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Sample records for vivo luteal function

  1. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT DURING PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) on Ex Vivo Luteal Function In the Pregnant F344 Rat

    Susan R. Bielmeier1, Ashley S. Murr2, Deborah S. Best2, Jerome M. Goldman2, and Michael G. Narotsky2

    1Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599,...

  2. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT.

    S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2

    1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2 Reproductive T...

  3. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT.

    S. R. Bielmeier1, A. S. Murr2, D. S. Best2, J. M. Goldman2, and M. G. Narotsky2

    1 Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2 Reproductive T...

  4. Assessment of luteal function after surgical tubal sterilization.

    PubMed

    Garza-Flores, J; Vázquez-Estrada, L; Reyes, A; Valero, A; Morales del Olmo, A; Alba, V M; Bonilla, C

    1991-12-01

    To evaluate ovarian luteal function after tubal occlusion, a group of women who underwent Pomeroy sterilization were studied. A prospective group I (n = 16) were followed for one year and scheduled for blood sampling every other day during their luteal phase before surgical procedure and at 3 and 12 months thereafter. Group II (n = 15) included women who were studied during their luteal phase at 1 or 5 years post-surgery. Mid-luteal progesterone and estradiol serum levels were calculated by estimating the average of at least 3 values of serum samples obtained in days 20-25 of a menstrual cycle. The data suggest that no major changes occur in ovarian function after surgical tubal occlusion, as assessed by the mid-luteal hormone serum levels, and underscore the safety of this procedure. PMID:1776562

  5. Isolation and functional aspects of free luteal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luborsky, J.L.; Berhrman, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of luteal cell isolation employ enzymatic treatment of luteal tissue with collagenase and deoxyribonuclease. Additional enzymes such as hyaluronidase or Pronase are also used in some instances. Isolated luteal cells retain the morphological characteristics of steroid secreting cells after isolation. They contain mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, and an extensive smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Isolated luteal cells have been used in numerous studies to examine the regulation of steriodogenesis by luteinizing hormone (LH). LH receptor binding studies were employed to quantitate specific properties of hormone-receptor interaction in relation to cellular function. Binding of (/sup 125/I)LH to bovine luteal cells and membranes was compared and it was concluded that the enzymatic treatment used to isolate cells did not change the LH receptor binding kinetics.

  6. The effect of metritis on luteal function in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Disturbed uterine involution impairs ovarian function in the first weeks after calving. This study analyzed the long-term effect of metritis on luteal function of 47 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows during the first four postpartum estrous cycles. Cows with abnormal uterine enlargement and malodorous lochia were classified as having metritis (group M, n = 18), and all others were considered healthy (group H, n = 29). Luteal size was measured once between days 9 and 13 of the first (group H, n = 11; group M, n = 12), second (group H, n = 23; group M, n = 18) and fourth (group H, n = 11; group M, n = 7) postpartum luteal phases. Serum progesterone concentration was measured at the same time. Sixteen cows (group H, n = 9; group M, n = 7) underwent transvaginal luteal biopsy for gene expression analysis of steroidogenic regulatory proteins during the second and fourth cycles. Cows with persistence of the corpus luteum (CL) underwent determination of luteal size, luteal biopsy and serum progesterone measurement once between days 29 and 33, followed by prostaglandin treatment to induce luteolysis. The same procedures were repeated once between days 9 and 13 of the induced cycle. Results The cows in group M had smaller first-cycle CLs than the cows in group H (p = 0.04), but progesterone concentrations did not differ between groups. Luteal size, progesterone concentration and gene expression did not differ between the two groups during the second and fourth cycles. Compared with healthy cows (10%), there was a trend (p = 0.07) toward a higher prevalence of persistent CLs in cows with metritis (33%). Persistent CLs were limited to the first cycle. Persistent CLs and the induced cyclic CLs did not differ with regard to the variables investigated. Conclusions An effect of metritis on luteal activity was apparent in the first postpartum estrous cycle. However, after the first postpartum cycle, no differences occurred

  7. Luteal regression vs. prepartum luteolysis: regulatory mechanisms governing canine corpus luteum function.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Mariusz P

    2014-04-01

    Canine reproductive physiology exhibits several unusual features. Among the most interesting of these are the lack of an acute luteolytic mechanism, coinciding with the apparent luteal independency of a uterine luteolysin in absence of pregnancy, contrasting with the acute prepartum luteolysis observed in pregnant animals. These features indicate the existence of mechanisms different from those in other species for regulating the extended luteal regression observed in non-pregnant dogs, and the actively regulated termination of luteal function observed prepartum as a prerequisite for parturition. Nevertheless, the supply of progesterone (P4) depends on corpora lutea (CL) as its primary source in both conditions, resulting in P4 levels that are similar in pregnant and non-pregnant bitches during almost the entire luteal life span prior to the prepartum luteolysis. Consequently, the duration of the prolonged luteal phase in non-pregnant bitches frequently exceeds that of pregnant ones, which is a peculiarity when compared with other domestic animal species. Both LH and prolactin (PRL) are endocrine luteotrophic factors in the dog, the latter being the predominant one. In spite of increased availability of these hormones, luteal regression/luteolysis still takes place. Recently, possible mechanisms regulating the expression and function of PRL receptor have been implicated in the local, i.e., intraluteal regulation of PRL bioavailability and thus its steroidogenic potential. Similar mechanisms may relate to the luteal LH receptor. Most recently, evidence has been provided for an autocrine/paracrine role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a luteotrophic factor in the canine CL acting at the level of steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR)-protein mediated supply of steroidogenic substrate, without having a significant impact on the enzymatic activity of the respective steroidogenic enzymes, 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3βHSD, HSD3B2) and cytochrome P450 side

  8. Influence of Reproductive Aging of the Cow on Luteal Function and Period 1 mRNA Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, disruption of the circadian clock genes results in increased incidence of anovulation, irregular estrous cycles, decreased luteal function, and accelerated reproductive ageing. In cattle, reproductive ageing is associated with decreased numbers of follicles in the ovary, decreased lutea...

  9. Inhibition of Delta-Like Ligand 4 Induces Luteal Hypervascularization Followed by Functional and Structural Luteolysis in the Primate Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Julie M.; Allan, Deborah; Morris, Keith D.; Rudge, John S.; Wiegand, Stanley J.

    2012-01-01

    Using specific inhibitors established that angiogenesis in the ovarian follicle and corpus luteum is driven by vascular endothelial growth factor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the Notch ligand, delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated vessel sprouting and branching. To investigate the role of Dll4 in regulation of the ovarian vasculature, we administered a neutralizing antibody to Dll4 to marmosets at the periovulatory period. The vasculature was examined on luteal d 3 or d 10: angiogenesis was determined by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine, staining for CD31 and cell death by staining for activated caspase-3. Ovulatory progesterone rises were monitored to determine effects of treatment on luteal function and time to recover normal cycles in a separate group of animals. Additionally, animals were treated in the follicular or midluteal phase to determine effects of Dll4 inhibition on follicular development and luteal function. Controls were treated with human IgG (Fc). Corpora lutea from marmosets treated during the periovulatory period exhibited increased angiogenesis and increased vascular density on luteal d 3, but plasma progesterone was significantly suppressed. By luteal d 10, corpora lutea in treated ovaries were significantly reduced in size, with involution of luteal cells, increased cell death, and suppressed plasma progesterone concentrations. In contrast, initiation of anti-Dll4 treatment during the midluteal phase produced only a slight suppression of progesterone for the remainder of the cycle. Moreover, Dll4 inhibition had no appreciable effect on follicular development. These results show that Dll4 has a specific and critical role in the development of the normal luteal vasculature. PMID:22334711

  10. The expression, regulation and function of secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich in the follicle-luteal transition.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Chitra; Hunter, Morag G; Sinclair, Kevin D; Robinson, Robert S

    2012-09-01

    The role of the tissue remodelling protein, secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC), in key processes (e.g. cell reorganisation and angiogenesis) that occur during the follicle-luteal transition is unknown. Hence, we investigated the regulation of SPARC in luteinsing follicular cells and potential roles of SPARC peptide 2.3 in a physiologically relevant luteal angiogenesis culture system. SPARC protein was detected mainly in the theca layer of bovine pre-ovulatory follicles, but its expression was considerably greater in the corpus haemorrhagicum. Similarly, SPARC protein (western blotting) was up-regulated in luteinising granulosa but not in theca cells during a 6-day culture period. Potential regulatory candidates were investigated in luteinising granulosa cells: LH did not affect SPARC (P>0.05); transforming growth factor (TGF) B1 (P<0.001) dose dependently induced the precocious expression of SPARC and increased final levels: this effect was blocked (P<0.001) by SB505124 (TGFB receptor 1 inhibitor). Additionally, fibronectin, which is deposited during luteal development, increased SPARC (P<0.01). In luteal cells, fibroblast growth factor 2 decreased SPARC (P<0.001) during the first 5 days of culture, while vascular endothelial growth factor A increased its expression (P<0.001). Functionally, KGHK peptide, a SPARC proteolytic fragment, stimulated the formation of endothelial cell networks in a luteal cell culture system (P<0.05) and increased progesterone production (P<0.05). Collectively, these findings indicate that SPARC is intricately regulated by pro-angiogenic and other growth factors together with components of the extracellular matrix during the follicle-luteal transition. Thus, it is possible that SPARC plays an important modulatory role in regulating angiogenesis and progesterone production during luteal development. PMID:22733805

  11. Luteal angiogenesis and its control.

    PubMed

    Woad, Kathryn J; Robinson, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones, is critical to luteal structure and function. In addition, it is a complex and tightly regulated process. Not only does rapid and extensive angiogenesis occur to provide the corpus luteum with an unusually high blood flow and support its high metabolic rate, but in the absence of pregnancy, the luteal vasculature must rapidly regress to enable the next cycle of ovarian activity. This review describes a number of key endogenous stimulatory and inhibitory factors, which act in a delicate balance to regulate luteal angiogenesis and ultimately luteal function. In vitro luteal angiogenesis cultures have demonstrated critical roles for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting, although other factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and platelet-derived growth factor were important modulators in the control of luteal angiogenesis. Post-transcriptional regulation by small non-coding microRNAs is also likely to play a central role in the regulation of luteal angiogenesis. Appropriate luteal angiogenesis requires the coordinated activity of numerous factors expressed by several cell types at different times, and this review will also describe the role of perivascular pericytes and the importance of vascular maturation and stability. It is hoped that a better understanding of the critical processes underlying the transition from follicle to corpus luteum and subsequent luteal development will benefit the management of luteal function in the future. PMID:27177965

  12. RESUMPTION OF POSTPARTUM LUTEAL FUNCTION OF PRIMIPAROUS, SUCKLED BEEF COWS EXPOSED CONTINUOUSLY TO BULL URINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the hypotheses that interval from urine exposure to resumption of luteal activity and proportions of cows that resume luteal activity by the end of the urine-exposure period do not differ between cows exposed to mature bull urine or steer urine. Thirty-eight Angus x Hereford cows, four mat...

  13. Prostaglandin F2 alpha administered in vivo induces Ca2+-dependent protein phosphorylation in rat luteal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was performed in order to further elucidate the mechanism of action of PGF2 alpha in luteolysis in the rat ovary. Seven days after priming with superovulatory doses of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin to induce luteal tissue formation, the rats were injected with a luteolytic dose of the prostaglandin F2 alpha analogue cloprostenol. The ovaries were then homogenized, a 30,000 x g supernatant and pellet were prepared, whereafter aliquots of the preparations were incubated in the presence of (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP with or without Ca2+. The phosphorylated proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and localized by autoradiography. The presence of Ca2+ caused an increased phosphorylation of a 45 kDa protein band in the particulate, but not in the cytosol, fraction. Furthermore, PGF2 alpha rapidly increased the /sup 32/P incorporation into the same protein band of 45 kDa. Thus, the PGF2 alpha-stimulated /sup 32/P incorporation was Ca2+-dependent and seen only in the particulate fraction. These results suggest that PGF2 alpha in its role as a luteolytic agent stimulates a Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of a specific protein in luteal membranes of the rat ovary.

  14. Estrogen Promotes Luteolysis by Redistributing Prostaglandin F2α Receptors Within Primate Luteal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ok; Markosyan, Nune; Pepe, Gerald J.; Duffy, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) has been proposed as a functional luteolysin in primates. However, administration of PGF2α or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors in vivo both initiate luteolysis. These contradictory findings may reflect changes in PGF2α receptors (PTGFR) or responsiveness to PGF2α at a critical point during the life span of the corpus luteum. The current study addressed this question using ovarian cells and tissues from female cynomolgus monkeys and luteinizing granulosa cells from healthy women undergoing follicle aspiration. PTGFRs were present in the cytoplasm of monkey granulosa cells, while PTGFRs were localized to the perinuclear region of large, granulosa-derived monkey luteal cells by mid-late luteal phase. A PTGFR agonist decreased progesterone production by luteal cells obtained at mid-late and late luteal phases but did not decrease progesterone production by granulosa or luteal cells from younger corpora lutea. These findings are consistent with a role for perinuclear PTGFRs in functional luteolysis. This concept was explored using human luteinizing granulosa cells maintained in vitro as a model for luteal cell differentiation. In these cells, PTGFRs relocated from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear area in an estrogen- and estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Similar to our findings with monkey luteal cells, human luteinizing granulosa cells with perinuclear PTGFRs responded to a PTGFR agonist with decreased progesterone production. These data support the concept that PTGFR stimulation promotes functional luteolysis only when PTGFRs are located in the perinuclear region. Estrogen receptor-mediated relocation of PTGFRs within luteal cells may be a necessary step in the initiation of luteolysis in primates. PMID:25687410

  15. A comparison of ovarian follicular and luteal cell gene expression profiles provides insight into cellular identities and functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After ovulation, somatic cells of the ovarian follicle (theca and granulosa cells) become the small and large luteal cells of the corpus luteum. Aside from known cell type-specific receptors and steroidogenic enzymes, little is known about the differences in the gene expression profiles of these fou...

  16. Oral Progestin Priming Increases Ovarian Sensitivity to Gonadotropin Stimulation and Improves Luteal Function in the Cat1

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rosemary A.; Pelican, Katharine M.; Crosier, Adrienne E.; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S.; Wildt, David E.; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Howard, JoGayle

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the only domesticated species known to exhibit both induced and spontaneous ovulation, the cat is a model for understanding the nuances of ovarian control. To explore ovarian sensitivity to exogenous gonadotropins and the influence of progestin priming, we conducted a study of queens that were down-regulated with oral progestin or allowed to cycle normally, followed by low or high doses of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Our metrics included 1) fecal steroid metabolite profiles before and after ovulation induction, 2) laparoscopic examination of ovarian follicles and corpora lutea (CL) on Days 2 and 17 (Day 0 = hCG administration), and 3) ovariohysterectomy (Day 17) to assess CL progesterone concentrations, morphometrics, and histology. Reproductive tracts from time-matched, naturally mated queens (n = 6) served as controls. Every progestin-primed cat (n = 12) produced the desired response of morphologically similar, fresh CL (regardless of eCG/hCG dose) by Day 2, whereas 41.7% of unprimed counterparts (n = 12) failed to ovulate or had variable-aged CL suggestive of prior spontaneous ovulation (P < 0.05). The ovarian response to low, but not high, eCG/hCG was improved (P < 0.05) in primed compared to unprimed cats, indicating increased sensitivity to gonadotropin in the progestin-primed ovary. Progestin priming prevented hyperelevated fecal steroid metabolites and normalized CL progesterone capacity, but only when combined with low eCG/hCG. However, priming failed to prevent ancillary CL formation, smaller CL mass, or abnormal luteal cell density, which were common to all eCG/hCG-treated cats. Thus, the domestic cat exposed to eCG/hCG produces CL with structural and functional aberrations. These anomalies can be partially mitigated by progestin priming, possibly due to a protective effect of progestin associated with enhanced ovarian sensitivity to gonadotropins. PMID:23100619

  17. Effect of mastitis on luteal function and pregnancy rates in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Mohsen; Hendawy, Amin O; Zeitoun, Moustafa M

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mastitis on CL development and function and pregnancy rate in buffaloes. Sixty-six buffaloes (Bubalus bubalus) reared in a commercial farm at El-Beheira governorate, north of Egypt were used in this study. According to the visual observation of milk, physical examination of the udder and actual somatic cell count in milk, buffalo cows were divided into three groups: without mastitis (W), n = 23; subclinical mastitis (SC), n = 18; and clinical mastitis (C), n = 25. All buffalo cows were synchronized by double dose of PGF2α (11-day interval) and inseminated by frozen-thawed semen of fertile bull. Mean CL diameter was ultrasonically examined on Days 5, 9, 12, 16, 21, and 25 after artificial insemination (AI). Blood samples were taken on the days of ultrasonography for progesterone (P4) assay. Results indicated that pregnancy rates were lower (P < 0.05) in C (28.00%) and SC (55.56%) compared with W (69.57%) on Day 25 after first AI. Pregnancy rates reduced to 60.87%, 44.45%, and 16.00% in W, SC, and C, respectively, at Day 45 after insemination. Thus, the embryonic loss was 8.7%, 11.11%, and 12.00 % in W, SC, and C cows, respectively. Pregnancy rates decreased between 44.32% and 50.51% when mastitis occurred during Day -15 before to Day +30 after AI, compared with 59.22% in the uninfected cows. The diameter of CL was greater (P < 0.05) in W than SC and C cows starting at Day 9 postbreeding onward. Likewise, P4 concentrations on Days 9 through 25 after AI were greater (P < 0.05) in W cows as compared to SC and C cows. Positive correlations (P < 0.01) were found on Days 5, 9, 12, 16, 21, and 25 after AI between CL diameter and P4 concentrations. Similar trend was found among CL diameter, P4 concentrations, and pregnancy rate. Accordingly, incidence of mastitis revealed suppression to both CL diameter and function leading to significant reduction in pregnancy outcome of buffalo cows. PMID:27177967

  18. Thrombospondin-1 Affects Bovine Luteal Function via Transforming Growth Factor-Beta1-Dependent and Independent Actions.

