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Sample records for vivo luteal function

  1. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT DURING PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) on Ex Vivo Luteal Function In the Pregnant F344 Rat

    Susan R. Bielmeier1, Ashley S. Murr2, Deborah S. Best2, Jerome M. Goldman2, and Michael G. Narotsky2

    1Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599,...

  2. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT.

    S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2

    1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2 Reproductive T...

  3. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT.

    S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2

    1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2 Reproductive T...

  4. Luteal blood flow and luteal function

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Akihisa; Tamura, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Ken; Asada, Hiromi; Taketani, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Aki; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Shimamura, Katsunori; Morioka, Hitoshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood flow in the corpus luteum (CL) is associated with luteal function. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether luteal function can be improved by increasing CL blood flow in women with luteal phase defect (LFD). Methods Blood flow impedance in the CL was measured by transvaginal color-pulsed-Doppler-ultrasonography and was expressed as a resistance index (RI). The patients with both LFD [serum progesterone (P) concentrations < 10 ng/ml during mid-luteal phase] and high CL-RI (? 0.51) were given vitamin-E (600 mg/day, n = 18), L-arginine (6 g/day, n = 14) as a potential nitric oxide donor, melatonin (3 mg/day, n = 13) as an antioxidant, or HCG (2,000 IU/day, n = 10) during the subsequent menstrual cycle. Results In the control group (n = 11), who received no medication to increase CL blood flow, only one patient (9%) improved in CL-RI and 2 patients (18%) improved in serum P. Vitamin-E improved CL-RI in 15 patients (83%) and improved serum P in 12 patients (67%). L-arginine improved CL-RI in all the patients (100%) and improved serum P in 10 patients (71%). HCG improved CL-RI in all the patients (100%) and improved serum P in 9 patients (90%). Melatonin had no significant effect. Conclusion Vitamin-E or L-arginine treatment improved luteal function by decreasing CL blood flow impedance. CL blood flow is a critical factor for luteal function. PMID:19144154

  5. The effect of metritis on luteal function in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Disturbed uterine involution impairs ovarian function in the first weeks after calving. This study analyzed the long-term effect of metritis on luteal function of 47 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows during the first four postpartum estrous cycles. Cows with abnormal uterine enlargement and malodorous lochia were classified as having metritis (group M, n?=?18), and all others were considered healthy (group H, n?=?29). Luteal size was measured once between days 9 and 13 of the first (group H, n?=?11; group M, n?=?12), second (group H, n?=?23; group M, n?=?18) and fourth (group H, n?=?11; group M, n?=?7) postpartum luteal phases. Serum progesterone concentration was measured at the same time. Sixteen cows (group H, n?=?9; group M, n?=?7) underwent transvaginal luteal biopsy for gene expression analysis of steroidogenic regulatory proteins during the second and fourth cycles. Cows with persistence of the corpus luteum (CL) underwent determination of luteal size, luteal biopsy and serum progesterone measurement once between days 29 and 33, followed by prostaglandin treatment to induce luteolysis. The same procedures were repeated once between days 9 and 13 of the induced cycle. Results The cows in group M had smaller first-cycle CLs than the cows in group H (p?=?0.04), but progesterone concentrations did not differ between groups. Luteal size, progesterone concentration and gene expression did not differ between the two groups during the second and fourth cycles. Compared with healthy cows (10%), there was a trend (p?=?0.07) toward a higher prevalence of persistent CLs in cows with metritis (33%). Persistent CLs were limited to the first cycle. Persistent CLs and the induced cyclic CLs did not differ with regard to the variables investigated. Conclusions An effect of metritis on luteal activity was apparent in the first postpartum estrous cycle. However, after the first postpartum cycle, no differences occurred in analyzed parameters between metritis and control cows. Therefore, a metritis is able to impair luteal activity transiently, but does not seem to have a long-term effect on luteal function. PMID:24304943

  6. Recovery of luteal function after interruption of gonadotrophin secretion in the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Polson, D W; Sagle, M; Mason, H D; Kiddy, D; Franks, S

    1987-05-01

    Ovulation was induced by a pulsatile infusion of GnRH in a patient with hypogonadotrophic amenorrhoea. In order to investigate the effect of short-term withdrawal of gonadotrophin support in the luteal phase, the pulsatile infusion was stopped 3 d after ovulation and restarted 48 h later. After stopping the pump gonadotrophin and progesterone concentrations fell rapidly to very low levels, but when the infusion was restarted progesterone concentrations returned to normal mid-luteal values. Menstruation occurred 14 d after the LH surge. We conclude that normal progesterone secretion by the corpus luteum can be restored after temporary withdrawal of gonadotrophin support. PMID:3311479

  7. Influence of Reproductive Aging of the Cow on Luteal Function and Period 1 mRNA Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, disruption of the circadian clock genes results in increased incidence of anovulation, irregular estrous cycles, decreased luteal function, and accelerated reproductive ageing. In cattle, reproductive ageing is associated with decreased numbers of follicles in the ovary, decreased lutea...

  8. Expression and functional implications of luteal endothelins in pregnant and non-pregnant dogs.

    PubMed

    Gram, Aykut; Latter, Sophie; Boos, Alois; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kowalewski, Mariusz P

    2015-11-01

    Luteal development is regulated by many locally produced mediators, e.g., prostaglandins and angiogenic factors. However, the role and function of vasoactive factors in the canine corpus luteum (CL) remain largely unknown. Consequently, expression of the endothelin (ET) receptors-A and -B (ETA and ETB, revealing vasoconstriction and vasodilator properties respectively), the ET-converting enzyme (ECE1) and ET1, -2 and -3 were investigated in CL from non-pregnant dogs (days 5, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 65 post-ovulation), and at selected stages of pregnancy (pre-implantation, post-implantation, mid-gestation), and during normal and antigestagen-induced prepartum luteolysis/abortion. The interrelationship between PGE2 and the ET system was investigated in PGE2-treated canine primary lutein cells from early CL. ET1 did not change significantly over time; ET2, ECE1 and ETB were elevated in early CL and were downregulated towards the mid/late-luteal phase. The prepartum increase of ET2 was significant. ET3 increased gradually, and was highest in late CL and/or at prepartum luteolysis. ETA remained constant until the late CL phase and increased only during prepartum luteolysis. ET1 was localized to the luteal cells, and ET2, ET3 and ETA to vascular endothelium. ECE1 and ETB were detected at both locations. Except for upregulated ET1 and lack of effect on ET2, antigestagen applied to mid-pregnant dogs evoked similar changes to those observed during normal luteolysis. PGE2 upregulated ETB in treated cells; ETA and ET1 remained unaffected, and ET2 decreased. A modulatory role of the ETs in canine CL, possibly in association with other factors (e.g., PGE2 and progesterone receptor), is strongly indicated. PMID:26240416

  9. RESUMPTION OF POSTPARTUM LUTEAL FUNCTION OF PRIMIPAROUS, SUCKLED BEEF COWS EXPOSED CONTINUOUSLY TO BULL URINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the hypotheses that interval from urine exposure to resumption of luteal activity and proportions of cows that resume luteal activity by the end of the urine-exposure period do not differ between cows exposed to mature bull urine or steer urine. Thirty-eight Angus x Hereford cows, four mat...

  10. Prostaglandin F2 alpha administered in vivo induces Ca2+-dependent protein phosphorylation in rat luteal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was performed in order to further elucidate the mechanism of action of PGF2 alpha in luteolysis in the rat ovary. Seven days after priming with superovulatory doses of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin to induce luteal tissue formation, the rats were injected with a luteolytic dose of the prostaglandin F2 alpha analogue cloprostenol. The ovaries were then homogenized, a 30,000 x g supernatant and pellet were prepared, whereafter aliquots of the preparations were incubated in the presence of (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP with or without Ca2+. The phosphorylated proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and localized by autoradiography. The presence of Ca2+ caused an increased phosphorylation of a 45 kDa protein band in the particulate, but not in the cytosol, fraction. Furthermore, PGF2 alpha rapidly increased the /sup 32/P incorporation into the same protein band of 45 kDa. Thus, the PGF2 alpha-stimulated /sup 32/P incorporation was Ca2+-dependent and seen only in the particulate fraction. These results suggest that PGF2 alpha in its role as a luteolytic agent stimulates a Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of a specific protein in luteal membranes of the rat ovary.

  11. Estrogen Promotes Luteolysis by Redistributing Prostaglandin F2? Receptors Within Primate Luteal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ok; Markosyan, Nune; Pepe, Gerald J.; Duffy, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2? (PGF2?) has been proposed as a functional luteolysin in primates. However, administration of PGF2? or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors in vivo both initiate luteolysis. These contradictory findings may reflect changes in PGF2? receptors (PTGFR) or responsiveness to PGF2? at a critical point during the life span of the corpus luteum. The current study addressed this question using ovarian cells and tissues from female cynomolgus monkeys and luteinizing granulosa cells from healthy women undergoing follicle aspiration. PTGFRs were present in the cytoplasm of monkey granulosa cells, while PTGFRs were localized to the perinuclear region of large, granulosa-derived monkey luteal cells by mid-late luteal phase. A PTGFR agonist decreased progesterone production by luteal cells obtained at mid-late and late luteal phases but did not decrease progesterone production by granulosa or luteal cells from younger corpora lutea. These findings are consistent with a role for perinuclear PTGFRs in functional luteolysis. This concept was explored using human luteinizing granulosa cells maintained in vitro as a model for luteal cell differentiation. In these cells, PTGFRs relocated from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear area in an estrogen- and estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Similar to our findings with monkey luteal cells, human luteinizing granulosa cells with perinuclear PTGFRs responded to a PTGFR agonist with decreased progesterone production. These data support the concept that PTGFR stimulation promotes functional luteolysis only when PTGFRs are located in the perinuclear region. Estrogen receptor-mediated relocation of PTGFRs within luteal cells may be a necessary step in the initiation of luteolysis in primates. PMID:25687410

  12. Aglepristone (RU534) effects on luteal function of pseudopregnant rabbits: steroid receptors, enzymatic activities, and hormone productions in corpus luteum and uterus.

    PubMed

    Parillo, Francesco; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Brecchia, Gabriele; Maranesi, Margherita; Polisca, Angela; Boiti, Cristiano; Zerani, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    The study was designed to examine the aglepristone (RU534) mechanisms affecting the corpora lutea (CL) lifespan in pseudopregnant rabbits. Aglepristone (10 mg/kg b.w.) was injected subcutaneously twice at either early- or mid-luteal phase (Days 3 and 4, or Days 8 and 9, respectively) after induction of ovulation with GnRH (Day 0). Corpora lutea and uteri, explanted at days 6 and 11, were evaluated for immunohistochemistry and Western blotting of progesterone (PR) and estrogen (ER) receptors, cyclooxygenase 1 (COX1), COX2, and PGE2-9-ketoreductase (PGE2-9-K) enzymatic activities, and progesterone, PGF2?, and PGE2 in vitro synthesis. Independent of luteal stage, aglepristone prolonged the functional luteal phase by 3 Days over that of controls as assessed by blood progesterone profiles. Aglepristone decreased protein for ER during both luteal-stages in CL and uteri. Progesterone receptor protein was decreased by RU354 at Days 6 in the uterus and at Days 11 in CL, whereas RU534 increased PR at Days 11 in uteri. In the CL, RU534 enhanced progesterone production at Days 6 and 11, whereas it decreased PGF2? and increased PGE2 at Day 11. In the uteri, RU534 decreased PGF2? and increased PGE2 synthesis at both days. COX2 and PGE2-9K activities were decreased by RU534 in the CL at Day 11, whereas in the uteri COX2 increased and PGE2-9-K decreased at Days 6 and 11. In conclusion, these data on aglepristone effects suggest that progesterone has a regulatory role on luteal function through direct and uterine-mediated mechanisms in pseudopregnant rabbits. PMID:23517855

  13. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2?), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2?) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed. PMID:23054443

  14. The luteotrophic function of galectin-1 by binding to the glycans on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in bovine luteal cells

    PubMed Central

    SANO, Masahiro; HASHIBA, Kazuhisa; NIO-KOBAYASHI, Junko; OKUDA, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a temporary endocrine gland producing a large amount of progesterone, which is essential for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Galectin-1 is a ?-galactose-binding protein that can modify functions of membrane glycoproteins and is expressed in the CL of mice and women. However, the physiological role of galectin-1 in the CL is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression and localization of galectin-1 in the bovine CL and the effect of galectin-1 on cultured luteal steroidogenic cells (LSCs) with special reference to its binding to the glycans on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Galectin-1 protein was highly expressed at the mid and late luteal stages in the membrane fraction of bovine CL tissue and was localized to the surface of LSCs in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Galectin-1 increased the viability in cultured LSCs. However, the viability of LSCs was decreased by addition of ?-lactose, a competitive carbohydrate inhibitor of galectin-1 binding activity. VEGFR-2 protein, like galectin-1, is also highly expressed in the mid CL, and it was modified by multi-antennary glycans, which can be recognized by galectin-1. An overlay assay using biotinylated galectin-1 revealed that galectin-1 directly binds to asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) on VEGFR-2. Enhancement of LSC viability by galectin-1 was suppressed by a selective inhibitor of VEGFR-2. The overall findings suggest that galectin-1 plays a role as a survival factor in the bovine CL, possibly by binding to N-glycans on VEGFR-2. PMID:26155753

  15. Expression of Aldo-keto Reductase 1C23 in the Equine Corpus Luteum in Different Luteal Phases

    PubMed Central

    KOZAI, Keisuke; HOJO, Takuo; TOKUYAMA, Shota; SZÓSTEK, Anna Z; TAKAHASHI, Masashi; SAKATANI, Miki; NAMBO, Yasuo; SKARZYNSKI, Dariusz J; OKUDA, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Regression of the corpus luteum (CL) is characterized by a decay in progesterone (P4) production (functional luteolysis) and disappearance of luteal tissues (structural luteolysis). In mares, structural luteolysis is thought to be caused by apoptosis of luteal cells, but functional luteolysis is poorly understood. 20?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20?-HSD) catabolizes P4 into its biologically inactive form, 20?-hydroxyprogesterone (20?-OHP). In mares, aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C23, which is a member of the AKR superfamily, has 20?-HSD activity. To clarify whether AKR1C23 is associated with functional luteolysis in mares, we investigated the expression of AKR1C23 in the CL in different luteal phases. The luteal P4 concentration and levels of 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3?-HSD) mRNA were higher in the mid luteal phase than in the late and regressed luteal phases (P<0.05), but the level of 3?-HSD protein was higher in the late luteal phase than in the regressed luteal phase (P<0.05). The luteal 20?-OHP concentration and the level of AKR1C23 mRNA were higher in the late luteal phase than in the early and mid luteal phases (P<0.05), and the level of AKR1C23 protein was also highest in the late luteal phase. Taken together, these findings suggest that metabolism of P4 by AKR1C23 is one of the processes contributing to functional luteolysis in mares. PMID:24492656

  16. Conceptus-induced changes in the gene expression of blood immune cells and the ultrasound-accessed luteal function in beef cattle: how early can we detect pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Pugliesi, Guilherme; Miagawa, Bruna T; Paiva, Yasmin N; França, Moana R; Silva, Luciano A; Binelli, Mario

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to identify the functional characteristics of the corpus luteum (CL) by color Doppler ultrasonography and changes in interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during early pregnancy in beef cows. We then aimed to use these features to establish earlier pregnancy diagnosis methods. In experiment 1, the CL size and blood flow were accessed by Doppler ultrasonography, and the PBMCs were isolated on Days 8, 12, 15, 18, 20, 22, 25, 30, 45, and 60 post-timed artificial insemination (TAI) from pregnant (n = 10) and nonpregnant cows (n = 12). The abundance of ISG (OAS1, MX1, MX2, and ISG15) transcripts was measured by quantitative PCR. Analyses of OAS1 and MX2 expression in isolated PBMCs (ISG-PBMC method) and Doppler imaging of CL (Doppler-US method) were performed to test the accuracy of these methods for the diagnosis of pregnancy on Day 20 post-TAI (n = 110; experiment 2). In experiment 1, the luteal volume and blood flow were reduced in nonpregnant cows during the first weeks post-TAI, but an evaluation of CL vascularization and size was efficient in identifying nonpregnant cows on Day 20 post-TAI. The expression of ISGs in PBMCs can be stimulated by the presence of a viable conceptus between Days 15 and 22 post-TAI, and the expression of these genes reaches a peak on Day 20. In experiment 2, the Doppler-US and ISG-PBMC methods resulted in similar specificity (85.5 and 87.7%, respectively). However, only the Doppler-US method resulted in 100% sensitivity. In conclusion, the greatest abundance of ISGs in PBMCs and a high detection of luteolysis by Doppler imaging on Day 20 post-TAI can be feasibly used for the earlier detection of nonpregnant cows in reproductive programs. The level of accuracy for our described pregnancy methods is high on Day 20 (80%-91%), but only the Doppler imaging method results in an absence of false-negative diagnoses. PMID:25210129

  17. Clinostat rotation induces apoptosis in luteal cells of the pregnant rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hyunwon; Bhat, Ganapathy K.; Sridaran, Rajagopala

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that microgravity induces changes at the cellular level, including apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether microgravity affects luteal cell function. This study was performed to assess whether microgravity conditions generated by clinostat rotation induce apoptosis and affect steroidogenesis by luteal cells. Luteal cells isolated from the corpora lutea of Day 8 pregnant rats were placed in equal numbers in slide flasks (chamber slides). One slide flask was placed in the clinostat and the other served as a stationary control. At 48 h in the clinostat, whereas the levels of progesterone and total cellular protein decreased, the number of shrunken cells increased. To determine whether apoptosis occurred in shrunken cells, Comet and TUNEL assays were performed. At 48 h, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the clinostat increased compared with that in the control. To investigate how the microgravity conditions induce apoptosis, the active mitochondria in luteal cells were detected with JC-1 dye. Cells in the control consisted of many active mitochondria, which were evenly distributed throughout the cell. In contrast, cells in the clinostat displayed fewer active mitochondria, which were distributed either to the outer edge of the cell or around the nucleus. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction induced by clinostat rotation could lead to apoptosis in luteal cells and suppression of progesterone production.

  18. Gestating for 22 months: luteal development and pregnancy maintenance in elephants

    PubMed Central

    Lueders, Imke; Niemuller, Cheryl; Rich, Peter; Gray, Charlie; Hermes, Robert; Goeritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The corpus luteum, a temporally established endocrine gland, formed on the ovary from remaining cells of the ovulated follicle, plays a key role in maintaining the early mammalian pregnancy by secreting progesterone. Despite being a monovular species, 2–12 corpora lutea (CLs) were found on the elephant ovaries during their long pregnancy lasting on average 640 days. However, the function and the formation of the additional CLs and their meaning remain unexplained. Here, we show from the example of the elephant, the close relationship between the maternally determined luteal phase length, the formation of multiple luteal structures and their progestagen secretion, the timespan of early embryonic development until implantation and maternal recognition. Through three-dimensional and Colour Flow ultrasonography of the ovaries and the uterus, we conclude that pregnant elephants maintain active CL throughout gestation that appear as main source of progestagens. Two LH peaks during the follicular phase ensure the development of a set of 5.4 ± 2.7 CLs. Accessory CLs (acCLs) form prior to ovulation after the first luteinizing hormone (LH) peak, while the ovulatory CL (ovCL) forms after the second LH peak. After five to six weeks (the normal luteal phase lifespan), all existing CLs begin to regress. However, they resume growing as soon as an embryo becomes ultrasonographically apparent on day 49 ± 2. After this time, all pregnancy CLs grow significantly larger than in a non-conceptive luteal phase and are maintained until after parturition. The long luteal phase is congruent with a slow early embryonic development and luteal rescue only starts ‘last minute’, with presumed implantation of the embryo. Our findings demonstrate a highly successful reproductive solution, different from currently described mammalian models. PMID:22719030

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize methods for in vivo imaging.

  20. Simultaneous ex vivo Functional Testing of Two Retinas by in vivo Electroretinogram System

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types. PMID:25992809

  1. Simultaneous ex vivo functional testing of two retinas by in vivo electroretinogram system.

    PubMed

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types. PMID:25992809

  2. Effect of oxytocin infusion on luteal blood flow and progesterone secretion in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brozos, Christos N.; Pancarci, Metin S.; Valencia, Javier; Beindorff, Nikola; Kiossis, Evaggelos; Bollwein, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of oxytocin infusion on corpus luteum (CL) function during early to mid-diestrus by measuring luteal size (LS) and luteal blood flow (LBF) along with plasma levels of progesterone (P4) and prostaglandin metabolites (13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2?, PGFM). On day (D) 7 of the estrus cycle (D1 = ovulation), seven cows received 100 IU of oxytocin (OXY) or placebo (PL) following a Latin square design. LS and LBF increased in both groups over time and no differences were observed between the groups. PGFM did not differ either within the groups over time or between the groups at any time point. P4 of the OXY group was higher compared to that of the the PL group 360 min after the infusion (p = 0.01) and tended to be higher at the time points 450 min, 48 h, and 72 h (all p = 0.08). Results from this study support the hypothesis that OXY is not directly involved in the mechanism(s) governing blood flow of the CL and has no remarkable effects either on luteal size or P4 and PGFM plasma levels. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the role of OXY in CL blood flow during early and late luteal phases. PMID:22437538

  3. Evaluation of bovine luteal blood flow by using color Doppler ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Lüttgenau, J; Bollwein, H

    2014-04-01

    Since luteal vascularization plays a decisive role for the function of the corpus luteum (CL), the investigation of luteal blood flow (LBF) might give valuable information about the physiology and patho-physiology of the CL. To quantify LBF, usually Power mode color Doppler ultrasonography is used. This method detects the number of red blood cells moving through the vessels and shows them as color pixels on the B-mode image of the CL. The area of color pixels is measured with computer-assisted image analysis software and is used as a semiquantitative parameter for the assessment of LBF. Although Power mode is superior for the evaluation of LBF compared to conventional color Doppler ultrasonography, which detects the velocity of blood cells, it is still not sufficiently sensitive to detect the blood flow in the small vessels in the center of the bovine CL. Therefore, blood flow can only be measured in the bigger luteal vessels in the outer edge of the CL. Color Doppler ultrasonographic studies of the bovine estrous cycle have shown that plasma progesterone (P4) concentration can be more reliably predicted by LBF than by luteal size (LS), especially during the CL regression. During the midluteal phase, cows with low P4 level showed smaller CL, but LBF, related to LS, did not differ between cows with low and high P4 levels. In contrast to non-pregnant cows, a significant rise in LBF was observed three weeks after insemination in pregnant cows. However, LBF was not useful for an early pregnancy diagnosis due to high LBF variation among cows. When the effects of an acute systemic inflammation and exogenous hormones on the CL are examined, the LBF determination is more sensitive than LS assessment. In conclusion, color Doppler ultrasonography of the bovine CL provides additional information on luteal function compared to measurements of LS and plasma P4, but its value as a parameter concerning assessment of fertility in cows has to be clarified. PMID:24856468

  4. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is viewed with confocal microscopy and laser speckle flowmetry to monitor glial cell responses and retinal blood flow. Retinal glial cells are labeled with the Ca2+ indicator dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and the caged Ca2+ compound NP-EGTA by injection of the compounds into the vitreous humor. Glial cells are stimulated by photolysis of caged Ca2+ and the activation state of the cells assessed by monitoring Ca2+ indicator dye fluorescence. We find that, as in the ex vivo retina, retinal glial cells in vivo generate both spontaneous and evoked intercellular Ca2+ waves. We also find that stimulation of glial cells leads to the dilation of neighboring retinal arterioles, supporting the hypothesis that glial cells regulate blood flow in the retina. This in vivo preparation holds great promise for assessing glial cell function in the healthy and pathological retina. PMID:22144328

  5. Mutant mouse models and their contribution to our knowledge of corpus luteum development, function and regression

    PubMed Central

    Henkes, Luiz E; Davis, John S; Rueda, Bo R

    2003-01-01

    The corpus luteum is a unique organ, which is transitory in nature. The development, maintenance and regression of the corpus luteum are regulated by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signaling events. Defining the specific mediators of luteal development, maintenance and regression has been difficult and often perplexing due to the complexity that stems from the variety of cell types that make up the luteal tissue. Moreover, some regulators may serve dual functions as a luteotropic and luteolytic agent depending on the temporal and spatial environment in which they are expressed. As a result, some confusion is present in the interpretation of in vitro and in vivo studies. More recently investigators have utilized mutant mouse models to define the functional significance of specific gene products. The goal of this mini-review is to identify and discuss mutant mouse models that have luteal anomalies, which may provide some clues as to the significance of specific regulators of corpus luteum function. PMID:14613537

  6. Formation of the early canine CL and the role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in regulation of its function: an in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, M P; Ihle, S; Siemieniuch, M J; Gram, A; Boos, A; Zdu?czyk, S; Fingerhut, J; Hoffmann, B; Schuler, G; Jurczak, A; Domos?awska, A; Janowski, T

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms governing corpus luteum (CL) function in domestic dogs remain not fully elucidated. The upregulated expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthase (PGES) at the beginning of the canine luteal phase indicated their luteotrophic roles, and the steroidogenic activity of PGE2 in the early canine CL has been confirmed in vitro. Recently, by applying a cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-specific inhibitor (firocoxib [Previcox]; Merial) from the day of ovulation until the midluteal phase, the luteotrophic effects of PGs have been shown in vivo. This is a follow-up study investigating the underlying endocrine mechanisms associated with the firocoxib-mediated effects on the canine CL. Experimental groups were formed with ovariohysterectomies performed on Days 5, 10, 20, or 30 of firocoxib treatments (10 mg/kg bw/24h; TGs = treated groups). Untreated dogs served as controls. A decrease of steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein expression was observed in TGs. The expression of PGE2 synthase was significantly suppressed in TGs 5 and 10, and both PGE2 and PGF2? levels were decreased in luteal homogenates, particularly from CL in TG 5. Similarly, expression of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) was diminished in TGs 5 and 20. The expression of PGE2 receptors PTGER2 (EP2) and PTGER4 (EP4), the PG- transporter (PGT), and 15-hydroxy PG dehydrogenase (HPGD) was not affected in TGs. Our results substantiate a direct luteotrophic role of PGs in the early canine CL, i.e., by upregulating the steroidogenic machinery. Additionally, the possibility of an indirect effect on PRL function arises from the increased prolactin receptor expression in response to PGE2 treatment in canine lutein cells observed in vitro. PMID:25595355

  7. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON EX VIVO AND IN VITRO LUTEAL FUNCTION AND BROMODICHLOROMETHANE TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a drinking water disinfection by-product, causes pregnancy loss, i.e. full-litter resorption, in F344 rats when treated during the luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent period. This effect is associated with reduced maternal serum progesterone (P) and LH...

  8. Function of tubulin binding proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, J A; Vega, L R; Solomon, F

    2000-01-01

    Overexpression of the beta-tubulin binding protein Rbl2p/cofactor A is lethal in yeast cells expressing a mutant alpha-tubulin, tub1-724, that produces unstable heterodimer. Here we use RBL2 overexpression to identify mutations in other genes that affect formation or stability of heterodimer. This approach identifies four genes-CIN1, CIN2, CIN4, and PAC2-as affecting heterodimer formation in vivo. The vertebrate homologues of two of these gene products-Cin1p/cofactor D and Pac2p/cofactor E-can catalyze exchange of tubulin polypeptides into preexisting heterodimer in vitro. Previous work suggests that both Cin2p or Cin4p act in concert with Cin1p in yeast, but no role for vertebrate homologues of either has been reported in the in vitro reaction. Results presented here demonstrate that these proteins can promote heterodimer formation in vivo. RBL2 overexpression in cin1 and pac2 mutant cells causes microtubule disassembly and enhanced formation of Rbl2p-beta-tubulin complex, as it does in the alpha-tubulin mutant that produces weakened heterodimer. Significantly, excess Cin1p/cofactor D suppresses the conditional phenotypes of that mutant alpha-tubulin. Although none of the four genes is essential for viability under normal conditions, they become essential under conditions where the levels of dissociated tubulin polypeptides increase. Therefore, these proteins may provide a salvage pathway for dissociated tubulin heterodimers and so rescue cells from the deleterious effects of free beta-tubulin. PMID:10978276

  9. Gelatinases, endonuclease and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor during development and regression of swine luteal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Luciana Andrea; Turba, Maria Elena; Zannoni, Augusta; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2006-01-01

    Background The development and regression of corpus luteum (CL) is characterized by an intense angiogenesis and angioregression accompanied by luteal tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is the main regulator of angiogenesis, promoting endothelial cell mitosis and differentiation. After the formation of neovascular tubes, the remodelling of ECM is essential for the correct development of CL, particularly by the action of specific class of proteolytic enzymes known as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). During luteal regression, characterized by an apoptotic process and successively by an intense ECM and luteal degradation, the activation of Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonucleases and MMPs activity are required. The levels of expression and activity of VEGF, MMP-2 and -9, and Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonucleases throughout the oestrous cycle and at pregnancy were analyzed. Results Different patterns of VEGF, MMPs and Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease were observed in swine CL during different luteal phases and at pregnancy. Immediately after ovulation, the highest levels of VEGF mRNA/protein and MMP-9 activity were detected. On days 5–14 after ovulation, VEGF expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities are at basal levels, while Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease levels increased significantly in relation to day 1. Only at luteolysis (day 17), Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease and MMP-2 spontaneous activity increased significantly. At pregnancy, high levels of MMP-9 and VEGF were observed. Conclusion Our findings, obtained from a precisely controlled in vivo model of CL development and regression, allow us to determine relationships among VEGF, MMPs and endonucleases during angiogenesis and angioregression. Thus, CL provides a very interesting model for studying factors involved in vascular remodelling. PMID:17137503

  10. Circumferentially aligned fibers guided functional neoartery regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meifeng; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Jiamin; Wang, Lina; Yang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrui; Fan, Guanwei; Ji, Shenglu; Xing, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Kong, Deling; Wang, Lianyong

    2015-08-01

    An ideal vascular graft should have the ability to guide the regeneration of neovessels with structure and function similar to those of the native blood vessels. Regeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with circumferential orientation within the grafts is crucial for functional vascular reconstruction in vivo. To date, designing and fabricating a vascular graft with well-defined geometric cues to facilitate simultaneously VSMCs infiltration and their circumferential alignment remains a great challenge and scarcely reported in vivo. Thus, we have designed a bi-layered vascular graft, of which the internal layer is composed of circumferentially aligned microfibers prepared by wet-spinning and an external layer composed of random nanofibers prepared by electrospinning. While the internal circumferentially aligned microfibers provide topographic guidance for in vivo regeneration of circumferentially aligned VSMCs, the external random nanofibers can offer enhanced mechanical property and prevent bleeding during and after graft implantation. VSMCs infiltration and alignment within the scaffold was then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the circumferentially oriented VSMCs and longitudinally aligned ECs were successfully regenerated in vivo after the bi-layered vascular grafts were implanted in rat abdominal aorta. No formation of thrombosis or intimal hyperplasia was observed up to 3 month post implantation. Further, the regenerated neoartery exhibited contraction and relaxation property in response to vasoactive agents. This new strategy may bring cell-free small diameter vascular grafts closer to clinical application. PMID:26001073

  11. Involvement of microtubules in lipoprotein degradation and utilization for steroidogenesis in cultured rat luteal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, V.P.; Menon, K.M.

    1985-12-01

    Cells isolated from superovulated rat ovaries metabolize low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) of human or rat origin and use the lipoprotein-derived cholesterol as a precursor for progesterone production. Under in vitro conditions, both lipoproteins are internalized and degraded in the lysosomes, although degradation of HDL is of lower magnitude than that of LDL. In this report we have examined the role of cellular microtubules in the internalization and degradation of human LDL and HDL in cultured rat luteal cells. The microtubule depolymerizing agents colchicine, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine, and nocodazole as well as taxol, deuterium oxide, and dimethyl sulfoxide, which are known to rapidly polymerize cellular tubulin into microtubules, were used to block the function of microtubules. When these antimicrotubule agents were included in the incubations, degradation of the apolipoproteins of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by the luteal cells was inhibited by 50-85% compared to untreated control values. Maximum inhibitory effects were observed when the cells were preincubated with the inhibitor for at least 4 h at 37 C before treatment with the labeled lipoprotein. Lipoprotein-stimulated progesterone production by luteal cells was also inhibited by 50% or more in the presence of antimicrotubule agents. However, basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone production were unaffected by these inhibitors. The binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL to luteal cell plasma membrane receptors was not affected by the microtubule inhibitors. Although binding was unaffected and degradation was impaired in the presence of the inhibitors, there was no detectable accumulation of undegraded lipoprotein within the cells during the 24 h of study.

  12. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  13. Expression of type I GNRH receptor and in vivo and in vitro GNRH-I effects in corpora lutea of pseudopregnant rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zerani, Massimo; Parillo, Francesco; Brecchia, Gabriele; Guelfi, Gabriella; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Lilli, Lorena; Maranesi, Margherita; Gobbetti, Anna; Boiti, Cristiano

    2010-12-01

    The expression of type I GNRH receptor (GNRHR-I) and the direct role of GNRH-I on corpora lutea (CL) function were studied in the pseudopregnant rabbit model. Immunohistochemistry evidenced GNRHR-I and GNRH-I in luteal cells at early (day 4 pseudopregnancy)-, mid (day 9)-, and late (day 13)-luteal stages. Real-time RT-PCR and western blotting revealed GNRHR-I mRNA and protein at the three luteal stages. Buserelin in vivo treatment at days 9 and 13 decreased plasma progesterone levels for 48 and 24 ?h respectively. In in vitro cultured CL, buserelin reduced progesterone secretion, increased prostaglandin F(2?) (PGF(2?)) secretion and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities at days 9 and 13, and decreased PGE? at day 13. Co-incubation with antagonists for GNRH-I (antide), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP?, 2-amino-ethoxydiphenylborate), and diacylglycerol (DAG, 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl glycerol) or inhibitors for phospholipase C (PLC, compound 48/80), and protein kinase C (PKC, staurosporine) counteracted the buserelin effects. Buserelin co-incubated with COX inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) increased progesterone and decreased PGF(2?) and NOS activity at days 9 and 13, whereas co-incubation with NOS inhibitor (N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester) increased progesterone at the same luteal stages. These results suggest that GNRHR-I is constitutively expressed in rabbit CL independently of luteal stage, whereas GNRH-I down-regulates directly CL progesterone production via PGF(2?) at mid- and late-luteal stages of pseudopregnancy, utilizing its cognate type I receptor with a post-receptorial mechanism that involves PLC, IP?, DAG, PKC, COX-2, and NOS. PMID:20880984

  14. Microarray analysis of the primate luteal transcriptome during chorionic gonadotrophin administration simulating early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C.V.; Satterwhite, S.; Xu, L.; Hennebold, J.D.; Stouffer, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    To explore chorionic gonadotrophin (CG)-regulated gene expression in the primate corpus luteum (CL), adult female rhesus macaques were treated in a model of simulated early pregnancy (SEP). Total RNA was isolated from individual CL after specific intervals of exposure (1, 3, 6 and 9 days) to recombinant hCG in vivo and hybridized to Affymetrix™ GeneChip Rhesus Macaque Genome Arrays. The mRNA levels of 1192 transcripts changed ?2-fold [one-way ANOVA, false discovery rate (FDR) correction; P< 0.05] during SEP when compared with Day 10 untreated controls. Real-time PCR validation indicated that 15 of 17 genes matched in expression pattern between PCR and microarray. Protein levels of three genes identified as CG-sensitive, CYP19A1 (aromatase), PGRMC1 (progestin-binding protein) and STAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) were quantified by western blot analysis. To further analyze global changes in gene expression induced by CG exposure, luteal gene expression was compared between SEP (rescued) and regressing CL, utilizing previously banked GeneChip data from the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Expression patterns and mRNA levels were analyzed between time-matched intervals. Transcripts for 7677 mRNAs differed in expression patterns ?2-fold (one-way ANOVA, FDR correction; P< 0.05) between the hCG-exposed (SEP) CL and regressing CL. Regressed CL (at menses) were most unlike all other CL. Pathway analysis of significantly affected transcripts was performed; the pathway most impacted by CG exposure was steroid biosynthesis. Further comparisons of the genome-wide changes in luteal gene expression during CG rescue and luteolysis in the natural menstrual cycle should identify additional key regulatory pathways promoting primate fertility. PMID:22072816

  15. Physiological functions of protein kinase D in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ellwanger, Kornelia; Hausser, Angelika

    2013-02-01

    The cellular functions of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) have been extensively studied within the last decade and distinct roles such as fission of vesicles at the Golgi compartment, coordination of cell migration and invasion, and regulation of gene transcription have been correlated with this kinase family. Here, we highlight the current state of in vivo studies on PKD function with a focus on animal models and discuss the molecular basis of the observed phenotypic characteristics associated with this kinase family. PMID:23288632

  16. In vivo investigation of cilia structure and function using Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Eric R.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are key organelles in development and homeostasis. The ever-expanding complement of cilia associated proteins necessitates rapid and tractable models for in vivo functional investigation. Xenopus laevis provides an attractive model for such studies, having multiple ciliated populations, including primary and multiciliated tissues. The rapid external development of Xenopus and the large cells make it an especially excellent platform for imaging studies. Here we present embryological and cell-biological methods for the investigation of cilia structure and function in Xenopus laevis, with a focus on quantitative live and fixed imaging. PMID:25837389

  17. Functional Beta2-Integrins Restrict Skin Inflammation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Savinko, Terhi S; Morrison, Vicky L; Uotila, Liisa M; Wolff, C Henrik J; Alenius, Harri T; Fagerholm, Susanna C

    2015-09-01

    Beta2-integrins and the important integrin regulator kindlin-3 are essential for leukocyte trafficking, but the role of beta2-integrins in regulating inflammation is still incompletely understood. Here, we have investigated skin inflammation in a mouse model where the kindlin-3 binding site in the beta2-integrin has been mutated (TTT/AAA-beta2-integrin knock-in), leading to expressed but dysfunctional integrins. We show that, surprisingly, neutrophil trafficking into the inflamed skin in a contact hypersensitivity model is normal in these mice, although trafficking of T cells and eosinophils into the skin is reduced. Instead, expression of dysfunctional integrins leads to increased mast cell and dendritic cell numbers in the skin, increased inflammatory cytokine production in the inflamed skin in vivo, and in mast cells in vitro. Furthermore, expression of dysfunctional integrins leads to increased dendritic cell activation and migration to lymph nodes and increased Th1 responses in vivo. Therefore, the kindlin-3/integrin interaction is important for trafficking of T cells and eosinophils but not absolutely required for neutrophil trafficking into the inflamed skin. Functional beta2-integrins also have a major role in restricting the immune response in the inflamed skin and lymph nodes in vivo, likely through effects on mast cell and dendritic cell numbers and activation. PMID:25918984

  18. In vivo analysis of functional domains from villin and gelsolin

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Transfected CV1 cells were used to compare the in vivo effects of various domains of villin and gelsolin. These two homologous actin modulating proteins both contain a duplicated severin-like sequence. Villin has in addition a carboxy-terminal domain, the headpiece, which accounts for its bundling activity. The effects of the villin-deleted mutants were compared with those of native villin. Our results show that essential domains of villin required to induce the growth of microvilli and F-actin redistribution are present in the first half of the core and in the headpiece. We also show that the second half of the villin core cannot be exchanged by its homolog in gelsolin. When expressed at high levels of CV1 cells, full length gelsolin completely disrupted stress fibers without change of the cell shape. Addition of the villin headpiece to gelsolin had no effect on the phenotype induced by gelsolin alone. Expression of the first half of gelsolin induced similar modifications as capping proteins and rapid cell mortality; this deleterious effect on the cell structure was also observed when the headpiece was linked to the first half of gelsolin. In cells expressing the second half of gelsolin, a dotted F-actin staining was often seen. Moreover elongated dorsal F-actin structures were observed when the headpiece was linked to the second gelsolin domain. These studies illustrate the patent in vivo severing activity of gelsolin as well as the distinct functional properties of villin core in contrast to gelsolin. PMID:1310994

  19. Degradation of high density lipoprotein in cultured rat luteal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, V.P.; Menon, K.M.J.

    1986-03-01

    In rat ovary luteal cells, degradation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) to tricholoracetic acid (TCA)-soluble products accounts for only a fraction of the HDL-derived cholesterol used for steroidogenesis. In this study the authors have investigated the fate of /sup 125/I)HDL bound to cultured luteal cells using pulse-chase technique. Luteal cell cultures were pulse labeled with (/sup 125/I)HDL/sub 3/ and reincubated in the absence of HDL. By 24 h about 50% of the initallay bound radioactivity was released into the medium, of which 60-65% could be precipitated with 10% TCA. Gel filtration of the chase incubation medium on 10% agarose showed that the amount of TCA-soluble radioactivity was nearly completely accounted for by a sharp peak in the low molecular weight region which was identified as 96% monoiodotyrosine by paper chromatography. The TCA-precipitable radioactivity was nearly completely accounted for by a sharp peak in the low molecular weight region which was identified as 96% monoiodotyrosine by paper chromatography. The TCA-precipitable radioactivity eluted over a wide range of molecular weights (15,000-80,000), and there was very little intact HDL present. Electrophoresis of the chase medium showed that component of the TCA-precipitable portion had mobility similar to apo AI. Lysosomal inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis had no effect on the composition or quantity of radioactivity released during chase incubation. The results show that HDL/sub 3/ binding to luteal cells is followed by complete degradation of the lipoprotein, although the TCA-soluble part does not reflect the extent of degradation.

  20. Mapping actin surfaces required for functional interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    An in vivo strategy to identify amino acids of actin required for functional interactions with actin-binding proteins was developed. This approach is based on the assumption that an actin mutation that specifically impairs the interaction with an actin-binding protein will cause a phenotype similar to a null mutation in the gene that encodes the actin-binding protein. 21 actin mutations were analyzed in budding yeast, and specific regions of actin subdomain 1 were implicated in the interaction with fimbrin, an actin filament-bundling protein. Mutations in this actin subdomain were shown to be, like a null allele of the yeast fimbrin gene (SAC6), lethal in combination with null mutations in the ABP1 and SLA2 genes, and viable in combination with a null mutation in the SLA1 gene. Biochemical experiments with act1-120 actin (E99A, E100A) verified a defect in the fimbrin-actin interaction. Genetic interactions between mutant alleles of the yeast actin gene and null alleles of the SAC6, ABP1, SLA1, and SLA2 genes also demonstrated that the effects of the 21 actin mutations are diverse and allowed four out of seven pseudo-wild-type actin alleles to be distinguished from the wild-type gene for the first time, providing evidence for functional redundancy between different surfaces of actin. PMID:8034743

  1. An in vivo assay of synaptic function mediating human cognition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Symmonds, Mkael; Stephan, Klaas E; Friston, Karl J; Dolan, Raymond J

    2011-08-01

    The contribution of dopamine to working memory has been studied extensively [1-3]. Here, we exploited its well characterized effects [1-3] to validate a novel human in vivo assay of ongoing synaptic [4, 5] processing. We obtained magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements from subjects performing a working memory (WM) task during a within-subject, placebo-controlled, pharmacological (dopaminergic) challenge. By applying dynamic causal modeling (DCM), a Bayesian technique for neuronal system identification [6], to MEG signals from prefrontal cortex, we demonstrate that it is possible to infer synaptic signaling by specific ion channels in behaving humans. Dopamine-induced enhancement of WM performance was accompanied by significant changes in MEG signal power, and a DCM assay disclosed related changes in synaptic signaling. By estimating the contribution of ionotropic receptors (AMPA, NMDA, and GABA(A)) to the observed spectral response, we demonstrate changes in their function commensurate with the synaptic effects of dopamine. The validity of our model is reinforced by a striking quantitative effect on NMDA and AMPA receptor signaling that predicted behavioral improvement over subjects. Our results provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a novel framework for inferring, noninvasively, neuromodulatory influences on ion channel signaling via specific ionotropic receptors, providing a window on the hidden synaptic events mediating discrete psychological processes in humans. PMID:21802302

  2. In vivo tests of thermodynamic models of transcription repressor function.

    PubMed

    Tungtur, Sudheer; Skinner, Harlyn; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Beckett, Dorothy

    2011-11-01

    One emphasis of the Gibbs Conference on Biothermodynamics is the value of thermodynamic measurements for understanding behaviors of biological systems. In this study, the correlation between thermodynamic measurements of in vitro DNA binding affinity with in vivo transcription repression was investigated for two transcription repressors. In the first system, which comprised an engineered LacI/GalR homolog, mutational changes altered the equilibrium constant for binding DNA. Changes correlated with altered repression, but estimates of in vivo repressor concentration suggest a ?25-fold discrepancy with in vitro conditions. In the second system, changes in ligand binding to BirA altered dimerization and subsequent DNA occupancy. Again, these changes correlate with altered in vivo repression, but comparison with in vitro measurements reveals a ~10-fold discrepancy. Further analysis of each system suggests that the observed discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results reflect the contributions of additional equilibria to the transcription repression process. PMID:21715082

  3. Roles of prostaglandin F2alpha and hydrogen peroxide in the regulation of Copper/Zinc superoxide dismutase in bovine corpus luteum and luteal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF) induces luteolysis in cow by inducing a rapid reduction in progesterone production (functional luteolysis) followed by tissue degeneration (structural luteolysis). However the mechanisms of action of PGF remain unclear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in regulating the luteolytic action of PGF. The local concentration of ROS is controlled by superoxide dismutase (SOD), the main enzyme involved in the control of intraluteal ROS. Thus SOD seems to be involved in luteolysis process induced by PGF in cow. Methods To determine the dynamic relationship between PGF and ROS in bovine corpus luteum (CL) during luteolysis, we determined the time-dependent change of Copper/Zinc SOD (SOD1) in CL tissues after PGF treatment in vivo. We also investigated whether PGF and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates SOD1 expression and SOD activity in cultured bovine luteal endothelial cells (LECs) in vitro. Results Following administration of a luteolytic dose of PGF analogue (0 h) to cows at the mid-luteal stage, the expression of SOD1 mRNA and protein, and total SOD activity in CL tissues increased between 0.5 and 2 h, but fell below the initial (0 h) level at 24 h post-treatment. In cultured LECs, the expression of SOD1 mRNA was stimulated by PGF (1–10 microM) and H2O2 (10–100 microM) at 2 h (P<0.05). PGF and H2O2 increased SOD1 protein expression and total SOD activity at 2 h (P<0.05), whereas PGF and H2O2 inhibited SOD1 protein expressions and total SOD activity at 24 h (P<0.05). In addition, H2O2 stimulated PGF biosynthesis at 2 and 24 h in bovine LECs. Overall results indicate that, SOD is regulated by PGF and ROS in bovine LECs. SOD may play a role in controlling intraluteal PGF and ROS action during functional and structural luteolysis in cows. PMID:23101731

  4. In vitro gene regulatory networks predict in vivo function of liver

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evolution of toxicity testing is predicated upon using in vitro cell based systems to rapidly screen and predict how a chemical might cause toxicity to an organ in vivo. However, the degree to which we can extend in vitro results to in vivo activity and possible mechanisms of action remains to be fully addressed. Results Here we use the nitroaromatic 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a model chemical to compare and determine how we might extrapolate from in vitro data to in vivo effects. We found 341 transcripts differentially expressed in common among in vitro and in vivo assays in response to TNT. The major functional term corresponding to these transcripts was cell cycle. Similarly modulated common pathways were identified between in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we uncovered the conserved common transcriptional gene regulatory networks between in vitro and in vivo cellular liver systems that responded to TNT exposure, which mainly contain 2 subnetwork modules: PTTG1 and PIR centered networks. Interestingly, all 7 genes in the PTTG1 module were involved in cell cycle and downregulated by TNT both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions The results of our investigation of TNT effects on gene expression in liver suggest that gene regulatory networks obtained from an in vitro system can predict in vivo function and mechanisms. Inhibiting PTTG1 and its targeted cell cyle related genes could be key machanism for TNT induced liver toxicity. PMID:21073692

  5. Luteal activity of pregnant rats with hypo-and hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Luteal activity is dependent on the interaction of various growth factors, cytokines and hormones, including the thyroid hormones, being that hypo- and hyperthyroidism alter the gestational period and are also a cause of miscarriage and stillbirth. Because of that, we evaluated the proliferation, apoptosis and expression of angiogenic factors and COX-2 in the corpus luteum of hypo- and hyperthyroid pregnant rats. Methods Seventy-two adult female rats were equally distributed into three groups: hypothyroid, hyperthyroid and control. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism were induced by the daily administration of propylthiouracil and L-thyroxine, respectively. The administration began five days before becoming pregnant and the animals were sacrificed at days 10, 14, and 19 of gestation. We performed an immunohistochemical analysis to evaluate the expression of CDC-47, VEGF, Flk-1 (VEGF receptor) and COX-2. Apoptosis was evaluated by the TUNEL assay. We assessed the gene expression of VEGF, Flk-1, caspase 3, COX-2 and PGF2? receptor using real time RT-PCR. The data were analyzed by SNK test. Results Hypothyroidism reduced COX-2 expression on day 10 and 19 (P?luteal cell proliferation on day 10 and 14 (p?

  6. Progesterone Inhibits Oxytocin- and Prostaglandin F2alpha-Stimulated Increases in Intracellular Calcium Concentrations in Small and Large Ovine Luteal Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy L.; Bott, Rebecca C.; Slough, Teresa L.; Bruemmer, Jason E.; Niswender, Gordon D.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the corpus luteum has an important role in regulating its own demise. A series of experiments was performed to study the effects of luteal concentrations of progesterone on the functions of steroidogenic luteal cells. In the first experiment, steroidogenic small luteal cells (SLCs) were separated from endothelial cells, and it was determined that it was the SLCs that contained receptors for oxytocin. Treatment with progesterone (95 ?M) for as little as 1 h decreased (P < 0.05) the percentage of SLCs responding to oxytocin (10 ?M) with an increase in intracellular concentrations of calcium, and this effect continued for the duration of the experiment. In a second experiment, the response to oxytocin was increased (P < 0.05) by 3 h (but not 1 h) following progesterone removal, with a further increase by 16 h. The ability of 1 ?M prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) to increase intracellular concentrations of calcium was also decreased (P < 0.05) by progesterone treatment. By 3 h following removal of progesterone, the percentage of steroidogenic large luteal cells (LLCs) responding to PGF2alpha was increased and not different from that observed in cells 16 h after progesterone removal. Finally, cyclodextrins (methyl-beta cyclodextrin [MbetaCD]) were used to remove cholesterol from the plasma membrane of luteal cells, and MbetaCD loaded with cholesterol was used to put cholesterol back into the plasma membrane of progesterone-treated cells. Treatment with MbetaCD reduced (P < 0.05) the responsiveness of SLCs to oxytocin and LLCs to PGF2alpha. Use of cholesterol-loaded MbetaCD returned the responsiveness of both SLCs and LLCs treated with progesterone to that observed in vehicle (no progesterone)-treated controls. In summary, intraluteal concentrations of progesterone inhibit the ability of oxytocin to increase intracellular concentrations of calcium in SLCs and the ability of PGF2alpha to increase intracellular concentrations of calcium in LLCs. The highest concentration of progesterone appears to act by influencing cholesterol content of the luteal cell membranes. PMID:19812299

  7. The impact of luteal phase support on gene expression of extracellular matrix protein and adhesion molecules

    E-print Network

    Terasaki, Mark

    significant suppression was documented in genes encoding for catenin-D2, collagen-11A1, and the laminins (LAMA, and there is no agreement regarding the optimal supplementation scheme during the luteal phase (9, 10). In the present study

  8. Differential Cellular Localization of Galectin-1 and Galectin-3 in the Regressing Corpus Luteum of Mice and Their Possible Contribution to Luteal Cell Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Galectin-1 and galectin-3, ?-galactoside–binding lectins, are predominantly expressed in the regressing corpus luteum (CL) of mouse ovary. This study revealed the expression patterns and cellular localizations of galectins during CL formation and regression by ISH and IHC. Galectin-1 mRNA expression temporarily increased in active CL, preceding the expression of progesterone degradation enzyme 20?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20?-HSD), which represents functional luteolysis. The expressions of both galectin-1 and galectin-3 remarkably increased in the structurally regressing CL, which vigorously expressed 20?-HSD and contained abundant apoptotic luteal cells. Ultrastructurally, galectin-1– and galectin-3–immunoreactive cells were identified as fibroblasts and infiltrating macrophages, respectively. In addition, some populations of luteal cells themselves expressed galectin-3 in regressing CL and formed unique demarcation membranes in the cytoplasm, showing a non-typical apoptotic feature. Ovary of adult mice with repeated estrus cycles contained CL of three different generations. Among them, the old CL formed during previous estrus cycles consisted of galectin-3–positive luteal cells. The galectin-3–positive old CL was resistant to apoptosis and seemed to be eliminated by a mechanism different from apoptosis. The stage- and cell-specific expression of galectin in CL suggests its differential contribution to luteolysis, and this expression may be mediated by major regulatory molecules of CL function, prolactin and/or prostaglandin F2?. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:741–749, 2010) PMID:20421595

  9. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  10. Application of electrical stimulation for functional tissue engineering in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Milica (Inventor); Park, Hyoungshin (Inventor); Langer, Robert (Inventor); Freed, Lisa (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides new methods for the in vitro preparation of bioartificial tissue equivalents and their enhanced integration after implantation in vivo. These methods include submitting a tissue construct to a biomimetic electrical stimulation during cultivation in vitro to improve its structural and functional properties, and/or in vivo, after implantation of the construct, to enhance its integration with host tissue and increase cell survival and functionality. The inventive methods are particularly useful for the production of bioartificial equivalents and/or the repair and replacement of native tissues that contain electrically excitable cells and are subject to electrical stimulation in vivo, such as, for example, cardiac muscle tissue, striated skeletal muscle tissue, smooth muscle tissue, bone, vasculature, and nerve tissue.

  11. The effect of progesterone replacement on gene expression in the corpus luteum during induced regression and late luteal phase in the bonnet monkey (Macaca radiata)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In higher primates, although LH/CG play a critical role in the control of corpus luteum (CL) function, the direct effects of progesterone (P4) in the maintenance of CL structure and function are unclear. Several experiments were conducted in the bonnet monkey to examine direct effects of P4 on gene expression changes in the CL, during induced luteolysis and the late luteal phase of natural cycles. Methods To identify differentially expressed genes encoding PR, PR binding factors, cofactors and PR downstream signaling target genes, the genome-wide analysis data generated in CL of monkeys after LH/P4 depletion and LH replacement were mined and validated by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Initially, expression of these P4 related genes were determined in CL during different stages of luteal phase. The recently reported model system of induced luteolysis, yet capable of responsive to tropic support, afforded an ideal situation to examine direct effects of P4 on structure and function of CL. For this purpose, P4 was infused via ALZET pumps into monkeys 24 h after LH/P4 depletion to maintain mid luteal phase circulating P4 concentration (P4 replacement). In another experiment, exogenous P4 was supplemented during late luteal phase to mimic early pregnancy. Results Based on the published microarray data, 45 genes were identified to be commonly regulated by LH and P4. From these 19 genes belonging to PR signaling were selected to determine their expression in LH/P4 depletion and P4 replacement experiments. These 19 genes when analyzed revealed 8 genes to be directly responsive to P4, whereas the other genes to be regulated by both LH and P4. Progesterone supplementation for 24 h during the late luteal phase also showed changes in expression of 17 out of 19 genes examined. Conclusion These results taken together suggest that P4 regulates, directly or indirectly, expression of a number of genes involved in the CL structure and function. PMID:21291521

  12. Recent developments in the understanding of astrocyte function in the cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, Tycho M; Kuhn, Bernd

    2010-09-01

    Several studies have contributed to our understanding of astrocytes, especially Bergmann glia, in the cerebellum; but, until recently, none has looked at their function in vivo. Multicell bolus loading of fluorescent calcium indicators in combination with the astrocytic marker SR101 has allowed imaging of up to hundreds of astrocytes at once in the intact cerebellum. In addition, the selective targeting of astrocytes with fluorescent calcium indicator proteins has enabled the study of their function in vivo without the confounding effects of other neuropil signals and with a resolution that surpasses multicell bolus loading and SR101 staining. The two astrocyte types of the cerebellar cortex, Bergmann glia, and velate protoplasmic astrocytes display a diverse signaling repertoire in vivo, which ranges from localized calcium elevations in subcellular processes to waves, triggered by the release of purines and mediated by purinergic receptors that span multiple processes and can involve tens of astrocytes. During locomotor behavior, even larger numbers of astrocytes display calcium increases that are driven by neuronal activity and correlate with global changes in blood flow. In this review, we give an overview of our current understanding of the function of Bergmann glia and velate protoplasmic astrocytes and the promise of the tools used to study their calcium dynamics and function in vivo. PMID:19904577

  13. A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX

    E-print Network

    Simon, Anne

    A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX College Park College Park, MD 20742, USA The motif1-hairpin (M1H), located on (2)-strands of Turnip, Turnip Crinkle Virus; SELEX, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment; M1H, motif1

  14. ?5 and ?v integrins cooperate to regulate vascular smooth muscle and neural crest functions in vivo

    E-print Network

    Turner, Christopher J.

    The RGD-binding ?5 and ?v integrins have been shown to be key regulators of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) function in vitro. However, their role on vSMCs during vascular development in vivo remains unclear. To address ...

  15. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  16. Defining Uremic Arterial Functional Abnormalities in Patients Recently Started on Haemodialysis: Combined In Vivo and Ex Vivo Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Abushufa, Adil M.; Eldehni, Mohamed T.; Odudu, Aghogho; Evans, Philip D.; O?Sullivan, Saoirse E.; McIntyre, Chris W.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in vascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and haemodialysis (HD) patients exhibit significant vascular abnormalities. To understand this further, we examined how ex vivo intrinsic function in isolated arteries correlates with in vivo assessments of cardiovascular status in HD patients. Abdominal fat biopsies were obtained from 11 HD patients and 26 non-uremic controls. Subcutaneous arteries were dissected and mounted on a wire myograph, and cumulative concentration-response curves to noradrenalin, endothelin-1, a thromboxane A2 agonist (U46619), angiotensin II, vasopressin, bradykinin (BK), acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were constructed. Pulse wave velocity and blood pressure were measured in HD patients. Enhanced (P<0.05?0.0001) maximal contractile responses (Rmax) to all spasmogens (particularly vasopressin) were observed in arteries from HD patients compared to controls, and this effect was more pronounced in arteries with an internal diameter>600 µm. The potency (pEC50) of U46619 (P<0.01) and vasopressin (P<0.001) was also increased in arteries>600 µm of HD patients. The maximal relaxant response to the endothelium-dependent dilators ACh and BK were lower in HD patients (P<0.01-P<0.0001) (worse for ACh than BK); however the endothelium-independent dilator SNP was similar in both groups. PWV was significantly correlated with the vasoconstrictor response to vasopressin (P?=?0.042) in HD patients. HD patients are primed for hypertension and end organ demand ischaemia by a highly sensitised pressor response. The failure of arterial relaxation is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. Intrinsic vascular abnormalities may be important in sensitising HD patients to recurrent cumulative ischaemic end organ injury. PMID:25546407

  17. Functional analysis of propeptide as an intramolecular chaperone for in vivo folding of subtilisin nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Liu, Hui; Bao, Wei; Weng, Meizhi; Chen, Wei; Cai, Yongjun; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2010-12-01

    Here, we show that during in vivo folding of the precursor, the propeptide of subtilisin nattokinase functions as an intramolecular chaperone (IMC) that organises the in vivo folding of the subtilisin domain. Two residues belonging to ?-strands formed by conserved regions of the IMC are crucial for the folding of the subtilisin domain through direct interactions. An identical protease can fold into different conformations in vivo due to the action of a mutated IMC, resulting in different kinetic parameters. Some interfacial changes involving conserved regions, even those induced by the subtilisin domain, blocked subtilisin folding and altered its conformation. Insight into the interaction between the subtilisin and IMC domains is provided by a three-dimensional structural model. PMID:21074529

  18. Ephrin B1 is expressed on human luteinizing granulosa cells in corpora lutea of the early luteal phase: the possible involvement of the B class Eph-ephrin system during corpus luteum formation.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Miho; Yoshioka, Shinya; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Sato, Yukiyasu; Tatsumi, Keiji; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Fujii, Shingo

    2003-09-01

    Ephrins and their Eph receptors are both membrane-bound proteins that function in various cell-cell recognition processes, such as morphogenesis and angiogenesis. In this study we examined the expression of B class ephrins-Ephs in the human ovary during corpus luteum formation, a process of tissue remodeling accompanied by angiogenesis. RT-PCR analysis detected mRNAs for Eph B1, B2, and B4 and ephrin B1 and B2, but not Eph B3 and B6 or ephrin B3, in human corpora lutea of the early luteal phase. By immunohistochemistry, ephrin B1 was moderately expressed on theca interna cells, but was expressed at a low level on granulosa cells in the preovulatory follicles. After ovulation, a rapid increase in ephrin B1 expression was observed on luteinizing granulosa cells, whereas its expression on luteinizing theca interna cells decreased. The mRNA expression of ephrin B1 in luteinizing granulosa cells was confirmed by Northern blotting. Flow cytometry showed that ephrin B1 was expressed on the surface of isolated luteinizing granulosa cells. Moreover, these cells had the ability to bind to recombinant Eph B2-Fc fusion protein. These findings suggest that ephrin B1-expressing granulosa cells can directly interact with Eph-bearing cells during corpus luteum formation in vivo, suggesting that Eph-ephrin system is involved in this process. PMID:12970314

  19. Functionalized gold nanoparticles: a detailed in vivo multimodal microscopic brain distribution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Fernanda; Mandal, Subhra; Garrovo, Chiara; Astolfo, Alberto; Bonifacio, Alois; Latawiec, Diane; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Huewel, Sabine; Legname, Giuseppe; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Krol, Silke

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex.In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S6. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00345j

  20. Bacterial ApbC protein has two biochemical activities that are required for in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jeffrey M; Sondelski, Jamie L; Downs, Diana M

    2009-01-01

    The ApbC protein has been shown previously to bind and rapidly transfer iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters to an apoprotein (Boyd, J. M., Pierik, A. J., Netz, D. J., Lill, R., and Downs, D. M. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 8195-8202. This study utilized both in vivo and in vitro assays to examine the function of variant ApbC proteins. The in vivo assays assessed the ability of ApbC proteins to function in pathways with low and high demand for [Fe-S] cluster proteins. Variant ApbC proteins were purified and assayed for the ability to hydrolyze ATP, bind [Fe-S] cluster, and transfer [Fe-S] cluster. This study details the first kinetic analysis of ATP hydrolysis for a member of the ParA subfamily of "deviant" Walker A proteins. Moreover, this study details the first functional analysis of mutant variants of the ever expanding family of ApbC/Nbp35 [Fe-S] cluster biosynthetic proteins. The results herein show that ApbC protein needs ATPase activity and the ability to bind and rapidly transfer [Fe-S] clusters for in vivo function. PMID:19001370

  1. Bacterial ApbC Protein Has Two Biochemical Activities That Are Required for in Vivo Function*

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Jeffrey M.; Sondelski, Jamie L.; Downs, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    The ApbC protein has been shown previously to bind and rapidly transfer iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters to an apoprotein (Boyd, J. M., Pierik, A. J., Netz, D. J., Lill, R., and Downs, D. M. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 8195–8202. This study utilized both in vivo and in vitro assays to examine the function of variant ApbC proteins. The in vivo assays assessed the ability of ApbC proteins to function in pathways with low and high demand for [Fe-S] cluster proteins. Variant ApbC proteins were purified and assayed for the ability to hydrolyze ATP, bind [Fe-S] cluster, and transfer [Fe-S] cluster. This study details the first kinetic analysis of ATP hydrolysis for a member of the ParA subfamily of “deviant” Walker A proteins. Moreover, this study details the first functional analysis of mutant variants of the ever expanding family of ApbC/Nbp35 [Fe-S] cluster biosynthetic proteins. The results herein show that ApbC protein needs ATPase activity and the ability to bind and rapidly transfer [Fe-S] clusters for in vivo function. PMID:19001370

  2. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo. PMID:25762151

  3. Luteal phase of the menstrual cycle increases sweating rate during exercise.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A M C; Lacerda, M G; Fonseca, I A T; Reis, F M; Rodrigues, L O C; Silami-Garcia, E

    2006-09-01

    The present study evaluated whether the luteal phase elevation of body temperature would be offset during exercise by increased sweating, when women are normally hydrated. Eleven women performed 60 min of cycling exercise at 60% of their maximal work load at 32 degrees C and 80% relative air humidity. Each subject participated in two identical experimental sessions: one during the follicular phase (between days 5 and 8) and the other during the luteal phase (between days 22 and 25). Women with serum progesterone >3 ng/mL, in the luteal phase were classified as group 1 (N = 4), whereas the others were classified as group 2 (N = 7). Post-exercise urine volume (213 +/- 80 vs 309 +/- 113 mL) and specific urine gravity (1.008 +/- 0.003 vs 1.006 +/- 0.002) changed (P < 0.05) during the luteal phase compared to the follicular phase in group 1. No menstrual cycle dependence was observed for these parameters in group 2. Sweat rate was higher (P < 0.05) in the luteal (3.10 +/- 0.81 g m-2 min-1) than in the follicular phase (2.80 +/- 0.64 g m(-2) min(-1)) only in group 1. During exercise, no differences related to menstrual cycle phases were seen in rectal temperature, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, mean skin temperature, and pre- and post-exercise body weight. Women exercising in a warm and humid environment with water intake seem to be able to adapt to the luteal phase increase of basal body temperature through reduced urinary volume and increased sweating rate. PMID:16981051

  4. In vivo interrogation of gene function in the mammalian brain using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Swiech, Lukasz; Heidenreich, Matthias; Banerjee, Abhishek; Habib, Naomi; Li, Yinqing; Trombetta, John; Sur, Mriganka; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Probing gene function in the mammalian brain can be greatly assisted with methods to manipulate the genome of neurons in vivo. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9)1 can be used to edit single or multiple genes in replicating eukaryotic cells, resulting in frame-shifting insertion/deletion (indel) mutations and subsequent protein depletion. Here, we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to target single (Mecp2) as well as multiple genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b) in the adult mouse brain in vivo. We characterized the effects of genome modifications in postmitotic neurons using biochemical, genetic, electrophysiological and behavioral readouts. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated SpCas9 genome editing can enable reverse genetic studies of gene function in the brain. PMID:25326897

  5. In vivo generation of a mature and functional artificial skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fuoco, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Biondo, Antonella; Longa, Emanuela; Mascaro, Anna; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Kossovar, Olga; Benedetti, Sara; Salvatori, Maria L; Santoleri, Sabrina; Testa, Stefano; Bernardini, Sergio; Bottinelli, Roberto; Bearzi, Claudia; Cannata, Stefano M; Seliktar, Dror; Cossu, Giulio; Gargioli, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Extensive loss of skeletal muscle tissue results in mutilations and severe loss of function. In vitro-generated artificial muscles undergo necrosis when transplanted in vivo before host angiogenesis may provide oxygen for fibre survival. Here, we report a novel strategy based upon the use of mouse or human mesoangioblasts encapsulated inside PEG-fibrinogen hydrogel. Once engineered to express placental-derived growth factor, mesoangioblasts attract host vessels and nerves, contributing to in vivo survival and maturation of newly formed myofibres. When the graft was implanted underneath the skin on the surface of the tibialis anterior, mature and aligned myofibres formed within several weeks as a complete and functional extra muscle. Moreover, replacing the ablated tibialis anterior with PEG-fibrinogen-embedded mesoangioblasts also resulted in an artificial muscle very similar to a normal tibialis anterior. This strategy opens the possibility for patient-specific muscle creation for a large number of pathological conditions involving muscle tissue wasting. PMID:25715804

  6. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  7. Effect of luteal metoclopramide-induced hyperprolactinemia on pituitary and luteal responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Caruso, A; Lanzone, A; Fulghesu, A M; Apa, R; Guida, C; Mancuso, S

    1989-01-01

    The pituitary and corpus luteum responses to acute gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration at the mid-luteal phase (LP) were studied in 24 infertile women. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. In one group (n = 12) metoclopramide (MCP, 10 mg orally 3 times daily) was administered from day 0 or 1 of the LP for 7 days. On day 7 or 8 of LP blood samples were taken every 15 min for 180 min; then 25 micrograms GnRH were acutely administered intravenously and blood samples taken at 185, 195, 210, 225, 240, 255, 270, 285 and 300 min. In the other 12 patients the same experimental design was performed on day 7 or 8 of an untreated LP. Plasma prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), progesterone and estradiol (E2) were assayed. The responsiveness of the different hormones to GnRH was evaluated as the integrated secretory area for 120 min after injection (sISA = stimulated integrated secretory area) and as the percentage increase (delta A) with respect to the area under basal conditions before GnRH administration (bISA = basal integrated secretory area). MCP-treated women showed higher basal PRL levels (p less than 0.01) and lower basal plasma concentrations and bISA (p less than 0.01) values of LH than controls. After GnRH a more marked response of LH secretion was observed in the treated group (p less than 0.01), so that the absolute values of sISA were superimposable in both groups. Basal and stimulated FSH secretion did not differ significantly in the study groups. Basal plasma and bISA values of progesterone were also decreased in MCP-treated subjects. After GnRH injection the absolute values of progesterone sISA were greater in controls (p less than 0.01), but delta A values were similar in both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2507435

  8. Structural Determinants of Arabidopsis thaliana Hyponastic Leaves 1 Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burdisso, Paula; Milia, Fernando; Schapire, Arnaldo L.; Bologna, Nicolás G.; Palatnik, Javier F.; Rasia, Rodolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have turned out to be important regulators of gene expression. These molecules originate from longer transcripts that are processed by ribonuclease III (RNAse III) enzymes. Dicer proteins are essential RNAse III enzymes that are involved in the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other small RNAs. The correct function of Dicer relies on the participation of accessory dsRNA binding proteins, the exact function of which is not well-understood so far. In plants, the double stranded RNA binding protein Hyponastic Leaves 1 (HYL1) helps Dicer Like protein (DCL1) to achieve an efficient and precise excision of the miRNAs from their primary precursors. Here we dissected the regions of HYL1 that are essential for its function in Arabidopsis thaliana plant model. We generated mutant forms of the protein that retain their structure but affect its RNA-binding properties. The mutant versions of HYL1 were studied both in vitro and in vivo, and we were able to identify essential aminoacids/residues for its activity. Remarkably, mutation and even ablation of one of the purportedly main RNA binding determinants does not give rise to any major disturbances in the function of the protein. We studied the function of the mutant forms in vivo, establishing a direct correlation between affinity for the pri-miRNA precursors and protein activity. PMID:25409478

  9. In-vivo imaging of the photoreceptor mosaic in retinal dystrophies and correlations with visual function

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S; Doble, N; Hardy, J; Jones, S; Keltner, J; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2005-10-26

    To relate in-vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function assessed with clinical tests in patients with various forms of retinal dystrophies. The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) Fundus Camera was used to acquire in-vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests, consisting of visual field analysis, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), contrast sensitivity and color vision measures, were performed on all subjects. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophies and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were characteristic features in fundi with retinal dystrophies. There was a correlation between functional vision loss and the extent to which the irregularities occurred in retinal images. Cone densities were found to decrease with an associated decrease in retinal function. AO fundus photography is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests give borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors.

