vivo evaluations on CD-1 mouse systems, we demonstrate that it is even not correct to assert that ceria NPs are harmless for living systems as they can induce status of inflammation, revealed by hematological-chemical-clinical assays as well as histological and TEM microscope observations. TEM analysis showed the presence of NPs in alveolar macrophages. Histological evaluation demonstrated the NPs presence in lungs tissues and this can be explained by assuming their ability to go into the blood stream and lately into the organs (generating inflammation). PMID:25032226

  16. Identification of Tissue Cyst Wall Components by Transcriptome Analysis of In Vivo and In Vitro Toxoplasma gondii Bradyzoites ? †

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Kerry R.; Fritz, Heather M.; Chen, Xiucui; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Rocke, David M.; Ferguson, David J.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite is essential to establish persistent infection, yet little is known about what factors this developmental form secretes to establish the cyst or interact with its host cell. To identify candidate bradyzoite-secreted effectors, the transcriptomes of in vitro tachyzoites 2 days postinfection, in vitro bradyzoites 4 days postinfection, and in vivo bradyzoites 21 days postinfection were interrogated by microarray, and the program SignalP was used to identify signal peptides indicating secretion. One hundred two putative bradyzoite-secreted effectors were identified by this approach. Two candidates, bradyzoite pseudokinase 1 and microneme adhesive repeat domain-containing protein 4, were chosen for further investigation and confirmed to be induced and secreted by bradyzoites in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we report the first analysis of the transcriptomes of in vitro and in vivo bradyzoites and identify two new protein components of the Toxoplasma tissue cyst wall. PMID:22021236

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotube reinforced scaffolds for bone regenerative engineering: fabrication, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mikael, Paiyz E; Amini, Ami R; Basu, Joysurya; Josefina Arellano-Jimenez, M; Laurencin, Cato T; Sanders, Mary M; Barry Carter, C; Nukavarapu, Syam P

    2014-06-01

    Designing biodegradable scaffolds with bone-compatible mechanical properties has been a significant challenge in the field of bone tissue engineering and regenerative engineering. The objective of this work is to improve the polymeric scaffold's mechanical strength by compositing it with mechanically superior carbon nanotubes. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microsphere scaffolds exhibit mechanical properties in the range of human cancellous bone. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes have outstanding mechanical properties. The aim of this study is to improve further the mechanical strength of PLGA scaffolds such that they may be applicable for a wide range of load-bearing repair and regeneration applications. We have formed composite microspheres of PLGA containing pristine and modified (with hydroxyl (OH), carboxylic acid (COOH)) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and fabricated them into three-dimensional porous scaffolds. Results show that by adding only 3% MWCNTs, the compressive strength and modulus was significantly increased (35 MPa, 510.99 MPa) compared to pure PLGA scaffolds (19 MPa and 166.38 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy images showed excellent cell adhesion and proliferation. In vitro studies exhibited good cell viability, proliferation and mineralization. The in vivo study, however, indicated differences in inflammatory response throughout the 12 weeks of implantation, with OH-modified MWCNTs having the least response, followed by unmodified and COOH-modified exhibiting a more pronounced response. Overall, our results show that PLGA scaffolds containing water-dispersible MWCNTs are mechanically stronger and display good cellular and tissue compatibility, and hence are potential candidates for load-bearing bone tissue engineering. PMID:24687391

  18. Functional Analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans Kinome

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Osmani, Aysha H.; Andrews, Peter; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungi are an ecologically important group of organisms which also have important industrial applications but devastating effects as pathogens and agents of food spoilage. Protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of virtually all biological processes but how they regulate filamentous fungal specific processes is not understood. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has long been utilized as a powerful molecular genetic system and recent technical advances have made systematic approaches to study large gene sets possible. To enhance A. nidulans functional genomics we have created gene deletion constructs for 9851 genes representing 93.3% of the encoding genome. To illustrate the utility of these constructs, and advance the understanding of fungal kinases, we have systematically generated deletion strains for 128 A. nidulans kinases including expanded groups of 15 histidine kinases, 7 SRPK (serine-arginine protein kinases) kinases and an interesting group of 11 filamentous fungal specific kinases. We defined the terminal phenotype of 23 of the 25 essential kinases by heterokaryon rescue and identified phenotypes for 43 of the 103 non-essential kinases. Uncovered phenotypes ranged from almost no growth for a small number of essential kinases implicated in processes such as ribosomal biosynthesis, to conditional defects in response to cellular stresses. The data provide experimental evidence that previously uncharacterized kinases function in the septation initiation network, the cell wall integrity and the morphogenesis Orb6 kinase signaling pathways, as well as in pathways regulating vesicular trafficking, sexual development and secondary metabolism. Finally, we identify ChkC as a third effector kinase functioning in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. The identification of many previously unknown functions for kinases through the functional analysis of the A. nidulans kinome illustrates the utility of the A. nidulans gene deletion constructs. PMID:23505451

  19. Proliferation of Functional Hair Cells in Vivo in the Absence of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Cyrille; Huang, Mingqian; Karimi, Kambiz; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Hinds, Philip W.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.; Corey, David P.; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2005-02-01

    In mammals, hair cell loss causes irreversible hearing and balance impairment because hair cells are terminally differentiated and do not regenerate spontaneously. By profiling gene expression in developing mouse vestibular organs, we identified the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) as a candidate regulator of cell cycle exit in hair cells. Differentiated and functional mouse hair cells with a targeted deletion of Rb1 undergo mitosis, divide, and cycle, yet continue to become highly differentiated and functional. Moreover, acute loss of Rb1 in postnatal hair cells caused cell cycle reentry. Manipulation of the pRb pathway may ultimately lead to mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  20. Depletion of retinal dopamine does not affect the ERG b-wave increment threshold function in goldfish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z S; Yazulla, S

    1994-01-01

    Increment threshold functions of the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave were obtained from goldfish using an in vivo preparation to study intraretinal mechanisms underlying the increase in perceived brightness induced by depletion of retinal dopamine by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Goldfish received unilateral intraocular injections of 6-OHDA plus pargyline on successive days. Depletion of retinal dopamine was confirmed by the absence of tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity at 2 to 3 weeks postinjection as compared to sham-injected eyes from the same fish. There was no difference among normal, sham-injected or 6-OHDA-injected eyes with regard to ERG waveform, intensity-response functions or increment threshold functions. Dopamine-depleted eyes showed a Purkinje shift, that is, a transition from rod-to-cone dominated vision with increasing levels of adaptation. We conclude (1) dopamine-depleted eyes are capable of photopic vision; and (2) the ERG b-wave is not diagnostic for luminosity coding at photopic backgrounds. We also predict that (1) dopamine is not required for the transition from scotopic to photopic vision in goldfish; (2) the ERG b-wave in goldfish is influenced by chromatic interactions; (3) horizontal cell spinules, though correlated with photopic mechanisms in the fish retina, are not necessary for the transition from scotopic to photopic vision; and (4) the OFF pathway, not the ON pathway, is involved in the action of dopamine on luminosity coding in the retina. PMID:7918220

  1. The ex-vivo intestinal absorption rate of uranium is a two-phase function of supply.

    PubMed

    Konietzka, Rainer; Heinze, Rita; Seiwert, Margarete; Dieter, Hermann H

    2014-07-01

    The concentration-dependent absorption behaviour of uranium was investigated with surviving intestinal segments of rat jejunums, using an ex-vivo model. The results showed a monotonic slightly nonlinear increase in absorption as uranium concentrations increased. This trend was observed over the entire concentration range tested. In the lower concentration range a slower linear ascent was observed while a steeper linear ascent was found for the higher concentration range. Statistical fit was only slightly poorer for an exponential function in the range of lower values and a logarithmic function in the range of higher values. The proportion of uranium absorbed expressed as percent of uranium concentrations in the perfusion solutions followed a monotonically increasing trend from 20 to around 200 ?g/l uranium in the perfusion solutions, which thereafter appears to reach a plateau, as further increase towards concentrations around 400 ?g/l is not substantial. The uranium concentration administered had no effect on the vitality and consequently the functionality of the intestinal segments, measured in terms of active glucose transport. The results imply that uranium concentrations of more than 20 ?g/l in drinking water, for example, could lead to elevated absorption rates and thus to higher internal exposures to consider when setting of Guideline values in this concentration range. PMID:24793262

  2. Functional analysis of 11 novel GBA alleles.

    PubMed

    Malini, Erika; Grossi, Serena; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Parini, Rossella; Dominisini, Silvia; Cariati, Roberta; Zampieri, Stefania; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficiency of the acid ?-glucosidase, encoded by the GBA gene. In this study, we report the structural and functional characterization of 11 novel GBA alleles. Seven single missense alleles, P159S, N188I, E235K, P245T, W312S, S366R and W381C, and two alleles carrying in cis mutations, (N188S; G265R) and (E326K; D380N), were studied for enzyme activity in transiently transfected cells. All mutants were inactive except the P159S, which retained 15% of wild-type activity. To further characterize the alleles carrying two in cis mutations, we expressed constructs bearing singly each mutation. The presence of G265R or D380N mutations completely abolished enzyme activity, while N188S and E326K mutants retained 25 and 54% of wild-type activity, respectively. Two mutations, affecting the acceptor splice site of introns 5 (c.589-1G>A) and 9 (c.1389-1G>A), led to the synthesis of aberrant mRNA. Unpredictably, family studies showed that two alleles resulted from germline or 'de novo' mutations. These results strengthen the importance of performing a complete and accurate molecular analysis of the GBA gene in order to avoid misleading conclusions and provide a comprehensive functional analysis of new GBA mutations. PMID:24022302

  3. Functional analysis of 11 novel GBA alleles

    PubMed Central

    Malini, Erika; Grossi, Serena; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Parini, Rossella; Dominisini, Silvia; Cariati, Roberta; Zampieri, Stefania; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficiency of the acid ?-glucosidase, encoded by the GBA gene. In this study, we report the structural and functional characterization of 11 novel GBA alleles. Seven single missense alleles, P159S, N188I, E235K, P245T, W312S, S366R and W381C, and two alleles carrying in cis mutations, (N188S; G265R) and (E326K; D380N), were studied for enzyme activity in transiently transfected cells. All mutants were inactive except the P159S, which retained 15% of wild-type activity. To further characterize the alleles carrying two in cis mutations, we expressed constructs bearing singly each mutation. The presence of G265R or D380N mutations completely abolished enzyme activity, while N188S and E326K mutants retained 25 and 54% of wild-type activity, respectively. Two mutations, affecting the acceptor splice site of introns 5 (c.589-1G>A) and 9 (c.1389-1G>A), led to the synthesis of aberrant mRNA. Unpredictably, family studies showed that two alleles resulted from germline or ‘de novo' mutations. These results strengthen the importance of performing a complete and accurate molecular analysis of the GBA gene in order to avoid misleading conclusions and provide a comprehensive functional analysis of new GBA mutations. PMID:24022302

  4. DISCRETE FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS TOOLS FOR DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS WITH APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DISCRETE FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS TOOLS FOR DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS WITH APPLICATION functional analysis tools are used to prove the conver- gence of Discontinuous Galerkin approximations and a conservative one based on a nonstandard modification of the pressure. 1. Introduction Discontinuous Galerkin

  5. Genetic and Molecular In Vivo Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus Assembly in Murine Visual System Neurons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer H. LaVail; Andrew N. Tauscher; James W. Hicks; Ons Harrabi; Gregory T. Melroe; David M. Knipe

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infects both epithelial cells and neuronal cells of the human host. Although HSV assembly has been studied extensively for cultured epithelial and neuronal cells, cultured neurons are bio- chemically, physiologically, and anatomically significantly different than mature neurons in vivo. Therefore, it is imperative that viral maturation and assembly be studied in vivo. To study viral assembly

  6. IN VITRO/IN VIVO COMPARISON OF YOLK SAC FUNCTION AND EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yolk sac function and development of rat embryos grown in vitro for 24 hrs starting on day 10.5 were compared to those of embryos grown in utero. he embryos grown in vitro had significantly fewer somites, shorter crown-rump length and smaller yolk sac diameter when compared to th...

  7. Correlation of mitochondrial form and function in vivo: Microinjection of substrate and nucleotides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muriel J. Ord; Robert A. Smith

    1982-01-01

    Summary  Microinjection of adenine nucleotides and substrates into the cytoplasm of Amoeba proteus followed by EM examination has been used in an attempt to relate alterations in mitochondrial morphology with functional changes. Contracted mitochondria with dark matrix and wide cristae (Type I), and expanded mitochondria with light matrix and narrower cristae (Type II) coexist in normal active amoebae, but their numbers

  8. The human protein Hugl-1 substitutes for Drosophila Lethal giant larvae tumour suppressor function in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela Grifoni; Flavio Garoia; Christoph C Schimanski; Gösta Schmitz; Elisa Laurenti; Peter R Galle; Annalisa Pession; Sandro Cavicchi; Dennis Strand

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila lethal giant larvae (lgl), discs large (dlg) and scribble (scrib) are tumour suppressor genes acting in a common pathway, whose loss of function leads to disruption of cell polarity and tissue architecture, uncontrolled proliferation and growth of neoplastic lesions. Mammalian homologues of these genes are highly conserved and evidence is emerging concerning their role in cell proliferation control and

  9. In vivo analysis of Purkinje cell firing properties during postnatal mouse development.

    PubMed

    Arancillo, Marife; White, Joshua J; Lin, Tao; Stay, Trace L; Sillitoe, Roy V

    2015-01-15

    Purkinje cell activity is essential for controlling motor behavior. During motor behavior Purkinje cells fire two types of action potentials: simple spikes that are generated intrinsically and complex spikes that are induced by climbing fiber inputs. Although the functions of these spikes are becoming clear, how they are established is still poorly understood. Here, we used in vivo electrophysiology approaches conducted in anesthetized and awake mice to record Purkinje cell activity starting from the second postnatal week of development through to adulthood. We found that the rate of complex spike firing increases sharply at 3 wk of age whereas the rate of simple spike firing gradually increases until 4 wk of age. We also found that compared with adult, the pattern of simple spike firing during development is more irregular as the cells tend to fire in bursts that are interrupted by long pauses. The regularity in simple spike firing only reached maturity at 4 wk of age. In contrast, the adult complex spike pattern was already evident by the second week of life, remaining consistent across all ages. Analyses of Purkinje cells in alert behaving mice suggested that the adult patterns are attained more than a week after the completion of key morphogenetic processes such as migration, lamination, and foliation. Purkinje cell activity is therefore dynamically sculpted throughout postnatal development, traversing several critical events that are required for circuit formation. Overall, we show that simple spike and complex spike firing develop with unique developmental trajectories. PMID:25355961

  10. Functional Analysis of the Cooled Rat Testis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. ZHANG; R. V. SHORT; T. MEEHAN; D. M. DE KRETSER; M. B. RENFREE; K. L. LOVELAND

    2004-01-01

    Direct cooling of the testis results in the depletion of most germ cells in vivo. Germ cell-depleted testes are now com- monly used to investigate spermatogenic regeneration and can serve as recipients for germ cell transplantation. The present study explored the effects of cooling rat testes on the depletion of endog- enous germ cells, spermatogenic regeneration, and Sertoli cell func-

  11. Tomato Functional Genomics Database: a comprehensive resource and analysis package

    E-print Network

    Klee, Harry J.

    Tomato Functional Genomics Database: a comprehensive resource and analysis package for tomato, 2010 ABSTRACT Tomato Functional Genomics Database (TFGD) provides a comprehensive resource to store, query, mine, analyze, visualize and integrate large-scale tomato functional genomics data sets

  12. In Vivo Maturation of Functional Renal Organoids Formed from Embryonic Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Valentina; Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Mauro; Corna, Daniela; Azzollini, Nadia; Conti, Sara; Unbekandt, Mathieu; Davies, Jamie A.; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of transplantable organs provides an impetus to develop tissue-engineered alternatives. Producing tissues similar to immature kidneys from simple suspensions of fully dissociated embryonic renal cells is possible in vitro, but glomeruli do not form in the avascular environment. Here, we constructed renal organoids from single-cell suspensions derived from E11.5 kidneys and then implanted these organoids below the kidney capsule of a living rat host. This implantation resulted in further maturation of kidney tissue, formation of vascularized glomeruli with fully differentiated capillary walls, including the slit diaphragm, and appearance of erythropoietin-producing cells. The implanted tissue exhibited physiologic functions, including tubular reabsorption of macromolecules, that gained access to the tubular lumen on glomerular filtration. The ability to generate vascularized nephrons from single-cell suspensions marks a significant step to the long-term goal of replacing renal function by a tissue-engineered kidney. PMID:23085631

  13. Macrophage functions measured by magnetic microparticles in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Winfried; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Häussinger, Karl; Heyder, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse ferrimagnetic iron-oxide particles of 1.4 ?m geometric diameter were used to study alveolar macrophage functions (phagocytosis, phagosome transport) and cytoskeletal integrity in healthy subjects and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in cultured macrophages. Dysfunctions in phagocytosis, in phagosome transport and cytoskeletal integrity correlated with an impaired alveolar clearance and could be induced in vitro by cytoskeletal drugs.

  14. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Taro; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which dopamine signaling causes these phenotypes requires an understanding of the dynamics of dopamine release. Here we report the effects of dDAT expression on behavioral traits. We show that dDAT expression in a subset of dopaminergic neurons is sufficient for normal sleep. dDAT expression in other cell types such as Kenyon cells and glial cells can also rescue the short sleep phenotype of dDAT mutants. dDAT mutants also show a down-regulation of the D1-like dopamine receptor dDA1, and this phenotype is rescued when dDAT is expressed in the same cell types in which it rescues sleep. On the other hand, dDAT overexpression in mushroom bodies, which are the target of memory forming dopamine neurons, abolishes olfactory aversive memory. Our data demonstrate that expression of extrasynaptic dopamine transporters can rescue some aspects of dopamine signaling in dopamine transporter mutants. These results provide novel insights into regulatory systems that modulate dopamine signaling. PMID:25232310

  15. TrkA In Vivo Function Is Negatively Regulated by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Kiris, Erkan; Wang, Ting; Yanpallewar, Sudhirkumar; Dorsey, Susan G.; Becker, Jodi; Bavari, Sina; Palko, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    TrkA is a tyrosine kinase receptor required for development and survival of the peripheral nervous system. In the adult, TrkA and its ligand NGF are peripheral pain mediators, particularly in inflammatory pain states. However, how TrkA regulates the function of nociceptive neurons and whether its activity levels may lead to sensory abnormalities is still unclear. Here we report the characterization of a 3 aa (KFG) domain that negatively regulates TrkA level and function in response to NGF. Deletion of this domain in mouse causes a reduction of TrkA ubiquitination leading to an increase in TrkA protein levels and activity. The number of dorsal root ganglia neurons is not affected by the mutation. However, mutant mice have enhanced thermal sensitivity and inflammatory pain. Together, these data suggest that ubiquitination is a mechanism used in nociceptive neurons to regulate TrkA level and function. Our results may enhance our understanding of how ubiquitination affects TrkA activation following noxious thermal stimulation and inflammatory pain. PMID:24623787

  16. Host defense peptides for treatment of colorectal carcinoma – a comparative in vitro and in vivo analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maletzki, Claudia; Klier, Ulrike; Marinkovic, Samuel; Klar, Ernst; Andrä, Jörg; Linnebacher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) constitute effector molecules of the innate immune system. Besides acting against microbia and fungi, they exhibit broad and selective oncolytic activity. The underlying mechanism is at least partially attributable to elevated surface-exposed levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on tumor targets. In this study, comprehensive analysis of NK-2-based derivatives (C7A, C7A-D21K, and C7A-?) was done on patient-derived ultra-low passage colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cell lines. Peptides were designed to improve antitumoral potential. Mellitin was used as positive control and a non-toxic peptide (NK11) served as negative control. Subsequently, effectiveness of local HDP application was determined in xenopatients. Generally, CRC lines displayed a heterogeneous pattern of surface-exposed PS, which was usually below standard CRC cells. Of note, five out of seven cell lines were susceptible towards HDP-mediated lysis (lytic activity of peptides: C7A-D21K > C7A-?= C7A). Oncolytic activity correlated mostly with surface-exposed PS levels. Apoptosis as well as necrosis were involved in killing. In an in vivo experiment, substantial growth inhibition of HROC24 xenografts was observed after HDP therapy and, surprisingly, also after NK11 treatment. These promising data underline the high potential of HDPs for oncolytic therapies and may provide a rationale for optimizing preclinical treatment schedules based on NK-2. PMID:24962950