    PubMed

    Farberov, Svetlana; Meidan, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFB1) are specifically up-regulated by prostaglandin F2alpha in mature corpus luteum (CL). This study examined the relationship between the expression of THBS1 and TGFB1 and the underlying mechanisms of their actions in luteal endothelial cells (ECs). TGFB1 stimulated SMAD2 phosphorylation and SERPINE1 levels in dose- and time-dependent manners in luteal EC. THBS1 also elevated SERPINE1; this effect was abolished by TGFB1 receptor-1 kinase inhibitor (SB431542). The findings here further imply that THBS1 activates TGFB1 in luteal ECs: THBS1 increased the effects of latent TGFB1 on phosphorylated SMAD (phospho-SMAD) 2 and SERPINE1. THBS1 silencing significantly decreased SERPINE1 and levels of phospho-SMAD2. Lastly, THBS1 actions on SERPINE1 were inhibited by LSKL peptide (TGFB1 activation inhibitor); LSKL also counteracted latent TGFB1-induced phospho-SMAD2. We found that TGFB1 up-regulated its own mRNA levels and those of THBS1. Both compounds generated apoptosis, but THBS1 was significantly more effective (2.5-fold). Notably, this effect of THBS1 was not mediated by TGFB1. THBS1 and TGFB1 also differed in their activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Whereas TGFB1 rapidly induced phospho-p38, THBS1 had a delayed effect. Inhibition of p38 pathway by SB203580 did not modulate TGFB1 effect on cell viability, but it amplified THBS1 actions. THBS1-stimulated caspase-3 activation coincided with p38 phosphorylation, suggesting that caspase-induced DNA damage initiated p38 phosphorylation. The in vitro data suggest that a feed-forward loop exists between THBS1, TGFB1, and SERPINE1. Indeed all these three genes were similarly induced in the regressing CL. Their gene products can promote vascular instability, apoptosis, and matrix remodeling during luteolysis. PMID:26658711

  19. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2α) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed. PMID:23054443

  20. The luteotrophic function of galectin-1 by binding to the glycans on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in bovine luteal cells

    PubMed Central

    SANO, Masahiro; HASHIBA, Kazuhisa; NIO-KOBAYASHI, Junko; OKUDA, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a temporary endocrine gland producing a large amount of progesterone, which is essential for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Galectin-1 is a β-galactose-binding protein that can modify functions of membrane glycoproteins and is expressed in the CL of mice and women. However, the physiological role of galectin-1 in the CL is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression and localization of galectin-1 in the bovine CL and the effect of galectin-1 on cultured luteal steroidogenic cells (LSCs) with special reference to its binding to the glycans on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Galectin-1 protein was highly expressed at the mid and late luteal stages in the membrane fraction of bovine CL tissue and was localized to the surface of LSCs in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Galectin-1 increased the viability in cultured LSCs. However, the viability of LSCs was decreased by addition of β-lactose, a competitive carbohydrate inhibitor of galectin-1 binding activity. VEGFR-2 protein, like galectin-1, is also highly expressed in the mid CL, and it was modified by multi-antennary glycans, which can be recognized by galectin-1. An overlay assay using biotinylated galectin-1 revealed that galectin-1 directly binds to asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) on VEGFR-2. Enhancement of LSC viability by galectin-1 was suppressed by a selective inhibitor of VEGFR-2. The overall findings suggest that galectin-1 plays a role as a survival factor in the bovine CL, possibly by binding to N-glycans on VEGFR-2. PMID:26155753

  1. Luteal insufficiency in first trimester

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Duru; Nagarajan, Nagadeepti

    2013-01-01

    Luteal phase insufficiency is one of the reasons for implantation failure and has been responsible for miscarriages and unsuccessful assisted reproduction. Luteal phase defect is seen in women with polycystic ovaries, thyroid and prolactin disorder. Low progesterone environment is created iatrogenically due to interventions in assisted reproduction. Use of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogs to prevent the LH surge and aspiration of granulosa cells during the oocyte retrieval may impair the ability of corpus luteum to produce progesterone. Treatment of the underlying disorder and use of progestational agents like progesterone/human chorionic gonadotrophin have been found to be effective in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage. There has been no proved beneficial effect of using additional agents like ascorbic acid, estrogen, prednisolone along with progesterone. Despite their widespread use, further studies are required to establish the optimal treatment. Literature review and analysis of published studies on luteal phase support. PMID:23776852

  2. Luteal blood flow in patients undergoing GnRH agonist long protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood flow in the corpus luteum (CL) is closely related to luteal function. It is unclear how luteal blood flow is regulated. Standardized ovarian-stimulation protocol with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa long protocol) causes luteal phase defect because it drastically suppresses serum LH levels. Examining luteal blood flow in the patient undergoing GnRHa long protocol may be useful to know whether luteal blood flow is regulated by LH. Methods Twenty-four infertile women undergoing GnRHa long protocol were divided into 3 groups dependent on luteal supports; 9 women were given ethinylestradiol plus norgestrel (Planovar) orally throughout the luteal phase (control group); 8 women were given HCG 2,000 IU on days 2 and 4 day after ovulation induction in addition to Planovar (HCG group); 7 women were given vitamin E (600 mg/day) orally throughout the luteal phase in addition to Planovar (vitamin E group). Blood flow impedance was measured in each CL during the mid-luteal phase by transvaginal color-pulsed-Doppler-ultrasonography and was expressed as a CL-resistance index (CL-RI). Results Serum LH levels were remarkably suppressed in all the groups. CL-RI in the control group was more than the cutoff value (0.51), and only 2 out of 9 women had CL-RI values < 0.51. Treatments with HCG or vitamin E significantly improved the CL-RI to less than 0.51. Seven of the 8 women in the HCG group and all of the women in the vitamin E group had CL-RI < 0.51. Conclusion Patients undergoing GnRHa long protocol had high luteal blood flow impedance with very low serum LH levels. HCG administration improved luteal blood flow impedance. This suggests that luteal blood flow is regulated by LH. PMID:21219663

  3. Progesterone vaginal ring for luteal support.

    PubMed

    Stadtmauer, Laurel; Waud, Kay

    2015-02-01

    Progesterone supplementation is universally used and has been shown to be beneficial in supplementation of the luteal phase in IVF. There are multiple options and the most commonly used include intramuscular and vaginal progesterone. A progesterone vaginal ring is a novel system for luteal support with advantages of controlled release with less frequent dosing. This review examines options for progesterone luteal support focusing on the rationale for a progesterone vaginal ring. Pub-med search of the literature. A weekly vaginal ring, although not yet FDA approved, is an effective and safe alternative for luteal supplementation in IVF. Large prospective clinical trials are needed to determine the best protocols for replacement cycles. PMID:25737615

  4. Lipid droplets in cultured luteal cells in non-pregnant sheep fed different planes of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Khanthusaeng, Vilaivan; Thammasiri, Jiratti; Bass, Casie S; Navanukraw, Chainarong; Borowicz, Pawel; Redmer, Dale A; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) in luteal cells likely is important for energy storage and steroidogenesis in the highly metabolically active corpus luteum (CL). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plane of nutrition on progesterone (P4) secretion, and lipid droplet number and size in cultured ovine luteal cells. Ewes were randomly assigned to one of three nutritional groups: control (C; 100% NRC requirements, n=9), overfed (O; 2×C, n=12), or underfed (U; 0.6×C, n=10). Superovulation was induced by follicle stimulating hormone injections. At the early and mid-luteal phases of the estrous cycle, CL were dissected from ovaries, and luteal cells isolated enzymatically. Luteal cells were incubated overnight in medium containing serum in chamber slides. Media were then changed to serum-free and after 24h incubation, media were collected for P4 analysis, and cells were fixed in formalin and stained with BODIPY followed by DAPI staining. Z-stacks of optical sections of large and small luteal cells (LLC and SLC, respectively) were obtained using a laser-scanning microscope. Rendered 3D images of individual LLC and SLC were analyzed for cell volume, and total and individual LD volume, number and percentage of cellular volume occupied by LD by using Imaris software. Concentrations of P4 in serum and media were greater (P<0.05) at the mid than early-luteal phase, and were not affected by nutritional plane. LD total volume and number were greater (P<0.001) in LLC than SLC; however, mean volume of individual LD was greater (P<0.02) in SLC than LLC. In LLC, total LD volume was greater (P<0.02) in O than C and U ewes. In SLC, total LD volume and number was greater (P<0.003) at the mid than early-luteal phase, and percentage of cell volume occupied by LD was greater (P<0.002) in U than C and O ewes. These data demonstrate that both stage of luteal development and nutritional plane affect selected LD measurements and thus may affect luteal functions

  5. Luteal phase support in in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Yanushpolsky, Elena H

    2015-03-01

    It has been well demonstrated that luteal phase physiology is disrupted in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles conducted with either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists, and that supplementation of the luteal phase with either exogenous progesterone or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is necessary to optimize IVF cycle outcomes. Though both progesterone and hCG supplementation resulted in comparable pregnancy rates, hCG supplementation was associated with increased risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). For that reason progesterone has been used for luteal support by most IVF programs around the world. Vaginal progesterone preparations have been shown definitively to be equally efficacious and better tolerated by patients than intramuscular progesterone injections, but new data on the subcutaneous and oral progesterone are also emerging. New evidence has been accumulating on the benefits of low-dose luteal hCG supplementation in GnRH-antagonist cycles where GnRH agonists are used for the final maturation trigger. New approaches to luteal phase support as well as new formulations of progesterone have been developed since the last comprehensive review was published in 2011. In this article, we examine current evidence for efficacy, dosing, and timing of progesterone preparations as well as the role of hCG for luteal support in IVF cycles triggered with GnRH agonists. We also discuss the data on the role of estrogen supplementation in the luteal phase, optimal duration of progesterone support in early pregnancy, and progesterone replacement in frozen embryo transfer cycles and donor egg recipient cycles. PMID:25734349

  6. Pregnancy-associated changes in uterine-luteal relationships in cows: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Sakumoto, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    The main function of the bovine corpus luteum (CL) is the production of progesterone. Adequate luteal progesterone is crucial for determining the physiological duration of the estrous cycle and for achieving a successful pregnancy. The CL is regulated not only by hypophyseal gonadotropin, but also by a number of intraluteal substances including steroids, peptides and prostaglandins. Although regulation of luteal function throughout the estrous cycle has been intensively studied, studies of the CL during the entire gestation period are limited. Understanding the role of luteal function during pregnancy might lead to ways to improve reproductive efficiencies and reduce the number of defective fetuses. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the gene expression profiles of bovine CL throughout the gestation period and to focus on recent studies documenting the interactions between the CL, uterus and conceptus in cows. PMID:27288343

  7. Clinostat rotation induces apoptosis in luteal cells of the pregnant rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hyunwon; Bhat, Ganapathy K.; Sridaran, Rajagopala

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that microgravity induces changes at the cellular level, including apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether microgravity affects luteal cell function. This study was performed to assess whether microgravity conditions generated by clinostat rotation induce apoptosis and affect steroidogenesis by luteal cells. Luteal cells isolated from the corpora lutea of Day 8 pregnant rats were placed in equal numbers in slide flasks (chamber slides). One slide flask was placed in the clinostat and the other served as a stationary control. At 48 h in the clinostat, whereas the levels of progesterone and total cellular protein decreased, the number of shrunken cells increased. To determine whether apoptosis occurred in shrunken cells, Comet and TUNEL assays were performed. At 48 h, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the clinostat increased compared with that in the control. To investigate how the microgravity conditions induce apoptosis, the active mitochondria in luteal cells were detected with JC-1 dye. Cells in the control consisted of many active mitochondria, which were evenly distributed throughout the cell. In contrast, cells in the clinostat displayed fewer active mitochondria, which were distributed either to the outer edge of the cell or around the nucleus. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction induced by clinostat rotation could lead to apoptosis in luteal cells and suppression of progesterone production.

  8. Gestating for 22 months: luteal development and pregnancy maintenance in elephants

    PubMed Central

    Lueders, Imke; Niemuller, Cheryl; Rich, Peter; Gray, Charlie; Hermes, Robert; Goeritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The corpus luteum, a temporally established endocrine gland, formed on the ovary from remaining cells of the ovulated follicle, plays a key role in maintaining the early mammalian pregnancy by secreting progesterone. Despite being a monovular species, 2–12 corpora lutea (CLs) were found on the elephant ovaries during their long pregnancy lasting on average 640 days. However, the function and the formation of the additional CLs and their meaning remain unexplained. Here, we show from the example of the elephant, the close relationship between the maternally determined luteal phase length, the formation of multiple luteal structures and their progestagen secretion, the timespan of early embryonic development until implantation and maternal recognition. Through three-dimensional and Colour Flow ultrasonography of the ovaries and the uterus, we conclude that pregnant elephants maintain active CL throughout gestation that appear as main source of progestagens. Two LH peaks during the follicular phase ensure the development of a set of 5.4 ± 2.7 CLs. Accessory CLs (acCLs) form prior to ovulation after the first luteinizing hormone (LH) peak, while the ovulatory CL (ovCL) forms after the second LH peak. After five to six weeks (the normal luteal phase lifespan), all existing CLs begin to regress. However, they resume growing as soon as an embryo becomes ultrasonographically apparent on day 49 ± 2. After this time, all pregnancy CLs grow significantly larger than in a non-conceptive luteal phase and are maintained until after parturition. The long luteal phase is congruent with a slow early embryonic development and luteal rescue only starts ‘last minute’, with presumed implantation of the embryo. Our findings demonstrate a highly successful reproductive solution, different from currently described mammalian models. PMID:22719030

  9. Luteal maintenance of pregnancy in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Stansfield, F J; Allen, W R

    2012-06-01

    The ovaries of eight African elephant foetuses and their mothers between 2 and 22 months of gestation, and those of two cycling and two lactating elephants, were examined grossly, histologically and immunocytochemically, with emphasis on the development and regression of accessory corpora lutea (CL) of pregnancy and the steroidogenic capacities of the accessory CL and the foetal ovaries. The results supported recent findings that the accessory CL form as a result of luteinisation, with and without ovulation, of medium-sized follicles during the 3-week inter-luteal period of the oestrous cycle. They enlarge significantly and become steroidogenically active around 5 weeks of gestation, probably in response to the placental lactogen which is secreted by the implanting trophoblast of the conceptus. The large luteal cells stained strongly for 3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD) activity throughout the 22-month gestation period although they showed vacuolation and other degenerative changes in the final months of gestation coincident with hypertrophy and hyperplasia of 3βHSD-positive interstitial cells in the foetal gonads. It is proposed that the progestagens secreted by the enlarged gonads of the elephant foetus may function both to assist the maternal ovaries in supporting the pregnancy state and to induce torpor and intrauterine immobility of the rapidly growing foetus. PMID:22457432

  10. Regulated C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) in luteal cells contributes to macrophage infiltration into the human corpus luteum during luteolysis.

    PubMed

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Kudo, Masataka; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Kimura, Shunsuke; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Duncan, W Colin

    2015-08-01

    Intense macrophage infiltration is observed during luteolysis in various animals including women; however, we still do not know how macrophage infiltration into the human corpus luteum (CL) during luteolysis is regulated. In this study, we examined the expression, localization and regulation of an important chemokine for the recruitment of monocyte/macrophage lineages, C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2), in the human CL across the luteal phase and in cultured human luteinized granulosa cells (LGCs), with special reference to the number of infiltrating macrophages and luteal cell function. CCL2 mRNA increased in the non-functional regressing CL during menstruation (P < 0.01), corresponding to an elevated mRNA expression of a macrophage-derived cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and an increased number of infiltrating macrophages positively stained with a macrophage marker, CD68. CCL2 protein was immunohistochemically localized to the cytoplasm of granulosa-lutein and theca-lutein cells, and CCL2 mRNA was significantly reduced by hCG both in vivo (P < 0.05) and in vitro (P < 0.01). CCL2 was also down-regulated by luteotrophic prostaglandin (PG) E (P < 0.0001), but up-regulated by luteolytic PGF (P < 0.05) in vitro. Administration of TNF significantly enhanced the CCL2 mRNA expression in cultured LGCs (P < 0.01). A greater abundance of infiltrating macrophages were found around granulosa-lutein cells lacking 3β-HSD or PGE synthase (PGES) immunostaining. CCL2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with both HSD3B1 and PGES, suggesting that locally produced progesterone and PGE suppress macrophage infiltration into the CL. Taken together, the infiltration of macrophages in the human CL is regulated by endocrine and paracrine molecules via regulation of the CCL2 expression in luteal cells. PMID:26003810

  11. Natural Micronized Progesterone Sustained Release (SR) and Luteal Phase: Role Redefined!!

    PubMed

    Malik, Sonia; Krishnaprasad, Korukonda

    2016-02-01

    Role of progesterone in reproductive medicine is evolving with its suggested clinical role for the hormonal and nonhormonal actions in reproductive medicine. The main function of progesterone is to induce 'secretory' changes in endometrium that is further complimented by its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory actions. It positively modulates PIBF, NK cells and HOXA 10 genes for better implantation. MHRA recommends Serum Progesterone levels ≥14ng/ml in the mid-luteal phase for supporting pregnancy adequately. Oral Natural Micronized Progesterone SR formulation represents a therapeutic advance in this direction offering 'therapeutic compliance' with oral formulation while avoiding the local side effects related to long-term patient compliance in reproductive disorders. The formulation offers round the clock efficiency and efficacy with single dose administration thereby improving patient convenience and compliance. This formulation has been marketed globally since 1986 utilizing the well validated drug delivery system involving Methylcellulose base. The clinical utility of this formulation is further suggested especially in various conditions related with luteal phase insufficiency and Bad obstetric history (BOH) or luteal phase support in ART. The level of evidence has been quite robust with several clinical studies including Prescription Event Monitoring and Investigator initiated studies supporting the clinical role of oral NMP SR formulation especially in 'Real world' clinic settings for Luteal phase insufficiency that may be physiological or iatrogenic. PMID:27042538

  12. Natural Micronized Progesterone Sustained Release (SR) and Luteal Phase: Role Redefined!!

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Role of progesterone in reproductive medicine is evolving with its suggested clinical role for the hormonal and nonhormonal actions in reproductive medicine. The main function of progesterone is to induce ‘secretory’ changes in endometrium that is further complimented by its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory actions. It positively modulates PIBF, NK cells and HOXA 10 genes for better implantation. MHRA recommends Serum Progesterone levels ≥14ng/ml in the mid-luteal phase for supporting pregnancy adequately. Oral Natural Micronized Progesterone SR formulation represents a therapeutic advance in this direction offering ‘therapeutic compliance’ with oral formulation while avoiding the local side effects related to long-term patient compliance in reproductive disorders. The formulation offers round the clock efficiency and efficacy with single dose administration thereby improving patient convenience and compliance. This formulation has been marketed globally since 1986 utilizing the well validated drug delivery system involving Methylcellulose base. The clinical utility of this formulation is further suggested especially in various conditions related with luteal phase insufficiency and Bad obstetric history (BOH) or luteal phase support in ART. The level of evidence has been quite robust with several clinical studies including Prescription Event Monitoring and Investigator initiated studies supporting the clinical role of oral NMP SR formulation especially in ‘Real world’ clinic settings for Luteal phase insufficiency that may be physiological or iatrogenic. PMID:27042538

  13. Mechanisms behind intrauterine device-induced luteal persistence in mares.

    PubMed

    Rivera Del Alamo, M M; Reilas, T; Kindahl, H; Katila, T

    2008-08-01

    Intrauterine glass balls are used to prevent oestrous signs in sports mares, but the mechanism of action is unknown. It has been suggested that the glass ball can mimic an embryo or act via an induced chronic uterine inflammation and absent or continuous low-grade prostaglandin (PG) release. The purpose of this study was to induce prolonged luteal function in mares using a small intrauterine device (IUD) and to study the mechanisms behind prolonged IUD-induced luteal function. A uterine swab and a biopsy specimen were obtained in early oestrus. A water-filled plastic ball, diameter 20mm and weight 3.6g, was inserted into the uterus 2-4 days after ovulation; the control mares underwent similar cervical manipulation without ball insertion. The mares were examined three times per week until day 23 and twice weekly thereafter until they returned to oestrus (transrectal palpation, ultrasonography and progesterone determination). The location of the IUD was recorded and ultrasound scans were video-recorded to assess the frequency of uterine contractions. When the mare returned to oestrus, a uterine swab and biopsy specimen were obtained and the bacteriological, cytological and histological (inflammation and glandular dilation) results compared with the samples obtained before the IUD insertion. The PG F(2alpha) metabolite levels were measured in the plasma of four control mares and eight IUD mares on days 11-16. The IUD induced a prolonged luteal phase in 75% of the mares (9/12; IUD-P); the mean dioestrous length was 57.0 days. The three mares that did not respond to the IUD (IUD-N) showed a mean dioestrous length of 15.7 days and the 12 control mares 16.1 days. The inflammation and glandular dilation scores were not significantly different in pre- and post-manipulation biopsy specimens. Although locational changes of the IUD were observed, they occurred over very small distances and were mostly limited within the body-bifurcation area. The IUD-N and control mares showed

  14. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON EX VIVO AND IN VITRO LUTEAL FUNCTION AND BROMODICHLOROMETHANE TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE PREGNANT F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a drinking water disinfection by-product, causes pregnancy loss, i.e. full-litter resorption, in F344 rats when treated during the luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent period. This effect is associated with reduced maternal serum progesterone (P) and LH...

  15. Gelatinases, endonuclease and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor during development and regression of swine luteal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Luciana Andrea; Turba, Maria Elena; Zannoni, Augusta; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2006-01-01

    Background The development and regression of corpus luteum (CL) is characterized by an intense angiogenesis and angioregression accompanied by luteal tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is the main regulator of angiogenesis, promoting endothelial cell mitosis and differentiation. After the formation of neovascular tubes, the remodelling of ECM is essential for the correct development of CL, particularly by the action of specific class of proteolytic enzymes known as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). During luteal regression, characterized by an apoptotic process and successively by an intense ECM and luteal degradation, the activation of Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonucleases and MMPs activity are required. The levels of expression and activity of VEGF, MMP-2 and -9, and Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonucleases throughout the oestrous cycle and at pregnancy were analyzed. Results Different patterns of VEGF, MMPs and Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease were observed in swine CL during different luteal phases and at pregnancy. Immediately after ovulation, the highest levels of VEGF mRNA/protein and MMP-9 activity were detected. On days 5–14 after ovulation, VEGF expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities are at basal levels, while Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease levels increased significantly in relation to day 1. Only at luteolysis (day 17), Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease and MMP-2 spontaneous activity increased significantly. At pregnancy, high levels of MMP-9 and VEGF were observed. Conclusion Our findings, obtained from a precisely controlled in vivo model of CL development and regression, allow us to determine relationships among VEGF, MMPs and endonucleases during angiogenesis and angioregression. Thus, CL provides a very interesting model for studying factors involved in vascular remodelling. PMID:17137503

  16. Simultaneous ex vivo Functional Testing of Two Retinas by in vivo Electroretinogram System

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types. PMID:25992809

  17. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is viewed with confocal microscopy and laser speckle flowmetry to monitor glial cell responses and retinal blood flow. Retinal glial cells are labeled with the Ca2+ indicator dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and the caged Ca2+ compound NP-EGTA by injection of the compounds into the vitreous humor. Glial cells are stimulated by photolysis of caged Ca2+ and the activation state of the cells assessed by monitoring Ca2+ indicator dye fluorescence. We find that, as in the ex vivo retina, retinal glial cells in vivo generate both spontaneous and evoked intercellular Ca2+ waves. We also find that stimulation of glial cells leads to the dilation of neighboring retinal arterioles, supporting the hypothesis that glial cells regulate blood flow in the retina. This in vivo preparation holds great promise for assessing glial cell function in the healthy and pathological retina. PMID:22144328

  18. Targeted Disruption of Pten in Ovarian Granulosa Cells Enhances Ovulation and Extends the Life Span of Luteal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; Cahill, Nicola; Richards, JoAnne S.