  10. Automatic Classification of African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) Follicular and Luteal Patrick J. Clemins1

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Michael T.

    the reproductive status of a female African elephant. The classification system is based on current state of their estrous cycle (1). One reason for these differences might be to attract a male for reproductive purposes classification system that can determine whether a female rumble was made during the luteal or follicular phase

  11. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 Promotes Functional Study of Testis Specific X-Linked Gene In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xue; Chen, Yuxi; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiya; Liang, Puping; Zhan, Shaoquan; Cao, Shanbo; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a highly regulated multistage process of sperm generation. It is hard to uncover the real function of a testis specific gene in vitro since the in vitro model is not yet mature. With the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system, we can now rapidly generate knockout mouse models of testis specific genes to study the process of spermatogenesis in vivo. SYCP3-like X-linked 2 (SLX2) is a germ cell specific component, which contains a Cor1 domain and belongs to the XLR (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family. Previous studies suggested that SLX2 might play an important role in mouse spermatogenesis based on its subcellular localization and interacting proteins. However, the function of SLX2 in vivo is still elusive. Here, to investigate the functions of SLX2 in spermatogenesis, we disrupted the Slx2 gene by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Since Slx2 is a testis specific X-linked gene, we obtained knockout male mice in the first generation and accelerated the study process. Compared with wild-type mice, Slx2 knockout mice have normal testis and epididymis. Histological observation of testes sections showed that Slx2 knockout affected none of the three main stages of spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. In addition, we further confirmed that disruption of Slx2 did not affect the number of spermatogonial stem cells, meiosis progression or XY body formation by immunofluorescence analysis. As spermatogenesis was normal in Slx2 knockout mice, these mice were fertile. Taken together, we showed that Slx2 itself is not an essential gene for mouse spermatogenesis and CRISPR/Cas9 technique could speed up the functional study of testis specific X-linked gene in vivo. PMID:26599493

  13. S100A1 gene therapy preserves in vivo cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pleger, Sven T; Remppis, Andrew; Heidt, Beatrix; Völkers, Mirko; Chuprun, J Kurt; Kuhn, Matthew; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Gao, Erhe; Szabo, Gabor; Weichenhan, Dieter; Müller, Oliver J; Eckhart, Andrea D; Katus, Hugo A; Koch, Walter J; Most, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) represents an enormous clinical challenge as loss of myocardium due to ischemic injury is associated with compromised left ventricular (LV) function often leading to acute cardiac decompensation or chronic heart failure. S100A1 was recently identified as a positive inotropic regulator of myocardial contractility in vitro and in vivo. Here, we explore the strategy of myocardial S100A1 gene therapy either at the time of, or 2 h after, MI to preserve global heart function. Rats underwent cryothermia-induced MI and in vivo intracoronary delivery of adenoviral transgenes (4 x 10(10) pfu). Animals received saline (MI), the S100A1 adenovirus (MI/AdS100A1), a control adenovirus (MI/AdGFP), or a sham operation. S100A1 gene delivery preserved global in vivo LV function 1 week after MI. Preservation of LV function was due mainly to S100A1-mediated gain of contractility of the remaining, viable myocardium since contractile parameters and Ca(2+) transients of isolated MI/AdS100A1 myocytes were significantly enhanced compared to myocytes isolated from both MI/AdGFP and sham groups. Moreover, S100A1 gene therapy preserved the cardiac beta-adrenergic inotropic reserve, which was associated with the attenuation of GRK2 up-regulation. Also, S100A1 overexpression reduced cardiac hypertrophy 1 week post-MI. Overall, our data indicate that S100A1 gene therapy provides a potential novel treatment strategy to maintain contractile performance of the post-MI heart. PMID:16168714

  14. Comparison of oral dydrogesterone with vaginal progesteronefor luteal support in IUI cycles: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Donya; Taheripanah, Robabeh; Taheripanah, Anahita; Tarighat Monfared, Vahid; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study, we have compared the advantages of oral dydrogestrone with vaginal progesterone (cyclogest) for luteal support in intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles. Progesterone supplementation is the first line treatment when luteal phase deficiency (LPD) can reasonably be assumed. Objective: This study was conduct to compare the effect of oral dydrogestrone with vaginal Cyclogest on luteal phase support in the IUI cycles. Materials and Methods: This prospective, randomized, double blind study was performed in a local infertility center from May 2013 to May 2014. It consisted of 150 infertile women younger than35years old undergoing ovarian stimulation for IUI cycles. They underwent ovarian stimulation with oral dydrogesterone (20 mg) as group A and vaginal cyclogest (400 mg) as group B in preparation for the IUI cycles. Clinical pregnancy and abortion rates, mid luteal progesterone (7daysafter IUI) and patient satisfaction were compared between two groups. Results: The mean serum progesterone levels was significantly higher in group A in comparison with group B (p=0.001). Pregnancy rates in group A was not statistically different in comparison with group B (p =0.58). Abortion rate in two groups was not statistically different (p =0.056) although rate of abortion was higher in group B in comparison with A group. Satisfaction rates were significantly higher in group A compared to group B (p<0.001). Conclusion: We concluded that oral dydrogestrone is effective as vaginal progesterone for luteal-phase support in woman undergoing IUI cycles. Moreover, the mean serum progesterone levels and satisfaction rates in dydrogestrone group were higher than cyclogest group. PMID:26494991

  15. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases in bovine luteal cells induced by prostaglandin F2?, interferon ? and tumor necrosis factor ?

    PubMed Central

    ABE, Hironori; SAKUMOTO, Ryosuke; OKUDA, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that luteal cells flow out from the ovary via lymphatic vessels during luteolysis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of the outflow of luteal cells are not known. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can degrade the extracellular matrix and basal membrane, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibit the activity of MMPs. To test the hypothesis that MMP expression in luteal cells is regulated by luteolytic factors, we investigated the effects of prostaglandin F2? (PGF), interferon ? (IFNG) and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF) on the mRNA expression of MMPs and TIMPs in cultured luteal cells. Luteal cells obtained from the CL at the mid-luteal stage (days 8–12 after ovulation) were cultured with PGF (0.01, 0.1, 1 ?M), IFNG (0.05, 0.5, 5 nM) and TNF (0.05, 0.5, 0.5 nM) alone or in combination for 24 h. PGF and IFNG significantly increased the expression of MMP-1 mRNA. In addition, 1 ?M PGF in combination with 5 nM IFNG stimulated MMP-1 and MMP-9 mRNA expression significantly more than either treatment alone. In contrast, IFNG significantly decreased the level of MMP-14 mRNA. The mRNA expression of TIMP-1, which preferentially inhibits MMP-1, was suppressed by 5 nM INFG. One ?M PGF and 5 nM IFNG suppressed TIMP-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest a new role of MMPs: luteal MMPs stimulated by PGF and IFNG break down the extracellular matrix surrounding luteal cells, which accelerates detachment from the CL during luteolysis, providing an essential prerequisite for outflow of luteal cells from the CL to lymphatic vessels. PMID:25924700

  16. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-06-28

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5mg and 1mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers. PMID:23684840

  17. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  18. The Ras/Rap GTPase activating protein RASA3: from gene structure to in vivo functions.

    PubMed

    Schurmans, Stéphane; Polizzi, Séléna; Scoumanne, Ariane; Sayyed, Sufyan; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    RASA3 (or GTPase Activating Protein III, R-Ras GTPase-activating protein, GAP1(IP4BP)) is a GTPase activating protein of the GAP1 subfamily which targets Ras and Rap1. RASA3 was originally purified from pig platelet membranes through its intrinsic ability to bind inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (I(1,3,4,5)P4) with high affinity, hence its first name GAP1(IP4BP) (for GAP1 subfamily member which binds I(1,3,4,5)P4). RASA3 was thus the first I(1,3,4,5)P4 receptor identified and cloned. The in vitro and in vivo functions of RASA3 remained somewhat elusive for a long time. However, recently, using genetically-modified mice and cells derived from these mice, the function of RASA3 during megakaryopoiesis, megakaryocyte adhesion and migration as well as integrin signaling has been reported. The goal of this review is thus to summarize and comment recent and less recent data in the literature on RASA3, in particular on the in vivo function of this specific GAP1 subfamily member. PMID:25294679

  19. Effects of antioxidants on endothelial function in human saphenous vein in an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Muhammed Anees; Bayraktutan, Ulvi; Arya, Nityanand; Badger, Stephen A; O'Donnell, Mark E; Young, Ian S; Soong, Chee V

    2009-01-01

    This ex vivo study is aimed at determining the beneficial effects of antioxidant agents on human saphenous vein endothelial function. Vein rings harvested during infrainguinal bypass surgery were assessed in an organ bath for endothelium-dependent relaxation, initially without and then with the addition of 10 microM manganese tetrakis benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP), 0.01% N-acetylcysteine (NAC), 0.02% NAC, 10 microM vitamin C, and 100 microM vitamin C. Fifty-five vein rings from 22 patients were analyzed. MnTBAP improved the endothelium-dependent relaxation when compared with control (57.0% vs 37.8%, P < .01). Addition of 0.01% or 0.02% NAC did not improve the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation (28.2% vs 18.6%, P = ns and 37.8% vs 29.8%, P = ns, respectively). Although 10-microM vitamin C failed to improve endothelial function (50.6% vs 37.2%, P = ns), 100-microM vitamin C significantly enhanced endothelium-dependent relaxation (66.5% vs 38.3%, P < .001). These results suggest that the addition of MnTBAP and high-dose vitamin C can improve the endothelial function of harvested saphenous vein segments in an ex vivo model. PMID:18796454

  20. Photoacoustics and fluorescence based nanoprobes towards functional and structural imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha

    Imaging of chemical analytes and structural properties related to physiological activities within biological systems is of great bio-medical interest; it can contribute to the fundamental understanding of biological systems and can be applied to the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases, especially tumors. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development and application of polymeric nanoprobe aided optical imaging of chemical analytes (Oxygen, pH) and structural properties in live cells and animal models. To this end, specific nanoprobes, based on the polyacrylamide nanoplatform, bearing both appropriate targeting functionalities, and high concentrations of sensing and contrast agents, have been developed. The nanoprobes presented here are biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic, rendering them safe for in vivo use. Furthermore the nanoprobes are designed to have variable optical properties that are dependent on the local concentration of the specific analyte of interest. Optical imaging techniques that are particularly suited for deep tissue applications, such as two-photon fluorescence and photoacoustics, were applied for non-invasive real-time imaging and sensing in cancer cells, tumor spheroids and animal models. Our results demonstrate that this technique enables high sensitive detection of chemical analytes with a sensitivity of <5 Torr for oxygen and <0.1 pH units in vivo, which is better than the currently available in vivo functional imaging techniques. This non-invasive and non-ionizing, yet low cost, method will enable morphological and functional evaluation across any tissue, with both high spatial and temporal resolution but without eliciting short- or long-term tissue damage. Currently no gold standard exists for such xii functional imaging. The approach presented here can be used for early detection and diagnosis of tumors, as well as for monitoring the progression of disease and therapy. This technique will also enable observing phenomena at the cellular level in vivo that would lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases as well as the disease onset, progression, and response to therapy.

  1. Minimally invasive microendoscopy system for in vivo functional imaging of deep nuclei in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Bocarsly, Miriam E.; Jiang, Wan-chen; Wang, Chen; Dudman, Joshua T.; Ji, Na; Aponte, Yeka

    2015-01-01

    The ability to image neurons anywhere in the mammalian brain is a major goal of optical microscopy. Here we describe a minimally invasive microendoscopy system for studying the morphology and function of neurons at depth. Utilizing a guide cannula with an ultrathin wall, we demonstrated in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of deeply buried nuclei such as the striatum (2.5 mm depth), substantia nigra (4.4 mm depth) and lateral hypothalamus (5.0 mm depth) in mouse brain. We reported, for the first time, the observation of neuronal activity with subcellular resolution in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia nigra of head-fixed awake mice. PMID:26601017

  2. Minimally invasive microendoscopy system for in vivo functional imaging of deep nuclei in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bocarsly, Miriam E; Jiang, Wan-Chen; Wang, Chen; Dudman, Joshua T; Ji, Na; Aponte, Yeka

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image neurons anywhere in the mammalian brain is a major goal of optical microscopy. Here we describe a minimally invasive microendoscopy system for studying the morphology and function of neurons at depth. Utilizing a guide cannula with an ultrathin wall, we demonstrated in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of deeply buried nuclei such as the striatum (2.5 mm depth), substantia nigra (4.4 mm depth) and lateral hypothalamus (5.0 mm depth) in mouse brain. We reported, for the first time, the observation of neuronal activity with subcellular resolution in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia nigra of head-fixed awake mice. PMID:26601017

  3. In vivo functions of Drp1: Lessons learned from yeast genetics and mouse knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Sesaki, Hiromi; Adachi, Yoshihiro; Kageyama, Yusuke; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria grow, divide, and fuse in cells. Mitochondrial division is critical for the maintenance of the structure and function of mitochondria. Alterations in this process have been linked to many human diseases, including peripheral neuropathies and aging-related neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss recent progress in mitochondrial division by focusing on molecular and in vivo analyses of the evolutionarily conserved, central component of mitochondrial division, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), in the yeast and mouse model organisms. PMID:24326103

  4. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  5. Histone acetyltransferase activity and interaction with ADA2 are critical for GCN5 function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Candau, R; Zhou, J X; Allis, C D; Berger, S L

    1997-01-01

    Yeast GCN5 is one component of a putative adaptor complex that includes ADA2 and ADA3 and functionally connects DNA-bound transcriptional activators with general transcription factors. GCN5 possesses histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, conceptually linking transcriptional activation with enzymatic modification at chromatin. We have identified the minimal catalytic domain within GCN5 necessary to confer HAT activity and have shown that in vivo activity of GCN5 requires this domain. However, complementation of growth and transcriptional activation in gcn5- cells required not only the HAT domain of GCN5, but also interaction with ADA2. The bromodomain in GCN5 was dispensable for HAT activity and for transcriptional activation by strong activators; however, it was required for full complementation in other assays. Fusion of GCN5 to the bacterial lexA DNA binding domain activated transcription in vivo, and required both the HAT domain and the ADA2 interaction domain. These results suggest that both functions of GCN5, HAT activity and interaction with ADA2, are necessary for targeting and acetylation of nucleosomal histones. PMID:9034338

  6. Ubiquitination regulates the neuroprotective function of the deubiquitinase ataxin-3 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Wei-Ling; Burr, Aaron A; Ouyang, Michelle; Blount, Jessica R; Scaglione, K Matthew; Todi, Sokol V

    2013-11-29

    Deubiquitinases (DUBs) are proteases that regulate various cellular processes by controlling protein ubiquitination. Cell-based studies indicate that the regulation of the activity of DUBs is important for homeostasis and is achieved by multiple mechanisms, including through their own ubiquitination. However, the physiological significance of the ubiquitination of DUBs to their functions in vivo is unclear. Here, we report that ubiquitination of the DUB ataxin-3 at lysine residue 117, which markedly enhances its protease activity in vitro, is critical for its ability to suppress toxic protein-dependent degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Compared with ataxin-3 with only Lys-117 present, ataxin-3 that does not become ubiquitinated performs significantly less efficiently in suppressing or delaying the onset of toxic protein-dependent degeneration in flies. According to further studies, the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ataxin-3 in vitro, is dispensable for its ubiquitination in vivo and is not required for the neuroprotective function of this DUB in Drosophila. Our work also suggests that ataxin-3 suppresses degeneration by regulating toxic protein aggregation rather than stability. PMID:24106274

  7. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.

  8. Thrombin as a multi-functional enzyme. Focus on in vitro and in vivo effects.

    PubMed

    Siller-Matula, Jolanta M; Schwameis, Michael; Blann, Andrew; Mannhalter, Christine; Jilma, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Thrombin is the central protease in the coagulation cascade and one of the most extensively studied of all enzymes. In addition to its recognised role in the coagulation cascade and haemostasis, thrombin is known to have multiple pleiotropic effects, which mostly have been shown only in in vitro studies: it plays a role in inflammation and cellular proliferation and displays a mitogen activity on smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, predominantly by activation of angiogenesis. In vivo , thrombin effects were examined in animal models of intravenous or intraarterial thrombin infusion. An extensive literature search regarding in vivo data showed that i) thrombin administered as a bolus causes microembolism, ii) thrombin infused slowly at steady-state conditions (up to 1.6 U/kg/min) leads to bleeds but not to intravascular clotting, iii) large quantity of thrombin infused at low rates (0.05 U/kg/min) does not have any measurable effect, and iv) thrombin increases vascular permeability leading to tissue damage. Although several decades of research on thrombin functions have provided a framework for understanding the biology of thrombin, animal and human studies with use of newer laboratory techniques are still needed to confirm the pleiotropic thrombin functions shown in in vitro studies. PMID:21979864

  9. Plant-PET Scans: In Vivo Mapping of Xylem and Phloem Functioning.

    PubMed

    Hubeau, Michiel; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-10-01

    Medical imaging techniques are rapidly expanding in the field of plant sciences. Positron emission tomography (PET) is advancing as a powerful functional imaging technique to decipher in vivo the function of xylem water flow (with (15)O or (18)F), phloem sugar flow (with (11)C or (18)F), and the importance of their strong coupling. However, much remains to be learned about how water flow and sugar distribution are coordinated in intact plants, both under present and future climate regimes. We propose to use PET analysis of plants (plant-PET) to visualize and generate these missing data about integrated xylem and phloem transport. These insights are crucial to understanding how a given environment will affect plant physiological processes and growth. PMID:26440436

  10. Protective effects of Zhuyeqing liquor on the immune function of normal and immunosuppressed mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zhuyeqing Liquor (ZYQL), a well-known Chinese traditional health liquor, has various biological properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunoenhancement and cardiovascular protective effects. Methods The protective effects of Zhuyeqing Liquor (ZYQL) on the immune function was investigated in vivo in normal healthy mice and immunosuppressed mice treated with Cyclophosphamide (Cy, 100 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection on days 4, 8 and 12. ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered via gavage daily for 14 days. The phagocytotic function of mononuclear phagocytic system was detected with carbon clearance methods, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-?) in serum were detected with Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immune organs were weighed and organ indexes (organ weight/body weight) of thymus and spleen were calculated. Meanwhile, the activity of lysozyme (LSZ) in serum and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) in spleen tissue were measured. Results ZYQL significantly upgrades the K value for clearance of carbon particles in normal mice treated with ZYQL (400 mg/kg) and immunosuppressed mice treated with ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) together with Cy (100 mg/kg) in vivo. The treatment of ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) effectively increased the activity of serum lysozyme as well as promoted the serum levels of IL-6 and IFN-? in normal mice and immunosuppressed mice. Furthermore, ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) had an antioxidant effects in immune system by enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activity of SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in vivo. In addition, ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) effectively elevated the Cy-induced decreased organ index (thymus and spleen). Conclusions The present work shows that the dose-dependent administration of ZYQL is capable of influencing immune responses, which implying that its valuable functional health may be attributed partly to its protective effects for the immune function. PMID:24090456

  11. The yeast centromere CDEI/Cpf1 complex: differences between in vitro binding and in vivo function.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmen, A; Pick, H; Niedenthal, R K; Sen-Gupta, M; Hegemann, J H

    1994-01-01

    The centromere and promoter factor Cpf1 binds centromere DNA element I found in all centromere DNAs from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We analyzed thirty different point mutations in or around CEN6-CDEI (ATCACGTG) for their relative binding affinity to Cpf1 and these data were compared with the in vivo centromere function of these mutants. We show that the minimal length of the Cpf1 binding site needed for full in vitro binding and in vivo activity is 10 base pairs long comprised of CDEI plus the two base pairs 3' of this sequence. The palindromic core sequence CACGTG is most important for in vivo CEN function and in vitro Cpf1 binding. Symmetrical mutations in either halfsite of the core sequence affect in vitro Cpf1 binding and in vivo mitotic centromere function asymmetrically albeit to a different extent. Enlarging the CDEI palindrome to 12 or 20 bps increases in vitro Cpf1 binding but results in increased chromosome loss rates suggesting a need for asymmetrical Cpf1 binding sequences. Additionally, the ability of Cpf1 protein to bind a mutant CDEI element in vitro does not parallel the ability of that mutant to confer in vivo CEN activity. Our data indicate that the in vitro binding characteristics of Cpf1 to CDEI only partly overlap with their corresponding activity within the centromere complex, thus suggesting that in the in vivo situation the CDEI/Cpf1 complex might undergo interactions with other centromere DNA/protein complexes. Images PMID:8052535

  12. Protective role of melatonin in progesterone production by human luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Toshiaki; Tamura, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Akihisa; Lee, Lifa; Kizuka, Fumie; Tamura, Isao; Taniguchi, Ken; Maekawa, Ryo; Asada, Hiromi; Shimamura, Katsunori; Reiter, Russel J; Sugino, Norihiro

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated whether melatonin protects luteinized granulosa cells from reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an antioxidant to enhance progesterone production in the follicle during ovulation. Follicular fluid was sampled at the time of oocyte retrieval in women undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). Melatonin concentrations in the follicular fluid were positively correlated with progesterone concentrations (r = 0.342, P < 0.05) and negatively correlated with the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative stress marker (r = -0.342, P < 0.05). The progesterone and 8-OHdG concentrations were negatively correlated (r = -0.246, P < 0.05). Luteinized granulosa cells were obtained at the time of oocyte retrieval in women undergoing IVF-ET. Cells were incubated with H(2)O(2) (30, 50, 100 ?m) in the presence or absence of melatonin (1, 10, 100 ?g/mL). Progesterone production by luteinized granulosa cells was significantly inhibited by H(2)O(2). Melatonin treatment overcame the inhibitory effect of H(2) O(2) . Twenty-five patients who had luteal phase defect (serum progesterone concentrations <10 ng/mL during the mid-luteal phase) were divided into two groups during the next treatment cycle: 14 women were given melatonin (3 mg/day at 22:00 hr) throughout the luteal phase and 11 women were given no medication as a control. Melatonin treatment improved serum progesterone concentrations (>10 ng/mL during the mid-luteal phase) in nine of 14 women (64.3%), whereas only two of 11 women (18.1%) showed normal serum progesterone levels in the control group. In conclusion, melatonin protects granulosa cells undergoing luteinization from ROS in the follicle and contributes to luteinization for progesterone production during ovulation. PMID:21585519

  13. Histological and endocrine characterisation of the annual luteal activity in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Carnaby, Kim; Painer, Johanna; Söderberg, Arne; Gavier-Widčn, Dolores; Göritz, Frank; Dehnhard, Martin; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2012-10-01

    Lynx presents a unique sexual cycle with persistent corpora lutea (CLs) and elevated serum progesterone (P?) throughout parturition and lactation. In other mammals, CLs normally disintegrate after parturition, therefore the aim of our study was to characterise the annual life cycle of lynx CLs. Ovaries from Eurasian lynxes were obtained from the National Veterinary Institute in Sweden, where tissues from killed lynx were stored at -20?°C. Ovaries from 66 animals were weighed; each corpus luteum was segmented for histology and hormone analysis. Ovary and CLs weights were constant throughout the year, peaking during pregnancy. In non-pregnant lynxes, the seasonal level of intraluteal steroids was steady for P? (3.2±1.9 s.d. ?g/g, n=53) and total oestrogens (18.3±15.5 s.d. ng/g, n=53). Within histology slides, structurally intact luteal cells were found throughout the year with the highest incidence in March/April; evidence of luteal regression was predominantly found in post-breeding season. Ovaries from pregnant animals contained two types of CLs. Group A was bigger in size with large luteal cells (P?, 72.3±65.4 s.d. ?g/g; oestrogen, 454.0±52.4 s.d. ng/g). In contrast, group B were smaller, with greater luteal regression and lower steroid concentrations (P?, 8.3±2.9 s.d. ?g/g; oestrogen, 31.5±20.4 s.d. ng/g). Our results suggest that structural luteolysis proceeds throughout the year and into next breeding cycle, resulting in two CLs types on the same ovary. PMID:22829688

  14. Impact of the prostaglandin-synthase 2 inhibitor celecoxib on ovulation and luteal events in women

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, A.B.; Jensen, J.T.; Doom, C; Hennebold, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian prostaglandins are critical in normal ovulation processes, thus their inhibition may provide contraceptive benefits. This study was performed to determine the effect of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor, celecoxib, on ovulation and luteal events in women. Study design Randomized double-blind crossover design. Ovulatory reproductive-aged women underwent ovarian ultrasound and serum hormone monitoring during four menstrual cycles (control cycle, treatment cycle 1, washout cycle, treatment cycle 2). Subjects received study drug (oral celecoxib 400 mg or placebo) either 1) once daily starting on cycle day 8 and continuing until follicle rupture or the onset of next menses if follicle rupture did not occur (pre-LH surge dosing) or 2) once daily beginning with the LH surge and continued for 6 days (post-LH surge dosing). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the above treatment schemes and received the other in the subsequent treatment cycle. The main outcomes were evidence of ovulatory and luteal dysfunction as determined by inhibited/delayed follicle rupture and reduced luteal progesterone synthesis or lifespan, respectively. Results A total of 20 women enrolled and completed the study (Group 1 = 10, Group 2 = 10) with similar demographics between groups. Nineteen subjects exhibited normal ovulation in the control cycle (one had a blunted LH peak). In comparison to control cycles, treatment cycles resulted in a significant increase in ovulatory dysfunction [pre-LH treatment: 30% (6/20), p = 0.04; post-LH treatment: 25% (5/20), p = 0.04]. Peak progesterone, estradiol, and LH levels and luteal phase length did not differ significantly between control and either treatment cycles. Conclusions Although treatment with celecoxib before or after the LH surge increases the rate of ovulatory dysfunction, most women ovulate normally. Thus, this selective COX2 inhibitor appears to be of limited usefulness as a potential emergency contraceptive. PMID:22902348

  15. Toxic effects of cypermethrin and methamidophos on bovine corpus luteal cells and progesterone production.

    PubMed

    Gill, Shahid Afzal; Rizvi, Farzana; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Khan, Ahrar

    2011-01-01

    This study was planned and executed with the aims to explore corpus luteal primary cell culture as an "animal alternate testing system" in toxicity studies and in vitro toxic effects of cypermethrin (CY) 90% (pyrethroid) and methamidophos (MTP) 73% (organophosphate) on morphology and progesterone secretory activity of bovine corpus luteal cells and tissue. For this purpose, primary cell cultures of bovine corpus luteum (CL) cells were maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) supplemented with 5% fetal calf serum (FCS). Toxicity evaluation were based on viable CL cell counts, morphological changes in CL cells, ability of CL cells to produce progesterone and histological changes in CL tissue at different hours post exposure to CY and MTP. The changes induced by both the insecticides were time and dose dependant. Viable cell counts and progesterone concentration decreased significantly (P<0.05) with the treatment of CY and MTP when compared to control. Corpus luteal cells exposed to CY showed more severe toxic effects as compared to MTP, though the difference was non-significant. Cellular or tissue alterations included degenerative changes in luteal cells, pleomorphic changes, nuclear degeneration and vacuolation, cell shrinkage and rupture, cloudy swelling and hydropic degeneration, less cytoplasmic granulation, cell elongation, hyalinization and cytoplasmic haziness and stripling and necrosis. It was concluded that both the insecticides induce toxic effects in terms of viable counts, morphological and histological changes and progesterone production of bovine CL cells. Cypermethrin exhibited more adverse toxic changes in viable cell counts, progesterone production and histological findings as compared to methamidophos. PMID:19942419

  16. N-acetylcysteine impairs survival of luteal cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Löhrke, Berthold; Xu, Jinxian; Weitzel, Joachim M; Krüger, Burkhard; Goldammer, Tom; Viergutz, Torsten

    2010-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is known as an antioxidant and used for mucus viscosity reduction. However, this drug prevents or induces cell death depending on the cell type. The response of steroidogenic luteal cells to NAC is unknown. Our data shows that NAC can behave as an antioxidant or prooxidant in dependency on the concentration and mitochondrial energization. NAC elevated the flowcytometric-measured portion of hypodiploid (dying) cells. This rise was completely abolished by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. NAC increased the secretion of nitric oxide and cellular nitrotyrosine. An image analysis indicated that cells pretreated with NAC and loaded with DHR showed a fluorescent structure probably elicited by the oxidative product of DHR, rhodamine 123 that sequesters mitochondrially. Pretreating luteal cells with NAC or adding NAC directly to mitochondrial fractions followed by assessing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential difference (Deltapsi) by the JC-1 technique demonstrated a marked decrease in Deltapsi. A protonophore restored Deltapsi and rotenone (an inhibitor of respiratory chain complex I) inhibited mitochondrial recovering. Thus, in steroidogenic luteal cells from healthy mature corpus luteum, NAC impairs cellular survival by interfering with mitochondrial metabolism. The protonophore-induced recovering of NAC-provoked decrease in Deltapsi indicates that an ATP synthase-favored route of H(+) re-entry to the matrix is essentially switched off by NAC while other respiratory chain complexes remain intact. These data may be important for therapeutic timing of treatments with NAC. (c) 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:20151456

  17. Effects of oxytocin-antagonist injections on luteal regression in the goat.

    PubMed Central

    Homeida, A. M.; Khalafalla, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    Intra-arterial administration of 0.25 ml physiological saline to the non-pregnant goat between days 12 and 20 of the oestrous cycle did not affect luteal regression, which was characterized by decreasing peripheral plasma progesterone concentration, beginning on day 13 of the oestrous cycle, and an increase in the plasma concentration of 13, 14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGFM) as oestrus approached on about day 20. Intra-arterial administration of oxytocin antagonist (OA) in saline at a dose of 0.2 microgram kg-1 body weight to goats between days 12 and 20 of the cycle significantly (P less than 0.001) delayed luteal regression beyond day 20 (to day 26). Injection of OA maintained plasma progesterone secretion at 4-5 ng ml-1 till day 23 of the cycle and suppressed the increase in PGFM concentration. Corpus luteum extract (100 microliters) of OA-treated animals released a significant (P less than 0.001) amount of PGF2 alpha from rat uterus in vitro as did authentic oxytocin. This oxytocic material failed to release PGF2 alpha during luteolysis in the goat, suggesting that oxytocin receptors for PGF2 alpha release may be occupied by OA. It is concluded that oxytocin-receptor interaction in the uterus may be the stimulus for PGF2 alpha release which triggers luteal regression in the goat. PMID:3469006

  18. Stress and memory retrieval in women: no strong impairing effect during the luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Daniela; Wolf, Oliver T

    2009-06-01

    Stress has been shown to impair delayed memory retrieval, but so far no study has been conducted solely with naturally cycling women. In a crossover design, 36 women (all in the luteal phase) participated in two experimental conditions (stress vs. control). Delayed memory retrieval of a wordlist learned 24 hours earlier was tested after stress or control treatment. Although stressed subjects showed a strong cortisol increase following stress, no influence on memory retrieval occurred. In an additional data analysis, subjects were split up into a cortisol responder and a cortisol nonresponder group. However, again no evidence for a stress-induced retrieval impairment became apparent. Similarly, no correlation was observed between the stress-induced cortisol increase and memory. This study failed to find an influence of stress on memory retrieval in women tested in the luteal phase. The findings are in contrast to our previous results obtained with men. Evidence is discussed that the luteal phase, which is characterized by elevated gonadal steroids, is associated with reduced glucocorticoid sensitivity. This might underlie the missing impact of stress on memory. PMID:19485561

  19. Head-to-tail regulation is critical for the in vivo function of myosin V

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kirk W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell organization requires regulated cargo transport along cytoskeletal elements. Myosin V motors are among the most conserved organelle motors and have been well characterized in both yeast and mammalian systems. Biochemical data for mammalian myosin V suggest that a head-to-tail autoinhibitory interaction is a primary means of regulation, but the in vivo significance of this interaction has not been studied. Here we generated and characterized mutations in the yeast myosin V Myo2p to reveal that it is regulated by a head-to-tail interaction and that loss of regulation renders the myosin V constitutively active. We show that an unregulated motor is very deleterious for growth, resulting in severe defects in Myo2-mediated transport processes, including secretory vesicle transport, mitochondrial inheritance, and nuclear orientation. All of the defects associated with motor misregulation could be rescued by artificially restoring regulation. Thus, spatial and temporal regulation of myosin V in vivo by a head-to-tail interaction is critical for the normal delivery functions of the motor. PMID:25940346

  20. Functional Evaluation of ES–Somatic Cell Hybrids In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kitai; Liu, Jun; Ng, Kitwa; Daley, George Q.; Verma, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have previously been reported to reprogram somatic cells following fusion. The resulting ES–somatic cell hybrids have been shown to adopt the transcriptional profile of ESCs, suggesting that the pluripotent program is dominant. ES–somatic cell hybrids have most characteristics of pluripotent cells in vitro; however, it remains unclear whether the somatic genome is an active partner in the hybrid cells or simply retained predominately as silent cargo. Furthermore, the functional properties of ES–somatic cell hybrids in vivo have been limited to studies on their contribution to teratomas and developing embryos/chimeras. The extent of their pluripotency remains largely unclear. Here we determined that the somatic genome is actively transcribed by generating ES–somatic cell hybrids using Rag2-deficient ESCs fused to autologous wild-type somatic cells. Rag2 expression was detected during in vitro differentiation, suggesting that the somatic genome follows the correct temporal cues during differentiation. Furthermore, ES–somatic cell hybrids maintain their tetraploid state following 4 weeks of differentiation in vivo and are immune tolerated when transferred into matched individuals. The ES–somatic cell hybrids can efficiently differentiate into hematopoietic precursors in both myeloid and lymphoid lineages in vitro, suggesting that the somatic genome is actively transcribed following cell fusion based reprogramming. However, the ES–somatic cell hybrids showed an altered hematopoietic potential following in vitro differentiation and were unable to show hematopoietic engraftment in a mouse model. PMID:24787484

  1. Head-to-tail regulation is critical for the in vivo function of myosin V.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Kirk W; Bretscher, Anthony

    2015-05-11

    Cell organization requires regulated cargo transport along cytoskeletal elements. Myosin V motors are among the most conserved organelle motors and have been well characterized in both yeast and mammalian systems. Biochemical data for mammalian myosin V suggest that a head-to-tail autoinhibitory interaction is a primary means of regulation, but the in vivo significance of this interaction has not been studied. Here we generated and characterized mutations in the yeast myosin V Myo2p to reveal that it is regulated by a head-to-tail interaction and that loss of regulation renders the myosin V constitutively active. We show that an unregulated motor is very deleterious for growth, resulting in severe defects in Myo2-mediated transport processes, including secretory vesicle transport, mitochondrial inheritance, and nuclear orientation. All of the defects associated with motor misregulation could be rescued by artificially restoring regulation. Thus, spatial and temporal regulation of myosin V in vivo by a head-to-tail interaction is critical for the normal delivery functions of the motor. PMID:25940346

  2. In Vivo Evaluation of Vena Caval Filters: Can Function Be Linked to Design Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, Mary C.; Cho, Kyung J.; Greenfield, Lazar J.

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the five vena caval filters marketed in the United States and one investigational vena caval filter and to determine whether there is an association between their design and their in vivo function.Methods: Four of each type of filter-Simon Nitinol (SN), Bird's Nest (BN), Vena Tech (VT), Greenfield stainless steel (PSGF), Greenfield titanium (TGF), and the investigational stent cone filter (NGF)-were studied for 60 days in 12 sheep. Radiographic and pathologic outcomes to be assessed included clot capture and resolution, vena caval penetration, position of the filter, thrombogenicity, and vessel wall reaction.Results: Filters differed with respect to the number of clot-trapping levels and the interdependence of the legs. All devices were successfully placed. Intentionally embolized clot was captured. One VT and two SN filters migrated in response to clot capture. Resolution of thrombus was variable, and related to the design of the device. Fibrin webbing was widely present with the VT, BN, and SN filters but limited in the others. The VT and NGF filters demonstrated the most stable filter base diameter.Conclusions: The performance of vena caval filters differs with respect to clot resolution and mechanical stability. Interdependent filter limbs and single-stage conical capture sites appear to result in more favorable performance in in vivo studies.

  3. In Vitro Hematological and In Vivo Vasoactivity Assessment of Dextran Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D.; Frame, Mary D.; Dewar, Anthony M.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    The intravenous, intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration of water solubilized graphene nanoparticles for biomedical applications will result in their interaction with the hematological components and vasculature. Herein, we have investigated the effects of dextran functionalized graphene nanoplatelets (GNP-Dex) on histamine release, platelet activation, immune activation, blood cell hemolysis in vitro, and vasoactivity in vivo. The results indicate that GNP-Dex formulations prevented histamine release from activated RBL-2H3 rat mast cells, and at concentrations ? 7?mg/ml, showed a 12–20% increase in levels of complement proteins. Cytokine (TNF-Alpha and IL-10) levels remained within normal range. GNP-Dex formulations did not cause platelet activation or blood cell hemolysis. Using the hamster cheek pouch in vivo model, the initial vasoactivity of GNP-Dex at concentrations (1–50?mg/ml) equivalent to the first pass of a bolus injection was a brief concentration-dependent dilation in arcade and terminal arterioles. However, they did not induce a pro-inflammatory endothelial dysfunction effect. PMID:24002570

  4. c-Kit Receptor Signaling Regulates Islet Vasculature, ?-Cell Survival, and Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhi-Chao; Popell, Alex; Li, Jinming; Silverstein, Jenna; Oakie, Amanda; Yee, Siu-Pok; Wang, Rennian

    2015-11-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit plays an integral role in maintaining ?-cell mass and function. Although c-Kit receptor signaling promotes angiogenesis in multiple cell types, its role in islet vasculature is unknown. This study examines the effects of c-Kit-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) and islet vascularization on ?-cell function and survival using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. In cultured INS-1 cells and primary islets, c-Kit regulates VEGF-A expression via the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Juvenile mice with mutated c-Kit (c-Kit(Wv/+)) showed impaired islet vasculature and ?-cell dysfunction, while restoring c-Kit expression in ?-cells of c-Kit(Wv/+) mice rescued islet vascular defects through modulation of the Akt/mTOR/VEGF-A pathway, indicating that c-Kit signaling in ?-cells is a required regulator for maintaining normal islet vasculature. Furthermore, ?-cell-specific c-Kit overexpression (c-Kit?Tg) in aged mice showed significantly increased islet vasculature and ?-cell function, but, when exposed to a long-term high-fat diet, c-Kit signaling in c-Kit?Tg mice induced substantial vascular remodeling, which resulted in increased islet inflammatory responses and ?-cell apoptosis. These results suggest that c-Kit-mediated VEGF-A action in ?-cells plays a pivotal role in maintaining islet vascularization and function. PMID:26253609

  5. Influence of endothelium-derived relaxing factor on platelet function and hemostasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Houston, D S; Buchanan, M R

    1994-04-01

    Endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) is a potent vasodilator, and is also, in vitro, a platelet-inhibitor. Experiments were performed to determine whether systemically released EDRF inhibits platelet-dependent hemostasis in vivo. Rabbits were treated with agents to release or block EDRF, and 5 standardized incisions were made in the ear. Carbachol, infused to stimulate EDRF release, abruptly lowered the blood pressure and caused increased bleeding. Neither effect was attributable to prostacyclin since neither was blocked by treatment of the rabbits with acetylsalicylic acid. In contrast, both the hypotension and bleeding were attenuated by the selective antagonist of EDRF synthesis, NG-nitro-L-arginine. However, neither the hypotension nor the bleeding associated with carbachol was inhibited by an infusion of free hemoglobin, used to scavenge intraluminally-released EDRF. We conclude that in this model endogenously-released EDRF increases bleeding indirectly by provoking vasodilatation, rather than directly by inhibiting platelet function. PMID:8029806

  6. Artemisia scoparia Enhances Adipocyte Development and Endocrine Function In Vitro and Enhances Insulin Action In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Allison J.; Fuller, Scott; Fedorcenco, Veaceslav; Beyl, Robbie; Burris, Thomas P.; Mynatt, Randall; Ribnicky, David M.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Failure of adipocytes to expand during periods of energy excess can result in undesirable metabolic consequences such as ectopic fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Blinded screening studies have indicated that Artemisia scoparia (SCO) extracts can enhance adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation in cultured adipocytes. The present study tested the hypothesis that SCO treatment modulates fat cell development and function in vitro and insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue in vivo. Methods In vitro experiments utilized a Gal4-PPAR? ligand binding domain (LBD) fusion protein-luciferase reporter assay to examine PPAR? activation. To investigate the ability of SCO to modulate adipogenesis and mature fat cell function in 3T3-L1 cells, neutral lipid accumulation, gene expression, and protein secretion were measured by Oil Red O staining, qRT-PCR, and immunoblotting, respectively. For the in vivo experiments, diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD containing 1% w/w SCO for four weeks. Body weight and composition, food intake, and fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured. Phospho-activation and expression of insulin-sensitizing proteins in epididymal adipose tissue (eWAT) were measured by immunoblotting. Results Ethanolic extracts of A. scoparia significantly activated the PPAR? LBD and enhanced lipid accumulation in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. SCO increased the transcription of several PPAR? target genes in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells and rescued the negative effects of tumor necrosis factor ? on production and secretion of adiponectin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in fully differentiated fat cells. DIO mice treated with SCO had elevated adiponectin levels and increased phosphorylation of AMPK? in eWAT when compared to control mice. In SCO-treated mice, these changes were also associated with decreased fasting insulin and glucose levels. Conclusion SCO has metabolically beneficial effects on adipocytes in vitro and adipose tissue in vivo, highlighting its potential as a metabolically favorable botanical supplement. PMID:24915004

  7. In vivo function and comparative genomic analyses of the Drosophila gut microbiota identify candidate symbiosis factors

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Chaston, John M.; Wang, Yiping; Winans, Nathan J.; Sannino, David R.; Wong, Adam C. N.; Dobson, Adam J.; Kagle, Jeanne; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis is often characterized by co-evolutionary changes in the genomes of the partners involved. An understanding of these changes can provide insight into the nature of the relationship, including the mechanisms that initiate and maintain an association between organisms. In this study we examined the genome sequences of bacteria isolated from the Drosophila melanogaster gut with the objective of identifying genes that are important for function in the host. We compared microbiota isolates with con-specific or closely related bacterial species isolated from non-fly environments. First the phenotype of germ-free Drosophila (axenic flies) was compared to that of flies colonized with specific bacteria (gnotobiotic flies) as a measure of symbiotic function. Non-fly isolates were functionally distinct from bacteria isolated from flies, conferring slower development and an altered nutrient profile in the host, traits known to be microbiota-dependent. Comparative genomic methods were next employed to identify putative symbiosis factors: genes found in bacteria that restore microbiota-dependent traits to gnotobiotic flies, but absent from those that do not. Factors identified include riboflavin synthesis and stress resistance. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify protein coding genes for which fly-isolate sequences were more similar to each other than to other sequences, reasoning that these genes may have a shared function unique to the fly environment. This method identified genes in Acetobacter species that cluster in two distinct genomic loci: one predicted to be involved in oxidative stress detoxification and another encoding an efflux pump. In summary, we leveraged genomic and in vivo functional comparisons to identify candidate traits that distinguish symbiotic bacteria. These candidates can serve as the basis for further work investigating the genetic requirements of bacteria for function and persistence in the Drosophila gut. PMID:25408687

  8. A novel method for determining human ex vivo submaximal skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Gram, Martin; Jensen, Martin Borch; Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Dela, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    The present study utilized a novel method aiming to investigate mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle at submaximal levels and at a predefined membrane potential. The effect of age and training status was investigated using a cross-sectional design. Ageing was found to be related to decreased leak regardless of training status. Increased training status was associated with increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide emission. Despite numerous studies, there is no consensus about whether mitochondrial function is altered with increased age. The novelty of the present study is the determination of mitochondrial function at submaximal activity rates, which is more physiologically relevant than the ex vivo functionality protocols used previously. Muscle biopsies were taken from 64 old or young male subjects (aged 60-70 or 20-30 years). Aged subjects were recruited as trained or untrained. Muscle biopsies were used for the isolation of mitochondria and subsequent measurements of DNA repair, anti-oxidant capacity and mitochondrial protein levels (complexes I-V). Mitochondrial function was determined by simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption, membrane potential and hydrogen peroxide emission using pyruvate + malate (PM) or succinate + rotenone (SR) as substrates. Proton leak was lower in aged subjects when determined at the same membrane potential and was unaffected by training status. State 3 respiration was lower in aged untrained subjects. This effect, however, was alleviated in aged trained subjects. H2 O2 emission with PM was higher in aged subjects, and was exacerbated by training, although it was not changed when using SR. However, with a higher manganese superoxide dismuthase content, the trained aged subjects may actually have lower or similar mitochondrial superoxide emission compared to the untrained subjects. We conclude that ageing and the physical activity level in aged subjects are both related to changes in the intrinsic functionality of the mitochondrion in skeletal muscle. Both of these changes could be important factors in determining the metabolic health of the aged skeletal muscle cell. PMID:26096709

  9. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  10. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Subcortical Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Liang, Chia-Pin; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The whisker system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the brain. Discrete neural modules represent each whisker in the somatosensory cortex (“barrels”), thalamus (“barreloids”), and brain stem (“barrelettes”). Stimulation of a single whisker evokes neural activity sequentially in its corresponding barrelette, barreloid, and barrel. Conventional optical imaging of functional activation in the brain is limited to surface structures such as the cerebral cortex. To access subcortical structures and image sensory-evoked neural activity, we designed a needle-based optical system using gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens. We performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi) with GRIN rod lens to visualize neural activity evoked in the thalamic barreloids by deflection of whiskers in vivo. We stimulated several whiskers together to determine the sensitivity of our approach in differentiating between different barreloid responses. We also carried out stimulation of different whiskers at different times. Finally, we used muscimol in the barrel cortex to silence the corticothalamic inputs while imaging in the thalamus. Our results show that it is possible to obtain functional maps of the sensory periphery in deep brain structures such as the thalamic barreloids. Our approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other core brain structures. PMID:26612326

  11. In vivo functional human imaging using photoacoustic microscopy: response to ischemic and thermal stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Maslov, Konstantin; Cornelius, Lynn; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    We report results of two in vivo functional human imaging experiments using photoacoustic microscopy. In Experiment 1, the hemodynamic response to an ischemic event was measured. The palm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while periodic arterial occlusions were administered using a blood pressure cuff wrapped around the upper arm and inflated to ~280 mmHg. Significant relative decreases in oxygen saturation (sO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) were observed during periods of ischemia. Upon release of the occlusion, significant relative increases in sO2 and HbT due to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia were recorded. Experiment 2 explored the vascular response to a local, external thermal stimulus. Thermal hyperemia is a common physiological phenomenon and thermoregulation function in which blood flow to the skin is increased to more efficiently exchange heat with the ambient environment. The forearm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while the imaged surface was exposed to an elevated temperature of ~46°C. Due to thermal hyperemia, relative increases in sO2 and HbT were measured as the temperature of the surface was raised. These results may contribute as clinically relevant measures of vascular functioning for detection and assessment of vascular related diseases.

  12. Structure predicts function: Combining non-invasive electrophysiology with in-vivo histology

    PubMed Central

    Helbling, Saskia; Teki, Sundeep; Callaghan, Martina F.; Sedley, William; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Barnes, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach for combining high resolution MRI-based myelin mapping with functional information from electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The main contribution to the primary currents detectable with EEG and MEG comes from ionic currents in the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, aligned perpendicularly to the local cortical surface. We provide evidence from an in-vivo experiment that the variation in MRI-based myeloarchitecture measures across the cortex predicts the variation of the current density over individuals and thus is of functional relevance. Equivalent current dipole locations and moments due to pitch onset evoked response fields (ERFs) were estimated by means of a variational Bayesian algorithm. The myeloarchitecture was estimated indirectly from individual high resolution quantitative multi-parameter maps (MPMs) acquired at 800 ?m isotropic resolution. Myelin estimates across cortical areas correlated positively with dipole magnitude. This correlation was spatially specific: regions of interest in the auditory cortex provided significantly better models than those covering whole hemispheres. Based on the MPM data we identified the auditory cortical area TE1.2 as the most likely origin of the pitch ERFs measured by MEG. We can now proceed to exploit the higher spatial resolution of quantitative MPMs to identify the cortical origin of M/EEG signals, inform M/EEG source reconstruction and explore structure–function relationships at a fine structural level in the living human brain. PMID:25529007

  13. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Subcortical Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Liang, Chia-Pin; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The whisker system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the brain. Discrete neural modules represent each whisker in the somatosensory cortex ("barrels"), thalamus ("barreloids"), and brain stem ("barrelettes"). Stimulation of a single whisker evokes neural activity sequentially in its corresponding barrelette, barreloid, and barrel. Conventional optical imaging of functional activation in the brain is limited to surface structures such as the cerebral cortex. To access subcortical structures and image sensory-evoked neural activity, we designed a needle-based optical system using gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens. We performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi) with GRIN rod lens to visualize neural activity evoked in the thalamic barreloids by deflection of whiskers in vivo. We stimulated several whiskers together to determine the sensitivity of our approach in differentiating between different barreloid responses. We also carried out stimulation of different whiskers at different times. Finally, we used muscimol in the barrel cortex to silence the corticothalamic inputs while imaging in the thalamus. Our results show that it is possible to obtain functional maps of the sensory periphery in deep brain structures such as the thalamic barreloids. Our approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other core brain structures. PMID:26612326

  14. Monitoring of in vivo function of superparamagnetic iron oxide labelled murine dendritic cells during anti-tumour vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tavaré, Richard; Sagoo, Pervinder; Varama, Gopal; Tanriver, Yakup; Warely, Alice; Diebold, Sandra S; Southworth, Richard; Schaeffter, Tobias; Lechler, Robert I; Razavi, Reza; Lombardi, Giovanna; Mullen, Gregory E D

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) generated in vitro to present tumour antigens have been injected in cancer patients to boost in vivo anti-tumour immune responses. This approach to cancer immunotherapy has had limited success. For anti-tumour therapy, delivery and subsequent migration of DCs to lymph nodes leading to effective stimulation of effector T cells is thought to be essential. The ability to non-invasively monitor the fate of adoptively transferred DCs in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical tool to correlate their in vivo behavior with response to treatment. Previous reports of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) labelling of different cell types, including DCs, have indicated varying detrimental effects on cell viability, migration, differentiation and immune function. Here we describe an optimised labelling procedure using a short incubation time and low concentration of clinically used SPIO Endorem to successfully track murine DC migration in vivo using MRI in a mouse tumour model. First, intracellular labelling of bone marrow derived DCs was monitored in vitro using electron microscopy and MRI relaxometry. Second, the in vitro characterisation of SPIO labelled DCs demonstrated that viability, phenotype and functions were comparable to unlabelled DCs. Third, ex vivo SPIO labelled DCs, when injected subcutaneously, allowed for the longitudinal monitoring by MR imaging of their migration in vivo. Fourth, the SPIO DCs induced the proliferation of adoptively transferred CD4(+) T cells but, most importantly, they primed cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell responses to protect against a B16-Ova tumour challenge. Finally, using anatomical information from the MR images, the immigration of DCs was confirmed by the increase in lymph node size post-DC injection. These results demonstrate that the SPIO labelling protocol developed in this study is not detrimental for DC function in vitro and in vivo has potential clinical application in monitoring therapeutic DCs in patients with cancer. PMID:21637760

  15. The past, present, and future of x-ray technology for in vivo imaging of function and form

    SciTech Connect

    Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.; Hourigan, K.; Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Hooper, S. B.

    2009-05-15

    Scientists and clinicians have a keen interest in studying not just the structure of physiological systems, but their motion also, or more generally their form and function. This paper focuses on the technologies that underpin in vivo measurements of form and function of the human body for both research and medical treatment. A concise literature review of x-ray imaging, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, laser Doppler velocimetry, and particle image velocimetry is presented. Additionally, a more detailed review of in vivo x-ray imaging is presented. Finally, two techniques, which the authors believe are representative of the present and future of in vivo x-ray imaging techniques, are presented.

  16. In VivoFunctional Imaging of Intrinsic Scattering Changes in the Human Retina with High-speed Ultrahigh Resolution OCT

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, V. J.; Chen, Y.; Duker, J. S.; Fujimoto, J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive methods of probing retinal function are of interest for the early detection of retinal disease. While retinal function is traditionally directly measured with the electroretinogram (ERG), recently functional optical imaging of the retina has been demonstrated. In this manuscript, stimulus-induced, intrinsic optical scattering changes in the human retina are measured in vivo with high-speed, ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) operating at 50,000 axial scans per second and ?3.3 micron axial resolution. A stimulus and measurement protocol that enables measurement of functional OCT retinal signals is described. OCT signal changes in the photoreceptors are demonstrated. Two distinct responses having different temporal and spatial properties are reported. These results are discussed in the context of optical intrinsic signals measured previously in the retina by fundus imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Finally, challenges associated with in vivo functional retinal imaging in human subjects are discussed. PMID:19259228

  17. In vitro, in vivo and ex vivo characterization of ibrutinib: a potent inhibitor of the efflux function of the transporter MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Patel, Atish; Ma, Shao-Lin; Li, Xiao Jie; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Yang, Pei-Qi; Kathawala, Rishil J; Wang, Yi-Jun; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The transporter, multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), plays a critical role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Ibrutinib is an inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase. Here we investigated the reversal effect of ibrutinib on MRP1-mediated MDR. Experimental Approach Cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. The expression of protein was detected by Western blot. RT-PCR and Q-PCR were performed to detect the expression of MRP1 mRNA. The intracellular accumulation and efflux of substrates for MRP1 were measured by scintillation counter and flow cytometry. HEK293/MRP1 cell xenografts in nude mice were established to study the effects of ibrutinib in vivo. Key Results Ibrutinib significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of MRP1 substrates in HEK293/MRP1 and HL60/Adr cells overexpressing MRP1. Furthermore, ibrutinib increased the accumulation of substrates in these MRP1-overexpressing cells by inhibiting the drug efflux function of MRP1. However, mRNA and protein expression of MRP1 remained unaltered after treatment with ibrutinib in MRP1-overexpressing cells. In vivo, ibrutinib enhanced the efficacy of vincristine to inhibit the growth of HEK293/MRP1 tumour xenografts in nude mice. Importantly, ibrutinib also enhances the cytotoxicity of vincristine in primary cultures of leukaemia blasts, derived from patients. Conclusions and Implications Our results indicated that ibrutinib significantly increased the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents which were MRP1 substrates, in MRP1-overexpressing cells, in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo. These findings will lead to further studies on the effects of a combination of ibrutinib with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer patients overexpressing MRP1. PMID:25164592

  18. In vivo circulation, clearance, and biodistribution of polyglycerol grafted functional red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Chapanian, Rafi; Constantinescu, Iren; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-04-01

    The in vivo circulation of hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) grafted red blood cells (RBCs) was investigated in mice. The number of HPG molecules grafted per RBC was measured using tritium labeled HPGs ((3)H-HPG) of different molecular weights; the values ranged from 1 × 10(5) to 2 × 10(6) molecules per RBC. HPG-grafted RBCs were characterized in vitro by measuring the electrophoretic mobility, complement mediated lysis, and osmotic fragility. Our results show that RBCs grafted with 1.5 × 10(5) HPG molecules per RBC having molecular weights 20 and 60 kDa have similar characteristics as that of control RBCs. The in vivo circulation of HPG-grafted RBCs was measured by a tail vain injection of (3)H-HPG60K-RBC in mice. The radioactivity of isolated RBCs, whole blood, plasma, different organs, urine and feces was evaluated at different time intervals. The portion of (3)H-HPG60K-RBC that survived the first day in mice (52%) remained in circulation for 50 days. Minimal accumulation radioactivity in organs other than liver and spleen was observed suggesting the normal clearance mechanism of modified RBCs. Animals gained normal weights and no abnormalities observed in necropsy analysis. The stability of the ester-amide linker between the RBC and HPG was evaluated by comparing the clearance rate of (3)H-HPG60K-RBC and PKH-26 lipid fluorescent membrane marker labeled HPG60K-RBCs. HPG modified RBCs combine the many advantages of a dendritic polymer and RBCs, and hold great promise in systemic drug delivery and other applications of functional RBC. PMID:22261097

  19. In vivo assessment of contractile strength distinguishes differential gene function in skeletal muscle of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brit L; Gallagher, Thomas L; Rastogi, Neha; Davis, Jonathan P; Beattie, Christine E; Amacher, Sharon L; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-10-01

    The accessible genetics and extensive skeletal musculature of the zebrafish make it a versatile and increasingly used model for studying muscle contraction. We here describe the development of an in vivo assay for measuring the contractile force of intact zebrafish at the larval stage. In addition, as proof of applicability, we have used this assay to quantify contractile strength of zebrafish larvae in a morphant model of deranged rbfox function. Average maximum tetanic (180 Hz) whole body forces produced by wild-type larvae at 2, 3, 4, and 5 days postfertilization amounted to 3.0, 7.2, 9.1, and 10.8 mN, respectively. To compare at potentially different stages of muscle development, we developed an immunohistological assay for empirically determining the cross-sectional area of larval trunk skeletal muscle to quantify muscle-specific force per cross-sectional area. At 4-5 days postfertilization, specific force amounts to ?300 mN/mm(2), which is similar to fully developed adult mammalian skeletal muscle. We used these assays to measure contractile strength in zebrafish singly or doubly deficient for two rbfox paralogs, rbfox1l and rbfox2, which encode RNA-binding factors shown previously to modulate muscle function and muscle-specific splicing. We found rbfox2 morphants produce maximal tetanic forces similar to wild-type larvae, whereas rbfox1l morphants demonstrate significantly impaired function. rbfox1l/rbfox2 morphants are paralyzed, and their lack of contractile force production in our assay suggests that paralysis is a muscle-autonomous defect. These quantitative functional results allow measurement of muscle-specific phenotypes independent of neural input. PMID:26251513

  20. In vivo studies of silk based gold nano-composite conduits for functional peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Das, Suradip; Sharma, Manav; Saharia, Dhiren; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Sarma, Monalisa Goswami; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Bora, Utpal

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel silk-gold nanocomposite based nerve conduit successfully tested in a neurotmesis grade sciatic nerve injury model in rats over a period of eighteen months. The conduit was fabricated by adsorbing gold nanoparticles onto silk fibres and transforming them into a nanocomposite sheet by electrospinning which is finally given a tubular structure by rolling on a stainless steel mandrel of chosen diameter. The conduits were found to promote adhesion and proliferation of Schwann cells in vitro and did not elicit any toxic or immunogenic responses in vivo. We also report for the first time, the monitoring of muscular regeneration post nerve conduit implantation by recording motor unit potentials (MUPs) through needle electromyogram. Pre-seeding the conduits with Schwann cells enhanced myelination of the regenerated tissue. Histo-morphometric and electrophysiological studies proved that the nanocomposite based conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells performed best in terms of structural and functional regeneration of severed sciatic nerves. The near normal values of nerve conduction velocity (50 m/sec), compound muscle action potential (29.7 mV) and motor unit potential (133 ?V) exhibited by the animals implanted with Schwann cell loaded nerve conduits in the present study are superior to those observed in previous reports with synthetic materials as well as collagen based nerve conduits. Animals in this group were also able to perform complex locomotory activities like stretching and jumping with excellent sciatic function index (SFI) and led a normal life. PMID:26026910

  1. A transcription blocker isolated from a designed repeat protein combinatorial library by in vivo functional screen

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonova, Elena B.; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Su, Yue; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Xie, Shicong; Guan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    A highly diverse DNA library coding for ankyrin seven-repeat proteins (ANK-N5C) was designed and constructed by a PCR-based combinatorial assembly strategy. A bacterial melibiose fermentation assay was adapted for in vivo functional screen. We isolated a transcription blocker that completely inhibits the melibiose-dependent expression of ?-galactosidase (MelA) and melibiose permease (MelB) of Escherichia coli by specifically preventing activation of the melAB operon. High-resolution crystal structural determination reveals that the designed ANK-N5C protein has a typical ankyrin fold, and the specific transcription blocker, ANK-N5C-281, forms a domain-swapped dimer. Functional tests suggest that the activity of MelR, a DNA-binding transcription activator and a member of AraC family of transcription factors, is inhibited by ANK-N5C-281 protein. All ANK-N5C proteins are expected to have a concave binding area with negative surface potential, suggesting that the designed ANK-N5C library proteins may facilitate the discovery of binders recognizing structural motifs with positive surface potential, like in DNA-binding proteins. Overall, our results show that the established library is a useful tool for the discovery of novel bioactive reagents. PMID:25627011

  2. In Vivo Function of PTEX88 in Malaria Parasite Sequestration and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Costa Nunes, Jean; Stenzel, Werner; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-06-01

    Malaria pathology is linked to remodeling of red blood cells by eukaryotic Plasmodium parasites. Central to host cell refurbishment is the trafficking of parasite-encoded virulence factors through the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX). Much of our understanding of its function is based on experimental work with cultured Plasmodium falciparum, yet direct consequences of PTEX impairment during an infection remain poorly defined. Using the murine malaria model parasite Plasmodium berghei, it is shown here that efficient sequestration to the pulmonary, adipose, and brain tissue vasculature is dependent on the PTEX components thioredoxin 2 (TRX2) and PTEX88. While TRX2-deficient parasites remain virulent, PTEX88-deficient parasites no longer sequester in the brain, correlating with abolishment of cerebral complications in infected mice. However, an apparent trade-off for virulence attenuation was spleen enlargement, which correlates with a strongly reduced schizont-to-ring-stage transition. Strikingly, general protein export is unaffected in PTEX88-deficient mutants that mature normally in vitro. Thus, PTEX88 is pivotal for tissue sequestration in vivo, parasite virulence, and preventing exacerbation of spleen pathology, but these functions do not correlate with general protein export to the host erythrocyte. The presented data suggest that the protein export machinery of Plasmodium parasites and their underlying mechanistic features are considerably more complex than previously anticipated and indicate challenges for targeted intervention strategies. PMID:25820521

  3. Smoking impairs endothelial function in human saphenous vein in an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Sharif, M A; Bayraktutan, U; Arya, N; O'Donnell, M E; Badger, S A; Young, I S; Soong, C V

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo experimental study was to assess the effect of smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension on endothelial function in human saphenous vein, a commonly used conduit for coronary and peripheral arterial bypass surgery. A segment of long saphenous vein harvested during infrainguinal bypass surgery was mounted in an organ bath for isometric tension studies. Vein rings were precontracted to submaximal contraction with phenylephrine, followed by endothelium-dependent relaxation with acetylcholine. Long saphenous vein segments were collected from 26 patients, including five females, with a mean age of 66.4 years (range 48-92). Current smokers had impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation compared to ex- and nonsmokers (10.2%, n=13, vs. 32.9%, n=13; p<0.010). However, ex-smokers and nonsmokers did not have a significant difference in relaxant responses to acetylcholine (29.1%, n=8, vs. 24.6%, n=5; p=nonsignificant [ns]). Similarly, diabetic and nondiabetic patients did not show a significant difference in endothelium-dependent relaxation (23.1%, n=10, vs. 15.6%, n=16; p=ns). The relaxant responses in hypertensive and normotensive patients were not different (20.4%, n=12, vs. 22.5%, n=14; p=ns). Smoking has a deleterious effect on the endothelial function of saphenous vein, and smoking cessation may improve the long-term durability of saphenous vein used as a bypass graft in patients undergoing arterial reconstruction. PMID:18640818

  4. Animal Models for Studying the In Vivo Functions of Cell Cycle CDKs.

    PubMed

    Risal, Sanjiv; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Cdks (Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdk2) and a mitotic Cdk (Cdk1) are involved in cell cycle progression in mammals. Cyclins, Cdk inhibitors, and phosphorylations (both activating and inhibitory) at different cellular levels tightly modulate the activities of these kinases. Based on the results of biochemical studies, it was long believed that different Cdks functioned at specific stages during cell cycle progression. However, deletion of all three interphase Cdks in mice affected cell cycle entry and progression only in certain specialized cells such as hematopoietic cells, beta cells of the pancreas, pituitary lactotrophs, and cardiomyocytes. These genetic experiments challenged the prevailing biochemical model and established that Cdks function in a cell-specific, but not a stage-specific, manner during cell cycle entry and the progression of mitosis. Recent in vivo studies have further established that Cdk1 is the only Cdk that is both essential and sufficient for driving the resumption of meiosis during mouse oocyte maturation. These genetic studies suggest a minimal-essential cell cycle model in which Cdk1 is the central regulator of cell cycle progression. Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of the interphase Cdks by forming active complexes with A-, B-, E-, and D-type Cyclins in a stepwise manner. Thus, Cdk1 plays an essential role in both mitosis and meiosis in mammals, whereas interphase Cdks are dispensable. PMID:26231715

  5. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of "Mind Reading" and In Vivo Rehearsal for High-Functioning Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomeer, Marcus L.; Smith, Rachael A.; Lopata, Christopher; Volker, Martin A.; Lipinski, Alanna M.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; McDonald, Christin A.; Lee, Gloria K.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a computer software (i.e., "Mind Reading") and in vivo rehearsal treatment on the emotion decoding and encoding skills, autism symptoms, and social skills of 43 children, ages 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). Children in treatment (n = 22)…

  7. Two Forms of Chlorophyll a in vivo with Distinct Photochemical Functions Author(s): Govindjee and Eugene Rabinowitch

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    Two Forms of Chlorophyll a in vivo with Distinct Photochemical Functions Author(s): Govindjee,u(Chlorella) and 630 m,u(Navicula) attributableto chlorophylls b and c. Thus, excitation of chlorophyll a form "chloro-700." The effect of the auxilia- ry pigments in these algae may be mediated by energy transfer to "chlorophyll

  8. Drug-based modulation of endogenous stem cells promotes functional remyelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Najm, Fadi J.; Madhavan, Mayur; Zaremba, Anita; Shick, Elizabeth; Karl, Robert T.; Factor, Daniel C.; Miller, Tyler E.; Nevin, Zachary S.; Kantor, Christopher; Sargent, Alex; Quick, Kevin L.; Schlatzer, Daniela M.; Tang, Hong; Papoian, Ruben; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B.; Jadhav, Ajit; Robinson, Andrew P.; Podojil, Joseph R.; Miller, Stephen D.; Miller, Robert H.; Tesar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) involves an aberrant autoimmune response and progressive failure of remyelination in the central nervous system (CNS). Prevention of neural degeneration and subsequent disability requires remyelination through the generation of new oligodendrocytes, but current treatments exclusively target the immune system. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are stem cells in the CNS and the principal source of myelinating oligodendrocytes1. OPCs are abundant in demyelinated regions of MS patients, yet fail to differentiate, thereby representing a cellular target for pharmacological intervention2. To discover therapeutic compounds for enhancing myelination from endogenous OPCs, we screened a library of bioactive small molecules on mouse pluripotent epiblast stem cell (EpiSC)-derived OPCs3–5. We identified seven drugs that functioned at nanomolar doses to selectively enhance the generation of mature oligodendrocytes from OPCs in vitro. Two drugs, miconazole and clobetasol, were effective in promoting precocious myelination in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures, and in vivo in early postnatal mouse pups. Systemic delivery of each of the two drugs significantly increased the number of new oligodendrocytes and enhanced remyelination in a lysolecithin-induced mouse model of focal demyelination. Administering each of the two drugs at the peak of disease in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of chronic progressive MS resulted in striking reversal of disease severity. Immune response assays showed that miconazole functioned directly as a remyelinating drug with no effect on the immune system, whereas clobetasol was a potent immunosuppressant as well as a remyelinating agent. Mechanistic studies showed that miconazole and clobetasol functioned in OPCs through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling, respectively. Furthermore, both drugs enhanced the generation of human oligodendrocytes from human OPCs in vitro. Collectively, our results provide a rationale for testing miconazole and clobetasol, or structurally-modified derivatives, to enhance remyelination in patients. PMID:25896324

  9. Flk-1+Sca-1- mesenchymal stem cells: functional characteristics in vitro and regenerative capacity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yugang; Pan, Enshan; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Wei, Anyang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a powerful tool in regenerative medicine because of their differentiation and migration capacities. We aimed to investigate the possibility of Flk-1+Sca-1- mesenchymal stem cells (Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs) transplantation to repair erectile function in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM)-associated erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods: In this study, we isolated Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs from bone marrow (bMSCs). Then, newborn male rats were intraperitoneally injected with 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine for the purpose of tracking endogenous Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs. Eight weeks later, 8 of these rats were randomly chosen to serve as normal control (N group). The remaining rats were injected intraperitoneally with 60 mg/kg of streptozotocin (STZ) to induce DM. Eight of these rats were randomly chosen to serve as DM control (DM group) while another 8 rats were subject to Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs treatment (DM+MSC group). All rats were evaluated for erectile function by intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurement. Afterward, their penile tissues were examined by histology. Results: Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs could differentiate into skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Engrafted Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs were shown to home to injured muscle, participate in myofibers repair and could partially reconstitute the sarcolemmal expression of myocardin and ameliorate the level of related specific pathological markers. Conclusion: Flk-1+Sca-1- MSCs could be used in the treatment erectile function in diabetes mellitus associated erectile dysfunction by promoting regeneration of nNOS-positive nerves, endothelium, and smooth muscle in the penis.