  17. Adaptation of Leishmania donovani to cutaneous and visceral environments: in vivo selection and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Zhang, Wen-Wei; Dejgaard, Kurt; Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Mazur, Alexander; Ranasinghe, Shalindra; Liu, Jing; Olivier, Martin; Nilsson, Tommy; Matlashewski, Greg

    2015-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania protozoa. Two main forms are found in the Old World, self-limited cutaneous leishmaniasis and potentially fatal visceral leishmaniasis, with parasite dissemination to liver, bone marrow, and spleen. The Leishmania donovani species complex is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis worldwide, but atypical L. donovani strains can cause cutaneous leishmaniasis. We hypothesized that L. donovani can adapt to survive in response to restrictions imposed by the host environment. To assess this, we performed in vivo selection in BALB/c mice with a cutaneous L. donovani clinical isolate to select for parasites with increased capacity to survive in visceral organs. We then performed whole cell proteomic analysis and compared this visceral-selected strain to the original cutaneous clinical isolate and to a visceral leishmaniasis clinical isolate. Overall, there were no major shifts in proteomic profiles; however, translation, biosynthetic processes, antioxidant protection, and signaling were elevated in visceral strains. Conversely, transport and trafficking were elevated in the cutaneous strain. Overall, these results provide new insight into the adaptability of Leishmania parasites to the host environment and on the factors that mediate their ability to survive in different organs. PMID:25536015

  18. Amplitude and frequency content analysis of optoacoustic signals in laser heated ex-vivo tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laderoute, Annie

    Laser thermal therapy involves heating tissue using light to temperatures between 55 °C and 95 °C for several minutes resulting in coagulation and cell death. This treatment method has been under investigation for use as a minimally invasive method for eradicating solid tumors and cancer cells. Optoacoustic imaging involves exposing optically absorbing media to nanosecond pulsed laser light causing rapid localized heating and inducing acoustic waves to be detected by wideband transducers. It has been proposed as a real-time, noninvasive method for monitoring laser thermal therapy. This thesis investigates the use of optoacoustics to discriminate between native and coagulated ex-vivo tissues (porcine tenderloin muscle, bovine liver and bovine kidney). Tissues were heated using a 1000 mum core optical fibre coupled to an 810 nm diode laser to generate lesions. Samples were scanned at 1064 nm using a prototype reverse-mode optoacoustic system consisting of a pulsed laser coupled to a bifurcated fibre bundle, and an 8 element annular array wideband ultrasound transducer with a central frequency of ˜5 MHz. Thermal coagulation effects were analyzed using optoacoustic signal amplitude-based and frequency-based analysis. Significant differences (p<0.05) in optoacoustic signals, between native and coagulated porcine muscle, were observed with both amplitude-based and frequency-based analysis methods. Inconsistencies in the amplitude-based analysis were observed in the bovine liver and bovine kidney. Significant differences between native and coagulated bovine liver tissues were observed in two of the three frequency parameters of interest (slope and midband fit, p<0.05). No significant differences between native and coagulated bovine kidney tissues using frequency-based analysis. Amplitude-based analysis methods take advantage of the optical and thermo-mechanical properties of the tissues, while the frequency-based method extracts metrics related physical parameters of the absorbers (such as size, shape and concentration). By isolating the samples from temperature influence (by acquiring OA data of native and coagulated tissues at constant temperature) we have demonstrated that optoacoustics can be used to directly detect tissue damage in two of these three tissue types. The results of this work support the evidence that optoacoustic imaging could be a tool for real-time monitoring of laser thermal heating, but warrant further investigation.

  19. In vivo studies on the positive control function of NifA: a conserved hydrophobic amino acid patch at the central domain involved in transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    González, V; Olvera, L; Soberón, X; Morett, E

    1998-04-01

    The eubacterial enhancer-binding proteins activate transcription by binding to distant sites and, simultaneously, contacting the RNA polymerase r54 promoter complex (Esigma54). The positive control function is located at the central domain of these proteins, but it is not know which specific region has the determinants for the interaction with Esigma54. Here, we present genetic evidence that a small region of hydrophobic amino acids, previously denominated C3, at the central domain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum NifA is involved in positive control. We obtained 26 missense mutants along this conserved region. Among these, only strains expressing the NifA(F307-->Y) and NifA(A310-->S) mutant proteins retained some of the transcriptional activity (<20%), whereas those carrying NifA(E298-->D) and NifA(T308-->S) had very low but detectable activity (< 1.0%). The rest of the NifA mutants did not induce any measurable transcriptional activity. When expressed in the presence of wild-type NifA, the great majority of the mutants displayed a dominant phenotype, suggesting that their oligomerization determinants were not altered. In vivo dimethyl-sulphate footprinting experiments for a subset of the NifA mutants showed that they were still able to bind specifically to DNA. Analysis of intragenic supressors highlight the functional role of a hydroxyl group at position 308 to activate transcription. PMID:9593296

  20. Targeting Tryptophan Decarboxylase to Selected Subcellular Compartments of Tobacco Plants Affects Enzyme Stability and in Vivo Function and Leads to a Lesion-Mimic Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Stefano; Li, Qiurong; Leech, Mark James; Schuster, Flora; Emans, Neil; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes an early step of the terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway by decarboxylation of l-tryptophan to produce the protoalkaloid tryptamine. In the present study, recombinant TDC was targeted to the chloroplast, cytosol, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants to evaluate the effects of subcellular compartmentation on the accumulation of functional enzyme and its corresponding enzymatic product. TDC accumulation and in vivo function was significantly affected by the subcellular localization. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that chloroplast-targeted TDC had improved accumulation and/or stability when compared with the cytosolic enzyme. Because ER-targeted TDC was not detectable by immunoblot analysis and tryptamine levels found in transient expression studies and in transgenic plants were low, it was concluded that the recombinant TDC was most likely unstable if ER retained. Targeting TDC to the chloroplast stroma resulted in the highest accumulation level of tryptamine so far reported in the literature for studies on heterologous TDC expression in tobacco. However, plants accumulating high levels of functional TDC in the chloroplast developed a lesion-mimic phenotype that was probably triggered by the relatively high accumulation of tryptamine in this compartment. We demonstrate that subcellular targeting may provide a useful strategy for enhancing accumulation and/or stability of enzymes involved in secondary metabolism and to divert metabolic flux toward desired end products. However, metabolic engineering of plants is a very demanding task because unexpected, and possibly unwanted, effects may be observed on plant metabolism and/or phenotype. PMID:12114570

  1. The novel costimulatory programmed death ligand 1/B7.1 pathway is functional in inhibiting alloimmune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Riella, Leonardo V; Chock, Susanne; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yuan, Xueli; Paterson, Alison M; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Vanguri, Vijay; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rodig, Scott J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Chandraker, Anil; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2011-08-01

    The programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1)/programmed death 1 (PD1) costimulatory pathway plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses as well as in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. It has been demonstrated recently that PDL1 also can bind B7.1 to inhibit T cell responses in vitro. Using the bm12 into B6 heart transplant model, we investigated the functional significance of this interaction in alloimmune responses in vivo. PD1 blockade unlike PDL1 blockade failed to accelerate bm12 allograft rejection, suggesting a role for an additional binding partner for PDL1 other than PD1 in transplant rejection. PDL1 blockade was able to accelerate allograft rejection in B7.2-deficient recipients but not B7.1-deficient recipients, indicating that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 was important in inhibiting rejection. Administration of the novel 2H11 anti-PDL1 mAb, which only blocks the PDL1-B7.1 interaction, aggravated chronic injury of bm12 allografts in B6 recipients. Aggravated chronic injury was associated with an increased frequency of alloreactive IFN-?-, IL-4-, and IL-6-producing splenocytes and a decreased percentage of regulatory T cells in the recipients. Using an in vitro cell culture assay, blockade of the interaction of PDL1 on dendritic cells with B7.1 on T cells increased IFN-? production from alloreactive CD4(+) T cells, whereas blockade of dendritic cell B7.1 interaction with T cell PDL1 did not. These data indicate that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses in vivo and suggests a dominant direction for PDL1 and B7.1 interaction. PMID:21697455

  2. The novel costimulatory pathway PDL1: B7.1 is functional in inhibiting alloimmune responses in vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Riella, Leonardo V.; Chock, Susanne; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yuan, Xueli; Paterson, Alison M.; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Vanguri, Vijay; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Blazar, Bruce R.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Rodig, Scott J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Chandraker, Anil; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2011-01-01

    The PDL1: PD1 costimulatory pathway plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses as well as in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. It has recently been demonstrated that PDL1 can also bind B7.1 to inhibit T cell responses in vitro. Using the bm12 into B6 heart transplant model, we investigated the functional significance of this interaction in alloimmune responses in vivo. PD1 blockade unlike PDL1 blockade failed to accelerate bm12 allograft rejection suggesting a role for an additional binding partner for PDL1 other than PD1 in transplant rejection. PDL1 blockade was able to accelerate allograft rejection in B7.2-deficient recipients but not B7.1-deficient recipients, indicating that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 was important in inhibiting rejection. Administration of the novel 2H11 anti-PDL1 mAb, which only blocks PDL1: B7.1 interaction, aggravated chronic injury of bm12 allografts in B6 recipients. Aggravated chronic injury was associated with an increased frequency of alloreactive IFN-?-, IL-4-, and IL-6-producing splenocytes and a decreased percentage of regulatory T cells in the recipients. Using an in vitro cell culture assay, blockade of the interaction of PDL1 on dendritic cells with B7.1 on T cells increased IFN-? production from alloreactive CD4+ T cells, whereas blockade of dendritic cell B7.1 interaction with T cell PDL1 did not. These data indicate that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses in vivo and suggests a dominant direction for PDL1 and B7.1 interaction. PMID:21697455

  3. Automation and uncertainty analysis of a method for in-vivo range verification in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, K.; Unholtz, D.; Bauer, J.; Debus, J.; Min, C. H.; Bortfeld, T.; Paganetti, H.; Parodi, K.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce the automation of the range difference calculation deduced from particle-irradiation induced ?+-activity distributions with the so-called most-likely-shift approach, and evaluate its reliability via the monitoring of algorithm- and patient-specific uncertainty factors. The calculation of the range deviation is based on the minimization of the absolute profile differences in the distal part of two activity depth profiles shifted against each other. Depending on the workflow of positron emission tomography (PET)-based range verification, the two profiles under evaluation can correspond to measured and simulated distributions, or only measured data from different treatment sessions. In comparison to previous work, the proposed approach includes an automated identification of the distal region of interest for each pair of PET depth profiles and under consideration of the planned dose distribution, resulting in the optimal shift distance. Moreover, it introduces an estimate of uncertainty associated to the identified shift, which is then used as weighting factor to ‘red flag’ problematic large range differences. Furthermore, additional patient-specific uncertainty factors are calculated using available computed tomography (CT) data to support the range analysis. The performance of the new method for in-vivo treatment verification in the clinical routine is investigated with in-room PET images for proton therapy as well as with offline PET images for proton and carbon ion therapy. The comparison between measured PET activity distributions and predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations or measurements from previous treatment fractions is performed. For this purpose, a total of 15 patient datasets were analyzed, which were acquired at Massachusetts General Hospital and Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center with in-room PET and offline PET/CT scanners, respectively. Calculated range differences between the compared activity distributions are reported in a 2D map in beam-eye-view. In comparison to previously proposed approaches, the new most-likely-shift method shows more robust results for assessing in-vivo the range from strongly varying PET distributions caused by differing patient geometry, ion beam species, beam delivery techniques, PET imaging concepts and counting statistics. The additional visualization of the uncertainties and the dedicated weighting strategy contribute to the understanding of the reliability of observed range differences and the complexity in the prediction of activity distributions. The proposed method promises to offer a feasible technique for clinical routine of PET-based range verification.

  4. Detection and analysis of gene expression during infection by in vivo expression technology.

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, D S; Camilli, A

    2000-01-01

    Many limitations associated with the use of in vitro models for study of bacterial pathogenesis can be overcome by the use of technologies that detect pathogen gene expression during the course of infection within an intact animal. In vivo expression technology (IVET) accomplishes this with versatility: it has been developed with a variety of reporter systems which allow for either in vivo selection or ex vivo screening. Selectable gene fusion systems generally allow for the complementation of a bacterial metabolic defect that is lethal in vivo, or for antibiotic resistance during the course of in vivo antibiotic challenge. In contrast, the screenable gene fusion system uses a site-specific DNA recombinase that, when expressed in vivo, excises a selectable gene cassette from the bacterial chromosome. Loss of this cassette can then be either screened or selected for ex vivo. The recombinase-based IVET can be used to detect genes that are transcriptionally induced during infection, including those expressed transiently or at low levels and, in addition, can be used to monitor the spatial and temporal expression of specific genes during the course of infection. PMID:10874732

  5. Bacterial lipoprotein Toll-like receptor 2 agonists broadly modulate endothelial function and coagulation pathways in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hae-Sook; Xu, Fengyun; Bagchi, Aranya; Herrup, Elizabeth; Prakash, Arun; Valentine, Catherine; Kulkarni, Hrishikesh; Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Warren, Shaw; Hellman, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation induces cellular and organ inflammation, and affects lung function. Since deranged endothelial function and coagulation pathways contribute to sepsis-induced organ failure, we studied the effects of bacterial lipoprotein TLR2 agonists, including peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, Pam3Cys, and murein lipoprotein, on endothelial function and coagulation pathways in vitro and in vivo. TLR2 agonist treatment induced diverse human endothelial cells (EC) to produce IL-6 and IL-8, and to express E-selectin on their surface, including human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC), human lung microvascular EC, and human coronary artery EC. Treatment of HUVEC with TLR2 agonists caused increased monolayer permeability and had multiple coagulation effects, including increased production of plasminogen-activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and tissue factor, and decreased production of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor. TLR2 agonist treatment also increased HUVEC expression of TLR2 itself. PAL induced IL-6 production by EC from wild-type, but not from TLR2 knockout mice, indicating TLR2 specificity. Mice were challenged with TLR2 agonists, and lungs and plasmas were assessed for markers of leukocyte trafficking and coagulopathy. Wild-type mice, but not TLR2 mice, that were challenged intravenously with TLR2 agonists had increased lung levels of myeloperoxidase and mRNAs for E-selectin, P-selectin, and MCP-1, and had increased plasma PAI-1 and E-selectin levels. Intratracheally administered TLR2 agonist caused increased lung fibrin levels. These studies show that TLR2 activation by bacterial lipoproteins broadly affects endothelial function and coagulation pathways, suggesting that TLR2 activation contributes in multiple ways to endothelial activation, coagulopathy, and vascular leakage in sepsis. PMID:21169547

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of Rod Photoreceptor Homeostasis Revealed by In Vivo NRL Targetome Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Hao; Douglas S. Kim; Bernward Klocke; Kory R. Johnson; Kairong Cui; Norimoto Gotoh; Chongzhi Zang; Janina Gregorski; Linn Gieser; Weiqun Peng; Yang Fann; Martin Seifert; Keji Zhao; Anand Swaroop

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing

  7. Enhanced Functions of Peripheral ?? T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Infection during Interferon ? Treatment In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Hu, Peng; Ling, Ning; Peng, Hui; Lei, Yu; Hu, Huaidong; Zhang, Dazhi; Ren, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background ?? T cells play an important role in infectious, autoimmune, or neoplastic diseases. Here, a study was conducted to investigate the dynamic changes in phenotype and function of peripheral ?? T cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) during pegylated-interferon (pegIFN)-? treatment, and to explore their roles in IFN-? therapy. Methods Total 15 CHB patients with pegIFN-? therapy and 6 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled in this study. Flow cytometry was used for the study of frequency of peripheral ?? T cells, subtypes, effector or memory ?? T cells, and also the IFN-?+, TNF-?+, CD107a+ or Granzyme B+ ?? T cells in 10 patients at week 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 of treatment. Another 5 CHB patients and 6 HC were recruited for the ?? T cell isolation, and gene expression in ?? T cells was evaluated before or after IFN-? treatment in vitro. Results Although ??T cells decreased in CHB patients during pegIFN-? therapy, their capacities to produce TNF-? and to express CD107a were enhanced. More effector ??T cells (CD27-CD45RA+) were found in the response group than in non-response group. Furthermore, IFN-? boosted the expression of Mx2 and cytokine genes in ??T cells from CHB patients in vitro. Conclusion IFN-? could enhance the cytokine production or cytotoxicity potential of ??T cells in vivo and in vitro. The enhanced function of ??T cells might contribute to the effect of IFN-? treatment. PMID:25774808

  8. Mitochondrial alpha-synuclein accumulation impairs complex I function in dopaminergic neurons and results in increased mitophagy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chinta, Shankar J.; Mallajosyula, Jyothi K.; Rane, Anand; Andersen, Julie K.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein is the major protein component of Lewy bodies, a cardinal pathological feature of the degenerating Parkinsonian brain. Alpha-synuclein has been reported to be able to intercalate into membranes via formation of an alpha-helical structure at its N-terminal end. Recent in vitro studies from various laboratories have demonstrated that alpha-synuclein can physically associate with mitochondria and interfere with mitochondrial function. ?-Syn predominantly associates with the inner mitochondrial membrane, where it can apparently interact with complex I resulting in reduced mitochondrial complex I activity and increased free radical production. However, the effect of in vivo alpha-synuclein accumulation within dopaminergic neurons on mitochondrial function has not been thoroughly studied. Examination of transgenic animals which overexpress the familial mutant A53T form of the protein selectively within dopaminergic neurons reveals that A53T localizes to the mitochondrial membranes as monomers and oligomers particularly under conditions of proteasomal inhibitory stress, and that this localization coincides with a selective age-related mitochondrial complex I inhibition and decreased substrate-specific respiration along with increases in mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). PMID:20887775

  9. Functional analysis and treatment of cigarette pica.

    PubMed

    Piazza, C C; Hanley, G P; Fisher, W W

    1996-01-01

    A series of analyses was conducted to assess and treat the pica of cigarette butts by a young man with mental retardation and autism. First, we demonstrated that pica was maintained in a condition with no social consequences when the available cigarettes contained nicotine but not when the cigarettes contained herbs without nicotine. Second, a choice assessment (Fisher et al., 1992) confirmed that tobacco was preferred over the other components of the cigarette (e.g., paper, filter, etc.). Third, an analogue functional analysis (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman & Richman, 1982/1994) demonstrated that cigarette pica was maintained independent of social consequences. Fourth, a treatment designed to interrupt the hypothesized response-reinforcer relationship reduced consumption of cigarettes to zero. Finally, because cigarette pica occurred primarily when the individual was alone or under minimal supervision, a procedure based on stimulus control was developed to improve the effectiveness of the intervention in these situations. PMID:8995829

  10. Reconstitution and functional analysis of kinetochore subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Gestaut, Daniel R.; Cooper, Jeremy; Asbury, Charles L.; Davis, Trisha N.; Wordeman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Kinetochores are multifunctional supercomplexes that link chromosomes to dynamic microtubule tips. Groups of proteins from the kinetochore are arranged into distinct subcomplexes that co-purify under stringent conditions and cause similar phenotypes when mutated. By co-expressing all the components of a given subcomplex from a polycistronic plasmid in bacteria, many labs have had great success in purifying active subcomplexes. This has enabled the study of how the microtubule binding subcomplexes of the kinetochore interact with both the microtubule lattice and dynamic microtubule tips. Here we outline methods for rapid cloning of polycistronic vectors for expression of kinetochore subcomplexes, their purification, and techniques for functional analysis using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM). PMID:20466157

  11. A USPL functional system with articulated mirror arm for in-vivo applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Dehn, Claudia; Oehme, Bernd; Bourauel, Christoph; Frentzen, Mathias

    Ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) systems for dental application have overcome many of their initial disadvantages. However, a problem that has not yet been addressed and solved is the beam delivery into the oral cavity. The functional system that is introduced in this study includes an articulated mirror arm, a scanning system as well as a handpiece, allowing for freehand preparations with ultra-short laser pulses. As laser source an Nd:YVO4 laser is employed, emitting pulses with a duration of tp < 10 ps at a repetition rate of up to 500 kHz. The centre wavelength is at 1064 nm and the average output power can be tuned up to 9 W. The delivery system consists of an articulated mirror arm, to which a scanning system and a custom made handpiece are connected, including a 75 mm focussing lens. The whole functional system is compact in size and moveable. General characteristics like optical losses and ablation rate are determined and compared to results employing a fixed setup on an optical table. Furthermore classical treatment procedures like cavity preparation are being demonstrated on mammoth ivory. This study indicates that freehand preparation employing an USPL system is possible but challenging, and accompanied by a variety of side-effects. The ablation rate with fixed handpiece is about 10 mm3/min. Factors like defocussing and blinding affect treatment efficiency. Laser sources with higher average output powers might be needed in order to reach sufficient preparation speeds.