    2008-01-01

    FSH activates the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/acute transforming retrovirus thymoma protein kinase pathway and thereby enhances granulosa cell differentiation in culture. To identify the physiological role of the PI3K pathway in vivo we disrupted the PI3K suppressor, Pten, in developing ovarian follicles. To selectively disrupt Pten expression in granulosa cells, Ptenfl/fl mice were mated with transgenic mice expressing cAMP response element recombinase driven by Cyp19 promoter (Cyp19-Cre). The resultant Pten mutant mice were fertile, ovulated more oocytes, and produced moderately more pups than control mice. These physiological differences in the Pten mutant mice were associated with hyperactivation of the PI3K/acute transforming retrovirus thymoma protein kinase pathway, decreased susceptibility to apoptosis, and increased proliferation of mutant granulosa cells. Strikingly, corpora lutea of the Pten mutant mice persisted longer than those of control mice. Although the follicular and luteal cell steroidogenesis in Ptenfl/fl;Cyp19-Cre mice was similar to controls, viable nonsteroidogenic luteal cells escaped structural luteolysis. These findings provide the novel evidence that Pten impacts the survival/life span of granulosa/luteal cells and that its loss not only results in the facilitated ovulation but also in the persistence of nonsteroidogenic luteal structures in the adult mouse ovary. PMID:18606860

  19. Involvement of microtubules in lipoprotein degradation and utilization for steroidogenesis in cultured rat luteal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, V.P.; Menon, K.M.

    1985-12-01

    Cells isolated from superovulated rat ovaries metabolize low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) of human or rat origin and use the lipoprotein-derived cholesterol as a precursor for progesterone production. Under in vitro conditions, both lipoproteins are internalized and degraded in the lysosomes, although degradation of HDL is of lower magnitude than that of LDL. In this report we have examined the role of cellular microtubules in the internalization and degradation of human LDL and HDL in cultured rat luteal cells. The microtubule depolymerizing agents colchicine, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine, and nocodazole as well as taxol, deuterium oxide, and dimethyl sulfoxide, which are known to rapidly polymerize cellular tubulin into microtubules, were used to block the function of microtubules. When these antimicrotubule agents were included in the incubations, degradation of the apolipoproteins of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by the luteal cells was inhibited by 50-85% compared to untreated control values. Maximum inhibitory effects were observed when the cells were preincubated with the inhibitor for at least 4 h at 37 C before treatment with the labeled lipoprotein. Lipoprotein-stimulated progesterone production by luteal cells was also inhibited by 50% or more in the presence of antimicrotubule agents. However, basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone production were unaffected by these inhibitors. The binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL to luteal cell plasma membrane receptors was not affected by the microtubule inhibitors. Although binding was unaffected and degradation was impaired in the presence of the inhibitors, there was no detectable accumulation of undegraded lipoprotein within the cells during the 24 h of study.

  20. Systemic and renal hemodynamic changes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle mimic early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A B; Zamudio, S; Woodmansee, W; Merouani, A; Osorio, F; Johnson, A; Moore, L G; Dahms, T; Coffin, C; Abraham, W T; Schrier, R W

    1997-11-01

    Blood pressure decreases during early pregnancy in association with a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and increases in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. These early changes suggest a potential association with corpora lutea function. To determine whether peripheral vasodilation occurs following ovulation, we studied 16 healthy women in the midfollicular and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure in the midluteal phase of the cycle (midfollicular of 81.7 +/- 2.0 vs. midluteal of 75.4 +/- 2.3 mmHg, P < 0.005) was found in association with a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and an increase in cardiac output. Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate increased. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration increased significantly in the luteal phase accompanied by a decrease in atrial natriuretic peptide concentration. Serum sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate concentrations and osmolarity also declined significantly in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Urinary adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) excretion increased in the luteal compared with the follicular phase, whereas no changes in urinary cGMP or NO2/NO3 excretion were found. Thus peripheral vasodilation occurs in the luteal phase of the normal menstrual cycle in association with an increase in renal plasma flow and filtration. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis is found in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. These changes are accompanied by an increase in urinary cAMP excretion indicating potential vasodilating mediators responsible for the observed hemodynamic changes. PMID:9374841

  1. In vivo activation and functions of the protease factor XII.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, Jenny; Nickel, Katrin F; Stavrou, Evi; Renné, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Combinations of proinflammatory and procoagulant reactions are the unifying principle for a variety of disorders affecting the cardiovascular system. Factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) is a plasma protease that initiates the contact system. The biochemistry of the contact system in vitro is well understood; however, its in vivo functions are just beginning to emerge. The current review concentrates on activators and functions of the FXII-driven contact system in vivo. Elucidating its physiologic activities offers the exciting opportunity to develop strategies for the safe interference with both thrombotic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25187064

  2. Resurrection of DNA function in vivo from an extinct genome.

    PubMed

    Pask, Andrew J; Behringer, Richard R; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine), obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity. PMID:18493600

  3. Resurrection of DNA Function In Vivo from an Extinct Genome

    PubMed Central

    Pask, Andrew J.; Behringer, Richard R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.

    2008-01-01

    There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine), obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity. PMID:18493600

  4. Detection of Tight Junction Barrier Function In Vivo by Biotin

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, Yuguo; Tatum, Rodney; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complexes in mammalian epithelial cells and form selective paracellular barriers restricting the passage of solutes and ions across the epithelial sheets. Claudins, a TJ integral membrane protein family, play a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. In the in vitro cell culture system, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurement and the flux of radioisotope or fluorescent labeled molecules with different sizes have been widely used to determine the TJ barrier function. In the in vivo system, the tracer molecule Sulfo-NHS-Biotin was initially used in Xenopus embryos system and subsequently was successfully applied to a number of animal tissues in situ and in different organisms under the experimental conditions to examine the functional integrity of TJs by several laboratories. In this chapter, we will describe the detailed procedures of applying biotin as a paracellular tracer molecule to different in vivo systems to assay TJ barrier function. PMID:21717351

  5. Natural influence of season on follicular, luteal, and endocrinological turnover in Indian crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Satheshkumar, S; Brindha, K; Roy, A; Devanathan, T G; Kathiresan, D; Kumanan, K

    2015-07-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the effect of seasonal changes on follicular and luteal dynamics in vivo in normally cycling crossbred cows during summer and winter months of the year. Six healthy regularly cycling Jersey crossbred nonlactating pluriparous cows were used for the study. Follicular and luteal developmental pattern was studied every other day throughout the estrous cycle by scanning the ovaries during two periods of a year viz., hot season (April to June; n = 16) and cold season (December to February; n = 12). Plasma progesterone (P4) concentrations were measured on Days 0 (estrus), 6, and 12 of the estrous cycle. Among the 12 cycles studied during the cold season, 11 (91.7%) had three waves and one had two waves. Of 16 cycles studied during the hot season, eight (50%) had two waves, four (25%) had three waves, and the remaining four cycles had single (n = 2) and four waves (n = 2). High P4 concentrations during the midcycle would have suppressed the dominant follicle of the second follicular wave and induced the emergence of the third wave during the cold season. The first follicular wave (wave I) of the cycle emerged much earlier (Day 0.5 ± 0.3) during the cold season than that in the hot season (Day 1.7 ± 0.4). The ovulatory wave emerged significantly earlier during the hot season (Day 11.5 ± 1.3) than in the cold season (Day 14.8 ± 0.4), and hence, the growth phase of ovulatory follicle significantly increased during the former season (11.0 ± 1.4 days) than the latter (5.8 ± 0.2 days). The ovulatory follicle attained a significantly larger diameter (12.8 ± 0.8 mm) to express the estrus during the hot season when compared to the cold season (11.3 ± 0.4 mm), which might be indicative of alterations in steroidogenic activity within the follicular microenvironment. During the midphase of the cycle, a period critical for embryonic sustenance, the P4 level was significantly reduced in the hot months indicating suppression of luteal activity

  6. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo-ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging-and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  7. In vivo investigation of cilia structure and function using Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Eric R.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are key organelles in development and homeostasis. The ever-expanding complement of cilia associated proteins necessitates rapid and tractable models for in vivo functional investigation. Xenopus laevis provides an attractive model for such studies, having multiple ciliated populations, including primary and multiciliated tissues. The rapid external development of Xenopus and the large cells make it an especially excellent platform for imaging studies. Here we present embryological and cell-biological methods for the investigation of cilia structure and function in Xenopus laevis, with a focus on quantitative live and fixed imaging. PMID:25837389

  8. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  9. New models for analyzing mast cell functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    In addition to their well-accepted role as critical effector cells in anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions, mast cells (MCs) have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that contribute to disease or help to maintain health. Although some of these roles were first suggested by analyses of MC products or functions in vitro, it is critical to determine whether, and under which circumstances, such potential roles actually can be performed by MCs in vivo. This review discusses recent advances in the development and analysis of mouse models to investigate the roles of MCs and MC-associated products during biological responses in vivo, and comments on some of the similarities and differences in the results obtained with these newer versus older models of MC deficiency. PMID:23127755

  10. Recent molecular approaches to understanding astrocyte function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Davila, David; Thibault, Karine; Fiacco, Todd A.; Agulhon, Cendra

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are a predominant glial cell type in the nervous systems, and are becoming recognized as important mediators of normal brain function as well as neurodevelopmental, neurological, and neurodegenerative brain diseases. Although numerous potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of astrocytes in the normal and diseased brain, research into the physiological relevance of these mechanisms in vivo is just beginning. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in innovative and powerful molecular approaches, including knockout mouse models, transgenic mouse models, and astrocyte-targeted gene transfer/expression, which have led to advances in understanding astrocyte biology in vivo that were heretofore inaccessible to experimentation. We will examine the recently improved understanding of the roles of astrocytes – with an emphasis on astrocyte signaling – in the context of both the healthy and diseased brain, discuss areas where the role of astrocytes remains debated, and suggest new research directions. PMID:24399932

  11. Novel in vivo techniques to visualize kidney anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Intravital imaging using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become an increasingly popular and widely used experimental technique in kidney research over the past few years. MPM allows deep optical sectioning of the intact, living kidney tissue with submicron resolution, which is unparalleled among intravital imaging approaches. MPM has solved a long-standing critical technical barrier in renal research to study several complex and inaccessible cell types and anatomical structures in vivo in their native environment. Comprehensive and quantitative kidney structure and function MPM studies helped our better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the healthy and diseased kidney. This review summarizes recent in vivo MPM studies with a focus on the glomerulus and the filtration barrier, although select, glomerulus-related renal vascular and tubular functions are also mentioned. The latest applications of serial MPM of the same glomerulus in vivo, in the intact kidney over several days, during the progression of glomerular disease are discussed. This visual approach, in combination with genetically encoded fluorescent markers of cell lineage, has helped track the fate and function (e.g., cell calcium changes) of single podocytes during the development of glomerular pathologies, and provided visual proof for the highly dynamic, rather than static, nature of the glomerular environment. Future intravital imaging applications have the promise to further push the limits of optical microscopy, and to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of kidney injury. Also, MPM will help to study new mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration, a cutting-edge area of kidney research. PMID:25738253

  12. GAGA Factor Isoforms Have Distinct but Overlapping Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Anthony J.; Schedl, Paul

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster GAGA factor (encoded by the Trithorax-like [Trl] gene) is required for correct chromatin architecture at diverse chromosomal sites. The Trl gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms of the GAGA factor (GAGA-519 and GAGA-581) that are identical except for the length and sequence of the C-terminal glutamine-rich (Q) domain. In vitro and tissue culture experiments failed to find any functional difference between the two isoforms. We made a set of transgenes that constitutively express cDNAs coding for either of the isoforms with the goal of elucidating their roles in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of the transgenes in Trl mutant background led us to the conclusion that GAGA-519 and GAGA-581 perform different, albeit largely overlapping, functions. We also expressed a fusion protein with LacZ disrupting the Q domain of GAGA-519. This LacZ fusion protein compensated for the loss of wild-type GAGA factor to a surprisingly large extent. This suggests that the Q domain either is not required for the essential functions performed by the GAGA protein or is exclusively used for tetramer formation. These results are inconsistent with a major role of the Q domain in chromatin remodeling or transcriptional activation. We also found that GAGA-LacZ was able to associate with sites not normally occupied by the GAGA factor, pointing to a role of the Q domain in binding site choice in vivo. PMID:11713290

  13. Algal photoreceptors: in vivo functions and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Many algae, particularly microalgae, possess a sophisticated light-sensing system including photoreceptors and light-modulated signaling pathways to sense environmental information and secure the survival in a rapidly changing environment. Over the last couple of years, the multifaceted world of algal photobiology has enriched our understanding of the light absorption mechanisms and in vivo function of photoreceptors. Moreover, specific light-sensitive modules have already paved the way for the development of optogenetic tools to generate light switches for precise and spatial control of signaling pathways in individual cells and even in complex biological systems. PMID:24081482

  14. Effect of betamethasone treatment on luteal lifespan and the LH response to GnRH in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dobson, H; Alam, M G; Kanchev, L N

    1987-05-01

    Betamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid, 15 mg) was administered i.m. twice daily for 10 days to 4 regularly cycling dairy cows, beginning on Day 10 of the oestrous cycle. Luteal function, monitored by plasma progesterone, was extended by 7, 9, 19 and 20 days, respectively. Luteal function in the next cycle was normal. Endogenous cortisol values were suppressed for 14, 13, 34 and 27 days, respectively. Pituitary responsiveness to 20 micrograms GnRH was assessed by LH measurement on Days -1, +3 and +7 relative to the start of betamethasone treatment. There was a progressive decrease in peak LH concentrations after each GnRH challenge compared to control cows. Hourly measurements of PGF-2 alpha metabolite during the expected period of luteolysis failed to reveal normal increases. It is suggested that betamethasone caused prolonged luteal function, either by directly inhibiting PGF-2 alpha release, or by suppressing pituitary stimulation of follicular growth and hence lowering oestradiol concentrations, since it is known that PGF-2 alpha and oestradiol act synergistically to cause luteolysis. PMID:3298644

  15. 'Luteal coasting' after GnRH agonist trigger - individualized, HCG-based, progesterone-free luteal support in 'high responders': a case series.

    PubMed

    Kol, Shahar; Breyzman, Tatiana; Segal, Linoy; Humaidan, Peter

    2015-12-01

    This study reports 21 IVF cases with excessive ovarian response, who received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) triggering for final oocyte maturation, followed by a human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG)-based, progesterone-free, luteal support, individually timed ('luteal coasting') according to endogenous luteal progesterone concentrations. One patient developed a brief early-onset moderate ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) condition. Six clinical pregnancies were achieved, two of which have resulted in live births thus far. To further individualize the luteal phase support post GnRHa trigger, the same principle that holds for follicular coasting, used in the context of OHSS prevention, may be valid. Monitoring luteal progesterone concentrations from the day of oocyte retrieval, and administering a bolus of HCG (1500 IU) when the concentration drops significantly, seems to facilitate fresh embryo transfer, even in patients with excessive ovarian responses. PMID:26507279

  16. Molecular Signatures of Immune Activation and Epithelial Barrier Remodeling Are Enhanced during the Luteal Phase of the Menstrual Cycle: Implications for HIV Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Kelly B.; Novak, Richard M.; McCorrister, Stuart; Shaw, Souradet; Westmacott, Garrett R.; Ball, Terry B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Burgener, Adam

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The variable infectivity and transmissibility of HIV/SHIV has been recently associated with the menstrual cycle, with particular susceptibility observed during the luteal phase in nonhuman primate models and ex vivo human explant cultures, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we performed an unbiased, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis to better understand the mucosal immunological processes underpinning this observed susceptibility to HIV infection. Cervicovaginal lavage samples (n = 19) were collected, characterized as follicular or luteal phase using days since last menstrual period, and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Biological insights from these data were gained using a spectrum of computational methods, including hierarchical clustering, pathway analysis, gene set enrichment analysis, and partial least-squares discriminant analysis with LASSO feature selection. Of the 384 proteins identified, 43 were differentially abundant between phases (P < 0.05, ≥2-fold change). Cell-cell adhesion proteins and antiproteases were reduced, and leukocyte recruitment (interleukin-8 pathway, P = 1.41E–5) and extravasation proteins (P = 5.62E–4) were elevated during the luteal phase. LASSO/PLSDA identified a minimal profile of 18 proteins that best distinguished the luteal phase. This profile included cytoskeletal elements and proteases known to be involved in cellular movement. Gene set enrichment analysis associated CD4+ T cell and neutrophil gene set signatures with the luteal phase (P < 0.05). Taken together, our findings indicate a strong association between proteins involved in tissue remodeling and leukocyte infiltration with the luteal phase, which may represent potential hormone-associated mechanisms of increased susceptibility to HIV. IMPORTANCE Recent studies have discovered an enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection during the progesterone-dominant luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. However, the mechanism responsible for

  17. In vivo minimally invasive interstitial multi-functional microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoon, Asaf; Aharon, Shiran; Kruchik, Oded; Hohmann, Martin; Slovin, Hamutal; Douplik, Alexandre; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Developing minimally invasive methodologies for imaging of internal organs is an emerging field in the biomedical examination research. This paper introduces a new multi-functional microendoscope device capable of imaging of internal organs with a minimal invasive intervention. In addition, the developed microendoscope can also be employed as a monitoring device for measuring local hemoglobin concentration in blood stream when administrated into a blood artery. The microendoscope device has a total external diameter of only 200 μm and can provide high imaging resolution capability of more than 5,000 pixels. The device can detect features with a spatial resolution of less than 1 μm. The microendoscope has been tested both in-vitro as well as in-vivo in rats presenting a promising and powerful tool as a high resolution and minimally invasive imaging facility suitable for previously unreachable clinical modalities. PMID:23712369

  18. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  19. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice. PMID:14967896

  20. Fetal in vivo continuous cardiovascular function during chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Allison, B J; Brain, K L; Niu, Y; Kane, A D; Herrera, E A; Thakor, A S; Botting, K J; Cross, C M; Itani, N; Skeffington, K L; Beck, C; Giussani, D A

    2016-03-01

    Although the fetal cardiovascular defence to acute hypoxia and the physiology underlying it have been established for decades, how the fetal cardiovascular system responds to chronic hypoxia has been comparatively understudied. We designed and created isobaric hypoxic chambers able to maintain pregnant sheep for prolonged periods of gestation under controlled significant (10% O2) hypoxia, yielding fetal mean P(aO2) levels (11.5 ± 0.6 mmHg) similar to those measured in human fetuses of hypoxic pregnancy. We also created a wireless data acquisition system able to record fetal blood flow signals in addition to fetal blood pressure and heart rate from free moving ewes as the hypoxic pregnancy is developing. We determined in vivo longitudinal changes in fetal cardiovascular function including parallel measurement of fetal carotid and femoral blood flow and oxygen and glucose delivery during the last third of gestation. The ratio of oxygen (from 2.7 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.8; P < 0.05) and of glucose (from 2.3 ± 0.1 to 3.3 ± 0.6; P < 0.05) delivery to the fetal carotid, relative to the fetal femoral circulation, increased during and shortly after the period of chronic hypoxia. In contrast, oxygen and glucose delivery remained unchanged from baseline in normoxic fetuses. Fetal plasma urate concentration increased significantly during chronic hypoxia but not during normoxia (Δ: 4.8 ± 1.6 vs. 0.5 ± 1.4 μmol l(-1), P<0.05). The data support the hypotheses tested and show persisting redistribution of substrate delivery away from peripheral and towards essential circulations in the chronically hypoxic fetus, associated with increases in xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26926316

  1. Characteristics and Functional Roles of Opioids Originally Present in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and functional roles of opioids originally present in vivo (endogenous opioids) in guinea-pig ileum were investigated. The release of endogenous opioids was determined by the inhibitory twitch response evoked by 0.1 Hz stimulation after 10 Hz stimulation (post-tetanic twitch inhibition). The effects of peptidase inhibitors increased the post-tetanic twitch inhibition, prevented by β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine, which are selective μ- and κ-opioid receptor subtype antagonists, respectively. Dopamine receptor antagonists (haloperidol, sultopride and domperidone) increased the post-tetanic twitch inhibition. These results suggest that dopamine receptors are involved in modulation of the ileal opioid system, so as to diminish endogenous opioid release by tetanic stimulation, and dopamine antagonists increase the opioid action, that might depend more on the increased release of endogenous opioids. The post-tetanic twitch inhibition was inhibited by adrenalectomy, and showed the supersensitivity of the opioid receptors, resulting from a decrease of endogenous opioids by adrenalectomy. These findings suggest that the increase in morphine-analgesia by adrenalectomy was due to this process. In the presence of naloxone, an opioid antagonist, an increase in basal tension after tetanic stimulation (10 Hz stimulation) (post-tetanic contraction) was observed, and was blocked by spantide, a substance P antagonist, and indomethacin, a prostaglandins-biosynthesis inhibitor. This contraction increased with morphine or peptidase inhibitor exposure, depending on the length of time the ileum was exposed to the morphine or peptidase inhibitor. Post-tetanic contraction might be a useful indicator of the formation of physical dependence to morphine or endogenous opioids in the ileum. PMID:27040344