  10. Balanced Hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Kidney Function In-Vivo without Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Martin Alexander; Baar, Wolfgang; Bruno, Raphael Romano; Wollborn, Jakob; Held, Christopher; Schneider, Reinhard; Flemming, Sven; Schlegel, Nicolas; Roewer, Norbert; Neuhaus, Winfried; Wunder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Volume therapy is a standard procedure in daily perioperative care, and there is an ongoing discussion about the benefits of colloid resuscitation with hydroxyethylstarch (HES). In sepsis HES should be avoided due to a higher risk for acute kidney injury (AKI). Results of the usage of HES in patients without sepsis are controversial. Therefore we conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of 6% HES 130/0.4 on kidney integrity with sepsis or under healthy conditions Sepsis was induced by standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis (sCASP). sCASP-group as well as control group (C) remained untreated for 24 h. After 18 h sCASP+HES group (sCASP+VOL) and control+HES (C+VOL) received 50 ml/KG balanced 6% HES (VOL) 130/0.4 over 6h. After 24h kidney function was measured via Inulin- and PAH-Clearance in re-anesthetized rats, and serum urea, creatinine (crea), cystatin C and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as well as histopathology were analysed. In vitro human proximal tubule cells (PTC) were cultured +/- lipopolysaccharid (LPS) and with 0.1–4.0% VOL. Cell viability was measured with XTT-, cell toxicity with LDH-test. sCASP induced severe septic AKI demonstrated divergent results regarding renal function by clearance or creatinine measure focusing on VOL. Soleley HES (C+VOL) deteriorated renal function without sCASP. Histopathology revealed significantly derangements in all HES groups compared to control. In vitro LPS did not worsen the HES induced reduction of cell viability in PTC cells. For the first time, we demonstrated, that application of 50 ml/KG 6% HES 130/0.4 over 6 hours induced AKI without inflammation in vivo. Severity of sCASP induced septic AKI might be no longer susceptible to the way of volume expansion. PMID:26340751

  11. Drug-based modulation of endogenous stem cells promotes functional remyelination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Najm, Fadi J; Madhavan, Mayur; Zaremba, Anita; Shick, Elizabeth; Karl, Robert T; Factor, Daniel C; Miller, Tyler E; Nevin, Zachary S; Kantor, Christopher; Sargent, Alex; Quick, Kevin L; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Tang, Hong; Papoian, Ruben; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B; Jadhav, Ajit; Robinson, Andrew P; Podojil, Joseph R; Miller, Stephen D; Miller, Robert H; Tesar, Paul J

    2015-06-11

    Multiple sclerosis involves an aberrant autoimmune response and progressive failure of remyelination in the central nervous system. Prevention of neural degeneration and subsequent disability requires remyelination through the generation of new oligodendrocytes, but current treatments exclusively target the immune system. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are stem cells in the central nervous system and the principal source of myelinating oligodendrocytes. These cells are abundant in demyelinated regions of patients with multiple sclerosis, yet fail to differentiate, thereby representing a cellular target for pharmacological intervention. To discover therapeutic compounds for enhancing myelination from endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, we screened a library of bioactive small molecules on mouse pluripotent epiblast stem-cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Here we show seven drugs function at nanomolar doses selectively to enhance the generation of mature oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells in vitro. Two drugs, miconazole and clobetasol, are effective in promoting precocious myelination in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures, and in vivo in early postnatal mouse pups. Systemic delivery of each of the two drugs significantly increases the number of new oligodendrocytes and enhances remyelination in a lysolecithin-induced mouse model of focal demyelination. Administering each of the two drugs at the peak of disease in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis results in striking reversal of disease severity. Immune response assays show that miconazole functions directly as a remyelinating drug with no effect on the immune system, whereas clobetasol is a potent immunosuppressant as well as a remyelinating agent. Mechanistic studies show that miconazole and clobetasol function in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells through mitogen-activated protein kinase and glucocorticoid receptor signalling, respectively. Furthermore, both drugs enhance the generation of human oligodendrocytes from human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in vitro. Collectively, our results provide a rationale for testing miconazole and clobetasol, or structurally modified derivatives, to enhance remyelination in patients. PMID:25896324

  12. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  13. Women Ornament Themselves for Intrasexual Competition near Ovulation, but for Intersexual Attraction in Luteal Phase

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jin-Ying; Wang, Jia-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined women's attentional bias toward ornamental objects in relation to their menstrual phase as well as to motivations of intersexual courtship or intrasexual competition. In Experiment 1, 33 healthy heterosexual women were tested in a bias-assessment visual cuing task twice: once on a high-fertility day (during the ovulatory phase) and once on a low-fertility day (during the luteal phase). They paid greater attention to pictures of ornamental objects than to pictures of non-ornamental objects near ovulation, but not during the luteal phase, suggesting an ornamental bias during the high-fertility phase. In Experiment 2, before the visual cuing task, 40 participants viewed 10 same-sex or opposite-sex facial photographs with either high or low attractiveness as priming tasks to activate the intrasexual competition or intersexual courtship motives. Results showed that women's ornamental bias was dependent on the interaction of menstrual phase and mating motive. Specifically, the ornamental bias was observed on the high-fertility day when the subjects were primed with high-attractive same-sex images (intrasexual competition) and was observed on the low-fertility day when they were primed with high-attractive opposite-sex photographs (intersexual courtship). In conclusion, the present findings confirm the hypothesis that, during the high-fertility phase, women have an attentional bias toward ornamental objects and further support the hypothesis that the ornamental bias is driven by intrasexual competition motivation near ovulation, but driven by intersexual courtship motivation during the luteal phase. PMID:25180577

  14. Simulated conditions of microgravity suppress progesterone production by luteal cells of the pregnant rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. K.; Yang, H.; Sridaran, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether simulated conditions of microgravity induce changes in the production of progesterone by luteal cells of the pregnant rat ovary using an in vitro model system. The microgravity environment was simulated using either a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) bioreactor with free fall or a clinostat without free fall of cells. A mixed population of luteal cells isolated from the corpora lutea of day 8 pregnant rats was attached to cytodex microcarrier beads (cytodex 3). These anchorage dependent cells were placed in equal numbers in the HARV or a spinner flask control vessel in culture conditions. It was found that HARV significantly reduced the daily production of progesterone from day 1 through day 8 compared to controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that cells attached to the microcarrier beads throughout the duration of the experiment in both types of culture vessels. Cells cultured in chamber slide flasks and placed in a clinostat yielded similar results when compared to those in the HARV. Also, when they were stained by Oil Red-O for lipid droplets, the clinostat flasks showed a larger number of stained cells compared to control flasks at 48 h. Further, the relative amount of Oil Red-O staining per milligram of protein was found to be higher in the clinostat than in the control cells at 48 h. It is speculated that the increase in the level of lipid content in cells subjected to simulated conditions of microgravity may be due to a disruption in cholesterol transport and/or lesions in the steroidogenic pathway leading to a fall in the synthesis of progesterone. Additionally, the fall in progesterone in simulated conditions of microgravity could be due to apoptosis of luteal cells.

  15. Luteal Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors During Gestation and Postpartum in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Navas, Paola B.; Redondo, Analía L.; Cuello-Carrión, F. Darío; Roig, Laura M. Vargas; Valdez, Susana R.; Jahn, Graciela A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Progesterone (P4) is the main steroid secreted by the corpora lutea (CL) and is required for successful implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. Although adequate circulating levels of thyroid hormone (TH) are needed to support formation and maintenance of CL during pregnancy, TH signaling had not been described in this gland. We determined luteal thyroid hormone receptor isoforms (TR) expression and regulation throughout pregnancy and under the influence of thyroid status, and in vitro effects of triiodothyronine (T3) exposure on luteal P4 synthesis. Methods: Euthyroid female Wistar rats were sacrificed by decapitation on gestational day (G) 5, G10, G15, G19, or G21 of pregnancy or on day 2 postpartum (L2). Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism were induced in female Wistar rats by daily administration of thyroxine (T4; 0.25?mg/kg subcutaneously) or 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU; 0.1?g/L in drinking water), respectively. Luteal TR expression of mRNA was determined using real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and of protein using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Primary cultures of luteal cells and of luteinized granulosa cells were used to study in vitro effects of T3 on P4 synthesis. In addition, the effect of T3 on P4 synthesis under basal conditions and under stimulation with luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was evaluated. Results: TR?1, TR?2, and TR?1 mRNA were present in CL, increasing during the first half and decreasing during the second half of pregnancy. At the protein level, TR?1 was abundantly expressed during gestation reaching a peak at G19 and decreasing afterwards. TR?1 was barely expressed during early gestation, peaked at G19, and diminished thereafter. Expression of TR?1 and TR?1 at the protein and mRNA level were not influenced by thyroid status. T3 neither modified P4 secretion from CL of pregnancy nor its synthesis in luteinized granulosa cells in culture. Conclusions: This study confirms for the first time the presence of TR isoforms in the CL during pregnancy and postpartum, identifying this gland as a TH target during gestation. TR expression is modulated in this tissue in accordance with the regulation of P4 metabolism, and the abrupt peripartum changes suggest a role of TH during luteolysis. However, TH actions on the CL do not seem to be related to a direct regulation of P4 synthesis. PMID:24684177

  16. Functionalization of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with targeting ligands: their physicochemical properties and in vivo behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chen; Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest; Bhattarai, Narayan; Wang, Freddy; Stephen, Zach; Li, Chun; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Aims To develop and evaluate two tumor-specific nanoprobes by functionalization of a PEG-immobilized nanoparticle with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) or chlorotoxin (CTX) ligand that targets ?v?3 integrin and MMP-2 receptors, respectively. Materials and Methods The nanoprobes were made of iron oxide cores, biocompatible polymer coating, and surface-conjugated RGD or CTX peptide. The tumor-targeting specificity of the nanoprobes was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Results and Discussion Both nanoprobes were highly dispersive and exhibited excellent long-term stability in cell culture media. The RGD-conjugated nanoprobe displayed a strong initial accumulation near neovasculatures in tumors followed by quick clearance. Conversely, the CTX-enabled nanoprobe exhibited sustained accumulation throughout the tumor. Conclusion These findings revealed the influence of the targeting ligands on the intratumoral distribution of the ligand-enabled nanoprobes. With flexible surface chemistry, our nanoparticle platform can be used in a modular fashion to conjugate biomolecules for intended applications. PMID:21128719

  17. Dissecting the Function and Assembly of Acentriolar Microtubule Organizing Centers in Drosophila Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Janina; Novak, Zsofia Anna; Raff, Jordan W.; Wainman, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs) are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2—the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems). We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs. PMID:26020779

  18. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. PMID:26385829

  19. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin. PMID:24445121

  20. Glycan variants of a respiratory syncytial virus antibody with enhanced effector function and in vivo efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Andrew; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J.; Piedra, Pedro A.; Gilbert, Brian E.; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause devastating lower respiratory tract infections in preterm infants or when other serious health problems are present. Immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab (Synagis), a humanized IgG1 mAb, is the current standard of care for preventing RSV infection in at-risk neonates. We have explored the contribution of effector function to palivizumab efficacy using a plant-based expression system to produce palivizumab N-glycan structure variants with high homogeneity on different antibody isotypes. We compared these isotype and N-glycoform variants with commercially available palivizumab with respect to both in vitro receptor and C1q binding and in vivo efficacy. Whereas the affinity for antigen and neutralization activity of each variant were indistinguishable from those of palivizumab, their Fc? receptor binding profiles were very different, which was reflected in either a reduced or enhanced ability to influence the RSV lung titer in challenged cotton rats. Enhanced Fc? receptor binding was associated with reduced viral lung titers compared with palivizumab, whereas abrogation of receptor binding led to a drastic reduction in efficacy. The results support the hypotheses that classic antibody neutralization is a minor component of efficacy by palivizumab in the cotton rat and that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity can significantly enhance the efficacy of this antiviral mAb. PMID:24711420

  1. Functional and fine structural changes in isolated rat lungs challenged with endotoxin ex vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, S.; Brasch, F.; Wollin, L.; Fehrenbach, H.; Richter, J.; Wendel, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate changes in rat lung functions caused by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to alterations in structure. The following four experimental groups were used: 1), control in vitro, perfusion for 150 minutes; 2), LPS in vitro, perfusion for 150 minutes and infusion of 5 mg of LPS after 40 minutes; 3), control ex vivo, perfusion for 10 minutes; and 4), LPS ex vivo, lungs perfused for 10 minutes from rats treated for 110 minutes with 20 mg/kg LPS intraperitoneally. Histologically, blood-derived leukocytes were detectable only in lungs from group 4, where neutrophils were found in capillaries, interstitium, and endothelial pouches. LPS treatment increased pulmonary resistance and decreased pulmonary compliance in group 4 (ex vivo), and, to a greater extent, in group 2 (in vitro). In these two groups, formation of giant lamellar bodies in the type II pneumocytes was observed. By histological examination, the bronchoconstriction induced by LPS in vitro was localized to the terminal bronchioles. At 2 hours after LPS treatment, no edema and no change in precapillary and postcapillary resistance, capillary pressure, vascular compliance, capillary permeability, and the wet/dry ratio was observed. Thus, our major findings are that LPS induced constriction of the terminal bronchioles in vitro, formation of giant lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes ex vivo and in vitro, and trapping of neutrophils in endothelial pouches in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7747816

  2. Addition of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist for luteal phase support in in-vitro fertilization: an analysis of 2739 cycles

    PubMed Central

    ?im?ek, Erhan; K?l?çda?, Esra Bulgan; Aytaç, P?nar Ça?lar; Çoban, Gonca; ?im?ek, Seda Yüksel; Çok, Tayfun; Haydardedeo?lu, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Objective Luteal phase is defective in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, and many regimens were tried for the very best luteal phase support (LPS). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist use, which was administered as an adjunct to the luteal phase support in IVF cycles, was suggested to improve pregnancy outcome measures in certain randomized studies. We analyzed the effects of addition of GnRH agonist to standard progesterone luteal support on pregnancy outcome measures, particularly the live birth rates. Material and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including 2739 IVF cycles. Long GnRH agonist and antagonist stimulation IVF cycles with cleavage-stage embryo transfer were included. Cycles were divided into two groups: Group A included cycles with single-dose GnRH agonist plus progesterone LPS and Group B included progesterone only LPS. Live birth rates were the primary outcome measures of the analysis. Miscarriage rates and multiple pregnancy rates were the secondary outcome measures. Results Live birth rates were not statistically different in GnRH agonist plus progesterone (Group A) and progesterone only (Group B) groups in both the long agonist and antagonist stimulation arms (40.8%/41.2% and 32.8%/34.4%, p<0.05 respectively). Moreover, pregnancy rates, implantation rates, and miscarriage rates were found to be similar between groups. Multiple pregnancy rates in antagonist cycles were significantly higher in Group A than those in Group B (12.0% and 6.9%, respectively). Conclusion A beneficial effect of a single dose of GnRH agonist administration as a luteal phase supporting agent is yet to be determined because of the wide heterogeneity of data present in literature. Well-designed randomized clinical studies are required to clarify any effect of luteal GnRH agonist addition on pregnancy outcome measures with different doses, timing, and administration routes of GnRH agonists. PMID:26097392

  3. Diagnosis of luteal and follicular ovarian cysts by palpation per rectum and linear-array ultrasonography in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Farin, P W; Youngquist, R S; Parfet, J R; Garverick, H A

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the accuracy of palpation per rectum and linear-array ultrasonography for diagnosing follicular vs luteal ovarian cysts in cows. Forty-seven examinations of ovarian cysts from 28 cows were diagnosed by palpation per rectum as either a firm, thick-walled structure (luteal cyst) or a soft, thin-walled structure (follicular cyst) during weekly herd examinations. The ovaries of each cow were then examined by ultrasonography. Ultrasonograms of cysts greater than 25 mm in diameter were diagnosed as luteal or follicular cysts and were recorded on videotape for evaluation by a second clinician. Serum progesterone concentrations at the time of examination were determined by radioimmunoassay and used to classify luteal (greater than 0.5 ng/ml) or follicular (less than or equal to 0.5 ng/ml) cysts. Selection of this discriminatory level was based on response of a proportion of cows with luteal cysts that were given 25 mg of prostaglandin F2 alpha at the time of diagnosis by ultrasonography. Sensitivity and specificity of palpation per rectum for diagnosis of type of ovarian cyst were low (43.3 and 64.7%, respectively). In contrast, sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography were considerably higher (86.7 and 82.3%, respectively). Agreement between the 2 methods of diagnosis was 57.4%. Overall agreement between the 2 clinicians' diagnoses by ultrasonography was 85.1%. On the basis of our findings, we confirm that luteal and follicular cysts cannot be accurately differentiated by palpation per rectum alone. These data suggest that linear-array ultrasonography is more effective than palpation per rectum for diagnosing type of ovarian cyst in cows. PMID:1607312

  4. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro; Bartolome, Maria Visitacion; Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente; Salaices, Mercedes; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small concentrations constitutes environmental cardiovascular risk factor.

  5. Resveratrol and diabetic cardiac function: focus on recent in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Turan, Belma; Tuncay, Erkan; Vassort, Guy

    2012-04-01

    Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin found in wine has the potential to impact a variety of human diseases. Resveratrol like other polyphenols activates many of the same intracellular pathways as those activated by caloric restriction. It can quench reactive oxidative species, ROS and induce eNOS and iNOS expression. Resveratrol also can activate SIRT1, a NAD?-dependent deacetylase, that leads an improved in mitochondrial function, and then this procedure turns to activate the transcription factor Nrf2 that coordinates expression of key antioxidant mechanisms by binding to the antioxidant response elements. Resveratrol provides cardioprotection by triggering preconditioning and inducing autophagy. It also presents chemical similarities with estrogen and was reported to activate both nuclear and extranuclear estrogen receptors. Resveratrol treatment alleviated diabetes-induced cardiovascular system disorders via different endogeneous signaling pathways including oxidative stress/antioxidant defense system, glucose/insulin metabolism, overexpression of iNOS/nitrotyrosine, and preconditioning. Resveratrol treatment significantly reduced the blood glucose level in STZ-treated type 1 diabetic animals through insulin-dependent and insulin-independent pathways. Resveratrol triggers some of the similar intracellular insulin signalling components in myocardium such as eNOS, AKT through the AMPK pathway, and plays an essential role in Glut-4 translocation and glucose uptake in STZ-induced diabetic myocardium. However, resveratrol can exhibit hormetic action expressing health benefits at lower doses whereas being detrimental at higher doses. It might also exert antidiabetic effects by activating SIRT1 directly in the brain. This review includes a summary of the role of resveratrol and diabetic cardiac function including a brief discussion on in vitro and in vivo studies as well as our original observations in diabetic rats. PMID:22437738

  6. Structural domains required for Caenorhabditis elegans G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK-2) function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jordan F; Wang, Jianjun; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Ferkey, Denise M

    2012-04-13

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are key regulators of signal transduction that specifically phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to terminate signaling. Biochemical and crystallographic studies have provided great insight into mammalian GRK2/3 interactions and structure. However, despite extensive in vitro characterization, little is known about the in vivo contribution of these described GRK structural domains and interactions to proper GRK function in signal regulation. We took advantage of the disrupted chemosensory behavior characteristic of Caenorhabditis elegans grk-2 mutants to discern the interactions required for proper in vivo Ce-GRK-2 function. Informed by mammalian crystallographic and biochemical data, we introduced amino acid substitutions into the Ce-grk-2 coding sequence that are predicted to selectively disrupt GPCR phosphorylation, G?(q/11) binding, G?? binding, or phospholipid binding. Changing the most amino-terminal residues, which have been shown in mammalian systems to be required specifically for GPCR phosphorylation but not phosphorylation of alternative substrates or recruitment to activated GPCRs, eliminated the ability of Ce-GRK-2 to restore chemosensory signaling. Disrupting interaction between the predicted Ce-GRK-2 amino-terminal ?-helix and kinase domain, posited to stabilize GRKs in their active ATP- and GPCR-bound conformation, also eliminated Ce-GRK-2 chemosensory function. Finally, although changing residues within the RH domain, predicted to disrupt interaction with G?(q/11), did not affect Ce-GRK-2 chemosensory function, disruption of the predicted PH domain-mediated interactions with G?? and phospholipids revealed that both contribute to Ce-GRK-2 function in vivo. Combined, we have demonstrated functional roles for broadly conserved GRK2/3 structural domains in the in vivo regulation of organismal behavior. PMID:22375004

  7. Microtubule depolymerization normalizes in vivo myocardial contractile function in dogs with pressure-overload left ventricular hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Hamawaki, M.; Narishige, T.; Sato, H.; Nemoto, S.; DeFreyte, G.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper G, I. V.; Carabello, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because initially compensatory myocardial hypertrophy in response to pressure overloading may eventually decompensate to myocardial failure, mechanisms responsible for this transition have long been sought. One such mechanism established in vitro is densification of the cellular microtubule network, which imposes a viscous load that inhibits cardiocyte contraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the present study, we extended this in vitro finding to the in vivo level and tested the hypothesis that this cytoskeletal abnormality is important in the in vivo contractile dysfunction that occurs in experimental aortic stenosis in the adult dog. In 8 dogs in which gradual stenosis of the ascending aorta had caused severe left ventricular (LV) pressure overloading (gradient, 152+/-16 mm Hg) with contractile dysfunction, LV function was measured at baseline and 1 hour after the intravenous administration of colchicine. Cardiocytes obtained by biopsy before and after in vivo colchicine administration were examined in tandem. Microtubule depolymerization restored LV contractile function both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These and additional corroborative data show that increased cardiocyte microtubule network density is an important mechanism for the ventricular contractile dysfunction that develops in large mammals with adult-onset pressure-overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Effect of human chorionic gonadotropin administration on pituitary and luteal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Lanzone, A; Fulghesu, A M; Di Simone, N; Apa, R; Guida, C; Caruso, A; Mancuso, S

    1989-01-01

    The effect of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration on the pituitary and luteal responses to acute gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration at the mid luteal phase (LP) were studied in 20 infertile women. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In 1 group (n = 8), hCG (5,000 IU i.m.) was injected in a single shot on day 5 of LP. Sixty hours later (day 8 of LP) blood samples were taken every 15 min for 180 min; then 25 micrograms GnRH were acutely administered intravenously and blood samples taken at 185, 195, 210, 225, 240, 255, 270, 285 and 300 min. In the other 12 patients the same experimental design with GnRH was performed on day 8 of an untreated LP. Plasma LH, FSH, beta-hCG, progesterone and estradiol (E2) were assayed. The responsiveness of different hormones to GnRH was evaluated as integrated secretory area for 120 min after injection (sISA) and as the absolute increase with respect to the area under basal conditions before a GnRH administration (bISA). hCG-treated patients showed higher basal and bISA plasma values of LH/hCG than controls (p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2483932

  9. Progesterone administration for luteal phase deficiency in human reproduction: an old or new issue?

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    Luteal phase deficiency (LPD) is described as a condition of insufficient progesterone exposure to maintain a regular secretory endometrium and allow for normal embryo implantation and growth. Recently, scientific focus is turning to understand the physiology of implantation, in particular the several molecular markers of endometrial competence, through the recent transcriptomic approaches and microarray technology. In spite of the wide availability of clinical and instrumental methods for assessing endometrial competence, reproducible and reliable diagnostic tests for LPD are currently lacking, so no type-IA evidence has been proposed by the main scientific societies for assessing endometrial competence in infertile couples. Nevertheless, LPD is a very common condition that may occur during a series of clinical conditions, and during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and hyperstimulation (COH) programs. In many cases, the correct approach to treat LPD is the identification and correction of any underlying condition while, in case of no underlying dysfunction, the treatment becomes empiric. To date, no direct data is available regarding the efficacy of luteal phase support for improving fertility in spontaneous cycles or in non-gonadotropin induced ovulatory cycles. On the contrary, in gonadotropin in vitro fertilization (IVF) and non-IVF cycles, LPD is always present and progesterone exerts a significant positive effect on reproductive outcomes. The scientific debate still remains open regarding progesterone administration protocols, specially on routes of administration, dose and timing and the potential association with other drugs, and further research is still needed. PMID:26585269

  10. The effect of cloprostenol on human luteal steroid and prostaglandin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, A N; Walker, F M; Watson, J

    1977-01-01

    1 Human luteal tissue slices from days 18, 21 and 25 of the menstrual cycle were superfused in vitro with Medium 199 alone or containing cloprostenol (1 microgram/ml). Concentrations of progesterone, oestradiol-17beta and prostaglandins F2alpha and E2 were determined in the superfusate samples. 2 Secretion of steroids and prostaglandins was maintained at an approximately constant level throughout the experiments (21 h in one case) when the tissue was perfused with M199 alone. 3 Superfusion with cloprostenol (1 microgram/ml) resulted in an initial depression of progesterone and oestradiol-17beta but this was not maintained, levels returning to control values or showing an increase, while superfusion with cloprostenol continued. Cloprostenol is not therefore considered to be luteolytic at this dose and under these conditions for human luteal tissue in vitro. 4 Superfusion with cloprostenol (1 microgram/ml) also resulted in a large stimulation of secretion of endogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha following a short lag phase. This stimulation was possibly due to the initial depression of progesterone secretion. A short-lived stimulation of prostaglandin E2 secretion was also observed. 5 The significance of the increase in prostaglandin E2 secretion and the interrelationships between the various changes observed with cloprostenol are difficult to interpret. PMID:890210

  11. Set1 and MLL1/2 Target Distinct Sets of Functionally Different Genomic Loci In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elizabeth M; Chitsazan, Alex D; Seidel, Chris W; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-12-29

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is known to correlate with both active and poised genomic loci, yet many questions remain regarding its functional roles in vivo. We identify functional genomic targets of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and MLL1/2, in both the stem cells and differentiated tissue of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that, despite their common substrate, these enzymes target distinct genomic loci in vivo, which are distinguishable by the pattern each enzyme leaves on the chromatin template, i.e., the breadth of the H3K4me3 peak. Whereas Set1 targets are largely associated with the maintenance of the stem cell population, MLL1/2 targets are specifically enriched for genes involved in ciliogenesis. These data not only confirm that chromatin regulation is fundamental to planarian stem cell function but also provide evidence for post-embryonic functional specificity of H3K4me3 methyltransferases in vivo. PMID:26711341

  12. In vivo subsurface morphological and functional cellular and subcellular imaging of the gastrointestinal tract with confocal mini-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Martin; Memadathil, Beena; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Schneider, Constantin; Gregor, Sebastian; Galle, Peter R; Neurath, Markus F; Kiesslich, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a newly developed hand-held confocal probe for in vivo microscopic imaging of the complete gastrointestinal tract in rodents. METHODS: A novel rigid confocal probe (diameter 7 mm) was designed with optical features similar to the flexible endomicroscopy system for use in humans using a 488 nm single line laser for fluorophore excitation. Light emission was detected at 505 to 750 nm. The field of view was 475 ?m × 475 ?m. Optical slice thickness was 7 ?m with a lateral resolution of 0.7 ?m. Subsurface serial images at different depths (surface to 250 ?m) were generated in real time at 1024 × 1024 pixels (0.8 frames/s) by placing the probe onto the tissue in gentle, stable contact. Tissue specimens were sampled for histopathological correlation. RESULTS: The esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine and meso, liver, pancreas and gall bladder were visualised in vivo at high resolution in n = 48 mice. Real time microscopic imaging with the confocal mini-microscopy probe was easy to achieve. The different staining protocols (fluorescein, acriflavine, FITC-labelled dextran and L. esculentum lectin) each highlighted specific aspects of the tissue, and in vivo imaging correlated excellently with conventional histology. In vivo blood flow monitoring added a functional quality to morphologic imaging. CONCLUSION: Confocal microscopy is feasible in vivo allowing the visualisation of the complete GI tract at high resolution even of subsurface tissue structures. The new confocal probe design evaluated in this study is compatible with laparoscopy and significantly expands the field of possible applications to intra-abdominal organs. It allows immediate testing of new in vivo staining and application options and therefore permits rapid transfer from animal studies to clinical use in patients. PMID:17465494

  13. Enzymatic Characterization and In Vivo Function of Five Terminal Oxidases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takuro; Osamura, Tatsuya; Hirai, Takehiro; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has five aerobic terminal oxidases: bo3-type quinol oxidase (Cyo), cyanide-insensitive oxidase (CIO), aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase (aa3), and two cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases (cbb3-1 and cbb3-2). These terminal oxidases are differentially regulated under various growth conditions and are thought to contribute to the survival of this microorganism in a wide variety of environmental niches. Here, we constructed multiple mutant strains of P. aeruginosa that express only one aerobic terminal oxidase to investigate the enzymatic characteristics and in vivo function of each enzyme. The Km values of Cyo, CIO, and aa3 for oxygen were similar and were 1 order of magnitude higher than those of cbb3-1 and cbb3-2, indicating that Cyo, CIO, and aa3 are low-affinity enzymes and that cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 are high-affinity enzymes. Although cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 exhibited different expression patterns in response to oxygen concentration, they had similar Km values for oxygen. Both cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 utilized cytochrome c4 as the main electron donor under normal growth conditions. The electron transport chains terminated by cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 generate a proton gradient across the cell membrane with similar efficiencies. The electron transport chain of aa3 had the highest proton translocation efficiency, whereas that of CIO had the lowest efficiency. The enzymatic properties of the terminal oxidases reported here are partially in agreement with their regulatory patterns and may explain the environmental adaptability and versatility of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25182500

  14. In vivo skin biophysical behaviour and surface topography as a function of ageing.

    PubMed

    Pailler-Mattei, C; Debret, R; Vargiolu, R; Sommer, P; Zahouani, H

    2013-12-01

    Normal skin ageing is characterised by an alteration of the underlying connective tissue with measurable consequences on global skin biophysical properties. The cutis laxa syndrome, a rare genetic disorder, is considered as an accelerated ageing process since patients appear prematurely aged due to alterations of dermal elastic fibres. In the present study, we compared the topography and the biomechanical parameters of normal aged skin with an 17 year old cutis laxa patient. Skin topography analyses were conducted on normal skin at different ages. The results indicate that the skin relief highly changes as a function of ageing. The cutaneous lines change from a relatively isotropic orientation to a highly anisotropic orientation. This reorganisation of the skin relief during the ageing process might be due to a modification of the skin mechanical properties, and particularly to a modification of the dermis mechanical properties. A specific bio-tribometer, based on the indentationtechnique under light load, has been developed to study the biophysical properties of the human skin in vivo through two main parameters: the physico-chemical properties of the skin surface, by measuring the maximum adhesion force between the skin and the bio-tribometer; and the bulk mechanical properties. Our results show that the pull-off force between the skin and the biotribometer as well as the skin Young's modulus decrease with age. In the case of the young cutis laxa patient, the results obtained were similar to those observed for aged individuals. These results are very interesting and encouraging since they would allow the monitoring of the cutis laxa skin in a standardised and non-invasive way to better characterize either the evolution of the disease or the benefit of a treatment. PMID:23664827

  15. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  17. Characterization of In Vivo Dlg1 Deletion on T Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tomassian, Tamar; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Humbert, Patrick O.; Silva, Oscar; Round, June L.; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The polarized reorganization of the T cell membrane and intracellular signaling molecules in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement has been implicated in the modulation of T cell development and effector responses. In siRNA-based studies Dlg1, a MAGUK scaffold protein and member of the Scribble polarity complex, has been shown to play a role in T cell polarity and TCR signal specificity, however the role of Dlg1 in T cell development and function in vivo remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the combined data from three independently-derived dlg1-knockout mouse models; two germline deficient knockouts and one conditional knockout. While defects were not observed in T cell development, TCR-induced early phospho-signaling, actin-mediated events, or proliferation in any of the models, the acute knockdown of Dlg1 in Jurkat T cells diminished accumulation of actin at the IS. Further, while Th1-type cytokine production appeared unaffected in T cells derived from mice with a dlg1germline-deficiency, altered production of TCR-dependent Th1 and Th2-type cytokines was observed in T cells derived from mice with a conditional loss of dlg1 expression and T cells with acute Dlg1 suppression, suggesting a differential requirement for Dlg1 activity in signaling events leading to Th1 versus Th2 cytokine induction. The observed inconsistencies between these and other knockout models and siRNA strategies suggest that 1) compensatory upregulation of alternate gene(s) may be masking a role for dlg1 in controlling TCR-mediated events in dlg1 deficient mice and 2) the developmental stage during which dlg1 ablation begins may control the degree to which compensatory events occur. Conclusions/Significance These findings provide a potential explanation for the discrepancies observed in various studies using different dlg1-deficient T cell models and underscore the importance of acute dlg1 ablation to avoid the upregulation of compensatory mechanisms for future functional studies of the Dlg1 protein. PMID:23028902

  18. The effect of PCB126, 77, and 153 on the intracellular mobilization of Ca+2 in bovine granulosa and luteal cells after FSH and LH surge in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczuk, J; Kowalik, M

    2013-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of persistent environmental pollutants that impair cattle reproduction. Among other effects, PCBs can disturb the intracellular mobilization of Ca(+2) in several cell types. Hence, it is possible that they disrupt the transduction of intracellular signals generated from gonadotropin (FSH/LH) receptors. In steroidogenic ovarian cells, a defect in Ca(+2) mobilization may have a detrimental influence on two important processes: the secretion of steroids (E2 or/and P4) and their morphological and functional differentiation. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of PCBs: 126 (dioxin-like) 77 (ambivalent) and 153 (estrogen-like) and a mixture of PCBs (Aroclor 1248) on these processes. Bovine granulosa and luteal cells were incubated for 72 hrs with PCBs (100 ng/ml), followed by Fura 2AM dye, and the fluctuations in intracellular Ca(+2) mobilization after FSH/LH treatment were determined using an inverted microscope coupled with a CCD camera. The intensity and area of fluorescence excited by UV light were detected in the green spectrum of visible light. Aroclor 1248 and PCBs 153 and 77 significantly decreased (P < 0.01-0.001) the effect of FSH on intracellular Ca(+2) mobilization in granulosa cells. In luteal cells, the most effective PCB on this process was PCB 77. The results revealed adverse effects of PCBs on the mobilization of intracellular Ca(+2). Moreover, the estrogen-like congeners were found to more effectively disturb this process than the dioxin-like PCB 126. Hence, it is possible for PCBs to have a negative influence on reproductive processes by affecting calcium mobilization. PMID:24195274

  19. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details on the preparation of HNO3 functionalized CNTs and supplementary analyses (?-Raman, TG, EDS, acid-base titration, FTIR, roughness measurements, SEM and optical images) are shown. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01829c

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns with Encapsulated Metallofullerenes and Exohedrally Functionalized Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfei; Ge, Jiechao; Shultz, M.D.; Chung, Eunna; Singh, Gurpreet; Shu, Chunying; Deck, Paul; Fatouros, Panos; Henderson, Scott; Corwin, Frank; Geohegan, David B; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Rylander, Nichole M; Rylander, Christopher; Gibson, Harry W; Dorn, Harry C

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) are new carbonaceous materials. In this paper, we report the first successful preparation of SWNHs encapsulating trimetallic nitride template endohedral metallofullerenes (TNT-EMFs). The resultant materials were functionalized by a high-speed vibration milling method and conjugated with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The successful encapsulation of TNT-EMFs and external functionalization with QDs provide a dual diagnostic platform for in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications of these new carbonaceous materials.

  1. Functionalized near-infrared quantum dots for in vivo tumor vasculature imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Ding, Hong; Law, Wing-Cheung; Cai, Hongxing; Zhang, Xihe; Vathy, Lisa A.; Bergey, Earl J.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we report the use of near-infrared (NIR)-emitting alloyed quantum dots (QDs) as efficient optical probes for high contrast in vivo imaging of tumors. Alloyed CdTe1 - xSex/CdS QDs were prepared in the non-aqueous phase using the hot colloidal synthesis approach. Water dispersion of the QDs were accomplished by their encapsulation within polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-grafted phospholipid micelles. For tumor-specific delivery in vivo, the micelle-encapsulated QDs were conjugated with the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide, which targets the ?v?3 integrins overexpressed in the angiogenic tumor vasculatures. Using in vivo NIR optical imaging of mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts, implanted both subcutaneously and orthotopically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered cRGD-conjugated QDs, but not the unconjugated ones, can efficiently target and label the tumors with high signal-to-noise ratio. Histopathological analysis of major organs of the treated mice showed no evidence of systemic toxicity associated with these QDs. These experiments suggest that cRGD-conjugated NIR QDs can serve as safe and efficient probes for optical bioimaging of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, by co-encapsulating these QDs and anticancer drugs within these micelles, we have demonstrated a promising theranostic, nanosized platform for both cancer imaging and therapy.

  2. In-Vivo functional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with stimulated Raman scattering fiber-laser source.

    PubMed

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger

    2014-02-01

    In this paper a multi-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system using stimulated Raman scattering is demonstrated for both phantom and in vivo imaging. A 1-ns pulse width ytterbium-doped fiber laser is coupled into a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber. Discrete Raman-shifted wavelength peaks extending to nearly 800 nm are generated with pulse energies sufficient for OR-PAM imaging. Bandpass filters are used to select imaging wavelengths. A dual-mirror galvanometer system was used to scan the focused outputs across samples of carbon fiber networks, 200?m dye-filled tubes, and Swiss Webster mouse ears. Photoacoustic signals were collected in transmission mode and used to create maximum amplitude projection C-scan images. Double dye experiments and in vivo oxygen saturation estimation confirmed functional imaging potential. PMID:24575346

  3. Internalization and degradation of human chorionic gonadotropin in ovine luteal cells: Kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, C.E.; Sawyer, H.R.; Niswender, G.D.

    1981-11-01

    Ovine luteal cells grown in suspensions and/or monolayer culture were used to study the rates of internalization and degradation of (/sup 125/I)hCG. At specified times after a 5- to 7-min exposure to (/sup 125/I)hCG, cells were treated with acidic buffer (pH 3.9) to elute membrane-bound hormone, which left the internalized radioactivity associated with the cell pellet. Radioactivity released into the medium during the incubation periods was subjected to 20% trichloroacetic acid and/or thin layer chromatography to monitor the extent of degradation of the radioactive hormone. Secretion of progesterone into the medium and exclusion of trypan blue were used to monitor the viability of the cells in each experiment. Radioactivity was lost from the plasma membrane with a tsub1/2 of 9.6 h, with approximately 85% of the radioactivity being lost within 24 h. Cell-associated radioactivity increased linearly with time to a plateau at 4 h, remained stable until 12 h, and then decreased between 12-24 h. The plateau between 4-12 h reflected an equilibrium between the (/sup 125/I)hCG which was internalized and degraded and the (/sup 125/I)hCG which was released into the medium. The degraded (/sup 125/I)hCG increased essentially linearly up to 24 h. These data suggest that the majority of (/sup 125/I)hCG bound to receptors in luteal cells is internalized and degraded. Less than 20% of the radioactivity bound initially to cells dissociated into the incubation medium and was trichloroacetic acid precipitable within 24 h. The internalization and degradation of (/sup 125/I)hCG was temperature dependent, with essentially no hCG internalized and/or degraded at 4C.

  4. Disruption of endocrine function in H295R cell in vitro and in zebrafish in vivo by naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cao, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jinhua; Huang, Yi; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-15

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) have been reported to exhibit endocrine disrupting effects on aquatic organisms. Although the responsible compounds are unknown, naphthenic acids (NAs) have been considered to be implicated. The current study was designed to investigate the endocrine disruption of OSPW extracted NAs (OS-NAs) and commercial NAs (C-NAs) using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. The effects of OS-NAs and C-NAs on steroidogenesis were assessed both at hormone levels and expression levels of hormone-related genes in the H295R cells. The transcriptions of biomarker genes involved in endocrine systems in zebrafish larvae were investigated to detect the effects of OS-NAs and C-NAs on endocrine function in vivo. Exposure to OS-NAs and C-NAs significantly increased production of 17?-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), and decreased production of testosterone (T). Both OS-NAs and C-NAs significantly induced the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis. The abundances of transcripts of biomarker gene CYP19b, ER?, and VTG were significantly up-regulated in zebrafish larvae exposed to OS-NAs and C-NAs, which indicated that NAs had negative effects on estrogen-responsive gene transcription in vivo. These results indicated that NAs should be partly responsible for the endocrine disrupting effects of OSPW. PMID:26073515

  5. Fluorescein and radiolabeled Function-Spacer-Lipid constructs allow for simple in vitro and in vivo bioimaging of enveloped virions.

    PubMed

    Hadac, Elizabeth M; Federspiel, Mark J; Chernyy, Evgeny; Tuzikov, Alexander; Korchagina, Elena; Bovin, Nicolai V; Russell, Stephen; Henry, Stephen M

    2011-09-01

    Tools that can aid in vitro and in vivo imaging and also noninvasively determine half-life and biodistribution are required to advance clinical developments. A Function-Spacer-Lipid construct (FSL) incorporating fluorescein (FSL-FLRO4) was used to label vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), measles virus MV-NIS (MV) and influenza virus (H1N1). The ability of FSL constructs to label these virions was established directly by FACScan of FSL-FLRO4 labeled VSV and MV, and indirectly following labeled H1N1 and MV binding to a cells. FSL-FLRO4 labeling of H1N1 was shown to maintain higher infectivity of the virus when compared with direct fluorescein virus labeling. A novel tyrosine (125)I radioiodinated FSL construct was synthesized (FSL-(125)I) from FSL-tyrosine. This was used to label VSV (VSV-FSL-(125)I), which was infused into the peritoneal cavity of laboratory mice. Bioscanning showed VSV-FSL-(125)I to localize in the liver, spleen and bloodstream in contrast to the free labels FSL-(125)I or (125)I, which localized predominantly in the liver and thyroid respectively. This is a proof-of-principle novel and rapid method for modifying virions and demonstrates the potential of FSL constructs to improve in vivo imaging of virions and noninvasively observe in vivo biodistribution. PMID:21703308

  6. 20-HETE Regulates the Angiogenic Functions of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Contributes to Angiogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H.; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G.; Falck, John R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Scicli, A. Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F–20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F–20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ?1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A–20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  7. Enhanced functional integration of human photoreceptor precursors into human and rodent retina in an ex vivo retinal explant model system.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Anat; Laver, Christopher R J; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Liu, Ran R; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Retinal disease is the major cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a promising and widely applicable approach for the treatment of these blinding conditions. Previously, it has been shown that after transplantation into the degenerating retina, the percentage of PPCs that undergo functional integration is low. The factors that inhibit PPC engraftment remain largely unknown, in part, because so many adverse factors could be at play during in vivo experiments. To advance our knowledge in overcoming potential adverse effects and optimize PPC transplantation, we have developed a novel ex vivo system. Harvested neural retina was placed directly on top of cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from a number of different sources. To mimic PPC transplantation into the subretinal space, hESC-derived PPCs were inserted between the retinal explant and underlying RPE. Explants cocultured with hESC-derived RPE maintained normal gross morphology and viability for up to 2 weeks, whereas the explants cultured on ARPE19 and RPE-J failed by 7 days. Furthermore, the proportion of PPCs expressing ribbon synapse-specific proteins BASSOON and RIBEYE was significantly higher when cocultured with hESC-derived RPE (20% and 10%, respectively), than when cocultured with ARPE19 (only 6% and 2%, respectively). In the presence of the synaptogenic factor thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), the proportion of BASSOON-positive and RIBEYE-positive PPCs cocultured with hESC-derived RPE increased to ?30% and 15%, respectively. These data demonstrate the utility of an ex vivo model system to define factors, such as TSP-1, which could influence integration efficiency in future in vivo experiments in models of retinal degeneration. PMID:25693608

  8. Arginyltransferase is an ATP-Independent Self-Regulating Enzyme that Forms Distinct Functional Complexes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Han, Xuemei; Saha, Sougata; Xu, Tao; Rai, Reena; Zhang, Fangliang; Wolf, Yuri. I.; Wolfson, Alexey; Yates, John R.; Kashina, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Summary Posttranslational arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) plays an important role in cardiovascular development, cell motility and regulation of cytoskeleton and metabolic enzymes. This protein modification was discovered decades ago, however, the arginylation reaction and the functioning of ATE1 remained poorly understood due to the lack of good biochemical models. Here we report the development of an in vitro arginylation system, in which ATE1 function and molecular requirements can be tested using purified recombinant ATE1 isoforms supplemented with a controlled number of components. Our results show that arginylation reaction is a self-sufficient, ATP-independent process that can affect different sites in a polypeptide, and that arginyltransferases form different molecular complexes in vivo, associate with components of the translation machinery, and have distinct, partially overlapping subsets of substrates, suggesting that these enzymes play different physiological functions. PMID:21276945

  9. Surface-Functionalized Nanoparticles by Olefin Metathesis: A Chemoselective Approach for In Vivo Characterization of Atherosclerosis Plaque.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Beatriz; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Benito, Marina; Herranz, Fernando

    2015-07-13

    The use of click chemistry reactions for the functionalization of nanoparticles is particularly useful to modify the surface in a well-defined manner and to enhance the targeting properties, thus facilitating clinical translation. Here it is demonstrated that olefin metathesis can be used for the chemoselective functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with three different examples. This approach enables, in one step, the synthesis and functionalization of different water-stable magnetite-based particles from oleic acid-coated counterparts. The surface of the nanoparticles was completely characterized showing how the metathesis approach introduces a large number of hydrophilic molecules on their coating layer. As an example of the possible applications of these new nanocomposites, a focus was taken on atherosclerosis plaques. It is also demonstrated how the in vitro properties of one of the probes, particularly its Ca(2+) -binding properties, mediate their final in vivo use; that is, the selective accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. This opens promising new applications to detect possible microcalcifications associated with plaque vulnerability. The accumulation of the new imaging tracers is demonstrated by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of carotids and aorta in the ApoE(-/-) mouse model and the results were confirmed by histology. PMID:26096657

  10. Assembly requirements of PU.1-Pip (IRF-4) activator complexes: inhibiting function in vivo using fused dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, A L; Zhu, A Q; Singh, H

    1999-01-01

    Gene expression in higher eukaryotes appears to be regulated by specific combinations of transcription factors binding to regulatory sequences. The Ets factor PU.1 and the IRF protein Pip (IRF-4) represent a pair of interacting transcription factors implicated in regulating B cell-specific gene expression. Pip is recruited to its binding site on DNA by phosphorylated PU.1. PU.1-Pip interaction is shown to be template directed and involves two distinct protein-protein interaction surfaces: (i) the ets and IRF DNA-binding domains; and (ii) the phosphorylated PEST region of PU.1 and a lysine-requiring putative alpha-helix in Pip. Thus, a coordinated set of protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts are essential for PU.1-Pip ternary complex assembly. To analyze the function of these factors in vivo, we engineered chimeric repressors containing the ets and IRF DNA-binding domains connected by a flexible POU domain linker. When stably expressed, the wild-type fused dimer strongly repressed the expression of a rearranged immunoglobulin lambda gene, thereby establishing the functional importance of PU.1-Pip complexes in B cell gene expression. Comparative analysis of the wild-type dimer with a series of mutant dimers distinguished a gene regulated by PU.1 and Pip from one regulated by PU.1 alone. This strategy should prove generally useful in analyzing the function of interacting transcription factors in vivo, and for identifying novel genes regulated by such complexes. PMID:10022840

  11. In vivo assessment of cardiac metabolism and function in the abdominal aortic banding model of compensated cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Anne-Marie L.; Giles, Lucia; Ball, Vicky; Miller, Jack J.; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to chronic mechanical overload and can lead to functional deterioration and heart failure. Changes in cardiac energy metabolism are considered as key to the hypertrophic remodelling process. The concurrence of obesity and hypertrophy has been associated with contractile dysfunction, and this work therefore aimed to investigate the in vivo structural, functional, and metabolic remodelling that occurs in the hypertrophied heart in the setting of a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western diet (WD). Methods and results Following induction of cardiac hypertrophy through abdominal aortic banding, male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to either a standard diet or a WD (containing 45% fat and 16% sucrose) for up to 14 weeks. Cardiac structural and functional characteristics were determined by CINE MRI, and in vivo metabolism was investigated using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled pyruvate. Cardiac hypertrophy was observed at all time points, irrespective of dietary manipulation, with no evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Pyruvate dehydrogenase flux was unchanged in the hypertrophied animals at any time point, but increased incorporation of the 13C label into lactate was observed by 9 weeks and maintained at 14 weeks, indicative of enhanced glycolysis. Conclusion Hypertrophied hearts revealed little evidence of a switch towards increased glucose oxidation but rather an uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism from glucose oxidation. This was maintained under conditions of dietary stress provided by a WD but, at this compensated phase of hypertrophy, did not result in any contractile dysfunction. PMID:25750189

  12. Functional expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein is controlled by receptor-associated protein in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Willnow, T E; Armstrong, S A; Hammer, R E; Herz, J

    1995-01-01

    The 39-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) associates with the multifunctional low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (LRP) and thereby prevents the binding of all known ligands, including alpha 2-macroglobulin and chylomicron remnants. RAP is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, raising the possibility that it functions as a chaperone or escort protein in the biosynthesis or intracellular transport of LRP. Here we have used gene targeting to show that RAP promotes the expression of functional LRP in vivo. The amount of mature, processed LRP is reduced in liver and brain of RAP-deficient mice. As a result, hepatic clearance of alpha 2-macroglobulin is impaired and remnant lipoproteins accumulate in the plasma of RAP-deficient mice that also lack functional LDL receptors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that RAP stabilizes LRP within the secretory pathway. They also suggest a further mechanism by which the activity of an endocytic receptor may be modulated in vivo. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7538675

  13. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    E-print Network

    Yaung, Stephanie J.

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics ...

  14. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on progesterone secretion and viability of cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Vazhoor, B; Yadav, V P; Gupta, M; Pathak, M C; Panda, R P; Khan, F A; Verma, M R; Maurya, V P; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the temporal (24, 48 and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, IGF-1, and EGF, respectively) production and secretion of progesterone (P4) in cultured luteal cells from different stages of estrous cycle as well as the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STARD1), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), anti-apoptotic gene PCNA, and pro-apoptotic gene BAX in luteal cells of mid-luteal phase in buffalo. Samples from early luteal phase (ELP; Day 1 to 4; n = 4), mid-luteal phase (MLP; Day 5 to 10; n = 4), and late luteal phase (LLP; Day 11 to 16; n = 4) of estrous cycle were collected. Progesterone was assayed by RIA, whereas mRNA expression was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results depicted that highest dose (100 ng/mL) of LH, IGF-1, and EGF and longer duration of time brought about a (P < 0.05) rise in P4 level and expression of steroidogenic enzymes and PCNA compared with the lower level(s) and control while, all treatments (P < 0.05) inhibited BAX expression in a time dependent-manner. Analysis of interaction between stage and treatments revealed that LH treatment (P < 0.05) increased P4 production compared with IGF-1 and EGF in ELP and MLP. However in LLP, treatment with IGF-1 and EGF significantly (P < 0.05) increased P4 production compared with LH treatment. Summarizing, our study explores the steroidogenic potential of LH and growth factors across different luteal stages in buffalo, which on promoting steroidogenic enzyme expression and cell viability culminated in enhanced P4 production in luteal cells. PMID:25263485

  15. In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways: Assembling old parts to build novel and functional structures

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Alejandro; Sebai, Sarra C; Sauveplane, Vincent; Ramaen, Odile; Pandjaitan, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    In our recent article “In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways by homeologous recombination in mitotic cells” we proposed a useful alternative to directed evolution methods that permits the generation of yeast cell libraries containing recombinant metabolic pathways from counterpart genes. The methodology was applied to generate single mosaic genes and intragenic mosaic pathways. We used flavonoid metabolism genes as a working model to assembly and express evolved pathways in DNA repair deficient cells. The present commentary revises the principles of gene and pathway mosaicism and explores the scope and perspectives of our results as an additional tool for synthetic biology. PMID:25482082

  16. Different processing of LH/hCG receptors in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellokumpu, S.

    1987-02-01

    The metabolic fate of LH/hCG receptors after exposure to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was examined in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1). Kinetic studies performed after pulse-labelling of the cells with (/sup 125/I)hCG indicated that the bound hormone was lost much more rapidly from the tumor cells than from the luteal cells. The tumor cells were also found to internalize and degrade the hormone more effectively than the luteal cells. Chemical cross-linking and analyses by SDS-PAGE of this material revealed that both cell types also released, in addition to intact hCG, two previously characterized receptor fragment-(/sup 125/I)hCG complexes (M/sub r/ 96,000 and 74,000) into the medium, although their amount was negligible in MLTC-1 cells. Possibly due to rapid discharge of the ligand from its receptor, no similar complexes could be detected inside the MLTC-1 cells, suggesting that they were released directly from the cell surface. However, the M/sub r/ 74,000 complex was observed inside MLTC-1 cells if chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent, was present during the incubations. This suggests that the internalized receptor also becomes degraded, at least when complexed to hCG. The results thus provide evidence that there exist two different mechanisms for proteolytic processing of LH/hCG receptors in these target cells. In tumor cells, the degradation seems to occur almost exclusively intracellularly, whereas in luteal cells a substantial portion of the receptors is also degraded at the cell surface.

  17. Cellular and functional characterization of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) corpus luteum during the estrous cycle and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baithalu, Rubina Kumari; Singh, S K; Gupta, Chhavi; Raja, Anuj K; Saxena, Abhishake; Kumar, Yogendra; Singh, R; Agarwal, S K

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, cellular composition of buffalo corpus luteum (CL) with its functional characterization based on 3?-HSD and progesterone secretory ability at different stages of estrous cycle and pregnancy was studied. Buffalo uteri along with ovaries bearing CL were collected from the local slaughter house. These were classified into different stages of estrous cycle (Stage I, II, III and IV) and pregnancy (Stage I, II and III) based on morphological appearance of CL, surface follicles on the ovary and crown rump length of conceptus. Luteal cell population, progesterone content and steroidogenic properties were studied by dispersion of luteal cells using collagenase type I enzyme, RIA and 3?-HSD activity, respectively. Large luteal cells (LLC) appeared as polyhedral or spherical in shape with a centrally placed large round nucleus and an abundance of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. However, small luteal cells (SLC) appeared to be spindle shaped with an eccentrically placed irregular nucleus and there was paucity of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The size of SLC (range 12-23?m) and LLC (range 25-55?m) increased (P<0.01) with the advancement of stage of estrous cycle and pregnancy. The mean progesterone concentration per gram and per CL increased (P<0.01) from Stage I to III of estrous cycle with maximum concentration at Stage III of estrous cycle and pregnancy. The progesterone concentration decreased at Stage IV (day 17-20) of estrous cycle coinciding with CL regression. Total luteal cell number (LLC and SLC) also increased (P<0.01) from Stage I to III of estrous cycle and decreased (P<0.05), thereafter, at Stage IV indicating degeneration of luteal cells and regression of the CL. Total luteal cell population during pregnancy also increased (P<0.01) from Stage I to II and thereafter decreased (P>0.05) indicating cessation of mitosis. Increased (P<0.05) large luteal cell numbers from Stage I to III of estrous cycle and pregnancy coincided with the increased progesterone secretion and 3?-HSD activity of CL. Thus, proportionate increases of large compared with small luteal cells were primarily responsible for increased progesterone secretion during the advanced stages of the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Total luteal cells and progesterone content per CL during the mid-luteal stage in buffalo as observed in the present study seem to be less than with cattle suggesting inherent luteal deficiency. PMID:23896394

  18. Impact of nonnatural amino acid mutagenesis on the in vivo function and binding modes of a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Majmudar, Chinmay Y; Lee, Lori W; Lancia, Jody K; Nwokoye, Adaora; Wang, Qian; Wands, Amberlyn M; Wang, Lei; Mapp, Anna K

    2009-10-14

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in cellular function, and methods to discover and characterize them in their native context are of paramount importance for gaining a deeper understanding of biological networks. In this study, an enhanced nonsense suppression system was utilized to incorporate the nonnatural amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (pBpa) throughout the transcriptional activation domain of the prototypical eukaryotic transcriptional activator Gal4 in vivo (S. cerevisiae). Functional studies of the pBpa-containing Gal4 mutants suggest that this essential binding interface of Gal4 is minimally impacted by these substitutions, with both transcriptional activity and sensitivity to growth conditions maintained. Further supporting this are in vivo cross-linking studies, including the detection of a key binding partner of Gal4, the inhibitor protein Gal80. Cross-linking with a range of pBpa-containing mutants revealed a Gal4 x Gal80 binding interface that extends beyond that previously predicted by conventional strategies. Thus, this approach can be broadened to the discovery of novel binding partners of transcription factors, information that will be critical for the development of therapeutically useful small molecule modulators of these protein-protein interactions. PMID:19764747

  19. The Intramembrane Proteases Signal Peptide Peptidase-Like 2a and 2b Have Distinct Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Mentrup, Torben; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Rothaug, Michelle; Engelke, Michael; Dittmann, Kai; Dressel, Ralf; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Wienands, Jürgen; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We reported recently that the presenilin homologue signal peptide peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) is essential for B cell development by cleaving the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of the invariant chain (li, CD74). Based on this, we suggested that pharmacological modulation of SPPL2a may represent a novel approach to deplete B cells in autoimmune disorders. With regard to reported overlapping substrate spectra of SPPL2a and its close homologue, SPPL2b, we investigated the role of SPPL2b in CD74 NTF proteolysis and its impact on B and dendritic cell homeostasis. In heterologous expression experiments, SPPL2b was found to cleave CD74 NTF with an efficiency simliar to that of SPPL2a. For in vivo analysis, SPPL2b single-deficient and SPPL2a/SPPL2b double-deficient mice were generated and examined for CD74 NTF turnover/accumulation, B cell maturation and functionality, and dendritic cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that in vivo SPPL2b does not exhibit a physiologically relevant contribution to CD74 proteolysis in B and dendritic cells. Furthermore, we reveal that both proteases exhibit divergent subcellular localizations in B cells and different expression profiles in murine tissues. These findings suggest distinct functions of SPPL2a and SPPL2b and, based on a high abundance of SPPL2b in brain, a physiological role of this protease in the central nervous system. PMID:24492962

  20. Single cell electroporation for longitudinal imaging of synaptic structure and function in the adult mouse neocortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pagčs, Stéphane; Cane, Michele; Randall, Jérôme; Capello, Luca; Holtmaat, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies of neuronal structures in vivo have revealed rich dynamics in dendritic spines and axonal boutons. Spines and boutons are considered to be proxies for synapses. This implies that synapses display similar dynamics. However, spines and boutons do not always bear synapses, some may contain more than one, and dendritic shaft synapses have no clear structural proxies. In addition, synaptic strength is not always accurately revealed by just the size of these structures. Structural and functional dynamics of synapses could be studied more reliably using fluorescent synaptic proteins as markers for size and function. These proteins are often large and possibly interfere with circuit development, which renders them less suitable for conventional transfection or transgenesis methods such as viral vectors, in utero electroporation, and germline transgenesis. Single cell electroporation (SCE) has been shown to be a potential alternative for transfection of recombinant fluorescent proteins in adult cortical neurons. Here we provide proof of principle for the use of SCE to express and subsequently image fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins over days to weeks in vivo. PMID:25904849

  1. Biocompatible near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles for macro and microscopic in vivo functional bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liliang; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Kanghui; Xi, Wang; Zhao, Xinyuan; Qian, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging technology has been widely used for biomedical research and applications, since it can achieve deep penetration in biological tissues due to less absorption and scattering of NIR light. In our research, polymer nanoparticles with NIR fluorophores doped were synthesized. The morphology, absorption/emission features and chemical stability of the fluorescent nanoparticles were characterized, separately. NIR fluorescent nanoparticles were then utilized as bright optical probes for macro in vivo imaging of mice, including sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping, as well as distribution and excretion monitoring of nanoparticles in animal body. Furthermore, we applied the NIR fluorescent nanoparticles in in vivo microscopic bioimaging via a confocal microscope. Under the 635 nm-CW excitation, the blood vessel architecture in the ear and the brain of mice, which were administered with nanoparticles, was visualized very clearly. The imaging depth of our one-photon microscopy, which was assisted with NIR fluorescent nanoprobes, can reach as deep as 500 ?m. Our experiments show that NIR fluorescent nanoparticles have great potentials in various deep-tissue imaging applications. PMID:25426331

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Tumor Targeted Photothermal Cancer Therapy Using Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung Eun; Sharker, Shazid Md; Jeong, Ji Hoon; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2015-11-01

    Despite the tremendous progress that photothermal therapy (PTT) has recently achieved, it still has a long way to go to gain the effective targeted photothermal ablation of tumor cells. Driven by this need, we describe a new class of targeted photothermal therapeutic agents for cancer cells with pH responsive bioimaging using near-infrared dye (NIR) IR825, conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-g-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEG-g-PDMA, PgP), and hyaluronic acid (HA) anchored reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid nanoparticles. The obtained rGO nanoparticles (PgP/HA-rGO) showed pH-dependent fluorescence emission and excellent near-infrared (NIR) irradiation of cancer cells targeted in vitro to provide cytotoxicity. Using intravenously administered PTT agents, the time-dependent in vivo tumor target accumulation was exactly defined, presenting eminent photothermal conversion at 4 and 8 h post-injection, which was demonstrated from the ex vivo biodistribution of tumors. These tumor environment responsive hybrid nanoparticles generated photothermal heat, which caused dominant suppression of tumor growth. The histopathological studies obtained by H&E staining demonstrated complete healing from malignant tumor. In an area of limited successes in cancer therapy, our translation will pave the road to design stimulus environment responsive targeted PTT agents for the safe eradication of devastating cancer. PMID:26451914

  3. Chromatin-modifying agents promote the ex vivo production of functional human erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Pratima; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Hoffman, Ronald

    2011-04-28

    Presently, blood transfusion products (TPs) are composed of terminally differentiated cells with a finite life span. We have developed an ex vivo-generated TP composed of erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) and precursors cells. Several histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) were used in vitro to promote the preferential differentiation of cord blood (CB) CD34(+) cells to EPCs. A combination of cytokines and valproic acid (VPA): (1) promoted the greatest degree of EPC expansion, (2) led to the generation of EPCs which were capable of differentiating into the various stages of erythroid development, (3) led to epigenetic modifications (increased H3 acetylation) of promoters for erythroid-specific genes, which resulted in the acquisition of a gene expression pattern characteristic of primitive erythroid cells, and (4) promoted the generation of a TP that when infused into NOD/SCID mice produced mature RBCs containing both human adult and fetal globins as well Rh blood group Ag which persisted for 3 weeks and the retention of human EPCs and erythroid precursor cells within the BM of recipient mice. This ex vivo-generated EPC-TP likely represents a paradigm shift in transfusion medicine because of its potential to continue to generate additional RBCs after its infusion. PMID:21355088

  4. Sweet taste threshold for sucrose inversely correlates with depression symptoms in female college students in the luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masanori; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Endo, Junko; Sakamoto, Reiko; Wada, Maki

    2015-03-15

    Influences of depression symptoms on the sweet taste threshold were investigated in healthy college students (30 males and 40 females). Depression symptoms were scored by SDS (Self-Rating Depression Scale), and anxiety levels by STAI (State- and Trait-Anxiety Inventory). Recognition thresholds for sucrose were determined. In female students, the menstrual phase on the day of the experiment was self-reported. Depression symptoms, anxiety levels, and the recognition threshold for sucrose were not different among the 3 groups, i.e. males, females in the follicular phase, and females in the luteal phase. Depression symptoms were positively correlated with state and trait anxiety in all groups. The sweet taste threshold was inversely correlated with depression symptoms (r=-0.472, p=0.031) and trait anxiety (r=-0.506, p=0.019) in females in the luteal phase. In males as well as females in the follicular phase, however, no correlation between sweet taste threshold and depression was found. The results show that the recognition threshold for sucrose reduces with increased depression in females with a higher anxiety trait, but only in the luteal phase. It is hypothesized that brain regions, which spatially overlap and are responsible for both aversive emotions and gustatory processing, are susceptible to periodic changes in gonadal hormones due to the menstrual cycle. PMID:25576640

  5. In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function: Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Jeffrey J.; Char, Jessica E.; Chen, Jonathan; Cho, Hyung-ju; Dunn, Colleen; Frisbee, Eric; Joo, Nam Soo; Milla, Carlos; Modlin, Sara E.; Park, Il-Ho; Thomas, Ewart A. C.; Tran, Kim V.; Verma, Rohan; Wolfe, Marlene H.