  12. Transcranial imaging of functional cerebral hemodynamic changes in single blood vessels using in vivo photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng; Shih, Yen-Yu I; Duong, Timothy Q; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Po-Hsun; Wu, Robby; Tsang, Siny; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Li, Meng-Lin; Chen, You-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Optical imaging of changes in total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) provides a means to investigate brain hemodynamic regulation. However, high-resolution transcranial imaging remains challenging. In this study, we applied a novel functional photoacoustic microscopy technique to probe the responses of single cortical vessels to left forepaw electrical stimulation in mice with intact skulls. Functional changes in HbT, CBV, and SO2 in the superior sagittal sinus and different-sized arterioles from the anterior cerebral artery system were bilaterally imaged with unambiguous 36 × 65-?m2 spatial resolution. In addition, an early decrease of SO2 in single blood vessels during activation (i.e., ‘the initial dip') was observed. Our results indicate that the initial dip occurred specifically in small arterioles of activated regions but not in large veins. This technique complements other existing imaging approaches for the investigation of the hemodynamic responses in single cerebral blood vessels. PMID:22472612

  13. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket. PMID:24361577

  14. Global analysis of in vivo Foxa2-binding sites in mouse adult liver using massively parallel sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth D. Wederell; Mikhail Bilenky; Rebecca Cullum; Nina Thiessen; Melis Dagpinar; Allen Delaney; Richard Varhol; YongJun Zhao; Thomas Zeng; Bridget Bernier; Matthew Ingham; Martin Hirst; Gordon Robertson; Marco A. Marra; Steven Jones; Pamela A. Hoodless

    2008-01-01

    Foxa2 (HNF3b) is a one of three, closely related tran- scription factors that are critical to the development and function of the mouse liver. We have used chro- matin immunoprecipitation and massively parallel Illumina 1G sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to create a genome-wide profile of in vivo Foxa2-binding sites in the adult liver. More than 65% of the »11.5k geno- mic sites

  15. Functional Analysis of the Primate Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Bianca; Scherf, Heike; Schmidt, Manuela; Krause, Cornelia; Witzel, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the shoulder girdle are in most cases restricted to morphological comparisons and rarely aim at elucidating function in a strictly biomechanical sense. To fill this gap, we investigated the basic functional conditions that occur in the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle of primates by means of mechanics. Because most of nonhuman primate locomotion is essentially quadrupedal walking—although on very variable substrates—our analysis started with quadrupedal postures. We identified the mechanical situation at the beginning, middle, and end of the load-bearing stance phase by constructing force parallelograms in the shoulder joint and the scapulo-thoracal connection. The resulting postulates concerning muscle activities are in agreement with electromyographical data in the literature. We determined the magnitude and directions of the internal forces and explored mechanically optimal shapes of proximal humerus, scapula, and clavicula using the Finite Element Method. Next we considered mechanical functions other than quadrupedal walking, such as suspension and brachiation. Quadrupedal walking entails muscle activities and joint forces that require a long scapula, the cranial margin of which has about the same length as the axillary margin. Loading of the hand in positions above the head and suspensory behaviors lead to force flows along the axillary margin and so necessitate a scapula with an extended axillary and a shorter cranial margin. In all cases, the facies glenoidalis is nearly normal to the calculated joint forces. In anterior view, terrestrial monkeys chose a direction of the ground reaction force requiring (moderate) activity of the abductors of the shoulder joint, whereas more arboreal monkeys prefer postures that necessitate activity of the adductors of the forelimb even when walking along branches. The same adducting and retracting muscles are recruited in various forms of suspension. As a mechanical consequence, the scapula is in a more frontal, rather than parasagittal, position on the thorax. In both forms of locomotion—quadrupedal walking and suspension—the compression-resistant clavicula contributes to keeping the shoulder complex distant from the rib cage. Future studies should consider the consequences for thorax shape. The morphological specializations of all Hominoidea match the functional requirements of suspensory behavior. The knowledge of mechanical functions allows an improved interpretation of fossils beyond morphological similarity. PMID:20495602

  16. Functional analysis of problem behavior: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Gregory P; Iwata, Brian A; McCord, Brandon E

    2003-01-01

    Functional analysis methodology focuses on the identification of variables that influence the occurrence of problem behavior and has become a hallmark of contemporary approaches to behavioral assessment. In light of the widespread use of pretreatment functional analyses in articles published in this and other journals, we reviewed the literature in an attempt to identify best practices and directions for future research. Studies included in the present review were those in which (a) a pretreatment assessment based on (b) direct observation and measurement of (c) problem behavior was conducted under (d) at least two conditions involving manipulation of an environmental variable in an attempt (e) to demonstrate a relation between the environmental event and behavior. Studies that met the criteria for inclusion were quantified and critically evaluated along a number of dimensions related to subject and setting characteristics, parametric and qualitative characteristics of the methodology, types of assessment conditions, experimental designs, topographies of problem behaviors, and the manner in which data were displayed and analyzed. PMID:12858983

  17. Human milk metagenome: a functional capacity analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human milk contains a diverse population of bacteria that likely influences colonization of the infant gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies, however, have been limited to characterization of this microbial community by 16S rRNA analysis. In the present study, a metagenomic approach using Illumina sequencing of a pooled milk sample (ten donors) was employed to determine the genera of bacteria and the types of bacterial open reading frames in human milk that may influence bacterial establishment and stability in this primal food matrix. The human milk metagenome was also compared to that of breast-fed and formula-fed infants’ feces (n?=?5, each) and mothers’ feces (n?=?3) at the phylum level and at a functional level using open reading frame abundance. Additionally, immune-modulatory bacterial-DNA motifs were also searched for within human milk. Results The bacterial community in human milk contained over 360 prokaryotic genera, with sequences aligning predominantly to the phyla of Proteobacteria (65%) and Firmicutes (34%), and the genera of Pseudomonas (61.1%), Staphylococcus (33.4%) and Streptococcus (0.5%). From assembled human milk-derived contigs, 30,128 open reading frames were annotated and assigned to functional categories. When compared to the metagenome of infants’ and mothers’ feces, the human milk metagenome was less diverse at the phylum level, and contained more open reading frames associated with nitrogen metabolism, membrane transport and stress response (P?functionality of the human milk metagenome are warranted. PMID:23705844

  18. Development of optical neuroimaging to detect drug-induced brain functional changes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in prefrontal function play a crucial role in compulsive cocaine use, which is a hallmark of addiction. Dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex might result from effects of cocaine on neurons as well as from disruption of cerebral blood vessels. However, the mechanisms underlying cocaine's neurotoxic effects are not fully understood, partially due to technical limitations of current imaging techniques (e.g., PET, fMRI) to differentiate vascular from neuronal effects at sufficiently high temporal and spatial resolutions. We have recently developed a multimodal imaging platform which can simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebrovascular hemodynamics, hemoglobin oxygenation and intracellular calcium fluorescence for monitoring the effects of cocaine on the brain. Such a multimodality imaging technique (OFI) provides several uniquely important merits, including: 1) a large field-of-view, 2) high spatiotemporal resolutions, 3) quantitative 3D imaging of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) networks, 4) label-free imaging of hemodynamic changes, 5) separation of vascular compartments (e.g., arterial and venous vessels) and monitoring of cortical brain metabolic changes, 6) discrimination of cellular (neuronal) from vascular responses. These imaging features have been further advanced in combination with microprobes to form micro-OFI that allows quantification of drug effects on subcortical brain. In addition, our ultrahigh-resolution ODT (?ODT) enables 3D microangiography and quantitative imaging of capillary CBF networks. These optical strategies have been used to investigate the effects of cocaine on brain physiology to facilitate the studies of brain functional changes induced by addictive substance to provide new insights into neurobiological effects of the drug on the brain.

  19. Brain basis of early parent–infant interactions: psychology, physiology, and in vivo functional neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P.; Kose, Samet; Strathearn, Lane

    2015-01-01

    Parenting behavior critically shapes human infants’ current and future behavior. The parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social experiences, forming templates of what they can expect from others and how to best meet others’ expectations. In this review, we focus on the neurobiology of parenting behavior, including our own functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain imaging experiments of parents. We begin with a discussion of background, perspectives and caveats for considering the neurobiology of parent–infant relationships. Then, we discuss aspects of the psychology of parenting that are significantly motivating some of the more basic neuroscience research. Following that, we discuss some of the neurohormones that are important for the regulation of social bonding, and the dysregulation of parenting with cocaine abuse. Then, we review the brain circuitry underlying parenting, proceeding from relevant rodent and nonhuman primate research to human work. Finally, we focus on a study-by-study review of functional neuroimaging studies in humans. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support aspects of parent response to infants, including the emotion, attention, motivation, empathy, decision-making and other thinking that are required to navigate the complexities of parenting. Specifically, infant stimuli activate basal forebrain regions, which regulate brain circuits that handle specific nurturing and caregiving responses and activate the brain’s more general circuitry for handling emotions, motivation, attention, and empathy – all of which are crucial for effective parenting. We argue that an integrated understanding of the brain basis of parenting has profound implications for mental health. PMID:17355399

  20. In vivo functional studies of tumor-specific retrogene NanogP8 in transgenic animals

    PubMed Central

    Badeaux, Mark A; Jeter, Collene R; Gong, Shuai; Liu, Bigang; Suraneni, Mahipal V; Rundhaug, Joyce; Fischer, Susan M; Yang, Tao; Kusewitt, Donna; Tang, Dean G

    2013-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to investigate potential oncogenic functions of NanogP8, a tumor-specific retrogene homolog of Nanog (expressed in pluripotent cells), in transgenic animal models. To this end, human primary prostate tumor-derived NanogP8 was targeted to the cytokeratin 14 (K14) cellular compartment, and two lines of K14-NanogP8 mice were derived. The line 1 animals, expressing high levels of NanogP8, experienced perinatal lethality and developmental abnormalities in multiple organs, including the skin, tongue, eye, and thymus in surviving animals. On postnatal day 5 transgenic skin, for example, there was increased c-Myc expression and Ki-67+ cells accompanied by profound abnormalities in skin development such as thickened interfollicular epidermis and dermis and lack of hypodermis and sebaceous glands. The line 3 mice, expressing low levels of NanogP8, were grossly normal except cataract development by 4–6 mo of age. Surprisingly, both lines of mice do not develop spontaneous tumors related to transgene expression. Even more unexpectedly, high levels of NanogP8 expression in L1 mice actually inhibited tumor development in a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis model. Mechanistic studies revealed that constitutive NanogP8 overexpression in adult L1 mice reduced CD34+?6+ and Lrig-1+ bulge stem cells, impaired keratinocyte migration, and repressed the expression of many stem cell-associated genes, including Bmp5, Fgfr2, Jmjd1a, and Jun. Our study, for the first time, indicates that transgenically expressed human NanogP8 is biologically functional, but suggests that high levels of NanogP8 may disrupt normal developmental programs and inhibit tumor development by depleting stem cells. PMID:23839044

  1. EFFECT OF OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLE BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS ON EX VIVO VASCULAR FUNCTION OF AORTAS RECOVERED FROM NORMAL AND TYPE 2 DIABETIC RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Oil Combustion Particle Bioavailable Constituents on Ex Vivo Vascular Function of Aortae Recovered from Healthy and Early Type 2 Diabetic Rats KL Dreher1, SE Kelly2, SD Proctor2, and JC Russell2. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, US EPA, RTP, NC;...

  2. Parametric Cost Analysis: A Design Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis uses equations to map measurable system attributes into cost. The measures of the system attributes are called metrics. The equations are called cost estimating relationships (CER's), and are obtained by the analysis of cost and technical metric data of products analogous to those to be estimated. Examples of system metrics include mass, power, failure_rate, mean_time_to_repair, energy _consumed, payload_to_orbit, pointing_accuracy, manufacturing_complexity, number_of_fasteners, and percent_of_electronics_weight. The basic assumption is that a measurable relationship exists between system attributes and the cost of the system. If a function exists, the attributes are cost drivers. Candidates for metrics include system requirement metrics and engineering process metrics. Requirements are constraints on the engineering process. From optimization theory we know that any active constraint generates cost by not permitting full optimization of the objective. Thus, requirements are cost drivers. Engineering processes reflect a projection of the requirements onto the corporate culture, engineering technology, and system technology. Engineering processes are an indirect measure of the requirements and, hence, are cost drivers.

  3. In vivo boron-10 analysis for the pre-screening of compounds for BNCS

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Xuping, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    An in vivo boron-10 screening technique was developed to analyze the boron biodistribution in a rabbit knee for the pre-screening of compounds for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). Three approaches were investigated: ...

  4. Pharmacological inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase improves endothelial vasodilatory function in rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiumei; Sievers, Richard E.; Varga, Monika; Kharait, Sourabh; Haddad, Daniel J.; Patton, Aaron K.; Delany, Christopher S.; Mutka, Sarah C.; Blonder, Joan P.; Dubé, Gregory P.; Rosenthal, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts a wide range of cellular effects in the cardiovascular system. NO is short lived, but S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) functions as a stable intracellular bioavailable NO pool. Accordingly, increased levels can facilitate NO-mediated processes, and conversely, catabolism of GSNO by the regulatory enzyme GSNO reductase (GSNOR) can impair these processes. Because dysregulated GSNOR can interfere with processes relevant to cardiovascular health, it follows that inhibition of GSNOR may be beneficial. However, the effect of GSNOR inhibition on vascular activity is unknown. To study the effects of GSNOR inhibition on endothelial function, we treated rats with a small-molecule inhibitor of GSNOR (N6338) that has vasodilatory effects on isolated aortic rings and assessed effects on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an NO-dependent process. GSNOR inhibition with a single intravenous dose of N6338 preserved FMD (15.3 ± 5.4 vs. 14.2 ± 6.3%, P = nonsignificant) under partial NO synthase inhibition that normally reduces FMD by roughly 50% (14.1 ± 2.9 vs. 7.6 ± 4.4%, P < 0.05). In hypertensive rats, daily oral administration of N6338 for 14 days reduced blood pressure (170.0 ± 5.3/122.7 ± 6.4 vs. 203.8 ± 1.9/143.7 ± 7.5 mmHg for vehicle, P < 0.001) and vascular resistance index (1.5 ± 0.4 vs. 3.2 ± 1.0 mmHg·min·l?1 for vehicle, P < 0.001), and restored FMD from an initially impaired state (7.4 ± 1.7%, day 0) to a level (13.0 ± 3.1%, day 14, P < 0.001) similar to that observed in normotensive rats. N6338 also reversed the pathological kidney changes exhibited by the hypertensive rats. GSNOR inhibition preserves FMD under conditions of impaired NO production and protects against both microvascular and conduit artery dysfunction in a model of hypertension. PMID:23349456

  5. In vivo alterations in skeletal muscle form and function after disuse atrophy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brian C

    2009-10-01

    Prolonged reductions in muscle activity and mechanical loading (e.g., bed rest, cast immobilization) result in alterations in skeletal muscle form and function. The purpose of this review article was to synthesize recent findings from several studies on the dramatic effects of disuse on skeletal muscle morphology and muscle performance in humans. Specifically, the following are discussed: 1) how the antigravity muscles are most susceptible to atrophy and how the degree of atrophy varies between muscle groups; 2) how disuse alters muscle composition by increasing intermuscular adipose tissue; 3) the influence of different disuse models on regulating the loss of muscle mass and strength, with immobilization causing greater reductions than bed rest and limb suspension do; 4) the observation that disuse decreases strength to a greater extent than muscle mass and the role of adaptations in both neural and contractile properties that influences this excessive loss of strength; 5) the equivocal findings on the effect of disuse on muscle fatigue resistance; and 6) the reduction in motor control after prolonged disuse. Lastly, emerging data warranting further inquiry into the modulating role of biological sex on disuse-induced adaptations are also discussed. PMID:19727027

  6. In vivo selection of lethal mutations reveals two functional domains in arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Geslain, R; Martin, F; Delagoutte, B; Cavarelli, J; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    2000-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and a genetic screening in yeast, we isolated 26 mutations that inactivate Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS). The mutations were identified and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding proteins were tested after purification of the expression products in Escherichia coli. The effects were interpreted in the light of the crystal structure of ArgRS. Eighteen functional residues were found around the arginine-binding pocket and eight others in the carboxy-terminal domain of the enzyme. Mutations of these residues all act by strongly impairing the rates of tRNA charging and arginine activation. Thus, ArgRS and tRNA(Arg) can be considered as a kind of ribonucleoprotein, where the tRNA, before being charged, is acting as a cofactor that activates the enzyme. Furthermore, by using different tRNA(Arg) isoacceptors and heterologous tRNA(Asp), we highlighted the crucial role of several residues of the carboxy-terminal domain in tRNA recognition and discrimination. PMID:10744027

  7. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  8. Effect of tomato industrial processing (different hybrids, paste, and pomace) on inhibition of platelet function in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0 g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0 g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  9. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing (Different Hybrids, Paste, and Pomace) on Inhibition of Platelet Function In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0?g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0?g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  10. Rumen function in vivo and in vitro in sheep fed Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Barros-Rodríguez, Marcos Antonio; Solorio-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Klieve, Athol; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael Antonio; Briceño-Poot, Eduardo Gaspar; Ku-Vera, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Leucaena leucocephala inclusion in sheep diets upon rumen function was evaluated. Nine Pelibuey sheep, 32.6 ± 5.33 kg live weight (LW), fitted with rumen cannula were used. A complete randomized block design was employed. Two experimental periods of 60 days each, with 60-day intervals between them, were used. Experimental treatments were as follows (n = 6): T1 (control), 100 % Pennisetum purpureum grass; T2, 20 %?L. leucocephala + 80 % P. purpureum; T3, 40 %?L. leucocephala + 60 % P. purpureum. In situ rumen neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) and crude protein (CP) degradation, dry matter intake (DMI), volatile fatty acids (VFA) production, estimated methane (CH4) yield, rumen pH, ammonia nitrogen (N-NH3), and protozoa counts were measured. The aNDF in situ rumen degradation of P. purpureum and leucaena was higher (P < 0.05) in T2 and T3. Leucaena CP degradation was higher in T2 and T3 but for P. purpureum it was only significantly higher in T3. Leucaena aNDF and CP degradation rate (c) was 50 % higher (P < 0.05) in T2 and T3, but only higher in T3 for P. purpureum. Voluntary intake and rumen (N-NH3) was higher in T2 and T3 (P = 0.0001, P = 0.005, respectively). Molar VFA proportions were similar for all treatments (P > 0.05). Protozoa counts and in vitro gas production (48 h) were lower in T2 and T3 (P < 0.05, P < 0.0001). Estimated methane yield (mol CH4/day) was higher in sheep fed leucaena (P < 0.0001). However, CH4 yield relative to animal performance (mol CH4/g LW gain) was lower in T2 and T3 (P < 0.0001). In summary, these results indicate that including L. leucocephala in sheep diets did not modify rumen fermentation pattern (same VFA ratios) nor reduce the amount of CH4 per unit of DMI (mol CH4/g DMI). However, leucaena inclusion does increase rumen N-NH3, aNDF and CP digestibility, and voluntary intake. PMID:25764346

  11. Correlation, functional analysis and optical pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Lee, M.L.; Stalker, K.T.