  2. The role of adrenergic activation on murine luteal cell viability and progesterone production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Min; Jiang, Huaide; Wu, Bing; Cai, Wei; Hu, Chuan; Bao, Riqiang; Dong, Qiming; Xiao, Li; Li, Gang; Zhang, Chunping

    2016-09-15

    Sympathetic innervations exist in mammalian CL. The action of catecholaminergic system on luteal cells has been the focus of a variety of studies. Norepinephrine (NE) increased progesterone secretion of cattle luteal cells by activating β-adrenoceptors. In this study, murine luteal cells were treated with NE and isoprenaline (ISO). We found that NE increased the viability of murine luteal cells and ISO decreased the viability of luteal cells. Both NE and ISO promoted the progesterone production. Nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol reversed the effect of ISO on cell viability but did not reverse the effect of NE on cell viability. Propranolol blocked the influence of NE and ISO on progesterone production. These results reveal that the increase of luteal cell viability induced by NE is not dependent on β-adrenergic activation. α-Adrenergic activation possibly contributes to it. Both NE and ISO increased progesterone production through activating β-adrenergic receptor. Further study showed that CyclinD2 is involved in the increase of luteal cell induced by NE. 3β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, LHR, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and PGF2α contribute to the progesterone production induced by NE and ISO. PMID:27173955

  3. Luteal activity of pregnant rats with hypo-and hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Luteal activity is dependent on the interaction of various growth factors, cytokines and hormones, including the thyroid hormones, being that hypo- and hyperthyroidism alter the gestational period and are also a cause of miscarriage and stillbirth. Because of that, we evaluated the proliferation, apoptosis and expression of angiogenic factors and COX-2 in the corpus luteum of hypo- and hyperthyroid pregnant rats. Methods Seventy-two adult female rats were equally distributed into three groups: hypothyroid, hyperthyroid and control. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism were induced by the daily administration of propylthiouracil and L-thyroxine, respectively. The administration began five days before becoming pregnant and the animals were sacrificed at days 10, 14, and 19 of gestation. We performed an immunohistochemical analysis to evaluate the expression of CDC-47, VEGF, Flk-1 (VEGF receptor) and COX-2. Apoptosis was evaluated by the TUNEL assay. We assessed the gene expression of VEGF, Flk-1, caspase 3, COX-2 and PGF2α receptor using real time RT-PCR. The data were analyzed by SNK test. Results Hypothyroidism reduced COX-2 expression on day 10 and 19 (P < 0.05), endothelial/pericyte and luteal cell proliferation on day 10 and 14 (p < 0.05), apoptotic cell numbers on day 19 (p < 0.05) and the expression of Flk-1 and VEGF on day 14 and 19, respectively (p < 0.05). Hyperthyroidism increased the expression of COX-2 on day 19 (P < 0.05) and the proliferative activity of endothelial/pericytes cells on day 14 (p <0.05), as well as the expression of VEGF and Flk-1 on day 19 (P < 0.05). Conclusions Hypothyroidism reduces the proliferation, apoptosis and expression of angiogenic factors and COX-2in the corpus luteum of pregnant rats, contrary to what is observed in hyperthyroid animals, being this effect dependent of the gestational period. PMID:25298361

  4. Luteal P4 synthesis in early pregnant gilts after induction of estrus with PMSG/hCG.

    PubMed

    Blitek, Agnieszka; Szymanska, Magdalena; Pieczywek, Marta; Morawska-Pucinska, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to examine whether an estrus induction with gonadotropins could affect luteal P4 synthesis in early pregnant gilts. Sixteen prepubertal gilts received 750IU of PMSG and 500IU of hCG 72h later. Prepubertal gilts in the control group (n=17) were observed daily for estrus behavior. All gilts were inseminated in their first estrus. Corpora lutea (CLs) were collected on days 10, 12 and 15 of pregnancy and analyzed for (1) the mRNA and protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 family 11 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP11A1), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD); (2) the tissue concentration of P4; and (3) the mRNA expression of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and estrogen receptors (ESR1 and ESR2). Additionally, P4 concentration was analyzed in blood serum of all animals. PMSG/hCG injections to induce estrus decreased mRNA expression of StAR, CYP11A1 and 3βHSD on day 10 and CYP11A1 on day 12 of pregnancy compared with the control group, while CYP11A1 and 3βHSD proteins were down-regulated on day 10 in the hormonally-treated gilts. Concentrations of P4 in luteal tissue and blood serum were also lower in animals after gonadotropin-induced estrus. In contrast, LHR and ESR1 mRNA expression was greater in PMSG/hCG-treated than control gilts on day 15 of gestation. In conclusion, induction of estrus with a PMSG/hCG protocol in prepubertal gilts impaired expression of the luteal P4 synthesis system. Low P4 content may, in turn, induce local mechanisms involving LHR and ESR1 expression to support CL function. PMID:26781360

  5. Blood-Induced Interference of Glucose Sensor Function in Vitro: Implications for in Vivo Sensor Function

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Liu, Zenghe; Ouyang, Tianmei; Cho, Brian; Feldman, Ben; Henning, Timothy P.; Kreutzer, Don

    2007-01-01

    Background Although tissue hemorrhages, with resulting blood clots, are associated with glucose sensor implantation, virtually nothing known is about the impact of red blood cells and red blood cell clots on sensor function in vitro or in vivo. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that blood can directly interfere with glucose sensor function in vitro. Methods To test this hypothesis, heparinized human whole blood (HWB) and nonheparinized human whole blood (WB) were obtained from normal individuals. Aliquots of HWB and WB samples were also fractionated into plasma, serum, and total leukocyte (TL) components. Resulting HWB, WB, and WB components were incubated in vitro with an amperometric glucose sensor for 24 hours at 37°C. During incubation, blood glucose levels were determined periodically using a glucose monitor, and glucose sensor function (GSF) was monitored continuously as nanoampere output. Results Heparinized human whole blood had no significant effect on GSF in vitro, nor did TL, serum, or plasmaderived clots from WB. Sensors incubated with WB displayed a rapid signal loss associated with clot formation at 37°C. The half-life was 0.8 ± 0.2 hours (n = 16) for sensors incubated with WB compared to 3.2 ± 0.5 (n = 12) for sensors incubated with HWB with a blood glucose level of approximately 100 mg/dl. Conclusions These studies demonstrated that human whole blood interfered with GSF in vitro. These studies further demonstrated that this interference was related to blood clot formation, as HWB, serum, plasma-derived clots, or TL did not interfere with GSF in vitro in the same way that WB did. These in vitro studies supported the concept that the formation of blood clots at sites of glucose sensor implantation could have a negative impact on GSF in vivo. PMID:19885155

  6. Dietary factors and luteal phase deficiency in healthy eumenorrheic women

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Mary A.; Schliep, Karen C.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Stanford, Joseph B.; Zarek, Shvetha M.; Radin, Rose G.; Sjaarda, Lindsey A.; Perkins, Neil J.; Kalwerisky, Robyn A.; Hammoud, Ahmad O.; Mumford, Sunni L.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are prospectively assessed dietary factors, including overall diet quality, macronutrients and micronutrients, associated with luteal phase deficiency (LPD) in healthy reproductive aged women with regular menstrual cycles? SUMMARY ANSWER Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), fiber and isoflavone intake were positively associated with LPD while selenium was negatively associated with LPD after adjusting for age, percentage body fat and total energy intake. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY LPD may increase the risk of infertility and early miscarriage. Prior research has shown positive associations between LPD and low energy availability, either through high dietary restraint alone or in conjunction with high energy expenditure via exercise, but few studies with adequate sample sizes have been conducted investigating dietary factors and LPD among healthy, eumenorrheic women. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The BioCycle Study (2005–2007) prospectively enrolled 259 women from Western New York state, USA, and followed them for one (n = 9) or two (n = 250) menstrual cycles. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Women aged 18–44 years, with self-reported BMI between 18 and 35 kg/m2 and cycle lengths between 21 and 35 days, were included in the study. Participants completed baseline questionnaires, four 24-h dietary recalls per cycle and daily diaries capturing vigorous exercise, perceived stress and sleep; they also provided up to eight fasting serum samples during clinic visits timed to specific phases of the menstrual cycle using a fertility monitor. Cycles were included for this analysis if the peak serum luteal progesterone was >1 ng/ml and a urine or serum LH surge was detected. Associations between prospectively assessed diet quality, macronutrients and micronutrients and LPD (defined as luteal duration <10 days) were evaluated using generalized linear models adjusting for age, percentage body fat and total energy intake. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE LPD

  7. Functional Genetic Targeting of Embryonic Kidney Progenitor Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M. Rita; Brändli, André W.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor–treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting. PMID:25201883

  8. In vivo characterization of regenerative peripheral nerve interface function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursu, Daniel C.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Nedic, Andrej; Cederna, Paul S.; Gillespie, R. Brent

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces (RPNIs) are neurotized free autologous muscle grafts equipped with electrodes to record myoelectric signals for prosthesis control. Viability of rat RPNI constructs have been demonstrated using evoked responses. In vivo RPNI characterization is the next critical step for assessment as a control modality for prosthetic devices. Approach. Two RPNIs were created in each of two rats by grafting portions of free muscle to the ends of divided peripheral nerves (peroneal in the left and tibial in the right hind limb) and placing bipolar electrodes on the graft surface. After four months, we examined in vivo electromyographic signal activity and compared these signals to muscular electromyographic signals recorded from autologous muscles in two rats serving as controls. An additional group of two rats in which the autologous muscles were denervated served to quantify cross-talk in the electrode recordings. Recordings were made while rats walked on a treadmill and a motion capture system tracked the hind limbs. Amplitude and periodicity of signals relative to gait were quantified, correlation between electromyographic and motion recording were assessed, and a decoder was trained to predict joint motion. Main Results. Raw RPNI signals were active during walking, with amplitudes of 1 mVPP, and quiet during standing, with amplitudes less than 0.1 mVPP. RPNI signals were periodic and entrained with gait. A decoder predicted bilateral ankle motion with greater than 80% reliability. Control group signal activity agreed with literature. Denervated group signals remained quiescent throughout all evaluations. Significance. In vivo myoelectric RPNI activity encodes neural activation patterns associated with gait. Signal contamination from muscles adjacent to the RPNI is minimal, as demonstrated by the low amplitude signals obtained from the Denervated group. The periodicity and entrainment to gait of RPNI recordings suggests the

  9. Comparison of Follicular and Luteal Phase Mucosal Markers of HIV Susceptibility in Healthy Women.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Chandra, Neelima; Yousefieh, Nazita; Zalenskaya, Irina; Kimble, Thomas; Asin, Susana; Rollenhagen, Christiane; Anderson, Sharon M; Herold, Betsy; Mesquita, Pedro M M; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Cunningham, Tina; Schwartz, Jill L; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in vaginal immune cell populations, vaginal tissue gene expression, antimicrobial activity of the cervicovaginal (CV) lavage (CVL), vaginal flora, and p24 antigen production from CV tissues after ex vivo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection between follicular (FOL) and luteal (LUT) phases of the menstrual cycle. CV tissue biopsies, CV secretions, and blood samples were obtained as part of two longitudinal clinical trials of healthy women (CONRAD D11-119 and A12-124 studies). Participants (n = 39) were HIV-seronegative women not using exogenous hormone supplementation, with normal menstrual cycles, who were screened to exclude sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections. Serum levels of estradiol and progesterone were significantly higher in the LUT versus the FOL phase of the menstrual cycle. Controlling for race, reported contraceptive use/sexual practices, and clinical trial, we found no differences in vaginal tissue immune cell populations and activation status, transcriptomes, inhibition of HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 and Escherichia coli by the CVL, vaginal pH or Nugent score, or production of p24 antigen after ex vivo infection by HIV-1BaL between CV samples obtained in the FOL phase versus the LUT phase of the menstrual cycle. There were no significant correlations between serum estradiol and progesterone levels and CV endpoints. The hypothesis that the LUT phase of the menstrual cycle represents a more vulnerable stage for mucosal infection with HIV was not supported by data from samples obtained from the lower genital tract (ectocervix and vagina) from these two clinical trials. PMID:26750085

  10. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment. PMID:27301303

  11. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment.

  12. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment. PMID:27301303

  13. In vitro gene regulatory networks predict in vivo function of liver

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evolution of toxicity testing is predicated upon using in vitro cell based systems to rapidly screen and predict how a chemical might cause toxicity to an organ in vivo. However, the degree to which we can extend in vitro results to in vivo activity and possible mechanisms of action remains to be fully addressed. Results Here we use the nitroaromatic 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a model chemical to compare and determine how we might extrapolate from in vitro data to in vivo effects. We found 341 transcripts differentially expressed in common among in vitro and in vivo assays in response to TNT. The major functional term corresponding to these transcripts was cell cycle. Similarly modulated common pathways were identified between in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we uncovered the conserved common transcriptional gene regulatory networks between in vitro and in vivo cellular liver systems that responded to TNT exposure, which mainly contain 2 subnetwork modules: PTTG1 and PIR centered networks. Interestingly, all 7 genes in the PTTG1 module were involved in cell cycle and downregulated by TNT both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions The results of our investigation of TNT effects on gene expression in liver suggest that gene regulatory networks obtained from an in vitro system can predict in vivo function and mechanisms. Inhibiting PTTG1 and its targeted cell cyle related genes could be key machanism for TNT induced liver toxicity. PMID:21073692

  14. Hypercapnic blood pressure response is greater during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N; Wilcox, I; Polo, O J; Sullivan, C E

    1996-11-01

    We investigated the cardiovascular responses to acute hypercapnia during the menstrual cycle. Eleven female subjects with regular menstrual cycles performed hypercapnic rebreathing tests during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycles. Ventilatory and cardiovascular variables were recorded breath by breath. Serum progesterone and estradiol were measured on each occasion. Serum progesterone was higher during the luteal [50.4 +/- 9.6 (SE) nmol/l] than during the follicular phase (2.1 +/- 0.7 nmol/l; P < 0.001), but serum estradiol did not differ (follicular phase, 324 +/- 101 pmol/l; luteal phase, 162 +/- 71 pmol/l; P = 0.61). The systolic blood pressure responses during hypercapnia were 2.0 +/- 0.3 and 4.0 +/- 0.5 mmHg/Torr (1 Torr = 1 mmHg rise in end-tidal PCO2) during the follicular and luteal phases, respectively, of the menstrual cycle (P < 0.01). The diastolic blood pressure responses were 1.1 +/- 0.2 and 2.1 +/- 0.3 mmHg/Torr during the follicular and luteal phases, respectively (P < 0.002). Heart rate responses did not differ during the luteal (1.7 +/- 0.3 beats.min-1.Torr-1) and follicular phases (1.4 +/- 0.3 beats.min-1.Torr-1; P = 0.59). These data demonstrate a greater pressor response during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle that may be related to higher serum progesterone concentrations. PMID:8941539

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  16. Rat parotid cell function in vitro following x irradiation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, L.; Kuyatt, B.L.; Hand, A.R.; Baum, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    The effect of X irradiation on rat parotid acinar cell function was evaluated in vitro 1, 3, and 7 days following in vivo exposure to 2000 R. Several cellular functions were followed: protein secretion (amylase release), ion movement (K/sup +/ efflux and reuptake), amino acid transport (..cap alpha..-amino(/sup 14/C)isobutyric acid), and an intermediary metabolic response ((/sup 14/C)glucose oxidation). In addition both the morphologic appearance and in vivo saliva secretory ability of parotid cells were assessed. Our results demonstrate that surviving rat parotid acinar cells, isolated and studied in vitro 1-7 days following 2000 R, remain functionally intact despite in vivo diminution of secretory function.

  17. GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) are functional in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Maja; Strömberg, Jessica; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) selectively inhibit neurosteroid-mediated enhancement of GABA-evoked currents at the GABAA receptor. 3α-hydroxy-neurosteroids, notably allopregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), potentiate GABAA receptor-mediated currents. On the contrary, various 3β-hydroxy-steroids antagonize this positive neurosteroid-mediated modulation. Importantly, GAMSAs are specific antagonists of the positive neurosteroid-modulation of the receptor and do not inhibit GABA-evoked currents. Allopregnanolone and THDOC have both negative and positive actions. Allopregnanolone can impair encoding/consolidation and retrieval of memories. Chronic administration of a physiological allopregnanolone concentration reduces cognition in mice models of Alzheimer's disease. In humans an allopregnanolone challenge impairs episodic memory and in hepatic encephalopathy cognitive deficits are accompanied by increased brain ammonia and allopregnanolone. Hippocampal slices react in vitro to ammonia by allopregnanolone synthesis in CA1 neurons, which blocks long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, allopregnanolone may impair learning and memory by interfering with hippocampal LTP. Contrary, pharmacological treatment with allopregnanolone can promote neurogenesis and positively influence learning and memory of trace eye-blink conditioning in mice. In rat the GAMSA UC1011 inhibits an allopregnanolone-induced learning impairment and the GAMSA GR3027 restores learning and motor coordination in rats with hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, the GAMSA isoallopregnanolone antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia in rats, and in humans it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced sedation and reductions in saccadic eye velocity. 17PA is also an effective GAMSA in vivo, as it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia and spinal analgesia in rats. In vitro the allopregnanolone/THDOC-increased GABA-mediated GABAA receptor activity is antagonized

  18. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  19. Effect of luteal-phase support on endometrial microRNA expression following controlled ovarian stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies suggested that microRNAs influence cellular activities in the uterus including cell differentiation and embryo implantation. In assisted reproduction cycles, luteal phase support, given to improve endometrial characteristics and to facilitate the implantation process, has been a standard practice. The effect of different types of luteal phase support using steroid hormones in relation to endometrial miRNA profiles during the peri-implantation period has not seen described. This study was designed to evaluate the expression of miRNAs during the luteal phase following controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF and the influence of different luteal phase support protocols on miRNA profiles. Methods The study was approved by the Johns Hopkins Hospital Institutional Review Board. Endometrial biopsies were obtained on the day of oocyte retrieval from 9 oocyte donors (group I). An additional endometrial biopsy was obtained 3–5 days later (Group II) after the donors were randomized into three groups. Group IIa had no luteal-phase support, group IIb had luteal support with micronized progesterone (P), and Group IIc had luteal support with progesterone plus 17-beta-estradiol (P + E). Total RNA was isolated and microarray analysis was performed using an Illumina miRNA expression panel. Results A total of 526 miRNAs were identified. Out of those, 216 miRNAs were differentially regulated (p < 0.05) between the comparison groups. As compared to the day of retrieval, 19, 11 and 6 miRNAs were differentially regulated more than 2 fold in the groups of no support, in the P support only, and in the P + E support respectively, 3–5 days after retrieval. During the peri-implantation period (3–5 days after retrieval) the expression of 33 and 6 miRNAs increased, while the expression of 3 and 0 miRNAs decreased, in the P alone and in the P + E group respectively as compared to the no steroid supplementation group. Conclusion Luteal support

  20. Time related changes in luteal prostaglandin synthesis and steroidogenic capacity during pregnancy, normal and antiprogestin induced luteolysis in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Mariusz Pawel; Beceriklisoy, Hakki Bülent; Aslan, Selim; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2009-11-01

    In nonpregnant and pregnant dogs the corpora lutea (CL) are the only source of progesterone (P4) which shows an almost identical secretion pattern until the rapid decrease of P4 prior to parturition. For the nonpregnant dog clear evidence has been obtained that physiological luteal regression is devoid of a functional role of the PGF2alpha-system and seems to depend on the provision of StAR. Yet in pregnant dogs the rapid prepartal luteal regression, coinciding with an increase of PGF2alpha, may be indicative for different regulatory mechanisms. To assess this situation and by applying semi-quantitative Real Time (Taq Man) RT-PCR, expression patterns were determined for the following factors in CL of pregnant and prepartal dogs and of mid-pregnant dogs treated with the antiprogestin Aglepristone: cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2), prostaglandin E2 synthase (PGES), prostaglandin F2alpha synthase (PGFS), its receptors (EP2, EP4 an FP), the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), 3beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3betaHSD) and the progesterone receptor (PR). Peripheral plasma P4 concentrations were determined by RIA. CL were collected via ovariohysterectomy from pregnant bitches (n=3-5) on days 8-12 (Group 1, pre-implantation period), days 18-25 (Group 2, post-implantation period), days 35-40 (Group 3, mid-gestation period) and during the prepartal progesterone decline (Group 4). Additionally, CL were obtained from groups of 5 mid-pregnant dogs (days 40-45) 24h, respectively 72h after the second treatment with Aglepristone. Expression of Cox2 and PGES was highest during the pre-implantation period, that of PGFS and FP during the post-implantation period. EP4 and EP2 revealed a constant expression pattern throughout pregnancy with a prepartal upregulation of EP2. 3betaHSD and StAR decreased significantly from the pre-implatation period to prepartal luteolysis, it was matched by the course of P4 concentrations. Expression of the PR was higher during mid-gestation and