    2013-01-01

    To assess CFTR function in vivo, we developed a bioassay that monitors and compares CFTR-dependent and CFTR-independent sweat secretion in parallel for multiple (?50) individual, identified glands in each subject. Sweating was stimulated by intradermally injected agonists and quantified by optically measuring spherical sweat bubbles in an oil-layer that contained dispersed, water soluble dye particles that partitioned into the sweat bubbles, making them highly visible. CFTR-independent secretion (M-sweat) was stimulated with methacholine, which binds to muscarinic receptors and elevates cytosolic calcium. CFTR-dependent secretion (C-sweat) was stimulated with a ?-adrenergic cocktail that elevates cytosolic cAMP while blocking muscarinic receptors. A C-sweat/M-sweat ratio was determined on a gland-by-gland basis to compensate for differences unrelated to CFTR function, such as gland size. The average ratio provides an approximately linear readout of CFTR function: the heterozygote ratio is ?0.5 the control ratio and for CF subjects the ratio is zero. During assay development, we measured C/M ratios in 6 healthy controls, 4 CF heterozygotes, 18 CF subjects and 4 subjects with ‘CFTR-related’ conditions. The assay discriminated all groups clearly. It also revealed consistent differences in the C/M ratio among subjects within groups. We hypothesize that these differences reflect, at least in part, levels of CFTR expression, which are known to vary widely. When C-sweat rates become very low the C/M ratio also tended to decrease; we hypothesize that this nonlinearity reflects ductal fluid absorption. We also discovered that M-sweating potentiates the subsequent C-sweat response. We then used potentiation as a surrogate for drugs that can increase CFTR-dependent secretion. This bioassay provides an additional method for assessing CFTR function in vivo, and is well suited for within-subject tests of systemic, CFTR-directed therapeutics. PMID:24204751

  6. Cyclosporine augments renal mitochondrial function in vivo and reduces renal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Lemmi, C A; Pelikan, P C; Sikka, S C; Hirschberg, R; Geesaman, B; Miller, R L; Park, K S; Liu, S C; Koyle, M; Rajfer, J

    1989-11-01

    The in vivo action of cyclosporine A (CS) on rat renal cortical mitochondria was investigated. CS (30 mg.kg-1.day-1) given orally to rats for 30 days caused an augmentation of renal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The ADP-stimulated respiratory rate was increased by 37.0% with glutamate plus malate as respiratory substrates (P less than 0.025) but not with succinate-supported respiration, indicating enhancement of mitochondrial complex I activity. This reaction may be a response to the 32.5% reduction of renal blood (P less than 0.005) in the CS-treated group, possibly serving to maximize ATP synthesis during ischemia. Ligation-induced decreases in renal blood flow also resulted in enhancement of mitochondrial complex I activity. PMID:2589485

  7. Increased osteoblast function in vitro and in vivo through surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongyuan; Hu, Beibei; Tang, Chu; Wu, Yunpeng; Sun, Pengfei; Zhang, Xianlong; Jia, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography has significant influence on good and fast osseointegration of biomedical implants. In this work, ultrasonic shot peening was conducted to modify titanium to produce nanograined (NG) surface. Its ability to induce new bone formation was evaluated using an in vivo animal model. We demonstrated that the NG surface enhanced osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization in in vitro experiments compared to coarse-grained titanium surface. Push-out test, histological observations, fluorescent labeling, and histomorphometrical analysis consistently indicated that the NG surfaces developed have the higher osseointegration than coarse-grained surfaces. Those results suggest that ultrasonic shot peening has the potential for future use as a surface modification method in biomedical application. PMID:26229463

  8. The C2 domain of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 2 is not required for catalysis but is essential for in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Wu, Wen-I; Voelker, Dennis R

    2002-09-13

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 2 (Psd2p) is currently being used to study lipid trafficking processes in intact and permeabilized yeast cells. The Psd2p contains a C2 homology domain and a putative Golgi retention/localization (GR) domain. C2 domains play important functions in membrane binding and docking reactions involving phospholipids and proteins. We constructed a C2 domain deletion variant (C2Delta) and a GR deletion variant (GRDelta) of Psd2p and examined their effects on in vivo function and catalysis. Immunoblotting confirmed that the predicted immature and mature forms of Psd2(C2Delta)p, Psd2(GRDelta)p, and wild type Psd2p were produced in vivo and that the proteins localized normally. Enzymology revealed that the Psd2(C2Delta)p and Psd2(GRDelta)p were catalytically active and could readily be expressed at levels 10-fold higher than endogenous Psd2p. Both Psd2p and Psd2(GRDelta)p expression complemented the growth defect of psd1Deltapsd2Delta strains and resulted in normal aminoglycerophospholipid metabolism. In contrast, the Psd2(C2Delta)p failed to complement psd1Deltapsd2Delta strains, and [(3)H]serine labeling revealed a severe defect in the formation of PtdEtn in both intact and permeabilized cells, indicative of disruption of lipid trafficking. These findings identify an essential, non-catalytic function of the C2 domain of Psd2p and raise the possibility that it plays a direct role in membrane docking and/or PtdSer transport to the enzyme. PMID:12093819

  9. In vivo relationship between pelvis motion and deep fascia displacement of the medial gastrocnemius: anatomical and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos; González Blanche, Alberto; López Sánchez, David; Cerda, Mauricio; Sanzana-Cuche, Rodolfo; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Different authors have modelled myofascial tissue connectivity over a distance using cadaveric models, but in vivo models are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pelvic motion and deep fascia displacement in the medial gastrocnemius (MG). Deep fascia displacement of the MG was evaluated through automatic tracking with an ultrasound. Angular variation of the pelvis was determined by 2D kinematic analysis. The average maximum fascia displacement and pelvic motion were 1.501?±?0.78?mm and 6.55?±?2.47?°, respectively. The result of a simple linear regression between fascia displacement and pelvic motion for three task executions by 17 individuals was r?=?0.791 (P?vivo model, reinforce the functional concept of force transmission through synergistic muscle groups, and grant new perspectives for the role of fasciae in restricting movement in remote zones. PMID:26467242

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Ferrocyanide Functionalized Nanopourous Silica Decorporation Agent for Cesium (Cs) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert; Addleman, R Shane; Fryxell, Glen E; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-01-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO2). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation, and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium (137Cs); therefore based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Animals in group I were administered 137Cs chloride (~40 ?g/kg) by intravenous (iv) injection or oral gavage; Group II animals were administered pre-bound 137Cs- SAMMS or sequential 137Cs chloride + SAMMS (~61 ng/kg) by oral gavage; and Group III was orally administered 137Cs chloride (~61 ng/kg) followed by either 0.1 g of SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing, the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 hour and blood, urine and fecal samples were collected for 137Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered 137Cs chloride was rapidly and well absorbed (~100% relative to iv dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces & tissues) were very comparable to the iv dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound 137Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with ~1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the 137Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS & Prussian blue both effectively captured available 137Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80–88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS outperforms Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low 137Cs chloride dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize SAMMS in vivo performance over a broader range of doses and conditions. PMID:20699707

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Ferrocyanide Functionalized Nanopourous Silica Decorporation Agent for Cesium in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO2). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation, and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium (137Cs); based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Group I was administered 137Cs (~40 ?geq/kg) by intravenous (iv) injection and oral gavage; Group II was administered pre-bound 137Cs-SAMMS and sequential 137Cs + SAMMS (~61 ngeq/kg) by oral gavage; and Group III evaluated orally administered 137Cs (~0.06 ?geq/kg) followed by 0.1 g of either SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 hour and blood, urine and fecal samples were collected for 137Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered 137Cs was rapidly and well absorbed (~100% relative to iv dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces & tissues) were very comparable to the iv dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound 137Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with ~1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the 137Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS & Prussian blue both effectively captured available 137Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS out performs Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low 137Cs dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize SAMMS in vivo performance over a broader range of doses and conditions.

  12. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption ?a and reduced scattering coefficient ?s' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of ?a and ?s' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that ?a ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and ?s' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Mind Reading and In Vivo Rehearsal for High-Functioning Children with ASD.

    PubMed

    Thomeer, Marcus L; Smith, Rachael A; Lopata, Christopher; Volker, Martin A; Lipinski, Alanna M; Rodgers, Jonathan D; McDonald, Christin A; Lee, Gloria K

    2015-07-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a computer software (i.e., Mind Reading) and in vivo rehearsal treatment on the emotion decoding and encoding skills, autism symptoms, and social skills of 43 children, ages 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). Children in treatment (n = 22) received the manualized protocol over 12 weeks. Primary analyses indicated significantly better posttest performance for the treatment group (compared to controls) on 3 of the 4 measures of emotion decoding and encoding and these were maintained at 5-week follow-up. Analyses of secondary measures favored the treatment group for 1 of the 2 measures; specifically, ASD symptoms were significantly lower at posttest and follow-up. PMID:25643864

  14. DNAM-1-based chimeric antigen receptors enhance T cell effector function and exhibit in vivo efficacy against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; Alcon, Andre; Sentman, Charles L

    2015-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies hold great potential for treating cancers, and new CARs that can target multiple tumor types and have the potential to target non-hematological malignancies are needed. In this study, the tumor recognition ability of a natural killer cell-activating receptor, DNAM-1 was harnessed to design CARs that target multiple tumor types. DNAM-1 ligands, PVR and nectin-2, are expressed on primary human leukemia, myeloma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. DNAM-1 CARs exhibit high tumor cell cytotoxicity but low IFN-? secretion in vitro. In contrast to other CAR designs, co-stimulatory domains did not improve the expression and function of DNAM-1 CARs. A DNAM-1/CD3zeta CAR reduced tumor burden in a murine melanoma model in vivo. In conclusion, DNAM-1-based CARs may have the potential to treat PVR and nectin-2 expressing hematological and solid tumors. PMID:25549845

  15. Synthesis, in vitro, and in vivo evaluation of novel functionalized quaternary ammonium curcuminoids as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Solano, Lucas N; Nelson, Grady L; Ronayne, Conor T; Lueth, Erica A; Foxley, Melissa A; Jonnalagadda, Sravan K; Gurrapu, Shirisha; Mereddy, Venkatram R

    2015-12-15

    Novel functionalized quaternary ammonium curcuminoids have been synthesized from piperazinyl curcuminoids and Baylis-Hillman reaction derived allyl bromides. These molecules are found to be highly water soluble with increased cytotoxicity compared to native curcumin against three cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2, MDA-MB-231, and 4T1. Preliminary in vivo toxicity evaluation of a representative curcuminoid 5a in healthy mice indicates that this molecule is well tolerated based on normal body weight gains compared to control group. Furthermore, the efficacy of 5a has been tested in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model of MIAPaCa-2 and has been found to exhibit good tumor growth inhibition as a single agent and also in combination with clinical pancreatic cancer drug gemcitabine. PMID:26561365

  16. Rapid experience-dependent plasticity of synapse function and structure in ferret visual cortex in vivo

    E-print Network

    Yu, Hongbo

    The rules by which visual experience influences neuronal responses and structure in the developing brain are not well understood. To elucidate the relationship between rapid functional changes and dendritic spine remodeling ...

  17. Polymer Fiber Probes Enable Optical Control of Spinal Cord and Muscle Function In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Lu, Chi

    Restoration of motor and sensory functions in paralyzed patients requires the development of tools for simultaneous recording and stimulation of neural activity in the spinal cord. In addition to its complex neurophysiology, ...

  18. Endogenous cannabinoid system regulates intestinal barrier function in vivo through cannabinoid type 1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zoppi, Silvia; Madrigal, José L M; Pérez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Caso, Javier R; Alou, Luis; García-Bueno, Borja; Colón, Arturo; Manzanares, Jorge; Gómez-Lus, M Luisa; Menchén, Luis; Leza, Juan C

    2012-03-01

    The deleterious effects of stress on the gastrointestinal tract seem to be mainly mediated by the induction of intestinal barrier dysfunction and subsequent subtle mucosal inflammation. Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) is expressed in the mammalian gut under physiological circumstances. The aim of this investigation is to study the possible role of CB1R in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis after stress exposure. CB1R knockout mice (CB1R(-/-)) and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were exposed to immobilization and acoustic (IA) stress for 2 h per day during 4 consecutive days. Colonic protein expression of the inducible forms of the nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase (NOS2 and COX2), IgA production, permeability to (51)Cr-EDTA, and bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes were evaluated. Stress exposure induced greater expression of proinflammatory enzymes NOS2 and COX2 in colonic mucosa of CB1R(-/-) mice when compared with WT animals. These changes were related with a greater degree of colonic barrier dysfunction in CB1R(-/-) animals determined by 1) a significantly lower IgA secretion, 2) higher paracellular permeability to (51)Cr-EDTA, and 3) higher bacterial translocation, both under basal conditions and after IA stress exposure. Pharmacological antagonism with rimonabant reproduced stress-induced increase of proinflammatory enzymes in the colon described in CB1R(-/-) mice. In conclusion, CB1R exerts a protective role in the colon in vivo through the regulation of intestinal secretion of IgA and paracellular permeability. Pharmacological modulation of cannabinoid system within the gastrointestinal tract might be therapeutically useful in conditions on which intestinal inflammation and barrier dysfunction takes place after exposure to stress. PMID:22135307

  19. In vivo stem cell function of interleukin-3-induced blast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, J.; Okada, S.; Suda, J.; Nagayoshi, K.; Nakauchi, H.; Hatake, K.; Miura, Y.; Suda, T. )

    1991-07-15

    The treatment of mice with high doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) results in an enrichment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors. Using this procedure, the authors obtained a new class of murine hematopoietic colonies that had very high secondary plating efficiencies in vitro and could differentiate into not only myeloid cells but also into lymphoid lineage cells. The phenotypes of interleukin-3 (IL-3) induced blast colony cells were Thy-1-positive and lineage-marker-negative. They examined whether these blast colony cells contained primitive hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and could reconstitute hematopoietic tissues in lethally irradiated mice. Blast colony cells could generate macroscopic visible spleen colonies on days 8 and 12, and 5 {times} 10(3) blast cells were sufficient to protect them from lethally irradiation. It was shown that 6 or 8 weeks after transplantation of 5 {times} 10(3) blast cells, donor male cells were detected in the spleen and thymus of the female recipients but not in the bone marrow by Southern blot analysis using Y-encoded DNA probe. After 10 weeks, bone marrow cells were partially repopulated from donor cells. In a congenic mouse system, donor-derived cells (Ly5.2) were detected in the thymus and spleen 6 weeks after transplantation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses showed that B cells and macrophages developed from donor cells in the spleen. In the thymus, donor-derived cells were found in CD4, CD8 double-positive, single-positive, and double-negative populations. Reconstitution of bone marrow was delayed and myeloid and lymphoid cells were detected 10 weeks after transplantation. These results indicate that IL-3-induced blast cells contain the primitive hematopoietic stem cells capable of reconstituting hematopoietic organs in lethally irradiated mice.

  20. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned factors emphasizing their regulatory role in luteal angiogenesis. Further studies are however necessary to divulge more information on other factors which regulate VEGF secretion in bubaline CL and the synergistic effects existing among such growth factors. PMID:26242566

  1. In Vivo Characterization of Traumatic Brain Injury Neuropathology with Structural and Functional Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    LEVINE, BRIAN; FUJIWARA, ESTHER; O’CONNOR, CHARLENE; RICHARD, NADINE; KOVACEVIC, NATASA; MANDIC, MARINA; RESTAGNO, ADRIANA; EASDON, CRAIG; ROBERTSON, IAN H.; GRAHAM, SIMON J.; CHEUNG, GORDON; GAO, FUQIANG; SCHWARTZ, MICHAEL L.; BLACK, SANDRA E.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative neuroimaging is increasingly used to study the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on brain structure and function. This paper reviews quantitative structural and functional neuroimaging studies of patients with TBI, with an emphasis on the effects of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), the primary neuropathology in TBI. Quantitative structural neuroimaging has evolved from simple planometric measurements through targeted region-of-interest analyses to whole-brain analysis of quantified tissue compartments. Recent studies converge to indicate widespread volume loss of both gray and white matter in patients with moderate-to-severe TBI. These changes can be documented even when patients with focal lesions are excluded. Broadly speaking, performance on standard neuropsychological tests of speeded information processing are related to these changes, but demonstration of specific brain-behavior relationships requires more refined experimental behavioral measures. The functional consequences of these structural changes can be imaged with activation functional neuroimaging. Although this line of research is at an early stage, results indicate that TBI causes a more widely dispersed activation in frontal and posterior cortices. Further progress in analysis of the consequences of TBI on neural structure and function will require control of variability in neuropathology and behavior. PMID:17020478

  2. Depletion of retinal dopamine does not affect the ERG b-wave increment threshold function in goldfish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z S; Yazulla, S

    1994-01-01

    Increment threshold functions of the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave were obtained from goldfish using an in vivo preparation to study intraretinal mechanisms underlying the increase in perceived brightness induced by depletion of retinal dopamine by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Goldfish received unilateral intraocular injections of 6-OHDA plus pargyline on successive days. Depletion of retinal dopamine was confirmed by the absence of tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity at 2 to 3 weeks postinjection as compared to sham-injected eyes from the same fish. There was no difference among normal, sham-injected or 6-OHDA-injected eyes with regard to ERG waveform, intensity-response functions or increment threshold functions. Dopamine-depleted eyes showed a Purkinje shift, that is, a transition from rod-to-cone dominated vision with increasing levels of adaptation. We conclude (1) dopamine-depleted eyes are capable of photopic vision; and (2) the ERG b-wave is not diagnostic for luminosity coding at photopic backgrounds. We also predict that (1) dopamine is not required for the transition from scotopic to photopic vision in goldfish; (2) the ERG b-wave in goldfish is influenced by chromatic interactions; (3) horizontal cell spinules, though correlated with photopic mechanisms in the fish retina, are not necessary for the transition from scotopic to photopic vision; and (4) the OFF pathway, not the ON pathway, is involved in the action of dopamine on luminosity coding in the retina. PMID:7918220

  3. Heparin inhibition of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, M; McNeill, P M; Carlson, P L; Kermode, J C; Adelman, B; Conroy, R; Marques, D

    1991-01-01

    The intravenous administration of heparin to patients before open heart surgery reduced ristocetin cofactor activity by 58% (P less than 0.01, t test), and this impairment of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function was closely related to plasma heparin levels (r2 = 0.9), but not to plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We hypothesized that heparin may inhibit vWF-dependent platelet hemostatic functions by directly binding vWF in solution and interfering with vWF-GpIb binding. Using the in vitro techniques of ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, fluorescent flow cytometric measurement of vWF-platelet binding, and conventional radioligand binding assays we observed that heparin inhibited both vWF-dependent platelet function and vWF-platelet binding in a parallel and dose-dependent manner. Heparin also inhibited platelet agglutination induced by bovine vWF and inhibited the binding of human asialo-vWF to platelets in ristocetin-free systems. The inhibitory potency of heparin was not dependent upon its affinity for antithrombin III, but was molecular weight dependent: homogeneous preparations of lower molecular weight were less inhibitory. Heparin impairment of vWF function may explain why some hemorrhagic complications of heparin therapy are not predictable based on techniques for monitoring the conventional anticoagulant effects of heparin. PMID:2022745

  4. IN VITRO/IN VIVO COMPARISON OF YOLK SAC FUNCTION AND EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yolk sac function and development of rat embryos grown in vitro for 24 hrs starting on day 10.5 were compared to those of embryos grown in utero. he embryos grown in vitro had significantly fewer somites, shorter crown-rump length and smaller yolk sac diameter when compared to th...

  5. Lack of Functionally-Active Sweet Taste Receptors in the Jejunum in vivo in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Rizwan M.; Garg, Alok; Abdelfatah, Mohamed M.; Duenes, Judith A.; Sarr, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND When studied in enterocyte-like cell lines (Caco-2 and RIE cells), agonists and antagonists of the sweet taste receptor (STR) augment and decrease glucose uptake, respectively. We hypothesize that exposure to STR agonists and antagonists in vivo will augment glucose absorption in the rat. MATERIAL/METHODS 30-cm segments of jejunum in anesthetized rats were perfused with iso-osmolar solutions containing 10, 35, and 100 mM glucose solutions (n=6 rats, each group) with and without the STR agonist 2 mM acesulfame potassium (AceK) and the STR inhibitor 10 ?M U-73122 (inhibitor of the PLC pathway). Carrier-mediated absorption of glucose was calculated by using stereospecific and non-stereospecific 14C-D-glucose and 3H-L-glucose, respectively. RESULTS Addition of the STR agonist AceK to the 10, 35, and 100 mM glucose solutions had no substantive effects on glucose absorption from 2.1±0.2 to 2.0±0.3, 5.8±0.2 to 4.8±0.2, and 15.5±2.3 to 15.7±2.7 ?mol/min/30-cm intestinal segment (p>0.05), respectively. Addition of the STR inhibitor (U-73122) also had no effect on absorption in the 10, 35, and 100 mM solutions from 2.3±0.1 to 2.1±0.2, 7.7±0.5 to 7.2±0.5, and 15.7±0.9 to 15.2±1.1 ?mol/min/30-cm intestinal segment, respectively. CONCLUSION Provision of glucose directly into rat jejunum does not augment glucose absorption via STR-mediated mechanisms within the jejunum in the rat. Our experiments show either no major role of STRs in mediating postprandial augmentation of glucose absorption or that proximal gastrointestinal tract stimulation of STR or other luminal factors may be required for absorption of glucose to be augmented by STR. PMID:23531453

  6. Methods for Ex Vivo Analysis of Immune Cell Function from the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Turner, Darryl G; Leech, Melanie D; O'Connor, Richard A; Anderton, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model commonly used to investigate the inflammatory response in organ-specific autoimmunity and a model of the early immune responses of multiple sclerosis.This protocol outlines the methods used for the processing of peripheral immune tissues, the spleen and draining lymph nodes, as well as the site of inflammation, the central nervous system (CNS), for analyzing immune cell phenotype and function during murine EAE. PMID:25863784

  7. Effects upon in vivo nicotine metabolism reveal functional variation in FMO3 associated with cigarette consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, A. Joseph; Murphy, Sharon E.; Martinez, Maribel; von Weymarn, Linda B.; Bierut, Laura J.; Goate, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO) catalyze the metabolism of nucleophilic heteroatom containing drugs and xenobiotics including nicotine. Rare mutations in FMO3 are responsible for defective N-oxygenation of dietary trimethylamine leading to trimethylaminuria, and common genetic variation in FMO3 has been linked to interindividual variability in metabolic function that may be substrate specific. Methods A genetic model of CYP2A6 function is used as a covariate to reveal functional polymorphism in FMO3 that indirectly influences the ratio of deuterated nicotine metabolized to cotinine following oral administration. The association is tested between FMO3 haplotype and cigarette consumption in a set of nicotine dependent smokers. Results FMO3 haplotype, based on all common coding variants in Europeans, significantly predicts nicotine metabolism and accounts for approximately 2% of variance in the apparent percent of nicotine metabolized to cotinine. The metabolic ratio is not associated with FMO2 haplotype or an FMO1 expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL). Cross validation demonstrates calculated FMO3 haplotype parameters to be robust and significantly improve the predictive nicotine metabolism model over CYP2A6 genotype alone. Functional classes of FMO3 haplotypes, as determined by their influence on nicotine metabolism to cotinine, are also significantly associated with cigarettes per day (CPD) in nicotine dependent European Americans (n=1,025, p=0.04), and significantly interact (p=0.016) with CYP2A6 genotype to predict CPD. Conclusion These findings suggest that common polymorphisms in FMO3 influence nicotine clearance, and that these genetic variants in turn influence cigarette consumption. PMID:23211429

  8. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis of rectal motor function and offers the potential for characterizing abnormal mechanical properties of the rectal wall in disease.

  9. Context-Dependent Functional Divergence of the Notch Ligands DLL1 and DLL4 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Preuße, Kristina; Tveriakhina, Lena; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Gaspar, Cláudia; Rosa, Alexandra Isabel; Henrique, Domingos; Gossler, Achim; Stauber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Notch signalling is a fundamental pathway that shapes the developing embryo and sustains adult tissues by direct communication between ligand and receptor molecules on adjacent cells. Among the ligands are two Delta paralogues, DLL1 and DLL4, that are conserved in mammals and share a similar structure and sequence. They activate the Notch receptor partly in overlapping expression domains where they fulfil redundant functions in some processes (e.g. maintenance of the crypt cell progenitor pool). In other processes, however, they appear to act differently (e.g. maintenance of foetal arterial identity) raising the questions of how similar DLL1 and DLL4 really are and which mechanism causes the apparent context-dependent divergence. By analysing mice that conditionally overexpress DLL1 or DLL4 from the same genomic locus (Hprt) and mice that express DLL4 instead of DLL1 from the endogenous Dll1 locus (Dll1Dll4ki), we found functional differences that are tissue-specific: while DLL1 and DLL4 act redundantly during the maintenance of retinal progenitors, their function varies in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) where somites form in a Notch-dependent process. In the anterior PSM, every cell expresses both Notch receptors and ligands, and DLL1 is the only activator of Notch while DLL4 is not endogenously expressed. Transgenic DLL4 cannot replace DLL1 during somitogenesis and in heterozygous Dll1Dll4ki/+ mice, the Dll1Dll4ki allele causes a dominant segmentation phenotype. Testing several aspects of the complex Notch signalling system in vitro, we found that both ligands have a similar trans-activation potential but that only DLL4 is an efficient cis-inhibitor of Notch signalling, causing a reduced net activation of Notch. These differential cis-inhibitory properties are likely to contribute to the functional divergence of DLL1 and DLL4. PMID:26114479

  10. In vivo functional photoacoustic microscopy of cutaneous microvasculature in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-02-01

    Microcirculation is an important component of the cardiovascular system and can be used to assess systemic cardiovascular health. Numerous studies have investigated cutaneous microcirculation as an indicator of cardiovascular related diseases. Such research has shown promising results; however, there are many limitations regarding the employed measurement techniques, such as poor depth and spatial resolution and measurement versatility. Here we show the results of functional cutaneous microvascular experiments measured with photoacoustic microscopy, which provides high spatial resolution and multiparameter measurements. In a set of experiments, microvascular networks located in the palms of volunteers were perturbed by periodic ischemic events, and the subsequent hemodynamic response to the stimulus was recorded. Results indicate that during periods of arterial occlusion, the relative oxygen saturation of the capillary vessels decreased below resting levels, and temporarily increased above resting levels immediately following the occlusion. Furthermore, a hyperemic reaction to the occlusions was measured, and the observation agreed well with similar measurements using more conventional imaging techniques. Due to its exceptional capability to functionally image vascular networks with high spatial resolution, photoacoustic microscopy could be a beneficial biomedical tool to assess microvascular functioning and applied to patients with diseases that affect cardiovascular health.

  11. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Taro; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which dopamine signaling causes these phenotypes requires an understanding of the dynamics of dopamine release. Here we report the effects of dDAT expression on behavioral traits. We show that dDAT expression in a subset of dopaminergic neurons is sufficient for normal sleep. dDAT expression in other cell types such as Kenyon cells and glial cells can also rescue the short sleep phenotype of dDAT mutants. dDAT mutants also show a down-regulation of the D1-like dopamine receptor dDA1, and this phenotype is rescued when dDAT is expressed in the same cell types in which it rescues sleep. On the other hand, dDAT overexpression in mushroom bodies, which are the target of memory forming dopamine neurons, abolishes olfactory aversive memory. Our data demonstrate that expression of extrasynaptic dopamine transporters can rescue some aspects of dopamine signaling in dopamine transporter mutants. These results provide novel insights into regulatory systems that modulate dopamine signaling. PMID:25232310

  12. In vitro and in vivo studies of macrophage functions in amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Chadee, K

    1988-12-01

    Experimental intrahepatic inoculation of the gerbil with Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites was used as a model of liver amebiasis to study the cellular immune response elicited by the parasite. It was shown that abscess-derived macrophages (5 to 20 days old) were deficient in their capacity to develop a respiratory burst, to secrete and express membrane-bound interleukin-1-like activity, and to kill E. histolytica trophozoites as well as to respond to lymphokines in vitro. However, macrophages isolated from the spleen and peritoneal cavities from the same infected animals were not significantly down regulated in these functions. Splenocytes from infected gerbils were shown to develop a strong responsiveness to amebic antigen, whereas their response to concanavalin A was suppressed. Crude E. histolytica extracts or conditioned medium down regulated murine BALB/c macrophage accessory and effector cell functions in vitro in a manner similar to abscess-derived macrophages, whereas crude extracts of the nonvirulent E. histolytica-like Laredo strain did not. Our results indicate that intrinsic or secreted products or both from E. histolytica are actively regulating macrophage functions at the abscess site and can possibly mediate other immunoregulatory mechanisms at distant targets. PMID:2903124

  13. In Vitro Oocyte Maturation and Preantral Follicle Culture from the Luteal-Phase Baboon Ovary Produce Mature Oocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Fazleabas, Asgerally T.; Shikanov, Ariella; Jackson, Erin; Barrett, Susan L.; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jenny; Kiesewetter, Sarah E.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2010-01-01

    Female cancer patients who seek fertility preservation but cannot undergo ovarian stimulation and embryo preservation may consider 1) retrieval of immature oocytes followed by in vitro maturation (IVM) or 2) ovarian tissue cryopreservation followed by transplantation or in vitro follicle culture. Conventional IVM is carried out during the follicular phase of menstrual cycle. There is limited evidence demonstrating that immature oocyte retrieved during the luteal phase can mature in vitro and be fertilized to produce viable embryos. While in vitro follicle culture is successful in rodents, its application in nonhuman primates has made limited progress. The objective of this study was to investigate the competence of immature luteal-phase oocytes from baboon and to determine the effect of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on baboon preantral follicle culture and oocyte maturation in vitro. Oocytes from small antral follicle cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with multiple cumulus layers (42%) were more likely to resume meiosis and progress to metaphase II (MII) than oocytes with a single layer of cumulus cells or less (23% vs. 3%, respectively). Twenty-four percent of mature oocytes were successfully fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and 25% of these developed to morula-stage embryos. Preantral follicles were encapsulated in fibrin-alginate-matrigel matrices and cultured to small antral stage in an FSH-independent manner. FSH negatively impacted follicle health by disrupting the integrity of oocyte and cumulus cells contact. Follicles grown in the absence of FSH produced MII oocytes with normal spindle structure. In conclusion, baboon luteal-phase COCs and oocytes from cultured preantral follicles can be matured in vitro. Oocyte meiotic competence correlated positively with the number of cumulus cell layers. This study clarifies the parameters of the follicle culture system in nonhuman primates and provides foundational data for future clinical development as a fertility preservation option for women with cancer. PMID:21123815

  14. Profiling of Luteal Transcriptome during Prostaglandin F2-Alpha Treatment in Buffalo Cows: Analysis of Signaling Pathways Associated with Luteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Suganthi, Hepziba; Rudraiah, Medhamurthy

    2014-01-01

    In several species including the buffalo cow, prostaglandin (PG) F2? is the key molecule responsible for regression of corpus luteum (CL). Experiments were carried out to characterize gene expression changes in the CL tissue at various time points after administration of luteolytic dose of PGF2? in buffalo cows. Circulating progesterone levels decreased within 1 h of PGF2? treatment and evidence of apoptosis was demonstrable at 18 h post treatment. Microarray analysis indicated expression changes in several of immediate early genes and transcription factors within 3 h of treatment. Also, changes in expression of genes associated with cell to cell signaling, cytokine signaling, steroidogenesis, PG synthesis and apoptosis were observed. Analysis of various components of LH/CGR signaling in CL tissues indicated decreased LH/CGR protein expression, pCREB levels and PKA activity post PGF2? treatment. The novel finding of this study is the down regulation of CYP19A1 gene expression accompanied by decrease in expression of E2 receptors and circulating and intra luteal E2 post PGF2? treatment. Mining of microarray data revealed several differentially expressed E2 responsive genes. Since CYP19A1 gene expression is low in the bovine CL, mining of microarray data of PGF2?-treated macaques, the species with high luteal CYP19A1 expression, showed good correlation between differentially expressed E2 responsive genes between both the species. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that PGF2? interferes with luteotrophic signaling, impairs intra-luteal E2 levels and regulates various signaling pathways before the effects on structural luteolysis are manifest. PMID:25102061

  15. In vivo functional analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster nicotinic acetylcholine receptor D?6 using the insecticide spinosad.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jason; Nguyen, Joseph; Lumb, Chris; Batterham, Phil; Perry, Trent

    2015-09-01

    The vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used to identify and manipulate insecticide resistance genes. The advancement of genome engineering technology and the increasing availability of pest genome sequences has increased the predictive and diagnostic capacity of the Drosophila model. The Drosophila model can be extended to investigate the basic biology of the interaction between insecticides and the proteins they target. Recently we have developed an in vivo system that permits the expression and study of key insecticide targets, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), in controlled genetic backgrounds. Here this system is used to study the interaction between the insecticide spinosad and a nAChR subunit, D?6. Reciprocal chimeric subunits were created from D?6 and D?7, a subunit that does not respond to spinosad. Using the in vivo system, the D?6/D?7 chimeric subunits were tested for their capacity to respond to spinosad. Only the subunits containing the C-terminal region of D?6 were able to respond to spinosad, thus confirming the importance this region for spinosad binding. A new incompletely dominant, spinosad resistance mechanism that may evolve in pest species is also examined. First generated using chemical mutagenesis, the D?6(P146S) mutation was recreated using the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, the first use of this technology to introduce a resistant mutation into a controlled genetic background. Both alleles present with the same incompletely dominant, spinosad resistance phenotype, proving the P146S replacement to be the causal mutation. The proximity of the P146S mutation to the conserved Cys-loop indicates that it may impair the gating of the receptor. The results of this study enhance the understanding of nAChR structure:function relationships. PMID:25747007

  16. Multiple In Vivo Biological Processes Are Mediated by Functionally Redundant Activities of Drosophila mir-279 and mir-996

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kailiang; Jee, David; de Navas, Luis F.; Duan, Hong; Lai, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    While most miRNA knockouts exhibit only subtle defects, a handful of miRNAs are profoundly required for development or physiology. A particularly compelling locus is Drosophila mir-279, which was reported as essential to restrict the emergence of CO2-sensing neurons, to maintain circadian rhythm, and to regulate ovarian border cells. The mir-996 locus is located near mir-279 and bears a similar seed, but they otherwise have distinct, conserved, non-seed sequences, suggesting their evolutionary maintenance for separate functions. We generated single and double deletion mutants of the mir-279 and mir-996 hairpins, and cursory analysis suggested that miR-996 was dispensable. However, discrepancies in the strength of individual mir-279 deletion alleles led us to uncover that all extant mir-279 mutants are deficient for mature miR-996, even though they retain its genomic locus. We therefore engineered a panel of genomic rescue transgenes into the double deletion background, allowing a pure assessment of miR-279 and miR-996 requirements. Surprisingly, detailed analyses of viability, olfactory neuron specification, and circadian rhythm indicate that miR-279 is completely dispensable. Instead, an endogenous supply of either mir-279 or mir-996 suffices for normal development and behavior. Sensor tests of nine key miR-279/996 targets showed their similar regulatory capacities, although transgenic gain-of-function experiments indicate partially distinct activities of these miRNAs that may underlie that co-maintenance in genomes. Altogether, we elucidate the unexpected genetics of this critical miRNA operon, and provide a foundation for their further study. More importantly, these studies demonstrate that multiple, vital, loss-of-function phenotypes can be rescued by endogenous expression of divergent seed family members, highlighting the importance of this miRNA region for in vivo function. PMID:26042831

  17. Stomatin-Like Protein 2 Is Required for In Vivo Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Formation and Optimal Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Chang, Yu-Han; Wai, Timothy; König, Tim; Dunn, Stanley D.; Langer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mainly mitochondrial protein that is widely expressed and is highly conserved across evolution. We have previously shown that SLP-2 binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 to form specialized membrane microdomains in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which are associated with optimal mitochondrial respiration. To determine how SLP-2 functions, we performed bioenergetic analysis of primary T cells from T cell-selective Slp-2 knockout mice under conditions that forced energy production to come almost exclusively from oxidative phosphorylation. These cells had a phenotype characterized by increased uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Since formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes (RCS) may correlate with more efficient electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that the defect in mitochondrial respiration in SLP-2-deficient T cells was due to deficient RCS formation. We found that in the absence of SLP-2, T cells had decreased levels and activities of complex I-III2 and I-III2-IV1-3 RCS but no defects in assembly of individual respiratory complexes. Impaired RCS formation in SLP-2-deficient T cells correlated with significantly delayed T cell proliferation in response to activation under conditions of limiting glycolysis. Altogether, our findings identify SLP-2 as a key regulator of the formation of RCS in vivo and show that these supercomplexes are required for optimal cell function. PMID:25776552

  18. Functional Assessment of Disease-Associated Regulatory Variants In Vivo Using a Versatile Dual Colour Transgenesis Strategy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T.; Foster, Robert G.; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Genevičve; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  19. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment. PMID:26234690

  20. Effects of GC7101, a Novel Prokinetic Agent on Gastric Motor Function: Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da Hyun; Choi, Eun Ju; Jeon, Han Ho; Lee, Young Ho; Park, Hyojin

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims GC7101, an extract of Lonicera Flos, is a novel developing drug for reflux esophagitis and functional dyspepsia. However, the drug’s exact pharmacological mechanism of action remains unclear. This study assessed the effects of GC7101 on gastrointestinal (GI) motor function. Methods We used male guinea pigs to evaluate the effects of GC7101 on GI motility. The contraction of antral circular muscle in the presence of different doses of GC7101 was measured in a tissue bath. The prokinetic effects of GC7101 were tested using the charcoal transit assay from the pylorus to the most distal point of migration of charcoal mixture. To clarify the mechanism of action of GC7101, atropine, dopamine and the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor antagonist, GR113808 were used. Results The maximal amplitude of circular muscle contraction was induced by 5 mg mL?1 GC7101. The area under the curve of contraction was significantly increased at 5 mg mL?1 GC7101. Addition of 10?6 M atropine, 10?8 M dopamine or 10?7 M GR 113808 to GC7101 5 mg mL?1 decreased the amplitude and area under curve compared to GC7101 5 mg mL?1 alone. GC7101 accelerated GI transit in a dose dependent manner except 100 mg kg?1. Delayed GI transit caused by atropine, dopamine and GR 113808 was restored by GC7101 50 mg kg?1. Conclusions GC7101, an extract of Lonicera Flos, exerts a gastric prokinetic effect in guinea pig through cholinergic, antidopaminergic and serotonergic mechanisms. Therefore, GC7101 might be a novel drug for the treatment of functional dyspepsia. PMID:25273117

  1. In Vivo Assessment of Endothelial Function in Human Lower Extremity Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Vikram S.; Lakin, Ryan O.; Feiten, Lindsay E.; Bishop, Paul; Sarac, Timur P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial function has been measured in preclinical studies, in human brachial and coronary arteries, but not in lower extremity arteries affected by atherosclerosis. We describe a novel, first-in-man, evaluation of endothelial function of the superficial femoral arteries (SFA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods Patients with PAD (n=25) requiring lower extremity angiography were enrolled. Endothelial dependent relaxation (EDR) was measured using intravascular ultrasound and a Doppler Flow wire after the infusion of acetylcholine (Ach). IVUS derived virtual histology (IVUS-VH) of the same vessel was calculated. Endothelial independent relaxation (EIR) was measured with infusion of nitroglycerin (NTG, 200 µg). Levels of nitric oxide (NOx) and serum metabolites were determined by laboratory analysis. Results Patients (mean age 62, 48% male) had a history of hypertension (80%), coronary disease (36%), and diabetes (40%). The mean SFA diameter was 5.2 ± 1 mm (range 3.2–6.9 mm). Patients tolerated Ach infusion with no side effects or adverse events. EDR increased over baseline for all patients with Ach infusion 10?6-10?4. Diameter (0.5% at Ach 10?4) and area (1.8% at Ach 10?4) changes in the diseased SFA were modest and insignificant. But, average peak velocity of blood flow (APV) significantly increased 26, 46 and 63% with Ach infusion 10?6-10?4. Calculations of limb volumetric flow (Q, mL/s, 68%, Ach 10?4) were significantly increased after Ach infusion. Lower extremity NOx levels were slightly lower than systemic venous levels (P = .04). NTG infusion indicated normal smooth muscle responsiveness (3% diameter, 9% area, and 116% velocity change over baseline). IVUS-VH plaque stratification indicated predominantly fibrous morphology (46%; necrotic core, 29%; calcium, 18%). Atheroma burden was 14.9 ± 5.5 mm3/cm and did not correlate with endothelial responsiveness. Conclusions Endothelial function can be measured directly in human lower extremity arteries at the sites of vascular disease. Despite extensive atherosclerosis, endothelial function is still intact. These data support the application of regional endothelial-specific biological therapies in patients with PAD. PMID:23830159

  2. Alterations at the Cross-Bridge Level Are Associated with a Paradoxical Gain of Muscle Function In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding ?-tropomyosinslow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8–9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occuring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo. PMID:25268244

  3. In vivo functional mapping of the conserved protein domains within murine Themis1.

    PubMed

    Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Lee, Jan; El-Khoury, Dalal; Barr, Valarie; Akpan, Itoro; Samelson, Lawrence; Love, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Thymocyte development requires the coordinated input of signals that originate from numerous cell surface molecules. Although the majority of thymocyte signal-initiating receptors are lineage-specific, most trigger 'ubiquitous' downstream signaling pathways. T-lineage-specific receptors are coupled to these signaling pathways by lymphocyte-restricted adapter molecules. We and others recently identified a new putative adapter protein, Themis1, whose expression is largely restricted to the T lineage. Mice lacking Themis1 exhibit a severe block in thymocyte development and a striking paucity of mature T cells revealing a critical role for Themis1 in T-cell maturation. Themis1 orthologs contain three conserved domains: a proline-rich region (PRR) that binds to the ubiquitous cytosolic adapter Grb2, a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), and two copies of a novel cysteine-containing globular (CABIT) domain. In the present study, we evaluated the functional importance of each of these motifs by retroviral reconstitution of Themis1(-/-) progenitor cells. The results demonstrate an essential requirement for the PRR and NLS motifs but not the conserved CABIT cysteines for Themis1 function. PMID:24935457

  4. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket. PMID:24361577

  5. In vivo effects of Aspalathus linearis (rooibos) on male rat reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Opuwari, C S; Monsees, T K

    2014-10-01

    Aspalathus linearis (rooibos tea) may improve sperm function owing to its antioxidant properties. To test this hypothesis, male rats were given 2% or 5% rooibos tea for 52 days. No significant alterations were observed in body and reproductive organs weight, serum antioxidant capacity and testosterone level. Seminiferous tubules displayed complete spermatogenesis. However, a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in tubule diameter and germinal epithelial height was observed. Epithelial height of caput epididymides showed a significant increase. Unfermented rooibos significantly enhanced sperm concentration, viability and motility. Fermented rooibos also significantly improved sperm vitality (P < 0.01), but caused a significant increase in spontaneous acrosome reaction (P < 0.05), whereas unfermented did not. Creatinine was significantly enhanced in all treated rats, consistent with significant higher kidney weights. Rooibos significantly reduced alanine transaminase level, while 2% fermented rooibos significantly decreased aspartate transaminase level (P < 0.01). In conclusion, treatment with rooibos improved sperm concentration, viability and motility, which might be attributed to its high level of antioxidants. However, prolonged exposure of rooibos might result in subtle structural changes in the male reproductive system and may induce acrosome reaction, which can impair fertility. Intake of large amounts of rooibos may also harm liver and kidney function. PMID:24007336

  6. A USPL functional system with articulated mirror arm for in-vivo applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Dehn, Claudia; Oehme, Bernd; Bourauel, Christoph; Frentzen, Mathias

    Ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) systems for dental application have overcome many of their initial disadvantages. However, a problem that has not yet been addressed and solved is the beam delivery into the oral cavity. The functional system that is introduced in this study includes an articulated mirror arm, a scanning system as well as a handpiece, allowing for freehand preparations with ultra-short laser pulses. As laser source an Nd:YVO4 laser is employed, emitting pulses with a duration of tp < 10 ps at a repetition rate of up to 500 kHz. The centre wavelength is at 1064 nm and the average output power can be tuned up to 9 W. The delivery system consists of an articulated mirror arm, to which a scanning system and a custom made handpiece are connected, including a 75 mm focussing lens. The whole functional system is compact in size and moveable. General characteristics like optical losses and ablation rate are determined and compared to results employing a fixed setup on an optical table. Furthermore classical treatment procedures like cavity preparation are being demonstrated on mammoth ivory. This study indicates that freehand preparation employing an USPL system is possible but challenging, and accompanied by a variety of side-effects. The ablation rate with fixed handpiece is about 10 mm3/min. Factors like defocussing and blinding affect treatment efficiency. Laser sources with higher average output powers might be needed in order to reach sufficient preparation speeds.

  7. EFFECT OF OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLE BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS ON EX VIVO VASCULAR FUNCTION OF AORTAS RECOVERED FROM NORMAL AND TYPE 2 DIABETIC RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Oil Combustion Particle Bioavailable Constituents on Ex Vivo Vascular Function of Aortae Recovered from Healthy and Early Type 2 Diabetic Rats
    KL Dreher1, SE Kelly2, SD Proctor2, and JC Russell2. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, US EPA, RTP, NC;...

  8. Supplementary Figure 1. In vivo functional properties of neurons in the EM imaged volume. (Top) Cell-based orientation preference map in mouse visual cortex.

    E-print Network

    Reid, R. Clay

    . Correspondence between in vivo fluorescence anatomy and electron microscopy throughout the EM volume. Merged, with reconstructions of each functionally characterized cell. Horizontal grey bars bound the SUPPLEMENTARY anatomy as in Fig. 1c (red: blood vessels or astrocytes, green: OGB or YFP). Blood vessels and astrocytes

  9. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography Enables In Vivo Physiological Assessment of Retinal Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-01

    Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) changes have been observed in retinal photoreceptors, suggesting a unique biomarker for eye disease detection. However, clinical deployment of IOS imaging is challenging due to unclear IOS sources and limited signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Here, by developing high spatiotemporal resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and applying an adaptive algorithm for IOS processing, we were able to record robust IOSs from single-pass measurements. Transient IOSs, which might reflect an early stage of light phototransduction, are consistently observed in the photoreceptor outer segment almost immediately (<4 ms) after retinal stimulation. Comparative studies of dark- and light-adapted retinas have demonstrated the feasibility of functional OCT mapping of rod and cone photoreceptors, promising a new method for early disease detection and improved treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye diseases that can cause photoreceptor damage.

  10. Development of optical neuroimaging to detect drug-induced brain functional changes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in prefrontal function play a crucial role in compulsive cocaine use, which is a hallmark of addiction. Dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex might result from effects of cocaine on neurons as well as from disruption of cerebral blood vessels. However, the mechanisms underlying cocaine's neurotoxic effects are not fully understood, partially due to technical limitations of current imaging techniques (e.g., PET, fMRI) to differentiate vascular from neuronal effects at sufficiently high temporal and spatial resolutions. We have recently developed a multimodal imaging platform which can simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebrovascular hemodynamics, hemoglobin oxygenation and intracellular calcium fluorescence for monitoring the effects of cocaine on the brain. Such a multimodality imaging technique (OFI) provides several uniquely important merits, including: 1) a large field-of-view, 2) high spatiotemporal resolutions, 3) quantitative 3D imaging of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) networks, 4) label-free imaging of hemodynamic changes, 5) separation of vascular compartments (e.g., arterial and venous vessels) and monitoring of cortical brain metabolic changes, 6) discrimination of cellular (neuronal) from vascular responses. These imaging features have been further advanced in combination with microprobes to form micro-OFI that allows quantification of drug effects on subcortical brain. In addition, our ultrahigh-resolution ODT (?ODT) enables 3D microangiography and quantitative imaging of capillary CBF networks. These optical strategies have been used to investigate the effects of cocaine on brain physiology to facilitate the studies of brain functional changes induced by addictive substance to provide new insights into neurobiological effects of the drug on the brain.

  11. A novel RNA oligonucleotide improves liver function and inhibits liver carcinogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reebye, V.; Sćtrom, P.; Mintz, P.J.; Huang, K.W.; Swiderski, P.; Peng, L.; Liu, C.; Liu, X.X.; Jensen, S.; Zacharoulis, D.; Kostomitsopoulos, N.; Kasahara, N.; Nicholls, J.P.; Jiao, L.R.; Pai, M.; Mizandari, M.; Chikovani, T.; Emara, M.M.; Haoudi, A.; Tomalia, D.A.; Rossi, J.J.; Habib, N.A.; Spalding, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurs predominantly in patients with liver cirrhosis. Here, we show an innovative RNA-based targeted approach to enhance endogenous albumin production whilst reducing liver tumour burden. We designed short-activating RNAs (saRNA) to enhance expression of C/EBP? (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-?), a transcriptional regulator and activator of albumin gene expression. Increased levels of both C/EBP? and albumin mRNA in addition to a 3-fold increase in albumin secretion and 50% decrease in cell proliferation was observed in C/EBP?-saRNA transfected HepG2 cells. Intravenous injection of C/EBP?-saRNA in a cirrhotic rat model with multifocal liver tumours increased circulating serum albumin by over 30% showing evidence of improved liver function. Tumour burden decreased by 80% (p = 0.003) with a 40% reduction in a marker of pre-neoplastic transformation. Since C/EBP? has known anti-proliferative activities via retinoblastoma, p21 and cyclins; we used mRNA expression liver cancer specific microarray in C/EBP?-saRNA transfected HepG2 cells to confirm down-regulation of genes strongly enriched for negative regulation of apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. Up-regulated genes were enriched for tumour suppressors and positive regulators of cell differentiation. A quantitative PCR and Western-blot analysis of C/EBP?-saRNA transfected cells suggested that in addition to the known anti-proliferative targets of C/EBP?, we also observed suppression of IL6R, c-Myc and reduced STAT3 phosphorylation. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that a novel injectable saRNA-oligonucleotide that enhances C/EBP? expression successfully reduces tumour burden and simultaneously improves liver function in a clinically relevant liver cirrhosis/HCC model. PMID:23929703

  12. Brain basis of early parent–infant interactions: psychology, physiology, and in vivo functional neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P.; Kose, Samet; Strathearn, Lane

    2015-01-01

    Parenting behavior critically shapes human infants’ current and future behavior. The parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social experiences, forming templates of what they can expect from others and how to best meet others’ expectations. In this review, we focus on the neurobiology of parenting behavior, including our own functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain imaging experiments of parents. We begin with a discussion of background, perspectives and caveats for considering the neurobiology of parent–infant relationships. Then, we discuss aspects of the psychology of parenting that are significantly motivating some of the more basic neuroscience research. Following that, we discuss some of the neurohormones that are important for the regulation of social bonding, and the dysregulation of parenting with cocaine abuse. Then, we review the brain circuitry underlying parenting, proceeding from relevant rodent and nonhuman primate research to human work. Finally, we focus on a study-by-study review of functional neuroimaging studies in humans. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support aspects of parent response to infants, including the emotion, attention, motivation, empathy, decision-making and other thinking that are required to navigate the complexities of parenting. Specifically, infant stimuli activate basal forebrain regions, which regulate brain circuits that handle specific nurturing and caregiving responses and activate the brain’s more general circuitry for handling emotions, motivation, attention, and empathy – all of which are crucial for effective parenting. We argue that an integrated understanding of the brain basis of parenting has profound implications for mental health. PMID:17355399

  13. Characteristics and retention of luteal structures, extended postinsemination cycle, progesterone, and pregnancy-specific protein B in serum after human chorionic gonadotropin treatment of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J S; Pulley, S L

    2012-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine characteristics (size, number, and stayability) of luteal structures formed in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administered on d 7 after timed artificial insemination (AI) and the influence of hCG on returns to estrus and pregnancy outcome. Holstein cows (n=328), milked 3 times daily, previously inseminated at first service were assigned randomly to a completely randomized design consisting of 2 treatments when at least 1 corpus luteum (CL) was detected on d 7 after AI. Treatment consisted of 1,000 IU hCG or 1 mL of saline (control) administered i.m. Blood was collected and luteal structures were mapped and sized by transrectal ultrasonography on d 7, 14, 21, 28, and 32 after AI. Blood also was collected on d 60 in all pregnant cows. Treatment with hCG induced new luteal structures in 70% of cows, regardless of pregnancy status or number of pretreatment CL. Cows producing greater than the median 46 kg of energy-corrected milk per day were less likely to respond to hCG. The number of total luteal structures per cow, original CL volume, and total luteal volume (original CL + new luteal structures) were increased by hCG. Progesterone concentration was greater in pregnant than nonpregnant cows on d 14 unless cows responded to hCG by forming new luteal structures. Concentrations of progesterone were greatest in pregnant, hCG-treated cows. Pregnancy per AI at d 32 or 60 after first AI was less in hCG- than saline-treated cows because pregnancy outcome for hCG cows that had only 1 pretreatment CL and failed to respond to hCG was only 55 to 61% of that observed in controls. Proportions of cows returning to estrus from 18 to 25 d after AI were less in hCG than control cows but greater for cows returning >25 d. Regardless of treatment, 25% of cows in both treatments retained at least 1 original CL to d 28 after AI and were not pregnant on d 32. Progesterone concentrations in these nonpregnant cows with retained CL between d 14 and 28 after AI were intermediate between nonpregnant cows that returned to estrus by d 25 and all pregnant cows. Concentrations of pregnancy-specific protein B were elevated in some of these nonpregnant, CL-retained cows, indicating early pregnancy loss. Retention of original luteal tissue in nonpregnant cows to d 28 after AI indicated that pregnancy had been initiated but failed, as verified by concentrations of progesterone and pregnancy-specific protein B. PMID:22818453

  14. Mechanism of platelet functional changes and effects of anti-platelet agents on in vivo hemostasis under different gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Liu, Guanglei; Zhang, Weilin; Wang, Zhicheng; Wang, Yuedan; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-05-01

    Serious thrombotic and hemorrhagic problems or even fatalities evoked by either microgravity or hypergravity occur commonly in the world. We recently reported that platelet functions are inhibited in microgravity environments and activated under high-G conditions, which reveals the pathogenesis for gravity change-related hemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases. However, the mechanisms of platelet functional variations under different gravity conditions remain unclear. In this study we show that the amount of filamin A coimmunoprecipitated with GPIbalpha was enhanced in platelets exposed to modeled microgravity and, in contrast, was reduced in 8 G-exposed platelets. Hypergravity induced actin filament formation and redistribution, whereas actin filaments were reduced in platelets treated with modeled microgravity. Furthermore, intracellular Ca2+ levels were elevated by hypergravity. Pretreatment of platelets with the cell-permeable Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM had no effect on cytoskeleton reorganization induced by hypergravity but significantly reduced platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin/hypergravity. Two anti-platelet agents, aspirin and tirofiban, effectively reversed the shortened tail bleeding time and reduced the death rate of mice exposed to hypergravity. Furthermore, the increased P-selectin surface expression was obviously reduced in platelets from mice treated with aspirin/hypergravity compared with those from mice treated with hypergravity alone. These data suggest that the actin cytoskeleton reorganization and intracellular Ca2+ level play key roles in the regulation of platelet functions in different gravitational environments. The results with anti-platelet agents not only further confirm the activation of platelets in vivo but also suggest a therapeutic potential for hypergravity-induced thrombotic diseases. PMID:20133435

  15. Immunologic effector mechanisms of a standardized mistletoe extract on the function of human monocytes and lymphocytes in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Lucie; von Baehr, Volker; Liebenthal, Christa; von Baehr, Rüdiger; Volk, Hans-Dieter

    2006-07-01

    Even though mistletoe extracts have been in clinical use for centuries their exact mode of action is still unknown. Currently, the application scheme for registered preparations is a dose-escalating scheme to thus reduce side effects. In this study, healthy controls and patients were evaluated for their immunologic response to treatment with a standardized mistletoe extract (Iscador). It shows a strong effect as adjuvant that induces TNF-alpha and IL-12, which was partly mediated via CD14. Desensitization of the TNF-alpha response could be shown after repeated application in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Iscador induces a specific lymphocyte sensitization upon multiple injections and production of IgG1- and IgG3 -mistletoe antibodies. Remarkably, a systemic bystander effect (heterologous immunity against other recall antigens) was observed after long-term treatment. In conclusion, dose-escalation reduces the monocyte-related clinical side effects. A T-lymphocyte sensitization stimulates mainly a specific Th1 response. The most interesting clinical long-term effect is the bystander stimulation of various memory T cells that might mediate in vivo antitumor and antiinfectious T-cell response under mistletoe-extract immunization. PMID:16705487

  16. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing (Different Hybrids, Paste, and Pomace) on Inhibition of Platelet Function In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0?g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0?g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  17. In vivo alterations in skeletal muscle form and function after disuse atrophy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brian C

    2009-10-01

    Prolonged reductions in muscle activity and mechanical loading (e.g., bed rest, cast immobilization) result in alterations in skeletal muscle form and function. The purpose of this review article was to synthesize recent findings from several studies on the dramatic effects of disuse on skeletal muscle morphology and muscle performance in humans. Specifically, the following are discussed: 1) how the antigravity muscles are most susceptible to atrophy and how the degree of atrophy varies between muscle groups; 2) how disuse alters muscle composition by increasing intermuscular adipose tissue; 3) the influence of different disuse models on regulating the loss of muscle mass and strength, with immobilization causing greater reductions than bed rest and limb suspension do; 4) the observation that disuse decreases strength to a greater extent than muscle mass and the role of adaptations in both neural and contractile properties that influences this excessive loss of strength; 5) the equivocal findings on the effect of disuse on muscle fatigue resistance; and 6) the reduction in motor control after prolonged disuse. Lastly, emerging data warranting further inquiry into the modulating role of biological sex on disuse-induced adaptations are also discussed. PMID:19727027

  18. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  19. Readthrough acetylcholinesterase (AChE-R) and regulated necrosis: pharmacological targets for the regulation of ovarian functions?