    1994-03-01

    Correlation integrals have played a central role in optical pattern recognition. The success of correlation, however, has been limited. What is needed is a mathematical operation more complex than correlation. Suitably complex operations are the functionals defined on the Hilbert space of Lebesgue square integrable functions. Correlation is a linear functional of a parameter. In this paper, we develop a representation of functionals in terms of inner products or equivalently correlation functions. We also discuss the role of functionals in neutral networks. Having established a broad relation of correlation to pattern recognition, we discuss the computation of correlation functions using acousto-optics.

  12. In vivo assessment of protease dynamics in cutaneous wound healing by degradomics analysis of porcine wound exudates.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Fabio; Hermes, Olivia; Egli, Fabian E; Kockmann, Tobias; Schlage, Pascal; Croizat, Pierre; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Smola, Hans; Auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Proteases control complex tissue responses by modulating inflammation, cell proliferation and migration, and matrix remodeling. All these processes are orchestrated in cutaneous wound healing to restore the skin's barrier function upon injury. Altered protease activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of healing impairments, and proteases are important targets in diagnosis and therapy of this pathology. Global assessment of proteolysis at critical turning points after injury will define crucial events in acute healing that might be disturbed in healing disorders. As optimal biospecimens, wound exudates contain an ideal proteome to detect extracellular proteolytic events, are noninvasively accessible, and can be collected at multiple time points along the healing process from the same wound in the clinics. In this study, we applied multiplexed Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) to globally assess proteolysis in early phases of cutaneous wound healing. By quantitative analysis of proteins and protein N termini in wound fluids from a clinically relevant pig wound model, we identified more than 650 proteins and discerned major healing phases through distinctive abundance clustering of markers of inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization. TAILS revealed a high degree of proteolysis at all time points after injury by detecting almost 1300 N-terminal peptides in ?450 proteins. Quantitative positional proteomics mapped pivotal interdependent processing events in the blood coagulation and complement cascades, temporally discerned clotting and fibrinolysis during the healing process, and detected processing of complement C3 at distinct time points after wounding and by different proteases. Exploiting data on primary cleavage specificities, we related candidate proteases to cleavage events and revealed processing of the integrin adapter protein kindlin-3 by caspase-3, generating new hypotheses for protease-substrate relations in the healing skin wound in vivo. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifier PXD001198. PMID:25516628

  13. Ex vivo analysis of human memory CD4 T cells specific for hepatitis C virus using MHC class II tetramers

    PubMed Central

    Day, Cheryl L.; Seth, Nilufer P.; Lucas, Michaela; Appel, Heiner; Gauthier, Laurent; Lauer, Georg M.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M.; Casson, Deborah R.; Chung, Raymond T.; Bell, Shannon; Harcourt, Gillian; Walker, Bruce D.; Klenerman, Paul; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2003-01-01

    Containment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other chronic human viral infections is associated with persistence of virus-specific CD4 T cells, but ex vivo characterization of circulating CD4 T cells has not been achieved. To further define the phenotype and function of these cells, we developed a novel approach for the generation of tetrameric forms of MHC class II/peptide complexes that is based on the cellular peptide-exchange mechanism. HLA-DR molecules were expressed as precursors with a covalently linked CLIP peptide, which could be efficiently exchanged with viral peptides following linker cleavage. In subjects who spontaneously resolved HCV viremia, but not in those with chronic progressive infection, HCV tetramer–labeled cells could be isolated by magnetic bead capture despite very low frequencies (1:1,200 to 1:111,000) among circulating CD4 T cells. These T cells expressed a set of surface receptors (CCR7+CD45RA–CD27+) indicative of a surveillance function for secondary lymphoid structures and had undergone significant in vivo selection since they utilized a restricted V? repertoire. These studies demonstrate a relationship between clinical outcome and the presence of circulating CD4 T cells directed against this virus. Moreover, they show that rare populations of memory CD4 T cells can be studied ex vivo in human diseases. PMID:12975468

  14. Function of the C-terminal Domain of the DEAD-Box Protein Mss116p Analyzed In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Georg; Del Campo, Mark; Mohr, Sabine; Yang, Quansheng; Jia, Huijue; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    The DEAD-box proteins CYT-19 in Neurospora crassa and Mss116p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are general RNA chaperones that function in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns and in translational activation. Both proteins consist of a conserved ATP-dependent RNA helicase core region linked to N- and C-terminal domains, the latter with a basic tail similar to many other DEAD-box proteins. In CYT-19, this basic tail was shown to contribute to non-specific RNA binding that helps tether the core helicase region to structured RNA substrates. Here, multiple sequence alignments and secondary structure predictions indicate that CYT-19 and Mss116p belong to distinct subgroups of DEAD-box proteins, whose C-terminal domains have a defining extended ?-helical region preceding the basic tail. We find that mutations or C-terminal truncations in the predicted ?-helical region of Mss116p strongly inhibit RNA-dependent ATPase activity, leading to loss of function in both translational activation and RNA splicing. These findings suggest that the ?-helical region may stabilize and/or regulate the activity of the RNA helicase core. By contrast, a truncation that removes only the basic tail leaves high RNA-dependent ATPase activity and causes only a modest reduction in translation and RNA splicing efficiency in vivo and in vitro. Biochemical analysis shows that deletion of the basic tail leads to weaker non-specific binding of group I and group II intron RNAs, and surprisingly, also impairs RNA-unwinding at saturating protein concentrations and nucleotide-dependent tight binding of single-stranded RNAs by the RNA helicase core. Together, our results indicate that the two subregions of Mss116p’s C-terminal domain act in different ways to support and modulate activities of the core helicase region, whose RNA-unwinding activity is critical for both the translation and RNA splicing functions. PMID:18096186

  15. Functional analysis and treatment of inappropriate verbal behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHRISTIE E. FYFFE; SungWoo Kahng; Ellen Fittro; David Russell

    2001-01-01

    The results of a functional analysis showed that inappropriate sexual behaviors exhibited by a 9-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury were maintained by positive reinforcement in the form of social attention. An intervention consisting of functional communication training and extinction resulted in reduced levels of inappro- priate sexual behaviors. DESCRIPTORS: functional analysis, inappropriate sexual behavior, traumatic

  16. Four Layered Approach to Non-Functional Requirements Analysis

    E-print Network

    Mirbel, Isabelle

    requirements elicitation and analysis is an important activity. In this requirements elicitation and analysis we need to elicit and analyze both functional and non functional requirements. But unfortunately, these methods do not support the non-functional requirements elicitation process well. For successful software

  17. Loss of Tsc1 in vivo impairs hippocampal mGluR-LTD and increases excitatory synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Bateup, Helen S.; Takasaki, Kevin T.; Saulnier, Jessica L.; Denefrio, Cassandra L.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2011-01-01

    The autism-spectrum disorder Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is caused by mutations in the Tsc1 or Tsc2 genes whose protein products form a heterodimeric complex that negatively regulates mTOR-dependent protein translation. Although several forms of synaptic plasticity, including metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD), depend on protein translation at the time of induction, it is unknown if these forms of plasticity require signaling through the Tsc1/2 complex. To examine this possibility, we postnatally deleted Tsc1 in vivo in a subset of hippocampal CA1 neurons using viral delivery of Cre recombinase in mice. We found that hippocampal mGluR-LTD was abolished by loss of Tsc1, whereas a protein synthesis-independent form of NMDA receptor-dependent LTD was preserved. Additionally, AMPA and NMDA receptor mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and miniature spontaneous EPSC frequency were enhanced in Tsc1 KO neurons. These changes in synaptic function occurred in the absence of alterations in spine density, morphology, or pre-synaptic release probability. Our findings indicate that signaling through Tsc1/2 is required for the expression of specific forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity as well as the maintenance of normal excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, these data suggest that perturbations of synaptic signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of TSC. PMID:21677170

  18. An in vivo functional screen identifies ST6GalNAc2 sialyltransferase as a breast cancer metastasis suppressor.

    PubMed

    Murugaesu, Nirupa; Iravani, Marjan; van Weverwijk, Antoinette; Ivetic, Aleksandar; Johnson, Damian A; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Fearns, Antony; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Sims, David; Fenwick, Kerry; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Gao, Qiong; Orr, Nick; Zvelebil, Marketa; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Yarwood, Helen; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan; Isacke, Clare M

    2014-03-01

    To interrogate the complex mechanisms involved in the later stages of cancer metastasis, we designed a functional in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) screen combined with next-generation sequencing. Using this approach, we identified the sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2 as a novel breast cancer metastasis suppressor. Mechanistically, ST6GalNAc2 silencing alters the profile of O-glycans on the tumor cell surface, facilitating binding of the soluble lectin galectin-3. This then enhances tumor cell retention and emboli formation at metastatic sites leading to increased metastatic burden, events that can be completely blocked by galectin-3 inhibition. Critically, elevated ST6GALNAC2, but not galectin-3, expression in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers significantly correlates with reduced frequency of metastatic events and improved survival. These data demonstrate that the prometastatic role of galectin-3 is regulated by its ability to bind to the tumor cell surface and highlight the potential of monitoring ST6GalNAc2 expression to stratify patients with breast cancer for treatment with galectin-3 inhibitors. PMID:24520024

  19. Nature, source and function of pigments in tardigrades: in vivo raman imaging of carotenoids in Echiniscus blumi.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alois; Guidetti, Roberto; Altiero, Tiziana; Sergo, Valter; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic aquatic animals with remarkable abilities to withstand harsh physical conditions such as dehydration or exposure to harmful highly energetic radiation. The mechanisms responsible for such robustness are presently little known, but protection against oxidative stresses is thought to play a role. Despite the fact that many tardigrade species are variously pigmented, scarce information is available about this characteristic. By applying Raman micro-spectroscopy on living specimens, pigments in the tardigrade Echiniscus blumi are identified as carotenoids, and their distribution within the animal body is visualized. The dietary origin of these pigments is demonstrated, as well as their presence in the eggs and in eye-spots of these animals, together with their absence in the outer layer of the animal (i.e., cuticle and epidermis). Using in-vivo semi-quantitative Raman micro-spectroscopy, a decrease in carotenoid content is detected after inducing oxidative stress, demonstrating that this approach can be used for studying the role of carotenoids in oxidative stress-related processes in tardigrades. This approach could be thus used in further investigations to test several hypotheses concerning the function of these carotenoids in tardigrades as photo-protective pigments against ionizing radiations or as antioxidants defending these organisms against the oxidative stress occurring during desiccation processes. PMID:23185564

  20. Nature, Source and Function of Pigments in Tardigrades: In Vivo Raman Imaging of Carotenoids in Echiniscus blumi

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Alois; Guidetti, Roberto; Altiero, Tiziana; Sergo, Valter; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic aquatic animals with remarkable abilities to withstand harsh physical conditions such as dehydration or exposure to harmful highly energetic radiation. The mechanisms responsible for such robustness are presently little known, but protection against oxidative stresses is thought to play a role. Despite the fact that many tardigrade species are variously pigmented, scarce information is available about this characteristic. By applying Raman micro-spectroscopy on living specimens, pigments in the tardigrade Echiniscus blumi are identified as carotenoids, and their distribution within the animal body is visualized. The dietary origin of these pigments is demonstrated, as well as their presence in the eggs and in eye-spots of these animals, together with their absence in the outer layer of the animal (i.e., cuticle and epidermis). Using in-vivo semi-quantitative Raman micro-spectroscopy, a decrease in carotenoid content is detected after inducing oxidative stress, demonstrating that this approach can be used for studying the role of carotenoids in oxidative stress-related processes in tardigrades. This approach could be thus used in further investigations to test several hypotheses concerning the function of these carotenoids in tardigrades as photo-protective pigments against ionizing radiations or as antioxidants defending these organisms against the oxidative stress occurring during desiccation processes. PMID:23185564

  1. Polyethylene insert damage in unicondylar knee replacement: a comparison of in vivo function and in vitro simulation.

    PubMed

    Harman, M; Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Stea, S; Toni, A

    2010-01-01

    Modification of knee joint wear simulation methods has included 'anatomic attachment' of unicondylar knee replacements (UKR) onto synthetic femurs with material properties and morphology similar to human femurs. The present study assesses the effect of such modification by comparing the damage patterns on UKR polyethylene inserts after in vitro simulation using standard and modified simulation methods with those on inserts retrieved after in vivo function. Three groups of UKR inserts were evaluated after retrieval (Explant Group, n = 17) or after knee joint wear simulation with the components attached to standard metal blocks (Standard Group, n = 6) or synthetic femurs (Anatomic Group, n = 6). All UKR had similar non-conforming articular surfaces. Articular damage patterns (mode, frequency, and area) were quantified using digital image photogrammetry. Although some common damage modes were noted, knee joint wear simulation with standard or 'anatomic' attachment did not generate damage pattern sizes similar to the explanted UKR. A focal damage pattern consistent with contact between the metal femoral articular surface and the polyethylene inserts was evident on all inserts, but only the Explant Group had evidence of dispersed damage dominated by abrasive modes. Synthetic femurs added complexity to the wear simulation without generating wear patterns substantially more similar to those observed on retrieved inserts. PMID:20839650

  2. Gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer composites as a universal carrier for in vivo delivery of biologically functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Sang-Mi; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Hyo Jung; Won, Miae; Kim, Jin-Sik; Lee, Boeun; Seong, Maeng-Je; Ha, Nam-Chul; Bae, Jeehyeon; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-12-28

    Although the delivery of biologically functional protein(s) into mammalian cells could be of tremendous value to biomedical research, the development of such technology has been hindered by the lack of a safe and effective delivery method. Here, we present a simple, efficient, and versatile gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system, with nanoblock-like properties, that allows any recombinant protein to be loaded without additional modifications and delivered into mammalian living systems. AuNP-Apt-based protein delivery system was able to deliver various proteins into variety of cell types in vitro without showing cytotoxicity. This AuNP-Apt system was also effective for the local and systemic targeted delivery of proteins in vivo. A local injection of the AuNP-Apt loaded with the apoptosis-inducing BIM protein efficiently inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Furthermore, an intravenous injection of AuNP-Apt loaded with both epidermal growth factor (EGF) and BIM resulted in the targeted delivery of BIM into a xenograft tumor derived from EGF receptor-overexpressing cancer cells with no detectable systemic toxicity. Our findings show that this system can serve as an innovative platform for the development of protein-based biomedical applications. PMID:25450403

  3. Development of pair distribution function analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vondreele, R.; Billinge, S.; Kwei, G.; Lawson, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year LDRD project at LANL. It has become more and more evident that structural coherence in the CuO{sub 2} planes of high-{Tc} superconducting materials over some intermediate length scale (nm range) is important to superconductivity. In recent years, the pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of powder diffraction data has been developed for extracting structural information on these length scales. This project sought to expand and develop this technique, use it to analyze neutron powder diffraction data, and apply it to problems. In particular, interest is in the area of high-{Tc} superconductors, although we planned to extend the study to the closely related perovskite ferroelectric materials andother materials where the local structure affects the properties where detailed knowledge of the local and intermediate range structure is important. In addition, we planned to carry out single crystal experiments to look for diffuse scattering. This information augments the information from the PDF.

  4. Functional and differential proteomic analyses to identify platelet derived factors affecting ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multilineage differentiation, immunomodulation and secretion of trophic factors render mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) highly attractive for clinical application. Human platelet derivatives such as pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) and thrombin-activated platelet releasate in plasma (tPRP) have been introduced as alternatives to fetal bovine serum (FBS) to achieve GMP-compliance. However, whereas both pHPL and tPRP support similar proliferation kinetics of lipoaspirate-derived MSC (LA-MSC), only pHPL significantly accelerates bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) expansion. To identify functionally bioactive factors affecting ex vivo MSC expansion, a differential proteomic approach was performed and identified candidate proteins were evaluated within a bioassay. Results Two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), MALDI-TOF analyses and complementary Western blotting revealed 20 differential protein species. 14 candidate proteins occured at higher concentrations in pHPL compared to tPRP and 6 at higher concentrations in tPRP. The candidate proteins fibrinogen and apolipoprotein A1 differentially affected LA- and BM-MSC proliferation. In a second set of experiments, reference cytokines known to foster proliferation in FBS were tested for their effects in the human supplements. Interestingly although these cytokines promoted proliferation in FBS, they failed to do so when added to the humanized system. Conclusions The differential proteomic approach identified novel platelet derived factors differentially acting on human MSC proliferation. Complementary testing of reference cytokines revealed a lack of stimulation in the human supplements compared to FBS. The data describe a new coherent approach to combine proteomic technologies with functional testing to develop novel, humanized, GMP-compliant conditions for MSC expansion. PMID:24168020

  5. The protein interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase II with SFH2p and its in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mee-Kyung; Hong, Seung-Keun; Oh, Young-Mee; Kim, Il-Han

    2003-09-12

    Previously, we reported that the yeast cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase type II isoform (cTPx II), a member of the TSA/AhpC family, showed a very low peroxidase activity when compared with other cytoplasmic yeast isoforms, and that cTPx II mutant (cTPx II Delta) showed a severe growth retardation compared with that of the wild-type cells. To reveal the physiological function of cTPx II in yeast cell growth, we searched for proteins which react with cTPx II. In this study, we identified a novel interaction between cTPx II and CSR1p using the yeast two-hybrid system. CSR1p (SFH2p) has been known to be one member of Sec14 homologous (SFH2) proteins. SFH2p exhibits phosphatidylinositol transfer protein activity. Interestingly, we found that cTPx II selectively bound to SFH2p among the five types of SFH proteins and Sec14p. The interaction required the dimerization of cTPx II. In addition, SFH2p also specifically bound to cTPx II among the yeast thiol peroxidase isoforms. The selective interaction of the dimer form of cTPx II (the oxidized form) with SFH2p was also confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. The growth retardation, clearly reflected by the length of the lag phase, of cTPx II Delta was rescued by deleting SFH2p in the cTPx II Delta strain. The SFH2 Delta strain did not show any growth retardation. In addition, the double mutant showed a higher susceptibility to oxidative stress. This finding provides the first in vivo demonstration of the specific interaction of cTPx II with SFH2p in an oxidative stress-sensitive manner and a novel physiological function of the complex of cTPx II and SFH2p. PMID:12824182

  6. Cys18-Cys137 Disulfide Bond in Mouse Angiotensinogen Does Not Affect AngII-Dependent Functions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Congqing; Xu, Yinchuan; Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Cassis, Lisa A; Wang, Jian-An; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Renin cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) releases angiotensin I (AngI) in the initial step of producing all angiotensin peptides. It has been suggested recently that redox regulation of a disulfide bond in AGT involving Cys18-Cys137 may be important to its renin cleavage efficiency in vivo. The purpose of this study was to test this prediction in a mouse model by comparing AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice expressing wild-type AGT versus a mutated form of AGT lacking the disulfide bond. Wild-type (hepAGT+/+) and hepatocyte-specific AGT-deficient (hepAGT-/-) littermates were developed in an low-density lipoprotein receptor -/- background. hepAGT+/+ mice were injected intraperitoneally with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a null insert. hepAGT-/- mice were injected with AAV containing a null insert, wild-type AGT or Cys18Ser and Cys137Ser mutated AGT. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. Administration of AAV containing either form of AGT led to similar plasma AGT concentrations in hepAGT-/- mice. High plasma renin concentrations in hepAGT-/- mice were suppressed equally by both forms of AGT, which were accompanied by comparable increases of plasma AngII concentrations similar to hepAGT+/+ mice. AAV-driven expression of both forms of AGT led to equivalent increases of systolic blood pressure and augmentation of atherosclerotic lesion size in hepAGT-/- mice. These measurements were comparable to systolic blood pressure and atherosclerotic lesions in hepAGT+/+ mice. These data indicate that the Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in AGT is dispensable for AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice. PMID:25691624

  7. Impact of the functional status of saeRS on in vivo phenotypes of Staphylococcus aureus?sarA mutants.

    PubMed

    Beenken, Karen E; Mrak, Lara N; Zielinska, Agnieszka K; Atwood, Danielle N; Loughran, Allister J; Griffin, Linda M; Matthews, K Alice; Anthony, Allison M; Spencer, Horace J; Skinner, Robert A; Post, Ginell R; Lee, Chia Y; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the in vivo relevance of the impact of sarA and saeRS on protease production using derivatives of the USA300 strain LAC. The results confirmed that mutation of saeRS or sarA reduces virulence in a bacteremia model to a comparable degree. However, while eliminating protease production restored virulence in the sarA mutant, it had little impact in the saeRS mutant. Additionally, constitutive activation of saeRS (saeRS(C)) enhanced the virulence of LAC and largely restored virulence in the isogenic sarA mutant. Based on these results, together with our analysis of the representative virulence factors alpha toxin, protein A (Spa), and extracellular nucleases, we propose a model in which the attenuation of saeRS mutants is defined primarily by decreased production of such factors, while constitutive activation of saeRS increases virulence, and reverses the attenuation of sarA mutants, because it results in both increased production and decreased protease-mediated degradation of these same factors. This regulatory balance was also apparent in a murine model of catheter-associated infection, with the results suggesting that the impact of saeRS on nuclease production plays an important role during the early stages of these infections that is partially offset by increased protease production in sarA mutants. PMID:24779437

  8. Subunit-Specific Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mulky, Alok; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Edward; Wu, Xiaoyun; Kappes, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a heterodimer comprised of two structurally distinct subunits (p51 and p66). Since p51 and p66 are derived from the same coding region, subunit-specific structure-function studies of RT have been conducted exclusively by in vitro biochemical approaches. To study RT subunit function in the context of infectious virus, we constructed an LTR-vpr-p51-IRES-p66 expression cassette in which the HIV-1 vpr gene was fused in frame with p51, followed by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence and the p66 coding region. By coexpression with RT-deficient proviral DNA, we demonstrated that the p66 subunit is specifically and selectively packaged into virions as a Vpr-p51/p66 complex. Our analysis showed that cleavage by the viral protease liberates Vpr and generates functional heterodimeric RT (p51/p66) that supports HIV-1 reverse transcription and virus infection. By exploiting this novel trans-complementation approach, we demonstrated, for the first time with infectious virions, that the YMDD aspartates of p66 are both required and sufficient for RT polymerase function. Mutational analyses of the p51 YMDD aspartates indicated that they play an important structural role in p51 folding and subunit interactions that are required for the formation of an active RT heterodimer within infected cells. Understanding the role of the individual RT subunits in RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA synthesis is integral to our understanding of RT function. Our findings will lead to important new insights into the role of the p51 and p66 subunits in HIV-1 reverse transcription. PMID:15194785

  9. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled â??A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivoâ? which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigatorâ??s laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts, as well as a U.S. patent. There are several additional publications that will be submitted in 2007 that were supported in part by this program. These future publications include one manuscript on in vivo expression profiling analysis in mouse models, one manuscript on radiation responses in human cell lines, at least one on development of stress signatures in human cells, and three manuscripts on radiation metabolomics.