  1. Inhibition of progesterone secretion by oestradiol administered in the luteal phase of assisted conception cycles.

    PubMed

    Tay, P Y; Lenton, E A

    2003-06-01

    A prospective randomised study was done to assess the effect of supplemental oestradiol in addition to progesterone on the luteal steroid profiles and pregnancy outcome in stimulated cycles with and without pituitary down regulation. Women undergoing stimulated cycle IVF with GnRH-a and FSH (Group A, n = 63) or stimulated intrauterine insemination using CC and FSH (Group B, n = 55) were studied. These subjects were randomly allocated to receive either 400 mg daily of vaginally administrated Cyclogest (progesterone) alone or in combination with 2 mg daily of oral Oestradiol Valerate (E2V) during the luteal phase. Significant lower concentrations of plasma progesterone were observed in those subjects supplemented with both E2V and progesterone compared to those in whom progesterone only was given during the luteal phase (P < 0.05). Exogenous E2V had a minimal impact on plasma oestradiol concentrations and did not disguise the characterised mid luteal decline in oestradiol secretion. The suppressive effect of E2V on plasma progesterone was lost if implantation occurred normally because any small change in steroid concentrations was reversed by the rapidly increasing concentrations of HCG. Similar pregnancy rates were observed among subjects supplemented with or without oestradiol. The addition of oestradiol to the luteal supplement suppresses endogenous corpus luteum progesterone secretion irrespective of the type of assisted conception cycle and that its use is unlikely to be beneficial to the process of implantation. PMID:14569738

  2. Specific in vivo knockdown of protein function by intrabodies

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Dübel, Stefan; Böldicke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) are recombinant antibody fragments that bind to target proteins expressed inside of the same living cell producing the antibodies. The molecules are commonly used to study the function of the target proteins (i.e., their antigens). The intrabody technology is an attractive alternative to the generation of gene-targeted knockout animals, and complements knockdown techniques such as RNAi, miRNA and small molecule inhibitors, by-passing various limitations and disadvantages of these methods. The advantages of intrabodies include very high specificity for the target, the possibility to knock down several protein isoforms by one intrabody and targeting of specific splice variants or even post-translational modifications. Different types of intrabodies must be designed to target proteins at different locations, typically either in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus or in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Most straightforward is the use of intrabodies retained in the ER (ER intrabodies) to knock down the function of proteins passing the ER, which disturbs the function of members of the membrane or plasma proteomes. More effort is needed to functionally knock down cytoplasmic or nuclear proteins because in this case antibodies need to provide an inhibitory effect and must be able to fold in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm. In this review, we present a broad overview of intrabody technology, as well as applications both of ER and cytoplasmic intrabodies, which have yielded valuable insights in the biology of many targets relevant for drug development, including α-synuclein, TAU, BCR-ABL, ErbB-2, EGFR, HIV gp120, CCR5, IL-2, IL-6, β-amyloid protein and p75NTR. Strategies for the generation of intrabodies and various designs of their applications are also reviewed. PMID:26252565

  3. Change of uterine histroph proteins during follicular and luteal phase in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Song, Eun-Ji; Hwangbo, Yong; Lee, Seunghyung; Park, Choon-Keun

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine protein expression patterns of uterine histroph (UH) during the follicular phase (FP) and luteal phase (LP) in pigs. Forty-nine common proteins were identified from FP and LP samples; five were significantly down-regulated (>1.5-fold), while 15 were significantly up-regulated (>1.5-fold) in LPUH compared with FPUH (P<0.05). The 20 differentially-expressed proteins are involved in cell proliferation, cell responses, translation, transport, and metabolism and their molecular functions include nucleic acid binding, oxygen activity, enzymatic activity, growth activity, iron binding, and redox binding. Protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor D (VEGFD), coatomer subunit gamma-2 (G2COP), collagen alpha 4 chain (COL4), cysteine rich protein 2 (CRP2), myoglobin (MYG), and galactoside 3-L-fucosyltransferase 4 (FUT4) was analyzed by Western blotting. These proteins were significantly higher in LPUH compared to FPUH (P<0.05). These data expand our understanding of changes in the intrauterine environment during the pre-implantation period in pigs. PMID:26968245

  4. In vivo TRPC functions in the cardiopulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Alexander; Kalwa, Hermann; Fuchs, Beate; Grimminger, Friedrich; Weissmann, Norbert; Gudermann, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the industrialized countries. The cardiovascular system includes the systemic blood circulation, the heart and the pulmonary circulation providing sufficient blood flow and oxygen to peripheral tissues and organs according to their metabolic demand. This review focuses on three major cell types of the cardiovascular system: myocytes of the heart as well as smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells from the systemic and pulmonary circulation. Ion channels initiate and regulate contraction in all three cell types, and the identification of their genes has significantly improved our knowledge of signal transduction pathways in these cells. Among the ion channels expressed in smooth muscle cells, cation channels of the TRPC family allow for the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+). Physiological functions of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7 in the cardiovascular system, dissected by down-regulating channel activity in isolated tissues or by the analysis of gene-deficient mouse models, are reviewed. Possible functional roles and physiological regulation of TRPCs as homomeric or heteromeric channels in these cell types are discussed. Moreover, TRP channels may also be responsible for pathophysiological processes of the cardiovascular system like hypertension as well as cardiac hypertrophy and increased endothelial permeability. PMID:17433435

  5. Stimulation of LH, FSH, and luteal blood flow by GnRH during the luteal phase in mares.

    PubMed

    Castro, T; Oliveira, F A; Siddiqui, M A R; Baldrighi, J M; Wolf, C A; Ginther, O J

    2016-03-01

    A study was performed on the effect of a single dose per mare of 0 (n = 9), 100 (n = 8), or 300 (n = 9) of GnRH on Day 10 (Day 0 = ovulation) on concentrations of LH, FSH, and progesterone (P4) and blood flow to the CL ovary. Hormone concentration and blood flow measurements were performed at hours 0 (hour of treatment), 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. Blood flow was assessed by spectral Doppler ultrasonography for resistance to blood flow in an ovarian artery before entry into the CL ovary. The percentage of the CL with color Doppler signals of blood flow was estimated from videotapes of real-time color Doppler imaging by an operator who was unaware of mare identity, hour, or treatment dose. Concentrations of LH and FSH increased (P < 0.05) at hour 0.25 and decreased (P < 0.05) over hours 1 to 6; P4 concentration was not altered by treatment. Blood flow resistance decreased between hours 0 and 1, but the decrease was greater (P < 0.05) for the 100-μg dose than for the 300-μg dose. The percentage of CL with blood flow signals increased (P < 0.05) between hours 0 and 1 with no significant difference between the 100- and 300-μg doses. The results supported the hypothesis that GnRH increases LH concentration, vascular perfusion of the CL ovary, and CL blood flow during the luteal phase; however, P4 concentration was not affected. PMID:26600292

  6. Human granulosa-luteal cells initiate an innate immune response to pathogen-associated molecules.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Laila A; Kramer, Joseph M; Williams, R Stan; Bromfield, John J

    2016-10-01

    The microenvironment of the ovarian follicle is key to the developmental success of the oocyte. Minor changes within the follicular microenvironment can significantly disrupt oocyte development, compromising the formation of competent embryos and reducing fertility. Previously described as a sterile environment, the ovarian follicle of women has been shown to contain colonizing bacterial strains, whereas in domestic species, pathogen-associated molecules are concentrated in the follicular fluid of animals with uterine infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether human granulosa-luteal cells mount an innate immune response to pathogen-associated molecules, potentially disrupting the microenvironment of the ovarian follicle. Human granulosa-luteal cells were collected from patients undergoing assisted reproduction. Cells were cultured in the presence of pathogen-associated molecules (LPS, FSL-1 and Pam3CSK4) for 24h. Supernatants and total RNA were collected for assessment by PCR and ELISA. Granulosa-luteal cells were shown to express the molecular machinery required to respond to a range of pathogen-associated molecules. Expression of TLR4 varied up to 15-fold between individual patients. Granulosa-luteal cells increased the expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6 and CXCL8 in the presence of the TLR4 agonist E. coli LPS. Similarly, the TLR2/6 ligand, FSL-1, increased the expression of IL6 and CXCL8. Although no detectable changes in CYP19A1 or STAR expression were observed in granulosa-luteal cells following challenge, a significant reduction in progesterone secretion was measured after treatment with FSL-1. These findings demonstrate the ability of human granulosa-luteal cells to respond to pathogen-associated molecules and generate an innate immune response. PMID:27512120

  7. Application of electrical stimulation for functional tissue engineering in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Milica (Inventor); Park, Hyoungshin (Inventor); Langer, Robert (Inventor); Freed, Lisa (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides new methods for the in vitro preparation of bioartificial tissue equivalents and their enhanced integration after implantation in vivo. These methods include submitting a tissue construct to a biomimetic electrical stimulation during cultivation in vitro to improve its structural and functional properties, and/or in vivo, after implantation of the construct, to enhance its integration with host tissue and increase cell survival and functionality. The inventive methods are particularly useful for the production of bioartificial equivalents and/or the repair and replacement of native tissues that contain electrically excitable cells and are subject to electrical stimulation in vivo, such as, for example, cardiac muscle tissue, striated skeletal muscle tissue, smooth muscle tissue, bone, vasculature, and nerve tissue.

  8. Circumferentially aligned fibers guided functional neoartery regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meifeng; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Jiamin; Wang, Lina; Yang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrui; Fan, Guanwei; Ji, Shenglu; Xing, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Kong, Deling; Wang, Lianyong

    2015-08-01

    An ideal vascular graft should have the ability to guide the regeneration of neovessels with structure and function similar to those of the native blood vessels. Regeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with circumferential orientation within the grafts is crucial for functional vascular reconstruction in vivo. To date, designing and fabricating a vascular graft with well-defined geometric cues to facilitate simultaneously VSMCs infiltration and their circumferential alignment remains a great challenge and scarcely reported in vivo. Thus, we have designed a bi-layered vascular graft, of which the internal layer is composed of circumferentially aligned microfibers prepared by wet-spinning and an external layer composed of random nanofibers prepared by electrospinning. While the internal circumferentially aligned microfibers provide topographic guidance for in vivo regeneration of circumferentially aligned VSMCs, the external random nanofibers can offer enhanced mechanical property and prevent bleeding during and after graft implantation. VSMCs infiltration and alignment within the scaffold was then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the circumferentially oriented VSMCs and longitudinally aligned ECs were successfully regenerated in vivo after the bi-layered vascular grafts were implanted in rat abdominal aorta. No formation of thrombosis or intimal hyperplasia was observed up to 3 month post implantation. Further, the regenerated neoartery exhibited contraction and relaxation property in response to vasoactive agents. This new strategy may bring cell-free small diameter vascular grafts closer to clinical application. PMID:26001073

  9. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Gortan Cappellari, Gianluca; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  10. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  11. Effects of ACL Reconstruction on In-Vivo, Dynamic Knee Function

    PubMed Central

    Tashman, Scott; Araki, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The purposes of this article are to discuss key factors for assessing joint function, to present some recent findings and to address the future directions for evaluating the function of the ACL-injured/reconstructed knees. Well-designed studies, using state-of-the art tools to assess knee kinematics under in vivo, dynamic, high-loading conditions, are necessary to evaluate the relative performance of different procedures for restoring normal joint motion. PMID:23177461

  12. In-vivo visualization and functional characterization of primary somatic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Donnelly, David F.; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    In-vivo electrophysiological recordings from cell bodies of primary sensory neurons are used to determine sensory function but are commonly performed blindly and without access to voltage-(patch-clamp) electrophysiology or optical imaging. We present a procedure to visualize and patch-clamp the neuronal cell body in the dorsal root ganglion, in vivo, manipulate its chemical environment, determine its receptive field properties, and remove it either to obtain subsequent molecular analyses or to gain access to deeper lying cells. This method allows the association of the peripheral transduction capacities of a sensory neuron with the biophysical and chemical characteristics of its cell body. PMID:20558205

  13. Functional analysis of propeptide as an intramolecular chaperone for in vivo folding of subtilisin nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Liu, Hui; Bao, Wei; Weng, Meizhi; Chen, Wei; Cai, Yongjun; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2010-12-01

    Here, we show that during in vivo folding of the precursor, the propeptide of subtilisin nattokinase functions as an intramolecular chaperone (IMC) that organises the in vivo folding of the subtilisin domain. Two residues belonging to β-strands formed by conserved regions of the IMC are crucial for the folding of the subtilisin domain through direct interactions. An identical protease can fold into different conformations in vivo due to the action of a mutated IMC, resulting in different kinetic parameters. Some interfacial changes involving conserved regions, even those induced by the subtilisin domain, blocked subtilisin folding and altered its conformation. Insight into the interaction between the subtilisin and IMC domains is provided by a three-dimensional structural model. PMID:21074529

  14. In vivo veritas: using yeast to probe the biological functions of G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jay E.; Smith, Jasmine S.; Kozak, Marina L.; Johnson, F. Brad

    2008-01-01

    Certain guanine-rich sequences are capable of forming higher order structures known as G-quadruplexes. Moreover, particular genomic regions in a number of highly divergent organisms are enriched for such sequences, raising the possibility that G-quadruplexes form in vivo and affect cellular processes. While G-quadruplexes have been rigorously studied in vitro, whether these structures actually form in vivo and what their roles might be in the context of the cell have remained largely unanswered questions. Recent studies suggest that G-quadruplexes participate in the regulation of such varied processes as telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation and ribosome biogenesis. Here we review studies aimed at elucidating the in vivo functions of quadruplex structures, with a particular focus on findings in yeast. In addition, we discuss the utility of yeast model systems in the study of the cellular roles of G-quadruplexes. PMID:18331848

  15. A genome scale resource for in vivo tag-based protein function exploration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sarov, Mihail; Murray, John; Schanze, Kristin; Pozniakovski, Andrei; Niu, Wei; Angermann, Karolin; Hasse, Susanne; Rupprecht, Michaela; Vinis, Elisabeth; Tinney, Matthew; Preston, Elicia; Zinke, Andrea; Enst, Susanne; Teichgraber, Tina; Janette, Judith; Reis, Kadri; Janosch, Stephan; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Ejsmont, Radoslaw K.; Slightam, Cindie; Xu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K.; Reinke, Valerie; Stewart, A. Francis; Snyder, Michael; Waterston, Robert; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the in vivo dynamics of protein localization and their physical interactions is important for many problems in Biology. To enable systematic protein function interrogation in a multicelluar context, we built a genome-scale transgenic platform for in vivo expression of fluorescent and affinity tagged proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans under endogenous cis regulatory control. The platform combines computer-assisted transgene design, massively parallel DNA engineering and next generation sequencing to generate a resource of 14637 genomic DNA transgenes, which covers 73% of the proteome. The multipurpose tag used allows any protein of interest to be localized in vivo or affinity purified using standard tag-based assays. We illustrate the utility of the resource by systematic chromatin immunopurification and automated 4D imaging, which produced detailed DNA binding and cell/tissue distribution maps for key transcription factor proteins PMID:22901814

  16. Ultrastructural features of goat oviductal secretory cells at follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    ABE, HIROYUKI; ONODERA, MASAKAZU; SUGAWARA, SHICHIRO; SATOH, TAKESHI; HOSHI, HIROYOSHI

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ultrastructure of secretory cells in the various regions of the goat oviduct during the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle. During the follicular phase in the fimbriae, the secretory cells contained small secretory granules with electron-dense matrices. In the luteal phase, the secretory granules disappeared and cytoplasmic protrusions, extending beyond the luminal border of the ciliated cells and often containing the nucleus, were predominant. During the follicular phase in ampullary secretory cells, numerous secretory granules with moderately electron-dense matrices were present in the supranuclear cytoplasm and exocytosis of secretory granules was observed. The number of secretory granules was dramatically reduced in the ampullary secretory cells at the luteal phase. Conspicuous cytoplasmic protrusions of secretory cells were observed similar to those of the fimbrial epithelium. Isthmic cells were almost free of secretory granules and lysosome-like bodies were found both at the follicular and luteal phases. In conclusion, our ultrastructural observations of goat oviduct revealed marked cyclic changes in the ultrastructural features of secretory cells and the ultrastructural features and the numbers of secretory granules were distinctive for each particular segment. PMID:10634690

  17. Effects of concanavalin A on the progesterone production by bovine steroidogenic luteal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Destro, F C; Martin, I; Landim-Alvarenga, Fdc; Ferreira, Jcp; Pate, J L

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of concanavalin A (CONA) on the progesterone (P4) production by bovine steroidogenic luteal cells (LCs) in vitro. Luteal cells were collected during the mid-luteal stage (at 10-12 days following ovulation) and processed in the laboratory. Luteal cells were grown for 7 days in a humid atmosphere with 5% CO2 , with or without 10% foetal bovine serum, and were subjected to the following treatments: control: no treatment; CONA (10 μg/ml); LH (100 μg/ml); CONA + LH; LH (100 μg/ml) + prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) (10 ng/ml); CONA + LH + PGF2α. Samples of the culture media were collected on days 1 (D1) and 7 (D7) for P4 quantification. The cells were counted on D7 of culture. Differences between treatments were considered statistically significant at p < .05. Culture in the presence of CONA decreased the P4-secreting capacity of LCs on D7 of culture, particularly in the absence of serum. The cell numbers did not change between treatments. PMID:27558864

  18. ATF3 Expression in the corpus luteum: possible role in luteal regression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the induction and possible role of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) in the corpus luteum. Postpubertal cattle were treated at midcycle with prostaglandin F2alpha(PGF) for 0–4 hours. Luteal tissue was processed for immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, an...

  19. Applications of phosphorescent materials for in-vivo imaging of brain structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boverman, Gregory; Shi, Xiaolei; Cotero, Victoria E.; Filkins, Robert J.; Srivastava, Alok M.; Lorraine, Peter W.; Neculaes, Vasile B.; Ishaque, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    A number of approaches have been developed for in-vivo imaging of neural function at the time scale of action potentials and at the spatial resolution of individual neurons. Remarkable results have been obtained with optogenetics, although the need for genetic modification is an important limitation of these approaches. Similarly, voltage and ion-sensitive dyes allow for optical imaging of action potentials but toxicity remains a problem. Additionally, optical techniques are often only able to be used up to a limited depth. Our preliminary work has shown that nanoparticles of common phosphorescent materials, believed to be generally non-toxic, specifically lutetium oxide and strontium aluminate, can be utilized for cellular imaging, for tomographic imaging, and that the particles can be designed to adhere to neurons. Additionally, lutetium oxide has been shown to be highly X-ray luminescent, potentially allowing for imaging deep within the brain, if the particles can be targeted properly. In ex vivo experiments, we have shown that the phosphorescence of strontium aluminate particles is significantly affected by electric fields similar in strength to those found in the vicinity of the cellular membrane of a neuron. This phenomenon is consistent with early published reports in the electroluminescence literature, namely the Gudden-Pohl effect. We will show results of the ex vivo imaging and dynamic electrical stimulation experiments. We will also show some preliminary ex vivo cell culture results, and will describe plans for future research, focusing on potential in both cell cultures and in vivo for animal models.