    PubMed Central

    Blohberger, J; Kunz, L; Einwang, D; Berg, U; Berg, D; Ojeda, S R; Dissen, G A; Fröhlich, T; Arnold, G J; Soreq, H; Lara, H; Mayerhofer, A

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation, differentiation and death of ovarian cells ensure orderly functioning of the female gonad during the reproductive phase, which ultimately ends with menopause in women. These processes are regulated by several mechanisms, including local signaling via neurotransmitters. Previous studies showed that ovarian non-neuronal endocrine cells produce acetylcholine (ACh), which likely acts as a trophic factor within the ovarian follicle and the corpus luteum via muscarinic ACh receptors. How its actions are restricted was unknown. We identified enzymatically active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in human ovarian follicular fluid as a product of human granulosa cells. AChE breaks down ACh and thereby attenuates its trophic functions. Blockage of AChE by huperzine A increased the trophic actions as seen in granulosa cells studies. Among ovarian AChE variants, the readthrough isoform AChE-R was identified, which has further, non-enzymatic roles. AChE-R was found in follicular fluid, granulosa and theca cells, as well as luteal cells, implying that such functions occur in vivo. A synthetic AChE-R peptide (ARP) was used to explore such actions and induced in primary, cultured human granulosa cells a caspase-independent form of cell death with a distinct balloon-like morphology and the release of lactate dehydrogenase. The RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 and the MLKL-blocker necrosulfonamide significantly reduced this form of cell death. Thus a novel non-enzymatic function of AChE-R is to stimulate RIPK1/MLKL-dependent regulated necrosis (necroptosis). The latter complements a cholinergic system in the ovary, which determines life and death of ovarian cells. Necroptosis likely occurs in the primate ovary, as granulosa and luteal cells were immunopositive for phospho-MLKL, and hence necroptosis may contribute to follicular atresia and luteolysis. The results suggest that interference with the enzymatic activities of AChE and/or interference with necroptosis may be novel approaches to influence ovarian functions. PMID:25766324

  20. In vivo and in vitro analyses of amygdalar function reveal a role for copper

    PubMed Central

    Gaier, E. D.; Rodriguiz, R. M.; Zhou, J.; Ralle, M.; Wetsel, W. C.; Eipper, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mice with a single copy of the peptide amidating monooxygenase (Pam) gene (PAM+/?) are impaired in contextual and cued fear conditioning. These abnormalities coincide with deficient long-term potentiation (LTP) at excitatory thalamic afferent synapses onto pyramidal neurons in the lateral amygdala. Slice recordings from PAM+/? mice identified an increase in GABAergic tone (Gaier ED, Rodriguiz RM, Ma XM, Sivaramakrishnan S, Bousquet-Moore D, Wetsel WC, Eipper BA, Mains RE. J Neurosci 30: 13656–13669, 2010). Biochemical data indicate a tissue-specific deficit in Cu content in the amygdala; amygdalar expression of Atox-1 and Atp7a, essential for transport of Cu into the secretory pathway, is reduced in PAM+/? mice. When PAM+/? mice were fed a diet supplemented with Cu, the impairments in fear conditioning were reversed, and LTP was normalized in amygdala slice recordings. A role for endogenous Cu in amygdalar LTP was established by the inhibitory effect of a brief incubation of wild-type slices with bathocuproine disulfonate, a highly selective, cell-impermeant Cu chelator. Interestingly, bath-applied CuSO4 had no effect on excitatory currents but reversibly potentiated the disynaptic inhibitory current. Bath-applied CuSO4 was sufficient to potentiate wild-type amygdala afferent synapses. The ability of dietary Cu to affect signaling in pathways that govern fear-based behaviors supports an essential physiological role for Cu in amygdalar function at both the synaptic and behavioral levels. This work is relevant to neurological and psychiatric disorders in which disturbed Cu homeostasis could contribute to altered synaptic transmission, including Wilson's, Menkes, Alzheimer's, and prion-related diseases. PMID:24554785

  1. Body Size in Relation to Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites (EM) among Premenopausal Women during the Luteal Phase

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Eliassen, A. Heather; Xu, Xia; Matthews, Charles E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism profiles may play an important role in the relationship between body size and breast carcinogenesis. Previously, we observed inverse associations between current body mass index (BMI) and plasma levels of parent estrogens (estrone and estradiol) among premenopausal women during both follicular and luteal phases. Using data from the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II), we assessed whether height, current BMI, and BMI at age 18 were associated with the urinary concentrations of 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites (jointly referred to as EM) measured during the luteal phase among 603 premenopausal women. We observed inverse associations with total EM for height (Ptrend=0.01) and current BMI (Ptrend=0.01), but not BMI at age 18 (Ptrend=0.26). Six EMs were 18–27% lower in women with a height 68+ inches versus ?62 inches, primarily in the methylated catechol pathway (Ptrend=0.04). Eight EMs were 18–50% lower in women with a BMI of 30+ versus <20, primarily in the 2-catechol and methylated catechol pathways (Ptrend<0.001 for both). Our results suggest that height and current BMI are associated with estrogen metabolism profiles in premenopausal women. Further studies with timed urine and blood collections are required to confirm and extend our findings. PMID:23011724

  2. Nature, source and function of pigments in tardigrades: in vivo raman imaging of carotenoids in Echiniscus blumi.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alois; Guidetti, Roberto; Altiero, Tiziana; Sergo, Valter; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic aquatic animals with remarkable abilities to withstand harsh physical conditions such as dehydration or exposure to harmful highly energetic radiation. The mechanisms responsible for such robustness are presently little known, but protection against oxidative stresses is thought to play a role. Despite the fact that many tardigrade species are variously pigmented, scarce information is available about this characteristic. By applying Raman micro-spectroscopy on living specimens, pigments in the tardigrade Echiniscus blumi are identified as carotenoids, and their distribution within the animal body is visualized. The dietary origin of these pigments is demonstrated, as well as their presence in the eggs and in eye-spots of these animals, together with their absence in the outer layer of the animal (i.e., cuticle and epidermis). Using in-vivo semi-quantitative Raman micro-spectroscopy, a decrease in carotenoid content is detected after inducing oxidative stress, demonstrating that this approach can be used for studying the role of carotenoids in oxidative stress-related processes in tardigrades. This approach could be thus used in further investigations to test several hypotheses concerning the function of these carotenoids in tardigrades as photo-protective pigments against ionizing radiations or as antioxidants defending these organisms against the oxidative stress occurring during desiccation processes. PMID:23185564

  3. Myozap, a novel intercalated disc protein, activates SRF-dependent signaling and is required to maintain cardiac function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Thalia S.; Frank, Derk; Rohr, Claudia; Will, Rainer; Just, Steffen; Grund, Christine; Lyon, Robert; Lüdde, Mark; Koegl, Manfred; Sheikh, Farah; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Franke, Werner W.; Katus, Hugo A.; Olson, Eric N.; Frey, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The intercalated disc (ID) is a highly specialized cell-cell contact structure that ensures mechanical and electrical coupling of contracting cardiomyocytes. Recently, the ID has been recognized to be a hot spot of cardiac disease, in particular inherited cardiomyopathy. Objective Given its complex structure and function we hypothesized that important molecular constituents of the ID still remain unknown. Methods Using a bioinformatic screen, we discovered and cloned a previously uncharacterized 54 kDa cardiac protein which we termed Myozap (Myocardium-enriched ZO-associated protein). Results Myozap is strongly expressed in the heart and lung. In cardiac tissue it localized to the ID and directly binds to desmoplakin and ZO-1. In a yeast-two hybrid screen for additional binding partners of Myozap we identified myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), a negative regulator of Rho activity. Myozap, in turn, strongly activates SRF-dependent transcription through its ERM (Ezrin/radixin/moesin)-like domain in a Rho-dependent fashion. Finally, in vivo knockdown of the Myozap orthologue in zebrafish led to severe contractile dysfunction and cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Taken together, these findings reveal Myozap as a previously unrecognized component of a Rho-dependent signaling pathway that links the intercalated disc to cardiac gene regulation. Moreover, its subcellular localization and the observation of a severe cardiac phenotype in zebrafish, implicate Myozap in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:20093627

  4. In vivo functional expression of a screened P. aeruginosa chaperone-dependent lipase in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial lipases particularly Pseudomonas lipases are widely used for biotechnological applications. It is a meaningful work to design experiments to obtain high-level active lipase. There is a limiting factor for functional overexpression of the Pseudomonas lipase that a chaperone is necessary for effective folding. As previously reported, several methods had been used to resolve the problem. In this work, the lipase (LipA) and its chaperone (LipB) from a screened strain named AB which belongs to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were overexpressed in E. coli with two dual expression plasmid systems to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA without in vitro refolding process. Results In this work, we screened a lipase-produced strain named AB through the screening procedure, which was identified as P. aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA. Genomic DNA obtained from the strain was used to isolate the gene lipA (936 bp) and lipase specific foldase gene lipB (1023 bp). One single expression plasmid system E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and two dual expression plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB and E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB were successfully constructed. The lipase activities of the three expression systems were compared to choose the optimal expression method. Under the same cultured condition, the activities of the lipases expressed by E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB were 1300 U/L and 3200 U/L, respectively, while the activity of the lipase expressed by E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was up to 8500 U/L. The lipase LipA had an optimal temperature of 30°C and an optimal pH of 9 with a strong pH tolerance. The active LipA could catalyze the reaction between fatty alcohols and fatty acids to generate fatty acid alkyl esters, which meant that LipA was able to catalyze esterification reaction. The most suitable fatty acid and alcohol substrates for esterification were octylic acid and hexanol, respectively. Conclusions The effect of different plasmid system on the active LipA expression was significantly different. pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was more suitable for the expression of active LipA than pET28a-lipAB and pETDuet-lipA-lipB. The LipA showed obvious esterification activity and thus had potential biocatalytic applications. The expression method reported here can give reference for the expression of those enzymes that require chaperones. PMID:22950599

  5. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of EB dispersed SWCNT; chemical structures of dyes applied for SWCNT dispersion; spectrum of EB/albumin; PTX loading efficiency onto albumin at different ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03752b

  6. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the effects of piperine on P-gp function and expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Chin Tan, Theresa May; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Piperine, a major component of black pepper, is used as spice and nutrient enhancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and prolonged piperine exposure on cellular P-gp expression and function in vitro and in vivo. Piperine at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 microM, determined by MTT assay to be non-cytotoxic, was observed to inhibit P-gp mediated efflux transport of [(3)H]-digoxin across L-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell monolayers. The acute inhibitory effect was dependent on piperine concentration, with abolishment of [(3)H]-digoxin polarized transport attained at 50 microM of piperine. In contrast, prolonged (48 and 72 h) co-incubation of Caco-2 cell monolayers with piperine (50 and 100 microM) increased P-gp activity through an up-regulation of cellular P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA levels. The up-regulated protein was functionally active, as demonstrated by a higher degree of [(3)H]-digoxin efflux across the cell monolayers, but the induction was readily reversed by the removal of the spice from the culture medium. Peroral administration of piperine at the dose of 112 microg/kg body weight/day to male Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days also led to increased intestinal P-gp levels. However, there was a concomitant reduction in the rodent liver P-gp although the kidney P-gp level was unaffected. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when piperine is to be co-administered with drugs that are P-gp substrates, particularly for patients whose diet relies heavily on pepper. PMID:18417181

  7. Functional and differential proteomic analyses to identify platelet derived factors affecting ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multilineage differentiation, immunomodulation and secretion of trophic factors render mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) highly attractive for clinical application. Human platelet derivatives such as pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) and thrombin-activated platelet releasate in plasma (tPRP) have been introduced as alternatives to fetal bovine serum (FBS) to achieve GMP-compliance. However, whereas both pHPL and tPRP support similar proliferation kinetics of lipoaspirate-derived MSC (LA-MSC), only pHPL significantly accelerates bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) expansion. To identify functionally bioactive factors affecting ex vivo MSC expansion, a differential proteomic approach was performed and identified candidate proteins were evaluated within a bioassay. Results Two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), MALDI-TOF analyses and complementary Western blotting revealed 20 differential protein species. 14 candidate proteins occured at higher concentrations in pHPL compared to tPRP and 6 at higher concentrations in tPRP. The candidate proteins fibrinogen and apolipoprotein A1 differentially affected LA- and BM-MSC proliferation. In a second set of experiments, reference cytokines known to foster proliferation in FBS were tested for their effects in the human supplements. Interestingly although these cytokines promoted proliferation in FBS, they failed to do so when added to the humanized system. Conclusions The differential proteomic approach identified novel platelet derived factors differentially acting on human MSC proliferation. Complementary testing of reference cytokines revealed a lack of stimulation in the human supplements compared to FBS. The data describe a new coherent approach to combine proteomic technologies with functional testing to develop novel, humanized, GMP-compliant conditions for MSC expansion. PMID:24168020

  8. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the effects of piperine on P-gp function and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yi; Chin Tan, Theresa May; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Piperine, a major component of black pepper, is used as spice and nutrient enhancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and prolonged piperine exposure on cellular P-gp expression and function in vitro and in vivo. Piperine at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, determined by MTT assay to be non-cytotoxic, was observed to inhibit P-gp mediated efflux transport of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin across L-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell monolayers. The acute inhibitory effect was dependent on piperine concentration, with abolishment of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin polarized transport attained at 50 {mu}M of piperine. In contrast, prolonged (48 and 72 h) co-incubation of Caco-2 cell monolayers with piperine (50 and 100 {mu}M) increased P-gp activity through an up-regulation of cellular P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA levels. The up-regulated protein was functionally active, as demonstrated by a higher degree of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin efflux across the cell monolayers, but the induction was readily reversed by the removal of the spice from the culture medium. Peroral administration of piperine at the dose of 112 {mu}g/kg body weight/day to male Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days also led to increased intestinal P-gp levels. However, there was a concomitant reduction in the rodent liver P-gp although the kidney P-gp level was unaffected. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when piperine is to be co-administered with drugs that are P-gp substrates, particularly for patients whose diet relies heavily on pepper.

  9. Potential electron mediators to extract electron energies of RBC glycolysis for prolonged in vivo functional lifetime of hemoglobin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kettisen, Karin; Bülow, Leif; Sakai, Hiromi

    2015-04-15

    Developing a functional blood substitute as an alternative to donated blood for clinical use is believed to relieve present and future blood shortages, and to reduce the risks of infection and blood type mismatching. Hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) encapsulates a purified and concentrated human-derived Hb solution in a phospholipid vesicle (liposome). The in vivo safety and efficacy of HbV as a transfusion alternative have been clarified. Auto-oxidation of ferrous Hb in HbV gradually increases the level of ferric methemoglobin (metHb) and impairs the oxygen transport capabilities. The extension of the functional half-life of HbV has recently been proposed using an electron mediator, methylene blue (MB), which acts as a shuttle between red blood cells (RBC) and HbV. MB transfers electron energies of NAD(P)H, produced by RBC glycolysis, to metHb in HbV. Work presented here focuses on screening of 15 potential electron mediators, with appropriate redox potential and water solubility, for electron transfer from RBC to HbV. The results are assessed with regard to the chemical properties of the candidates. The compounds examined in this study were dimethyl methylene blue (DMB), methylene green, azure A, azure B, azure C, toluidine blue (TDB), thionin acetate, phenazine methosulfate, brilliant cresyl blue, cresyl violet, gallocyanine, toluylene blue, indigo carmine, indigotetrasulfonate, and MB. Six candidates were found to be unsuitable because of their insufficient diffusion across membranes, or overly high or nonexistent reactivity with relevant biomolecules. However, 9 displayed favorable metHb reduction. Among the suitable candidates, phenothiazines DMB and TDB exhibited effectiveness like MB did. In comparison to MB, they showed faster reduction by electron-donating NAD(P)H, coupled with showing a lower rate of reoxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen. Ascertaining the best electron mediator can provide a pathway for extending the lifetime and efficiency of potential blood substitutes. PMID:25734688

  10. Defective Mitochondrial Function In Vivo in Skeletal Muscle in Adults with Down’s Syndrome: A 31P-MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Alexander C.; Sleigh, Alison; McAllister, Catherine J.; Brage, Soren; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Kemp, Graham J.; Holland, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Down’s syndrome (DS) is a developmental disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID). We have previously shown that people with DS engage in very low levels of exercise compared to people with ID not due to DS. Many aspects of the DS phenotype, such as dementia, low activity levels and poor muscle tone, are shared with disorders of mitochondrial origin, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in cultured DS tissue. We undertook a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) study in the quadriceps muscle of 14 people with DS and 11 non-DS ID controls to investigate the post-exercise resynthesis kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr), which relies on mitochondrial respiratory function and yields a measure of muscle mitochondrial function in vivo. We found that the PCr recovery rate constant was significantly decreased in adults with DS compared to non-DS ID controls (1.7±0.1 min?1 vs 2.1±0.1 min?1 respectively) who were matched for physical activity levels, indicating that muscle mitochondrial function in vivo is impaired in DS. This is the first study to investigate mitochondrial function in vivo in DS using 31P-MRS. Our study is consistent with previous in vitro studies, supporting a theory of a global mitochondrial defect in DS. PMID:24391872

  11. Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human UCB-HSCs/HPCs by Coculture with AFT024-hkirre Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muti ur Rehman; Ali, Ijaz; Jiao, Wei; Wang, Yun; Masood, Saima; Yousaf, Muhammad Zubair; Javaid, Aqeel; Ahmad, Shafique; Feng, Meifu

    2014-01-01

    Kiaa1867 (human Kirre, hKirre) has a critical role in brain development and/or maintenance of the glomerular slit diaphragm in kidneys. Murine homolog of this gene, mKirre expressed in OP9 and AFT024 cells could support hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells (HSC/HPC) expansion in vitro. HKirre is also expressed in human FBMOB-hTERT cell line and fetal liver fibroblast-like cells but its function has remained unclear. In this paper, we cloned a hKirre gene from human fetal liver fibroblast-like cells and established a stably overexpressing hKirre-AFT024 cell line. Resultant cells could promote self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSCs/HPCs significantly higher than AFT024-control cells transformed with mock plasmid. The Expanded human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) CD34+ cells retained the capacity of multipotent differentiation as long as 8 weeks and successfully repopulated the bone marrow of sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, which demonstrated the expansion of long-term primitive transplantable HSCs/HPCs. Importantly, hkirre could upregulate the expressions of Wnt-5A, BMP4, and SDF-1 and downregulate TGF-? with other hematopoietic growth factors. By SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis, a ~89?kDa protein in total lysate of AFT024-hKirre was identified. Supernatants from AFT024-hkirre could also support CD34+CD38? cells expansion. These results demonstrated that the AFT024-hKirre cells have the ability to efficiently expand HSCs/HPCs. PMID:24719861

  12. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentăo, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further, it evidences zebrafish's potential for in vivo efficacy or toxicity screening of ubiquinone analogues or antiparasitic mitochondria-targeted drugs. PMID:23758163

  13. Assessment of blood clot formation and platelet receptor function ex vivo in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Collins, K S; Balasubramaniam, K; Viswanathan, G; Natasari, A; Tarn, J; Lendrem, D; Mitchell, S; Zaman, A; Ng, W F

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) shares clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is associated with an increased thromboembolic risk; however, it is unclear whether pSS patients are susceptible to thromboembolic diseases. In this study, we examined ex vivo blood clot formation (clot strength, rates of clot formation and lysis) in pSS using thromboelastography (TEG) and platelet aggregation to common agonists using multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA). We also investigated the relationship between TEG/MEA parameters and clinical/laboratory features of pSS. Design Case control. Setting Secondary care, single centre. Participants 34 pSS patients, 11 SLE patients and 13 healthy volunteers (all women) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes: TEG and MEA parameters between three subject groups. Secondary outcomes: The relationships between TEG/MEA and clinical/laboratory parameters analysed using bivariate correlation analysis with corrections for multiple testing. Results All TEG and MEA parameters were similar for the three subject groups. After corrections for multiple testing, interleukin (IL)-1? and Macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-1? remain correlated inversely with clot strength (r=?0.686, p=0.024 and r=?0.730, p=0.012, respectively) and overall coagulability (r=?0.640, p=0.048 and r=?0.648, p=0.048). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that several cytokines such as MIP-1?, IL-17a, IL-1? and Interferon (IFN)-? may be key predictors of clot strength and overall coagulability in pSS. Conclusions Clot kinetics and platelet receptor function are normal in pSS. Several cytokines correlate with clot strength and overall coagulability in pSS. PMID:23793707

  14. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca’ Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2/FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2/FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40–84] vs. 39 [36–46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  15. Husbandry Factors and the Resumption of Luteal Activity in Open and Zero-Grazed Dairy Cows in Urban and Peri-Urban Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kanyima, BM; Bĺge, R; Owiny, DO; Ntallaris, T; Lindahl, J; Magnusson, U; Nassuna-Musoke, MG

    2014-01-01

    Contents The study investigated the influence of selected husbandry factors on interval to resumption of post-partum cyclicity among dairy cows in urban and peri-urban Kampala. A prospective study of 85 day post-partum period of 59 dairy cows in open (n = 38) and zero grazing (n = 21) systems was conducted on 24 farms. Cows of parity 1–6 were recruited starting 15–30 days post-partum. Progesterone (P4) content in milk taken at 10–12 day intervals was analysed using ELISA. The cow P4 profiles were classified into ‘normal’ (< 56 days), ‘delayed’ (> 56 days), ‘ceased’ or ‘prolonged’ (if started < 56 days but with abnormal P4 displays) resumption of luteal activity and tested for association with husbandry and cow factors. Of the 59 cows, luteal activity in 81.4% resumed normally and in 18.6%, delayed. Only 23.7% maintained regular luteal activity, while the others had ceased (10.2%), prolonged (37.3%) or unclear luteal activity (20.3%). There were no differences between open and zero-grazed cows. Milk production was higher (p < 0.05) in zero than open grazing, in urban than peri-urban and in cows fed on brew waste (p < 0.001) compared with mill products and banana peels. Results suggest that luteal activity resumes normally in a majority of cows, although only a minority experienced continued normal cyclicity once ovulation had occurred, in the two farming systems irrespective of feed supplements or water, and that supplementing with brew waste is beneficial for milk production. PMID:24930481

  16. Husbandry factors and the resumption of luteal activity in open and zero-grazed dairy cows in urban and peri-urban kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kanyima, B M; Bĺge, R; Owiny, D O; Ntallaris, T; Lindahl, J; Magnusson, U; Nassuna-Musoke, M G

    2014-08-01

    The study investigated the influence of selected husbandry factors on interval to resumption of post-partum cyclicity among dairy cows in urban and peri-urban Kampala. A prospective study of 85 day post-partum period of 59 dairy cows in open (n = 38) and zero grazing (n = 21) systems was conducted on 24 farms. Cows of parity 1-6 were recruited starting 15-30 days post-partum. Progesterone (P4) content in milk taken at 10-12 day intervals was analysed using ELISA. The cow P4 profiles were classified into 'normal' (< 56 days), 'delayed' (> 56 days), 'ceased' or 'prolonged' (if started < 56 days but with abnormal P4 displays) resumption of luteal activity and tested for association with husbandry and cow factors. Of the 59 cows, luteal activity in 81.4% resumed normally and in 18.6%, delayed. Only 23.7% maintained regular luteal activity, while the others had ceased (10.2%), prolonged (37.3%) or unclear luteal activity (20.3%). There were no differences between open and zero-grazed cows. Milk production was higher (p < 0.05) in zero than open grazing, in urban than peri-urban and in cows fed on brew waste (p < 0.001) compared with mill products and banana peels. Results suggest that luteal activity resumes normally in a majority of cows, although only a minority experienced continued normal cyclicity once ovulation had occurred, in the two farming systems irrespective of feed supplements or water, and that supplementing with brew waste is beneficial for milk production. PMID:24930481

  17. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  18. Effect of Perinatal secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on in vivo and intrinsic airway structure/function in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2009-02-01

    Infants exposed to second hand smoke (SHS) experience more problems with wheezing. This study was designed to determine if perinatal SHS exposure increases intrinsic and/or in vivo airway responsiveness to methacholine and whether potential structural/cellular alterations in the airway might explain the change in responsiveness. Pregnant rhesus monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA) or SHS (1 mg/m{sup 3} total suspended particulates) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week starting at 50 days gestational age. The mother/infant pairs continued the SHS exposures postnatally. At 3 months of age each infant: 1) had in vivo lung function measurements in response to inhaled methacholine, or 2) the right accessory lobe filled with agarose, precision-cut to 600 {mu}m slices, and bathed in increasing concentrations of methacholine. The lumenal area of the central airway was determined using videomicrometry followed by fixation and histology with morphometry. In vivo tests showed that perinatal SHS increases baseline respiratory rate and decreases responsiveness to methacholine. Perinatal SHS did not alter intrinsic airway responsiveness in the bronchi. However in respiratory bronchioles, SHS exposure increased airway responsiveness at lower methacholine concentrations but decreased it at higher concentrations. Perinatal SHS did not change eosinophil profiles, epithelial volume, smooth muscle volume, or mucin volume. However it did increase the number of alveolar attachments in bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In general, as mucin increased, airway responsiveness decreased. We conclude that perinatal SHS exposure alters in vivo and intrinsic airway responsiveness, and alveolar attachments.

  19. Apoptosis-Related Factors in the Luteal Phase of the Domestic Cat and Their Involvement in the Persistence of Corpora Lutea in Lynx

    PubMed Central

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Braun, Beate C.; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland formed in the ovary after ovulation and is the major source of progesterone. In the Iberian and Eurasian lynx, CL physiologically persist after parturition and retain their capacity to produce progesterone, thus suppressing the ovarian activity. This unique reproductive characteristic has a big impact on the success of assisted reproduction techniques in the endangered Iberian lynx. The mechanisms behind CL persistence are not yet understood and require extensive studies on potential luteotropic and luteolytic factors in felids. Because the apoptosis system has been shown to be involved in structural regression of CL in many species, we aimed to investigate the capacity of perCL to undergo apoptosis. In addition, we performed initial studies on the apoptosis system in the luteal phase of the domestic cat. No previous research on this system has been made in this species. Our factors of interest included agents of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, i.e., pro-survival B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), the executioner caspase-3 (CASP3), as well as of the extrinsic pathway, i.e., pro-apoptotic receptor FAS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors (pro-apoptotic TNFRSF1A and pro-survival TNFRSF1B). We analyzed the relative mRNA levels of these factors, as well as protein localization of CASP3 and TNF during stages of pregnancy and the non-pregnant luteal phase in CL of domestic cats. The same factors were investigated in freshly ovulated CL (frCL) and perCL of Iberian and Eurasian lynx, which were histologically analyzed. All factors were present in the CL tissue of both domestic cat and lynx throughout all analyzed stages. The presence of pro-apoptotic factors BAX, CASP3, FAS and TNFRSF1A in perCL of the Eurasian and Iberian lynx might indicate the potential sensitivity of perCL to apoptotic signals. The expression of pro-survival factors BCL2 and TNFRSF1B was significantly higher in perCL compared to frCL of studied Iberian lynx, suggesting the potential involvement of these factors in the structural integrity of perCL. In both Iberian lynx and pregnant and non-pregnant domestic cats, the expression of TNFRSF1A was significantly higher in forming CL compared to other stages, suggesting the conserved involvement of this factor in the tissue reorganization during formation of the feline CL. The mRNA levels of CASP3 and TNFRSF1B were highest during regression stages of domestic cat CL. The current study provides initial results on the possible involvement of the apoptosis system in the structure and function of the feline CL and in its physiological persistence. PMID:26599641

  20. Apoptosis-Related Factors in the Luteal Phase of the Domestic Cat and Their Involvement in the Persistence of Corpora Lutea in Lynx.

    PubMed

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Braun, Beate C; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland formed in the ovary after ovulation and is the major source of progesterone. In the Iberian and Eurasian lynx, CL physiologically persist after parturition and retain their capacity to produce progesterone, thus suppressing the ovarian activity. This unique reproductive characteristic has a big impact on the success of assisted reproduction techniques in the endangered Iberian lynx. The mechanisms behind CL persistence are not yet understood and require extensive studies on potential luteotropic and luteolytic factors in felids. Because the apoptosis system has been shown to be involved in structural regression of CL in many species, we aimed to investigate the capacity of perCL to undergo apoptosis. In addition, we performed initial studies on the apoptosis system in the luteal phase of the domestic cat. No previous research on this system has been made in this species. Our factors of interest included agents of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, i.e., pro-survival B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), the executioner caspase-3 (CASP3), as well as of the extrinsic pathway, i.e., pro-apoptotic receptor FAS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors (pro-apoptotic TNFRSF1A and pro-survival TNFRSF1B). We analyzed the relative mRNA levels of these factors, as well as protein localization of CASP3 and TNF during stages of pregnancy and the non-pregnant luteal phase in CL of domestic cats. The same factors were investigated in freshly ovulated CL (frCL) and perCL of Iberian and Eurasian lynx, which were histologically analyzed. All factors were present in the CL tissue of both domestic cat and lynx throughout all analyzed stages. The presence of pro-apoptotic factors BAX, CASP3, FAS and TNFRSF1A in perCL of the Eurasian and Iberian lynx might indicate the potential sensitivity of perCL to apoptotic signals. The expression of pro-survival factors BCL2 and TNFRSF1B was significantly higher in perCL compared to frCL of studied Iberian lynx, suggesting the potential involvement of these factors in the structural integrity of perCL. In both Iberian lynx and pregnant and non-pregnant domestic cats, the expression of TNFRSF1A was significantly higher in forming CL compared to other stages, suggesting the conserved involvement of this factor in the tissue reorganization during formation of the feline CL. The mRNA levels of CASP3 and TNFRSF1B were highest during regression stages of domestic cat CL. The current study provides initial results on the possible involvement of the apoptosis system in the structure and function of the feline CL and in its physiological persistence. PMID:26599641

  1. Contractile behavior of the forelimb digital flexors during steady-state locomotion in horses (Equus caballus): an initial test of muscle architectural hypotheses about in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Butcher, M T; Hermanson, J W; Ducharme, N G; Mitchell, L M; Soderholm, L V; Bertram, J E A

    2009-01-01

    The forelimb digital flexors of the horse display remarkable diversity in muscle architecture despite each muscle-tendon unit having a similar mechanical advantage across the fetlock joint. We focus on two distinct muscles of the digital flexor system: short compartment deep digital flexor (DDF(sc)) and the superficial digital flexor (SDF). The objectives were to investigate force-length behavior and work performance of these two muscles in vivo during locomotion, and to determine how muscle architecture contributes to in vivo function in this system. We directly recorded muscle force (via tendon strain gauges) and muscle fascicle length (via sonomicrometry crystals) as horses walked (1.7 m s(-1)), trotted (4.1 m s(-1)) and cantered (7.0 m s(-1)) on a motorized treadmill. Over the range of gaits and speeds, DDF(sc) fascicles shortened while producing relatively low force, generating modest positive net work. In contrast, SDF fascicles initially shortened, then lengthened while producing high force, resulting in substantial negative net work. These findings suggest the long fibered, unipennate DDF(sc) supplements mechanical work during running, whereas the short fibered, multipennate SDF is specialized for economical high force and enhanced elastic energy storage. Apparent in vivo functions match well with the distinct architectural features of each muscle. PMID:18835360

  2. Preserved endothelium-dependent dilatation of the coronary microvasculature at the early phase of diabetes mellitus despite the increased oxidative stress and depressed cardiac mechanical function ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been accumulating evidence associating diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular dysfunctions. However, most of the studies are focused on the late stages of diabetes and on the function of large arteries. This study aimed at characterizing the effects of the early phase of diabetes mellitus on the cardiac and vascular function with focus on the intact coronary microvasculature and the oxidative stress involved. Materials and methods Zucker diabetic fatty rats and their lean littermates fed with standard diet A04 (Safe) were studied at the 11th week of age. Biochemical parameters such as glucose, insulin and triglycerides levels as well as their oxidative stress status were measured. Their hearts were perfused ex vivo according to Langendorff and their cardiac activity and coronary microvascular reactivity were evaluated. Results Zucker fatty rats already exhibited a diabetic state at this age as demonstrated by the elevated levels of plasma glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin and triglycerides. The ex vivo perfusion of their hearts revealed a decreased cardiac mechanical function and coronary flow. This was accompanied by an increase in the overall oxidative stress of the organs. However, estimation of the active form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and coronary reactivity indicated a preserved function of the coronary microvessels at this phase of the disease. Diabetes affected also the cardiac membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition by increasing the arachidonic acid and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids levels. Conclusions The presence of diabetes, even at its beginning, significantly increased the overall oxidative stress of the organs resulting to decreased cardiac mechanical activity ex vivo. However, adaptations were adopted at this early phase of the disease regarding the preserved coronary microvascular reactivity and the associated cardiac phospholipid composition in order to provide a certain protection to the heart. PMID:23530768

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotubes noncovalently functionalized with lipid modified polyethylenimine for siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Siu, King S; Zheng, Xiufen; Liu, Yanling; Zhang, Yujuan; Zhang, Xusheng; Chen, Di; Yuan, Ken; Gillies, Elizabeth R; Koropatnick, James; Min, Wei-Ping

    2014-10-15

    siRNA can downregulate the expression of specific genes. However, delivery to specific cells and tissues in vivo presents significant challenges. Modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to protect siRNA and facilitate its entry into cells. However, simple and efficient methods to functionalize CNTs are needed. Here, noncovalent functionalization of CNTs is performed and shown to effectively deliver siRNA to target cells. Specifically, single-walled CNTs were functionalized by noncovalent association with a lipopolymer. The lipopolymer (DSPE-PEG) was composed of a phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Three different ratios of polyethylenimine (PEI) to DSPE-PEG were synthesized and characterized and the products were used to disperse CNTs. The resulting materials were used for siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. The structural, biophysical, and biological properties of DGI/C and their complexes formed with siRNA were investigated. Cytotoxicity of the materials was low, and effective gene silencing in B16-F10 cells was demonstrated in vitro. In addition, significant uptake of siRNA as well as gene silencing in the liver was found following intravenous injection. This approach provides a new strategy for siRNA delivery and could provide insight for the development of noncovalently functionalized CNTs for siRNA therapy. PMID:25216445

  4. Impact of buserelin acetate or hCG administration on day 12 post-ovulation on subsequent luteal profile and conception rate in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Pandey, A K; Ghuman, S P S; Dhaliwal, G S; Kumar, Ajeet; Agarwal, S K

    2013-01-30

    The present study investigated the impact of gonadotropic hormone administration on day 12 post-ovulation on subsequent luteal profile and conception rate in buffaloes. All the buffaloes (n=48) were estrus synchronized by a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin F(2?) (PGF(2?)), administered 11 days apart, followed by insemination during mid to late estrus. To examine the effect of mid-luteal phase hormonal treatment, buffaloes were randomly divided into control (normal saline, n=14), d12-BA (buserelin acetate, 20?g, n=17) and d12-hCG (hCG, 3000IU, n=17) groups. Ovaries were scanned on the day of induced estrus to measure the preovulatory follicle (POF) diameter and on days 5, 12, 16 and 21 post-ovulation to examine the alterations in corpus luteum (CL) diameter. On the day of each sonography, blood samples were collected for the estimation of plasma progesterone. In treatment groups, luteal profile (CL diameter and plasma progesterone) on day 16-21 post-ovulation was better (P<0.05) as well as first service conception rate was higher (52.9% in each treatment group vs. 28.6%, P>0.05) compared to controls. All the pregnant buffaloes exhibited higher (P<0.05) plasma progesterone on various post-ovulation days than their respective non-pregnant counterparts. Treatment-induced accessory corpus luteum (ACL) formation was observed in 58.8 per cent and 70.6 per cent buffaloes of d12-BA and d12-hCG group, respectively, that also had higher (P<0.05) plasma progesterone compared to controls. Compared to the spontaneous CL, the diameter of ACL was less (P<0.05) in the treatment groups. In conclusion, buserelin acetate and hCG administration on day 12 post-ovulation leads to accessory CL formation, improves luteal profile and consequently increases conception rate in buffaloes. PMID:23201300

  5. Relation of myocardial oxygen consumption and function to high energy phosphate utilization during graded hypoxia and reoxygenation in sheep in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Portman, M A; Standaert, T A; Ning, X H

    1995-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), function, and high energy phosphates during severe hypoxia and reoxygenation in sheep in vivo. Graded hypoxia was performed in open-chested sheep to adjust PO2 to values where rapid depletion of energy stores occurred. Highly time-resolved 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy enabled monitoring of myocardial phosphates throughout hypoxia and recovery with simultaneous MVO2 measurement. Sheep undergoing graded hypoxia (n = 5) with an arterial PO2 nadir of 13.4 +/- 0.5 mmHg, demonstrated maintained rates of oxygen consumption with large changes in coronary flow as phosphocreatine (PCr) decreased within 4 min to 40 +/- 7% of baseline. ATP utilization rate increased simultaneously 59 +/- 20%. Recovery was accompanied by marked increases in MVO2 from 2.0 +/- 0.5 to 7.2 +/- 1.9 mumol/g per min, while PCr recovery rate was 4.3 +/- 0.6 mumol/g per min. ATP decreased to 75 +/- 6% of baseline during severe hypoxia and did not recover. Sheep (n = 5) which underwent moderate hypoxia (PO2 maintained 25-35 mmHg for 10 min) did not demonstrate change in PCr or ATP. Functional and work assessment (n = 4) revealed that cardiac power increased during the graded hypoxia and was maintained through early reoxygenation. These studies show that (a) MVO2 does not decrease during oxygen deprivation in vivo despite marked and rapid decreases in high energy phosphates; (b) contractile function during hypoxia in vivo does not decrease during periods of PCr depletion and intracellular phosphate accumulation, and this may be related to marked increases in circulating catecholamines during global hypoxia. The measured creatine rephosphorylation rate is 34 +/- 11% of predicted (P < 0.01) calculated from reoxygenation parameters, which indicates that some mitochondrial respiratory uncoupling also occurs during the rephosphorylation period. Images PMID:7738181

  6. Intracellular cleavable poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for efficient siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daoshu; Cheng, Qiang; Jiang, Qian; Huang, Yuanyu; Yang, Zheng; Han, Shangcong; Zhao, Yuning; Guo, Shutao; Liang, Zicai; Dong, Anjie

    2013-05-21

    A low cytotoxicity and high efficiency delivery system with the advantages of low cost and facile fabrication is needed for the application of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery both in vitro and in vivo. For these prerequisites, cationic polymer-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (ssCP-MSNs) were prepared by surface functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles with disulfide bond cross-linked poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA). In vitro and in vivo evaluations were performed. The synthesized ssCP-MSNs are 100-150 nm in diameter with a pore size of 10 nm and a positively charged surface with a high zeta potential of 27 mV. Consequently, the ssCP-MSNs showed an excellent binding capacity for siRNA, and an enhancement in the cell uptake and cytosolic availability of siRNA. Furthermore, the intracellular reducing cleavage of the disulfide bonds cross-linking the PDMAEMA segments led to intracellular cleavage of PDMAEMA from ssCP-MSNs, which facilitated the intracellular triggered release of siRNA. Therefore, promoted RNA interference was observed in HeLa-Luc cells, which was equal to that of Lipofectamine 2000. Significantly, compared to Lipofectamine 2000, the ssCP-MSNs were more biocompatible, with low cytotoxicity (even non-cytotoxicity) and promotion of cell proliferation to HeLa-Luc cells. The in vivo systemic distribution studies certified that ssCP-MSNs/siRNA could prolong the duration of siRNA in vivo, and that they accumulated in the adrenal gland, liver, lung, spleen, kidney, heart and thymus after intravenous injection. Encouragingly, with the ability to deliver siRNA to a tumor, ssCP-MSNs/siRNA showed a tumor suppression effect in the HeLa-Luc xenograft murine model after intravenous injection. Therefore, the ssCP-MSNs cationic polymer-mesoporous silica nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity are promising for siRNA delivery. PMID:23552843

  7. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its application to detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andrew J; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2012-04-01

    Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development. PMID:22559696

  8. A conserved salt bridge in the G loop of multiple protein kinases is important for catalysis and for in vivo Lyn function.

    PubMed

    Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Che, Jianwei; Lee, Christian C; Yang, Yating; Herman, Ann; Jia, Yong; Velentza, Anastasia; Watson, James; Sternberg, Luise; Kim, Sunjun; Ziaee, Niusha; Miller, Andrew; Jackson, Carie; Fujimoto, Manabu; Young, Mike; Batalov, Serge; Liu, Yi; Warmuth, Markus; Wiltshire, Tim; Cooke, Michael P; Sauer, Karsten

    2009-01-16

    The glycine-rich G loop controls ATP binding and phosphate transfer in protein kinases. Here we show that the functions of Src family and Abl protein tyrosine kinases require an electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged amino acids within their G loops that is conserved in multiple other phylogenetically distinct protein kinases, from plants to humans. By limiting G loop flexibility, it controls ATP binding, catalysis, and inhibition by ATP-competitive compounds such as Imatinib. In WeeB mice, mutational disruption of the interaction results in expression of a Lyn protein with reduced catalytic activity, and in perturbed B cell receptor signaling. Like Lyn(-/-) mice, WeeB mice show profound defects in B cell development and function and succumb to autoimmune glomerulonephritis. This demonstrates the physiological importance of the conserved G loop salt bridge and at the same time distinguishes the in vivo requirement for the Lyn kinase activity from other potential functions of the protein. PMID:19150426

  9. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its applicationto detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K.; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-04-01

    Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development.

  10. [Coupling of membranous and metabolic functions in nucleated erythrocytes of Scorpaena porcus L. in hypoxia (experiments in vivo and in vitro)].

    PubMed

    Soldatov, A A; Andreeva, A Yu; Novitskaya, V N; Parfenova, I A

    2014-01-01

    Effect of hypoxia (diapason of 0.57-8.17 mg O2 l(-1)) on functional characteristics of nucleated erythrocytes of the benthonic marine fish Scorpaena porcus L. was studied under conditions in vivo and in vitro. It has been established that characteristic of cellular system of this species is a balanced unhibition of membranous and metabolic functions under conditions of external deficit of oxygen (experiments in vivo). This is expressed in the ability of cells to maintain within norm the intracellular ATP concentration and transmembrane gradients for Na+ and K+ with low activities of Na+, K(+)-ATPase and hexokinase. This phenomenon seems to be based on the process of a decrease of the number of functioning ion channel at the level of the cell cytoplasmic membrane; this process reduces energy expenditure for maintenance of cationic gradients (the phenomenon of metabolic arrest). The same is also indicated by an increase of intensity of fluorescence of FDA and R123 in the scorpaena erythrocytic suspensions in hypoxia (experiments in vitro). Mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:25786318

  11. In vivo direct reprogramming of reactive glial cells into functional neurons after brain injury and in an Alzheimer’s disease model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ziyuan; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Chen, Yuchen; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of neurons after brain injury and in neurodegenerative disease is often accompanied by reactive gliosis and scarring, which are difficult to reverse with existing treatment approaches. Here, we show that reactive glial cells in the cortex of stab-injured or Alzheimer’s disease (AD) model mice can be directly reprogrammed into functional neurons in vivo using retroviral expression of a single neural transcription factor, NeuroD1. Following expression of NeuroD1, astrocytes were reprogrammed into glutamatergic neurons, while NG2 cells were reprogrammed into glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Cortical slice recordings revealed both spontaneous and evoked synaptic responses in NeuroD1-converted neurons, suggesting that they integrated into local neural circuits. NeuroD1 expression was also able to reprogram cultured human cortical astrocytes into functional neurons. Our studies therefore suggest that direct reprogramming of reactive glial cells into functional neurons in vivo could provide an alternative approach for repair of injured or diseased brain. PMID:24360883

  12. Targeted Resequencing and Systematic In Vivo Functional Testing Identifies Rare Variants in MEIS1 as Significant Contributors to Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Eva C.; Kousi, Maria; Tan, Perciliz L.; Tilch, Erik; Knauf, Franziska; Lichtner, Peter; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Berger, Klaus; Fietze, Ingo; Hornyak, Magdolna; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Bachmann, Cornelius G.; Zimprich, Alexander; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic condition characterized by nocturnal dysesthesias and an urge to move, affecting the legs. RLS is a complex trait, for which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common susceptibility alleles of modest (OR 1.2–1.7) risk at six genomic loci. Among these, variants in MEIS1 have emerged as the largest risk factors for RLS, suggesting that perturbations in this transcription factor might be causally related to RLS susceptibility. To establish this causality, direction of effect, and total genetic burden of MEIS1, we interrogated 188 case subjects and 182 control subjects for rare alleles not captured by previous GWASs, followed by genotyping of ?3,000 case subjects and 3,000 control subjects, and concluded with systematic functionalization of all discovered variants using a previously established in vivo model of neurogenesis. We observed a significant excess of rare MEIS1 variants in individuals with RLS. Subsequent assessment of all nonsynonymous variants by in vivo complementation revealed an excess of loss-of-function alleles in individuals with RLS. Strikingly, these alleles compromised the function of the canonical MEIS1 splice isoform but were irrelevant to an isoform known to utilize an alternative 3? sequence. Our data link MEIS1 loss of function to the etiopathology of RLS, highlight how combined sequencing and systematic functional annotation of rare variation at GWAS loci can detect risk burden, and offer a plausible explanation for the specificity of phenotypic expressivity of loss-of-function alleles at a locus broadly necessary for neurogenesis and neurodevelopment. PMID:24995868

  13. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice. PMID:26474456

  14. Formulation, High Throughput In Vitro Screening and In Vivo Functional Characterization of Nanoemulsion-Based Intranasal Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pamela T.; Leroueil, Pascale R.; Smith, Douglas M.; Ciotti, Susan; Bielinska, Anna U.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Mullen, Catherine H.; Groom, Jeffrey V.; Taylor, Erin M.; Passmore, Crystal; Makidon, Paul E.; O’Konek, Jessica J.; Myc, Andrzej; Hamouda, Tarek; Baker, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants have been reported to induce both mucosal and systemic immunity when applied to mucosal surfaces and this dual response appears important for protection against certain pathogens. Despite the potential advantages, however, no mucosal adjuvants are currently approved for human use. Evaluating compounds as mucosal adjuvants is a slow and costly process due to the need for lengthy animal immunogenicity studies. We have constructed a library of 112 intranasal adjuvant candidate formulations consisting of oil-in-water nanoemulsions that contain various cationic and nonionic surfactants. To facilitate adjuvant development we first evaluated this library in a series of high-throughput, in vitro assays for activities associated with innate and adaptive immune activation in vivo. These in vitro assays screened for the ability of the adjuvant to bind to mucin, induce cytotoxicity, facilitate antigen uptake in epithelial and dendritic cells, and activate cellular pathways. We then sought to determine how these parameters related to adjuvant activity in vivo. While the in vitro assays alone were not enough to predict the in vivo adjuvant activity completely, several interesting relationships were found with immune responses in mice. Furthermore, by varying the physicochemical properties of the surfactant components (charge, surfactant polar head size and hydrophobicity) and the surfactant blend ratio of the formulations, the strength and type of the immune response generated (TH1, TH2, TH17) could be modulated. These findings suggest the possibility of using high-throughput screens to aid in the design of custom adjuvants with unique immunological profiles to match specific mucosal vaccine applications. PMID:25962136

  15. Insulin Resistance Is Not Associated with an Impaired Mitochondrial Function in Contracting Gastrocnemius Muscle of Goto-Kakizaki Diabetic Rats In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Macia, Michael; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Desrois, Martine; Lan, Carole; Portha, Bernard; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David; Giannesini, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance, altered lipid metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle would play a major role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development, but the causal relationships between these events remain conflicting. To clarify this issue, gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics were investigated throughout a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a non-obese T2DM model developing peripheral insulin resistant without abnormal level of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). Wistar rats were used as controls. Mechanical performance and energy metabolism were assessed strictly non-invasively using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 31-phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Compared with control group, plasma insulin and glucose were respectively lower and higher in GK rats, but plasma NEFA level was normal. In resting GK muscle, phosphocreatine content was reduced whereas glucose content and intracellular pH were both higher. However, there were not differences between both groups for basal oxidative ATP synthesis rate, citrate synthase activity, and intramyocellular contents for lipids, glycogen, ATP and ADP (an important in vivo mitochondrial regulator). During a standardized fatiguing protocol (6 min of maximal repeated isometric contractions electrically induced at a frequency of 1.7 Hz), mechanical performance and glycolytic ATP production rate were reduced in diabetic animals whereas oxidative ATP production rate, maximal mitochondrial capacity and ATP cost of contraction were not changed. These findings provide in vivo evidence that insulin resistance is not caused by an impairment of mitochondrial function in this diabetic model. PMID:26057538

  16. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns encountered in using heterologous systems are totally excluded.

  17. Nano-imaging of the beating mouse heart in vivo: Importance of sarcomere dynamics, as opposed to sarcomere length per se, in the regulation of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Oyama, Kotaro; Shimozawa, Togo; Mizuno, Akari; Ohki, Takashi; Terui, Takako; Minamisawa, Susumu; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomeric contraction in cardiomyocytes serves as the basis for the heart's pump functions in mammals. Although it plays a critical role in the circulatory system, myocardial sarcomere length (SL) change has not been directly measured in vivo under physiological conditions because of technical difficulties. In this study, we developed a high speed (100-frames per second), high resolution (20-nm) imaging system for myocardial sarcomeres in living mice. Using this system, we conducted three-dimensional analysis of sarcomere dynamics in left ventricular myocytes during the cardiac cycle, simultaneously with electrocardiogram and left ventricular pressure measurements. We found that (a) the working range of SL was on the shorter end of the resting distribution, and (b) the left ventricular-developed pressure was positively correlated with the SL change between diastole and systole. The present findings provide the first direct evidence for the tight coupling of sarcomere dynamics and ventricular pump functions in the physiology of the heart. PMID:26712849

  18. Phosphorylation of Enabled by the Drosophila Abelson Tyrosine Kinase Regulates the In Vivo Function and Protein-Protein Interactions of Enabled

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Allen R.; Ahern-Djamali, Shawn M.; Juang, Jyh-Lyh; Jackson, P. David; Hoffmann, F. M.

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila Enabled (Ena) is a member of a family of cytoskeleton-associated proteins including mammalian vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and murine Enabled that regulate actin cytoskeleton assembly. Mutations in Drosophila ena were discovered as dominant genetic suppressors of mutations in the Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), suggesting that Ena and Abl function in the same pathway or process. We have identified six tyrosine residues on Ena that are phosphorylated by Abl in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of these phosphorylation sites to phenylalanine partially impaired the ability of Ena to restore viability to ena mutant animals, indicating that phosphorylation is required for optimal Ena function. Phosphorylation of Ena by Abl inhibited the binding of Ena to SH3 domains in vitro, suggesting that one effect of Ena phosphorylation may be to modulate its association with other proteins. PMID:9418863

  19. Integrating structural and functional imaging for computer assisted detection of prostate cancer on multi-protocol in vivo 3 Tesla MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Rosen, Mark; Chappelow, Jonathan; Toth, Robert; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2009-02-01

    Screening and detection of prostate cancer (CaP) currently lacks an image-based protocol which is reflected in the high false negative rates currently associated with blinded sextant biopsies. Multi-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high resolution functional and structural data about internal body structures (such as the prostate). In this paper we present a novel comprehensive computer-aided scheme for CaP detection from high resolution in vivo multi-protocol MRI by integrating functional and structural information obtained via dynamic-contrast enhanced (DCE) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MRI, respectively. Our scheme is fully-automated and comprises (a) prostate segmentation, (b) multimodal image registration, and (c) data representation and multi-classifier modules for information fusion. Following prostate boundary segmentation via an improved active shape model, the DCE/T2-w protocols and the T2-w/ex vivo histological prostatectomy specimens are brought into alignment via a deformable, multi-attribute registration scheme. T2-w/histology alignment allows for the mapping of true CaP extent onto the in vivo MRI, which is used for training and evaluation of a multi-protocol MRI CaP classifier. The meta-classifier used is a random forest constructed by bagging multiple decision tree classifiers, each trained individually on T2-w structural, textural and DCE functional attributes. 3-fold classifier cross validation was performed using a set of 18 images derived from 6 patient datasets on a per-pixel basis. Our results show that the results of CaP detection obtained from integration of T2-w structural textural data and DCE functional data (area under the ROC curve of 0.815) significantly outperforms detection based on either of the individual modalities (0.704 (T2-w) and 0.682 (DCE)). It was also found that a meta-classifier trained directly on integrated T2-w and DCE data (data-level integration) significantly outperformed a decision-level meta-classifier, constructed by combining the classifier outputs from the individual T2-w and DCE channels.

  20. In Vitro Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells into Functional ? Islets Under 2D and 3D Culture Conditions and In Vivo Preclinical Validation of 3D Islets.

    PubMed

    Bose, Bipasha; Sudheer, P Shenoy

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of pluripotent stem cells, (embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells), applications of such pluripotent stem cells are of prime importance. Indeed, scientists are involved in studying the basic biology of pluripotent stem cells, but equal impetus is there to direct the pluripotent stem cells into multiple lineages for cell therapy applications. Scientists across the globe have been successful, to a certain extent, in obtaining cells of definitive endoderm and also pancreatic ? islets by differentiating human pluripotent stem cells. Pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocols aim at mimicking in vivo embryonic development. As in vivo embryonic development is a complex process and involves interplay of multiple cytokines, the differentiation protocols also involve a stepwise use of multiple cytokines. Indeed the novel markers for pancreas organogenesis serve as the roadmaps to develop new protocols for pancreatic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells. Earliest developed protocols for pancreas differentiation involved "Nestin selection pathway," a pathway common for both neuronal and pancreatic differentiation lead to the generation of cells that were a combination of cells from neuronal lineage. Eventually with the discovery of hierarchy of ? cell transcription factors like Pdx1, Pax4, and Nkx2.2, forced expression of such transcription factors proved successful in converting a pluripotent stem cell into a ? cell. Protocols developed almost half a decade ago to the recent ones rather involve stepwise differentiations involving various cytokines and could generate as high as 25 % functional insulin-positive cells in vitro. Most advanced protocols for ? islet differentiations from human pluripotent stem cells focused on 3D culture conditions, which reportedly produced 60-65 % functional ? islet cells. Here, we describe the protocol for differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional ? cells under both 2D and 3D culture conditions. PMID:25783769

  1. Accelerated apoptotic death and in vivo turnover of erythrocytes in mice lacking functional mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Bissinger, Rosi; Fajol, Abul; Salker, Madhuri S.; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Gu, Shuchen; Jilani, Kashif; Lupescu, Adrian; Reyskens, Kathleen M. S. E.; Ackermann, Teresa F.; Föller, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Sheffield, William P.; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2 plays a decisive role in apoptosis. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, suicidal erythrocyte death called eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Here, we explored whether MSK1/2 participates in the regulation of eryptosis. To this end, erythrocytes were isolated from mice lacking functional MSK1/2 (msk?/?) and corresponding wild-type mice (msk+/+). Blood count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and mean erythrocyte volume were similar in both msk?/? and msk+/+ mice, but reticulocyte count was significantly increased in msk?/? mice. Cell membrane PS exposure was similar in untreated msk?/? and msk+/+ erythrocytes, but was enhanced by pathophysiological cell stressors ex vivo such as hyperosmotic shock or energy depletion to significantly higher levels in msk?/? erythrocytes than in msk+/+ erythrocytes. Cell shrinkage following hyperosmotic shock and energy depletion, as well as hemolysis following decrease of extracellular osmolarity was more pronounced in msk?/? erythrocytes. The in vivo clearance of autologously-infused CFSE-labeled erythrocytes from circulating blood was faster in msk?/? mice. The spleens from msk?/? mice contained a significantly greater number of PS-exposing erythrocytes than spleens from msk+/+ mice. The present observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent clearance of erythrocytes leading to enhanced erythrocyte turnover in MSK1/2-deficient mice. PMID:26611568

  2. Investigation of Functional Activity of Cells in Granulomatous Inflammatory Lesions from Mice with Latent Tuberculous Infection in the New Ex Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The new ex vivo model system measuring functional input of individual granuloma cells to formation of granulomatous inflammatory lesions in mice with latent tuberculous infection has been developed and described in the current study. Monolayer cultures of cells that migrated from individual granulomas were established in the proposed culture settings for mouse spleen and lung granulomas induced by in vivo exposure to BCG vaccine. The cellular composition of individual granulomas was analyzed. The expression of the leukocyte surface markers such as phagocytic receptors CD11b, CD11c, CD14, and CD16/CD32 and the expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80, CD83, and CD86 were tested as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN? and IL-1?) and growth factors (GM-CSF and FGFb) for cells of individual granulomas. The colocalization of the phagocytic receptors and costimulatory molecules in the surface microdomains of granuloma cells (with and without acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria) has also been detected. It was found that some part of cytokine macrophage producers have carried acid-fast mycobacteria. Detected modulation in dynamics of production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and leukocyte surface markers by granuloma cells has indicated continued processes of activation and deactivation of granuloma inflammation cells during the latent tuberculous infection progress in mice. PMID:24198843

  3. Accelerated apoptotic death and in vivo turnover of erythrocytes in mice lacking functional mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Bissinger, Rosi; Fajol, Abul; Salker, Madhuri S; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Gu, Shuchen; Jilani, Kashif; Lupescu, Adrian; Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Ackermann, Teresa F; Föller, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Sheffield, William P; Arthur, J Simon C; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2 plays a decisive role in apoptosis. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, suicidal erythrocyte death called eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Here, we explored whether MSK1/2 participates in the regulation of eryptosis. To this end, erythrocytes were isolated from mice lacking functional MSK1/2 (msk(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (msk(+/+)). Blood count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and mean erythrocyte volume were similar in both msk(-/-) and msk(+/+) mice, but reticulocyte count was significantly increased in msk(-/-) mice. Cell membrane PS exposure was similar in untreated msk(-/-) and msk(+/+) erythrocytes, but was enhanced by pathophysiological cell stressors ex vivo such as hyperosmotic shock or energy depletion to significantly higher levels in msk(-/-) erythrocytes than in msk(+/+) erythrocytes. Cell shrinkage following hyperosmotic shock and energy depletion, as well as hemolysis following decrease of extracellular osmolarity was more pronounced in msk(-/-) erythrocytes. The in vivo clearance of autologously-infused CFSE-labeled erythrocytes from circulating blood was faster in msk(-/-) mice. The spleens from msk(-/-) mice contained a significantly greater number of PS-exposing erythrocytes than spleens from msk(+/+) mice. The present observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent clearance of erythrocytes leading to enhanced erythrocyte turnover in MSK1/2-deficient mice. PMID:26611568

  4. Folic acid-functionalized up-conversion nanoparticles: toxicity studies in vivo and in vitro and targeted imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lining; Wei, Zuwu; Chen, Haige; Liu, Jinliang; Guo, Jianjian; Cao, Ming; Wen, Tieqiao; Shi, Liyi

    2014-07-01

    Folate receptors (FRs) are overexpressed on a variety of human cancer cells and tissues, including cancers of the breast, ovaries, endometrium, and brain. This over-expression of FRs can be used to target folate-linked imaging specifically to FR-expressing tumors. Fluorescence is emerging as a powerful new modality for molecular imaging in both the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, we prepared three kinds of folate-targeted up-conversion nanoparticles as imaging agents (UCNC-FA: UCNC-Er-FA, UCNC-Tm-FA, and UCNC-Er,Tm-FA). In vivo and in vitro toxicity studies showed that these nanoparticles have both good biocompatibility and low toxicity. Moreover, the up-conversion luminescence imaging indicated that they have good targeting to HeLa cells and can therefore serve as potential fluorescent contrast agents.Folate receptors (FRs) are overexpressed on a variety of human cancer cells and tissues, including cancers of the breast, ovaries, endometrium, and brain. This over-expression of FRs can be used to target folate-linked imaging specifically to FR-expressing tumors. Fluorescence is emerging as a powerful new modality for molecular imaging in both the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, we prepared three kinds of folate-targeted up-conversion nanoparticles as imaging agents (UCNC-FA: UCNC-Er-FA, UCNC-Tm-FA, and UCNC-Er,Tm-FA). In vivo and in vitro toxicity studies showed that these nanoparticles have both good biocompatibility and low toxicity. Moreover, the up-conversion luminescence imaging indicated that they have good targeting to HeLa cells and can therefore serve as potential fluorescent contrast agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Up-conversion luminescence spectra of UCNC-Er and UCNC-Er-FA, UCNC-Tm and UCNC-Tm-FA. Confocal luminescence imaging data collected as a series along the Z optical axis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02312a

  5. The relationship between the diameter of chemically-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their organ biodistribution profiles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Julie T-W; Fabbro, Chiara; Venturelli, Enrica; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Chaloin, Olivier; Da Ros, Tatiana; Methven, Laura; Nunes, Antonio; Sosabowski, Jane K; Mather, Stephen J; Robinson, Martyn K; Amadou, Julien; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2014-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit unique properties which have led to their applications in the biomedical field as novel delivery systems for diagnosis and therapy purposes. We have previously reported that the degree of functionalization of CNTs is a key factor determining their biological behaviour. The present study broadens the spectrum by investigating the impact of the diameter of CNTs using two series of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs) with distinct differences in their diameters. Both MWNTs were doubly functionalized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and amidation reactions, allowing the appended functional groups to be further conjugated with radionuclide chelating moieties and antibodies or antibody fragments. All constructs possessed comparable degree of functionalization and were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance. The MWNT conjugates were radio-labelled with indium-111, which thereby enabled in vivo single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and organ biodistribution study using ?-scintigraphy. The narrow MWNTs (average diameter: 9.2 nm) demonstrated enhanced tissue affinity including non-reticular endothelial tissues compared to the wider MWNTs (average diameter: 39.5 nm). The results indicate that the higher aspect ratio of narrow MWNTs may be beneficial for their future biological applications due to higher tissue accumulation. PMID:25168822

  6. Hormonal patterns during heat stress following PGF(2)alpha-tham salt induced luteal regression in heifers.

    PubMed

    Gwazdauskas, F C; Thatcher, W W; Kiddy, C A; Paape, M J; Wilcox, C J

    1981-09-01

    Ten, normally cycling, Holstein heifers were assigned to one of two environmental treatment groups (21.3 C, 59% RH or 32.0 C, 67% RH). PGF(2)alpha was used to induce luteal regression and synchronize estrus in order to evaluate temperature effects on various hormonal and physiological responses during the proestrous through metestrous periods. Environmental temperature (32.0 C) evoked a 1.4 C increase in rectal temperature and a 3.6 C increase in skin temperatures. Length of estrus was shorter (P<.10) for heifers at 32.0 C (16 vs 21 hr.). Average plasma progestin concentration between treatments was not different (P>.10). Mean estradiol concentrations were significantly (P<.10) lower in heifers at 32.0 C. No differences (P>.10) were detected in mean concentrations of LH between heifers at 21.3 C and 32.0 C. Preovulatory peak LH concentrations were 32.2 and 33.2 ng/ml plasma, respectively. All animals had a preovulatory surge of LH, suggesting that hyperthermia did not alter factors which regulate hypothalamic control of LH release. Mean basal concentrations of prolactin and corticoids were not different between temperature treatments (P>.10). However, mean corticoid response following ACTH was of lower magnitude, earlier to peak, and of shorter duration in heat stressed heifers. Heat stress did not appear to affect the hormonal milieu in peripheral plasma associated with corpus luteum regression (decrease in progestin) and ovulation (LH surge). However, duration of estrus, concentrations of estradiol at proestrus and corticoid response to injection of ACTH were reduced. PMID:16725640

  7. Anatomical and Functional Images of in vitro and in vivo Tissues by NIR Time-domain Diffuse Optical Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Onodera, Yoichi; Yamada, Yukio

    Near infra-red (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has gained much attention and it will be clinically applied to imaging breast, neonatal head, and the hemodynamics of the brain because of its noninvasiveness and deep penetration in biological tissue. Prior to achieving the imaging of infant brain using DOT, the developed methodologies need to be experimentally justified by imaging some real organs with simpler structures. Here we report our results of an in vitro chicken leg and an in vivo exercising human forearm from the data measured by a multi-channel time-resolved NIR system. Tomographic images were reconstructed by a two-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm based on a modified generalized pulse spectrum technique for simultaneous reconstruction of the µa and µs´. The absolute µa- and µs´-images revealed the inner structures of the chicken leg and the forearm, where the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscle. The ?µa-images showed the blood volume changes during the forearm exercise, proving that the system and the image reconstruction algorithm could potentially be used for imaging not only the anatomic structure but also the hemodynamics in neonatal heads.

  8. Tongxinluo (TXL), a Traditional Chinese Medicinal Compound, Improves Endothelial Function After Chronic Hypoxia Both In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Cui-Ying; Song, Li-Li; Wen, Jin-Kun; Li, Li-Min; Guo, Zong-Wei; Zhou, Pei-Pei; Wang, Chang; Li, Yong-Hui; Ma, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Vascular injury after chronic hypoxia leads to endothelial injury and structural damage to tight junctions (TJs), thereby resulting in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, attenuating hypoxia-induced damage has great significance for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the endothelial protection conferred by tongxinluo (TXL), a traditional Chinese medicinal compound, is related to its regulation of TJ protein expression. In vivo, we found that TXL could promote hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in lung and liver tissue. In vitro, we found that CoCl2 treatment significantly reduced the expression of the TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1, VE-cadherin, and beta-catenin in cultured human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. TXL pretreatment abrogated the CoCl2-induced downregulation of these TJ proteins. Conversely, overexpression of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) inhibited the expression of TJ proteins in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was reversed by TXL pretreatment. Further experiments showed that TXL could promote endothelial cell proliferation by increasing KLF4 phosphorylation, thereby reversing the effect of KLF4 on the expression of TJ proteins. These findings provide a new molecular mechanism for the TXL-induced increase in TJ protein expression. PMID:26065642

  9. A genetic system to assess in vivo the functions of histones and histone modifications in higher eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Günesdogan, Ufuk; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role of canonical histones in nucleosome structure, there is no experimental system for higher eukaryotes in which basic questions about histone function can be directly addressed. We developed a new genetic tool for Drosophila melanogaster in which the canonical histone complement can be replaced with multiple copies of experimentally modified histone transgenes. This new histone-replacement system provides a well-defined and direct cellular assay system for histone function with which to critically test models in chromatin biology dealing with chromatin assembly, variant histone functions and the biological significance of distinct histone modifications in a multicellular organism. PMID:20814422

  10. A randomized, controlled trial comparing the efficacy and safety of aqueous subcutaneous progesterone with vaginal progesterone for luteal phase support of in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Valerie L.; Jones, Christopher A.; Doody, Kevin; Foulk, Russell; Yee, Bill; Adamson, G. David; Cometti, Barbara; DeVane, Gary; Hubert, Gary; Trevisan, Silvia; Hoehler, Fred; Jones, Clarence; Soules, Michael

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the ongoing pregnancy rate with a new aqueous formulation of subcutaneous progesterone (Prolutex®) non-inferior to vaginal progesterone (Endometrin®) when used for luteal phase support of in vitro fertilization? SUMMARY ANSWER In the per-protocol (PP) population, the ongoing pregnancy rates per oocyte retrieval at 12 weeks of gestation were comparable between Prolutex and Endometrin (41.6 versus 44.4%), with a difference between groups of ?2.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) ?9.7, 4.2), consistent with the non-inferiority of subcutaneous progesterone for luteal phase support. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Luteal phase support has been clearly demonstrated to improve pregnancy rates in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Because of the increased risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome associated with the use of hCG, progesterone has become the treatment of choice for luteal phase support. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled, parallel-group, multicentre, two-arm, non-inferiority study was performed at eight fertility clinics. A total of 800 women, aged 18–42 years, with a BMI of ?30 kg/m2, with <3 prior completed assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles, exhibiting baseline (Days 2–3) FSH of ?15 IU/L and undergoing IVF at 8 centres (seven private, one academic) in the USA, were enrolled from January 2009 through June 2011. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS In total, 800 women undergoing IVF were randomized after retrieval of at least three oocytes to an aqueous preparation of progesterone administered subcutaneously (25 mg daily) or vaginal progesterone (100 mg bid daily). Randomization was performed to enrol 100 patients at each site using a randomization list that was generated with Statistical Analysis Software (SAS®). If a viable pregnancy occurred, progesterone treatment was continued up to 12 weeks of gestation. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Using a PP analysis, which included all patients who received an embryo transfer (Prolutex = 392; Endometrin = 390), the ongoing pregnancy rate per retrieval for subcutaneous versus vaginal progesterone was 41.6 versus 44.4%, with a difference between groups of ?2.8% (95% CI ?9.7, 4.2), consistent with the non-inferiority of subcutaneous progesterone for luteal phase support. In addition, rates of initial positive ?-hCG (56.4% subcutaneous versus 59.0% vaginal; 95% CI ?9.5, 4.3), clinical intrauterine pregnancy with fetal cardiac activity (42.6 versus 46.4%; 95% CI ?10.8, 3.2), implantation defined as number of gestational sacs divided by number of embryos transferred (33.2 versus 35.1%; 95% CI ?7.6, 4.0), live birth (41.1 versus 43.1%; 95% CI ?8.9, 4.9) and take-home baby (41.1 versus 42.6%; 95% CI ?8.4, 5.4) were comparable. Both formulations were well-tolerated, with no difference in serious adverse events. Analysis with the intention-to-treat population also demonstrated no difference for any outcomes between the treatment groups. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The conclusions are limited to the progesterone dosing regimen studied and duration of treatment for the patient population examined in this study. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Subcutaneous progesterone represents a novel option for luteal phase support in women undergoing IVF who for personal reasons prefer not to use a vaginal preparation or who wish to avoid the side effects of vaginal or i.m. routes of administration. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS The study was funded by Institut Biochimique SA (IBSA). CAJ, BC, ST and CJ are employees of IBSA. FH currently consults for IBSA. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00828191. PMID:25100106

  11. Luteal 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in the rat corpus luteum of pseudopregnancy: Effect of the deciduoma reaction

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Marisa A; Deis, Ricardo P; Telleria, Carlos M

    2004-01-01

    Background In the rat, the maintenance of gestation is dependent on progesterone production from the corpora lutea (CL), which are under the control of pituitary, decidual and placental hormones. The luteal metabolism of progesterone during gestation has been amply studied. However, the regulation of progesterone synthesis and degradation during pseudopregnancy (PSP), in which the CL are mainly under the control of pituitary prolactin (PRL), is not well known. The objectives of this investigation were: i) to study the luteal metabolism of progesterone during PSP by measuring the activities of the enzymes 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD), involved in progesterone biosynthesis, and that of 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alphaHSD), involved in progesterone catabolism; and ii) to determine the role of decidualization on progesterone metabolism in PSP. Methods PSP was induced mechanically at 10:00 h on the estrus of 4-day cycling Wistar rats, and the stimulus for decidualization was provided by scratching the uterus on day 4 of PSP. 3betaHSD and 20alphaHSD activities were measured in the CL isolated from ovaries of PSP rats using a spectrophotometric method. Serum concentrations of progesterone, PRL, androstenedione, and estradiol were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results The PSP stage induced mechanically in cycling rats lasted 11.3 ± 0.09 days (n = 14). Serum progesterone concentration was high until day 10 of PSP, and declined thereafter. Serum PRL concentration was high on the first days of PSP but decreased significantly from days 6 to 9, having minimal values on days 10 and 11. Luteal 3betaHSD activities were elevated until day 6 of PSP, after which they progressively declined, reaching minimal values at the end of PSP. Luteal 20alphaHSD activities were very low until day 9, but abruptly increased at the end of PSP. When the deciduoma was induced by scratching the uterus of pseudopregnant animals on day 4 (PSP+D), PSP was extended to 18 ± 2.2 days (n = 8). In PSP + D rats, serum progesterone and PRL levels, and luteal 3betaHSD activities were higher than in pseudopregnant rats on day 11. Decidualization also prevented the increase in luteal 20alphaHSD activities observed on day 11 of PSP. Administration of the dopaminergic agonist CB154 in PSP + D rats on day 10 of PSP induced a decline in both serum PRL and progesterone on day 11 of PSP, values that were not different from that of pseudopregnant controls. Conclusions We have established that during the final period of PSP a decline in progesterone biosynthesis occurs before the increase in progesterone catabolism. We have also shown that decidualization in pseudopregnant rats extends the life of the CL by prolonging the production of pituitary PRL, and by maintaining high 3betaHSD and low 20alphaHSD activities within the CL leading to sustained production of progesterone. PMID:15140254

  12. Generation and characterization of androgen receptor knockout (ARKO) mice: An in vivo model for the study of androgen functions in selective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shuyuan; Tsai, Meng-Yin; Xu, Qingquan; Mu, Xiao-Min; Lardy, Henry; Huang, Ko-En; Lin, Hank; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Zhou, Xinchang; Xing, Lianping; Boyce, Brendan F.; Hung, Min-Chi; Zhang, Su; Gan, Lin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2002-01-01

    By using a cre-lox conditional knockout strategy, we report here the generation of androgen receptor knockout (ARKO) mice. Phenotype analysis shows that ARKO male mice have a female-like appearance and body weight. Their testes are 80% smaller and serum testosterone concentrations are lower than in wild-type (wt) mice. Spermatogenesis is arrested at pachytene spermatocytes. The number and size of adipocytes are also different between the wt and ARKO mice. Cancellous bone volumes of ARKO male mice are reduced compared with wt littermates. In addition, we found the average number of pups per litter in homologous and heterozygous ARKO female mice is lower than in wt female mice, suggesting potential defects in female fertility and/or ovulation. The cre-lox ARKO mouse provides a much-needed in vivo animal model to study androgen functions in the selective androgen target tissues in female or male mice. PMID:12370412

  13. Characterization of the alpha-gamma and alpha-beta complex: evidence for an in vivo functional role of alpha-crystallin as a molecular chaperone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that in vitro, alpha-crystallin can protect other lens proteins against extensive denaturation and aggregation. The mechanism of this protection involves preferential binding of the partially denatured protein to a central region of the native alpha-crystallin complex. To test whether a similar phenomenon might occur in vivo, a high molecular weight aggregate (HMWA) fraction was isolated from the aged bovine lens. Negative staining of this preparation revealed the presence of particles of 13-14 nm diameter, characteristic of alpha-crystallin. Immunolocalization of the same particles using antiserum specific for gamma- and beta-crystallins demonstrated preferential binding of these crystallins to the central region of the alpha-crystallin complex. Together, these results provide evidence that in the intact lens, the alpha-crystallins are functionally important molecular chaperones.