  10. Clopidogrel (Plavix), a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, inhibits bone cell function in vitro and decreases trabecular bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Syberg, Susanne; Brandao-Burch, Andrea; Patel, Jessal J; Hajjawi, Mark; Arnett, Timothy R; Schwarz, Peter; Jorgensen, Niklas R; Orriss, Isabel R

    2012-11-01

    Clopidogrel (Plavix), a selective P2Y(12) receptor antagonist, is widely prescribed to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke and acts via the inhibition of platelet aggregation. Accumulating evidence now suggests that extracellular nucleotides, signaling through P2 receptors, play a significant role in bone, modulating both osteoblast and osteoclast function. In this study, we investigated the effects of clopidogrel treatment on (1) bone cell formation, differentiation, and activity in vitro; and (2) trabecular and cortical bone parameters in vivo. P2Y(12) receptor expression by osteoblasts and osteoclasts was confirmed using qPCR and Western blotting. Clopidogrel at 10 µM and 25 µM inhibited mineralized bone nodule formation by 50% and >85%, respectively. Clopidogrel slowed osteoblast proliferation with dose-dependent decreases in cell number (25% to 40%) evident in differentiating osteoblasts (day 7). A single dose of 10 to 25 µM clopidogrel to mature osteoblasts also reduced cell viability. At 14 days, ?10 µM clopidogrel decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity by ?70% and collagen formation by 40%, while increasing adipocyte formation. In osteoclasts, ?1 µM clopidogrel inhibited formation, viability and resorptive activity. Twenty-week-old mice (n = 10-12) were ovariectomized or sham treated and dosed orally with clopidogrel (1 mg/kg) or vehicle (NaCl) daily for 4 weeks. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis showed clopidogrel-treated animals had decreases of 2% and 4% in whole-body and femoral bone mineral density (BMD), respectively. Detailed analysis of trabecular and cortical bone using micro-computed tomography (microCT) showed decreased trabecular bone volume in the tibia (24%) and femur (18%) of clopidogrel-treated mice. Trabecular number was reduced 20%, while trabecular separation was increased up to 15%. Trabecular thickness and cortical bone parameters were unaffected. Combined, these findings indicate that long-term exposure of bone cells to clopidogrel in vivo could negatively impact bone health. PMID:22714653

  11. Proteomic Analysis of the Left Ventricle Post-myocardial Infarction to Identify In Vivo Candidate Matrix Metalloproteinase Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Li, Yaojun; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E.; Hakala, Kevin; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling post-myocardial infarction (MI) involves a multitude of mechanisms that regulate the repair response. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a major family of proteolytic enzymes that coordinate extracellular matrix turnover. Both MMP-7 deletion and MMP-9 deletion reduce of the left ventricle post-MI, but the mechanisms have not been fully clarified. Both MMP-7 and MMP-9 have a large number of known in vitro substrates, but in vivo substrates for these two MMPs in the myocardial infarction setting are incompletely identified. Advances in proteomic techniques have enabled comprehensive profiling of protein expression in cells and tissue. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for the proteomic analysis of in vivo candidate MMP substrates in the post-MI left ventricle using two-dimensional electrophoresis, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and immunoblotting. PMID:23955744

  12. Analysis of Scanning DMA Transfer Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Praney Dubey; Suresh Dhaniyala

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to determine transfer functions of scanning differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) is introduced. An expression for non-diffusive particle trajectories in a cylindrical DMA operating in a scanning voltage mode is obtained analytically. Particle trajectory simulations are then used to determine the scanning DMA transfer functions. The results suggest that the shape of the scanning DMA transfer functions may

  13. In vivo proteomic analysis of the intracellular bacterial pathogen, Francisella tularensis, isolated from mouse spleen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Twine; Nadia C. S. Mykytczuk; Mireille D. Petit; Hua Shen; Anders Sjöstedt; J. Wayne Conlan; John F. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of infectious diseases requires comprehensive knowledge of the proteins expressed by the pathogen during in vivo growth in the host. Proteomics provides the tools for such analyses but the protocols required to purify sufficient quantities of the pathogen from the host organism are currently lacking. Here, we present a rapid immunomagnetic protocol for the separation of Francisella

  14. In vivo analysis of mechanical wall stress and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark F. Fillinger; M. L. Raghavan; Steven P. Marra; Jack L. Cronenwett; Francis E. Kennedy

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to calculate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall stresses in vivo for ruptured, symptomatic, and electively repaired AAAs with three-dimensional computer modeling techniques, computed tomographic scan data, and blood pressure and to compare wall stress with current clinical indices related to rupture risk. Methods: CT scans were analyzed for 48 patients with AAAs: 18

  15. Defective Mitochondrial Function In Vivo in Skeletal Muscle in Adults with Down’s Syndrome: A 31P-MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Alexander C.; Sleigh, Alison; McAllister, Catherine J.; Brage, Soren; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Kemp, Graham J.; Holland, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Down’s syndrome (DS) is a developmental disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID). We have previously shown that people with DS engage in very low levels of exercise compared to people with ID not due to DS. Many aspects of the DS phenotype, such as dementia, low activity levels and poor muscle tone, are shared with disorders of mitochondrial origin, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in cultured DS tissue. We undertook a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) study in the quadriceps muscle of 14 people with DS and 11 non-DS ID controls to investigate the post-exercise resynthesis kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr), which relies on mitochondrial respiratory function and yields a measure of muscle mitochondrial function in vivo. We found that the PCr recovery rate constant was significantly decreased in adults with DS compared to non-DS ID controls (1.7±0.1 min?1 vs 2.1±0.1 min?1 respectively) who were matched for physical activity levels, indicating that muscle mitochondrial function in vivo is impaired in DS. This is the first study to investigate mitochondrial function in vivo in DS using 31P-MRS. Our study is consistent with previous in vitro studies, supporting a theory of a global mitochondrial defect in DS. PMID:24391872

  16. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo Defective Interfering-Like RNA of Influenza A H1N1 Pandemic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Saira, Kazima; Lin, Xudong; DePasse, Jay V.; Halpin, Rebecca; Twaddle, Alan; Stockwell, Timothy; Angus, Brian; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Delfino, Marina; Dugan, Vivien; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Freiberg, Matthew; Horban, Andrzej; Losso, Marcelo; Lynfield, Ruth; Wentworth, Deborah N.; Holmes, Edward C.; Davey, Richard; Wentworth, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus defective interfering (DI) particles are naturally occurring noninfectious virions typically generated during in vitro serial passages in cell culture of the virus at a high multiplicity of infection. DI particles are recognized for the role they play in inhibiting viral replication and for the impact they have on the production of infectious virions. To date, influenza virus DI particles have been reported primarily as a phenomenon of cell culture and in experimentally infected embryonated chicken eggs. They have also been isolated from a respiratory infection of chickens. Using a sequencing approach, we characterize several subgenomic viral RNAs from human nasopharyngeal specimens infected with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The distribution of these in vivo-derived DI-like RNAs was similar to that of in vitro DIs, with the majority of the defective RNAs generated from the PB2 (segment 1) of the polymerase complex, followed by PB1 and PA. The lengths of the in vivo-derived DI-like segments also are similar to those of known in vitro DIs, and the in vivo-derived DI-like segments share internal deletions of the same segments. The presence of identical DI-like RNAs in patients linked by direct contact is compatible with transmission between them. The functional role of DI-like RNAs in natural infections remains to be established. PMID:23678180

  17. A peptide targeting an interaction interface disrupts the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer to block signaling and function in vitro and in vivo: effective selective antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hasbi, Ahmed; Perreault, Melissa L; Shen, Maurice Y F; Zhang, Lucia; To, Ryan; Fan, Theresa; Nguyen, Tuan; Ji, Xiaodong; O'Dowd, Brian F; George, Susan R

    2014-11-01

    Although the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer has emerging physiological relevance and a postulated role in different neuropsychiatric disorders, such as drug addiction, depression, and schizophrenia, there is a need for pharmacological tools that selectively target such receptor complexes in order to analyze their biological and pathophysiological functions. Since no selective antagonists for the D1-D2 heteromer are available, serial deletions and point mutations were used to precisely identify the amino acids involved in an interaction interface between the receptors, residing within the carboxyl tail of the D1 receptor that interacted with the D2 receptor to form the D1-D2 receptor heteromer. It was determined that D1 receptor carboxyl tail residues (404)Glu and (405)Glu were critical in mediating the interaction with the D2 receptor. Isolated mutation of these residues in the D1 receptor resulted in the loss of agonist activation of the calcium signaling pathway mediated through the D1-D2 receptor heteromer. The physical interaction between the D1 and D2 receptor could be disrupted, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation and BRET analysis, by a small peptide generated from the D1 receptor sequence that contained these amino acids, leading to a switch in G-protein affinities and loss of calcium signaling, resulting in the inhibition of D1-D2 heteromer function. The use of the D1-D2 heteromer-disrupting peptide in vivo revealed a pathophysiological role for the D1-D2 heteromer in the modulation of behavioral despair. This peptide may represent a novel pharmacological tool with potential therapeutic benefits in depression treatment. PMID:25063849

  18. Elements of the Polycomb Repressor SU(Z)12 Needed for Histone H3-K27 Methylation, the Interface with E(Z), and In Vivo Function

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Vargas, Marcus L.; Wang, Liangjun; Andersen, Erica F.; Miller, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential chromatin-modifying enzyme that implements gene silencing. PRC2 methylates histone H3 on lysine-27 and is conserved from plants to flies to humans. In Drosophila melanogaster, PRC2 contains four core subunits: E(Z), SU(Z)12, ESC, and NURF55. E(Z) bears a SET domain that houses the enzyme active site. However, PRC2 activity depends upon critical inputs from SU(Z)12 and ESC. The stimulatory mechanisms are not understood. We present here functional dissection of the SU(Z)12 subunit. SU(Z)12 contains two highly conserved domains: an ?140-amino-acid VEFS domain and a Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF). Analysis of recombinant PRC2 bearing VEFS domain alterations, including some modeled after leukemia mutations, identifies distinct elements needed for SU(Z)12 assembly with E(Z) and stimulation of histone methyltransferase. The results define an extensive VEFS subdomain that organizes the SU(Z)12-E(Z) interface. Although the SU(Z)12 ZnF is not needed for methyltransferase in vitro, genetic rescue assays show that the ZnF is required in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitations reveal that this ZnF facilitates PRC2 binding to a genomic target. This study defines functionally critical SU(Z)12 elements, including key determinants of SU(Z)12-E(Z) communication. Together with recent findings, this illuminates PRC2 modulation by conserved inputs from its noncatalytic subunits. PMID:24100017

  19. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca’ Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2/FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2/FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40–84] vs. 39 [36–46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  20. Longitudinal, 3D in vivo imaging of sebaceous glands by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy: normal function and response to cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yookyung; Tam, Joshua; Jalian, H Ray; Anderson, R Rox; Evans, Conor L

    2015-01-01

    Sebaceous glands perform complex functions, and they are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Current techniques for studying sebaceous glands are mostly static in nature, whereas the gland's main function-excretion of sebum via the holocrine mechanism-can only be evaluated over time. We present a longitudinal, real-time alternative-the in vivo, label-free imaging of sebaceous glands using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy, which is used to selectively visualize lipids. In mouse ears, CARS microscopy revealed dynamic changes in sebaceous glands during the holocrine secretion process, as well as in response to damage to the glands caused by cooling. Detailed gland structure, plus the active migration of individual sebocytes and cohorts of sebocytes, were measured. Cooling produced characteristic changes in sebocyte structure and migration. This study demonstrates that CARS microscopy is a promising tool for studying the sebaceous gland and its associated disorders in three dimensions in vivo. PMID:25026458

  1. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane

  2. Fast static analysis of C++ virtual function calls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David F. Bacon; Peter F. Sweeney

    1996-01-01

    Virtual functions make code easier for programmers to reuse but also make it harder for compilers to analyze. We investigate the ability of three static analysis algorithms to improve C++ programs by resolving virtual function calls, thereby reducing compiled code size and reducing program complexity so as to improve both human and automated program understanding and analysis. In measurements of

  3. The alteration of profile analysis to accommodate testing functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a methodology was studied for testing differences among several pilot functions, where the data points represent averages at various frequencies. Topics discussed include: basic assumptions, hypothesis, profile analysis, alteration of profile analysis to accommodate testing functions, test and procedures, and power of tests.

  4. Continuous detrended cross-correlation analysis on generalized Weierstrass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Shang, Pengjian; Huang, Jingjing

    2013-02-01

    The paper mainly introduces a continuous detrended cross-correlation analysis method to detect the long-range fractal scaling behaviors of continuous and integrable functions. The effects of such method are tested by the generalized Weierstrass function with various seeds. It presents accurate scaling characterization as desired by comparing with that from the popular detrended cross-correlation analysis method of discrete case.

  5. The impact of ex vivo clinical grade activation protocols on human T cell phenotype and function for the generation of genetically modified cells for adoptive cell transfer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Koya, Richard C.; Chodon, Thinle; Graham, Nicholas A.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Ribas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Optimized conditions for the ex vivo activation, genetic manipulation, and expansion of human lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy (ACT) may lead to protocols that maximize their in vivo function. We analyzed the effects of four clinical grade activation and expansion protocols over three weeks on cell proliferative rate, immunophenotype, cell metabolism, and transduction efficiency of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Peak lentiviral transduction efficiency was early (days 2 to 4), at a time when cells demonstrated a larger size, maximal uptake of metabolic substrates, and the highest level of proximal TCR signaling engagement. Anti-CD2/3/28 activation beads induced greater proliferation rate and skewed PBMCs early on to a CD4 phenotype when compared to the cells cultured in OKT3. Multicolor surface phenotyping demonstrated that changes in T cell surface markers that define T cell functional phenotypes were dependent on the time spent in culture as opposed to the particular activation protocol. In conclusion, ex vivo activation of human PBMCs for ACT demonstrate defined immunophenotypic and functional signatures over time, with cells early on showing larger sizes, higher transduction efficiency, maximal metabolic activity and ZAP-70 activation. PMID:20842061

  6. Titanium implants with modified surfaces: Meta-analysis of in vivo osteointegration.

    PubMed

    Gasik, Michael; Braem, Annabel; Chaudhari, Amol; Duyck, Joke; Vleugels, Jozef

    2015-04-01

    Titanium-based implants are widely used in modern clinical practice, but their "optimal" properties in terms of porosity and topology, roughness and hydrophilic parameters are being a subject of intensive discussions. Recent in vitro results have shown a possibility to optimize the surface of an implant with maximal repelling of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and improvement in human osteogenic and endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this work, these different grades titanium implants were tested in vivo using the same analytical methodology. In addition to material parameters, key histomorphometrical parameters such a regeneration area, bone adaptation area and bone-to-implant contact were determined after 2 and 4weeks of implantation in rabbit animal model. Porous implants have more clear differences than non-porous ones, with the best optimum values obtained on hydrothermally treated electrophoretically deposited titanium. These in vivo data correlate well with the optimal prediction made by in vitro tests. PMID:25686935

  7. Analysis of lipid droplet dynamics and functions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han; Peng, Ying; Guo, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The lipid droplet (LD) is a unique cellular organelle containing a neutral-lipid core enclosed by a phospholipid monolayer and associated proteins. Despite the important function of LDs at the hub of cellular energy homeostasis regulation, major questions in the field of LD biology are still unanswered. Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a model organism to make fundamental discoveries in biology for over a century. In recent years, genome-wide unbiased reverse genetic screens using Drosophila cells or transgenic lines have been proven to provide valuable knowledge to the field of LD biology. Here we summarize the methods we use for functional genomic screens in Drosophila S2 cells to identify genes involved in LD biology, and the methods used for studying LD function in vivo using Drosophila as a model to combat metabolic diseases. PMID:24099287

  8. In vivo effect of coronary laser angioplasty on atherosclerotic plaques: Histopathologic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    On Topaz; Anthony J Minisi; Laxmi Mohanty; Nanny Bailey; Jack L Titus

    2001-01-01

    Information from histopathologic examination of coronary arterial atherosclerotic plaques treated with in vivo laser energy is sparse. Directional atherectomy provides biopsies for study of tissue changes (injury) due to coronary arterial debulking devices, including laser. Sixteen patients who presented with acute ischemic coronary syndromes underwent debulking of a total of 17 obstructive intracoronary lesions with pulsed-wave holmium:YAG laser (2.1 ?m

  9. In vivo formaldehyde cross-linking: it is time for black box analysis.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Alexey; Razin, Sergey V; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2015-03-01

    Formaldehyde cross-linking is an important component of many technologies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation and chromosome conformation capture. The procedure remains empirical and poorly characterized, however, despite a long history of its use in research. Little is known about the specificity of in vivo cross-linking, its efficiency and chemical adducts induced by the procedure. It is time to search this black box. PMID:25241225

  10. An exploration of function analysis and function allocation in the commercial flight domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James C.; Zich, John A.; Goins, Richard T.; Erickson, Jeffery B.; Dwyer, John P.; Cody, William J.; Rouse, William B.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability is explored of functional analysis methods to support cockpit design. Specifically, alternative techniques are studied for ensuring an effective division of responsibility between the flight crew and automation. A functional decomposition is performed of the commercial flight domain to provide the information necessary to support allocation decisions and demonstrate methodology for allocating functions to flight crew or to automation. The function analysis employed 'bottom up' and 'top down' analyses and demonstrated the comparability of identified functions, using the 'lift off' segment of the 'take off' phase as a test case. The normal flight mission and selected contingencies were addressed. Two alternative methods for using the functional description in the allocation of functions between man and machine were investigated. The two methods were compared in order to ascertain their relative strengths and weaknesses. Finally, conclusions were drawn regarding the practical utility of function analysis methods.