  20. A protein targeting signal that functions in polarized epithelial cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, S; Hall, J; Hazlewood, G P; Hirst, B H; Gilbert, H J

    1996-01-01

    Eukaryotic membrane-associated polypeptides often contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that signals the attachment of GPI lipids to these proteins. The GPI anchor can function as a basolateral or apical targeting signal in mammalian cells cultured in vitro, although the function of the GPI anchor in vivo remains to be elucidated. In this study we have evaluated the effect of fusing a GPI anchor sequence to a prokaryotic reporter protein on the cellular location of the polypeptide in polarized epithelial cells of transgenic mice. The bacterial enzyme, when fused to a eukaryotic signal peptide, was secreted through the basolateral membrane of small-intestinal enterocytes; however, when the enzyme was lined to the GPI anchor sequence the polypeptide was redirected to the apical surface of the epithelial cells. These data provide the first direct evidence that the GPI anchor functions as an apical membrane protein sorting signal in polarized epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:8645168

  1. Establishment and characterization of a simian virus 40-transformed temperature-sensitive rat luteal cell line.

    PubMed

    Sugino, N; Zilberstein, M; Srivastava, R K; Telleria, C M; Nelson, S E; Risk, M; Chou, J Y; Gibori, G

    1998-04-01

    The primary culture of rat luteal cells and their long-term maintenance have been difficult. Low cellular yields have limited the possibility for the study of gene regulation in luteal cells. The goal of this study was to develop a cell line to serve as a model by which to study the expression and regulation of various genes specific to luteal cells. We attempted to develop a luteal cell line by transformation of large luteal cells through infection with a temperature-sensitive simian virus (SV-40 tsA209) mutant that has a temperature-sensitive mutation required for the maintenance of cell transformation. We report here the successful establishment of such a cell line, designated GG-CL cells. Large luteal cells were purified to homogeneity by flow cytometry from corpora lutea of day 14 pregnant rats, cultured for 24 h, and then infected with the SV-40 tsA209 mutant virus. Transformed cells were maintained at the permissive temperature (33 C) until colonies were identified. Several colonies of transformed cells were isolated and passaged. They multiplied at 33 C and formed multilayers. At the nonpermissive temperature (40 C), cells reverted to the normal differentiated phenotype similar to the primary luteal cells in culture. To determine whether GG-CL cells express the genes found in normal luteal cells, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was examined by either Northern analysis or RT-PCR with primers specific to each mRNA. GG-CL cells were found to express receptors for interleukin-6 and glucocorticoid, as well as the newly discovered estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) and the orphan nuclear receptor nur 77. No receptors for ER-alpha, progesterone, LH, or PRL could be detected. This cell line also expressed 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 (P450scc), 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, or aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom). Although the cells did not express the PRL receptor, they did express

  2. Reproductive performance of dairy cows with luteal or follicular ovarian cysts after treatment with buserelin.

    PubMed

    Probo, Monica; Comin, Antonella; Mollo, Antonio; Cairoli, Fausto; Stradaioli, Giuseppe; Veronesi, Maria C

    2011-09-01

    In dairy farm management economic losses resulting from cystic ovarian degeneration are well known. In spite of this, neither the definition nor the aetiopathology of ovarian cysts are clear and agreed upon. Also the usual classification in luteal and follicular cysts, requiring ultrasound examination together with assessment of P4 to be accurate, is not very helpful in field conditions. Consequently a single treatment is often provided for both types of cysts, and since the 1970s treatments with GnRH and its analogues have been considered very useful. Nevertheless differences in recovery rates after GnRH treatment in animals with either luteal or follicular cysts are reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate recovery rate, recovery time and conception rate after treatment with buserelin (GnRH-analogue) in cows with ovarian luteal or follicular cysts. In a 5 years period, 150 cows with cysts out of a total of 990 animals, were detected and treated intravenously between 45 and 60 days PP with 20μg buserelin. No statistically significant differences were found in recovery rates and in conception rates between the two types of cysts. Comparison of recovery times showed significantly shorter recovery for cows with luteal cysts. The results emphasise the usefulness of GnRH to treat ovarian cysts regardless of their type, in relation to both recovery and conception rates. Intervals from treatment to resumption of ovarian activity were affected by the characteristics of ovarian cysts, with a faster recovery for the luteal type. PMID:21920681

  3. Comparison of oral dydrogesterone with vaginal progesteronefor luteal support in IUI cycles: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Donya; Taheripanah, Robabeh; Taheripanah, Anahita; Tarighat Monfared, Vahid; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study, we have compared the advantages of oral dydrogestrone with vaginal progesterone (cyclogest) for luteal support in intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles. Progesterone supplementation is the first line treatment when luteal phase deficiency (LPD) can reasonably be assumed. Objective: This study was conduct to compare the effect of oral dydrogestrone with vaginal Cyclogest on luteal phase support in the IUI cycles. Materials and Methods: This prospective, randomized, double blind study was performed in a local infertility center from May 2013 to May 2014. It consisted of 150 infertile women younger than35years old undergoing ovarian stimulation for IUI cycles. They underwent ovarian stimulation with oral dydrogesterone (20 mg) as group A and vaginal cyclogest (400 mg) as group B in preparation for the IUI cycles. Clinical pregnancy and abortion rates, mid luteal progesterone (7daysafter IUI) and patient satisfaction were compared between two groups. Results: The mean serum progesterone levels was significantly higher in group A in comparison with group B (p=0.001). Pregnancy rates in group A was not statistically different in comparison with group B (p =0.58). Abortion rate in two groups was not statistically different (p =0.056) although rate of abortion was higher in group B in comparison with A group. Satisfaction rates were significantly higher in group A compared to group B (p<0.001). Conclusion: We concluded that oral dydrogestrone is effective as vaginal progesterone for luteal-phase support in woman undergoing IUI cycles. Moreover, the mean serum progesterone levels and satisfaction rates in dydrogestrone group were higher than cyclogest group. PMID:26494991

  4. Functionalized gold nanoparticles: a detailed in vivo multimodal microscopic brain distribution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Fernanda; Mandal, Subhra; Garrovo, Chiara; Astolfo, Alberto; Bonifacio, Alois; Latawiec, Diane; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Huewel, Sabine; Legname, Giuseppe; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Krol, Silke

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex.In the present study, the in vivo distribution of polyelectrolyte multilayer coated gold nanoparticles is shown, starting from the living animal down to cellular level. The coating was designed with functional moieties to serve as a potential nano drug for prion disease. With near infrared time-domain imaging we followed the biodistribution in mice up to 7 days after intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The peak concentration in the head of mice was detected between 19 and 24 h. The precise particle distribution in the brain was studied ex vivo by X-ray microtomography, confocal laser and fluorescence microscopy. We found that the particles mainly accumulate in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the cerebral cortex. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S6. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00345j

  5. Development of Chemical Probes for Investigation of Salt-Inducible Kinase Function in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Thomas B; Liang, Yanke; Wu, Huixian; Choi, Hwan Geun; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo; Johannessen, Liv; Petrone, Adam; Khor, Bernard; Graham, Daniel B; Latorre, Isabel J; Phillips, Andrew J; Schreiber, Stuart L; Perez, Jose; Shamji, Alykhan F; Gray, Nathanael S; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-08-19

    Salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) are promising therapeutic targets for modulating cytokine responses during innate immune activation. The study of SIK inhibition in animal models of disease has been limited by the lack of selective small-molecule probes suitable for modulating SIK function in vivo. We used the pan-SIK inhibitor HG-9-91-01 as a starting point to develop improved analogs, yielding a novel probe 5 (YKL-05-099) that displays increased selectivity for SIKs versus other kinases and enhanced pharmacokinetic properties. Well-tolerated doses of YKL-05-099 achieve free serum concentrations above its IC50 for SIK2 inhibition for >16 h and reduce phosphorylation of a known SIK substrate in vivo. While in vivo active doses of YKL-05-099 recapitulate the effects of SIK inhibition on inflammatory cytokine responses, they did not induce metabolic abnormalities observed in Sik2 knockout mice. These results identify YKL-05-099 as a useful probe to investigate SIK function in vivo and further support the development of SIK inhibitors for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27224444

  6. Uptake of postprandial lipoproteins into bone in vivo: impact on osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Niemeier, Andreas; Niedzielska, Dagmara; Secer, Rukiye; Schilling, Arndt; Merkel, Martin; Enrich, Carlos; Rensen, Patrick C N; Heeren, Joerg

    2008-08-01

    Dietary lipids and lipophilic vitamins are transported by postprandial lipoproteins and are required for bone metabolism. Despite that, it remains unknown whether bone cells are involved in the uptake of circulating postprandial lipoproteins in vivo. The current study was performed to investigate a putative participation of bone in the systemic postprandial lipoprotein metabolism in mice, to identify potentially involved cell type populations and to analyze whether lipoprotein uptake affects bone function in vivo. As a model for the postprandial state, chylomicron remnants (CR) were injected intravenously into mice. Next to the liver and compared to other organs, bone appeared to be the second most important organ for the clearance of radiolabeled CR particles from the circulation in vivo. In addition, uptake of radiolabeled CR by primary murine osteoblasts and hepatocytes was quantified to be in a similar range in vitro. A complementary approach with fluorescently labeled CR and immunohistochemical staining for apoE proved that intact CR particles were taken up into bone and liver. Electron microscopy localization studies of bone sections revealed CR uptake into sinusoidal endothelial cells, macrophages and osteoblasts. The relative amount of radiolabeled CR uptake into femoral cortical bone, representing predominantly osteoblasts, and bone marrow, representing predominantly non-osteoblast cells, was within the same range. Most importantly, the injection of vitamin K1-enriched CR resulted in an increase of the degree of osteocalcin carboxylation in vivo while total osteocalcin concentrations remained unaffected, giving functional proof that osteoblasts process CR in vivo. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that bone is involved in the postprandial lipoprotein metabolism in mice. Osteoblasts participate in CR clearance from the circulation, which has a direct impact on the secretory function of osteoblasts. PMID:18538644

  7. In Vivo Function of Tryptophans in the Arabidopsis UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8[W

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Andrew; Jenkins, Gareth I.

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) is a photoreceptor specifically for UV-B light that initiates photomorphogenic responses in plants. UV-B exposure causes rapid conversion of UVR8 from dimer to monomer, accumulation in the nucleus, and interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), which functions with UVR8 in UV-B responses. Studies in yeast and with purified UVR8 implicate several tryptophan amino acids in UV-B photoreception. However, their roles in UV-B responses in plants, and the functional significance of all 14 UVR8 tryptophans, are not known. Here we report the functions of the UVR8 tryptophans in vivo. Three tryptophans in the β-propeller core are important in maintaining structural stability and function of UVR8. However, mutation of three other core tryptophans and four at the dimeric interface has no apparent effect on function in vivo. Mutation of three tryptophans implicated in UV-B photoreception, W233, W285, and W337, impairs photomorphogenic responses to different extents. W285 is essential for UVR8 function in plants, whereas W233 is important but not essential for function, and W337 has a lesser role. Ala mutants of these tryptophans appear monomeric and constitutively bind COP1 in plants, but their responses indicate that monomer formation and COP1 binding are not sufficient for UVR8 function. PMID:23012433

  8. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L.; Church, George M.; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H.; Gerber, Georg K.

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Populationmore » dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Here, our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.« less

  9. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo. PMID:25762151

  10. In vivo generation of a mature and functional artificial skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fuoco, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Biondo, Antonella; Longa, Emanuela; Mascaro, Anna; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Kossovar, Olga; Benedetti, Sara; Salvatori, Maria L; Santoleri, Sabrina; Testa, Stefano; Bernardini, Sergio; Bottinelli, Roberto; Bearzi, Claudia; Cannata, Stefano M; Seliktar, Dror; Cossu, Giulio; Gargioli, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Extensive loss of skeletal muscle tissue results in mutilations and severe loss of function. In vitro-generated artificial muscles undergo necrosis when transplanted in vivo before host angiogenesis may provide oxygen for fibre survival. Here, we report a novel strategy based upon the use of mouse or human mesoangioblasts encapsulated inside PEG-fibrinogen hydrogel. Once engineered to express placental-derived growth factor, mesoangioblasts attract host vessels and nerves, contributing to in vivo survival and maturation of newly formed myofibres. When the graft was implanted underneath the skin on the surface of the tibialis anterior, mature and aligned myofibres formed within several weeks as a complete and functional extra muscle. Moreover, replacing the ablated tibialis anterior with PEG-fibrinogen-embedded mesoangioblasts also resulted in an artificial muscle very similar to a normal tibialis anterior. This strategy opens the possibility for patient-specific muscle creation for a large number of pathological conditions involving muscle tissue wasting. PMID:25715804

  11. Functional Studies of the Carboxy-Terminal Repeat Domain of Drosophila RNA Polymerase II in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brickey, W. J.; Greenleaf, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    To understand the in vivo function of the unique and conserved carboxy-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RpII215), we have studied RNA polymerase II biosynthesis, activity and genetic function in Drosophila RpII215 mutants that possessed all (C4), half (W81) or none (IIt) of the CTD repeats. We have discovered that steady-state mRNA levels from transgenes encoding a fully truncated, CTD-less subunit (IIt) are essentially equal to wild-type levels, whereas the levels of the CTD-less subunit itself and the amount of polymerase harboring it (Pol IIT) are significantly lower than wild type. In contrast, for the half-CTD mutant (W81), steady-state mRNA levels are somewhat lower than for wild type or IIt, while W81 subunit and polymerase amounts are much less than wild type. Finally, we have tested genetically the ability of CTD mutants to complement (rescue) partially functional RpII215 alleles and have found that IIt fails to complement whereas W81 complements partially to completely. These results suggest that removal of the entire CTD renders polymerase completely defective in vivo, whereas eliminating half of the CTD results in a polymerase with significant in vivo activity. PMID:7498740

  12. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  13. Structural Determinants of Arabidopsis thaliana Hyponastic Leaves 1 Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burdisso, Paula; Milia, Fernando; Schapire, Arnaldo L.; Bologna, Nicolás G.; Palatnik, Javier F.; Rasia, Rodolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have turned out to be important regulators of gene expression. These molecules originate from longer transcripts that are processed by ribonuclease III (RNAse III) enzymes. Dicer proteins are essential RNAse III enzymes that are involved in the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other small RNAs. The correct function of Dicer relies on the participation of accessory dsRNA binding proteins, the exact function of which is not well-understood so far. In plants, the double stranded RNA binding protein Hyponastic Leaves 1 (HYL1) helps Dicer Like protein (DCL1) to achieve an efficient and precise excision of the miRNAs from their primary precursors. Here we dissected the regions of HYL1 that are essential for its function in Arabidopsis thaliana plant model. We generated mutant forms of the protein that retain their structure but affect its RNA-binding properties. The mutant versions of HYL1 were studied both in vitro and in vivo, and we were able to identify essential aminoacids/residues for its activity. Remarkably, mutation and even ablation of one of the purportedly main RNA binding determinants does not give rise to any major disturbances in the function of the protein. We studied the function of the mutant forms in vivo, establishing a direct correlation between affinity for the pri-miRNA precursors and protein activity. PMID:25409478

  14. In-vivo imaging of the photoreceptor mosaic in retinal dystrophies and correlations with visual function

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S; Doble, N; Hardy, J; Jones, S; Keltner, J; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2005-10-26

    To relate in-vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function assessed with clinical tests in patients with various forms of retinal dystrophies. The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) Fundus Camera was used to acquire in-vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests, consisting of visual field analysis, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), contrast sensitivity and color vision measures, were performed on all subjects. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophies and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were characteristic features in fundi with retinal dystrophies. There was a correlation between functional vision loss and the extent to which the irregularities occurred in retinal images. Cone densities were found to decrease with an associated decrease in retinal function. AO fundus photography is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests give borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors.

  15. Alteration of canine left ventricular diastolic function by intravenous anesthetics in vivo. Ketamine and propofol.

    PubMed

    Pagel, P S; Schmeling, W T; Kampine, J P; Warltier, D C

    1992-03-01

    Diastolic function has been shown to influence overall cardiac performance significantly, but the effect of intravenous anesthetics on diastolic function has not been previously characterized in vivo. The effects of ketamine and propofol on two indices of left ventricular diastolic function were examined in chronically instrumented dogs. Because autonomic nervous system function may significantly influence the systemic hemodynamic actions produced by intravenous anesthetics in vivo, experiments were performed in the presence of pharmacologic blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Two groups comprising a total of 14 experiments were performed using 7 dogs instrumented for measurement of aortic and left ventricular pressure, the maximum rate of increase of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt), subendocardial segment length, and cardiac output. Systemic hemodynamics and diastolic function were recorded and evaluated in the conscious state and after a 20-min equilibration at 25-, 50-, and 100-mg.kg-1.h-1 infusion doses of ketamine or propofol. Ventricular relaxation was described using the time constant of isovolumetric relaxation (tau) assuming a nonzero asymptote of ventricular pressure decay. Regional chamber stiffness, an index of passive ventricular filling, was described using an exponential equation relating segment length to ventricular pressure between minimum ventricular pressure and the onset of atrial systole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1539854

  16. Transcription factor YY1 functions as a PcG protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Lakshmi; Ghias, Ayesha; Wilkinson, Frank; Bonini, Nancy; Atchison, Michael L

    2003-03-17

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins function as high molecular weight complexes that maintain transcriptional repression patterns during embryogenesis. The vertebrate DNA binding protein and transcriptional repressor, YY1, shows sequence homology with the Drosophila PcG protein, pleiohomeotic (PHO). YY1 might therefore be a vertebrate PcG protein. We used Drosophila embryo and larval/imaginal disc transcriptional repression systems to determine whether YY1 repressed transcription in a manner consistent with PcG function in vivo. YY1 repressed transcription in Drosophila, and this repression was stable on a PcG-responsive promoter, but not on a PcG-non-responsive promoter. PcG mutants ablated YY1 repression, and YY1 could substitute for PHO in repressing transcription in wing imaginal discs. YY1 functionally compensated for loss of PHO in pho mutant flies and partially corrected mutant phenotypes. Taken together, these results indicate that YY1 functions as a PcG protein. Finally, we found that YY1, as well as Polycomb, required the co-repressor protein CtBP for repression in vivo. These results provide a mechanism for recruitment of vertebrate PcG complexes to DNA and demonstrate new functions for YY1. PMID:12628927

  17. In vivo investigations on luteotropic activity of prostaglandins during early diestrus in nonpregnant bitches.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Tomasz; Fingerhut, Julia; Kowalewski, Mariusz P; Zduńczyk, Sławomir; Domosławska, Anna; Jurczak, Andrzej; Boos, Alois; Schuler, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test for the postulated luteotropic effect of prostaglandin E2 during early diestrus in the dog in an in vivo study. This study was performed on 30 bitches which were randomly assigned to a treatment group (TG) and a control group. Starting on the day of ovulation (Day 0), dogs of the TG were treated for 5, 10, 20, or 30 days with 10 mg firocoxib/kg body weight per day (Previcox, a selective PTGS2 inhibitor) and ovariohysterectomized for collection of corpora lutea on the last day of treatment. Similarly, dogs of the control group were ovariohysterectomized on Days 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30. Blood samples for progesterone measurement were collected every second day; additionally, the area of luteal cell nuclei and the expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase at the mRNA and the protein levels were assessed. Mean P4 concentrations were lower in TGs; however, a significant difference was only observed on Day 10. This observation is in line with the finding that treatment with firocoxib reduced expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase mRNA and protein (P < 0.05) and the area of luteal cell nuclei (P < 0.05). The results of this study further point to the postulated luteotropic function of prostaglandin E2. PMID:25115648

  18. In vivo functional microangiography by visible-light optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Although hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) in the microvasculature is an essential physiological parameter of local tissue functions, non-invasive measurement of microvascular sO2 is still challenging. Here, we demonstrated that visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) can simultaneously provide three-dimensional anatomical tissue morphology, visualize microvasculature at the capillary level, and measure sO2 from the microvasculature in vivo. We utilized speckle contrast caused by the moving blood cells to enhance microvascular imaging. We applied a series of short-time inverse Fourier transforms to obtain the spectroscopic profile of blood optical attenuation, from which we quantified sO2. We validated the sO2 measurement in mouse ears in vivo through hypoxia and hyperoxia challenges. We further demonstrated that vis-OCT can continuously monitor dynamic changes of microvascular sO2. PMID:25360376

  19. Dual-selection for evolution of in vivo functional aptazymes as riboswitch parts.

    PubMed

    Goler, Jonathan A; Carothers, James M; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    Both synthetic biology and metabolic engineering are aided by the development of genetic control parts. One class of riboswitch parts that has great potential for sensing and regulation of protein levels is aptamer-coupled ribozymes (aptazymes). These devices are comprised of an aptamer domain selected to bind a particular ligand, a ribozyme domain, and a communication module that regulates the ribozyme activity based on the state of the aptamer. We describe a broadly applicable method for coupling a novel, newly selected aptamer to a ribozyme to generate functional aptazymes via in vitro and in vivo selection. To illustrate this approach, we describe experimental procedures for selecting aptazymes assembled from aptamers that bind p-amino-phenylalanine and a hammerhead ribozyme. Because this method uses selection, it does not rely on sequence-specific design and thus should be generalizable for the generation of in vivo operational aptazymes that respond to any targeted molecules. PMID:24549623

  20. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  1. CRISPR/Cas9 Promotes Functional Study of Testis Specific X-Linked Gene In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xue; Chen, Yuxi; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiya; Liang, Puping; Zhan, Shaoquan; Cao, Shanbo; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a highly regulated multistage process of sperm generation. It is hard to uncover the real function of a testis specific gene in vitro since the in vitro model is not yet mature. With the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system, we can now rapidly generate knockout mouse models of testis specific genes to study the process of spermatogenesis in vivo. SYCP3-like X-linked 2 (SLX2) is a germ cell specific component, which contains a Cor1 domain and belongs to the XLR (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family. Previous studies suggested that SLX2 might play an important role in mouse spermatogenesis based on its subcellular localization and interacting proteins. However, the function of SLX2 in vivo is still elusive. Here, to investigate the functions of SLX2 in spermatogenesis, we disrupted the Slx2 gene by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Since Slx2 is a testis specific X-linked gene, we obtained knockout male mice in the first generation and accelerated the study process. Compared with wild-type mice, Slx2 knockout mice have normal testis and epididymis. Histological observation of testes sections showed that Slx2 knockout affected none of the three main stages of spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. In addition, we further confirmed that disruption of Slx2 did not affect the number of spermatogonial stem cells, meiosis progression or XY body formation by immunofluorescence analysis. As spermatogenesis was normal in Slx2 knockout mice, these mice were fertile. Taken together, we showed that Slx2 itself is not an essential gene for mouse spermatogenesis and CRISPR/Cas9 technique could speed up the functional study of testis specific X-linked gene in vivo. PMID:26599493