  14. Structural Dynamics of Synapses in Vivo Correlate with Functional Changes during Experience-Dependent Plasticity in Visual Cortex

    E-print Network

    Tropea, Daniela

    The impact of activity on neuronal circuitry is complex, involving both functional and structural changes whose interaction is largely unknown. We have used optical imaging of mouse visual cortex responses and two-photon ...

  15. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    E-print Network

    Bric, Anka

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor-suppressor-gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a ...

  16. The N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea-Induced Goldenticket Mouse Mutant Reveals an Essential Function of Sting in the In Vivo Interferon Response to Listeria monocytogenes and Cyclic Dinucleotides ?

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, John-Demian; Sotelo-Troha, Katia; von Moltke, Jakob; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Rae, Chris S.; Brubaker, Sky W.; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Woodward, Joshua J.; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Vance, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are central regulators of the innate and adaptive immune responses to viral and bacterial infections. Type I IFNs are induced upon cytosolic detection of microbial nucleic acids, including DNA, RNA, and the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). In addition, a recent study demonstrated that the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes stimulates a type I IFN response due to cytosolic detection of bacterially secreted c-di-AMP. The transmembrane signaling adaptor Sting (Tmem173, Mita, Mpys, Eris) has recently been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs in response to cytosolic DNA and/or RNA. However, the role of Sting in response to purified cyclic dinucleotides or during in vivo L. monocytogenes infection has not been addressed. In order to identify genes important in the innate immune response, we have been conducting a forward genetic mutagenesis screen in C57BL/6 mice using the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Here we describe a novel mutant mouse strain, Goldenticket (Gt), that fails to produce type I IFNs upon L. monocytogenes infection. By genetic mapping and complementation experiments, we found that Gt mice harbor a single nucleotide variant (T596A) of Sting that functions as a null allele and fails to produce detectable protein. Analysis of macrophages isolated from Gt mice revealed that Sting is absolutely required for the type I interferon response to both c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Additionally, Sting is required for the response to c-di-GMP and L. monocytogenes in vivo. Our results provide new functions for Sting in the innate interferon response to pathogens. PMID:21098106

  17. Effect of low-temperature ethylene oxide and electron beam sterilization on the in vitro and in vivo function of reconstituted extracellular matrix-derived scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Proffen, Benedikt L; Perrone, Gabriel S; Fleming, Braden C; Sieker, Jakob T; Kramer, Joshua; Hawes, Michael L; Murray, Martha M

    2015-10-01

    Reconstituted extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffolds are commonly utilized in preclinical tissue engineering studies as delivery vehicles for cells and growth factors. Translation into clinical use requires identifying a sterilization method that effectively removes bacteria but does not harm scaffold function. To determine effectiveness of sterilization and impact on ECM scaffold integrity and function, low-temperature ethylene oxide and 15 kGy electron beam irradiation techniques were evaluated. Scaffold sterility was assessed in accordance to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 71. Scaffold matrix degradation was determined in vitro using enzymatic resistance tests and gel electrophoresis. Scaffold mechanics including elastic modulus, yield stress and collapse modulus were tested. Lastly, 14 Yorkshire pigs underwent ACL transection and bio-enhanced ACL repair using sterilized scaffolds. Histologic response of ligament, synovium, and lymph nodes was compared at 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Ethylene oxide as well as electron beam irradiation yielded sterile scaffolds. Scaffold resistance to enzymatic digestion and protein integrity slightly decreased after electron beam irradiation while ethylene oxide altered scaffold matrix. Scaffold elastic modulus and yield stress were increased after electron beam treatment, while collapse modulus was increased after ethylene oxide treatment. No significant changes in ACL dimensions, in vivo scaffold resorption rate, or histologic response of synovium, ligament, and lymph nodes with either terminal sterilization technique were detectable. In conclusion, this study identifies two methods to terminally sterilize an ECM scaffold. In vitro scaffold properties were slightly changed without significantly influencing the biologic responses of the surrounding tissues in vivo. This is a critical step toward translating new tissue engineering strategies to clinical trials. PMID:26088294

  18. Disruption of Src function potentiates Chk1-inhibitor–induced apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yun; Chen, Shuang; Shah, Rena; Pei, Xin-Yan; Wang, Li; Almenara, Jorge A.; Kramer, Lora B.; Dent, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Ras/MEK/ERK pathway activation represents an important compensatory response of human multiple myeloma (MM) cells to checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibitors. To investigate the functional roles of Src in this event and potential therapeutic significance, interactions between Src and Chk1 inhibitors (eg, UCN-01 or Chk1i) were examined in vitro and in vivo. The dual Src/Abl inhibitors BMS354825 and SKI-606 blocked Chk1-inhibitor–induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation, markedly increasing apoptosis in association with BimEL up-regulation, p34cdc2 activation, and DNA damage in MM cell lines and primary CD138+ MM samples. Loss-of-function Src mutants (K297R, K296R/Y528F) or shRNA knock-down of Src prevented the ERK1/2 activation induced by Chk1 inhibitors and increased apoptosis. Conversely, constitutively active Ras or mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase 1 (MEK1) significantly diminished the ability of Src inhibitors to potentiate Chk1-inhibitor lethality. Moreover, Src/Chk1-inhibitor cotreatment attenuated MM-cell production of vascular endothelial growth factor and other angiogenic factors (eg, ANG [angiogenin], TIMP1/2 [tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1/2], and RANTES [regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted]), and inhibited in vitro angiogenesis. Finally, coadministration of BMS354825 and UCN-01 suppressed human MM tumor growth in a murine xenograft model, increased apoptosis, and diminished angiogenesis. These findings suggest that Src kinase is required for Chk1-inhibitor–mediated Ras ? ERK1/2 signaling activation, and that disruption of this event sharply potentiates the anti-MM activity of Chk1 inhi-bitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21148814

  19. Effects of different five-day progesterone-based synchronization protocols on the estrous response and follicular/luteal dynamics in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    LÓPEZ-GATIUS, Fernando; LÓPEZ-HELGUERA, Irene; DE RENSIS, Fabio; GARCIA-ISPIERTO, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the responses shown by lactating dairy cows to four different P4-based protocols for AI at estrus. Cows with no estrous signs 96 h after progesterone intravaginal device (PRID) removal were subjected to fixed-time AI (FTAI), and their data were also included in the study. In Experiment I, follicular/luteal and endometrial dynamics were assessed every 12 h from the beginning of treatment until AI. The estrous response was examined in Experiment II, and fertility was assessed in both experiments. The protocols consisted of a PRID fitted for five days, along with the administration of different combinations of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), equine chorionic gonadotropin and a single or double dose (24 h apart) of prostaglandin F2?. In Experiment I (40 cows), animals receiving GnRH at the start of treatment showed a significantly higher ovulation rate during the PRID insertion period while estrus was delayed. In Experiment II (351 cows), according to the odds ratios, cows showing luteal activity at the time of treatment were less likely to show estrus than cows with no signs of luteal activity. Treatment affected the estrous response and the interval from PRID removal to estrus but did not affect conception rates 28–34 days post AI. Primiparous cows displayed a better estrous response than multiparous cows. Our findings reveal acceptable results of 5-day P4-based protocols for AI at estrus in high-producing dairy cows. Time from treatment to estrus emerged as a good guide for FTAI after a 5-day P4-based synchronization protocol. PMID:26211922

  20. Intracellular cleavable poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for efficient siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Daoshu; Cheng, Qiang; Jiang, Qian; Huang, Yuanyu; Yang, Zheng; Han, Shangcong; Zhao, Yuning; Guo, Shutao; Liang, Zicai; Dong, Anjie

    2013-05-01

    A low cytotoxicity and high efficiency delivery system with the advantages of low cost and facile fabrication is needed for the application of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery both in vitro and in vivo. For these prerequisites, cationic polymer-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (ssCP-MSNs) were prepared by surface functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles with disulfide bond cross-linked poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA). In vitro and in vivo evaluations were performed. The synthesized ssCP-MSNs are 100-150 nm in diameter with a pore size of 10 nm and a positively charged surface with a high zeta potential of 27 mV. Consequently, the ssCP-MSNs showed an excellent binding capacity for siRNA, and an enhancement in the cell uptake and cytosolic availability of siRNA. Furthermore, the intracellular reducing cleavage of the disulfide bonds cross-linking the PDMAEMA segments led to intracellular cleavage of PDMAEMA from ssCP-MSNs, which facilitated the intracellular triggered release of siRNA. Therefore, promoted RNA interference was observed in HeLa-Luc cells, which was equal to that of Lipofectamine 2000. Significantly, compared to Lipofectamine 2000, the ssCP-MSNs were more biocompatible, with low cytotoxicity (even non-cytotoxicity) and promotion of cell proliferation to HeLa-Luc cells. The in vivo systemic distribution studies certified that ssCP-MSNs/siRNA could prolong the duration of siRNA in vivo, and that they accumulated in the adrenal gland, liver, lung, spleen, kidney, heart and thymus after intravenous injection. Encouragingly, with the ability to deliver siRNA to a tumor, ssCP-MSNs/siRNA showed a tumor suppression effect in the HeLa-Luc xenograft murine model after intravenous injection. Therefore, the ssCP-MSNs cationic polymer-mesoporous silica nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity are promising for siRNA delivery.A low cytotoxicity and high efficiency delivery system with the advantages of low cost and facile fabrication is needed for the application of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery both in vitro and in vivo. For these prerequisites, cationic polymer-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (ssCP-MSNs) were prepared by surface functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles with disulfide bond cross-linked poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA). In vitro and in vivo evaluations were performed. The synthesized ssCP-MSNs are 100-150 nm in diameter with a pore size of 10 nm and a positively charged surface with a high zeta potential of 27 mV. Consequently, the ssCP-MSNs showed an excellent binding capacity for siRNA, and an enhancement in the cell uptake and cytosolic availability of siRNA. Furthermore, the intracellular reducing cleavage of the disulfide bonds cross-linking the PDMAEMA segments led to intracellular cleavage of PDMAEMA from ssCP-MSNs, which facilitated the intracellular triggered release of siRNA. Therefore, promoted RNA interference was observed in HeLa-Luc cells, which was equal to that of Lipofectamine 2000. Significantly, compared to Lipofectamine 2000, the ssCP-MSNs were more biocompatible, with low cytotoxicity (even non-cytotoxicity) and promotion of cell proliferation to HeLa-Luc cells. The in vivo systemic distribution studies certified that ssCP-MSNs/siRNA could prolong the duration of siRNA in vivo, and that they accumulated in the adrenal gland, liver, lung, spleen, kidney, heart and thymus after intravenous injection. Encouragingly, with the ability to deliver siRNA to a tumor, ssCP-MSNs/siRNA showed a tumor suppression effect in the HeLa-Luc xenograft murine model after intravenous injection. Therefore, the ssCP-MSNs cationic polymer-mesoporous silica nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity are promising for siRNA delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00294b

  1. A Conserved Salt Bridge in the G-Loop of Multiple Protein Kinases is Important for Catalysis and for in Vivo Lyn Function

    PubMed Central

    Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Che, Jianwei; Lee, Christian C.; Yang, Yating; Herman, Ann; Jia, Yong; Velentza, Anastasia; Watson, James; Sternberg, Luise; Kim, Sunjun; Ziaee, Niusha; Miller, Andrew; Jackson, Carie; Fujimoto, Manabu; Young, Mike; Batalov, Serge; Liu, Yi; Warmuth, Markus; Wiltshire, Tim; Cooke, Michael P.; Sauer, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The glycine-rich G-loop controls ATP binding and phosphate transfer in protein kinases. Here we show that the functions of Src family and Abl protein tyrosine kinases require an electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged amino acids within their G loops that is conserved in multiple other phylogenetically distinct protein kinases from plants to humans. By limiting G-loop flexibility, it controls ATP binding, catalysis and inhibition by ATP-competitive compounds such as Imatinib. In WeeB mice, mutational disruption of the interaction results in expression of a Lyn protein with reduced catalytic activity, and in perturbed B cell receptor signaling. Like Lyn-/- mice, WeeB mice show profound defects in B cell development and function and succumb to autoimmune glomerulonephritis. This demonstrates the physiological importance of the conserved G-loop salt bridge and at the same time distinguishes the in vivo requirement for the Lyn kinase activity from other potential functions of the protein. PMID:19150426

  2. Effect of altered CH2-associated carbohydrate structure on the functional properties and in vivo fate of chimeric mouse-human immunoglobulin G1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are glycosylated in CH2 at Asn297; the N-linked carbohydrates attached there have been shown to contribute to antibody (Ab) stability and various effector functions. The carbohydrate attached to the IgG constant region is a complex biantennary structure. Alterations in the structure of oligosaccharide have been associated with human diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. To study the effects of altered carbohydrate structure on Ab effector function, we have used gene transfection techniques to produce mouse-human chimeric IgG1 Abs in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line Lec 1, which is incapable of processing the high-mannose intermediate through the terminal glycosylation steps. We also produced IgG1 Abs in Pro-5, the wild-type CHO cell line that is the parent of Lec 1. The Pro-5-produced Ab (IgG1-Pro-5) was similar to IgG1-My 1, a myeloma-produced IgG1 Ab of the same specificity, in its biologic properties such as serum half-life, ability to effect complement-mediated cytolysis, and affinity for Fc gamma RI. Although the Lec 1-produced Ab, IgG1-Lec 1, was properly assembled and retained antigen specificity, it was incapable of complement-mediated hemolysis and was substantially deficient in complement consumption, C1q binding, and C1 activation. IgG1-Lec 1 also showed reduced but significant affinity for Fc gamma R1 receptors. The in vivo half-life of IgG1-Lec 1 was shorter than that of either the myeloma- or Pro-5-produced counterpart, with more being cleared during the alpha-phase and with more rapid clearance during the beta-phase. Clearance of IgG1-Lec 1 could be inhibited by the administration of yeast-derived mannan. Thus the uptake of IgG1-Lec 1 appears to be accelerated by the presence of terminally mannosylated oligosaccharide. Therefore, certain Ab functions as well as the in vivo fate of the protein are dramatically affected by altered carbohydrate structure. Expression of Igs in cell lines with defined glycosylation mutations is shown to be a useful technique for investigating the contribution of carbohydrate structure to Ab function. PMID:8064227

  3. Molecular Cell, Vol. 6, 467478, August, 2000, Copyright 2000 by Cell Press In Vivo Functions of the Patched Protein

    E-print Network

    Scott, Matthew

    disease. Inactivating mutations in a human ho- Departments of Developmental Biology and Genetics molog and sequesters Hh protein. To dissect of the adult wing. In the wing imaginal disc, signalingthese functions, we tested partially deleted forms of between two groups of cells, an anterior and posterior Ptc

  4. Selenite-Releasing Bone Mineral Nanoparticles Retard Bone Tumor Growth and Improve Healthy Tissue Functions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Hao, Hang; Liu, Haoming; Wang, Yifan; Li, Yan; Yang, Gaojie; Ma, Jun; Mao, Chuanbin; Zhang, Shengmin

    2015-08-26

    Selenite-doped bone mineral nanoparticles can retard the growth of osteosarcoma in a nude mice model, through sustained release of selenite ions. The selenite ions released from the nanoparticles through a degradation-mediated fashion inhibit tumor metastasis. Blood routine analysis indicates that selenite ions can also improve the functions of liver, kidney, and heart. PMID:26101804

  5. Acid sphingomyelinase involvement in tumor necrosis factor ?-regulated vascular and steroid disruption during luteolysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Henkes, Luiz E.; Sullivan, Brian T.; Lynch, Maureen P.; Kolesnick, Richard; Arsenault, Danielle; Puder, Mark; Davis, John S.; Rueda, Bo R.

    2008-01-01

    TNF is well known for its role in inflammation, including direct effects on the vasculature. TNF also is implicated in the regulation of reproduction by its actions to affect ovarian steroidogenic cells and to induce apoptosis of corpus luteum (CL)-derived endothelial cells in vitro. We hypothesized that the disruption of TNF signaling would postpone the regression of the highly vascularized CL in vivo, and this effect could be replicated in mutant mouse models lacking TNF receptor (TNFRI?/?) and/or a critical enzyme of TNF signaling, acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase?/?). In the current study, the treatment of pseudopregnant mice with the luteolytic mediator prostaglandin F2-? (PGF) significantly increased TNF in the ovaries when compared with saline-treated controls. Treatment with PGF also reduced serum progesterone (P4) concentrations and caused involution of the CL. However, pretreatment of pseudopregnant mice with Etanercept (ETA), a TNF-neutralizing antibody, inhibited the PGF-induced decrease in P4 and delayed luteal regression. A similar outcome was evident in pseudopregnant TNFRI?/? animals. Treatment of luteal microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) with TNF provoked a significant increase in ASMase activity when compared with the corresponding controls. Furthermore, TNF-induced MVEC death was inhibited in the ASMase?/? mice. The ASMase?/? mice displayed no obvious evidence of luteal regression 24 h after treatment with PGF and were resistant to the PGF-induced decrease in P4. Together these data provide evidence that TNF plays an active role in luteolysis. Further studies are required to determine the deleterious effects of anti-inflammatory agents on basic ovarian processes. PMID:18505843

  6. Mouse Invariant Monoclonal Antibody NKT14: A Novel Tool to Manipulate iNKT Cell Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scheuplein, Felix; Lamont, Deanna J.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Serreze, David; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Mashal, Robert; Schaub, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a T cell subset expressing an invariant T Cell Receptor (TCR) that recognizes glycolipid antigens rather than peptides. The cells have both innate-like rapid cytokine release, and adaptive-like thymic positive selection. iNKT cell activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma and inflammatory diseases, while reduced iNKT cell activation promotes infectious disease, cancer and certain autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therapeutic means to reduce or deplete iNKT cells could treat inflammatory diseases, while approaches to promote their activation may have potential in certain infectious diseases, cancer or autoimmunity. Thus, we developed invariant TCR-specific monoclonal antibodies to better understand the role of iNKT cells in disease. We report here the first monoclonal antibodies specific for the mouse invariant TCR that by modifying the Fc construct can specifically deplete or activate iNKT cells in vivo in otherwise fully immuno-competent animals. We have used both the depleting and activating version of the antibody in the NOD model of T1D. As demonstrated previously using genetically iNKT cell deficient NOD mice, and in studies of glycolipid antigen activated iNKT cells in standard NOD mice, we found that antibody mediated depletion or activation of iNKT cells respectively accelerated and retarded T1D onset. In BALB/c mice, ovalbumin (OVA) mediated airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) was abrogated with iNKT cell depletion prior to OVA sensitization, confirming studies in knockout mice. Depletion of iNKT cells after sensitization had no effect on AHR in the conducting airways but did reduce AHR in the lung periphery. This result raises caution in the interpretation of studies that use animals that are genetically iNKT cell deficient from birth. These activating and depleting antibodies provide a novel tool to assess the therapeutic potential of iNKT cell manipulation. PMID:26474487

  7. Early ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is completely prevented by gonadotropin releasing-hormone agonist triggering in high-risk oocyte donor cycles: a prospective, luteal-phase follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bodri, Daniel; Guillén, Juan José; Trullenque, Marta; Schwenn, Katja; Esteve, Carolina; Coll, Oriol

    2010-05-01

    In this prospective, follow-up study of 102 high-risk oocyte donors in their luteal phase, we found a complete absence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (no signs of hemoconcentration or ascites) after the donors were triggered with a gonadotropin releasing-hormone (GnRH) agonist. Due to its powerful preventive effect, the GnRH antagonist protocol combined with a GnRH agonist trigger should preferentially be used in egg donors; in conjunction with an effective luteal support or embryo cryopreservation, the protocol could also be applied to high-risk in vitro fertilization patients. PMID:19800620

  8. Phenotypical Analysis of Atypical PKCs In Vivo Function Display a Compensatory System at Mouse Embryonic Day 7.5

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Sebastian; Braun, Ursula; Roos, Norbert; Li, Shaohua; Lüdtke, Timo H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The atypical protein kinases C (PKC) isoforms ?/? and ? play crucial roles in many cellular processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Possible redundancy between the two isoforms has always been an issue since most biochemical tools do not differentiate between the two proteins. Thus, much effort has been made during the last decades to characterize the functions of aPKCs using gene targeting approaches and depletion studies. However, little is known about the specific roles of each isoform in mouse development. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the importance of PKC? in mouse development we designed PKC? deletion mutants using the gene targeting approach. We show that the deletion of PKC?, results in a reduced size of the amniotic cavity at E7.5 and impaired growth of the embryo at E8.5 with subsequent absorption of the embryo. Our data also indicate an impaired localization of ZO-1 and disorganized structure of the epithelial tissue in the embryo. Importantly, using electron microscopy, embryoid body formation and immunofluorescence analysis, we found, that in the absence of PKC?, tight junctions and apico-basal polarity were still established. Finally, our study points to a non-redundant PKC? function at E9.5, since expression of PKC? is able to rescue the E7.5 phenotype, but could not prevent embryonic lethality at a later time-point (E9.5). Conclusion Our data show that PKC? is crucial for mouse embryogenesis but is dispensable for the establishment of polarity and tight junction formation. We present a compensatory function of PKC? at E7.5, rescuing the phenotype. Furthermore, this study indicates at least one specific, yet unknown, PKC? function that cannot be compensated by the overexpression of PKC? at E9.5. PMID:23690951

  9. Comparing the in Vivo Function of ?-Carboxysomes and ?-Carboxysomes in Two Model Cyanobacteria1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Lynne; Long, Benedict M.; Price, G. Dean; Badger, Murray R.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-concentrating mechanism of cyanobacteria is characterized by the occurrence of Rubisco-containing microcompartments called carboxysomes within cells. The encapsulation of Rubisco allows for high-CO2 concentrations at the site of fixation, providing an advantage in low-CO2 environments. Cyanobacteria with Form-IA Rubisco contain ?-carboxysomes, and cyanobacteria with Form-IB Rubisco contain ?-carboxysomes. The two carboxysome types have arisen through convergent evolution, and ?-cyanobacteria and ?-cyanobacteria occupy different ecological niches. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first direct comparison of the carboxysome function from ?-cyanobacteria (Cyanobium spp. PCC7001) and ?-cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp. PCC7942) with similar inorganic carbon (Ci; as CO2 and HCO3?) transporter systems. Despite evolutionary and structural differences between ?-carboxysomes and ?-carboxysomes, we found that the two strains are remarkably similar in many physiological parameters, particularly the response of photosynthesis to light and external Ci and their modulation of internal ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate, phosphoglycerate, and Ci pools when grown under comparable conditions. In addition, the different Rubisco forms present in each carboxysome had almost identical kinetic parameters. The conclusions indicate that the possession of different carboxysome types does not significantly influence the physiological function of these species and that similar carboxysome function may be possessed by each carboxysome type. Interestingly, both carboxysome types showed a response to cytosolic Ci, which is of higher affinity than predicted by current models, being saturated by 5 to 15 mm Ci. This finding has bearing on the viability of transplanting functional carboxysomes into the C3 chloroplast. PMID:24642960

  10. Actions of incretin metabolites on locomotor activity, cognitive function and in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in high fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Porter, David; Faivre, Emilie; Flatt, Peter R; Hölscher, Christian; Gault, Victor A

    2012-05-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improve markers of cognitive function in obesity-diabetes, however, both are rapidly degraded to their major metabolites, GLP-1(9-36)amide and GIP(3-42), respectively. Therefore, the present study investigated effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GIP(3-42) on locomotor activity, cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in mice with diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. High-fat fed Swiss TO mice treated with GLP-1(9-36)amide, GIP(3-42) or exendin(9-39)amide (twice-daily for 60 days) did not exhibit any changes in bodyweight, non-fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations or glucose tolerance compared with high-fat saline controls. Similarly, locomotor and feeding activity, O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, respiratory exchange ratio and energy expenditure were not altered by chronic treatment with incretin metabolites. Administration of the truncated metabolites did not alter general behavior in an open field test or learning and memory ability as recorded during an object recognition test. High-fat mice exhibited a significant impairment in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) which was not affected by treatment with incretin metabolites. These data indicate that incretin metabolites do not influence locomotor activity, cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity when administered at pharmacological doses to mice fed a high-fat diet. PMID:22465882

  11. A novel method for the in vivo isolation of circulating tumor cells from peripheral blood of cancer patients using a functionalized and structured medical wire.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Zeni, Nadia; Mewes, Steffi; Niestroj, Robert; Gasiorowski, Lukasz; Murawa, David; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Tomasi, Tatiana; Weber, Ekkehard; Dworacki, Grzegorz; Morgenthaler, Nils G; Jansen, Heike; Propping, Corinna; Sterzynska, Karolina; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech; Zabel, Maciej; Kiechle, Marion; Reuning, Ute; Schmitt, Manfred; Lücke, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    The isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of patients afflicted with solid malignant tumors becomes increasingly important as it may serve as a 'liquid biopsy' with the potential of monitoring the course of the cancer disease and its response to cancer therapy, with subsequent molecular characterization. For this purpose, we functionalized a structured medical Seldinger guidewire (FSMW), normally used to obtain safe access to blood vessels and other organ cavities, with a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed to the cell surface expressed epithelial cell surface adhesion molecule (EpCAM). This medical device was optimized in vitro and its biocompatibility was tested according to the regulations for medical devices and found to be safe with no noteworthy side effects. Suitability, specificity and sensitivity of the FSMW to catch and enrich CTCs in vivo from circulating peripheral blood were tested in 24 breast cancer or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and in 29 healthy volunteers. For this, the FSMW was inserted through a standard venous cannula into the cubital veins of healthy volunteers or cancer patients for the duration of 30 min. After removal, CTCs were identified by immuno-cytochemical staining of EpCAM and/or cytokeratins and staining of their nuclei and counted. The FSMW successfully enriched EpCAM-positive CTCs from 22 of the 24 patients, with a median of 5.5 (0-50) CTCs in breast cancer (n=12) and 16 (2-515) CTCs in NSCLC (n=12). CTCs could be isolated across all tumor stages, including early stage cancer, in which distant metastases were not yet diagnosed, while no CTCs could be detected in healthy volunteers. In this observatory study, no adverse effects were noted. Evidently, the FSMW has the potential to become an important device to enrich CTCs in vivo for monitoring the course of the cancer disease and the efficacy of anticancer treatment. PMID:22825490

  12. A novel method for the in vivo isolation of circulating tumor cells from peripheral blood of cancer patients using a functionalized and structured medical wire

    PubMed Central

    SAUCEDO-ZENI, NADIA; MEWES, STEFFI; NIESTROJ, ROBERT; GASIOROWSKI, LUKASZ; MURAWA, DAVID; NOWACZYK, PIOTR; TOMASI, TATIANA; WEBER, EKKEHARD; DWORACKI, GRZEGORZ; MORGENTHALER, NILS G.; JANSEN, HEIKE; PROPPING, CORINNA; STERZYNSKA, KAROLINA; DYSZKIEWICZ, WOJCIECH; ZABEL, MACIEJ; KIECHLE, MARION; REUNING, UTE; SCHMITT, MANFRED; LÜCKE, KLAUS

    2012-01-01

    The isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of patients afflicted with solid malignant tumors becomes increasingly important as it may serve as a ‘liquid biopsy’ with the potential of monitoring the course of the cancer disease and its response to cancer therapy, with subsequent molecular characterization. For this purpose, we functionalized a structured medical Seldinger guidewire (FSMW), normally used to obtain safe access to blood vessels and other organ cavities, with a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed to the cell surface expressed epithelial cell surface adhesion molecule (EpCAM). This medical device was optimized in vitro and its biocompatibility was tested according to the regulations for medical devices and found to be safe with no noteworthy side effects. Suitability, specificity and sensitivity of the FSMW to catch and enrich CTCs in vivo from circulating peripheral blood were tested in 24 breast cancer or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and in 29 healthy volunteers. For this, the FSMW was inserted through a standard venous cannula into the cubital veins of healthy volunteers or cancer patients for the duration of 30 min. After removal, CTCs were identified by immunocytochemical staining of EpCAM and/or cytokeratins and staining of their nuclei and counted. The FSMW successfully enriched EpCAM-positive CTCs from 22 of the 24 patients, with a median of 5.5 (0–50) CTCs in breast cancer (n=12) and 16 (2–515) CTCs in NSCLC (n=12). CTCs could be isolated across all tumor stages, including early stage cancer, in which distant metastases were not yet diagnosed, while no CTCs could be detected in healthy volunteers. In this observatory study, no adverse effects were noted. Evidently, the FSMW has the potential to become an important device to enrich CTCs in vivo for monitoring the course of the cancer disease and the efficacy of anticancer treatment. PMID:22825490

  13. Further Development of a Tissue Engineered Muscle Repair Construct In Vitro for Enhanced Functional Recovery Following Implantation In Vivo in a Murine Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Benjamin T.; Machingal, Masood A.; Criswell, Tracy; Vadhavkar, Manasi; Dannahower, Ashley C.; Bergman, Christopher; Zhao, Weixin

    2012-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) can result from trauma and surgery in civilian and military populations, resulting in irrecoverable functional and cosmetic deficits that cannot be effectively treated with current therapies. Previous work evaluated a bioreactor-based tissue engineering approach in which muscle derived cells (MDCs) were seeded onto bladder acellular matrices (BAM) and mechanically preconditioned. This first generation tissue engineered muscle repair (TEMR) construct exhibited a largely differentiated cellular morphology consisting primarily of myotubes, and moreover, significantly improved functional recovery within 2 months of implantation in a murine latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle with a surgically created VML injury. The present report extends these initial observations to further document the importance of the cellular phenotype and composition of the TEMR construct in vitro to the functional recovery observed following implantation in vivo. To this end, three distinct TEMR constructs were created by seeding MDCs onto BAM as follows: (1) a short-term cellular proliferation of MDCs to generate primarily myoblasts without bioreactor preconditioning (TEMR-1SP), (2) a prolonged cellular differentiation and maturation period that included bioreactor preconditioning (TEMR-1SPD; identical to the first generation TEMR construct), and (3) similar treatment as TEMR-1SPD but with a second application of MDCs during bioreactor preconditioning (TEMR-2SPD); simulating aspects of “exercise” in vitro. Assessment of maximal tetanic force generation on retrieved LD muscles in vitro revealed that TEMR-1SP and TEMR-1SPD constructs promoted either an accelerated (i.e., 1 month) or a prolonged (i.e., 2 month postinjury) functional recovery, respectively, of similar magnitude. Meanwhile, TEMR-2SPD constructs promoted both an accelerated and prolonged functional recovery, resulting in twice the magnitude of functional recovery of either TEMR-1SP or TEMR-1SPD constructs. Histological and molecular analyses indicated that TEMR constructs mediated functional recovery via regeneration of functional muscle fibers either at the interface of the construct and the native tissue or within the BAM scaffolding independent of the native tissue. Taken together these findings are encouraging for the further development and clinical application of TEMR constructs as a VML injury treatment. PMID:22439962

  14. In vivo structure-function studies of human hepatic lipase: the catalytic function rescues the lean phenotype of HL-deficient (hl?/?) mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeffrey; Kaiyala, Karl J; Lam, Jennifer; Agrawal, Nalini; Nguyen, Lisa; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Spencer, Dean; Morton, Gregory J; Schwartz, Michael W; Dichek, Helén L

    2015-01-01

    The lean body weight phenotype of hepatic lipase (HL)–deficient mice (hl?/?) suggests that HL is required for normal weight gain, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. HL plays a unique role in lipoprotein metabolism performing bridging as well as catalytic functions, either of which could participate in energy homeostasis. To determine if both the catalytic and bridging functions or the catalytic function alone are required for the effect of HL on body weight, we studied (hl?/?) mice that transgenically express physiologic levels of human (h)HL (with catalytic and bridging functions) or a catalytically-inactive (ci)HL variant (with bridging function only) in which the catalytic Serine 145 was mutated to Alanine. As expected, HL activity in postheparin plasma was restored to physiologic levels only in hHL-transgenic mice (hl?/?hHL). During high-fat diet feeding, hHL-transgenic mice exhibited increased body weight gain and body adiposity relative to hl?/?ciHL mice. A similar, albeit less robust effect was observed in female hHL-transgenic relative to hl?/?ciHL mice. To delineate the basis for this effect, we determined cumulative food intake and measured energy expenditure using calorimetry. Interestingly, in both genders, food intake was 5–10% higher in hl?/?hHL mice relative to hl?/?ciHL controls. Similarly, energy expenditure was ?10% lower in HL-transgenic mice after adjusting for differences in total body weight. Our results demonstrate that (1) the catalytic function of HL is required to rescue the lean body weight phenotype of hl?/? mice; (2) this effect involves complementary changes in both sides of the energy balance equation; and (3) the bridging function alone is insufficient to rescue the lean phenotype of hl?/?ciHL mice. PMID:25862097

  15. Over-expression of Arabidopsis thaliana carotenoid hydroxylases individually and in combination with a beta-carotene ketolase provides insight into in vivo functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Cheng, Kimberly M; Craft, Neal E; Hamberger, Björn; Douglas, Carl J

    2010-02-01

    Carotenoids represent a group of widely distributed pigments derived from the general isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway that possess diverse functions in plant primary and secondary metabolism. Modification of alpha- and beta-carotene backbones depends in part on ring hydroxylation. Two ferredoxin-dependent non-heme di-iron monooxygenases (AtB1 and AtB2) that mainly catalyze in vivo beta-carotene hydroxylations of beta,beta-carotenoids, and two heme-containing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases (CYP97A3 and CYP97C1) that preferentially hydroxylate the epsilon-ring of alpha-carotene or the beta-ring of beta,epsilon-carotenoids, have been characterized in Arabidopsis by analysis of loss-of-function mutant phenotypes. We further investigated functional roles of both hydroxylase classes in modification of the beta- and epsilon-rings of alpha-carotene and beta-carotene through over-expression of AtB1, CYP97A3, CYP97C1, and the hydroxylase candidate CYP97B3. Since carotenoid hydroxylation is required for generation of ketocarotenoids by the bkt1(CrtO) beta-carotene ketolase, all hydroxylase constructs were also introduced into an Arabidopsis line expressing the Haematococcus pluvalis bkt1 beta-carotene ketolase. Analysis of foliar carotenoid profiles in lines overexpressing the individual hydroxylases indicate a role for CYP97B3 in carotenoid biosynthesis, confirm and extend previous findings of hydroxylase activities based on knock-out mutants, and suggest functions of the multifunctional enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis. Hydroxylase over-expression in combination with bkt1 did not result in ketocarotenoid accumulation, but instead unexpected patterns of alpha-carotene derivatives, accompanied by a reduction of alpha-carotene, were observed. These data suggest possible interactions between the beta-carotene ketolase bkt1 and the hydroxylases that impact partitioning of carbon flux into different carotenoid branch pathways. PMID:19939422

  16. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katja; Koester, Tino; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance. PMID:26213982

  17. Cell-specific in vivo functions of glycosphingolipids: lessons from genetic deletions of enzymes involved in glycosphingolipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jennemann, Richard; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2013-04-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are believed to be involved in many cellular events including trafficking, signaling and cellular interactions. Over the past decade considerable progress was made elucidating the function of GSLs by generating and exploring animal models with GSL-deficiency. Initial studies focused on exploring the role of complex sialic acid containing GSLs (gangliosides) in neuronal tissue. Although complex gangliosides were absent, surprisingly, the phenotype observed was rather mild. In subsequent studies, several mouse models with combinations of gene-deletions encoding GSL-synthesizing enzymes were developed. The results indicated that reduction of GSL-complexity correlated with severity of phenotypes. However, in these mice, accumulation of precursor GSLs or neobiosynthesized GSL-series seemed to partly compensate the loss of GSLs. Thus, UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase (Ugcg), catalyzing the basic step of the glucosylceramide-based GSL-biosynthesis, was genetically disrupted. A total systemic deletion of Ugcg caused early embryonic lethality. Therefore, Ugcg was eliminated in a cell-specific manner using the cre/loxP-system. New insights into the cellular function of GSLs were gained. It was demonstrated that neurons require GSLs for differentiation and maintenance. In keratinocytes, preservation of the skin barrier depends on GSL synthesis and in enterocytes of the small intestine GSLs are involved in endocytosis and vesicular transport. PMID:23473748

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of the BEGe detector response function for in vivo measurements of 241Am in the skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantínová, K.; Fojtík, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure of the BEGe detector characterization for the Monte Carlo calibrations. A project is under way to improve the counting and operating capabilities of the Whole Body Counter (WBC) installed in SÚRO, v.v.i. (NRPI) Prague, Czech Republic. Possible emergency monitoring should mainly benefit from the rapid, safe and flexible operation of the WBC. The system of the WBC for the detection of low energy X and gamma radiation comprises four HPGe detectors intended for the routine, emergency, and research measurements of persons internally contaminated with low-energy photon emitters, mainly actinides. Among them, 241Am is the main subject of interest. A precise detection efficiency calibration of the detector is required for the measurement of activity in individual organs and tissues. The use of physical phantoms in the calibrations is often supplemented with the application of voxel phantoms and a Monte Carlo technique that are used for the calculation of the detector response function and the full energy peak efficiency. Both experimental and computational approaches have been used for the calibration of the BEGe (Broad Energy Germanium) detector. In this paper, the process of the Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response function and the peak efficiency calculation is described. Results of the simulations are provided in the paper and discussed.

  19. Functional Microarchitecture of the Mouse Dorsal Inferior Colliculus Revealed through In Vivo Two-Photon Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Keating, Peter; Weissenberger, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is an obligatory relay for ascending auditory inputs from the brainstem and receives descending input from the auditory cortex. The IC comprises a central nucleus (CNIC), surrounded by several shell regions, but the internal organization of this midbrain nucleus remains incompletely understood. We used two-photon calcium imaging to study the functional microarchitecture of both neurons in the mouse dorsal IC and corticocollicular axons that terminate there. In contrast to previous electrophysiological studies, our approach revealed a clear functional distinction between the CNIC and the dorsal cortex of the IC (DCIC), suggesting that the mouse midbrain is more similar to that of other mammals than previously thought. We found that the DCIC comprises a thin sheet of neurons, sometimes extending barely 100 ?m below the pial surface. The sound frequency representation in the DCIC approximated the mouse's full hearing range, whereas dorsal CNIC neurons almost exclusively preferred low frequencies. The response properties of neurons in these two regions were otherwise surprisingly similar, and the frequency tuning of DCIC neurons was only slightly broader than that of CNIC neurons. In several animals, frequency gradients were observed in the DCIC, and a comparable tonotopic arrangement was observed across the boutons of the corticocollicular axons, which form a dense mesh beneath the dorsal surface of the IC. Nevertheless, acoustically responsive corticocollicular boutons were sparse, produced unreliable responses, and were more broadly tuned than DCIC neurons, suggesting that they have a largely modulatory rather than driving influence on auditory midbrain neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Due to its genetic tractability, the mouse is fast becoming the most popular animal model for sensory neuroscience. Nevertheless, many aspects of its neural architecture are still poorly understood. Here, we image the dorsal auditory midbrain and its inputs from the cortex, revealing a hitherto hidden level of organization and paving the way for the direct observation of corticocollicular interactions. We show that a precise functional organization exists in the mouse auditory midbrain, which has been missed by previous, more macroscopic approaches. The fine-scale distribution of sound-frequency tuning suggests that the mouse midbrain is more similar to that of other mammals than previously thought and contrasts with the more heterogeneous organization reported in imaging studies of auditory cortex. PMID:26245957

  20. In Vivo Reprogramming of Striatal NG2 Glia into Functional Neurons that Integrate into Local Host Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Torper, Olof; Ottosson, Daniella Rylander; Pereira, Maria; Lau, Shong; Cardoso, Tiago; Grealish, Shane; Parmar, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Summary The possibility of directly converting non-neuronal cells into neurons in situ in the brain would open therapeutic avenues aimed at repairing the brain after injury or degenerative disease. We have developed an adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based reporter system that allows selective GFP labeling of reprogrammed neurons. In this system, GFP is turned on only in reprogrammed neurons where it is stable and maintained for long time periods, allowing for histological and functional characterization of mature neurons. When combined with a modified rabies virus-based trans-synaptic tracing methodology, the system allows mapping of 3D circuitry integration into local and distal brain regions and shows that the newly reprogrammed neurons are integrated into host brain. PMID:26166567

  1. Functional EF-Hands in Neuronal Calcium Sensor GCAP2 Determine Its Phosphorylation State and Subcellular Distribution In Vivo, and Are Essential for Photoreceptor Cell Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Jose Luis; Chen, Jeannie; Méndez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal calcium sensor proteins GCAPs (guanylate cyclase activating proteins) switch between Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound conformational states and confer calcium sensitivity to guanylate cyclase at retinal photoreceptor cells. They play a fundamental role in light adaptation by coupling the rate of cGMP synthesis to the intracellular concentration of calcium. Mutations in GCAPs lead to blindness. The importance of functional EF-hands in GCAP1 for photoreceptor cell integrity has been well established. Mutations in GCAP1 that diminish its Ca2+ binding affinity lead to cell damage by causing unabated cGMP synthesis and accumulation of toxic levels of free cGMP and Ca2+. We here investigate the relevance of GCAP2 functional EF-hands for photoreceptor cell integrity. By characterizing transgenic mice expressing a mutant form of GCAP2 with all EF-hands inactivated (EF?GCAP2), we show that GCAP2 locked in its Ca2+-free conformation leads to a rapid retinal degeneration that is not due to unabated cGMP synthesis. We unveil that when locked in its Ca2+-free conformation in vivo, GCAP2 is phosphorylated at Ser201 and results in phospho-dependent binding to the chaperone 14-3-3 and retention at the inner segment and proximal cell compartments. Accumulation of phosphorylated EF?GCAP2 at the inner segment results in severe toxicity. We show that in wildtype mice under physiological conditions, 50% of GCAP2 is phosphorylated correlating with the 50% of the protein being retained at the inner segment. Raising mice under constant light exposure, however, drastically increases the retention of GCAP2 in its Ca2+-free form at the inner segment. This study identifies a new mechanism governing GCAP2 subcellular distribution in vivo, closely related to disease. It also identifies a pathway by which a sustained reduction in intracellular free Ca2+ could result in photoreceptor damage, relevant for light damage and for those genetic disorders resulting in “equivalent-light” scenarios. PMID:25058152

  2. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: Role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E.; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1?, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing due to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:26343372

  3. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: Role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Han-Ching; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1?, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:26343372

  4. Function of the C-terminal Domain of the DEAD-Box Protein Mss116p Analyzed In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Georg; Del Campo, Mark; Mohr, Sabine; Yang, Quansheng; Jia, Huijue; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    The DEAD-box proteins CYT-19 in Neurospora crassa and Mss116p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are general RNA chaperones that function in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns and in translational activation. Both proteins consist of a conserved ATP-dependent RNA helicase core region linked to N- and C-terminal domains, the latter with a basic tail similar to many other DEAD-box proteins. In CYT-19, this basic tail was shown to contribute to non-specific RNA binding that helps tether the core helicase region to structured RNA substrates. Here, multiple sequence alignments and secondary structure predictions indicate that CYT-19 and Mss116p belong to distinct subgroups of DEAD-box proteins, whose C-terminal domains have a defining extended ?-helical region preceding the basic tail. We find that mutations or C-terminal truncations in the predicted ?-helical region of Mss116p strongly inhibit RNA-dependent ATPase activity, leading to loss of function in both translational activation and RNA splicing. These findings suggest that the ?-helical region may stabilize and/or regulate the activity of the RNA helicase core. By contrast, a truncation that removes only the basic tail leaves high RNA-dependent ATPase activity and causes only a modest reduction in translation and RNA splicing efficiency in vivo and in vitro. Biochemical analysis shows that deletion of the basic tail leads to weaker non-specific binding of group I and group II intron RNAs, and surprisingly, also impairs RNA-unwinding at saturating protein concentrations and nucleotide-dependent tight binding of single-stranded RNAs by the RNA helicase core. Together, our results indicate that the two subregions of Mss116p’s C-terminal domain act in different ways to support and modulate activities of the core helicase region, whose RNA-unwinding activity is critical for both the translation and RNA splicing functions. PMID:18096186

  5. Withdrawal from repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine induced opposing adaptive changes in the noradrenaline and serotonin system function: a behavioral and neurochemical ex vivo and in vivo studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; W?sik, Agnieszka; Mo?d?e?, Edyta; Roma?ska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Reserpine is an inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and monoamine releaser, so it can be used as a pharmacological model of depression. In the present paper, we investigated the behavioral and neurochemical effects of withdrawal from acute and repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine (0.2 mg/kg) in Wistar Han rats. We demonstrated the behavioral and receptor oversensitivity (postsynaptic dopamine D1) during withdrawal from chronic reserpine. It was accompanied by a significant increase in motility in the locomotor activity test and climbing behavior in the forced swim test (FST). Neurochemical studies revealed that repeated but not acute administration the a low dose of reserpine triggered opposing adaptive changes in the noradrenergic and serotonin system function analyzed during reserpine withdrawal, i.e. 48 h after the last injection. The tissue concentration of noradrenaline was significantly decreased in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens only after repeated drug administration (by about 20% and 35% vs. control; p<0.05, respectively). On the other hand, the concentration of its extraneuronal metabolite, normetanephrine (NM) increased significantly in the VTA during withdrawal both from acute and chronic reserpine. The serotonin concentration was significantly reduced in the VTA after chronic reserpine (by about 40% vs. the control group, p<0.05) as well as its main metabolite, 5-HIAA (by about 30% vs. control; p<0.05) in the VTA and hypothalamus. Dopamine and its metabolites were not changed after acute or chronic reserpine administration. In vivo microdialysis studies clearly evidenced the lack of the effect of a single dose of reserpine, and its distinct effects after chronic treatment on the release of noradrenaline and serotonin in the rat striatum. In fact, the withdrawal from repeated administration of reserpine significantly increased an extraneuronal concentration of noradrenaline in the rat striatum but at the same time produced a distinct fall in the extraneuronal serotonin in this brain structure. On the basis of the presented behavioral and neurochemical experiments, we suggest that chronic administration of reserpine even in such low dose which not yet acted on the release of monoamines but produced an inhibition of VMAT2 caused a long-lasting disadvantageous effect of plasticity in the brain resembling depressive disorders. PMID:25445479

  6. Targeted Gene Deletion and In Vivo Analysis of Putative Virulence Gene Function in the Pathogenic Dermatophyte Arthroderma benhamiae?

    PubMed Central

    Grumbt, Maria; Defaweux, Valérie; Mignon, Bernard; Monod, Michel; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Staib, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dermatophytes cause the majority of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. However, little is known about the pathogenicity of this specialized group of filamentous fungi, for which molecular research has been limited thus far. During experimental infection of guinea pigs by the human pathogenic dermatophyte Arthroderma benhamiae, we recently detected the activation of the fungal gene encoding malate synthase AcuE, a key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle. By the establishment of the first genetic system for A. benhamiae, specific ?acuE mutants were constructed in a wild-type strain and, in addition, in a derivative in which we inactivated the nonhomologous end-joining pathway by deletion of the A. benhamiae KU70 gene. The absence of AbenKU70 resulted in an increased frequency of the targeted insertion of linear DNA by homologous recombination, without notably altering the monitored in vitro growth abilities of the fungus or its virulence in a guinea pig infection model. Phenotypic analyses of ?acuE mutants and complemented strains depicted that malate synthase is required for the growth of A. benhamiae on lipids, major constituents of the skin. However, mutant analysis did not reveal a pathogenic role of the A. benhamiae enzyme in guinea pig dermatophytosis or during epidermal invasion of the fungus in an in vitro model of reconstituted human epidermis. The presented efficient system for targeted genetic manipulation in A. benhamiae, paired with the analyzed infection models, will advance the functional characterization of putative virulence determinants in medically important dermatophytes. PMID:21478433

  7. High-Resolution Crystal Structure and In Vivo Function of a Kinesin-2 Homologue in Giardia intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Hoeng, J. C.; House, S. A.; Sagolla, M. S.; Pham, J. K.; Mancuso, J. J.; Löwe, J.; Cande, W. Z.

    2008-01-01

    A critical component of flagellar assembly, the kinesin-2 heterotrimeric complex powers the anterograde movement of proteinaceous rafts along the outer doublet of axonemes in intraflagellar transport (IFT). We present the first high-resolution structures of a kinesin-2 motor domain and an ATP hydrolysis–deficient motor domain mutant from the parasitic protist Giardia intestinalis. The high-resolution crystal structures of G. intestinalis wild-type kinesin-2 (GiKIN2a) motor domain, with its docked neck linker and the hydrolysis-deficient mutant GiKIN2aT104N were solved in a complex with ADP and Mg2+ at 1.6 and 1.8 ? resolutions, respectively. These high-resolution structures provide unique insight into the nucleotide coordination within the active site. G. intestinalis has eight flagella, and we demonstrate that both kinesin-2 homologues and IFT proteins localize to both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound regions of axonemes, with foci at cell body exit points and the distal flagellar tips. We demonstrate that the T104N mutation causes GiKIN2a to act as a rigor mutant in vitro. Overexpression of GiKIN2aT104N results in significant inhibition of flagellar assembly in the caudal, ventral, and posterolateral flagellar pairs. Thus we confirm the conserved evolutionary structure and functional role of kinesin-2 as the anterograde IFT motor in G. intestinalis. PMID:18463165

  8. Anti-atherosclerotic function of Astragali Radix extract: downregulation of adhesion molecules in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is considered to be a chronic inflammatory disease. Astragali Radix extract (ARE) is one of the major active ingredients extracted from the root of Astragalus membranaceus Bge. Although ARE has an anti-inflammatory function, its anti-atherosclerotic effects and mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Methods Murine endothelial SVEC4-10 cells were pretreated with different doses of ARE at different times prior to induction with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?. Cell adhesion assays were performed using THP-1 cells and assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses to detect the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), phosphorylated inhibitor of ?B (p-i?B) and nuclear factor (NF)-?B. We also examined the effect of ARE on atherosclerosis in the aortic endothelium of apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE?/?) mice. Results TNF-? strongly increased the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 accompanied by increased expression of p-i?B and NF-?B proteins. However, the expression levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 were reduced by ARE in dose- and time-dependent manners, with the strongest effect at a dose of 120??g/ml incubated for 4?h. This was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of p-i?B and inhibited activation of NF-?B. Immunofluorescence analysis also revealed that oral administration of ARE resulted in downregulation of adhesion molecules and decreased expression of macrophages in the aortic endothelium of apoE?/? mice. ARE could suppress the inflammatory reaction and inhibit the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in apoE?/? mice. Conclusion This study demonstrated that ARE might be an effective anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of atherosclerosis, possibly acting via the decreased expression of adhesion molecules. PMID:22536886

  9. Disarming Burkholderia pseudomallei: Structural and Functional Characterization of a Disulfide Oxidoreductase (DsbA) Required for Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Róisín M.; Marshall, Laura E.; Halili, Maria; Furlong, Emily; Tay, Stephanie; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, a major source of morbidity and mortality in southeast Asia and northern Australia. The need to develop novel antimicrobials is compounded by the absence of a licensed vaccine and the bacterium's resistance to multiple antibiotics. In a number of clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogens, DsbA is the primary disulfide oxidoreductase responsible for catalyzing the formation of disulfide bonds in secreted and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, a putative B. pseudomallei dsbA gene was evaluated functionally and structurally and its contribution to infection assessed. Results: Biochemical studies confirmed the dsbA gene encodes a protein disulfide oxidoreductase. A dsbA deletion strain of B. pseudomallei was attenuated in both macrophages and a BALB/c mouse model of infection and displayed pleiotropic phenotypes that included defects in both secretion and motility. The 1.9 Ĺ resolution crystal structure of BpsDsbA revealed differences from the classic member of this family Escherichia coli DsbA, in particular within the region surrounding the active site disulfide where EcDsbA engages with its partner protein E. coli DsbB, indicating that the interaction of BpsDsbA with its proposed partner BpsDsbB may be distinct from that of EcDsbA-EcDsbB. Innovation: This study has characterized BpsDsbA biochemically and structurally and determined that it is required for virulence of B. pseudomallei. Conclusion: These data establish a critical role for BpsDsbA in B. pseudomallei infection, which in combination with our structural characterization of BpsDsbA will facilitate the future development of rationally designed inhibitors against this drug-resistant organism. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 606–617. PMID:23901809

  10. The HOXB4 homeoprotein promotes the ex vivo enrichment of functional human embryonic stem cell-derived NK cells.

    PubMed

    Larbi, Aniya; Gombert, Jean-Marc; Auvray, Céline; l'Homme, Bruno; Magniez, Aurélie; Féraud, Olivier; Coulombel, Laure; Chapel, Alain; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa; Turhan, Ali G; Haddad, Rima; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be induced to differentiate into blood cells using either co-culture with stromal cells or following human embryoid bodies (hEBs) formation. It is now well established that the HOXB4 homeoprotein promotes the expansion of human adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but also myeloid and lymphoid progenitors. However, the role of HOXB4 in the development of hematopoietic cells from hESCs and particularly in the generation of hESC-derived NK-progenitor cells remains elusive. Based on the ability of HOXB4 to passively enter hematopoietic cells in a system that comprises a co-culture with the MS-5/SP-HOXB4 stromal cells, we provide evidence that HOXB4 delivery promotes the enrichment of hEB-derived precursors that could differentiate into fully mature and functional NK. These hEB-derived NK cells enriched by HOXB4 were characterized according to their CMH class I receptor expression, their cytotoxic arsenal, their expression of IFN? and CD107a after stimulation and their lytic activity. Furthermore our study provides new insights into the gene expression profile of hEB-derived cells exposed to HOXB4 and shows the emergence of CD34(+)CD45RA(+) precursors from hEBs indicating the lymphoid specification of hESC-derived hematopoietic precursors. Altogether, our results outline the effects of HOXB4 in combination with stromal cells in the development of NK cells from hESCs and suggest the potential use of HOXB4 protein for NK-cell enrichment from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22761810

  11. The HOXB4 Homeoprotein Promotes the Ex Vivo Enrichment of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larbi, Aniya; Gombert, Jean-Marc; Auvray, Céline; l’Homme, Bruno; Magniez, Aurélie; Féraud, Olivier; Coulombel, Laure; Chapel, Alain; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa; Turhan, Ali G.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be induced to differentiate into blood cells using either co-culture with stromal cells or following human embryoid bodies (hEBs) formation. It is now well established that the HOXB4 homeoprotein promotes the expansion of human adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but also myeloid and lymphoid progenitors. However, the role of HOXB4 in the development of hematopoietic cells from hESCs and particularly in the generation of hESC-derived NK-progenitor cells remains elusive. Based on the ability of HOXB4 to passively enter hematopoietic cells in a system that comprises a co-culture with the MS-5/SP-HOXB4 stromal cells, we provide evidence that HOXB4 delivery promotes the enrichment of hEB-derived precursors that could differentiate into fully mature and functional NK. These hEB-derived NK cells enriched by HOXB4 were characterized according to their CMH class I receptor expression, their cytotoxic arsenal, their expression of IFN? and CD107a after stimulation and their lytic activity. Furthermore our study provides new insights into the gene expression profile of hEB-derived cells exposed to HOXB4 and shows the emergence of CD34+CD45RA+ precursors from hEBs indicating the lymphoid specification of hESC-derived hematopoietic precursors. Altogether, our results outline the effects of HOXB4 in combination with stromal cells in the development of NK cells from hESCs and suggest the potential use of HOXB4 protein for NK-cell enrichment from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22761810

  12. Ex vivo proliferation of mesothelial cells directly obtained from peritoneal effluent: its relationship with peritoneal antecedents and functional parameters.

    PubMed

    Díaz, C; Selgas, R; Castro, M A; Bajo, M A; Fernández de Castro, M; Molina, S; Jiménez, C; Ortiz, A; Vara, F

    1998-01-01

    The peritoneal membrane requires anatomico-functional integrity to guarantee long-term stability for peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since mesothelial cells (MC) are active cells and the first part of the membrane to contact the dialysate, they are important in maintaining this stability. Mesothelial cells released daily into peritoneal effluent are able to grow in culture. This growth capacity may be related to some of the anatomicofunctional characteristics of each peritoneum. Our aim was to culture mesothelial cells taken from peritoneal effluents drained by 32 PD-stable patients, and relate this growth capacity to individual peritoneal data. Cells were taken from a residual fluid after sedimentation, washed twice with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and seeded into 25-cm2 tissue-culture flasks. These flasks were incubated in a humidified 5%-CO2 atmosphere. After MC confluence, cells were detached by trypsinization, passaged into 24-well plates, and finally counted. Cells were identified by morphology and immuno-histochemical characteristics. Cells from 28 out of 32 patients showed an appropriate growth in culture. Mesothelial cell confluence was reached in a mean of 18.2 +/- 8 days. After 7 days of seeding in plate wells, the cell growth showed a significant and progressive increase until day 16. Mesothelial cell growth rate was inversely related to PD duration. Neither peritonitis incidence nor other demographic characteristic were related to MC growth. Creatinine and urea mass transfer coefficients (MTC), but not ultrafiltration (UF) capacity, were significantly related to MC growth rate. In conclusion, the growth in culture of MC taken directly from PD bags is certainly possible. This growth is influenced by some of the intrinsic peritoneal characteristics derived from the peritoneal dialysis process. This tool could be useful in evaluating individual peritoneal conditions and, probably, as a method for peritoneal viability follow-up, although further research is required. PMID:10649684

  13. Structural characterization of the medfly hsp83 gene and functional analysis of its proximal promoter region in vivo by germ-line transformation.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria; Tatari, Marianthi; Chrysanthis, George; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mintzas, Anastassios C

    2008-01-01

    In order to define the regulatory elements responsible for the expression of the medfly hsp83 (Cchsp83) gene, we determined the sequence of a genomic region of the gene that included 3,536 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site, the first untranslated exon of 144 bp, a 275-bp intron, and 516 bp of the second coding exon. Structural analysis of the 5' flanking region revealed the presence of a typical TATA box, 28 bp upstream of the transcription start site, and seven putative heat shock elements (HSEs) further upstream. The 5' untranslated region of the Cchsp83 mRNA was found to contain extensive secondary structure in the first 126 nucleotides. We carried out deletion functional analysis of the proximal promoter region (-380/+139) in vivo by germ line transformation using the lacZ as a reporter gene. We found that sequences in the -380/-86 region are essential for the constitutive expression of the Cchsp83 gene. Under normal conditions, the -380/+139 region was able to drive significant levels of transgene expression in all developmental stages of the medfly as well as in the ovaries and testis. In most stages, the temporal expression pattern of the reporter gene was similar to the respective pattern of the endogenous Cchsp83 gene. Although the -380/+139 promoter region contained two putative HSEs, it was found unable to confer any heat-induced expression in the reporter gene. PMID:18064699

  14. Recombinant IFN-?2a-NGR exhibits higher inhibitory function on tumor neovessels formation compared with IFN-?2a in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Weina; Hao, Qiang; He, Liqing; Meng, Jieru; Li, Meng; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Cun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that NGR-fused IFN-?2a (IFN-?2a-NGR) exhibited similar biological activities with native IFN-?2a and was well-tolerated in mice, rats and monkeys. In the current study, we evaluated the mechanisms of this fusion protein on angiogenesis and tumor formation. Our data indicated that IFN-?2a-NGR has the ability to target tumor blood vessels while preserving the original function of native IFN-?2a. IFN-?2a-NGR was found to be concentrated in the tumor tissues, particularly around the vessel areas. In contrast to IFN-?2a, IFN-?2a-NGR significantly decreased microvessel density and increased the apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. IFN-?2a-NGR also decreased the expression of VEGF and bFGF in tumor cells. Significant inhibition of invasion, migration, tube formation and induction of apoptosis of endothelial cells were observed in IFN-?2a-NGR-treated group. In conclusion, results from in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that IFN-?2a-NGR is a promising anti-angiogenic agent with greater therapeutic efficacy than IFN-?2a. PMID:24897998

  15. In vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV) non-structural proteins in insect cells reveals their putative functions

    SciTech Connect

    Maroniche, Guillermo A.; Mongelli, Vanesa C.; Llauger, Gabriela; Alfonso, Victoria; Taboga, Oscar

    2012-09-01

    The in vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV, Fijivirus, Reoviridae) non-structural proteins fused to GFP was analyzed by confocal microscopy. P5-1 showed a cytoplasmic vesicular-like distribution that was lost upon deleting its PDZ binding TKF motif, suggesting that P5-1 interacts with cellular PDZ proteins. P5-2 located at the nucleus and its nuclear import was affected by the deletion of its basic C-termini. P7-1 and P7-2 also entered the nucleus and therefore, along with P5-2, could function as regulators of host gene expression. P6 located in the cytoplasm and in perinuclear cloud-like inclusions, was driven to P9-1 viroplasm-like structures and co-localized with P7-2, P10 and {alpha}-tubulin, suggesting its involvement in viroplasm formation and viral intracellular movement. Finally, P9-2 was N-glycosylated and located at the plasma membrane in association with filopodia-like protrusions containing actin, suggesting a possible role in virus cell-to-cell movement and spread.

  16. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled â??A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivoâ?ť which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigatorâ??s laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts, as well as a U.S. patent. There are several additional publications that will be submitted in 2007 that were supported in part by this program. These future publications include one manuscript on in vivo expression profiling analysis in mouse models, one manuscript on radiation responses in human cell lines, at least one on development of stress signatures in human cells, and three manuscripts on radiation metabolomics.

  17. Ovarian function in the Nile hippopotamus and the effects of Depo-Provera administration.

    PubMed

    Graham, L H; Webster, T; Richards, M; Reid, K; Joseph, S

    2002-01-01

    The preliminary results of an investigation into the reproductive endocrinology of the hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) and the effects of the progestin Depo-Provera on ovarian function are presented. Faecal progestagen analysis indicated that hippos have an oestrous cycle of 29.2 +/- 0.9 days and faecal progestagen concentrations of 323.6 +/- 31.4 ng g(-1) during the luteal phase. Concentrations were higher (765.9 +/- 162.4 ng g(-1); P < 0.05) during pregnancy than during the luteal phase and remained high until parturition. A lactational anoestrus was usually, but not always, observed during nursing. The onset of puberty was observed in three animals and started at 2.5-3.5 years of age. After Depo-Provera treatment, increases in faecal progestagens indicative of ovulation were observed and were not significantly different from luteal concentrations observed before treatment (236.3 +/- 24.4 versus 340.1 +/- 47.9 ng g(-1), respectively); however, the duration of the luteal phase was shorter (P < 0.05) than before treatment (11.3 +/- 1.0 versus 18.9 +/- 1.0 days, respectively). Females returned to normal cyclicity at day 100.7 +/- 15.3 (range 70-116 days) after administration and one female conceived on day 100 after administration. PMID:12220165

  18. Use of an In Vivo FTA Assay to Assess the Magnitude, Functional Avidity and Epitope Variant Cross-Reactivity of T Cell Responses Following HIV-1 Recombinant Poxvirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wijesundara, Danushka K.; Ranasinghe, Charani; Jackson, Ronald J.; Lidbury, Brett A.; Parish, Christopher R.; Quah, Benjamin J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative characteristics of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs) are important in measuring the effectiveness of CTLs in controlling HIV-1 infections. Indeed, in recent studies patients who are naturally resistant to HIV-1 infections have been shown to possess CTLs that are of high functional avidity and have a high capacity to recognize HIV epitope variants, when compared to HIV-1 infection progressors. When developing efficacious vaccines, assays that can effectively measure CTL quality specifically in vivo are becoming increasingly important. Here we report the use of a recently developed high-throughput multi-parameter technique, known as the fluorescent target array (FTA) assay, to simultaneously measure CTL killing magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity in real time in vivo. In the current study we have applied the FTA assay as a screening tool to assess a large cohort of over 20 different HIV-1 poxvirus vaccination strategies in mice. This screen revealed that heterologous poxvirus prime-boost vaccination regimes (i.e., recombinant fowlpox (FPV)-HIV prime followed by a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV)-HIV booster) were the most effective in generating high quality CTL responses in vivo. In conclusion, we have demonstrated how the FTA assay can be utilized as a cost effective screening tool (by reducing the required number of animals by >100 fold), to evaluate a large range of HIV-1 vaccination strategies in terms of CTL avidity and variant cross-reactivity in an in vivo setting. PMID:25170620

  19. Immunolocalization and in vivo Functional Analysis by RNAi of the Aedes Kinin Receptor in Female Mosquitoes of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera, Culicidae) 

    E-print Network

    Kersch, Cymon

    2012-02-14

    , followed by measurement of in vivo urine excretion post blood feeding in a precision humidity chamber. Transcript and protein knockdown were confirmed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results indicate widespread expression of the Aedes kinin...