  11. A quantitative look inside the body: minimally invasive infrared analysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vran?i?, Christian; Kröger, Niels; Gretz, Norbert; Neudecker, Sabine; Pucci, Annemarie; Petrich, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Today's minimally invasive biosensors are often based on chemical reagents and suffer from, e.g., oxygen dependence, toxic reaction products, excess analyte consumption, and/or degradation of the reagents. Here, we show the first successful analyte quantification by means of a minimally invasive sensor in vivo, which does not use chemical reactions. The concentration of glucose is determined continuously in vivo using transcutaneous, fiber-based mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. When comparing the infrared data measured in vivo with the 127 reference readings of glucose obtained in vitro, an overall standard deviation of 17.5% and a median of the absolute values of the relative deviations of 11.0% are achieved. The encouraging results open up the path toward a reagent-free long-term implant for the continuous surveillance of metabolites. In addition, the high sampling rate facilitates important research in body metabolism as well as its application outside the field of medicine such as real-time analyte sensing during fermentation. PMID:25329042

  12. Effect of Perinatal secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on in vivo and intrinsic airway structure/function in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)], E-mail: jesse.joad@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Infants exposed to second hand smoke (SHS) experience more problems with wheezing. This study was designed to determine if perinatal SHS exposure increases intrinsic and/or in vivo airway responsiveness to methacholine and whether potential structural/cellular alterations in the airway might explain the change in responsiveness. Pregnant rhesus monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA) or SHS (1 mg/m{sup 3} total suspended particulates) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week starting at 50 days gestational age. The mother/infant pairs continued the SHS exposures postnatally. At 3 months of age each infant: 1) had in vivo lung function measurements in response to inhaled methacholine, or 2) the right accessory lobe filled with agarose, precision-cut to 600 {mu}m slices, and bathed in increasing concentrations of methacholine. The lumenal area of the central airway was determined using videomicrometry followed by fixation and histology with morphometry. In vivo tests showed that perinatal SHS increases baseline respiratory rate and decreases responsiveness to methacholine. Perinatal SHS did not alter intrinsic airway responsiveness in the bronchi. However in respiratory bronchioles, SHS exposure increased airway responsiveness at lower methacholine concentrations but decreased it at higher concentrations. Perinatal SHS did not change eosinophil profiles, epithelial volume, smooth muscle volume, or mucin volume. However it did increase the number of alveolar attachments in bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In general, as mucin increased, airway responsiveness decreased. We conclude that perinatal SHS exposure alters in vivo and intrinsic airway responsiveness, and alveolar attachments.

  13. Live-cell high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy for in vivo analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Constantinou, Caterina; Kesarwani, Meenu; Rahme, Laurence G; Tzika, Aria A

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium that is widespread in nature, inhabiting soil, water, plants and animals. PA is a prevalent cause of deleterious human infections, particularly in patients whose host defense mechanisms have been compromised. Metabolomics is an important tool used to study host-pathogen interactions and to identify novel therapeutic targets and corresponding compounds. The aim of the present study was to report the metabolic profile of live PA bacteria using in vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), in combination with 1- and 2-dimensional HRMAS NMR. This methodology provides a new and powerful technique to rapidly interrogate the metabolome of intact bacterial cells and has several advantages over traditional techniques that identify metabolome components from disrupted cells. Furthermore, application of multidimensional HRMAS NMR, in combination with the novel technique total through-Bond correlation Spectroscopy (TOBSY), is a promising approach that may be used to obtain in vivo metabolomics information from intact live bacterial cells and can mediate such analyses in a short period of time. Moreover, HRMAS (1)H NMR enables the investigation of the associations between metabolites and cell processes. In the present study, we detected and quantified several informative metabolic molecules in live PA cells, including N-acetyl, betaine, citrulline, alanine and glycine, which are important in peptidoglycan synthesis. The results provided a complete metabolic profile of PA for future studies of PA clinical isolates and mutants. In addition, this in vivo NMR biomedical approach might have clinical utility and should prove useful in gene function validation, the study of pathogenetic mechanisms, the classification of microbial strains into functional/clinical groups, the testing of anti-bacterial agents and the determination of metabolic profiles of bacterial mutants. PMID:24649014

  14. Green function analysis of a Raman FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, G.; Wurtele, J. S.

    1995-04-01

    This paper derives, in closed form, the Green function of an FEL operating in the strongly Raman regime. This Green function allows for the calculation of the temporal and spacial evolution of an arbitrary input radiation pulse. For the first time superradiance, originally studied in Compton regime by Bonifacio and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 70; Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 239 (1985) 36], has been seen numerically in a strongly Raman FEL.

  15. Structure Function Analysis of Complex Dynamics of Plasma Turbulence

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Mark

    Structure Function Analysis of Complex Dynamics of Plasma Turbulence C.X. Yu1 , M. Gilmore2 , TGn signals The Scaled Windowed Variance Method: fBm signals Structure Functions: fBm signals Spectral statistical methods are needed to characterize different classes of random processes. · Structure Functions

  16. Application of Lie group analysis to functional differential equations

    E-print Network

    Martin Oberlack; Marta Waclawczyk

    2006-10-27

    In the present paper the classical point symmetry analysis is extended from partial differential to functional differential equations with functional derivatives. In order to perform the group analysis and deal with the functional derivatives we extend the quantities such as infinitesimal transformations, prolongations and invariant solutions. For the sake of example the procedure is applied to the continuum limit of the heat equation. The method can further lead to significant applications in statistical physics and fluid dynamics.

  17. Analysis of the interaction of phytoestrogens and synthetic chemicals: An in vitro/in vivo comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, Grantley D. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States)]. E-mail: charles_grantley@allergan.com; Gennings, Chris [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Tornesi, Belen [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Kan, H. Lynn [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Zacharewski, Timothy R. [Department of Biochemistry and National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bhaskar Gollapudi, B. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Carney, Edward W. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States)

    2007-02-01

    In the evaluation of chemical mixture toxicity, it is desirable to develop an evaluation paradigm which incorporates some critical attributes of real world exposures, particularly low dose levels, larger numbers of chemicals, and chemicals from synthetic and natural sources. This study evaluated the impact of low level exposure to a mixture of six synthetic chemicals (SC) under conditions of co-exposure to various levels of plant-derived phytoestrogen (PE) compounds. Estrogenic activity was evaluated using an in vitro human estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation assay and an in vivo immature rat uterotrophic assay. Initially, dose-response curves were characterized for each of the six SCs (methoxyclor, o,p-DDT, octylphenol, bisphenol A, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile) in each of the assays. The six SCs were then combined at equipotent ratios and tested at 5-6 dose levels spanning from very low, sub-threshold levels, to a dose in which every chemical in the mixture was at its individual estrogenic response threshold. The SC mixtures also were tested in the absence or presence of 5-6 different levels of PEs, for a total of 36 (in vitro) or 25 (in vivo) treatment groups. Both in vitro and in vivo, low concentrations of the SC mixture failed to increase estrogenic responses relative to those induced by PEs alone. However, significant increases in response occurred when each chemical in the SC mixture was near or above its individual response threshold. In vitro, interactions between high-doses of SCs and PEs were greater than additive, whereas mixtures of SCs in the absence of PEs interacted in a less than additive fashion. In vivo, the SC and PE mixture responses were consistent with additivity. These data illustrate a novel approach for incorporating key attributes of real world exposures in chemical mixture toxicity assessments, and suggest that chemical mixture toxicity is likely to be of concern only when the mixture components are near or above their individual response thresholds. However, these data suggest that extrapolation from in vitro assays to in vivo mixture effects should be approached with caution.

  18. Large-scale phosphoprotein analysis in Medicago truncatula roots provides insight into in vivo kinase activity in legumes.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Paul A; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D; Swaney, Danielle L; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  19. Euclidean analysis of the entropy functional formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Silva, Pedro J. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) and Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies (IFAE), E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    The attractor mechanism implies that the supersymmetric black hole near-horizon solution is defined only in terms of the conserved charges and is therefore independent of asymptotic moduli. Starting only with the near-horizon geometry, Sen's entropy functional formalism computes the entropy of an extreme black hole by means of a Legendre transformation where the electric fields are defined as conjugated variables to the electric charges. However, traditional Euclidean methods require the knowledge of the full geometry to compute the black hole thermodynamic quantities. We establish the connection between the entropy functional formalism and the standard Euclidean formalism taken at zero-temperature. We find that Sen's entropy function f (on-shell) matches the zero-temperature limit of the Euclidean action. Moreover, Sen's near-horizon angular and electric fields agree with the chemical potentials that are defined from the zero-temperature limit of the Euclidean formalism.

  20. WHITE NOISE ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRALS Ludwig Streit

    E-print Network

    WHITE NOISE ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRALS Ludwig Streit BiBoS, Univ. Bielefeld, D 4800 of White Noise Analysis as preparation for a discussion of a recent, mathematically rigorous and effective][5] and the corresponding Markov processes [6], rotation 1 see e.g. the remarks in [2] 1 #12; WHITE NOISE ANALYSIS

  1. Error analysis in nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  2. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    E-print Network

    Nicolas Schunck; Jordan D. McDonnell; Jason Sarich; Stefan M. Wild; Dave Higdon

    2014-07-11

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  3. Comparison of human lung tissue mass measurements from Ex Vivo lungs and high resolution CT software analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantification of lung tissue via analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is increasingly common for monitoring disease progression and for planning of therapeutic interventions. The current study evaluates the quantification of human lung tissue mass by software analysis of a CT to physical tissue mass measurements. Methods Twenty-two ex vivo lungs were scanned by CT and analyzed by commercially available software. The lungs were then dissected into lobes and sublobar segments and weighed. Because sublobar boundaries are not visually apparent, a novel technique of defining sublobar segments in ex vivo tissue was developed. The tissue masses were then compared to measurements by the software analysis. Results Both emphysematous (n?=?14) and non-emphysematous (n?=?8) bilateral lungs were evaluated. Masses (Mean?±?SD) as measured by dissection were 651?±?171?g for en bloc lungs, 126?±?60?g for lobar segments, and 46?±?23?g for sublobar segments. Masses as measured by software analysis were 598?±?159?g for en bloc lungs, 120?±?58?g for lobar segments, and 45?±?23?g for sublobar segments. Correlations between measurement methods was above 0.9 for each segmentation level. The Bland-Altman analysis found limits of agreement at the lung, lobe and sublobar levels to be ?13.11% to ?4.22%, –13.59% to 4.24%, and –45.85% to 44.56%. Conclusion The degree of concordance between the software mass quantification to physical mass measurements provides substantial evidence that the software method represents an appropriate non-invasive means to determine lung tissue mass. PMID:22584018

  4. Genetic analysis of the Complexin trans-clamping model for cross-linking SNARE complexes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Richard W.; Kümmel, Daniel; Li, Feng; Baguley, Stephanie Wood; Coleman, Jeff; Rothman, James E.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2014-01-01

    Complexin (Cpx) is a SNARE-binding protein that regulates neurotransmission by clamping spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion in the absence of Ca2+ influx while promoting evoked release in response to an action potential. Previous studies indicated Cpx may cross-link multiple SNARE complexes via a trans interaction to function as a fusion clamp. During Ca2+ influx, Cpx is predicted to undergo a conformational switch and collapse onto a single SNARE complex in a cis-binding mode to activate vesicle release. To test this model in vivo, we performed structure–function studies of the Cpx protein in Drosophila. Using genetic rescue approaches with cpx mutants that disrupt SNARE cross-linking, we find that manipulations that are predicted to block formation of the trans SNARE array disrupt the clamping function of Cpx. Unexpectedly, these same mutants rescue action potential-triggered release, indicating trans–SNARE cross-linking by Cpx is not a prerequisite for triggering evoked fusion. In contrast, mutations that impair Cpx-mediated cis–SNARE interactions that are necessary for transition from an open to closed conformation fail to rescue evoked release defects in cpx mutants, although they clamp spontaneous release normally. Our in vivo genetic manipulations support several predictions made by the Cpx cross-linking model, but unexpected results suggest additional mechanisms are likely to exist that regulate Cpx’s effects on SNARE-mediated fusion. Our findings also indicate that the inhibitory and activating functions of Cpx are genetically separable, and can be mapped to distinct molecular mechanisms that differentially regulate the SNARE fusion machinery. PMID:24982161

  5. Genetic analysis of the Complexin trans-clamping model for cross-linking SNARE complexes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cho, Richard W; Kümmel, Daniel; Li, Feng; Baguley, Stephanie Wood; Coleman, Jeff; Rothman, James E; Littleton, J Troy

    2014-07-15

    Complexin (Cpx) is a SNARE-binding protein that regulates neurotransmission by clamping spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion in the absence of Ca(2+) influx while promoting evoked release in response to an action potential. Previous studies indicated Cpx may cross-link multiple SNARE complexes via a trans interaction to function as a fusion clamp. During Ca(2+) influx, Cpx is predicted to undergo a conformational switch and collapse onto a single SNARE complex in a cis-binding mode to activate vesicle release. To test this model in vivo, we performed structure-function studies of the Cpx protein in Drosophila. Using genetic rescue approaches with cpx mutants that disrupt SNARE cross-linking, we find that manipulations that are predicted to block formation of the trans SNARE array disrupt the clamping function of Cpx. Unexpectedly, these same mutants rescue action potential-triggered release, indicating trans-SNARE cross-linking by Cpx is not a prerequisite for triggering evoked fusion. In contrast, mutations that impair Cpx-mediated cis-SNARE interactions that are necessary for transition from an open to closed conformation fail to rescue evoked release defects in cpx mutants, although they clamp spontaneous release normally. Our in vivo genetic manipulations support several predictions made by the Cpx cross-linking model, but unexpected results suggest additional mechanisms are likely to exist that regulate Cpx's effects on SNARE-mediated fusion. Our findings also indicate that the inhibitory and activating functions of Cpx are genetically separable, and can be mapped to distinct molecular mechanisms that differentially regulate the SNARE fusion machinery. PMID:24982161

  6. Ex vivo promoter analysis of antiviral heat shock cognate 70B gene in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seokyoung; Sim, Cheolho; Byrd, Brian D; Collins, Frank H; Hong, Young S

    2008-01-01

    Background The Anopheles gambiae heat shock cognate gene (hsc70B) encodes a constitutively expressed protein in the hsp70 family and it functions as a molecular chaperone for protein folding. However, the expression of hsc70B can be further induced by certain stimuli such as heat shock and infection. We previously demonstrated that the An. gambiae hsc70B is induced during o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV) infection and subsequently suppresses ONNV replication in the mosquito. To further characterize the inducibility of hsc70B by ONNV infection in An. gambiae, we cloned a 2.6-kb region immediately 5' upstream of the starting codon of hsc70B into a luciferase reporter vector (pGL3-Basic), and studied its promoter activity in transfected Vero cells during infection with o'nyong-nyong, West Nile and La Crosse viruses. Results Serial deletion analysis of the hsc70B upstream sequence revealed that the putative promoter is likely located in a region 1615–2150 bp upstream of the hsc70B starting codon. Sequence analysis of this region revealed transcriptional regulatory elements for heat shock element-binding protein (HSE-bind), nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), dorsal (Dl) and fushi-tarazu (Ftz). Arbovirus infection, regardless of virus type, significantly increased the hsc70B promoter activity in transfected Vero cells. Conclusion Our results further validate the transcriptional activation of hsc70B during arbovirus infection and support the role of specific putative regulatory elements. Induction by three taxonomically distinct arboviruses suggests that the HSC70B protein may be expressed to cope with cellular stress imposed during infection. PMID:18986525

  7. Functional Analysis for Double Shell Tank (DST) Subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, D.F.

    2000-08-22

    This functional analysis identifies the hierarchy and describes the subsystem functions that support the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System described in HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System. Because of the uncertainty associated with the need for upgrades of the existing catch tanks supporting the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission, catch tank functions are not addressed in this document. The functions identified herein are applicable to the Phase 1 WFD mission only.

  8. FAD: A FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS AND DESIGN METHODOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Kent, University of

    also includes relationships and associations between these elements, and provides simple's Introduction to Functional Programming on holiday to India. It's strange, I loved was always interested in what I was doing and provided love all the way. My dad, brother and sister have

  9. Understanding of Brain Function Multivariate Pattern Analysis

    E-print Network

    Bucci, David J.

    provide new insights into the functional properties of the brain. However, unlike the wealth of software groups to fully assess their potential with respect to cognitive neuroscience research. Here, a novel to interface with the wealth of existing machine-learning packages. The framework is presented in this thesis

  10. RNA Interference for Wheat Functional Gene Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells. In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species, this appr...

  11. Analysis of radial basis function interpolation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, You-Long; Hu, Fa-Long; Zhou, Can-Can; Li, Chao-Liu; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2013-12-01

    The radial basis function (RBF) interpolation approach proposed by Freedman is used to solve inverse problems encountered in well-logging and other petrophysical issues. The approach is to predict petrophysical properties in the laboratory on the basis of physical rock datasets, which include the formation factor, viscosity, permeability, and molecular composition. However, this approach does not consider the effect of spatial distribution of the calibration data on the interpolation result. This study proposes a new RBF interpolation approach based on the Freedman's RBF interpolation approach, by which the unit basis functions are uniformly populated in the space domain. The inverse results of the two approaches are comparatively analyzed by using our datasets. We determine that although the interpolation effects of the two approaches are equivalent, the new approach is more flexible and beneficial for reducing the number of basis functions when the database is large, resulting in simplification of the interpolation function expression. However, the predicted results of the central data are not sufficiently satisfied when the data clusters are far apart.