  2. Critical role of tissue mast cells in controlling long-term glucose sensor function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Klueh, Ulrike; Kaur, Manjot; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the specific cells, mediators and mechanisms involved in the loss of glucose sensor function (GSF) in vivo. Since mast cells (MC) are known to be key effector cells in inflammation and wound healing, we hypothesized that MC and their products are major contributors to the skin inflammation and wound healing that controls GSF at sites of sensor implantation. To test this hypothesis we utilized a murine model of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo in both normal C57BL/6 mice (mast cell sufficient), as well as mast cell deficient B6.Cg-Kit(W-sh)/HNihrJaeBsmJ (Sash) mice over a 28 day CGM period. As expected, both strains of mice displayed excellent CGM for the first 7 days post sensor implantation (PSI). CGM in the mast cell sufficient C57BL/6 mice was erratic over the remaining 21 days PSI. CGM in the mast cell deficient Sash mice displayed excellent sensor function for the entire 28 day of CGM. Histopathologic evaluation of implantation sites demonstrated that tissue reactions in Sash mice were dramatically less compared to the reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, mast cells were also seen to be consistently associated with the margins of sensor tissue reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Finally, direct injection of bone marrow derived mast cells at sites of sensor implantation induced an acute and dramatic loss of sensor function in both C57BL/6 and Sash mice. These results demonstrate the key role of mast cells in controlling glucose sensor function in vivo. PMID:20226521

  3. In Vivo Imaging of the Photoreceptor Mosaic in Retinal Dystrophies and Correlations with Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan; Hardy, Joseph L.; Jones, Steven M.; Keltner, John L.; Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To relate in vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function in patients who have various forms of retinal dystrophy. Methods The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) fundus camera was used to acquire in vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests consisting of visual fields, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), and contrast sensitivity were measured in all subjects by using stimuli that were coincident with areas imaged. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophy and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. Results In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were apparent in patients with retinal dystrophy. There were significant correlations between functional vision losses and the extent to which these irregularities, quantified by cone density, occurred in retinal images. Conclusions AO fundus imaging is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests provide borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors. PMID:16639019

  4. N-acetylcysteine impairs survival of luteal cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Löhrke, Berthold; Xu, Jinxian; Weitzel, Joachim M; Krüger, Burkhard; Goldammer, Tom; Viergutz, Torsten

    2010-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is known as an antioxidant and used for mucus viscosity reduction. However, this drug prevents or induces cell death depending on the cell type. The response of steroidogenic luteal cells to NAC is unknown. Our data shows that NAC can behave as an antioxidant or prooxidant in dependency on the concentration and mitochondrial energization. NAC elevated the flowcytometric-measured portion of hypodiploid (dying) cells. This rise was completely abolished by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. NAC increased the secretion of nitric oxide and cellular nitrotyrosine. An image analysis indicated that cells pretreated with NAC and loaded with DHR showed a fluorescent structure probably elicited by the oxidative product of DHR, rhodamine 123 that sequesters mitochondrially. Pretreating luteal cells with NAC or adding NAC directly to mitochondrial fractions followed by assessing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential difference (Deltapsi) by the JC-1 technique demonstrated a marked decrease in Deltapsi. A protonophore restored Deltapsi and rotenone (an inhibitor of respiratory chain complex I) inhibited mitochondrial recovering. Thus, in steroidogenic luteal cells from healthy mature corpus luteum, NAC impairs cellular survival by interfering with mitochondrial metabolism. The protonophore-induced recovering of NAC-provoked decrease in Deltapsi indicates that an ATP synthase-favored route of H(+) re-entry to the matrix is essentially switched off by NAC while other respiratory chain complexes remain intact. These data may be important for therapeutic timing of treatments with NAC. (c) 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:20151456

  5. Stress and memory retrieval in women: no strong impairing effect during the luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Daniela; Wolf, Oliver T

    2009-06-01

    Stress has been shown to impair delayed memory retrieval, but so far no study has been conducted solely with naturally cycling women. In a crossover design, 36 women (all in the luteal phase) participated in two experimental conditions (stress vs. control). Delayed memory retrieval of a wordlist learned 24 hours earlier was tested after stress or control treatment. Although stressed subjects showed a strong cortisol increase following stress, no influence on memory retrieval occurred. In an additional data analysis, subjects were split up into a cortisol responder and a cortisol nonresponder group. However, again no evidence for a stress-induced retrieval impairment became apparent. Similarly, no correlation was observed between the stress-induced cortisol increase and memory. This study failed to find an influence of stress on memory retrieval in women tested in the luteal phase. The findings are in contrast to our previous results obtained with men. Evidence is discussed that the luteal phase, which is characterized by elevated gonadal steroids, is associated with reduced glucocorticoid sensitivity. This might underlie the missing impact of stress on memory. PMID:19485561

  6. Partial characterization of a luteal factor that induces implantation in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Mead, R A; Joseph, M M; Neirinckx, S; Berria, M

    1988-05-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ferret corpora lutea (CL) secrete a compound that acts in conjunction with progesterone to induce blastocyst implantation and to identify the chemical nature of this compound. CL and the residual ovarian tissue, obtained predominantly on the ninth day of pseudopregnancy, were extracted with 0.05 M phosphate-buffered saline. The extracts were injected into pregnant ferrets that had been ovariectomized on Day 6 of pregnancy and had received Silastic implants containing progesterone. Aqueous luteal extracts, but not those of the residual ovarian tissue, induced implantation in test animals. Fractionation of the luteal extracts by passage through a series of filters with molecular weight (MW) cutoffs ranging from 500 to 50,000 consistently revealed that the biologically active fraction was retained on the filter with the highest MW cutoff employed. Moreover, blastocyst implantation failed to occur in ovariectomized, progesterone-treated ferrets after one-half of a luteal preparation (MW greater than 50,000) was incubated with a broad-spectrum protease. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that CL of the ferret secrete a protein during the preimplantation period that is essential for blastocyst implantation. PMID:3401538

  7. Dopamine impairs functional integrity of rat hepatocytes through nuclear factor kappa B activity modulation: An in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Lee, Po-Huang; Wu, Ming-Chang; Chen, Kun-Cho; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Chen, Po-Han

    2015-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) is commonly used to maintain the hemodynamic stability of brain-dead donors despite its controversial effects on organ functions. This study aimed at examining the hemodynamic effect of DA in a rat brain-dead model in vivo, alteration of hepatocyte integrity in liver grafts after ex vivo preservation, and changes in cultured clone-9 hepatocytes including cellular viability, cell cycle, apoptotic regulators, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling machinery. Although in vivo findings demonstrated enhanced portal venous blood flow and hepatic microcirculatory perfusion after DA infusion, no apparent advantage was noted in preserving hepatocyte integrity ex vivo. In vitro, prolonged exposure to high-dose DA reduced proliferation and induced G1 growth arrest of clone-9 hepatocytes with concomitant decreases in B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)/B cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (BAX) and heat shock protein 70/BAX protein ratios and intracellular NF-κB p65. Moreover, DA pretreatment suppressed LPS-elicited inhibitor of κBα phosphorylation and subsequent NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that DA may down-regulate NF-κB signaling, thereby reducing expression of antiapoptotic regulators, such as BCL2. In conclusion, despite augmentation of hepatic perfusion, DA infusion failed to preserve hepatocyte integrity both in vivo and ex vivo. In vitro findings demonstrated that high-dose DA may hamper the function of NF-κB signaling machinery and eventually undermine functional integrity of hepatocytes in liver grafts. PMID:26421799

  8. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  9. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  10. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C; Salhi, Hussam E; Hansen, Brian J; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M L; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Ziolo, Mark T; Davis, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca(2+) signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca(2+)-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  11. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  12. Noninvasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography for structural and functional in vivo imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueding; Pang, Yongjiang; Ku, Geng; Xie, Xueyi; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2003-07-01

    Imaging techniques based on optical contrast analysis can be used to visualize dynamic and functional properties of the nervous system via optical signals resulting from changes in blood volume, oxygen consumption and cellular swelling associated with brain physiology and pathology. Here we report in vivo noninvasive transdermal and transcranial imaging of the structure and function of rat brains by means of laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The advantage of PAT over pure optical imaging is that it retains intrinsic optical contrast characteristics while taking advantage of the diffraction-limited high spatial resolution of ultrasound. We accurately mapped rat brain structures, with and without lesions, and functional cerebral hemodynamic changes in cortical blood vessels around the whisker-barrel cortex in response to whisker stimulation. We also imaged hyperoxia- and hypoxia-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes. This neuroimaging modality holds promise for applications in neurophysiology, neuropathology and neurotherapy. PMID:12808463

  13. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C.; Salhi, Hussam E.; Hansen, Brian J.; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K.; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca2+ signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca2+-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  14. Fatigue alters in vivo function within and between limb muscles during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle fatigue, a reduction in force as a consequence of exercise, is an important factor for any animal that moves, and can result from both peripheral and/or central mechanisms. Although much is known about whole-limb force generation and activation patterns in fatigued muscles under sustained isometric contractions, little is known about the in vivo dynamics of limb muscle function in relation to whole-body fatigue. Here we show that limb kinematics and contractile function in the lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius of helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) are significantly altered following fatiguing exercise at 2 m s−1 on an inclined treadmill. The two most significant findings were that the variation in muscle force generation, measured directly from the muscles' tendons, increased significantly with fatigue, and fascicle shortening in the proximal MG, but not the distal MG, decreased significantly with fatigue. We suggest that the former is a potential mechanism for decreased stability associated with fatigue. The region-specific alteration of fascicle behaviour within the MG as a result of fatigue suggests a complex response to fatigue that probably depends on muscle–aponeurosis and tendon architecture not previously explored. These findings highlight the importance of studying the integrative in vivo dynamics of muscle function in response to fatigue. PMID:19129096

  15. Fatigue alters in vivo function within and between limb muscles during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Biewener, Andrew A

    2009-03-22

    Muscle fatigue, a reduction in force as a consequence of exercise, is an important factor for any animal that moves, and can result from both peripheral and/or central mechanisms. Although much is known about whole-limb force generation and activation patterns in fatigued muscles under sustained isometric contractions, little is known about the in vivo dynamics of limb muscle function in relation to whole-body fatigue. Here we show that limb kinematics and contractile function in the lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius of helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) are significantly altered following fatiguing exercise at 2ms-1 on an inclined treadmill. The two most significant findings were that the variation in muscle force generation, measured directly from the muscles' tendons, increased significantly with fatigue, and fascicle shortening in the proximal MG, but not the distal MG, decreased significantly with fatigue. We suggest that the former is a potential mechanism for decreased stability associated with fatigue. The region-specific alteration of fascicle behaviour within the MG as a result of fatigue suggests a complex response to fatigue that probably depends on muscle-aponeurosis and tendon architecture not previously explored. These findings highlight the importance of studying the integrative in vivo dynamics of muscle function in response to fatigue. PMID:19129096

  16. In vivo left ventricular function and collagen expression in aldosterone/salt-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Gil, J F; Delcayre, C; Robert, V; Wassef, M; Trouve, P; Mougenot, N; Charlemagne, D; Lechat, P

    1998-12-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is linked to aldosterone-induced hypertension, but the effects on in vivo left ventricular (LV) function are not established. We studied the relations between in vivo LV function and aldosterone/salt cardiac fibrosis. Adult guinea pigs (GPs) were treated for 3 months with an aldosterone infusion and high-salt diet. This treatment induced arterial hypertension (+35%) and moderate LV hypertrophy (LVH; +60%) without right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy. Echo-Doppler LV assessment demonstrated unaltered cardiac output, stroke volume, or LV relaxation. Type I collagen messenger RNA (mRNA) was significantly increased in both ventricles (LV, +48%; RV, +77%) and accompanied by a significant increase in total collagen deposition (LV, from 0.52% in controls to 4.4% in treated GPs; RV, from 0.82 to 5.5% in treated GPs). Plasma norepinephrine levels increased 2.6-fold (p < 0.01) and correlated with the increase in collagen deposition in both ventricles. Collagen content was not correlated with hypertension or LVH. We conclude that aldosterone administration induces cardiac collagen accumulation and a sympathetic stimulation, which might preserve systolic and diastolic function. PMID:9869498

  17. Copper-induced changes in reproductive functions: in vivo and in vitro effects.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhury, S; Nath, S; Massanyi, P; Stawarz, R; Kacaniova, M; Kolesarova, A

    2016-03-14

    The goal of this study is to summarize the current knowledge on the effects of one of the essential metals, copper (Cu) on the reproductive system. The development of past four decades addressing effects of Cu on reproductive organs is reviewed. The most relevant data obtained from in vivo and in vitro experiments performed on humans and other mammals, including effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on the reproductive functions are presented. Short term Cu administration has been found to exert deleterious effect on intracellular organelles of rat ovarian cells in vivo. In vitro administration in porcine ovarian granulosa cells releases insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I), steroid hormone progesterone (P(4)), and induces expression of peptides related to proliferation and apoptosis. Adverse effect of Cu on male reproductive functions has been indicated by the decrease in spermatozoa parameters such as concentration, viability and motility. Copper nanoparticles are capable of generating oxidative stress in vitro thereby leading to reproductive toxicity. Toxic effect of CuNPs has been evident more in male mice than in females. Even though further investigations are necessary to arrive at a definitive conclusion, Cu notably influences the reproductive functions by interfering with both male and female reproductive systems and also hampers embryo development in dose-dependent manner. PMID:26596322

  18. TYK2 Kinase Activity Is Required for Functional Type I Interferon Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Semper, Christian; Lassnig, Caroline; Wallner, Barbara; Gausterer, Christian; Teppner-Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Kobolak, Julianna; Müller, Simone; Kolbe, Thomas; Karaghiosoff, Marina; Dinnyés, Andras; Rülicke, Thomas; Leitner, Nicole R.; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a member of the Janus kinase (JAK) family and is involved in cytokine signalling. In vitro analyses suggest that TYK2 also has kinase-independent, i.e., non-canonical, functions. We have generated gene-targeted mice harbouring a mutation in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase domain. The Tyk2 kinase-inactive (Tyk2K923E) mice are viable and show no gross abnormalities. We show that kinase-active TYK2 is required for full-fledged type I interferon- (IFN) induced activation of the transcription factors STAT1-4 and for the in vivo antiviral defence against viruses primarily controlled through type I IFN actions. In addition, TYK2 kinase activity was found to be required for the protein’s stability. An inhibitory function was only observed upon over-expression of TYK2K923E in vitro. Tyk2K923E mice represent the first model for studying the kinase-independent function of a JAK in vivo and for assessing the consequences of side effects of JAK inhibitors. PMID:22723949

  19. Analysis of in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong

    Despite the high incidence of osteoarthritis in human knee joint, its causes remain unknown. Total knee replacement (TKR) has been shown clinically to be effective in restoring the knee function. However, wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene has limited the longevity of TKRs. To address these important issues, it is necessary to investigate the in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models. A multibody dynamic model of an AMTI knee simulator was developed. Incorporating a wear prediction model into the contact model based on elastic foundation theory enables the contact surface to take into account creep and wear during the dynamic simulation. Comparisons of the predicted damage depth, area, and volume lost with worn retrievals from a physical machine were made to validate the model. In vivo tibial force distributions during dynamic and high flexion activities were investigated using the dynamic contact model. In vivo medial and lateral contact forces experienced by a well-aligned instrumented knee implant, as well as upper and lower bounds on contact pressures for a variety of activities were studied. For all activities, the predicted medial and lateral contact forces were insensitive to the selected material model. For this patient, the load split during the mid-stance phase of gait and during stair is more equal than anticipated. The external knee adduction torque has been proposed as a surrogate measure for medial compartment load during gait. However, a direct link between these two quantities has not been demonstrated using in vivo measurement of medial compartment load. In vivo data collected from a subject with an instrumented knee implant were analyzed to evaluate this link. The subject performed five different overground gait motions (normal, fast, slow, wide, and toe out) while instrumented implant, video motion, and ground reaction data were simultaneously collected. The high correlation coefficient

  20. Photoacoustics and fluorescence based nanoprobes towards functional and structural imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha

    Imaging of chemical analytes and structural properties related to physiological activities within biological systems is of great bio-medical interest; it can contribute to the fundamental understanding of biological systems and can be applied to the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases, especially tumors. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development and application of polymeric nanoprobe aided optical imaging of chemical analytes (Oxygen, pH) and structural properties in live cells and animal models. To this end, specific nanoprobes, based on the polyacrylamide nanoplatform, bearing both appropriate targeting functionalities, and high concentrations of sensing and contrast agents, have been developed. The nanoprobes presented here are biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic, rendering them safe for in vivo use. Furthermore the nanoprobes are designed to have variable optical properties that are dependent on the local concentration of the specific analyte of interest. Optical imaging techniques that are particularly suited for deep tissue applications, such as two-photon fluorescence and photoacoustics, were applied for non-invasive real-time imaging and sensing in cancer cells, tumor spheroids and animal models. Our results demonstrate that this technique enables high sensitive detection of chemical analytes with a sensitivity of <5 Torr for oxygen and <0.1 pH units in vivo, which is better than the currently available in vivo functional imaging techniques. This non-invasive and non-ionizing, yet low cost, method will enable morphological and functional evaluation across any tissue, with both high spatial and temporal resolution but without eliciting short- or long-term tissue damage. Currently no gold standard exists for such xii functional imaging. The approach presented here can be used for early detection and diagnosis of tumors, as well as for monitoring the progression of disease and therapy. This technique will also enable observing

  1. Using CRISPR/Cas to study gene function and model disease in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Lowe, Scott W; Garippa, Ralph J; Livshits, Geulah

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of the CRISPR/Cas system and repurposing of this technology to edit a variety of different genomes have revolutionized an array of scientific fields, from genetics and translational research, to agriculture and bioproduction. In particular, the prospect of rapid and precise genome editing in laboratory animals by CRISPR/Cas has generated an immense interest in the scientific community. Here we review current in vivo applications of CRISPR/Cas and how this technology can improve our knowledge of gene function and our understanding of biological processes in animal models. PMID:27149548

  2. Minimally invasive microendoscopy system for in vivo functional imaging of deep nuclei in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Bocarsly, Miriam E.; Jiang, Wan-chen; Wang, Chen; Dudman, Joshua T.; Ji, Na; Aponte, Yeka

    2015-01-01

    The ability to image neurons anywhere in the mammalian brain is a major goal of optical microscopy. Here we describe a minimally invasive microendoscopy system for studying the morphology and function of neurons at depth. Utilizing a guide cannula with an ultrathin wall, we demonstrated in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of deeply buried nuclei such as the striatum (2.5 mm depth), substantia nigra (4.4 mm depth) and lateral hypothalamus (5.0 mm depth) in mouse brain. We reported, for the first time, the observation of neuronal activity with subcellular resolution in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia nigra of head-fixed awake mice. PMID:26601017

  3. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  4. Non invasive in vivo investigation of hepatobiliary structure and function in STII medaka (Oryzias latipes): methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Ron C; Kullman, Seth W; Hinton, David E

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel transparent stock of medaka (Oryzias latipes; STII), recessive for all pigments found in chromatophores, permits transcutaneous imaging of internal organs and tissues in living individuals. Findings presented describe the development of methodologies for non invasive in vivo investigation in STII medaka, and the successful application of these methodologies to in vivo study of hepatobiliary structure, function, and xenobiotic response, in both 2 and 3 dimensions. Results Using brightfield, and widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy, coupled with the in vivo application of fluorescent probes, structural and functional features of the hepatobiliary system, and xenobiotic induced toxicity, were imaged at the cellular level, with high resolution (< 1 μm), in living individuals. The findings presented demonstrate; (1) phenotypic response to xenobiotic exposure can be investigated/imaged in vivo with high resolution (< 1 μm), (2) hepatobiliary transport of solutes from blood to bile can be qualitatively and quantitatively studied/imaged in vivo, (3) hepatobiliary architecture in this lower vertebrate liver can be studied in 3 dimensions, and (4) non invasive in vivo imaging/description of hepatobiliary development in this model can be investigated. Conclusion The non-invasive in vivo methodologies described are a unique means by which to investigate biological structure, function and xenobiotic response with high resolution in STII medaka. In vivo methodologies also provide the future opportunity to integrate molecular mechanisms (e.g., genomic, proteomic) of disease and toxicity with phenotypic changes at the cellular and system levels of biological organization. While our focus has been the hepatobiliary system, other organ systems are equally amenable to in vivo study, and we consider the potential for discovery, within the context of in vivo investigation in STII medaka, as significant. PMID:18838008