  20. Visfatin activates eNOS via Akt and MAP kinases and improves endothelial cell function and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo: translational implications for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lovren, Fina; Pan, Yi; Shukla, Praphulla C; Quan, Adrian; Teoh, Hwee; Szmitko, Paul E; Peterson, Mark D; Gupta, Milan; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Verma, Subodh

    2009-06-01

    Improving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) bioactivity and endothelial function is important to limit native, vein graft, and transplant atherosclerosis. Visfatin, a NAD biosynthetic enzyme, regulates the activity of the cellular survival factor, Sirt1. We hypothesized that visfatin may improve eNOS expression, endothelial function, and postnatal angiogenesis. In human umbilical vein (HUVEC) and coronary artery endothelial cells, we evaluated the effects of recombinant human visfatin on eNOS protein and transcript expression and mRNA stability, in the presence and absence of visfatin RNA silencing. We also assessed visfatin-induced protein kinase B (Akt) activation and its association with src-tyrosine kinases, phosphorylation of Ser(1177) within eNOS in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibition with LY-294002, and evaluated the contributory role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Finally, we determined the impact of visfatin on HUVEC migration, proliferation, inflammation-induced permeability, and in vivo angiogenesis. Visfatin (100 ng/ml) upregulated and stabilized eNOS mRNA and increased the production of nitric oxide and cGMP. Visfatin-treated HUVEC demonstrated greater proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation but less tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced permeability; these effects were decreased in visfatin gene-silenced cells. Visfatin increased total Akt and Ser(473)-phospho-Akt expression with concomitant rises in eNOS phosphorylation at Ser(1177); these effects were blocked by LY-2940002. Studies with PP2 showed that the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, src, is an upstream stimulator of the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway. Visfatin also activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase through PI 3-kinase, and mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibition attenuated visfatin-elicited Akt and eNOS phosphorylation. Visfatin-filled Matrigel implants showed an elevated number of infiltrating vessels, and visfatin treatment produced significant recovery of limb perfusion following hindlimb ischemia. These results indicate a novel effect of visfatin to stimulate eNOS expression and function in endothelial cells, via a common upstream, src-mediated signaling cascade, which leads to activation of Akt and MAP kinases. Visfatin represents a translational target to limit endothelial dysfunction, native, vein graft and transplant atherosclerosis, and improve postnatal angiogenesis. PMID:19351806

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MGT1 DNA repair methyltransferase gene: its promoter and entire coding sequence, regulation and in vivo biological functions.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W; Samson, L

    1992-01-01

    We previously cloned a yeast DNA fragment that, when fused with the bacterial lacZ promoter, produced O6-methylguanine DNA repair methyltransferase (MGT1) activity and alkylation resistance in Escherichia coli (Xiao et al., EMBO J. 10,2179). Here we describe the isolation of the entire MGT1 gene and its promoter by sequence directed chromosome integration and walking. The MGT1 promoter was fused to a lacZ reporter gene to study how MGT1 expression is controlled. MGT1 is not induced by alkylating agents, nor is it induced by other DNA damaging agents such as UV light. However, deletion analysis defined an upstream repression sequence, whose removal dramatically increased basal level gene expression. The polypeptide deduced from the complete MGT1 sequence contained 18 more N-terminal amino acids than that previously determined; the role of these 18 amino acids, which harbored a potential nuclear localization signal, was explored. The MGT1 gene was also cloned under the GAL1 promoter, so that MTase levels could be manipulated, and we examined MGT1 function in a MTase deficient yeast strain (mgt1). The extent of resistance to both alkylation-induced mutation and cell killing directly correlated with MTase levels. Finally we show that mgt1 S.cerevisiae has a higher rate of spontaneous mutation than wild type cells, indicating that there is an endogenous source of DNA alkylation damage in these eukaryotic cells and that one of the in vivo roles of MGT1 is to limit spontaneous mutations. PMID:1641326

  2. Exposure of female macaques to Western-style diet with or without chronic T in vivo alters secondary follicle function during encapsulated 3-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; McGee, Whitney K; Bishop, Cecily V; Park, Byung S; Cameron, Judy L; Zelinski, Mary B; Stouffer, Richard L

    2015-03-01

    Increased adiposity and hyperandrogenemia alter reproductive parameters in both animal models and women, but their effects on preantral follicles in the ovary remain unknown. We recently reported that Western-style diet (WSD) consumption over 1 year, with or without chronic exposure to elevated circulating T, increased the body fat percentage, elicited insulin resistance, suppressed estradiol and progesterone production, as well as altered the numbers, size, and dynamics of antral follicles in the ovary during the menstrual cycle in female macaques. Therefore, experiments were designed to compare the WSD and WSD+T effects to age-matched controls on the survival, growth, and function of isolated secondary follicles during 5 weeks of encapsulated 3-dimensional culture. Follicle survival significantly declined in the WSD and WSD+T groups compared with the control (CTRL) group. Although media progesterone levels were comparable among groups, androstenedione and estradiol levels were markedly reduced in the WSD and WSD+T groups compared with the CTRL group at week 5. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels peaked at week 3 and were lower in the WSD+T group compared with the WSD or CTRL group. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels also decreased at week 5 in the WSD+T group compared with the WSD or CTRL group. After human chorionic gonadotropin exposure, only antral follicles developed from the CTRL group yielded metaphase II oocytes. Thus, WSD with or without T exposure affects the cohort of secondary follicles in vivo, suppressing their subsequent survival, production of steroid hormones and local factors, as well as oocyte maturation in vitro. PMID:25545382

  3. Novel in vivo imaging techniques for trafficking the behavior of subventricular zone neural stem cells (SVZSC) and SVZSC induced functional repair

    SciTech Connect

    Anna-Liisa Brownell

    2003-11-28

    Adult progenitor cells hold promise for therapeutic treatment where there has been a disabling loss of function due to death of cells from trauma, disease or aging. However, it will be essential in clinical application to be able to follow the fate of the transplanted cells over time using in vivo tracking methods. We have developed protocol for labeling of progenitor cells to monitor cell trafficking by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and super high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). We have transfected rat subventricular zone stem cells (SVZ, progenitor cell line) and another control cell line (PC12, pheochromocytoma cells) utilizing super paramagnetic iron oxide and poly-L-lysine complex for MR imaging or radiolabeling with 18F-fluor deoxy-D- glucose for PET imaging. The labeled cells were transplanted into the rostral migratory stream (RMS) or striatum of normal or 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Spraque-Dawley rats. Longitudinal MRI studies (up to 40 days) showed that transplantation site has significant impact to the fate of the cells; when SVZ cells were transplanted into the RMS, cells migrated several centimeter into the olfactory bulb; after transplantation into the striatum, the migration was minimal, only 2 mm. PC 12 cells grew a massive tumor after the striatal implantation and significantly smaller tumor after the RMS implantation. PET studies conducted immediately after transplantation verified the transplantation site. MRI studies were able to show the whole path of migration in one image, since part of the cells die during migration and will get detected because of iron content. Endpoint histological studies verified the cell survival and immunohistochemical studies revealed the differentiation of the transplanted cells into astrocytes and neurons.

  4. Functions of nuclear receptor HR3 during larval-pupal molting in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) revealed by in vivo RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Chao; Liu, Xin-Ping; Fu, Kai-Yun; Shi, Ji-Feng; Lü, Feng-Gong; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Our previous results revealed that RNA interference-aided knockdown of Leptinotarsa decemlineata FTZ-F1 (LdFTZ-F1) reduced 20E titer, and impaired pupation. In this study, we characterized a putative LdHR3 gene, an early-late 20E-response gene upstream of LdFTZ-F1. Within the first, second and third larval instars, three expression peaks of LdHR3 occurred just before the molt. In the fourth (final) larval instar 80 h after ecdysis and prepupal stage 3 days after burying into soil, two LdHR3 peaks occurred. The LdHR3 expression peaks coincide with the peaks of circulating 20E level. In vitro midgut culture and in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide (Hal) enhanced LdHR3 expression in the final larval instars. Conversely, a decrease in 20E by feeding a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against an ecdysteroidogenesis gene Ldshd repressed the expression. Moreover, Hal rescued the transcript levels in the Ldshd-silenced larvae. Thus, 20E peaks activate the expression of LdHR3. Furthermore, ingesting dsRNA against LdHR3 successfully knocked down the target gene, and impaired pupation. Finally, knockdown of LdHR3 upregulated the transcription of three ecdysteroidogenesis genes (Ldphm, Lddib and Ldshd), increased 20E titer, and activated the expression of two 20E-response genes (LdEcR and LdFTZ-F1). Thus, LdHR3 functions in regulation of pupation in the Colorado potato beetle. PMID:26005119

  5. TARGETING TUMOUR CELL INVASION AND DISSEMINATION IN VIVO BY AN APTAMER THAT INHIBITS UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR THROUGH A NOVEL MULTI-FUNCTIONAL MECHANISM

    PubMed Central

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A.; Deryugina, Elena I.; Dupont, Daniel M.; Gĺrdsvoll, Henrik; Bekes, Erin M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Chen, Zhou; Ploug, Michael; Quigley, James P.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Data accumulated over the latest two decades have established that the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. When designing inhibitors of the proteolytic activity of serine proteases, obtaining sufficient specificity is problematic since the topology of the proteases’ active sites are highly similar. In an effort to generate highly specific uPA inhibitors with new inhibitory modalities, we isolated uPA-binding RNA aptamers by screening a library of 35 nucleotides long 2?-fluoro-pyrimidine RNA molecules using as bait a version of human pro-uPA lacking the epidermal growth factor-like and kringle domains. One pro-uPA binding aptamer sequence, referred to as upanap-126, proved to be highly specific for human uPA. Upanap-126 delayed the proteolytic conversion of human pro-uPA to active uPA, but did not inhibit plasminogen activation catalysed by two-chain uPA. The aptamer also inhibited the binding of pro-uPA to uPAR and the binding of vitronectin to the preformed pro-uPA/uPAR complexes both in cell-free systems and on cell surfaces. Furthermore, upanap-126 inhibited human tumour cell invasion in vitro, in the Matrigel assay, and in vivo, in the chick embryo assay of cell escape from microtumours. Finally, upanap-126 significantly reduced the levels of tumour cell intravasation and dissemination in the chick embryo model of spontaneous metastasis. Together, our findings demonstrate that utilisation of upanap-126 represents a novel multi-functional mechanistic modality for inhibition of uPA-dependent processes involved in tumour cell spread. PMID:23038812

  6. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095–2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab’)2 fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab’)2 fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095–2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. Similarly, 2095–2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. mAb 2095–2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab’)2 fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095–2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095–2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095–2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095–2 to F(ab’)2, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease activity is abundant. PMID:25517311

  7. Evidence for a Dopamine Intrinsic Direct Role in the Regulation of the Ovary Reproductive Function: In Vitro Study on Rabbit Corpora Lutea

    PubMed Central

    Parillo, Francesco; Maranesi, Margherita; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Marinelli, Lisa; Di Stefano, Antonio; Boiti, Cristiano; Zerani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptor (DR) type 1 (D1R) has been found to be expressed in luteal cells of various species, but the intrinsic role of the DA/DRs system on corpora lutea (CL) function is still unclear. Experiments were devised to characterize the expression of DR types and the presence of DA, as well as the in vitro effects of DA on hormone productions by CL in pseudopregnant rabbits. Immunoreactivity and gene expression for D1R decreased while that for D3R increased in luteal and blood vessel cells from early to late pseudopregnant stages. DA immunopositivity was evidenced only in luteal cells. The DA and D1R agonist increased in vitro release of progesterone and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by early CL, whereas the DA and D3R agonist decreased progesterone and increased PGF2? in vitro release by mid- and late CL. These results provide evidence that the DA/DR system exerts a dual modulatory function in the lifespan of CL: the DA/D1R is luteotropic while the DA/D3R is luteolytic. The present data shed new light on the physiological mechanisms regulating luteal activity that might improve our ability to optimize reproductive efficiency in mammal species, including humans. PMID:25148384

  8. Simultaneous synthesis and amine-functionalization of single-phase BaYF5:Yb/Er nanoprobe for dual-modal in vivo upconversion fluorescence and long-lasting X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongrong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Haibo; Rao, Ling; Yi, Zhigao; Zeng, Songjun; Hao, Jianhua

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we developed a novel and biocompatible dual-modal nanoprobe based on single-phase amine-functionalized BaYF5:Yb/Er nanoparticles (NPs) for upconversion (UC) fluorescence and in vivo computed X-ray tomography (CT) bioimaging for the first time. High-quality water-soluble amine-functionalized BaYF5:Yb/Er NPs with an average size of 24 nm were synthesized by a facile environmentally friendly hydrothermal method for simultaneous synthesis and surface functionalization. Structure investigation based on the Rietveld refinement method revealed that the as-synthesized BaYF5:Yb/Er NPs present a cubic phase structure, which differs from the previously reported tetragonal structure. Under 980 nm excitation, high-contrast green and red UC emissions were observed from HeLa cells incubated with these amine-functionalized NPs. The UC spectra measured from the NPs incubated with HeLa cells presented only green and red UC emissions without any autofluorescence, further revealing that these NPs are ideal candidates for fluorescent bioimaging. In addition, the cell cytotoxicity test showed low cell toxicity of these NPs. These amine-functionalized NPs were also successfully used as CT agents for in vivo CT imaging because of the efficient X-ray absorption efficiency of Ba and doped Yb ions. A prolonged (2 h) signal enhancement of the spleen in a mouse was observed in CT imaging, which can improve the detection of splenic diseases. More importantly, the simultaneous X-ray and UC in vivo bioimaging was demonstrated in a nude mouse for the first time, indicating the as-prepared UCNPs can be successfully used as dual-modal bioprobes. These results demonstrate that BaYF5:Yb/Er NPs are ideal nanoprobes for dual-modal fluorescent/CT bioimaging with low cytotoxicity, non-autofluorescence, and enhanced detection of the spleen. PMID:23715609

  9. A genome-scale in vivo loss-of-function screen identifies Phf6 as a lineage-specific regulator of leukemia cell growth

    E-print Network

    Meacham, Corbin E.

    We performed a genome-scale shRNA screen for modulators of B-cell leukemia progression in vivo. Results from this work revealed dramatic distinctions between the relative effects of shRNAs on the growth of tumor cells in ...

  10. In vivo targeted magnetic resonance imaging and visualized photodynamic therapy in deep-tissue cancers using folic acid-functionalized superparamagnetic-upconversion nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Leyong; Luo, Lijia; Pan, Yuanwei; Luo, Song; Lu, Guangming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-05-01

    Multifunctional nanoprobes used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) also have potential applications in diagnosis and visualized therapy of cancers, and hence it is important to investigate the active-targeting ability and in vivo reliability of these nanoprobes. In this work, folic acid (FA)-targeted, photosensitizer (PS)-loaded Fe3O4@NaYF4:Yb/Er (FA-NPs-PS) nanocomposites were synthesized for in vivo T2-weighted MRI and visualized PDT of cancers by modeling MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice. By measuring the upconversion luminescence (UCL) and fluorescence emission spectra, the as-prepared FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites showed near-infrared (NIR)-triggered PDT performance due to the production of a singlet oxygen species. Moreover, by tracing PS fluorescence in MCF-7, HeLa cells and in MCF-7 tumors, the FA-targeted nanocomposites demonstrated good targeting ability both in vitro and in vivo. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser, the viabilities of MCF-7 and HeLa cells incubated with FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites could decrease to about 18.4% and 30.7%, respectively, and the inhibition of MCF-7 tumors could reach about 94.9%. The transverse MR relaxivity of 63.79 mM-1 s-1 (r2 value) and in vivo MR imaging of MCF-7 tumors indicated an excellent T2-weighted MR performance. This work demonstrated that FA-targeted MRI/PDT nanoprobes are effective for in vivo diagnosis and visualized therapy of breast cancers.Multifunctional nanoprobes used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) also have potential applications in diagnosis and visualized therapy of cancers, and hence it is important to investigate the active-targeting ability and in vivo reliability of these nanoprobes. In this work, folic acid (FA)-targeted, photosensitizer (PS)-loaded Fe3O4@NaYF4:Yb/Er (FA-NPs-PS) nanocomposites were synthesized for in vivo T2-weighted MRI and visualized PDT of cancers by modeling MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice. By measuring the upconversion luminescence (UCL) and fluorescence emission spectra, the as-prepared FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites showed near-infrared (NIR)-triggered PDT performance due to the production of a singlet oxygen species. Moreover, by tracing PS fluorescence in MCF-7, HeLa cells and in MCF-7 tumors, the FA-targeted nanocomposites demonstrated good targeting ability both in vitro and in vivo. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser, the viabilities of MCF-7 and HeLa cells incubated with FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites could decrease to about 18.4% and 30.7%, respectively, and the inhibition of MCF-7 tumors could reach about 94.9%. The transverse MR relaxivity of 63.79 mM-1 s-1 (r2 value) and in vivo MR imaging of MCF-7 tumors indicated an excellent T2-weighted MR performance. This work demonstrated that FA-targeted MRI/PDT nanoprobes are effective for in vivo diagnosis and visualized therapy of breast cancers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01932j

  11. The Expression Pattern of microRNAs in Granulosa Cells of Subordinate and Dominant Follicles during the Early Luteal Phase of the Bovine Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhn, Samuel; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Hossain, MD Munir; Rings, Franca; Hoelker, Michael; Tholen, Ernst; Neuhoff, Christiane; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the miRNA expression patterns in granulosa cells of subordinate (SF) and dominant follicle (DF) during the early luteal phase of the bovine estrous cycle. For this, miRNA enriched total RNA isolated from granulosa cells of SF and DF obtained from heifers slaughtered at day 3 and day 7 of the estrous cycle was used for miRNAs deep sequencing. The results revealed that including 17 candidate novel miRNAs, several known miRNAs (n?=?291–318) were detected in SF and DF at days 3 and 7 of the estrous cycle of which 244 miRNAs were common to all follicle groups. The let-7 families, bta-miR-10b, bta-miR-26a, bta-miR-99b and bta-miR-27b were among abundantly expressed miRNAs in both SF and DF at both days of the estrous cycle. Further analysis revealed that the expression patterns of 16 miRNAs including bta-miR-449a, bta-miR-449c and bta-miR-222 were differentially expressed between the granulosa cells of SF and DF at day 3 of the estrous cycle. However, at day 7 of the estrous cycle, 108 miRNAs including bta-miR-409a, bta-miR-383 and bta-miR-184 were differentially expressed between the two groups of granulosa cell revealing the presence of distinct miRNA expression profile changes between the two follicular stages at day 7 than day 3 of the estrous cycle. In addition, unlike the SF, marked temporal miRNA expression dynamics was observed in DF groups between day 3 and 7 of the estrous cycle. Target gene prediction and pathway analysis revealed that major signaling associated with follicular development including Wnt signaling, TGF-beta signaling, oocyte meiosis and GnRH signaling were affected by differentially expressed miRNAs. Thus, this study highlights the miRNA expression patterns of granulosa cells in subordinate and dominant follicles that could be associated with follicular recruitment, selection and dominance during the early luteal phase of the bovine estrous cycle. PMID:25192015

  12. Ex Vivo ERG analysis of photoreceptors using an In Vivo ERG system

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Frans; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    The Function of the retina and effects of drugs on it can be assessed by recording transretinal voltage across isolated retina that is perfused with physiological medium. However, building ex vivo ERG apparatus requires substantial amount of time, resources and expertise. Here we adapted a commercial in vivo ERG system for transretinal ERG recordings from rod and cone photoreceptors and compared rod and cone signalling between ex vivo and in vivo environments. We found that the rod and cone a- and b-waves recorded with the transretinal ERG adapter and a standard in vivo ERG system are comparable to those obtained from live anesthetized animals. However, ex vivo responses are somewhat slower and their oscillatory potentials are suppressed as compared to those recorded in vivo. We found that rod amplification constant (A) was comparable between ex vivo and in vivo conditions, ?10 - 30 s-2 depending on the choice of response normalization. We estimate that the A in cones is between 3 and 6 s-2 in ex vivo conditions and by assuming equal A in vivo we arrive to light funnelling factor of 3 for cones in the mouse retina. The ex vivo ERG adapter provides a simple and affordable alternative to designing a custom-built transretinal recordings setup for the study of photoreceptors. Our results provide a roadmap to the rigorous quantitative analysis of rod and cone responses made possible with such a system. PMID:24959652

  13. Defining the in Vivo Role for Cytochrome b5 in Cytochrome P450 Function through the Conditional Hepatic Deletion of Microsomal Cytochrome b5*S?

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Ronseaux, Sebastien; Rosewell, Ian; Houston, J. Brian; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland

    2008-01-01

    In vitro, cytochrome b5 modulates the rate of cytochrome P450-dependent mono-oxygenation reactions. However, the role of this enzyme in determining drug pharmacokinetics in vivo and the consequential effects on drug absorption distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity are unclear. In order to resolve this issue, we have carried out the conditional deletion of microsomal cytochrome b5 in the liver to create the hepatic microsomal cytochrome b5 null mouse. These mice develop and breed normally and have no overt phenotype. In vitro studies using a range of substrates for different P450 enzymes showed that in hepatic microsomal cytochrome b5 null NADH-mediated metabolism was essentially abolished for most substrates, and the NADPH-dependent metabolism of many substrates was reduced by 50–90%. This reduction in metabolism was also reflected in the in vivo elimination profiles of several drugs, including midazolam, metoprolol, and tolbutamide. In the case of chlorzoxazone, elimination was essentially unchanged. For some drugs, the pharmacokinetics were also markedly altered; for example, when administered orally, the maximum plasma concentration for midazolam was increased by 2.5-fold, and the clearance decreased by 3.6-fold in hepatic microsomal cytochrome b5 null mice. These data indicate that microsomal cytochrome b5 can play a major role in the in vivo metabolism of certain drugs and chemicals but in a P450- and substrate-dependent manner. PMID:18805792

  14. Analysis of TFIIA Function In Vivo: Evidence for a Role in TATA-Binding Protein Recruitment and Gene-Specific Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Gabriel, Scott E.; Roinick, Kelli L.; Ward, Robert D.; Arndt, Karen M.

    1999-01-01

    Activation of transcription can occur by the facilitated recruitment of TFIID to promoters by gene-specific activators. To investigate the role of TFIIA in TFIID recruitment in vivo, we exploited a class of yeast TATA-binding protein (TBP) mutants that is activation and DNA binding defective. We found that co-overexpression of TOA1 and TOA2, the genes that encode yeast TFIIA, overcomes the activation defects caused by the TBP mutants. Using a genetic screen, we isolated a new class of TFIIA mutants and identified three regions on TFIIA that are likely to be involved in TBP recruitment or stabilization of the TBP-TATA complex in vivo. Amino acid replacements in only one of these regions enhance TFIIA-TBP-DNA complex formation in vitro, suggesting that the other regions are involved in regulatory interactions. To determine the relative importance of TFIIA in the regulation of different genes, we constructed yeast strains to conditionally deplete TFIIA levels prior to gene activation. While the activation of certain genes, such as INO1, was dramatically impaired by TFIIA depletion, activation of other genes, such as CUP1, was unaffected. These data suggest that TFIIA facilitates DNA binding by TBP in vivo, that TFIIA may be regulated by factors that target distinct regions of the protein, and that promoters vary significantly in the degree to which they require TFIIA for activation. PMID:10567590

  15. In Vivo Loss of Function Screening Reveals Carbonic Anhydrase IX as a Key Modulator of Tumor Initiating Potential in Primary Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pore, Nabendu; Jalla, Sanjoo; Liu, Zheng; Higgs, Brandon; Sorio, Claudio; Scarpa, Aldo; Hollingsworth, Robert; Tice, David A; Michelotti, Emil

    2015-06-01

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Up-regulation of energy metabolism pathways fuels cell growth and division, a key characteristic of neoplastic disease, and can lead to dependency on specific metabolic pathways. Thus, targeting energy metabolism pathways might offer the opportunity for novel therapeutics. Here, we describe the application of a novel in vivo screening approach for the identification of genes involved in cancer metabolism using a patient-derived pancreatic xenograft model. Lentiviruses expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting 12 different cell surface protein transporters were separately transduced into the primary pancreatic tumor cells. Transduced cells were pooled and implanted into mice. Tumors were harvested at different times, and the frequency of each shRNA was determined as a measure of which ones prevented tumor growth. Several targets including carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), monocarboxylate transporter 4, and anionic amino acid transporter light chain, xc- system (xCT) were identified in these studies and shown to be required for tumor initiation and growth. Interestingly, CAIX was overexpressed in the tumor initiating cell population. CAIX expression alone correlated with a highly tumorigenic subpopulation of cells. Furthermore, CAIX expression was essential for tumor initiation because shRNA knockdown eliminated the ability of cells to grow in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first parallel in vivo assessment of multiple novel oncology target genes using a patient-derived pancreatic tumor model. PMID:26152355

  16. Functional In Vivo Delivery of Multiplexed Anti-HIV-1 siRNAs via a Chemically Synthesized Aptamer With a Sticky Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Neff, C Preston; Swiderski, Piotr; Li, Haitang; Smith, David D; Aboellail, Tawfik; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Akkina, Ramesh; Rossi, John J

    2013-01-01

    One of the most formidable impediments to clinical translation of RNA interference (RNAi) is safe and effective delivery of the siRNAs to the desired target tissue at therapeutic doses. We previously described in vivo cell type-specific delivery of anti-HIV small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) through covalent conjugation to an anti-gp120 aptamer. In order to improve the utility of aptamers as siRNA delivery vehicles, we chemically synthesized the gp120 aptamer with a 3? 7-carbon linker (7C3), which in turn is attached to a 16-nucleotide 2? OMe/2? Fl GC-rich bridge sequence. This bridge facilitates the noncovalent binding and interchange of various siRNAs with the same aptamer. We show here that this aptamer-bridge-construct complexed with three different Dicer substrate siRNAs (DsiRNAs) results in effective delivery of the cocktail of DsiRNAs in vivo, resulting in knockdown of target mRNAs and potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Following cessation of the aptamer-siRNA cocktail treatment, HIV levels rebounded facilitating a follow-up treatment with the aptamer cocktail of DsiRNAs. This follow-up injection resulted in complete suppression of HIV-1 viral loads that extended several weeks beyond the final injection. Collectively, these data demonstrate a facile, targeted approach for combinatorial delivery of antiviral and host DsiRNAs for HIV-1 therapy in vivo. PMID:23164935

  17. Combined Deficiency of p50 and cRel in CD4+ T Cells Reveals an Essential Requirement for Nuclear Factor ?B in Regulating Mature T Cell Survival and In Vivo Function

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ye; Vig, Monika; Lyons, Jesse; Van Parijs, Luk; Beg, Amer A.

    2003-01-01

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating T cell proliferation and survival are not well understood. Here we have investigated a possible role of the nuclear factor (NF)-?B pathway in regulating mature T cell function by using CD4+ T cells from p50?/? cRel?/? mice, which exhibit virtually no inducible ?B site binding activity. Studies with these mice indicate an essential role of T cell receptor (TCR)-induced NF-?B in regulating interleukin (IL)-2 expression, cell cycle entry, and survival of T cells. Our results further indicate that NF-?B regulates TCR-induced expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Strikingly, retroviral transduction of CD4+ T cells with the NF-?B–inducing I?B kinase ? showed that NF-?B activation is not only necessary but also sufficient for T cell survival. In contrast, our results indicate a lack of involvement of NF-?B in both IL-2 and Akt-induced survival pathways. In vivo, p50?/? cRel?/? mice showed impaired superantigen-induced T cell responses as well as decreased numbers of effector/memory and regulatory CD4+ T cells. These findings provide the first demonstration of a role for NF-?B proteins in regulating T cell function in vivo and establish a critically important function of NF-?B in TCR-induced regulation of survival. PMID:12668645

  18. Morphological criteria for normalization of menstrual function in women with spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Shaklein, A V; Bogatova, N P; Kuleshov, V M; Marinkin, I O

    2002-11-01

    Normalization of the menstrual function in women with spontaneous abortion receiving sorbent and bioresonance (extremely high-frequency) therapy was evaluated by morphological criteria (correspondence of structural changes in the endometrium to the phase of the menstrual cycle). The absence of microvilli and cilia on the apical surface of surface and glandular epitheliocytes, presence of intranuclear tubules and giant mitochondria in the cytoplasm, and signs of apocrine secretion in epitheliocytes attested to the luteal phase of the cycle. PMID:12802463

  19. Incorporation of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging function into NaYF4:Yb/Tm upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo trimodal bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ji-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Dong, Lu-Xi; Sun, Hao-Ran; Gao, Kai; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2013-12-17

    Rational design and fabrication of multimodal imaging nanoprobes are of great significance for in vivo imaging. Here we report the fabrication of a multishell structured NaYF4:Yb/Tm@NaLuF4@NaYF4@NaGdF4 nanoprobe via a seed-mediated epitaxial growth strategy for upconversion luminescence (UCL), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) trimodal imaging. Hexagonal phase NaYF4:Yb/Tm is used as the core to provide UCL, while the shell of NaLuF4 is epitaxially grown on the core not only to provide an optically inert layer for enhancing the UCL but also to serve as a contrast agent for CT. The outermost NaGdF4 shell is fabricated as a thin layer to give the high longitudinal relaxivity (r1) desired for MR imaging. The transition shell layer of NaYF4 not only provides an interface to facilitate the formation of NaGdF4 shell but also inhibits the energy transfer from inner upconversion activator to surface paramagnetic Gd(3+) ions. The fabricated multishell structured nanoprobe shows intense near-infrared UCL, high r1 value of 3.76 mM(-1) s(-1), and in vitro CT contrast effect. The multishell structured nanoprobe offers great potential for in vivo UCL/CT/MR trimodal imaging. Further covalent bonding of folic acid makes the multishell structured nanoprobe promising for in vivo targeted UCL imaging of tumor-bearing mice. PMID:24237132

  20. Phenotype, functions and fate of adoptively transferred tumor draining lymphocytes activated ex vivo in mice with an aggressive weakly immunogenic mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Regression of established tumors can be induced by adoptive immunotherapy with tumor draining lymph node lymphocytes activated with bryostatin and ionomycin. We hypothesized that tumor regression is mediated by a subset of the transferred T lymphocytes, which selectively infiltrate the tumor draining lymph nodes and proliferate in vivo. Results Adoptive transfer of B/I activated tumor draining lymphocytes induces regression of advanced 4T1 tumors, and depletion of CD8, but not CD4 T cells, abrogated tumor regression in mice. The predominant mediators of tumor regression are CD8+ and derived from CD62L- T cells. Transferred lymphocytes reached their peak concentration (10.5%) in the spleen 3 days after adoptive transfer and then rapidly declined. Adoptively transferred cells preferentially migrated to and/or proliferated in the tumor draining lymph nodes, peaking at day 5 (10.3%) and remained up to day 28. CFSE-stained cells were seen in tumors, also peaking at day 5 (2.1%). Bryostatin and ionomycin-activated cells proliferated vigorously in vivo, with 10 generations evident in the tumor draining lymph nodes on day 3. CFSE-stained cells found in the tumor draining lymph nodes on day 3 were 30% CD8+, 72% CD4+, 95% CD44+, and 39% CD69+. Pre-treatment of recipient mice with cyclophosphamide dramatically increased the number of interferon-gamma producing cells. Conclusions Adoptively transferred CD8+ CD62Llow T cells are the principal mediators of tumor regression, and host T cells are not required. These cells infiltrate 4T1 tumors, track preferentially to tumor draining lymph nodes, have an activated phenotype, and proliferate in vivo. Cyclophosphamide pre-treatment augments the anti-tumor effect by increasing the proliferation of interferon-gamma producing cells in the adoptive host. PMID:21050466

  1. SIRT1 overexpression in skeletal muscle in vivo induces increased insulin sensitivity and enhanced complex I but not complex II-V functions in individual subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Qin, Gui-Jun; Li, Xia-Lian; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Du, Pei-Jie; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Wu, Jing

    2015-06-01

    SIRT1 is known to improve insulin resistance (IR), but whether this effect is direct or not is still unclear, and this question has not been addressed in vivo in the skeletal muscle. Therefore, we sought to test if acute overexpression of SIRT1 in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet (HFD) rats in vivo would affect subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondrial complexes I-V activities and antioxidant enzymes thereby improving insulin action. In vivo electrotransfer was used to overexpress SIRT1 in the skeletal muscle of rats fed HFD for 12 weeks. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and downstream effects of SIRT1 on AMPK, SIRT3, and mitochondrial biogenesis were studied. Citrate synthase (CS), complexes I-V, oxidative stress, and antioxidant levels were assessed in SS and IMF mitochondria. HFD rats showed skeletal muscle IR as well as decreased SIRT1 and SIRT3 expressions, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and mitochondrial biogenesis (p?functions in individual SS and IMF mitochondria. This study suggests that SIRT1 overexpression improved IR at least partly by targeting complex I functions of SS and IMF mitochondria through the activation of SIRT1 and SIRT3. PMID:25782776

  2. MicroRNA in ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, S W; Liu, W S; Pate, J L

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian ovary is a dynamic organ. The coordination of follicle recruitment, selection, and ovulation and the timely development and regression of the corpus luteum are essential for a functional ovary and fertility. Deregulation of any of these processes results in ovarian dysfunction and potential infertility. MicroRNA (miRNA) are short noncoding RNA that regulate developmental processes and time-sensitive functions. The expression of miRNA in the ovary varies with cell type, function, and stage of the estrous cycle. miRNA are involved in the formation of primordial follicles, follicular recruitment and selection, follicular atresia, oocyte-cumulus cell interaction, granulosal cell function, and luteinization. miRNA are differentially expressed in luteal cells at the various stages of the estrous cycle and during maternal recognition of pregnancy, suggesting a role in luteal development, maintenance, and regression. An understanding of the patterns of expression and functions of miRNA in the ovary will lead to novel therapeutics to treat ovarian dysfunction and improve fertility and, potentially, to the development of better contraceptives. PMID:26558383

  3. Organosilane and Polyethylene Glycol Functionalized Magnetic Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Carriers for CpG Immunotherapy In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hengrui; Wen, Songsong; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Zhenliang

    2015-01-01

    Cytosine–guanine (CpG) containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) have significant clinical potential as immunotherapeutics. However, limitations exist due to their transient biological stability in vivo, lack of specificity for target cells, and poor cellular uptake. To address these issues, we prepared amine magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSN-A) then further modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for use as CpG delivery vectors. The PEG modified M-MSN-A (M-MSN-P) had notable CpG ODN loading capacity, negligible cytotoxicity, and were easily internalized into cells where they released the loaded CpG into the cytoplasm. As a result, such complexes were effective in activating macrophages and inhibiting tumor cells when combined with chemotherapeutics in vitro. Furthermore, these complexes had excellent immuno-stimulating activity in vivo, compared to the free CpG therapeutics. We report here a highly effective MSNs-based delivery system with great potential as a therapeutic CpG formulation in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26451735

  4. Arginine-terminated generation 4 PAMAM dendrimer as an effective nanovector for functional siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Rocchi, Palma; Qu, Fanqi; Iovanna, Juan L; Peng, Ling

    2014-03-19

    Successful therapeutic implementation of RNA interference critically depends on systems able to safely and efficiently deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA). Dendrimers are emerging as appealing nanovectors for siRNA delivery by virtue of their unique well-defined dendritic nanostructure within which is confined an intriguing cooperativity and multivalency. We have previously demonstrated that structurally flexible triethanolamine (TEA) core poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of high generations are effective nanovectors for siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we have developed arginine-terminated dendrimers with the aim of combining and harnessing the unique siRNA delivery properties of the TEA-core PAMAM dendrimer and the cell-penetrating advantages of the arginine-rich motif. A generation 4 dendrimer of this family (G4Arg) formed stable dendriplexes with siRNA, leading to improved cell uptake of siRNA by comparison with its nonarginine bearing dendrimer counterpart. Moreover, G4Arg was demonstrated to be an excellent nanocarrier for siRNA delivery, yielding potent gene silencing and anticancer effects in prostate cancer models both in vitro and in vivo with no discernible toxicity. Consequently, importing an arginine residue on the surface of a dendrimer is an appealing option to improve delivery efficiency, and at the same time, the dendrimer G4Arg constitutes a highly promising nanovector for efficacious siRNA delivery and holds great potential for further therapeutic applications. PMID:24494983

  5. Linear diffusion of the restriction endonuclease EcoRV on DNA is essential for the in vivo function of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jeltsch, A; Wenz, C; Stahl, F; Pingoud, A

    1996-01-01

    Linear diffusion along DNA is a mechanism of enhancing the association rates of proteins to their specific recognition sites on DNA. It has been demonstrated for several proteins in vitro, but to date in no case in vivo. Here we show that the restriction endonuclease EcoRV slides along the DNA, scanning approximately 1000 bp in one binding event. This process is critically dependent on contacts between amino acid residues of the protein and the backbone of the DNA. The disruption of single hydrogen bonds and, in particular, the alteration of electrostatic interactions between amino acid side chains of the protein and phosphate groups of the DNA interfere with or abolish effective sliding. The efficiency of linear diffusion is dependent on salt concentration, having a maximum at 50 mM NaCl. These results suggest that a nonspecific and mobile binding mode capable of linear diffusion is dependent on a subtle balance of forces governing the interaction of the enzyme and the DNA. A strong correlation between the ability of EcoRV mutants to slide along the DNA in vitro and to protect Escherichia coli cells from phage infection demonstrates that linear diffusion occurs in vivo and is essential for effective phage restriction. Images PMID:8890184

  6. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  7. Impact of buserelin acetate or hCG administration on day 5 post-ovulation on subsequent luteal profile and conception rate in Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Pandey, A K; Dhaliwal, G S; Ghuman, S P S; Agarwal, S K

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to establish the impact of buserelin acetate or hCG administration on day 5 post-ovulation on subsequent luteal profile and conception rate in buffalo. The buffalo (n=45) were subjected to an estrous synchronization protocol (synthetic analog of PGF2? administered, through intramuscular route, 11 days apart), followed by artificial insemination (AI) during mid to late estrus. On day 5 post-ovulation, buffalo were administered (i.m.) normal saline (Control, n=14), buserelin acetate (20?g, d5-BA, n=14) or human chorionic gonadotropin (3000IU, d5-hCG, n=17). Ovarian ultrasonography was conducted on the day of induced estrus and on days 0, 5, 12, 16 and 21 post-ovulation to assess preovulatory follicle or corpus luteum (CL) diameter. Also, on these days, jugular vein blood sampling was conducted for the estimation of plasma progesterone. First service conception rate was greater (?(2)=5.18, P>0.05) in d5-BA and d5-hCG groups (71.4% and 47.1%, respectively) as compared to control (28.6%). Both treatment groups had a greater (P<0.05) CL diameter and plasma progesterone during the post-treatment period in comparison to that control treatment group. Treatment-induced accessory CL formation was observed in 92.9% and 76.5% buffalo of d5-BA and d5-hCG groups, respectively. In conclusion, buserelin acetate and hCG administration on day 5 post-ovulation leads to accessory CL formation that may have a role in enhancing conception rate. PMID:26471839

  8. Effects of different five-day progesterone-based fixed-time AI protocols on follicular/luteal dynamics and fertility in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    GARCIA-ISPIERTO, Irina; LÓPEZ-GATIUS, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This study compares in two experiments the responses of lactating dairy cows to four different progesterone-based protocols for fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI) in terms of their effects on follicular/luteal dynamics and fertility. The protocols consisted of a progesterone intravaginal device fitted for five days, along with the administration of different combinations of gonadotropin releasing hormone, equine chorionic gonadotropin and a single or double dose (24 h apart) of prostaglandin F2?. In Experiment I, the data were derived from 232 lactating cows. Binary logistic regression identified no effects of treatment on ovulation failure or multiple ovulation 10 days post artificial insemination (AI). Based on the odds ratio, the likelihood of ovulation failure was lower (by a factor of 0.1) in cows showing at least one corpus luteum (CL) upon treatment than in cows lacking a CL; repeat breeders (> 3 AI) and cows with multiple CLs at treatment showed lower (by a factor of 0.44) and higher (by a factor of 9.0) risks of multiple ovulation, respectively, than the remaining animals. In Experiment II, the data were derived from 5173 AIs. The independent variable treatment failed to affect the conception rate 28–34 days post AI, twin pregnancy or early fetal loss 58–64 days post AI. The results of this study demonstrate the efficacy of 5-day progesterone-based protocols for FTAI. All four protocols examined were able to induce ovulation in both cyclic and non-cyclic animals so that FTAI returned a similar pregnancy rate to spontaneous estrus. Our results suggest that the ovarian response and fertility resulting from each treatment are due more to the effect of ovarian structures at treatment than to the different combinations of hormones investigated. PMID:25196275

  9. Functional Ginger Extracts from Supercritical Fluid Carbon Dioxide Extraction via In Vitro and In Vivo Assays: Antioxidation, Antimicroorganism, and Mice Xenografts Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Chen; Chiou, Li-Yu; Wang, Jheng-Yang; Chou, Sin-You; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Huang, Kuo-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction technology was developed to gain the active components from a Taiwan native plant, Zingiber officinale (ginger). We studied the biological effects of ginger extracts via multiple assays and demonstrated the biofunctions in each platform. Investigations of ginger extracts indicated antioxidative properties in dose-dependant manners on radical scavenging activities, reducing powers and metal chelating powers. We found that ginger extracts processed moderate scavenging values, middle metal chelating levels, and slight ferric reducing powers. The antibacterial susceptibility of ginger extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sobrinus, S. mutans, and Escherichia coli was determined with the broth microdilution method technique. The ginger extracts had operative antimicroorganism potentials against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further discovered the strong inhibitions of ginger extracts on lethal carcinogenic melanoma through in vivo xenograft model. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agents, pharmaceutical antibiotics, and food supplements. PMID:23983624

  10. A genome-scale in vivo loss-of-function screen identifies Phf6 as a lineage-specific regulator of leukemia cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Corbin E.; Lawton, Lee N.; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; Pritchard, Justin R.; Joughin, Brian A.; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Fenouille, Nina; Zuber, Johannes; Williams, Richard T.; Young, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-scale shRNA screen for modulators of B-cell leukemia progression in vivo. Results from this work revealed dramatic distinctions between the relative effects of shRNAs on the growth of tumor cells in culture versus in their native microenvironment. Specifically, we identified many “context-specific” regulators of leukemia development. These included the gene encoding the zinc finger protein Phf6. While inactivating mutations in PHF6 are commonly observed in human myeloid and T-cell malignancies, we found that Phf6 suppression in B-cell malignancies impairs tumor progression. Thus, Phf6 is a “lineage-specific” cancer gene that plays opposing roles in developmentally distinct hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:25737277

  11. The use of pH-sensitive functional selenium nanoparticles shows enhanced in vivo VEGF-siRNA silencing and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qianqian; Liu, Yanan; Cao, Chengwen; Le, Fangling; Qin, Xiuying; Sun, Dongdong; Liu, Jie

    2014-07-01

    The utility of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) has shown great promise in treating a variety of diseases including many types of cancer. While their ability to silence a wide range of target genes underlies their effectiveness, the application of therapies remains hindered by a lack of an effective delivery system. In this study, we sought to develop an siRNA-delivery system for VEGF, a known signaling molecule involved in cancer, that consists of two selenium nanoparticles SeNPs and G2/PAH-Cit/SeNPs. A G2/PAH-Cit/SeNP is a pH-sensitive delivery system that is capable of enhancing siRNA loading, thus increasing siRNA release efficiency and subsequent target gene silencing both in vitro and in vivo. In vivo experiments using G2/PAH-Cit/SeNPs@siRNA led to significantly higher accumulation of siRNA within the tumor itself, VEGF gene silencing, and reduced angiogenesis in the tumor. Furthermore, the G2/PAH-Cit/SeNP delivery system not only enhanced anti-tumor effects on tumor-bearing nude mice as compared to SeNPs@siRNA, but also resulted in weak occurrence of lesions in major target organs. In sum, this study provides a new class of siRNA delivery system, thereby providing an alternative therapeutic route for cancer treatment.The utility of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) has shown great promise in treating a variety of diseases including many types of cancer. While their ability to silence a wide range of target genes underlies their effectiveness, the application of therapies remains hindered by a lack of an effective delivery system. In this study, we sought to develop an siRNA-delivery system for VEGF, a known signaling molecule involved in cancer, that consists of two selenium nanoparticles SeNPs and G2/PAH-Cit/SeNPs. A G2/PAH-Cit/SeNP is a pH-sensitive delivery system that is capable of enhancing siRNA loading, thus increasing siRNA release efficiency and subsequent target gene silencing both in vitro and in vivo. In vivo experiments using G2/PAH-Cit/SeNPs@siRNA led to significantly higher accumulation of siRNA within the tumor itself, VEGF gene silencing, and reduced angiogenesis in the tumor. Furthermore, the G2/PAH-Cit/SeNP delivery system not only enhanced anti-tumor effects on tumor-bearing nude mice as compared to SeNPs@siRNA, but also resulted in weak occurrence of lesions in major target organs. In sum, this study provides a new class of siRNA delivery system, thereby providing an alternative therapeutic route for cancer treatment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02423k

  12. A genome-scale in vivo loss-of-function screen identifies Phf6 as a lineage-specific regulator of leukemia cell growth.

    PubMed

    Meacham, Corbin E; Lawton, Lee N; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M; Pritchard, Justin R; Joughin, Brian A; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Fenouille, Nina; Zuber, Johannes; Williams, Richard T; Young, Richard A; Hemann, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    We performed a genome-scale shRNA screen for modulators of B-cell leukemia progression in vivo. Results from this work revealed dramatic distinctions between the relative effects of shRNAs on the growth of tumor cells in culture versus in their native microenvironment. Specifically, we identified many "context-specific" regulators of leukemia development. These included the gene encoding the zinc finger protein Phf6. While inactivating mutations in PHF6 are commonly observed in human myeloid and T-cell malignancies, we found that Phf6 suppression in B-cell malignancies impairs tumor progression. Thus, Phf6 is a "lineage-specific" cancer gene that plays opposing roles in developmentally distinct hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:25737277

  13. Targeting FR-expressing cells in ovarian cancer with Fab-functionalized nanoparticles: a full study to provide the proof of principle from in vitro to in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarta, Alessandra; Bernareggi, Davide; Benigni, Fabio; Luison, Elena; Nano, Giuseppe; Nitti, Simone; Cesta, Maria Candida; di Ciccio, Luciano; Canevari, Silvana; Pellegrino, Teresa; Figini, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    Efficient targeting in tumor therapies is still an open issue: systemic biodistribution and poor specific accumulation of drugs weaken efficacy of treatments. Engineered nanoparticles are expected to bring benefits by allowing specific delivery of drug to the tumor or acting themselves as localized therapeutic agents. In this study we have targeted epithelial ovarian cancer with inorganic nanoparticles conjugated to a human antibody fragment against the folate receptor over-expressed on cancer cells. The conjugation approach is generally applicable. Indeed several types of nanoparticles (either magnetic or fluorescent) were engineered with the fragment, and their biological activity was preserved as demonstrated by biochemical methods in vitro. In vivo studies with mice bearing orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors were performed. Elemental and histological analyses showed that the conjugated magnetic nanoparticles accumulated specifically and were retained at tumor sites longer than the non-conjugated nanoparticles.Efficient targeting in tumor therapies is still an open issue: systemic biodistribution and poor specific accumulation of drugs weaken efficacy of treatments. Engineered nanoparticles are expected to bring benefits by allowing specific delivery of drug to the tumor or acting themselves as localized therapeutic agents. In this study we have targeted epithelial ovarian cancer with inorganic nanoparticles conjugated to a human antibody fragment against the folate receptor over-expressed on cancer cells. The conjugation approach is generally applicable. Indeed several types of nanoparticles (either magnetic or fluorescent) were engineered with the fragment, and their biological activity was preserved as demonstrated by biochemical methods in vitro. In vivo studies with mice bearing orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors were performed. Elemental and histological analyses showed that the conjugated magnetic nanoparticles accumulated specifically and were retained at tumor sites longer than the non-conjugated nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04426f

  14. Hepatocyte-targeted in vivo gene expression by intravenous injection of plasmid DNA complexed with synthetic multi-functional gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, M; Yamauchi, M; Morimoto, K; Ishida, E; Takakura, Y; Hashida, M

    2000-04-01

    To achieve hepatocyte-targeted in vivo gene expression, a carrier that controls both the tissue and intracellular distribution of DNA was designed and synthesized. A cationic polymer, poly(L-ornithine) (pOrn), was modified first with galactose, then with a fusigenic peptide (mHA2) to obtain Gal-pOrn-mHA2. When applied with Gal-pOrn-mHA2 to asialoglycoprotein receptor-positive cells, fluorescein-labeled DNA showed a diffuse profile, suggesting the release of DNA from endosomes and/or lysosomes by the carrier. Then the biodistribution and gene expression after intravenous injection of DNA complexes (10 microg DNA per mouse) were examined. After injection of [32P]DNA/Gal-pOrn-mHA2, about 60% of the radioactivity was recovered in the liver, mostly in parenchymal cells. A large amount (81 ng/g tissue) of transgene product (luciferase) was detected in the liver of mice injected with DNA/Gal-pOm-mHA2, which was 280-fold greater than that obtained with DNA/DOTMA:Chol liposomes (50 microg DNA). Prior administration of galactosylated albumin reduced the gene expression to 1/100, indicating the asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated gene transfer in liver parenchymal cells, ie hepatocytes. The luciferase activity in hepatocytes contributed more than 95% of the total activity in all the tissues examined. Thus, hepatocyte-targeted in vivo gene expression was achieved by the intravenous injection of DNA complex with the multifunctional gene carrier. PMID:10819569

  15. Autophosphorylation is essential for the in vivo function of the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 1 and receptor-mediated signalling in cooperation with Nod factor receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Esben B; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Grossmann, Christina; Ye, Juanying; Vieweg, Syndi; Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Radutoiu, Simona; Jensen, Ole N; Stougaard, Jens; Parniske, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Soil-living rhizobia secrete lipochitin oligosaccharides known as Nod factors, which in Lotus japonicus are perceived by at least two Nod-factor receptors, NFR1 and NFR5. Despite progress in identifying molecular components critical for initial legume host recognition of the microsymbiont and cloning of downstream components, little is known about the activation and signalling mechanisms of the Nod-factor receptors themselves. Here we show that both receptor proteins localize to the plasma membrane, and present evidence for heterocomplex formation initiating downstream signalling. Expression of NFR1 and NFR5 in Nicotiana benthamiana and Allium ampeloprasum (leek) cells caused a rapid cell-death response. The signalling leading to cell death was abrogated using a kinase-inactive variant of NFR1. In these surviving cells, a clear interaction between NFR1 and NFR5 was detected in vivo through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). To analyse the inter- and intramolecular phosphorylation events of the kinase complex, the cytoplasmic part of NFR1 was assayed for in vitro kinase activity, and autophosphorylation on 24 amino acid residues, including three tyrosine residues, was found by mass spectrometry. Substitution of the phosphorylated amino acids of NFR1 identified a single phosphorylation site to be essential for NFR1 Nod-factor signalling in vivo and kinase activity in vitro. In contrast to NFR1, no in vitro kinase activity of the cytoplasmic domain of NFR5 was detected. This is further supported by the fact that a mutagenized NFR5 construct, substituting an amino acid essential for ATP binding, restored nodulation of nfr5 mutant roots. PMID:21265894

  16. Progestin and AdipoQ Receptor 7, Progesterone Membrane Receptor Component 1 (PGRMC1), and PGRMC2 and Their Role in Regulating Progesterone's Ability to Suppress Human Granulosa/Luteal Cells from Entering into the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Sueldo, Carolina; Liu, Xiufang; Peluso, John J

    2015-09-01

    The present studies were designed to determine the role of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), PGRMC2, progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (PAQR7), and progesterone receptor (PGR) in mediating the antimitotic action of progesterone (P4) in human granulosa/luteal cells. For these studies granulosa/luteal cells of 10 women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation were isolated, maintained in culture, and depleted of PGRMC1, PGRMC2, PAQR7, or PGR by siRNA treatment. The rate of entry into the cell cycle was assessed using the FUCCI cell cycle sensor to determine the percentage of cells in the G1/S stage of the cell cycle. PGRMC1, PGRMC2, PAQR7, and PGR mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR and their interactions monitored by in situ proximity ligation assays (PLAs). These studies revealed that PGRMC1, PGRMC2, PAQR7, and PGR were expressed by granulosa/luteal cells from all patients, with PGRMC1 mRNA being most abundant, followed by PAQR7, PGRMC2, and PGR. However, their mRNA levels showed considerable patient variation. P4's ability to suppress entry into the cell cycle was dependent on PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and PAQR7 but not PGR. Moreover, PLAs indicated that PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and PAQR7 formed a complex within the cytoplasm. Based on these studies, it is proposed that these three P4 mediators form a complex within the cytoplasm that is required for P4's action. Moreover, P4's ability to regulate human follicle development may be dependent in part on the expression levels of each of these P4 mediators. PMID:26203174

  17. Effects of hypophysectomy and administration of pituitary hormones on luteal function and uptake of high density lipoproteins by luteinized ovaries and adrenals of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.; Rajkumar, K.; McKibbin, P.E.; Macdonald, G.J.; Buhr, M.M.; Grinwich, D.L.

    1985-04-01

    The role of plasma lipoproteins and hypophyseal hormones in the maintenance of progesterone secretion by the rat corpus luteum was investigated. In the first experiment, rats were treated daily from days 1-6 of pregnancy with 5 mg/kg 4-aminopyrozolopyramidine (4APP), a blocker of hepatic lipoprotein secretion, or with 5 mg/kg 4APP and 1 or 2 mg ovine PRL or 0.1 ml 0.5% phosphoric acid (4APP vehicle). The administration of 4APP reduced serum cholesterol and progesterone levels on days 2-6 of pregnancy and ovarian progesterone on day 6. The reduced progesterone secretion had no effect on embryo implantation. PRL, in the doses used, was incapable of abrogating the effects of 4APP on circulating or ovarian progesterone levels. Ovaries and adrenals, but not kidneys, of pseudopregnant rats exhibited specific and saturable uptake of porcine high density lipoprotein (HDL). Time-course studies indicated that the uptake of HDL was rapid in ovaries compared to that in adrenals. Ovaries from rats not only exhibited uptake of porcine HDL, but also were capable of using it for progesterone synthesis. Treatment with 4APP increased the adrenal uptake of HDL, but ovarian uptake was not different from that in the control group. Hypophysectomy reduced both adrenal and ovarian uptake of HDL. In adrenals only ACTH at the dose employed ameliorated reduction of HDL uptake induced by hypophysectomy, while in the ovaries, both PRL and LH reversed the effect of hypophysectomy. The effect of PRL on uptake was specific to (/sup 125/I)HDL and did not alter (/sup 125/I)albumin uptake. It is concluded that: 1) hypophysectomy reduces HDL uptake in the luteinized rat ovary; and 2) PRL and LH replacement therapy maintain ovarian uptake of HDL, suggesting a direct effect of these luteotropins on lipoprotein uptake.

  18. Disruption of endocrine function in in vitro H295R cell-based and in in vivo assay in zebrafish by 2,4-dichlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanbo; Han, Jian; Guo, Yongyong; Lam, Paul K S; Wu, Rudolf S S; Giesy, John P; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2012-01-15

    Chlorophenols in the aquatic environment have been of concern due to their potential effects on human and wildlife. In the present study, the endocrine disrupting effects of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) were investigated in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro assay, H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells were used to determine the potential effects of 2,4-DCP on steroidogenesis. Exposure to 0, 0.1, 0.3 or 1.0 mg 2,4-DCP/L resulted in less production of 17?-estradiol (E2) and alterations in transcript expressions of genes involved in steroidogenesis, including cytochrome P450 (CYP11A, CYP17, CYP19), 3?HSD, 17?HSD and StAR. In the in vivo study, effects of 0, 0.03, 0.1 or 0.3 mg 2,4-DCP/L on concentrations of steroid hormones in plasma of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were measured and expression of mRNA of selected genes in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and liver were determined. Exposure of zebrafish to 2,4-DCP resulted in lesser concentrations of E2 accompanied by down-regulation of CYP19A mRNA in the females. In males, exposure to 2,4-DCP resulted in greater concentrations of testosterone (T) and E2 along with greater mRNA expression of CYP17 and CYP19A. The mRNA expression of prostaglandin synthase (Ptgs2) gene, which regulates ovulation, was down-regulated in females, but up-regulated in males. The hepatic estrogenic receptor (ER? and ER?) and vitellogenin (VTG1 and VTG3) mRNAs were up-regulated in both females and males. The average number of eggs spawned was significantly less upon exposure to 2,4-DCP. Exposure of adult zebrafish to 2,4-DCP resulted in lesser rates of hatching of eggs. The results demonstrated that 2,4-DCP modulates transcription of steroidogenetic genes in both H295R cells and in the zebrafish HPG-axis and disrupts steroidogenesis, which in turn, can cause adverse effects on reproduction in fish. PMID:22155427

  19. In vivo imaging of functional microvasculature within tissue beds of oral and nasal cavities by swept-source optical coherence tomography with a forward/side-viewing probe

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1300 nm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm × 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions. PMID:25136490

  20. Highly efficient in vitro and in vivo delivery of functional RNAs using new versatile MS2-chimeric retrovirus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Prel, Anne; Caval, Vincent; Gayon, Régis; Ravassard, Philippe; Duthoit, Christine; Payen, Emmanuel; Maouche-Chretien, Leila; Creneguy, Alison; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Martin, Nicolas; Piver, Eric; Sevrain, Raphaël; Lamouroux, Lucille; Leboulch, Philippe; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Bouillé, Pascale; Sensébé, Luc; Pagčs, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    RNA delivery is an attractive strategy to achieve transient gene expression in research projects and in cell- or gene-based therapies. Despite significant efforts investigating vector-directed RNA transfer, there is still a requirement for better efficiency of delivery to primary cells and in vivo. Retroviral platforms drive RNA delivery, yet retrovirus RNA-packaging constraints limit gene transfer to two genome-molecules per viral particle. To improve retroviral transfer, we designed a dimerization-independent MS2-driven RNA packaging system using MS2-Coat-retrovirus chimeras. The engineered chimeric particles promoted effective packaging of several types of RNAs and enabled efficient transfer of biologically active RNAs in various cell types, including human CD34+ and iPS cells. Systemic injection of high-titer particles led to gene expression in mouse liver and transferring Cre-recombinase mRNA in muscle permitted widespread editing at the ROSA26 locus. We could further show that the VLPs were able to activate an osteoblast differentiation pathway by delivering RUNX2- or DLX5-mRNA into primary human bone-marrow mesenchymal-stem cells. Thus, the novel chimeric MS2-lentiviral particles are a versatile tool for a wide range of applications including cellular-programming or genome-editing. PMID:26528487

  1. Crinone Gel for Luteal Phase Support in Frozen-Thawed Embryo Transfer Cycles: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Ji, Xiaowei; Hong, Yan; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Qinling; Xu, Bin; Sun, Yun

    2015-01-01

    To compare Crinone vaginal progesterone gel with intramuscularly injected progesterone for luteal phase support in progesterone-supplemented frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles, a randomized prospective study of patients qualified for FET was conducted between September 2010 and January 2013 at a hospital in Shanghai, China. From the day of transformation into secretory phase endometrium (day 0), Crinone vaginal gel (90 mg/d) was administered to patients in the Gel Group, while progesterone (40 mg/d) was injected intramuscularly in patients in the Inj Group (n = 750 per group). All patients received oral dydrogesterone (20 mg/d) and estradiol valerate (4–8 mg/d). Day 3 embryos with the highest pre-frozen scores were transferred to patients in the two groups and the clinical outcomes compared. This study comprised 1,500 cycles (750 in each group). Twenty-nine cycles in the Gel Group and 24 in the Inj Group were withdrawn. There were no significant differences between groups in age, endometrial thickness, endometrial preparation time or number of embryos transferred. No significant differences were observed between the Gel Group and Inj Group in the rates of live birth (32.6% vs. 31.7%, P = 0.71), clinical pregnancy (40.1% vs. 40.6%, P = 0.831), implantation (25.8% vs. 25.3%, P = 0.772), abortion (16.3% vs. 18.3%, P = 0.514) or ectopic pregnancy (2.8% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.288). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the rates of live birth, clinical pregnancy, abortion and ectopic pregnancy (Gel Group relative to Inj Group) were 1.036 (0.829–1.295), 0.971 (0.785–1.200), 0.919 (0.595–1.420) and 0.649 (0.261–1.614), respectively. Our study revealed that using Crinone vaginal gel in FET cycles achieved similar pregnancy outcomes to intramuscular progesterone, indicating that vaginal gel is a viable alternative to intramuscular injection. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-14004565 PMID:26222435

  2. Panax ginseng Improves Functional Recovery after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury by Regulating the Inflammatory Response in Rats: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ock; Kim, Youngkyung; Lee, Koeun; Na, Sae Won; Hong, Seon Pyo; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Yoon, Young Wook; Kim, Junesun

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in permanent loss of motor function below the injured site. Neuroinflammatory reaction following SCI can aggravate neural injury and functional impairment. Ginseng is well known to possess anti-inflammatory effects. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of Panax ginseng C.A. Mayer (P. ginseng) after SCI. A spinal contusion was made at the T11-12 spinal cord in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 47) using the NYU impactor. Motor function was assessed using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) score in P. ginseng (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, and 5?mg/kg) or vehicle (saline) treated after SCI. We also assessed the protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the lesion site by western blot and then measured the cavity area using luxol fast blue/cresyl violet staining. P. ginseng treated group in SCI showed a significant improvement in locomotor function after the injury. The protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS at the lesion site and the cavity area were decreased following SCI by P. ginseng treatment. These results suggest that P. ginseng may improve the recovery of motor function after SCI which provides neuroprotection by alleviating posttraumatic inflammatory responses. PMID:26451158

  3. The Function of the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Brain in Vivo and Learning Ability Decrease in Parallel in Mature Compared with Young Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to…

  4. In vivo priming heterophil innate immune functions and increasing resistance to Salmonella enteritidis infection in neonatal chickens by immune stimulatory CpG-ODN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing CpG dinucleotides (CpG-ODN) mimic bacterial DNA and stimulate the innate immune system of vertebrates. Here, we investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (ip) administered CpG-ODN on the innate immune functions of chicken heterophils. Our results demonstrat...

  5. Concomitant inactivation of the p53- and pRB- functional pathways predicts resistance to DNA damaging drugs in breast cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Knappskog, Stian; Berge, Elisabet O; Chrisanthar, Ranjan; Geisler, Stephanie; Staalesen, Vidar; Leirvaag, Beryl; Yndestad, Synnřve; de Faveri, Elise; Karlsen, Bĺrd O; Wedge, David C; Akslen, Lars A; Lilleng, Peer K; Lřkkevik, Erik; Lundgren, Steinar; Řstenstad, Bjřrn; Risberg, Terje; Mjaaland, Ingvild; Aas, Turid; Lřnning, Per E

    2015-10-01

    Chemoresistance is the main obstacle to cancer cure. Contrasting studies focusing on single gene mutations, we hypothesize chemoresistance to be due to inactivation of key pathways affecting cellular mechanisms such as apoptosis, senescence, or DNA repair. In support of this hypothesis, we have previously shown inactivation of either TP53 or its key activators CHK2 and ATM to predict resistance to DNA damaging drugs in breast cancer better than TP53 mutations alone. Further, we hypothesized that redundant pathway(s) may compensate for loss of p53-pathway signaling and that these are inactivated as well in resistant tumour cells. Here, we assessed genetic alterations of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) and its key regulators: Cyclin D and E as well as their inhibitors p16 and p27. In an exploratory cohort of 69 patients selected from two prospective studies treated with either doxorubicin monotherapy or 5-FU and mitomycin for locally advanced breast cancers, we found defects in the pRB-pathway to be associated with therapy resistance (p-values ranging from 0.001 to 0.094, depending on the cut-off value applied to p27 expression levels). Although statistically weaker, we observed confirmatory associations in a validation cohort from another prospective study (n = 107 patients treated with neoadjuvant epirubicin monotherapy; p-values ranging from 7.0 × 10(-4) to 0.001 in the combined data sets). Importantly, inactivation of the p53-and the pRB-pathways in concert predicted resistance to therapy more strongly than each of the two pathways assessed individually (exploratory cohort: p-values ranging from 3.9 × 10(-6) to 7.5 × 10(-3) depending on cut-off values applied to ATM and p27 mRNA expression levels). Again, similar findings were confirmed in the validation cohort, with p-values ranging from 6.0 × 10(-7) to 6.5 × 10(-5) in the combined data sets. Our findings strongly indicate that concomitant inactivation of the p53- and pRB- pathways predict resistance towards anthracyclines and mitomycin in breast cancer in vivo. PMID:26004085

  6. Functional characterization of a full length pregnane X receptor, expression in vivo, and identification of PXR alleles, in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Bainy, Afonso C D; Kubota, Akira; Goldstone, Jared V; Lille-Langřy, Roger; Karchner, Sibel I; Celander, Malin C; Hahn, Mark E; Goksřyr, Anders; Stegeman, John J

    2013-10-15

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) (nuclear receptor NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor, mediating responses to diverse xenobiotic and endogenous chemicals. The properties of PXR in fish are not fully understood. Here we report on cloning and characterization of full-length PXR of zebrafish, Danio rerio, and pxr expression in vivo. Initial efforts gave a cDNA encoding a 430 amino acid protein identified as zebrafish pxr by phylogenetic and synteny analysis. The sequence of the cloned Pxr DNA binding domain (DBD) was highly conserved, with 74% identity to human PXR-DBD, while the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the cloned sequence was only 44% identical to human PXR-LBD. Sequence variation among clones in the initial effort prompted sequencing of multiple clones from a single fish. There were two prominent variants, one sequence with S183, Y218 and H383 and the other with I183, C218 and N383, which we designate as alleles pxr*1 (nr1i2*1) and pxr*2 (nr1i2*2), respectively. In COS-7 cells co-transfected with a PXR-responsive reporter gene, the full-length Pxr*1 (the more common variant) was activated by known PXR agonists clotrimazole and pregnenolone 16?-carbonitrile but to a lesser extent than the full-length human PXR. Activation of full-length Pxr*1 was only 10% of that with the Pxr*1 LBD. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of pxr in liver and eye, as well as brain and intestine of adult zebrafish. The pxr was expressed in heart and kidney at levels similar to that in intestine. The expression of pxr in liver was weakly induced by ligands for mammalian PXR or constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3). The results establish a foundation for PXR studies in this vertebrate model. PXR allelic variation and the differences between the full-length PXR and the LBD in reporter assays have implications for assessing the action of PXR ligands in zebrafish. PMID:24121122

  7. Effects of Deletion of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Lipoprotein Diacylglyceryl Transferase Gene lgt on ABC Transporter Function and on Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chimalapati, Suneeta; Cohen, Jonathan M.; Camberlein, Emilie; MacDonald, Nathanael; Durmort, Claire; Vernet, Thierry; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Mitchell, Timothy; Brown, Jeremy S.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoproteins are an important class of surface associated proteins that have diverse roles and frequently are involved in the virulence of bacterial pathogens. As prolipoproteins are attached to the cell membrane by a single enzyme, prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt), deletion of the corresponding gene potentially allows the characterisation of the overall importance of lipoproteins for specific bacterial functions. We have used a ?lgt mutant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to investigate the effects of loss of lipoprotein attachment on cation acquisition, growth in media containing specific carbon sources, and virulence in different infection models. Immunoblots of triton X-114 extracts, flow cytometry and immuno-fluorescence microscopy confirmed the ?lgt mutant had markedly reduced lipoprotein expression on the cell surface. The ?lgt mutant had reduced growth in cation depleted medium, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, reduced zinc uptake, and reduced intracellular levels of several cations. Doubling time of the ?lgt mutant was also increased slightly when grown in medium with glucose, raffinose and maltotriose as sole carbon sources. These multiple defects in cation and sugar ABC transporter function for the ?lgt mutant were associated with only slightly delayed growth in complete medium. However the ?lgt mutant had significantly reduced growth in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a marked impairment in virulence in mouse models of nasopharyngeal colonisation, sepsis and pneumonia. These data suggest that for S. pneumoniae loss of surface localisation of lipoproteins has widespread effects on ABC transporter functions that collectively prevent the ?lgt mutant from establishing invasive infection. PMID:22911788

  8. Enhanced in vivo antitumor efficacy of dual-functional peptide-modified docetaxel nanoparticles through tumor targeting and Hsp90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yao; Yang, Nan; Zhang, Huifeng; Sun, Bo; Hou, Chunying; Ji, Chao; Zheng, Ji; Liu, Yanyong; Zuo, Pingping

    2016-01-10

    Although conventional anticancer drugs exhibit excellent efficacy, serious adverse effects and/or even toxicity have occurred due to their nonselectivity. Moreover, active targeting approaches have not consistently led to successful outcomes. Ligands that simultaneously possess targeting capability and exert a strong influence on intracellular signaling cascades may be expected to improve the therapeutic efficacy of active targeting nanoparticulate carriers. In this study, we screened a targeting peptide, LPLTPLP, which specifically bound to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens in vitro. Surprisingly, this peptide inhibited the expression of Hsp90 and induced apoptosis by preventing autophagy in A549 cells treated with docetaxel. The results suggested that this peptide might be used as a promising dual-functional ligand for cancer treatment. Based on these findings, we designed and developed a novel active targeting delivery system by modifying docetaxel nanoparticles (DNP) with the dual-functional ligand LPLTPLP. We consistently demonstrated that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) was significantly enhanced in vitro. Furthermore, the targeting NPs exhibited significantly improved antitumor efficacy and biodistribution compared with nontargeting nanodrug and free docetaxel. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of dual-functional NPs for efficient anticancer therapy. PMID:26643616

  9. Multi-functional NaErF4:Yb nanorods: enhanced red upconversion emission, in vitro cell, in vivo X-ray, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Lu, Wei; Zeng, Tianmei; Yi, Zhigao; Rao, Ling; Liu, Hongrong; Zeng, Songjun

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, multi-functional hexagonal phase NaErF4:Yb nanorods were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The upconversion luminescence (UCL) intensity and red to green ratio of the multi-functional NaErF4 nanorods can be improved by Yb3+ doping. More importantly, owing to the decreased distance of Er and Yb, the significant enhancement of red UCL can be obtained, which is different to the usual green UCL of Yb/Er doped NaYF4 host. In addition, the intensity of UCL is strongest when the Yb3+-doped concentration reached 30%. The in vitro cell imaging and localized UCL spectra taken from HeLa cells revealed that these NaErF4: 30% Yb3+ nanorods are ideal nanoprobes with absence of autofluorescence for optical bioimaging. Moreover, these nanorods possess large X-ray absorption ions (Er3+ and doped Yb3+), and were successfully used as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray bioimaging for the first time. In addition to the excellent UCL and X-ray absorption properties, these nanorods present significant paramagnetic properties and can be used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. Therefore, these enhanced red UCL NaErF4 nanocrystals with excellent paramagnetic properties and X-ray absorption properties can be used as promising multi-modal nanoprobes for optical bioimaging, MRI, computed X-ray tomography (CT), and may have potential applications in bioseparation.