  12. A critical role for suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 in promoting M1 macrophage activation and function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christina E; Whyte, Claire S; Gordon, Peter; Barker, Robert N; Rees, Andrew J; Wilson, Heather M

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages respond to their microenvironment and develop polarized functions critical for orchestrating appropriate inflammatory responses. Classical (M1) activation eliminates pathogens while alternative (M2) activation promotes regulation and repair. M1 macrophage activation is strongly associated with suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) expression in vitro, but the functional consequences of this are unclear and the role of SOCS3 in M1-macrophage polarization in vivo remains controversial. To address these questions, we defined the characteristics and function of SOCS3-expressing macrophages in vivo and identified potential mechanisms of SOCS3 action. Macrophages infiltrating inflamed glomeruli in a model of acute nephritis show significant up-regulation of SOCS3 that co-localizes with the M1-activation marker, inducible nitric oxide synthase. Numbers of SOCS3hi-expressing, but not SOCS1hi-expressing, macrophages correlate strongly with the severity of renal injury, supporting their inflammatory role in vivo. Adoptive transfer of SOCS3-short interfering RNA-silenced macrophages into a peritonitis model demonstrated the importance of SOCS3 in driving production of pro-inflammatory IL-6 and nitric oxide, while curtailing expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10 and SOCS1. SOCS3-induced pro-inflammatory effects were due, at least in part, to its role in controlling activation and nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-?B and activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. We show for the first time that SOCS3 also directs the functions of human monocyte-derived macrophages, including efficient M1-induced cytokine production (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-23, IL-12), attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity and ability of antigen-loaded macrophages to drive T-cell responses. Hence, M1-associated SOCS3 was a positive regulator of pro-inflammatory responses in our rodent models and up-regulated SOCS3 is essential for effective M1-macrophage activation and function in human macrophages. PMID:24088176

  13. Development of genetic tools for in vivo virulence analysis of Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Senty Turner, Lauren; Das, Sankar; Kanamoto, Taisei; Munro, Cindy L.; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Completion of the genome sequence of Streptococcus sanguinis SK36 necessitates tools for further characterization of this species. It is often desirable to insert antibiotic resistance markers and other exogenous genes into the chromosome; therefore, we sought to identify a chromosomal site for ectopic expression of foreign genes, and to verify that insertion into this site did not affect important cellular phenotypes. We designed three plasmid constructs for insertion of erm, aad9 or tetM resistance determinants into a genomic region encoding only a small (65?aa) hypothetical protein. To determine whether this insertion affected important cellular properties, SK36 and its erythromycin-resistant derivative, JFP36, were compared for: (i) growth in vitro, (ii) genetic competence, (iii) biofilm formation and (iv) virulence for endocarditis in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis (IE). The spectinomycin-resistant strain, JFP56, and tetracycline-resistant strain, JFP76, were also tested for virulence in vivo. Insertion of erm did not affect growth, competence or biofilm development of JFP36. Recovery of bacteria from heart valves of co-inoculated rabbits was similar to wild-type for JFP36, JFP56 and JFP76, indicating that IE virulence was not significantly affected. The capacity for mutant complementation in vivo was explored in an avirulent ssaB mutant background. Expression of ssaB from its predicted promoter in the target region restored IE virulence. Thus, the chromosomal site utilized is a good candidate for further manipulations of S. sanguinis. In addition, the resistant strains developed may be further applied as controls to facilitate screening for virulence factors in vivo. PMID:19423626

  14. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in vitro and in vivo metabolism and analysis.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Essers, Martien L; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Thevis, Mario; Bovee, Toine F H; van Ginkel, Leendert A; Sterk, Saskia S

    2013-01-01

    For future targeted screening in National Residue Control Programmes, the metabolism of seven SARMs, from the arylpropionamide and the quinolinone classes, was studied in vitro using S9 bovine liver enzymes. Metabolites were detected and identified with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS) and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS). Several metabolites were identified and results were compared with literature data on metabolism using a human cell line. Monohydroxylation, nitro-reduction, dephenylation and demethylation were the main S9 in vitro metabolic routes established. Next, an in vivo study was performed by oral administration of the arylpropionamide ostarine to a male calf and urine samples were analysed with UPLC-QToF-MS. Apart from two metabolites resulting from hydroxylation and dephenylation that were also observed in the in vitro study, the bovine in vivo metabolites of ostarine resulted in glucuronidation, sulfation and carboxylation, combined with either a hydroxylation or a dephenylation step. As the intact mother compounds of all SARMs tested are the main compounds present after in vitro incubations, and ostarine is still clearly present in the urine after the in vivo metabolism study in veal calves, the intact mother molecules were selected as the indicator to reveal treatment. The analytical UPLC-QqQ-MS/MS procedure was validated for three commercially available arylpropionamides according to European Union criteria (Commission Decision 2002/657/EC), and resulted in decision limits ranging from 0.025 to 0.05 µg l?¹ and a detection capability of 0.025 µg l?¹ in all cases. Adequate precision and intra-laboratory reproducibility (relative standard deviation below 20%) were obtained for all SARMs and the linearity was 0.999 for all compounds. This newly developed method is sensitive and robust, and therefore useful for confirmation and quantification of SARMs in bovine urine samples for residue control programmes and research purposes. PMID:23883284

  15. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  16. Analysis of spectra using correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method is presented for the quantitative analysis of spectra based on the properties of the cross correlation between a real spectrum and either a numerical synthesis or laboratory simulation. A new goodness-of-fit criterion called the heteromorphic coefficient H is proposed that has the property of being zero when a fit is achieved and varying smoothly through zero as the iteration proceeds, providing a powerful tool for automatic or near-automatic analysis. It is also shown that H can be rendered substantially noise-immune, permitting the analysis of very weak spectra well below the apparent noise level and, as a byproduct, providing Doppler shift and radial velocity information with excellent precision. The technique is in regular use in the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) project and operates in an interactive, realtime computing environment with turn-around times of a few seconds or less.

  17. In silico to in vivo splicing analysis using splicing code models

    PubMed Central

    Gazzara, Matthew R.; Vaquero-Garcia, Jorge; Lynch, Kristen W.; Barash, Yoseph

    2015-01-01

    With the growing appreciation of RNA splicing’s role in gene regulation, development, and disease, researchers from diverse fields find themselves investigating exons of interest. Commonly, researchers are interested in knowing if an exon is alternatively spliced, if it is differentially included in specific tissues or in developmental stages, and what regulatory elements control its inclusion. An important step towards the ability to perform such analysis in silico was made with the development of computational splicing code models. Aimed as a practical how-to guide, we demonstrate how researchers can now use these code models to analyze a gene of interest, focusing on Bin1 as a case study. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a nucleocytoplasmic adaptor protein known to be functionally regulated through alternative splicing in a tissue-specific manner. Specific Bin1 isoforms have been associated with muscular diseases and cancers, making the study of its splicing regulation of wide interest. Using AVISPA, a recently released web tool based on splicing code models, we show that many Bin1 tissue-dependent isoforms are correctly predicted, along with many of its known regulators. We review the best practices and constraints of using the tool, demonstrate how AVISPA is used to generate high confidence novel regulatory hypotheses, and experimentally validate predicted regulators of Bin1 alternative splicing. PMID:24321485

  18. Modal analysis of the human neck in vivo as a criterion for crash test dummy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willinger, R.; Bourdet, N.; Fischer, R.; Le Gall, F.

    2005-10-01

    Low speed rear impact remains an acute automative safety problem because of a lack of knowledge of the mechanical behaviour of the human neck early after impact. Poorly validated mathematical models of the human neck or crash test dummy necks make it difficult to optimize automotive seats and head rests. In this study we have constructed an experimental and theoretical modal analysis of the human head-neck system in the sagittal plane. The method has allowed us to identify the mechanical properties of the neck and to validate a mathematical model in the frequency domain. The extracted modal characteristics consist of a first natural frequency at 1.3±0.1 Hz associated with head flexion-extension motion and a second mode at 8±0.7 Hz associated with antero-posterior translation of the head, also called retraction motion. Based on this new validation parameters we have been able to compare the human and crash test dummy frequency response functions and to evaluate their biofidelity. Three head-neck systems of current test dummies dedicated for use in rear-end car crash accident investigations have been evaluated in the frequency domain. We did not consider any to be acceptable, either because of excessive rigidity of their flexion-extension mode or because they poorly reproduce the head translation mode. In addition to dummy evaluation, this study provides new insight into injury mechanisms when a given natural frequency can be linked to a specific neck deformation.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of the Human Skin Proteome after In Vivo Treatment with Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Erika; Skipp, Paul; Aleksic, Maja; Garrow, Andrew; Dadd, Tony; Hughes, Michael; Clough, Geraldine; O?Connor, C. David

    2014-01-01

    Background Skin has a variety of functions that are incompletely understood at the molecular level. As the most accessible tissue in the body it often reveals the first signs of inflammation or infection and also represents a potentially valuable source of biomarkers for several diseases. In this study we surveyed the skin proteome qualitatively using gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) and quantitatively using an isobaric tagging strategy (iTRAQ) to characterise the response of human skin following exposure to sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Results A total of 653 skin proteins were assigned, 159 of which were identified using GeLC-MS/MS and 616 using iTRAQ, representing the most comprehensive proteomic study in human skin tissue. Statistical analysis of the available iTRAQ data did not reveal any significant differences in the measured skin proteome after 4 hours exposure to the model irritant SDS. Conclusions This study represents the first step in defining the critical response to an irritant at the level of the proteome and provides a valuable resource for further studies at the later stages of irritant exposure. PMID:24849295

  20. Next generation software for functional trend analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berriz, Gabriel F.; Beaver, John E.; Cenik, Can; Tasan, Murat; Roth, Frederick P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: FuncAssociate is a web application that discovers properties enriched in lists of genes or proteins that emerge from large-scale experimentation. Here we describe an updated application with a new interface and several new features. For example, enrichment analysis can now be performed within multiple gene- and protein-naming systems. This feature avoids potentially serious translation artifacts to which other enrichment analysis strategies are subject. Availability: The FuncAssociate web application is freely available to all users at http://llama.med.harvard.edu/funcassociate. Contact: fritz_roth@hms.harvard.edu PMID:19717575

  1. DISSIMILARITY-BASED FUNCTIONS FOR ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The package ecodistR is an add-on developed for R statistical software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). It implements statistical analysis methods developed by the authors and others for use with ecological data. The main focus is on multivariate, spatial and dissimilarity...

  2. Finite element analysis in functional morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian G. Richmond; Barth W. Wright; Ian Grosse; Paul C. Dechow; Callum F. Ross; Mark A. Spencer; David S. Strait

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental principles of the finite element method and the three basic steps (model creation, solution, and validation and interpretation) involved in using it to examine structural mechanics. Validation is a critical step in the analysis, without which researchers cannot evaluate the extent to which the model represents or is relevant to the real biological condition. We

  3. Analysis of the Intrinsic Mode Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert C. Sharpley; Vesselin Vatchev

    2006-01-01

    The Empirical Mode Decomposition is a process for signals which produces Intrinsic Mode Functions from which instantaneous\\u000a frequencies may be extracted by simple application of the Hilbert transform. The beauty of this method to generate redundant\\u000a representations is in its simplicity and its effectiveness. Our study has two objectives: first, to provide an alternate characterization\\u000a of the Intrinsic Mode components

  4. Network analysis, complexity, and brain function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olaf Sporns

    2002-01-01

    distributed properties [1]. Instead, modern views focus extensively on the struc-ture and dynamics of large-scale neuronal networks, especially those of the cerebral cortex and associated thalamocortical circuits whose activation underlies human perception and cognition [2,3]. Both, localized and distributed aspects of brain function naturally emerge from this network perspective. This essay highlights several unique characteristics of brain networks and explores

  5. Cloning, characterization, sequence analysis and expression patterns in vivo of testicular 20?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase cDNA in yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco).

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Qi; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Weiren; Liu, Xiaochun; Li, Yun; Zhu, Pei; Lu, Danqi; Lin, Haoran

    2011-07-01

    We have cloned a full-length cDNA for testicular 20?-HSD in yellow catfish. The validated 20?-HSD cDNA full-length sequence, 1141 bp in length, contained a 108 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 202 bp 3'-UTR with an AATAAAA frame, and an 831 bp open reading frame (ORF) which encoded a propeptide of 277 amino acid residues. The enzyme shows the highest structural homology with that of zebrafish, and rainbow trout. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that 20?-HSD has widespread tissue distribution, with expression being abundant in tissues with high metabolic rates like gonads, liver, intestine, stomach and gill. In vivo experiments showed that expression level was highest at testicular mature stage indicating that 20?-HSD could play an important role in testicular developmental maturation in yellow catfish. During testicular mature stage, 20?-HSD related metabolism was regulated by GnRH and LH. Moreover, structural analysis showed that the predicted 20?-HSD contained 7 functional motifs of SDR superfamily of enzymes, including the putative coenzyme binding domain (Rossmann fold), GlyXXXGlyIleuGly, and the region responsible for nucleophilic attack of the substrate pocket, TyrXXXLys. These motifs are strictly conserved in yellow catfish 20?-HSD. Comprehensive functional analysis revealed that this enzyme has multiple functions, such as xenobiotic metabolism, and steroid conversion. Catfish 20?-HSD contains multiple potential post-translational modification sites. Its subcellular location, theoretical isoelectric point and molecular weight were also investigated. Furthermore, we constructed its phylogenetic tree and secondary structure. All results provided basic information for further studies of its structure, functions and properties. PMID:21511050

  6. Evidence of CYP3A allosterism in vivo: analysis of interaction between fluconazole and midazolam.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Atkins, W M; Isoherranen, N; Paine, M F; Thummel, K E

    2012-03-01

    The allosteric effect of fluconazole (effector) on the formation of 1'-hydroxymidazolam (1'-OH-MDZ) and 4-hydroxymidazolam (4-OH-MDZ) from midazolam (MDZ), a substrate of CYP3A4/5--members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes--was examined in healthy volunteers. Following pretreatment with fluconazole, the ratio of the areas under the curve (AUCs) for 4-OH-MDZ and MDZ (AUC(4-OH)/AUC(MDZ)) increased by 35-62%, whereas the ratio AUC(1'-OH)/AUC(MDZ) decreased by 5-37%; the ratio AUC(1'-OH)/AUC(4-OH) decreased by 46-58% after fluconazole administration and had no association with the CYP3A5 genotype. The in vitro formation of 1'-OH-MDZ was more susceptible to inhibition by fluconazole than that of 4-OH-MDZ. Fluconazole decreased the intrinsic formation-clearance ratio of 1'-OH-MDZ/4-OH-MDZ to an extent that was quantitatively comparable to in vivo observations. The elimination clearance of MDZ metabolites appeared unaffected by fluconazole. This study demonstrated that fluconazole alters formation of MDZ metabolites, both in vivo and in vitro, in a manner consistent with an allosteric interaction. The 1'-OH-MDZ/4-OH-MDZ ratio may serve as a biomarker of such interactions among MDZ, CYP3A4/5, and other putative effectors. PMID:22048224

  7. Evidence of CYP3A Allosterism In Vivo: Analysis of Fluconazole and Midazolam Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Atkins, William M.; Isoherranen, Nina; Paine, Mary F.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    The allosteric effect of fluconazole (effector) on the formation of 1’-hydroxymidazolam (1’-OH-MDZ) and 4-hydroxymidazolam (4-OH-MDZ) from the CYP3A4/5 substrate, midazolam (MDZ), was examined in healthy volunteers. Following pre-treatment of fluconazole, AUC4-OH/AUCMDZ increased 35–62%, while AUC1’-OH/AUCMDZ decreased 5–37%; AUC1’-OH/AUC4-OH ratio decreased 46–58% by fluconazole and had no association with CYP3A5 genotype. 1’-OH-MDZ formation in vitro was more susceptible than 4-OH-MDZ formation to inhibition by fluconazole. Fluconazole decreased the intrinsic formation clearance ratio of 1’-OH-MDZ/4-OH-MDZ to an extent that was quantitatively comparable to in vivo observations. The elimination clearance of midazolam metabolites appeared unaffected by fluconazole. This study demonstrated that fluconazole alters midazolam product formation both in vivo and in vitro in a manner consistent with an allosteric interaction. The 1'-OH-MDZ/4-OH-MDZ ratio may serve as a biomarker of such interactions between midazolam, CYP3A4/5 and other putative effectors. PMID:22048224

  8. Vectors with the fd replicon for in vivo cloning and analysis of genes.

    PubMed

    Osuský, M; Stuchlík, S; Zámocký, M; Dubaová, M; Janitorová, V; Turna, J

    1994-12-30

    We have constructed two new mini-Mu derivatives, pMRfP and pBEf, that combine the properties of known mini-Mu vectors and the advantages of the replication origin (orifd) of filamentous phage fd. Mini-Mu pMRfP consists of the left (850 bp) and the right (216 bp) ends of the Mu genome, orifd, packaging signal of fd, and the gene conferring resistance to chloramphenicol. The second mini-Mu, termed pBEf, carries the left end of Mu (1001 bp), which contains the so-called internal activation sequence (enhancer of transposition), required for a higher frequency of transposition, the right end (116 bp) and the gene conferring resistance to kanamycin. These new mini-Mu vectors are suitable for in vivo cloning with the ability of single-stranded DNA preparation using one of the helper phages (M13K07, rv1, IR1, R408) and with a large cloning capacity (the size of the cloned fragment can be up to 35 kb). They can also be used as the hoppers (a transposable ori that can be turned on or off depending on the presence of the fd gene 2 product). Thus, these mini-Mu derivatives can be employed as vectors for in vivo cloning, and as regulated transposons or mobile replicons. PMID:7828856

  9. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S.; Shulkes, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene. PMID:21051525

  10. Analysis of in vivo penetration of textile dyes causing allergic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Worm, M.; Richter, H.; Sterry, W.; Meinke, M.

    2009-10-01

    Contact allergies to textile dyes are common and can cause severe eczema. In the present study, we investigated the penetration of a fluorescent textile dye, dissolved from a black pullover, into the skin of one volunteer during perspiration and nonperspiration. Previously, wearing this pullover had induced a severe contact dermatitis in an 82-year old woman, who was not aware of her sensitization to textile dyes. The investigations were carried out by in vivo laser scanning microscopy. It could be demonstrated that the dye was eluted from the textile material by sweat. Afterwards, the dye penetrated into the stratum corneum and into the hair follicles. Inside the hair follicles, the fluorescent signal was still detectable after 24 h, whereas it was not verifiable anymore in the stratum corneum, Laser scanning microscopy represents an efficient tool for in vivo investigation of the penetration and storage of topically applied substances and allergens into the human skin and reveals useful hints for the development and optimization of protection strategies.

  11. Spectral Unmixing: Analysis of Performance in the Olfactory Bulb In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ducros, Mathieu; Moreaux, Laurent; Bradley, Jonathan; Tiret, Pascale; Griesbeck, Oliver; Charpak, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Background The generation of transgenic mice expressing combinations of fluorescent proteins has greatly aided the reporting of activity and identification of specific neuronal populations. Methods capable of separating multiple overlapping fluorescence emission spectra, deep in the living brain, with high sensitivity and temporal resolution are therefore required. Here, we investigate to what extent spectral unmixing addresses these issues. Methodology/Principal Findings Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporters, and two-photon laser scanning microscopy with synchronous multichannel detection, we report that spectral unmixing consistently improved FRET signal amplitude, both in vitro and in vivo. Our approach allows us to detect odor-evoked FRET transients 180–250 µm deep in the brain, the first demonstration of in vivo spectral imaging and unmixing of FRET signals at depths greater than a few tens of micrometer. Furthermore, we determine the reporter efficiency threshold for which FRET detection is improved by spectral unmixing. Conclusions/Significance Our method allows the detection of small spectral variations in depth in the living brain, which is essential for imaging efficiently transgenic animals expressing combination of multiple fluorescent proteins. PMID:19198655

  12. Human CD68 promoter GFP transgenic mice allow analysis of monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Asif J; McNeill, Eileen; Kapellos, Theodore S; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Norman, Sophie; Burd, Sarah; Smart, Nicola; Machemer, Daniel E W; Stylianou, Elena; McShane, Helen; Channon, Keith M; Chawla, Ajay; Greaves, David R

    2014-10-01

    The recruitment of monocytes and their differentiation into macrophages at sites of inflammation are key events in determining the outcome of the inflammatory response and initiating the return to tissue homeostasis. To study monocyte trafficking and macrophage differentiation in vivo, we have generated a novel transgenic reporter mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the human CD68 promoter. CD68-GFP mice express high levels of GFP in both monocyte and embryo-derived tissue resident macrophages in adult animals. The human CD68 promoter drives GFP expression in all CD115(+) monocytes of adult blood, spleen, and bone marrow; we took advantage of this to directly compare the trafficking of bone marrow-derived CD68-GFP monocytes to that of CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes in vivo using a sterile zymosan peritonitis model. Unlike CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes, which downregulate GFP expression on differentiation into macrophages in this model, CD68-GFP monocytes retain high-level GFP expression for 72 hours after differentiation into macrophages, allowing continued cell tracking during resolution of inflammation. In summary, this novel CD68-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource for analyzing monocyte mobilization and monocyte trafficking as well as studying the fate of recruited monocytes in models of acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:25030063

  13. New adaptive clutter rejection based on spectral analysis for ultrasound color Doppler imaging: phantom and in vivo abdominal study.

    PubMed

    Geunyong Park; Sunmi Yeo; Jae Jin Lee; Changhan Yoon; Hyun-Woo Koh; Hyungjoon Lim; Youngtae Kim; Hwan Shim; Yangmo Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Effective rejection of time-varying clutter originating from slowly moving vessels and surrounding tissues is important for depicting hemodynamics in ultrasound color Doppler imaging (CDI). In this paper, a new adaptive clutter rejection method based on spectral analysis (ACR-SA) is presented for suppressing nonstationary clutter. In ACR-SA, tissue and flow characteristics are analyzed by singular value decomposition and tissue acceleration of backscattered Doppler signals to determine an appropriate clutter filter from a set of clutter filters. To evaluate the ACR-SA method, 20 frames of complex baseband data were acquired by a commercial ultrasound system equipped with a research package (Accuvix V10, Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea) using a 3.5-MHz convex array probe by introducing tissue movements to the flow phantom (Gammex 1425 A LE, Gammex, Middleton, WI, USA). In addition, 20 frames of in vivo abdominal data from five volunteers were captured. From the phantom experiment, the ACR-SA method provided 2.43 dB (p <; 0.001) and 1.09 dB ( ) improvements in flow signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) compared to static (STA) and down-mixing (ACR-DM) methods. Similarly, it showed smaller values in fractional residual clutter area (FRCA) compared to the STA and ACR-DM methods (i.e., 2.3% versus 5.4% and 3.7%, respectively, ). The consistent improvements in SCR from the proposed ACR-SA method were obtained with the in vivo abdominal data (i.e., 4.97 dB and 3.39 dB over STA and ACR-DM, respectively). The ACR-SA method showed less than 1% FRCA values for all in vivo abdominal data. These results indicate that the proposed ACR-SA method can improve image quality in CDI by providing enhanced rejection of nonstationary clutter. PMID:24235290

  14. Can carcinogenic potency be predicted from in vivo genotoxicity data?: a meta-analysis of historical data.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lya G; Slob, Wout; van Steeg, Harry; van Benthem, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Genotoxicity is generally a parameter used for hazard identification, however, the applicability of using in vivo genotoxicity tests for hazard characterization has never been thoroughly investigated in a quantitative manner. Genotoxicity assays could be useful for the determination of cancer potency parameters given that genotoxicty tests measure mutations and/or chromosomal aberrations which are strongly associated with carcinogenesis. A detailed literature survey was performed in search for dose-response data in various in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The benchmark dose (BMD) approach was applied using the dose-response modeling program PROAST. Dose-response data were available from 18 compounds in the micronucleus assay (MN), the in vivo transgenic rodent mutation assay (TG) and the comet assay, and their BMD(10) values were compared to the BMD(10) from carcinogenicity studies in mice. Of the 18 compounds, 15 had acceptable dose-response data from the MN and the TG, but only 4 from the comet assay. A major limitation in our analysis was the lack of proper dose-response studies using the recommended protocols. Nevertheless, our findings are promising because even with these suboptimal studies, a positive correlation was observed when the lowest BMD(10) from the genotoxicity tests (MN and TG) was compared to the tissue-matched carcinogenicity BMD(10) . It is evident that more compounds need to be analyzed with proper dose-response schemes to further validate our initial findings. Experimental designs of genotoxicity assays need to shift from focusing only on hazard identification where positive and negative results are reported, to a more quantitative, dose-response assessment. PMID:21542028

  15. Genetic Manipulation in ?ku80 Strains for Functional Genomic Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Rommereim, Leah M.; Hortua Triana, Miryam A.; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L.; Guevara, Rebekah B.; Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein1,2. The ?ku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The ?ku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale1-4. Here, we report methods for using type I and type II ?ku80?hxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in ?ku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human pathogens that cause malaria (Plasmodium sp.) and cryptosporidiosis (Cryptosporidium). PMID:23892917

  16. In Vivo Analysis of Aicda Gene Regulation: A Critical Balance between Upstream Enhancers and Intronic Silencers Governs Appropriate Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huong, Le Thi; Kobayashi, Maki; Nakata, Mikiyo; Shioi, Go; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Honjo, Tasuku; Nagaoka, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The Aicda gene encodes activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Aicda is strongly transcribed in activated B cells to diversify immunoglobulin genes, but expressed at low levels in various other cells in response to physiological or pathological stimuli. AID’s mutagenic nature has been shown to be involved in tumor development. Here, we used a transgenic strategy with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to examine the in vivo functions of Aicda regulatory elements, which cluster in two regions: in the first intron (region 2), and approximately 8-kb upstream of the transcription start site (region 4). Deleting either of these regions completely abolished the expression of Aicda-BAC reporters, demonstrating these elements’ critical roles. Furthermore, we found that selectively deleting two C/EBP-binding sites in region 4 inactivated the enhancer activity of the region despite the presence of intact NF-?B-, STAT6- and Smad-binding sites. On the other hand, selectively deleting E2F- and c-Myb-binding sites in region 2 increased the frequency of germinal-center B cells in which the Aicda promoter was active, indicating that E2F and c-Myb act as silencers in vivo. Interestingly, the silencer deletion did not cause ectopic activation of the Aicda promoter, indicating that Aicda activation requires enhancer-specific stimulation. In summary, precise regulation of the Aicda promoter appears to depend on a coordinated balance of activities between enhancer and silencer elements. PMID:23613851

  17. Functional Analysis of Rex1 During Preimplantation Development

    PubMed Central

    Climent, María; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Guallar, Diana; Benito, Alfredo A.; Larraga, Ana; Fernández-Juan, Marta; Sanz, Marta; de Diego, Alicia; Seisdedos, María T.; Muniesa, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Rex1/Zfp42 is a nuclear protein that is highly conserved in mammals, and widely used as an embryonic stem (ES) cell marker. Although Rex1 expression is associated with enhanced pluripotency, loss-of-function models recently described do not exhibit major phenotypes, and both preimplantation development and ES cell derivation appear normal in the absence of Rex1. To better understand the functional role of Rex1, we examined the expression and localization of Rex1 during preimplantation development. Our studies indicated that REX1 is expressed at all stages during mouse preimplantation development, with a mixed pattern of nuclear, perinuclear, and cytoplasmic localization. Chromatin association seemed to be altered in 8-cell embryos, and in the blastocyst, we found REX1 localized almost exclusively in the nucleus. A functional role for Rex1 in vivo was assessed by gain- and loss-of-function approaches. Embryos with attenuated levels of Rex1 after injection of zygotes with siRNAs did not exhibit defects in preimplantation development in vitro. In contrast, overexpression of Rex1 interfered with cleavage divisions and with proper blastocyst development, although we failed to detect alterations in the expression of lineage and pluripotency markers. Rex1 gain- and loss-of-function did alter the expression levels of Zscan4, an important regulator of preimplantation development and pluripotency. Our results suggest that Rex1 plays a role during preimplantation development. They are compatible with a role for Rex1 during acquisition of pluripotency in the blastocyst. PMID:22897771

  18. Grammatical analysis as a distributed neurobiological function.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Mirjana; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Su, Li; Marslen-Wilson, William D

    2015-03-01

    Language processing engages large-scale functional networks in both hemispheres. Although it is widely accepted that left perisylvian regions have a key role in supporting complex grammatical computations, patient data suggest that some aspects of grammatical processing could be supported bilaterally. We investigated the distribution and the nature of grammatical computations across language processing networks by comparing two types of combinatorial grammatical sequences--inflectionally complex words and minimal phrases--and contrasting them with grammatically simple words. Novel multivariate analyses revealed that they engage a coalition of separable subsystems: inflected forms triggered left-lateralized activation, dissociable into dorsal processes supporting morphophonological parsing and ventral, lexically driven morphosyntactic processes. In contrast, simple phrases activated a consistently bilateral pattern of temporal regions, overlapping with inflectional activations in L middle temporal gyrus. These data confirm the role of the left-lateralized frontotemporal network in supporting complex grammatical computations. Critically, they also point to the capacity of bilateral temporal regions to support simple, linear grammatical computations. This is consistent with a dual neurobiological framework where phylogenetically older bihemispheric systems form part of the network that supports language function in the modern human, and where significant capacities for language comprehension remain intact even following severe left hemisphere damage. PMID:25421880

  19. Grammatical Analysis as a Distributed Neurobiological Function

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Mirjana; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Su, Li; Marslen-Wilson, William D

    2015-01-01

    Language processing engages large-scale functional networks in both hemispheres. Although it is widely accepted that left perisylvian regions have a key role in supporting complex grammatical computations, patient data suggest that some aspects of grammatical processing could be supported bilaterally. We investigated the distribution and the nature of grammatical computations across language processing networks by comparing two types of combinatorial grammatical sequences—inflectionally complex words and minimal phrases—and contrasting them with grammatically simple words. Novel multivariate analyses revealed that they engage a coalition of separable subsystems: inflected forms triggered left-lateralized activation, dissociable into dorsal processes supporting morphophonological parsing and ventral, lexically driven morphosyntactic processes. In contrast, simple phrases activated a consistently bilateral pattern of temporal regions, overlapping with inflectional activations in L middle temporal gyrus. These data confirm the role of the left-lateralized frontotemporal network in supporting complex grammatical computations. Critically, they also point to the capacity of bilateral temporal regions to support simple, linear grammatical computations. This is consistent with a dual neurobiological framework where phylogenetically older bihemispheric systems form part of the network that supports language function in the modern human, and where significant capacities for language comprehension remain intact even following severe left hemisphere damage. PMID:25421880

  20. Immunochemical analysis of kinesin light chain function.

    PubMed Central

    Stenoien, D L; Brady, S T

    1997-01-01

    The kinesin heterotetramer consists of two heavy and two light chains. Kinesin light chains have been proposed to act in binding motor protein to cargo, but evidence for this has been indirect. A library of monoclonal antibodies directed against conserved epitopes throughout the kinesin light chain sequence were used to map light chain functional architecture and to assess physiological functions of these domains. Immunocytochemistry with all antibodies showed a punctate pattern that was detergent soluble. A monoclonal antibody (KLC-All) made against a highly conserved epitope in the tandem repeat domain of light chains inhibited fast axonal transport in isolated axoplasm by decreasing both the number and velocity of vesicles moving, whereas an antibody against a conserved amino terminus epitope had no effect. KLC-All was equally effective at inhibiting both anterograde and retrograde transport. Neither antibody inhibited microtubule-binding or ATPase activity in vitro. KLC-All was unique among antibodies tested in releasing kinesin from purified membrane vesicles, suggesting a mechanism of action for inhibition of axonal transport. These results provide further evidence that conventional kinesin is a motor for fast axonal transport and demonstrate that kinesin light chains play an important role in kinesin interaction with membranes. Images PMID:9247647

  1. Using Text Analysis to Identify Functionally Coherent Gene Groups

    E-print Network

    Batzoglou, Serafim

    based on their associated scientific literature. The method uses statistical natural language processing of genes shares a common biological function by automatic analysis of scientific text. It requires only

  2. Global analysis of fragmentation functions for eta mesons

    E-print Network

    Aidala, Christine A.

    Fragmentation functions for eta mesons are extracted at next-to-leading order accuracy of QCD in a global analysis of data taken in electron-positron annihilation and proton-proton scattering experiments. The obtained ...

  3. AZD3514: a small molecule that modulates androgen receptor signaling and function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Loddick, Sarah A; Ross, Sarah J; Thomason, Andrew G; Robinson, David M; Walker, Graeme E; Dunkley, Tom P J; Brave, Sandra R; Broadbent, Nicola; Stratton, Natalie C; Trueman, Dawn; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Shaheen, Fadhel S; Jacobs, Vivien N; Cumberbatch, Marie; Wilson, Joanne; Jones, Rhys D O; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred; Gaughan, Luke; Womack, Chris; Barry, Simon T; Robson, Craig N; Critchlow, Susan E; Wedge, Stephen R; Brooks, A Nigel

    2013-09-01

    Continued androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling is a key driver in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after classical androgen ablation therapies have failed, and therefore remains a target for the treatment of progressive disease. Here, we describe the biological characterization of AZD3514, an orally bioavailable drug that inhibits androgen-dependent and -independent AR signaling. AZD3514 modulates AR signaling through two distinct mechanisms, an inhibition of ligand-driven nuclear translocation of AR and a downregulation of receptor levels, both of which were observed in vitro and in vivo. AZD3514 inhibited testosterone-driven seminal vesicle development in juvenile male rats and the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327H prostate tumors in adult rats. Furthermore, this class of compound showed antitumor activity in the HID28 mouse model of CRPC in vivo. AZD3514 is currently in phase I clinical evaluation. PMID:23861347

  4. AZD3514: a small molecule that modulates androgen receptor signaling and function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Loddick, Sarah A; Ross, Sarah J; Thomason, Andrew G; Robinson, David M; Walker, Graeme E; Dunkley, Tom PJ; Brave, Sandra R; Broadbent, Nicola; Stratton, Natalie C; Trueman, Dawn; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Shaheen, Fadhel S; Jacobs, Vivien N; Cumberbatch, Marie; Wilson, Joanne; Jones, Rhys D O; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred; Gaughan, Luke; Womack, Chris; Barry, Simon T; Robson, Craig N; Critchlow, Susan E; Wedge, Stephen R; Brooks, Nigel A

    2013-01-01

    Continued androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling is a key driver in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after classical androgen ablation therapies have failed, and therefore remains a target for the treatment of progressive disease. Here we describe the biological characterization of AZD3514, an orally bioavailable drug that inhibits androgen-dependent and–independent AR signaling. AZD3514 modulates AR signaling through two distinct mechanisms, an inhibition of ligand driven nuclear translocation of AR and a down-regulation of receptor levels, both of which were observed in vitro and in vivo. AZD3514 inhibited testosterone-driven seminal vesicle development in juvenile male rats and the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327H prostate tumors in adult rats. Furthermore, this class of compound demonstrated anti-tumor activity in the HID28 mouse model of CRPC in vivo. AZD3514 is currently in Phase I clinical evaluation. PMID:23861347

  5. In vivo diffusion analysis with quantum dots and dextrans predicts the width of brain extracellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Robert G.; Nicholson, Charles

    2006-04-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is necessary for chemical signaling and for neurons and glia to access nutrients and therapeutics; however, the width of the ECS in living tissue remains unknown. We used integrative optical imaging to show that dextrans and water-soluble quantum dots with Stokes-Einstein diameters as large as 35 nm diffuse within the ECS of adult rat neocortex in vivo. Modeling the ECS as fluid-filled "pores" predicts a normal width of 38-64 nm, at least 2-fold greater than estimates from EM of fixed tissue. ECS width falls below 10 nm after terminal ischemia, a likely explanation for the small ECS visualized in electron micrographs. Our results will improve modeling of neurotransmitter spread after spillover and ectopic release and establish size limits for diffusion of drug delivery vectors such as viruses, liposomes, and nanoparticles in brain ECS. drug delivery | integrative optical imaging | nanoparticles | restricted diffusion | somatosensory cortex

  6. Computational analysis, design, and experimental validation of antibody binding affinity improvements beyond in vivo maturation

    E-print Network

    Lippow, Shaun Matthew

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents novel methods for the analysis and design of high-affinity protein interactions using a combination of high-resolution structural data and physics-based molecular models. First, computational analysis ...

  7. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few selected muscles that have been examined in human electromyographic studies. Neck muscle function and morphology can be studied at a detailed level using exercise-induced shifts in magnetic resonance images.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae cultivated in vivo and co-culture with Burkholderia seminalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Ge, Mengyu; Cui, Zhouqi; Sun, Guochang; Xu, Fei; Kube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Response of bacterial pathogen to environmental bacteria and its host is critical for understanding of microbial adaption and pathogenesis. Here, we used RNA-Seq to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the transcriptional response of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1 cultivated in vitro, in vivo and in co-culture with rice rhizobacterium Burkholderia seminalis R456. Results revealed a slight response to other bacteria, but a strong response to host. In particular, a large number of virulence associated genes encoding Type I to VI secretion systems, 118 putative non-coding RNAs, and 7 genomic islands (GIs) were differentially expressed in vivo based on comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses. Furthermore, the loss of virulence for knockout mutants of 11 differentially expressed T6SS genes emphasized the importance of these genes in bacterial pathogenicity. In addition, the reliability of expression data obtained by RNA-Seq was supported by quantitative real-time PCR of the 25 selected T6SS genes. Overall, this study highlighted the role of differentially expressed genes in elucidating bacterial pathogenesis based on combined analysis of RNA-Seq data and knockout of T6SS genes. PMID:25027476

  9. Transcriptome analysis of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae cultivated in vivo and co-culture with Burkholderia seminalis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Ge, Mengyu; Cui, Zhouqi; Sun, Guochang; Xu, Fei; Kube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Response of bacterial pathogen to environmental bacteria and its host is critical for understanding of microbial adaption and pathogenesis. Here, we used RNA-Seq to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the transcriptional response of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1 cultivated in vitro, in vivo and in co-culture with rice rhizobacterium Burkholderia seminalis R456. Results revealed a slight response to other bacteria, but a strong response to host. In particular, a large number of virulence associated genes encoding Type I to VI secretion systems, 118 putative non-coding RNAs, and 7 genomic islands (GIs) were differentially expressed in vivo based on comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses. Furthermore, the loss of virulence for knockout mutants of 11 differentially expressed T6SS genes emphasized the importance of these genes in bacterial pathogenicity. In addition, the reliability of expression data obtained by RNA-Seq was supported by quantitative real-time PCR of the 25 selected T6SS genes. Overall, this study highlighted the role of differentially expressed genes in elucidating bacterial pathogenesis based on combined analysis of RNA-Seq data and knockout of T6SS genes. PMID:25027476

  10. Multiparametric Analysis of CLASP-Interacting Protein Functions during Interphase Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jennifer B.; Bagonis, Maria; Lowery, Laura Anne; Lee, Haeryun; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein (+TIP) CLASP mediates dynamic cellular behaviors and interacts with numerous cytoplasmic proteins. While the influence of some CLASP interactors on MT behavior is known, a comprehensive survey of the proteins in the CLASP interactome as MT regulators is missing. Ultimately, we are interested in understanding how CLASP collaborates with functionally linked proteins to regulate MT dynamics. Here, we utilize multiparametric analysis of time-lapse MT +TIP imaging data acquired in Drosophila melanogaster S2R+ cells to assess the effects on individual microtubule dynamics for RNA interference-mediated depletion of 48 gene products previously identified to be in vivo genetic CLASP interactors. While our analysis corroborates previously described functions of several known CLASP interactors, its multiparametric resolution reveals more detailed functional profiles (fingerprints) that allow us to precisely classify the roles that CLASP-interacting genes play in MT regulation. Using these data, we identify subnetworks of proteins with novel yet overlapping MT-regulatory roles and also uncover subtle distinctions between the functions of proteins previously thought to act via similar mechanisms. PMID:23382075

  11. Hsp70 promotes antigen-presenting cell function and converts T-cell tolerance to autoimmunity in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas G Millar; Kristine M Garza; Bernhard Odermatt; Alisha R Elford; Nobuyuki Ono; Zihai Li; Pamela S Ohashi

    2003-01-01

    Pathogens or pathogen-associated molecular patterns can signal to cells of the innate immune system and trigger effective adaptive immunity. However, relatively little is known about how the innate immune system detects tissue injury or necrosis. Evidence suggests that the release of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) may provide adjuvant-like signals, but the ability of HSPs to promote activation or tolerance in vivo

  12. Integration of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Based on the in Vivo Analysis of Drug-receptor Binding.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

      As I was deeply interested in the effects of drugs on the human body, I chose pharmacology as the subject of special study when I became a 4th year student at Shizuoka College of Pharmacy. I studied abroad as a postdoctoral fellow for two years, from 1978, under the tutelage of Professor Henry I. Yamamura (pharmacology) in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, USA. He taught me a variety of valuable skills such as the radioreceptor binding assay, which represented the most advanced technology developed in the US at that time. After returning home, I engaged in clarifying receptor abnormalities in pathological conditions, as well as in drug action mechanisms, by making the best use of this radioreceptor binding assay. In 1989, following the founding of the University of Shizuoka, I was invited by Professor Ryohei Kimura to join the Department of Pharmacokinetics. This switch in discipline provided a good opportunity for me to broaden my perspectives in pharmaceutical sciences. I worked on evaluating drug-receptor binding in vivo as a combined index for pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effect manifestation, with the aim of bridging pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. In fact, by focusing on data from in vivo receptor binding, it became possible to clearly rationalize the important consideration of drug dose-concentration-action relationships, and to study quantitative and kinetic analyses of relationships among pharmacokinetics, receptor binding and pharmacological effects. Based on this concept, I was able to demonstrate the utility of dynamic analyses of drug-receptor binding in drug discovery, drug fostering, and the proper use of pharmacokinetics with regard to many drugs. PMID:25743911

  13. In Vivo Airway Surface Liquid Cl? Analysis with Solid-State Electrodes

    PubMed Central