  10. Multi-functional NaErF4:Yb nanorods: enhanced red upconversion emission, in vitro cell, in vivo X-ray, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Lu, Wei; Zeng, Tianmei; Yi, Zhigao; Rao, Ling; Liu, Hongrong; Zeng, Songjun

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, multi-functional hexagonal phase NaErF4:Yb nanorods were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The upconversion luminescence (UCL) intensity and red to green ratio of the multi-functional NaErF4 nanorods can be improved by Yb(3+) doping. More importantly, owing to the decreased distance of Er and Yb, the significant enhancement of red UCL can be obtained, which is different to the usual green UCL of Yb/Er doped NaYF4 host. In addition, the intensity of UCL is strongest when the Yb(3+)-doped concentration reached 30%. The in vitro cell imaging and localized UCL spectra taken from HeLa cells revealed that these NaErF4: 30% Yb(3+) nanorods are ideal nanoprobes with absence of autofluorescence for optical bioimaging. Moreover, these nanorods possess large X-ray absorption ions (Er(3+) and doped Yb(3+)), and were successfully used as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray bioimaging for the first time. In addition to the excellent UCL and X-ray absorption properties, these nanorods present significant paramagnetic properties and can be used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. Therefore, these enhanced red UCL NaErF4 nanocrystals with excellent paramagnetic properties and X-ray absorption properties can be used as promising multi-modal nanoprobes for optical bioimaging, MRI, computed X-ray tomography (CT), and may have potential applications in bioseparation. PMID:24469246

  11. Generation and Selection of Novel Fully Human Monoclonal Antibodies That Neutralize Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) Inhibitory Function in Vitro and Increase Bone Mass in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Glantschnig, Helmut; Hampton, Richard A.; Lu, Ping; Zhao, Jing Z.; Vitelli, Salvatore; Huang, Lingyi; Haytko, Peter; Cusick, Tara; Ireland, Cheryl; Jarantow, Stephen W.; Ernst, Robin; Wei, Nan; Nantermet, Pascale; Scott, Kevin R.; Fisher, John E.; Talamo, Fabio; Orsatti, Laura; Reszka, Alfred A.; Sandhu, Punam; Kimmel, Donald; Flores, Osvaldo; Strohl, William; An, Zhiqiang; Wang, Fubao

    2010-01-01

    Wnt/LRP5 signaling is a central regulatory component of bone formative and resorptive activities, and the pathway inhibitor DKK1 is a suppressor of bone formation and bone mass accrual in mice. In addition, augmented DKK1 levels are associated with high bone turnover in diverse low bone mass states in rodent models and disease etiologies in human. However, examination of the precise role of DKK1 in the normal skeleton and in higher species requires the development of refined DKK1-specific pharmacological tools. Here, we report the strategy resulting in isolation of a panel of fully human anti-DKK1 antibodies applicable to studies interrogating the roles of mouse, rhesus, and human DKK1. Selected anti-DKK1 antibodies bind primate and human DKK-1 with picomolar affinities yet do not appreciably bind to DKK2 or DKK4. Epitopes mapped within the DKK1 C-terminal domain necessary for interaction with LRP5/6 and consequently effectively neutralized DKK1 function in vitro. When introduced into naďve normal growing female mice, IgGs significantly improved trabecular bone volume and structure and increased both trabecular and cortical bone mineral densities in a dose-related fashion. Furthermore, fully human DKK1-IgG displayed favorable pharmacokinetic parameters in non-human primates. In summary, we demonstrate here a rate-limiting function of physiologic DKK1 levels in the regulation of bone mass in intact female mice, amendable to specific pharmacologic neutralization by newly identified DKK1-IgGs. Importantly the fully human IgGs display a profile of attributes that recommends their testing in higher species and their use in evaluating DKK1 function in relevant disease models. PMID:20929859

  12. Robust motion correction and outlier rejection of in vivo functional MR images of the fetal brain and placenta during maternal hyperoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wonsang; Serag, Ahmed; Evangelou, Iordanis E.; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Subject motion is a major challenge in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) of the fetal brain and placenta during maternal hyperoxia. We propose a motion correction and volume outlier rejection method for the correction of severe motion artifacts in both fetal brain and placenta. The method is optimized to the experimental design by processing different phases of acquisition separately. It also automatically excludes high-motion volumes and all the missing data are regressed from ROI-averaged signals. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in enhancing motion correction in fetal fMRI without large data loss, compared to traditional motion correction methods.

  13. Robust motion correction and outlier rejection of in vivo functional MR images of the fetal brain and placenta during maternal hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    You, Wonsang; Serag, Ahmed; Evangelou, Iordanis E.; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Subject motion is a major challenge in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) of the fetal brain and placenta during maternal hyperoxia. We propose a motion correction and volume outlier rejection method for the correction of severe motion artifacts in both fetal brain and placenta. The method is optimized to the experimental design by processing different phases of acquisition separately. It also automatically excludes high-motion volumes and all the missing data are regressed from ROI-averaged signals. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in enhancing motion correction in fetal fMRI without large data loss, compared to traditional motion correction methods. PMID:25859294

  14. Production of a Functional Human Acid Maltase in Tobacco Seeds: Biochemical Analysis, Uptake by Human GSDII Cells, and In Vivo Studies in GAA Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reggi, Serena; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N.; Busconi, Matteo; Fogher, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Genetic deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) results in glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) or Pompe’s disease. To investigate whether we could generate a functional recombinant human GAA enzyme (tobrhGAA) in tobacco seeds for future enzyme replacement therapy, we subcloned the human GAA cDNA into the plant expression plasmid-pBI101 under the control of the soybean ?-conglycinin seed-specific promoter and biochemically analyzed the tobrhGAA. Tobacco seeds contain the metabolic machinery that is more compatible with mammalian glycosylation–phosphorylation and processing. We found the tobrhGAA to be enzymatically active was readily taken up by GSDII fibroblasts and in white blood cells from whole blood to reverse the defect. The tobrhGAA corrected the enzyme defect in tissues at 7 days after a single dose following intraperitoneal (IP) administration in GAA knockout (GAA?/?) mice. Additionally, we could purify the tobrhGAA since it bound tightly to the matrix of Sephadex G100 and can be eluted by competition with maltose. These data demonstrate indirectly that the tobrhGAA is fully functional, predominantly proteolytically cleaved and contains the minimal phosphorylation and mannose-6-phosphate residues essential for biological activity. PMID:23907679

  15. Macrophage function in simian AIDS. Killing defects in vivo are independent of macrophage infection, associated with alterations in Th phenotype, and reversible with IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Brodie, S J; Sasseville, V G; Reimann, K A; Simon, M A; Sehgal, P K; Ringler, D J

    1994-12-15

    Infection of macrophages (M phi) in vitro with M phi-tropic isolates of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) did not affect killing of Cryptococcus neoformans up to 16 days after inoculation (p < 0.05). Conversely, alveolar M phi from animals with SIV-induced AIDS killed C. neoformans less efficiently (10.4 +/- 2.8% killing) and, when stimulated with phorbol myristate, produced less superoxide anion (O2-; 0.15 +/- 0.02 O2-/h/mg M phi protein) than M phi from uninfected monkeys (21.8 +/- 1.6% killing and 0.29 +/- 0.02 O2-/h/mg M phi protein). In contrast, killing and O2- release were accentuated in SIV+ asymptomatic animals (25.8 +/- 2.3% killing and 0.40 +/- 0.04 O2-/h/mg M phi protein; p < 0.05). M phi-mediated killing and O2- production could be restored by culturing the affected cells in supernatants derived from Con A-stimulated PBMC of uninfected or SIV+ asymptomatic monkeys. Supernatants with restorative properties had high IFN-gamma bioactivity (63.4 +/- 11.0 U/ml) and elevated IL-10 concentrations (75.3 +/- 10.4 pg/ml) as compared with PBMC supernatants derived from animals with AIDS (IFN-gamma, 9.7 +/- 4.9 U/ml; IL-10, 24.0 +/- 10.1 pg/ml). Functional restoration was found to be dependent, in part, on the presence of IFN-gamma, as neutralizing Abs to IFN-gamma significantly inhibited functional restoration in active supernatants. Moreover, the inactivity of supernatants from mitogen-stimulated PBMC cultures derived from animals with AIDS was not solely dependent upon the loss of CD4+ lymphocytes, inasmuch as purified pulmonary alveolar and peripheral blood CD4+ T cells from only uninfected and SIV+ asymptomatic animals, and not those from animals with AIDS, produced IFN-gamma upon mitogen stimulation. Collectively, these findings suggest that functional aberrations in alveolar M phi from animals with AIDS are not directly due to virus infection but likely result from changes in the pulmonary microenvironment in association with the multisystemic loss and dysfunction of CD4+ T cells. PMID:7989775

  16. Comparison of three formal methods used to estimate the functional axis of rotation: an extensive in-vivo analysis performed on the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Colle, Francesca; Lopomo, Nicola; Visani, Andrea; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the main axis of rotation (AoR) of a human joint represents an important issue in biomechanics. This study compared three formal methods used to estimate functional AoR, namely a cylindrical fitting method, a mean helical axis transformation, and a symmetrical axis approach. These methods were tested on 106 subjects undergoing navigated total knee arthroplasty. AoR orientation in 3D and in the frontal and coronal planes provided by each method was compared to the transepicondylar axis direction. Although all the methods resulted effective, significant differences were identified among them, relatively to the orientation in 3D and in the frontal plane projection. This was probably due to the presence of secondary rotations during the first degrees of knee flexion. PMID:26207419

  17. Chlorogenic acid improves ex vivo vessel function and protects endothelial cells against HOCl-induced oxidative damage, via increased production of nitric oxide and induction of Hmox-1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rujia; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Mas, Emilie; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are potential contributors toward improved cardiovascular health. Coffee is one of the richest sources of dietary polyphenols in a coffee-drinking population, the most abundant form being chlorogenic acid (CGA). Endothelial dysfunction is an early and major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) is a key factor in regulation of endothelial function. Heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1), an inducible isoform of heme oxygenase that is produced in response to stressors such as oxidative stress, may also play a role in vascular protection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CGA on endothelial function with oxidant-induced damage in isolated aortic rings from C57BL mice. We further examine the mechanism by investigating cell viability, activation of eNOS and induction of Hmox-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). We found that pretreatment of isolated aortic rings with 10-?M CGA-protected vessels against HOCl-induced endothelial dysfunction (P<0.05). Pretreatment of cultured HAECs with 10-?M CGA increased endothelial cell viability following exposure to HOCl (P<0.05). Moreover, CGA increased NO production in HAECs in a dose-dependent manner, peaking at 6 h (P<0.05). CGA at 5 ?M and 10 ?M increased eNOS dimerization at 6 h and induced Hmox-1 protein expression at 6 h and 24 h in HAECs. These results are consistent with the cardiovascular protective effects of coffee polyphenols and demonstrate that CGA can protect vessels and cultured endothelial cells against oxidant-induced damage. The mechanism behind the beneficial effect of CGA appears to be in part via increased production of NO and induction of Hmox-1. PMID:26386740

  18. In Vivo Delivery of Adenoviral Vector Containing Interleukin-17 Receptor A Reduces Cardiac Remodeling and Improves Myocardial Function in Viral Myocarditis Leading to Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuquan; Li, Minghui; Wang, Xinggang; Zhang, Xian; Peng, Tianqing; Yang, Yingzhen; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo; Chen, Haozhu; Chen, Ruizhen

    2013-01-01

    Th17 cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocarditis. Interleukin (IL)-17A produced by Th17 cells is dispensable for viral myocarditis but essential for the progression to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study investigated whether the adenoviral transfer of the IL-17 receptor A reduces myocardial remodeling and dysfunction in viral myocarditis leading to DCM. In a mouse model of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced chronic myocarditis, the delivery of the adenovirus-containing IL-17 receptor A (Ad-IL17RA:Fc) reduced IL-17A production and decreased the number of Th17 cells in the spleen and heart, leading to the down-regulation of systemic TNF-? and IL-6 production. Cardiac function improved significantly in the Ad-IL17R:Fc- compared with the Ad-null-treated mice 3 months after the first CVB3 infection. Ad-IL17R:Fc reduced the left ventricle dilation and decreased the mortality in viral myocarditis, leading to DCM (56% in the Ad-IL17R:Fc versus 76% in the Ad-null group). The protective effects of Ad-IL17R-Fc on remodeling correlated with the attenuation of myocardial collagen deposition and the reduction of fibroblasts in CVB3-infected hearts, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of A distintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motifs (ADAMTS-1), Matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2), and collagen subtypes I and III in the heart. Moreover, in cultured cardiac fibroblasts, IL-17A induced the expression of ADAMTS-1, MMP-2, and collagen subtypes I and III and increased the proliferation of fibroblasts. We determined that the delivery of IL-17-RA:Fc reduces cardiac remodeling, improves function, and decreases mortality in viral myocarditis leading to DCM, possibly by suppressing fibrosis. Therefore, the adenoviral transfer of the IL-17 receptor A may represent an alternative therapy for chronic viral myocarditis and its progression to DCM. PMID:23977238

  19. GRP78(BiP) facilitates the cytosolic delivery of anthrax lethal factor (LF) in vivo and functions as an unfoldase in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Alfred G.; Slater, Louise; Taylor-Parker, Julian; Bharti, Ajit; Harrison, Robert; Hung, Deborah T.; Murphy, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Anthrax toxin is an A/B bacterial protein toxin which is composed of the enzymatically active Lethal Factor (LF) and/or Oedema Factor (EF) bound to Protective Antigen 63 (PA63) which functions as both the receptor binding and transmembrane domains. Once the toxin binds to its cell surface receptors it is internalized into the cell and traffics through Rab5- and Rab7-associated endosomal vesicles. Following acidification of the vesicle lumen, PA63 undergoes a dynamic change forming a beta-barrel that inserts into and forms a pore through the endosomal membrane. It is widely recognized that LF, and the related fusion protein LFnDTA, must be completely denatured in order to transit through the PA63 formed pore and enter the eukaryotic cell cytosol. We demonstrate by protease protection assays that the molecular chaperone GRP78 mediates the unfolding of LFnDTA and LF at neutral pH and thereby converts these proteins from a trypsin resistant to sensitive conformation. We have used immuno-electron microscopy and gold-labeled antibodies to demonstrate that both GRP78 and GRP94 chaperones are present in the lumen of endosomal vesicles. Finally, we have used siRNA to demonstrate that knock down of GRP78 results in the emergence of resistance to anthrax lethal toxin and edema toxin action. PMID:21797942

  20. In vitro and in vivo studies of three dimensional porous composites of biphasic calcium phosphate/poly ?-caprolactone: Effect of bio-functionalization for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyung-A.; Jyoti, Md. Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2014-05-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and poly ?-caprolactone (PCL) each have many applications as tissue repair materials. In this study, a three dimensional (3D) PCL infiltrated BCP scaffold was prepared. This composite was further modified and bio-functionalized for bone tissue engineering by subsequent amination and immobilization technique using silicon (Si) and fibronectin (FN) on the surfaces (BCP/PCL + Si and BCP/PCL + Si + FN). In this study, such 3D porous scaffolds were evaluated for bone formation applicability. In vitro studies by immunocytochemistry showed cell morphology and adherence on these scaffolds. Interconnected networks like appearance of tubulin and vinculin expression were notably higher in BCP/PCL + Si and BCP/PCL + Si + FN scaffold surfaces than BCP/PCL surfaces. The scaffolds were also investigated detailed and quantitatively using micro-CT tomography for the repair of bone defects (4 mm diameter) in rats. Micro-CT tomography showed the BCP/PCL + Si + FN scaffolds were almost replaced by newly grown bone within 12 weeks after surgery, suggesting that they have an especially strong capacity for osteogenesis, mineralization, and biodegradation for bone replacement.

  1. Transport by Populations of Fast and Slow Kinesins Uncovers Novel Family-Dependent Motor Characteristics Important for In Vivo Function

    PubMed Central

    Arpa?, Göker; Shastry, Shankar; Hancock, William O.; Tüzel, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular cargo transport frequently involves multiple motor types, either having opposite directionality or having the same directionality but different speeds. Although significant progress has been made in characterizing kinesin motors at the single-molecule level, predicting their ensemble behavior is challenging and requires tight coupling between experiments and modeling to uncover the underlying motor behavior. To understand how diverse kinesins attached to the same cargo coordinate their movement, we carried out microtubule gliding assays using pairwise mixtures of motors from the kinesin-1, -2, -3, -5, and -7 families engineered to have identical run lengths and surface attachments. Uniform motor densities were used and microtubule gliding speeds were measured for varying proportions of fast and slow motors. A coarse-grained computational model of gliding assays was developed and found to recapitulate the experiments. Simulations incorporated published force-dependent velocities and run lengths, along with mechanical interactions between motors bound to the same microtubule. The simulations show that the force-dependence of detachment is the key parameter that determines gliding speed in multimotor assays, while motor compliance, surface density, and stall force all play minimal roles. Simulations also provide estimates for force-dependent dissociation rates, suggesting that kinesin-1 and the mitotic motors kinesin-5 and -7 maintain microtubule association against loads, whereas kinesin-2 and -3 readily detach. This work uncovers unexpected motor behavior in multimotor ensembles and clarifies functional differences between kinesins that carry out distinct mechanical tasks in cells. PMID:25418170

  2. Functional studies on the activity of efflux transporters in an ex vivo model with chicken splenocytes and evaluation of selected fluoroquinolones in this model.

    PubMed

    Haritova, Aneliya Milanova; Schrickx, Jan A; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2007-03-15

    The efflux proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp), BCRP and members of the MRP-family (MRPs) are increasingly recognized as determinants of the absorption, tissue distribution and excretion of numerous drugs. A widely applied in vitro screening method, to assess the effect of these efflux transporters in transmembrane transport of drugs is based on the use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), in which the efflux of fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) can be easily measured. In avian species, the isolation of PBMCs is compromised by the presence of thrombocytes having approximately the same size. As an alternative, we validated the use of isolated splenocytes to assess Rhodamine 123 transport in the presence and absence of specific inhibitors for P-gp, MRPs and BCRP. Rh-123 efflux was concentration-dependent with the percentage of efflux that decreased with increasing concentrations. P-gp inhibitors, PSC833 and GF120918, significantly inhibit Rh-123 efflux, whereas inhibitors for MRPs and BCRP, MK571 and Ko-143, respectively, have a limited inhibitory effect. However, the effect of GF120918 was more pronounced as compared to PSC833, suggesting an additional role for BCRP next to P-gp in Rh-123 efflux. Moreover, fluoroquinolones were selected to test the applicability of the described model. None of these fluoroquinolones significantly inhibit P-gp function at concentrations up to 50 microM, with exception of danofloxacin and danofloxacin mesylate that were found to reduce Rh-123 efflux by approximately 15%. PMID:17188652

  3. SslE Elicits Functional Antibodies That Impair In Vitro Mucinase Activity and In Vivo Colonization by Both Intestinal and Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nesta, Barbara; Valeri, Maria; Spagnuolo, Angela; Rosini, Roberto; Mora, Marirosa; Donato, Paolo; Alteri, Christopher J.; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Buccato, Scilla; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Bertoldi, Isabella; Buzzigoli, Lapo; Tuscano, Giovanna; Falduto, Maria; Rippa, Valentina; Ashhab, Yaqoub; Bensi, Giuliano; Fontana, Maria Rita; Seib, Kate L.; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Soriani, Marco; Serino, Laura

    2014-01-01

    SslE, the Secreted and surface-associated lipoprotein from Escherichia coli, has recently been associated to the M60-like extracellular zinc-metalloprotease sub-family which is implicated in glycan recognition and processing. SslE can be divided into two main variants and we recently proposed it as a potential vaccine candidate. By applying a number of in vitro bioassays and comparing wild type, knockout mutant and complemented strains, we have now demonstrated that SslE specifically contributes to degradation of mucin substrates, typically present in the intestine and bladder. Mutation of the zinc metallopeptidase motif of SslE dramatically impaired E. coli mucinase activity, confirming the specificity of the phenotype observed. Moreover, antibodies raised against variant I SslE, cloned from strain IHE3034 (SslEIHE3034), are able to inhibit translocation of E. coli strains expressing different variants through a mucin-based matrix, suggesting that SslE induces cross-reactive functional antibodies that affect the metallopeptidase activity. To test this hypothesis, we used well-established animal models and demonstrated that immunization with SslEIHE3034 significantly reduced gut, kidney and spleen colonization by strains producing variant II SslE and belonging to different pathotypes. Taken together, these data strongly support the importance of SslE in E. coli colonization of mucosal surfaces and reinforce the use of this antigen as a component of a broadly protective vaccine against pathogenic E. coli species. PMID:24809621

  4. Development of functional connections between thalamic fibres and the visual cortex of the wallaby revealed by current source density analysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pearce, A R; James, A C; Mark, R F

    2000-03-20

    Functional development of thalamic input to the cortex in anaesthetised wallaby pouch young between postnatal day 25 (P25) and P153 has been studied by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve, current source density (CSD) analysis, and histologic identification of recording sites. Conduction in the optic nerve was recorded prior to P39, by which time responses from the superior colliculus appeared. No evoked potential of cortical origin was recorded until P46, even though thalamic fibres grew into the cortical plate from P15. The first cortical synaptic responses were recorded at the margin of the subplate and the developing cortical plate, where cells that later comprise the adult layer 6 settle. At about P66, an additional short-latency, superficial response appeared, coinciding with the formation of layer 4. The deep response was retained in layer 6. Evoked activity in the presumed layer 4 was found progressively deeper in the cortex over the next few weeks, which would be expected from the addition of layer 3 above it. By P113, a new sink was added superficial in the cortex. Thalamocortical connections follow the same deep-to-superficial order in development as the cellular layers of the cortex. PMID:10713572

  5. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in vivo Nanotechnology in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Since the development of x-rays the ability to image inside our bodies has provided medicine with a potent diagnostic tool, as well as fascinating us with the eerie evidence of our mechanistic mortality. In December 2008 Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien received a Nobel Prize for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein. The award recognised a new discovery that further facilitated our abilities to follow cellular activities and delve deeper into the workings of living organisms. Since the first observation of green fluorescent protein in jelly fish over thirty years ago, quantum dots have emerged as a potential alternative tool for imaging [1]. The advantages of quantum dots over organic dyes and fluorescent proteins include intense luminescence, high molar extinction coefficient, resistance to photobleaching, and broad excitation with narrow emission bands. However, one drawback for biological applications has been the layer of hydrophobic organic ligands often present at the surface as a result of the synthesis procedures. One solution to improve the solubility of quantum dots has been to conjugate them with a hydrophilic substance, as reported by Nie et al [2]. Chitosan is a hydrophilic, non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable substance and has been conjugated with quantum dots such as CdSe-ZnS [2] for bioassays and intracellular labelling. As well as luminescence, different nanoparticles present a variety of exceptional properties that render them useful in a range of bio applications, including MRI, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia therapy. The ability to harness these various attributes in one system was reported by researchers in China, who incorporated magnetic nanoparticles, fluorescent quantum dots and pharmaceutical drugs into chitosan nanoparticles for multifunctional smart drug delivery systems [3]. More recently silicon quantum dots have emerged as a less cytotoxic alternative to CdSe for bio-imaging labels [4]. A surface hydroxyl group renders silicon quantum dots soluble in water and the photoluminescence can be made stable with oxygen-passivation. In addition, researchers in Japan have demonstrated how the initially modest yield in the preparation of silicon quantum dots can be improved to tens of milligrams per batch, thus further promoting their application in bio-imaging [5]. In the search for non-toxic quantum dots, researchers at the Amrita Centre for Nanoscience in India have prepared heavy metal-free quantum dot bio-probes based on single phase ZnS [6]. The quantum dots are selectively doped with metals, transition metals and halides to provide tuneable luminescence properties, and they are surface conjugated with folic acid for cancer targeting. The quantum dots were demonstrated to be water-soluble, non-toxic in normal and cancer cell lines, and have bright, tuneable luminescence. So far most of the quantum dots developed for bio-imaging have had excitation and emission wavelengths in the visible spectrum, which is highly absorbed by tissue. This limits imaging with these quantum dots to superficial tissues. This week, researchers in China and the US reported work developing functionalized dots for in vivo tumour vasculature in the infrared part of the spectrum [7]. In addition the quantum dots were functionalised with glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides, which target the vasculature of almost all types of growing tumours, unlike antibody- or aptamer-mediated targeting strategies that are specific to a particular cancer type. In this issue, researchers in China and the US demonstrate a novel type of contrast agent for ultrasonic tumour imaging [8]. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonic tumour imaging extends the diagnostic and imaging capabilities of traditional techniques. The use of nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents exploits the presence of open pores in the range of 380 to 780 nm in tumour blood vessels, which enhance the permeability and retention of nanoparticles in the tumour vasculature. However, previous reports on techniques to generate

  6. Aptamer photoregulation in vivo

    E-print Network

    Li, Lele

    The in vivo application of aptamers as therapeutics could be improved by enhancing target-specific accumulation while minimizing off-target uptake. We designed a light-triggered system that permits spatiotemporal regulation ...

  7. Cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in mice following primary exposure to chemical allergens: evidence for functional differentiation of T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, A; Dearman, R J; Kimber, I; Kemeny, D M

    1998-06-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that repeated exposure of mice to chemical allergens of different types results in the development of qualitatively divergent immune responses characterized by the production by draining lymph node cells (LNC) of distinct cytokine patterns. Chronic exposure of mice to contact allergens, such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), resulted in the secretion by LNC of low or undetectable levels of interleukins 4 and 10 (IL-4 and IL-10), but comparatively high levels of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma); the latter cytokine being produced by both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. In contrast, chronic exposure of mice to trimellitic anhydride (TMA), a respiratory allergen associated in humans with occupational asthma, induced instead the production by LNC of relatively high concentrations of IL-4 and IL-10, but little IFN-gamma. The low levels of IFN-gamma secretion which were provoked by treatment with TMA were shown to derive from CD8+ cells exclusively. In the present investigations we have sought to determine whether the polarized responses observed following repeated exposure to these chemical allergens are reflected by cytokine secretion patterns provoked by primary exposure. To this end, mice of BALB/c strain were exposed epicutaneously daily for 3 consecutive days to concentrations of DNCB and TMA (1 and 10%, respectively), or to oxazolone, another contact allergen (0.25%), that resulted in substantial proliferative activity in draining lymph nodes. The production by draining LNC of IFN-gamma and of mitogen-inducible IL-4 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the relative contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ cells to the patterns of cytokine secretion observed was analyzed using both positive and negative selection methods. It was found that primary exposure to DNCB, oxazolone and TMA each resulted in the production by LNC of both IFN-gamma and IL-4. Selective depletion of, or enrichment for, CD4+ and CD8+ cells revealed that only CD4+ cells elaborated mitogen-inducible IL-4. Depletion of neither CD4+ nor CD8+ cells compromised the production by TMA- or DNCB-activated LNC of IFN-gamma, although positively selected CD8+ cells were considerably less able than CD4+ cells to elaborate this cytokine, presumably secondary to a lack of appropriate accessory cells. Taken together the results demonstrate that early during immune responses to DNCB or oxazolone and TMA there is no evidence for the selectivity of cytokine secretion patterns that characterizes responses following more chronic exposure. Moreover, it is clear that exposure to TMA initially induces the production of IFN-gamma by both CD4+ and CD8+ cells, whereas after more chronic treatment the secretion of this cytokine is a function of CD8+ cells exclusively. Collectively, these results indicate that the polarized responses that develop in mice following chronic exposure to different classes of chemical allergen are not reflected by the characteristics of primary immune responses. As such the development of qualitatively divergent immune responses to chemical allergens provides a paradigm for the evolution of differentiated T cell function with time and/or with antigen exposure. PMID:9652304

  8. Functional cooperation between the IP3 receptor and phospholipase C secures the high sensitivity to light of Drosophila photoreceptors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Elkana; Katz, Ben; Yasin, Bushra; Peters, Maximilian; Rhodes, Elisheva; Zaguri, Rachel; Weiss, Shirley; Minke, Baruch

    2015-02-11

    Drosophila phototransduction is a model system for the ubiquitous phosphoinositide signaling. In complete darkness, spontaneous unitary current events (dark bumps) are produced by spontaneous single Gq? activation, while single-photon responses (quantum bumps) arise from synchronous activation of several Gq? molecules. We have recently shown that most of the spontaneous single Gq? activations do not produce dark bumps, because of a critical phospholipase C? (PLC?) activity level required for bump generation. Surpassing the threshold of channel activation depends on both PLC? activity and cellular [Ca(2+)], which participates in light excitation via a still unclear mechanism. We show here that in IP3 receptor (IP3R)-deficient photoreceptors, both light-activated Ca(2+) release from internal stores and light sensitivity were strongly attenuated. This was further verified by Ca(2+) store depletion, linking Ca(2+) release to light excitation. In IP3R-deficient photoreceptors, dark bumps were virtually absent and the quantum-bump rate was reduced, indicating that Ca(2+) release from internal stores is necessary to reach the critical level of PLC? catalytic activity and the cellular [Ca(2+)] required for excitation. Combination of IP3R knockdown with reduced PLC? catalytic activity resulted in highly suppressed light responses that were partially rescued by cellular Ca(2+) elevation, showing a functional cooperation between IP3R and PLC? via released Ca(2+). These findings suggest that in contrast to the current dogma that Ca(2+) release via IP3R does not participate in light excitation, we show that released Ca(2+) plays a critical role in light excitation. The positive feedback between PLC? and IP3R found here may represent a common feature of the inositol-lipid signaling. PMID:25673847

  9. Functional Cooperation between the IP3 Receptor and Phospholipase C Secures the High Sensitivity to Light of Drosophila Photoreceptors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Elkana; Katz, Ben; Yasin, Bushra; Peters, Maximilian; Rhodes, Elisheva; Zaguri, Rachel; Weiss, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila phototransduction is a model system for the ubiquitous phosphoinositide signaling. In complete darkness, spontaneous unitary current events (dark bumps) are produced by spontaneous single Gq? activation, while single-photon responses (quantum bumps) arise from synchronous activation of several Gq? molecules. We have recently shown that most of the spontaneous single Gq? activations do not produce dark bumps, because of a critical phospholipase C? (PLC?) activity level required for bump generation. Surpassing the threshold of channel activation depends on both PLC? activity and cellular [Ca2+], which participates in light excitation via a still unclear mechanism. We show here that in IP3 receptor (IP3R)-deficient photoreceptors, both light-activated Ca2+ release from internal stores and light sensitivity were strongly attenuated. This was further verified by Ca2+ store depletion, linking Ca2+ release to light excitation. In IP3R-deficient photoreceptors, dark bumps were virtually absent and the quantum-bump rate was reduced, indicating that Ca2+ release from internal stores is necessary to reach the critical level of PLC? catalytic activity and the cellular [Ca2+] required for excitation. Combination of IP3R knockdown with reduced PLC? catalytic activity resulted in highly suppressed light responses that were partially rescued by cellular Ca2+ elevation, showing a functional cooperation between IP3R and PLC? via released Ca2+. These findings suggest that in contrast to the current dogma that Ca2+ release via IP3R does not participate in light excitation, we show that released Ca2+ plays a critical role in light excitation. The positive feedback between PLC? and IP3R found here may represent a common feature of the inositol-lipid signaling. PMID:25673847

  10. Regional and epi- to endocardial differences in transmural angles of left ventricular cardiomyocytes measured in ex vivo pig hearts: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Smerup, Morten; Agger, Peter; Nielsen, Eva Amalie; Ringgaard, Steffen; Pedersen, Michael; Niederer, Peter; Anderson, Robert H; Lunkenheimer, Paul P

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies point toward the existence of a significant population of cardiomyocytes that intrude transmurally, in addition to those aligned tangentially. Our aim was to investigate the extent of transmural angulation in the porcine left ventricle using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI). Hearts from eight 15 kg pigs were arrested in diastole. The ventricles were filled with polymer to maintain the end-diastolic dimensions. All hearts were examined using DTMRI to assess the distribution of transmural angulation of the cardiomyocytes at 12 predetermined locations covering the entirety of the left ventricle. We found significant differences between the regions, as well as within the transmural subcomponents. In eight out of the 12 predetermined mural segments, the highest mean transmural angle was located sub-endocardially. The greatest mean transmural angles were found in the anterior basal region, specifically 14.9?±?6.0-degree angle, with the greatest absolute value being 34.3-degree angle. This is the first study to show the significant heterogeneities in the distribution of helical and transmural angles within the entirety of the left ventricular walls, not only for different depths within the ventricular walls, but also between different ventricular regions. The results show unequivocally that not all the contractile elements are aligned exclusively in tangential fashion within the left ventricle. The main function of the transmurally intruding component is most likely to equalize and normalize shortening of the cardiomyocytes at all depths within the myocardium, but our findings also support the notion of antagonistic forces existing within the myocardial walls. PMID:24591128

  11. Plantation Forestry under Global Warming: Hybrid Poplars with Improved Thermotolerance Provide New Insights on the in Vivo Function of Small Heat Shock Protein Chaperones1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Irene; Contreras, Angela; Jing, Zhong-Ping; Gallardo, Fernando; Cánovas, Francisco M.; Gómez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Climate-driven heat stress is a key factor affecting forest plantation yields. While its effects are expected to worsen during this century, breeding more tolerant genotypes has proven elusive. We report here a substantial and durable increase in the thermotolerance of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) through overexpression of a major small heat shock protein (sHSP) with convenient features. Experimental evidence was obtained linking protective effects in the transgenic events with the unique chaperone activity of sHSPs. In addition, significant positive correlations were observed between phenotype strength and heterologous sHSP accumulation. The remarkable baseline levels of transgene product (up to 1.8% of total leaf protein) have not been reported in analogous studies with herbaceous species. As judged by protein analyses, such an accumulation is not matched either by endogenous sHSPs in both heat-stressed poplar plants and field-grown adult trees. Quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses supported these observations and allowed us to identify the poplar members most responsive to heat stress. Interestingly, sHSP overaccumulation was not associated with pleiotropic effects that might decrease yields. The poplar lines developed here also outperformed controls under in vitro and ex vitro culture conditions (callus biomass, shoot production, and ex vitro survival), even in the absence of thermal stress. These results reinforce the feasibility of improving valuable genotypes for plantation forestry, a field where in vitro recalcitrance, long breeding cycles, and other practical factors constrain conventional genetic approaches. They also provide new insights into the biological functions of the least understood family of heat shock protein chaperones. PMID:24306533

  12. Radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis as a function of time and dietary iodine supply: an in vivo model of tumorigenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Carsten; Brabant, Georg; Dralle, Henning; Gerlach, Reinhard; Roessner, Albert; Hoang-Vu, Cuong

    2002-07-01

    It is believed that a combination of environmental factors with mutagens induces carcinomas derived from thyroid follicular cells. In this study we tried to ascertain whether a single short-term exposure to external radiation is sufficient to induce thyroid carcinomas in rats under long-term high or low dietary iodine intake. Rats were tested over a period of 110 wk under high (approximately 10-fold of normal), normal, and low (approximately 0.1-fold of normal) daily iodine intake. Forty-day-old animals were subjected to single external radiation of 4 Gy or sham radiation. Thyroid function was tested weekly, and thyroid morphology was determined after 15, 35, 55, and 110 wk. Iodine deficiency, but not high iodine intake, led to a decrease in T(3) and T(4) plasma levels, but to an increase in TSH, which became significant after 9 and 11 wk of treatment, respectively. Both high and low iodine treatment significantly increased the proliferation rate and induced thyroid adenomas, but no malignancies after 55 and 110 wk. Radiation with 4 Gy resulted in a significant destruction of the follicular structure. Under high and low iodine intakes (50-80% of animals), but not under normal iodine supply, thyroid carcinomas were observed in irradiated rats. Thus, the increased proliferation rate induced under the experimental conditions described in this study is apparently not sufficient to cause thyroid carcinomas, but the presence of a mutagen-like radiation is required. This model may help to define genetic alterations long before histological changes are detectable. PMID:12072390

  13. S/T Phosphorylation of DLL1 Is Required for Full Ligand Activity In Vitro but Dispensable for DLL1 Function In Vivo during Embryonic Patterning and Marginal Zone B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Braune, Eike-Benjamin; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Lyszkiewicz, Marcin; Serth, Katrin; Preusse, Kristina; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Krueger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of Notch receptors with Delta- and Serrate-type ligands is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that mediates direct communication between adjacent cells and thereby regulates multiple developmental processes. Posttranslational modifications of both receptors and ligands are pivotal for normal Notch pathway function. We have identified by mass spectrometric analysis two serine and one threonine phosphorylation sites in the intracellular domain of the mouse Notch ligand DLL1. Phosphorylation requires cell membrane association of DLL1 and occurs sequentially at the two serine residues. Phosphorylation of one serine residue most likely by protein kinase B primes phosphorylation of the other serine. A DLL1 variant, in which all three identified phosphorylated serine/threonine residues are mutated to alanine and valine, was more stable than wild-type DLL1 but had reduced relative levels on the cell surface and was more effectively cleaved in the extracellular domain. In addition, the mutant variant activated Notch1 significantly less efficient than wild-type DLL1 in a coculture assay in vitro. Mice, however, whose endogenous DLL1 was replaced with the phosphorylation-deficient triple mutant developed normally, suggesting compensatory mechanisms under physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:24449764

  14. Engineering functional blood vessels in vivo

    E-print Network

    Au, Pakwai

    2008-01-01

    At the present time, there are many hurdles to overcome in order to create a long-lasting and engineered tissue for tissue transplant in patients. The challenges include the isolation and expansion of appropriate cells, ...

  15. DISSECTION OF PLANT PROMOTER FUNCTION IN VIVO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Combinatorial interactions between MYB and transcription HLH factors are required for the regulation of several important processes in plants. Protein-DNA binding and transient expression experiments established a modular structure for several maize flavonoid biosynthetic gene promoters, in which h...

  16. In vivo canine muscle function assay.

    PubMed

    Childers, Martin K; Grange, Robert W; Kornegay, Joe N

    2011-01-01

    We describe a minimally-invasive and reproducible method to measure canine pelvic limb muscle strength and muscle response to repeated eccentric contractions. The pelvic limb of an anesthetized dog is immobilized in a stereotactic frame to align the tibia at a right angle to the femur. Adhesive wrap affixes the paw to a pedal mounted on the shaft of a servomotor to measure torque. Percutaneous nerve stimulation activates pelvic limb muscles of the paw to either push (extend) or pull (flex) against the pedal to generate isometric torque. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation activates tibiotarsal extensor muscles. Repeated eccentric (lengthening) contractions are induced in the tibiotarsal flexor muscles by percutaneous peroneal nerve stimulation. The eccentric protocol consists of an initial isometric contraction followed by a forced stretch imposed by the servomotor. The rotation effectively lengthens the muscle while it contracts, e.g., an eccentric contraction. During stimulation flexor muscles are subjected to an 800 msec isometric and 200 msec eccentric contraction. This procedure is repeated every 5 sec. To avoid fatigue, 4 min rest follows every 10 contractions with a total of 30 contractions performed. PMID:21494224

  17. Aptamer photoregulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Lele; Tong, Rong; Chu, Hunghao; Wang, Weiping; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2014-12-01

    The in vivo application of aptamers as therapeutics could be improved by enhancing target-specific accumulation while minimizing off-target uptake. We designed a light-triggered system that permits spatiotemporal regulation of aptamer activity in vitro and in vivo. Cell binding by the aptamer was prevented by hybridizing the aptamer to a photo-labile complementary oligonucleotide. Upon irradiation at the tumor site, the aptamer was liberated, leading to prolonged intratumoral retention. The relative distribution of the aptamer to the liver and kidney was also significantly decreased, compared to that of the free aptamer. PMID:25404344

  18. Ex vivo DNA Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Adam B.; Canfield, Zachary B.; Hayward, Laura C.; Fong, Stephen S.; McArthur, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid, and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods. PMID:25024067

  19. Enhancement of the Immunostimulatory Functions of Ex Vivo–Generated Dendritic Cells from Early-Stage Colon Cancer Patients by Consecutive Exposure to Low Doses of Sequential-Kinetic-Activated IL-4 and IL-12. A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Radice, Elisabetta; Bellone, Graziella; Miranda, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), specialized antigen-presenting cells bridging innate and adaptive immunity, play a crucial role in determining specific immune response to tumors. Because of their potent immunoregulatory capacities, DCs have been exploited in anticancer vaccination, with limited success thus far. This pilot study compared low-dose interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-12 prepared by sequential kinetic activation (SKA) with standard doses of the same recombinant human cytokines on functional activity of ex vivo–generated monocyte-derived (Mo) DCs from colon carcinoma patients and normal subjects. MoDCs were exposed to medium alone, SKA-IL-4 (0.5 fg/ml), or SKA-IL-12 (2 fg/ml), alone or consecutively combined, in parallel with rhIL-4 (50 ng/ml) and rhIL-12 (1 ng/ml). Primary allogeneic one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was the end point to assess in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to MoDCs, and secreted IL-12p70 and interferon-? in MLR supernatants measured by ELISA to assay for T-helper 1–promoting MoDC phenotype. No single agent enhanced the compromised allostimulatory activity of MoDCs from colon cancer patients, unlike healthy donors. However, MoDCs from nonmetastatic colon cancer patients, after sequential exposure to SKA-IL-4 (48 hours) and SKA-IL-12 (24 hours), displayed increased T-cell stimulatory capacity by MLR and acquired driving T-helper 1 polarization activity, although less markedly than the effects induced by recombinant human cytokines or found in normal subjects. These results point to an immunomodulatory capacity of low-dose SKA-IL-4 and SKA-IL-12 and encourage further investigation to provide clues for the rational development of new and more effective immunotherapeutic strategies against cancer. PMID:26310379

  20. In vitro and in vivo characterization of several functionalized ultrasmall particles of iron oxide, vectorized against amyloid plaques and potentially able to cross the blood-brain barrier: toward earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Ansciaux, Emilie; Burtea, Carmen; Laurent, Sophie; Crombez, Deborah; Nonclercq, Denis; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder most often diagnosed 10?years after its onset and development. It is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-? peptide (ABP) into amyloid plaques between nerve cells, which produces a massive local neurodegeneration. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging allows diagnosis of AD by showing ABP accumulation in the brain. The ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIO) derivatives proposed in the present work were functionalized with peptides that present an affinity for ABP, independently of its state of aggregation. Their nanomolar Kd * confirms the high affinity of our vectorized contrast agents (VCA) for ABP and therefore their high labeling potential, specificity and sensitivity. Their lack of toxicity has been demonstrated, both by in vitro studies using the MTT method on several cell types, and by in vivo investigations with assessment of renal and hepatic biomarkers and by histopathology evaluation. The results of biodistribution studies corroborated by MRI demonstrate that USPIO-PHO (USPIO coupled to peptide C-IPLPFYN-C) are able to cross the blood-brain barrier without any facilitating strategy, and accumulates in the brain 90?min after its injection in NMRI mice. None of the USPIO derivatives were found in any organs one week after administration. To conclude, USPIO-PHO seems to have a genuine potential for labeling amyloid plaques in the brain; it has a nanomolar binding affinity, no toxic effects, and its elimination half-life is about 3?h. Further tests will be made on transgenic mice, aimed at confirming the potential of early AD diagnosis using our VCA. PMID:25284012

  1. In vivo radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B; Vares, G

    2015-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) describes phenomena where small conditioning doses of ionizing radiation (IR) reduce detrimental effects of subsequent higher IR doses. Current radiation protection regulations do not include RAR because of the large variability in expression among individuals and uncertainties of the mechanism. However, RAR should be regarded as an indispensable factor for estimation and control of individual IR sensitivity. In this article, RAR studies relevant to individual cancer risk are reviewed. Using various stains of mice, carcinogenic RAR has been demonstrated. Consistently much in vivo evidence for RAR with end points of DNA and chromosome damage is reported. Most in vivo RAR studies revealed efficient induction of RAR by chronic or repeated low-dose priming irradiation. Chronic IR-induced RAR was observed also in human individuals after environmental, occupational, and nuclear accident radiation exposure. These observations may be associated with an intrinsically distinct feature of in vivo experimental systems that mainly consist of nonproliferating mature cells. Alternatively, induction of RAR by gap junction-mediated bystander effects suggests that multicellular systems comprising densely communicating cells may be capable of responding to long-lasting low-dose-rate priming irradiation. Regulation by endocrine factors is also a plausible mechanism for RAR at an individual level. Emerging evidence suggests that glucocorticoids, known as stress hormones, participate in in vivo RAR induction following long-term low-dose-rate exposure to IR. PMID:24925363

  2. Discovery of Novel Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Reveals Chemical and Functional Diversity and In Vivo Activity in Rat Behavioral Models of Anxiolytic and Antipsychotic ActivityS?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alice L.; Grier, Mark D.; Jones, Carrie K.; Herman, Elizabeth J.; Kane, Alexander S.; Smith, Randy L.; Williams, Richard; Zhou, Ya; Marlo, Joy E.; Days, Emily L.; Blatt, Tasha N.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Menon, Usha N.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) may provide novel treatments for multiple central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including anxiety and schizophrenia. Although compounds have been developed to better understand the physiological roles of mGluR5 and potential usefulness for the treatment of these disorders, there are limitations in the tools available, including poor selectivity, low potency, and limited solubility. To address these issues, we developed an innovative assay that allows simultaneous screening for mGluR5 agonists, antagonists, and potentiators. We identified multiple scaffolds that possess diverse modes of activity at mGluR5, including both positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively). 3-Fluoro-5-(3-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)benzonitrile (VU0285683) was developed as a novel selective mGluR5 NAM with high affinity for the 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) binding site. VU0285683 had anxiolytic-like activity in two rodent models for anxiety but did not potentiate phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotor activity. (4-Hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)(4-phenylethynyl)phenyl)methanone (VU0092273) was identified as a novel mGluR5 PAM that also binds to the MPEP site. VU0092273 was chemically optimized to an orally active analog, N-cyclobutyl-6-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)nicotinamide hydrochloride (VU0360172), which is selective for mGluR5. This novel mGluR5 PAM produced a dose-dependent reversal of amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, a rodent model predictive of antipsychotic activity. Discovery of structurally and functionally diverse allosteric modulators of mGluR5 that demonstrate in vivo efficacy in rodent models of anxiety and antipsychotic activity provide further support for the tremendous diversity of chemical scaffolds and modes of efficacy of mGluR5 ligands. In addition, these studies provide strong support for the hypothesis that multiple structurally distinct mGluR5 modulators have robust activity in animal models that predict efficacy in the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:20923853

  3. In vivo RNAi: Today and Tomorrow

    PubMed Central

    Perrimon, Norbert; Ni, Jian-Quan; Perkins, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful reverse genetics approach to analyze gene functions both in tissue culture and in vivo. Because of its widespread applicability and effectiveness it has become an essential part of the tool box kits of model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and the mouse. In addition, the use of RNAi in animals in which genetic tools are either poorly developed or nonexistent enables a myriad of fundamental questions to be asked. Here, we review the methods and applications of in vivo RNAi to characterize gene functions in model organisms and discuss their impact to the study of developmental as well as evolutionary questions. Further, we discuss the applications of RNAi technologies to crop improvement, pest control and RNAi therapeutics, thus providing an appreciation of the potential for phenomenal applications of RNAi to agriculture and medicine. PMID:20534712

  4. In vivo electroporation of adult mouse sensory neurons for studying peripheral axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saijilafu; Zhang, Bo-Yin; Zhou, Feng-quan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Electroporation has been a widely used tool to introduce DNA plasmids or RNA oligos into cultured cells, and recently in vivo into chick or mouse embryos. Here we report a rapid and efficient approach to transfect adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vivo with precise spatiotemporal control via electroporation. This approach will allow both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in vivo to study the function of adult sensory neurons, such as sensory axon regeneration. PMID:24838967

  5. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  6. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy for imaging apoptotic DNA fragmentation at the single-cell level in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Gubory, Kais H. . E-mail: kais.algubory@jouy.inra.fr

    2005-11-01

    The major characteristic of cell death by apoptosis is the loss of nuclear DNA integrity by endonucleases, resulting in the formation of small DNA fragments. The application of confocal imaging to in vivo monitoring of dynamic cellular events, like apoptosis, within internal organs and tissues has been limited by the accessibility to these sites. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM) to image in situ apoptotic DNA fragmentation in surgically exteriorized sheep corpus luteum in the living animal. Following intra-luteal administration of a fluorescent DNA-staining dye, YO-PRO-1, DNA cleavage within nuclei of apoptotic cells was serially imaged at the single-cell level by FCFM. This imaging technology is sufficiently simple and rapid to allow time series in situ detection and visualization of cells undergoing apoptosis in the intact animal. Combined with endoscope, this approach can be used for minimally invasive detection of fluorescent signals and visualization of cellular events within internal organs and tissues and thereby provides the opportunity to study biological processes in the natural physiological environment of the cell in living animals.

  7. In vivo and ex vivo evaluation of cosmetic properties of seedcakes.

    PubMed

    Ratz-?yko, Anna; Arct, Jacek; Pytkowska, Katarzyna; Majewski, S?awomir

    2015-04-01

    The seedcakes are a potential source of natural bioactive substances: antioxidants, protein, and carbohydrates. Thus, they may scavenge free radicals and have an effect on the stratum corneum hydration and epidermal barrier function. The aim of the study was to evaluate the in vivo and ex vivo properties of emulsions with the seedcake extracts using the pH meter, corneometer, tewameter, methyl nicotinate model of micro-inflammation in human skin, and tape stripping of the stratum corneum. The in vivo and ex vivo studies showed that the emulsions with Oenothera biennis, Borago officinalis, and Nigella sativa seedcake extracts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. The 6-week topical application of the emulsions with the B. officinalis and N. sativa seedcakes significantly reduced skin irritation and influenced the improvement of the skin hydration and epidermal barrier function compared with placebo. The seedcakes due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have potential application in anti-aging, moisturizing, mitigating, and protective cosmetics. PMID:25415370

  8. RNA circularization strategies in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Sonja; Müller, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    In the plenitude of naturally occurring RNAs, circular RNAs (circRNAs) and their biological role were underestimated for years. However, circRNAs are ubiquitous in all domains of life, including eukaryotes, archaea, bacteria and viruses, where they can fulfill diverse biological functions. Some of those functions, as for example playing a role in the life cycle of viral and viroid genomes or in the maturation of tRNA genes, have been elucidated; other putative functions still remain elusive. Due to the resistance to exonucleases, circRNAs are promising tools for in vivo application as aptamers, trans-cleaving ribozymes or siRNAs. How are circRNAs generated in vivo and what approaches do exist to produce ring-shaped RNAs in vitro? In this review we illustrate the occurrence and mechanisms of RNA circularization in vivo, survey methods for the generation of circRNA in vitro and provide appropriate protocols. PMID:25662225

  9. A method to study in vivo stability of DNA nanostructures?

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Sunaina; Bhatia, Dhiraj; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    DNA nanostructures are rationally designed, synthetic, nanoscale assemblies obtained from one or more DNA sequences by their self-assembly. Due to the molecularly programmable as well as modular nature of DNA, such designer DNA architectures have great potential for in cellulo and in vivo applications. However, demonstrations of functionality in living systems necessitates a method to assess the in vivo stability of the relevant nanostructures. Here, we outline a method to quantitatively assay the stability and lifetime of various DNA nanostructures in vivo. This exploits the property of intact DNA nanostructures being uptaken by the coelomocytes of the multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies reveal that the present fluorescence based assay in coelomocytes of C. elegans is an useful in vivo test bed for measuring DNA nanostructure stability. PMID:23623822

  10. Effects of soy foods on ovarian function in premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wu, A H; Stanczyk, F Z; Hendrich, S; Murphy, P A; Zhang, C; Wan, P; Pike, M C

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that the high intake of soy foods among Asians may partly explain their lower rates of breast cancer, perhaps by lowering endogenous oestrogen levels, although this has been inadequately studied. Twenty healthy cycling premenopausal women (ten Asians and ten non-Asians) participated in a 7-month soy intervention study which was designed to investigate the effect of supplementation on ovarian function. Asian soy foods (tofu, soymilk, green soybean peas) in the amount of approximately 32 mg of isoflavones per day were added to the women's diets for three menstrual cycles. The women's baseline (two cycles) serum hormone levels were compared to levels during soy intervention (three cycles) and levels after intervention (two cycles). During the entire study period, subjects provided almost daily overnight urine samples and blood specimens during specified days of their menstrual cycles. The day of urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) peak was used as a marker for the day of ovulation. Knowledge of day of ovulation allowed comparison of hormone measurements at baseline to those obtained during intervention and recovery cycles with standardization of day of cycle. Soy intervention was associated with a statistically significant reduction in serum luteal oestradiol level (–9.3%, P< 0.05), but there were no significant changes in follicular phase oestradiol, follicular or luteal phase progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin or menstrual cycle length. This significant reduction in luteal phase oestradiol was, however, observed only among Asian (–17.4%) but not among non-Asian (–1.2%) participants; urinary excretion of isoflavones was higher among Asians than non-Asians (29.2 vs 17.1 ?mol day?1, P = 0.16) during the intervention period. Thus, supplementation using traditional soy foods reduced serum oestradiol levels among Asian participants in this study. Differences in the type of soy products (i.e. traditional soy foods versus soy protein products), amount of isoflavones, and race/ethnicity of participants may have contributed to the divergent results. Larger soy intervention studies designed specifically to include participants of different race/ethnicities and using both traditional soy foods and soy protein products providing comparable doses of isoflavones are needed to definitively determine the effect of soy on ovarian function. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839307

  11. [Sex hormones and cognitive functioning of women].

    PubMed

    Simi?, Natasa; Gregov, Ljiljana

    2009-09-01

    This paper discusses the organisational and activational effects of sex hormones, and their influence on cognitive functioning. Previous studies have shown gender differences in specific cognitive abilities. Women generally show an advantage in verbal fluency, perceptual speed and accuracy, as well as in fine motor skills, while men generally show an advantage in spatial and mathematical abilities. These differences in cognitive functioning are thought to occur as a result of foetal brain exposure to different levels of sex hormones during prenatal life. Additional evidence of organisational effects of sex hormones on cognitive functioning also comes from studies of subjects with genetic disorders, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and Tyrner syndrome.Furthermore, former investigations have shown that increase in female sex hormone in the late follicular and/or luteal phase of the menstrual cycle intensifies the typical female cognitive pattern of functioning with improved efficiency in tasks which are usually better performed by women. At the same time, low levels of such hormones that characterise the menstrual phase of the cycle intensify the typical male cognitive pattern of functioning with better efficiency in tasks which usually better performed by men.This paper also points to methodological differences between investigations of organizational and activational effects of sex hormones on cognitive functioning, as well a to the direction of future investigations. PMID:19789167

  12. Imaging schistosomes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Krautz-Peterson, Greice; Ndegwa, David; Vasquez, Kristine; Korideck, Houari; Zhang, Jun; Peterson, Jeffrey D.; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Schistosomes are intravascular, parasitic helminths that cause a chronic, often debilitating disease afflicting over 200 million people in over 70 countries. Here we describe novel imaging methods that, for the first time, permit visualization of live schistosomes within their living hosts. The technology centers on fluorescent agent uptake and activation in the parasite’s gut, and subsequent detection and signal quantitation using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). There is a strong positive correlation between the signal detected and parasite number. Schistosoma mansoni parasites of both sexes recovered from infected experimental animals exhibit vivid fluorescence throughout their intestines. Likewise, the remaining important human schistosome parasites, S. japonicum and S. hematobium, also exhibit gut fluorescence when recovered from infected animals. Imaging has been used to efficiently document the decline in parasite numbers in infected mice treated with the antischistosome drug praziquantel. This technology will provide a unique opportunity both to help rapidly identify much-needed, novel antischistosome therapies and to gain direct visual insight into the intravascular lives of the major schistosome parasites of humans.—Krautz-Peterson, G., Ndegwa, D., Vasquez, K., Korideck, H., Zhang, J., Peterson, J. D., Skelly, P. J. Imaging schistosomes in vivo. PMID:19346298

  13. Nanocrystal targeting in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ĺkerman, Maria E.; Chan, Warren C. W.; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-10-01

    Inorganic nanostructures that interface with biological systems have recently attracted widespread interest in biology and medicine. Nanoparticles are thought to have potential as novel intravascular probes for both diagnostic (e.g., imaging) and therapeutic purposes (e.g., drug delivery). Critical issues for successful nanoparticle delivery include the ability to target specific tissues and cell types and escape from the biological particulate filter known as the reticuloendothelial system. We set out to explore the feasibility of in vivo targeting by using semiconductor quantum dots (qdots). Qdots are small (<10 nm) inorganic nanocrystals that possess unique luminescent properties; their fluorescence emission is stable and tuned by varying the particle size or composition. We show that ZnS-capped CdSe qdots coated with a lung-targeting peptide accumulate in the lungs of mice after i.v. injection, whereas two other peptides specifically direct qdots to blood vessels or lymphatic vessels in tumors. We also show that adding polyethylene glycol to the qdot coating prevents nonselective accumulation of qdots in reticuloendothelial tissues. These results encourage the construction of more complex nanostructures with capabilities such as disease sensing and drug delivery.

  14. Immunomodulatory effects of curcumin: in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Varalakshmi, Ch; Ali, A Mubarak; Pardhasaradhi, B V V; Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Singh, Sarvjeet; Khar, Ashok

    2008-05-01

    Curcumin specifically exhibits cytostatic and cytotoxic effects against tumors of multiple origin. Previously we have demonstrated apoptotic activity of curcumin against tumor cells with no effect on normal cells in-vitro. Many anti-cancer drugs exhibit deleterious effects on immune cells, which restrict their wide use in-vivo. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of curcumin on the major functions of T cells, natural killer cells, macrophages and on total splenocytes in-vivo, which insight the role of curcumin on their broad effector functions. This study demonstrates that prolonged curcumin-injections (i.p.) do not impair the cytotoxic function of natural killer cells, the generation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide from macrophages and the levels of Th1 regulatory cytokines remained unaltered. Interestingly, curcumin-injections enhanced the mitogen and antigen induced proliferation potential of T cells. We have also evaluated immunomodulatory effects of curcumin in ascites-bearing animals. This study strengthens our belief that curcumin is a safe and useful immunomodulator for the immune system. PMID:18387511

  15. Utilizing time-lapse micro-CT-correlated bisphosphonate binding kinetics and soft tissue-derived input functions to differentiate site-specific changes in bone metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tower, R J; Campbell, G M; Müller, M; Glüer, C C; Tiwari, S

    2015-05-01

    The turnover of bone is a tightly regulated process between bone formation and resorption to ensure skeletal homeostasis. This process differs between bone types, with trabecular bone often associated with higher turnover than cortical bone. Analyses of bone by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) reveal changes in structure and mineral content, but are limited in the study of metabolic activity at a single time point, while analyses of serum markers can reveal changes in bone metabolism, but cannot delineate the origin of any aberrant findings. To obtain a site-specific assessment of bone metabolic status, bisphosphonate binding kinetics were utilized. Using a fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, we show that early binding kinetics monitored in vivo using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) can monitor changes in bone metabolism in response to bone loss, stimulated by ovariectomy (OVX), or bone gain, resulting from treatment with the anabolic bone agent parathyroid hormone (PTH), and is capable of distinguishing different, metabolically distinct skeletal sites. Using time-lapse micro-CT, longitudinal bone turnover was quantified. The spine showed a significantly greater percent resorbing volume and surface in response to OVX, while mice treated with PTH showed significantly greater resorbing volume per bone surface in the spine and significantly greater forming surfaces in the knee. Correlation studies between binding kinetics and micro-CT suggest that forming surfaces, as assessed by time-lapse micro-CT, are preferentially reflected in the rate constant values while forming and resorbing bone volumes primarily affect plateau values. Additionally, we developed a blood pool correction method which now allows for quantitative multi-compartment analyses to be conducted using FMT. These results further expand our understanding of bisphosphonate binding and the use of bisphosphonate binding kinetics as a tool to monitor site-specific changes in bone metabolism in vivo. PMID:25613175

  16. In vivo infection of sheep by bovine leukemia virus mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, L; Kettmann, R; Dequiedt, F; Portetelle, D; Vončche, V; Cornil, I; Kerkhofs, P; Burny, A; Mammerickx, M

    1993-01-01

    Direct inoculation of a cloned bovine leukemia virus (BLV) provirus into sheep has allowed study of the viral infectivity of genetic mutants in vivo. Three BLV variants cloned from BLV-induced tumors and 12 in vitro-modified proviruses were isolated and analyzed for viral expression in cell culture. The proviruses were then inoculated into sheep in order to assess viral infectivity in vivo. Of three variants cloned from BLV-induced tumors (344, 395, and 1345), one (344) was found infectious in vivo. This particular provirus was used to engineer 12 BLV mutants. A hybrid between the 5' region of the complete but noninfectious provirus 395 and the 3' end of mutant 344 was infectious in vivo, suggesting that the tax/rex sequences were altered in virus 395. As expected, several regions of the BLV genome appeared to be essential for viral infection: the protease, pol, and env genes. Even discrete modifications in the fusion peptide located at the NH2 end of the transmembrane gp30 glycoprotein destroyed the infectious potential. In contrast, mutations and deletions in the X3 region present between the env gene and the 3' tax/rex region did not interfere with viral infection in vivo. This region of unknown function could thus be used to introduce foreign sequences. A BLV recombinant carrying a ribozyme directed against the tax/rex sequences was still infectious in vivo. Cotransfection of two noninfectious mutants carrying deletions led to infection in two of four independent injections, the infectious virus being then a recombinant between the two deletants. The experimental approach described here should help to gain insight into essential mechanisms such as in vivo viral replication, cooperation between deletants for viral infectivity, and viral superinfections. The gene products in the X3 and X4 region which are dispensable for in vivo infection could be involved in leukemogenesis, and thus proviruses deleted in these sequences could constitute the basis for a live attenuated vaccine. Images PMID:8389918

  17. Effects of intrauterine infusion of Trueperella pyogenes on endometrial mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and luteolytic cascade genes and their association with luteal life span in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lima, F S; Greco, L F; Bisinotto, R S; Ribeiro, E S; Martinez, N M; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P; Reinhard, M K; Galvăo, K N

    2015-11-01

    Objectives were to determine the effects of intrauterine infusion (IUI) of Trueperella pyogenes on endometrial expression of proinflammatory cytokines and luteal life span. Holstein cows (n = 32) were allocated randomly, in two replicates (15 then 17 cows), to receive one of three treatments on Day 5 of the estrous cycle: TP (n = 13), IUI containing 10(9) colony-forming units/mL of T pyogenes; tumor necrosis factor (TNF; n = 9), IUI containing 1 ?g of TNF?; and control (n = 10), IUI of saline solution. Five cows per treatment had uterine biopsies collected at 6, 12, and 24 hours after treatment to evaluate the endometrial messenger RNA expression of TNF? (TNF), interleukin-1? (IL1B), IL6, IL8, prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS), and oxytocin receptor (OXR), and histologic evidence of inflammation. Messenger RNA expression was measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The remaining cows had ovaries scanned and blood collected for progesterone evaluation; however, only seven, four, and three cows in the TP, TNF, and control groups were used for comparison in replicate 2. The GLIMMIX procedure of SAS was used for statistical analysis. All TP and TNF cows had moderate to severe endometrial inflammation, whereas only one control had mild inflammation. Premature luteolysis occurred in three, one, and zero cows in the TP, TNF and control groups, respectively. Delayed luteolysis occurred in one TP and one TNF cow. Interleukin-1? expression was greater in the TP cows than in the TNF cows at 24 hours after IUI. Moreover, IL6 expression tended to be greater for the TP cows than for the control cows at 12 hours after IUI. Interleukin 8 expression was greater in the TP cows than in the control and TNF cows at 24 hours after IUI. Oxytocin receptor expression tended to be greater for the TP cows and was greater for the TNF cows than for the control cows at 12 hours. The messenger RNA expressions of TNF, PGES, and PGFS were not affected by treatment, time, or their interaction. In conclusion, IUI of T pyogenes or TNF? led to histologic evidence of inflammation and early luteolysis in some cows, which may have been caused by increased endometrial expression of proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL1B, IL6), chemokines (i.e., IL8), and luteolytic cascade factors (i.e., OXR). PMID:26234463

  18. In Vivo Programmed Gene Expression Based on Artificial Quorum Networks.

    PubMed

    Chu, Teng; Huang, Yajun; Hou, Mingyu; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-08-01

    The quorum sensing (QS) system, as a well-functioning population-dependent gene switch, has been widely applied in many gene circuits in synthetic biology. In our work, an efficient cell density-controlled expression system (QS) was established via engineering of the Vibrio fischeri luxI-luxR quorum sensing system. In order to achieve in vivo programmed gene expression, a synthetic binary regulation circuit (araQS) was constructed by assembling multiple genetic components, including the quorum quenching protein AiiA and the arabinose promoter ParaBAD, into the QS system. In vitro expression assays verified that the araQS system was initiated only in the absence of arabinose in the medium at a high cell density. In vivo expression assays confirmed that the araQS system presented an in vivo-triggered and cell density-dependent expression pattern. Furthermore, the araQS system was demonstrated to function well in different bacteria, indicating a wide range of bacterial hosts for use. To explore its potential applications in vivo, the araQS system was used to control the production of a heterologous protective antigen in an attenuated Edwardsiella tarda strain, which successfully evoked efficient immune protection in a fish model. This work suggested that the araQS system could program bacterial expression in vivo and might have potential uses, including, but not limited to, bacterial vector vaccines. PMID:25979894

  19. Correlative In Vivo 2-Photon Imaging and Focused Ion

    E-print Network

    Fua, Pascal

    to understanding how they function. The increasing use of live-imaging methods has enabled neuro- sciCHAPTER C0080 Correlative In Vivo 2-Photon Imaging and Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron.1.2 Laser Fiducial Marks Around Region of Interest (NIRB Technique

  20. AN IN VIVO METHOD TO QUANTIFY BIOMECHANCAL COMPROMISE IN TENDON

    E-print Network

    Sethares, William A.

    . Comparative local stiffnesses (normal versus tendinopathic) indicate the degree of mechanical compromiseAN IN VIVO METHOD TO QUANTIFY BIOMECHANCAL COMPROMISE IN TENDON R. Vanderby1 , S.E. Kuehl2 , M compromise and monitor functional healing in pathological tendons. 2. INTRODUCTION Hughes and Kelly's [1