  5. Translation initiation factors are not required for Dicistroviridae IRES function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Nilsa; Lenarcic, Erik M.; Landry, Dori M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2009-01-01

    The cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) intergenic region (IGR) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) uses an unusual mechanism of initiating translation, whereby the IRES occupies the P-site of the ribosome and the initiating tRNA enters the A-site. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that the CrPV IGR IRES is able to bind purified ribosomes and form 80S complexes capable of synthesizing small peptides in the absence of any translation initiation factors. These results suggest that initiation by this IRES is factor-independent. To determine whether the IGR IRES functions in the absence of initiation factors in vivo, we assayed IGR IRES activity in various yeast strains harboring mutations in canonical translation initiation factors. We used a dicistronic reporter assay in yeast to determine whether the CrPV IGR IRES is able to promote translation sufficient to support growth in the presence of various deletions or mutations in translation initiation factors. Using this assay, we have previously shown that the CrPV IGR IRES functions efficiently in yeast when ternary complexes (eIF2•GTP•initiator tRNAmet) are reduced. Here, we demonstrate that the CrPV IGR IRES activity does not require the eukaryotic initiation factors eIF4G1 or eIF5B, and it is enhanced when eIF2B, the eIF3b subunit of eIF3, or eIF4E are impaired. Taken together, these data support a model in which the CrPV IGR IRES is capable of initiating protein synthesis in the absence of any initiation factors in vivo, and suggests that the CrPV IGR IRES initiates translation by directly recruiting the ribosomal subunits in vivo. PMID:19299549

  6. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  7. Zinc supplementation augments in vivo antitumor effect of chemotherapy by restoring p53 function.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Ofer; Simon, Amos J; Yakubov, Eduard; Puca, Rosa; Yosepovich, Ady; Avivi, Camila; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Gelernter, Ilana; Harmelin, Alon; Barshack, Iris; Rechavi, Gideon; D'Orazi, Gabriella; Givol, David; Amariglio, Ninette

    2012-08-15

    Activated p53 is necessary for tumor suppression. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a positive regulator of functional p53. HIPK2 modulates wild-type p53 activity toward proapoptotic transcription and tumor suppression by the phosphorylation of serine 46. Knock-down of HIPK2 interferes with tumor suppression and sensitivity to chemotherapy. Combined administration of adriamycin and zinc restores activity of misfolded p53 and enables the induction of its proapoptotic and tumor suppressor functions in vitro and in vivo. We therefore looked for a cancer model where HIPK2 expression is low. MMTV-neu transgenic mice overexpressing HER2/neu, develop mammary tumors at puberty with a long latency, showing very low expression of HIPK2. Here we show that whereas these tumors are resistant to adriamycin treatment, a combination of adriamycin and zinc suppresses tumor growth in vivo in these mice, an effect evidenced by the histological features of the mammary tumors. The combined treatment of adriamycin and zinc also restores wild-type p53 conformation and induces proapoptotic transcription activity. These findings may open up new possibilities for the treatment of human cancers via the combination of zinc with chemotherapeutic agents, for a selected group of patients expressing low levels of HIPK2, with an intact p53. In addition, HIPK2 may serve as a new biomarker for tumor aggressiveness. PMID:21932419

  8. In vivo imaging of functional disruption, recovery and alteration in rat olfactory circuitry after lesion.

    PubMed

    Cross, Donna J; Flexman, Jennifer A; Anzai, Yoshimi; Morrow, Thomas J; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Compensatory changes following disruption of neuronal circuitry have been indicated by previous imaging studies of stroke and other brain injury, but evidence of the pathways involved in such dynamic changes has not been shown in vivo. We imaged rats before and after lesion-induced disruption of the lateral olfactory tract to investigate the subsequent recovery and/or reorganization of functional neuronal circuitry. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was performed following intranasal administration of a paramagnetic track tracer Mn(2+). Images were analyzed using statistical mapping techniques in the stereotactic coordinate system. At 1 week post-lesion, Mn(2+) transport caudal to lesion was reduced as expected, and more importantly, increased transport through the anterior commissure was seen. At 4 weeks post-lesion, there was recovery of transport caudal to lesion, and increased transport through the anterior commissure extended to the contralateral olfactory cortex. Correlation analysis of regional Mn(2+) transport indicated that contralateral enhancement was not simply due to septal window spillover. This study demonstrates for the first time in vivo evidence of compensatory changes in functional neuronal activity to a contralateral pathway through the commissure following brain injury. PMID:16859928

  9. Ubiquitination regulates the neuroprotective function of the deubiquitinase ataxin-3 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Wei-Ling; Burr, Aaron A; Ouyang, Michelle; Blount, Jessica R; Scaglione, K Matthew; Todi, Sokol V

    2013-11-29

    Deubiquitinases (DUBs) are proteases that regulate various cellular processes by controlling protein ubiquitination. Cell-based studies indicate that the regulation of the activity of DUBs is important for homeostasis and is achieved by multiple mechanisms, including through their own ubiquitination. However, the physiological significance of the ubiquitination of DUBs to their functions in vivo is unclear. Here, we report that ubiquitination of the DUB ataxin-3 at lysine residue 117, which markedly enhances its protease activity in vitro, is critical for its ability to suppress toxic protein-dependent degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Compared with ataxin-3 with only Lys-117 present, ataxin-3 that does not become ubiquitinated performs significantly less efficiently in suppressing or delaying the onset of toxic protein-dependent degeneration in flies. According to further studies, the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ataxin-3 in vitro, is dispensable for its ubiquitination in vivo and is not required for the neuroprotective function of this DUB in Drosophila. Our work also suggests that ataxin-3 suppresses degeneration by regulating toxic protein aggregation rather than stability. PMID:24106274

  10. The synthesis and in vivo assembly of functional antibodies in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Clive R.; Boss, Michael A.; Kenten, John H.; Calvert, Jane E.; Roberts, Nicola A.; Emtage, J. Spencer

    1985-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can synthesize, process and secrete higher eukaryotic proteins1-5. We have investigated the expression of immunoglobulin chains in yeast and demonstrate here (1) the synthesis, processing and secretion of light and heavy chains, (2) the glycosylation of heavy chain, (3) the intracellular localization of these foreign proteins by immunofluorescence, and (4) the detection of functional antibodies in cells co-expressing both chains. This may provide the basis of a microbial fermentation process for the production of monoclonal antibodies. The co-expression of light and heavy chains in Escherichia coli has been reported but functional antibodies were not assembled in vivo6,7. Furthermore, only low-level assembly of these chains was found in vitro.

  11. In vivo imaging of the integration and function of nigral grafts in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Piccini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    In vivo functional imaging has provided objective evidence for the integration and function of nigral grafts in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease. Clinical trials with the use of positron emission tomography have shown that transplants of human dopamine-rich fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue can survive, grow, and release dopamine providing motor symptom relief, and also that they can restore brain activation related to movement. Positron emission tomography has aided in the elucidation of the pathophysiology of serious adverse effects, so-called graft-induced dyskinesias. With the use of newly established radioligands, positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography could help to improve Parkinson's patient selection in future clinical trials by selecting those with better predicted outcomes. Moreover, positron emission tomography could help monitoring postoperational inflammatory processes around the grafted tissue and the effect of immunosuppression. Recent evidence from positron emission tomography has provided insight of how ongoing extrastriatal serotonergic denervation may have relevance to nonmotor symptoms in transplanted Parkinson's disease patients indicating new cell therapy targets for a more complete relief of symptoms. Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging techniques could help to better assess the integration of nigral graft with the host brain by assessing the restoration of brain activation during movement and of functional and structural connectivity. This knowledge should lead to the development of new, optimized in vivo imaging protocols that could help to better schedule, monitor, and modify the clinical outcomes of future human trials assessing the efficacy of fetal or stem cell therapy in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23195420

  12. Increased in vivo effector function of human IgG4 isotype antibodies through afucosylation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qian; Hazen, Meredith; Marshall, Brett; Crowell, Susan R; Ou, Qinglin; Wong, Athena W; Phung, Wilson; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y Gloria; Tejada, Max; Andersen, Dana; Kelley, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    For some antibodies intended for use as human therapeutics, reduced effector function is desired to avoid toxicities that might be associated with depletion of target cells. Since effector function(s), including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), require the Fc portion to be glycosylated, reduced ADCC activity antibodies can be obtained through aglycosylation of the human IgG1 isotype. An alternative is to switch to an IgG4 isotype in which the glycosylated antibody is known to have reduced effector function relative to glycosylated IgG1 antibody. ADCC activity of glycosylated IgG1 antibodies is sensitive to the fucosylation status of the Fc glycan, with both in vitro and in vivo ADCC activity increased upon fucose removal ("afucosylation"). The effect of afucosylation on activity of IgG4 antibodies is less well characterized, but it has been shown to increase the in vitro ADCC activity of an anti-CD20 antibody. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo activity of anti-CD20 IgG4 isotype antibodies is increased via afucosylation. Using blends of material made in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Fut8KO-CHO cells, we show that ADCC activity of an IgG4 version of an anti-human CD20 antibody is directly proportional to the fucose content. In mice transgenic for human FcγRIIIa, afucosylation of an IgG4 anti-mouse CD20 antibody increases the B cell depletion activity to a level approaching that of the mIgG2a antibody. PMID:27216702

  13. Protective effects of Zhuyeqing liquor on the immune function of normal and immunosuppressed mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zhuyeqing Liquor (ZYQL), a well-known Chinese traditional health liquor, has various biological properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunoenhancement and cardiovascular protective effects. Methods The protective effects of Zhuyeqing Liquor (ZYQL) on the immune function was investigated in vivo in normal healthy mice and immunosuppressed mice treated with Cyclophosphamide (Cy, 100 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection on days 4, 8 and 12. ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered via gavage daily for 14 days. The phagocytotic function of mononuclear phagocytic system was detected with carbon clearance methods, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in serum were detected with Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immune organs were weighed and organ indexes (organ weight/body weight) of thymus and spleen were calculated. Meanwhile, the activity of lysozyme (LSZ) in serum and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) in spleen tissue were measured. Results ZYQL significantly upgrades the K value for clearance of carbon particles in normal mice treated with ZYQL (400 mg/kg) and immunosuppressed mice treated with ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) together with Cy (100 mg/kg) in vivo. The treatment of ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) effectively increased the activity of serum lysozyme as well as promoted the serum levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ in normal mice and immunosuppressed mice. Furthermore, ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) had an antioxidant effects in immune system by enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activity of SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in vivo. In addition, ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) effectively elevated the Cy-induced decreased organ index (thymus and spleen). Conclusions The present work shows that the dose-dependent administration of ZYQL is capable of influencing immune responses, which implying that its valuable functional health may be attributed

  14. Mapping 3-D functional capillary geometry in rat skeletal muscle in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Milkovich, Stephanie; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel mapping software package to reconstruct microvascular networks in three dimensions (3-D) from in vivo video images for use in blood flow and O2 transport modeling. An intravital optical imaging system was used to collect video sequences of blood flow in microvessels at different depths in the tissue. Functional images of vessels were produced from the video sequences and were processed using automated edge tracking software to yield location and geometry data for construction of the 3-D network. The same video sequences were analyzed for hemodynamic and O2 saturation data from individual capillaries in the network. Simple user-driven commands allowed the connection of vessel segments at bifurcations, and semiautomated registration enabled the tracking of vessels across multiple focal planes and fields of view. The reconstructed networks can be rotated and manipulated in 3-D to verify vessel connections and continuity. Hemodynamic and O2 saturation measurements made in vivo can be indexed to corresponding vessels and visualized using colorized maps of the vascular geometry. Vessels in each reconstruction are saved as text-based files that can be easily imported into flow or O2 transport models with complete geometry, hemodynamic, and O2 transport conditions. The results of digital morphometric analysis of seven microvascular networks showed mean capillary diameters and overall capillary density consistent with previous findings using histology and corrosion cast techniques. The described mapping software is a valuable tool for the quantification of in vivo microvascular geometry, hemodynamics, and oxygenation, thus providing rich data sets for experiment-based computational models. PMID:22140042

  15. Demonstration of an in vivo functional beta 3-adrenoceptor in man.

    PubMed

    Enocksson, S; Shimizu, M; Lönnqvist, F; Nordenström, J; Arner, P

    1995-05-01

    Although it is well established in several mammalian species that beta 3-adrenoceptors play a major role in regulating lipolysis and thermogenesis in adipose tissue, the functional existence and role of this receptor subtype in man has been controversial. We investigated whether the beta 3-adrenoceptor functionally co-exists with beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in vivo in human adipose tissue. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue of healthy non-obese subjects was microdialyzed with equimolar concentrations of dobutamine (selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist), terbutaline (selective beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), or CGP 12177 (selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist). All three agents caused a rapid, sustained, concentration-dependent and significant elevation of the glycerol level in the microdialysate (lipolysis index). However, only terbutaline stimulated the nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue, as measured by an ethanol escape technique. Dobutamine and CGP 12177 was equally effective in elevating the glycerol level (maximum effect 150% above baseline). Terbutaline was significantly more effective than the other two beta-agonists (maximum effect 200% above baseline). When adipose tissue was pretreated with the beta 1/beta 2-selective adrenoceptor blocker propranolol the glycerol increasing effect of dobutamine or terbutaline was inhibited by 80-85% but the glycerol response to CGP 12177 was not influenced. It is concluded that a functional beta 3-adrenoceptor is present in vivo in man. It co-exists with beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in adipose tissue and may therefore play a role in lipolysis regulation. It appears, however, that the beta 2-adrenoceptor is the most important beta-adrenoceptor subtype for the mobilization of lipids from abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue because of its concomitant stimulatory effect on lipolysis and blood flow. PMID:7738189

  16. Characterization of the Structural and Functional Determinants of MANF/CDNF in Drosophila In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Riitta; Lindholm, Päivi; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Yu, Li-ying; Piepponen, T. Petteri; Arumäe, Urmas; Saarma, Mart; Heino, Tapio I.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian MANF and CDNF proteins are evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors that can protect and repair mammalian dopaminergic neurons in vivo. In Drosophila, the sole MANF protein (DmManf) is needed for the maintenance of dopaminergic neurites and dopamine levels. Although both secreted and intracellular roles for MANF and CDNF have been demonstrated, very little is known about the molecular mechanism of their action. Here, by using a transgenic rescue approach in the DmManf mutant background we show that only full-length MANF containing both the amino-terminal saposin-like and carboxy-terminal SAP-domains can rescue the larval lethality of the DmManf mutant. Independent N- or C-terminal domains of MANF, even when co-expressed together, fail to rescue. Deleting the signal peptide or mutating the CXXC motif in the C-terminal domain destroys the activity of full-length DmManf. Positively charged surface amino acids and the C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum retention signal are necessary for rescue of DmManf mutant lethality when DmManf is expressed in a restricted pattern. Furthermore, rescue experiments with non-ubiquitous expression reveals functional differences between the C-terminal domain of human MANF and CDNF. Finally, DmManf and its C-terminal domain rescue mammalian sympathetic neurons from toxin-induced apoptosis in vitro demonstrating functional similarity of the mammalian and fly proteins. Our study offers further insights into the functional conservation between invertebrate and mammalian MANF/CDNF proteins and reveals the importance of the C-terminal domain for MANF activity in vivo. PMID:24019940

  17. Inhibition of progesterone secretion during the luteal phase by two luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists in Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, J P; Mary, I; Moguilewsky, M; Mouren, M; Labrie, F

    1980-12-01

    The administration of 200 microgram of the potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist [D-Leu6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide on day 6 following the plasma estradiol peak to 11 female monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) during two consecutive menstrual cycles decreased plasma progesterone levels by 40.0% +/- 3.9% as compared with previous control cycles. The plasma estradiol profile and the cycle length were not affected significantly by the treatment. Similar results were obtained with 25 microgram of [D-Ser(TBU)6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide administered to one monkey at the same period of the cycle, such treatment leading to a 41% inhibition of circulating progesterone levels. Although plasma progesterone levels were still reduced in the two post-treatment cycles in monkeys treated with the high dose (200 microgram) of [D-Leu6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide, the recovery cycle was normal after the administration of a lower dose (25 microgram) of [D-Ser(TBU)6, des-Gly-NH2(10)] LHRH ethylamide. The M. fascicularis monkey thus appears as a valid model with which to study the inhibitory effects of LHRH agonists on luteal function. PMID:6778718

  18. Physiologically inspired cardiac scaffolds for tailored in vivo function and heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Nicholas J; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is well suited for the treatment of cardiac disease due to the limited regenerative capacity of native cardiac tissue and the loss of function associated with endemic cardiac pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and congenital heart defects. However, the physiological complexity of the myocardium imposes extensive requirements on tissue therapies intended for these applications. In recent years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has been characterized by great innovation and diversity in the fabrication of engineered tissue scaffolds for cardiac repair and regeneration to address these problems. From early approaches that attempted only to deliver cardiac cells in a hydrogel vessel, significant progress has been made in understanding the role of each major component of cardiac living tissue constructs (namely cells, scaffolds, and signaling mechanisms) as they relate to mechanical, biological, and electrical in vivo performance. This improved insight, accompanied by modern material science techniques, allows for the informed development of complex scaffold materials that are optimally designed for cardiac applications. This review provides a background on cardiac physiology as it relates to critical cardiac scaffold characteristics, the degree to which common cardiac scaffold materials fulfill these criteria, and finally an overview of recent in vivo studies that have employed this type of approach. PMID:25970645

  19. In Vivo Evaluation of Vena Caval Filters: Can Function Be Linked to Design Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, Mary C.; Cho, Kyung J.; Greenfield, Lazar J.

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the five vena caval filters marketed in the United States and one investigational vena caval filter and to determine whether there is an association between their design and their in vivo function.Methods: Four of each type of filter-Simon Nitinol (SN), Bird's Nest (BN), Vena Tech (VT), Greenfield stainless steel (PSGF), Greenfield titanium (TGF), and the investigational stent cone filter (NGF)-were studied for 60 days in 12 sheep. Radiographic and pathologic outcomes to be assessed included clot capture and resolution, vena caval penetration, position of the filter, thrombogenicity, and vessel wall reaction.Results: Filters differed with respect to the number of clot-trapping levels and the interdependence of the legs. All devices were successfully placed. Intentionally embolized clot was captured. One VT and two SN filters migrated in response to clot capture. Resolution of thrombus was variable, and related to the design of the device. Fibrin webbing was widely present with the VT, BN, and SN filters but limited in the others. The VT and NGF filters demonstrated the most stable filter base diameter.Conclusions: The performance of vena caval filters differs with respect to clot resolution and mechanical stability. Interdependent filter limbs and single-stage conical capture sites appear to result in more favorable performance in in vivo studies.

  20. Head-to-tail regulation is critical for the in vivo function of myosin V

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kirk W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell organization requires regulated cargo transport along cytoskeletal elements. Myosin V motors are among the most conserved organelle motors and have been well characterized in both yeast and mammalian systems. Biochemical data for mammalian myosin V suggest that a head-to-tail autoinhibitory interaction is a primary means of regulation, but the in vivo significance of this interaction has not been studied. Here we generated and characterized mutations in the yeast myosin V Myo2p to reveal that it is regulated by a head-to-tail interaction and that loss of regulation renders the myosin V constitutively active. We show that an unregulated motor is very deleterious for growth, resulting in severe defects in Myo2-mediated transport processes, including secretory vesicle transport, mitochondrial inheritance, and nuclear orientation. All of the defects associated with motor misregulation could be rescued by artificially restoring regulation. Thus, spatial and temporal regulation of myosin V in vivo by a head-to-tail interaction is critical for the normal delivery functions of the motor. PMID:25940346

  1. In vivo ultrasound imaging of the popliteus muscle: investigation of functional characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Soda, Naoki; Fujihashi, Yuichiro; Aoki, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to use ultrasound imaging equipment for in vivo observation of the popliteus muscle thickness during rest and exercise to examine its functional characteristics and to establish a training method for this muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 30 healthy adults (15 men and 15 women). The measurement tasks, consisting of isometric knee flexion and extension and internal rotation of the lower leg were performed in an arbitrary order. The popliteus muscle thickness was measured using an ultrasound. [Results] The popliteus muscle thickness significantly increased in the internal rotation in 27 subjects (90%), whereas, it remained unchanged in the remaining three subjects (10%). [Conclusion] This study differed from most of the previous studies because it involved in vivo observation of the popliteus muscle. We found that ultrasound was an effective method for the measurement of popliteus muscle thickness. The results suggest that internal rotation of the lower leg is the most effective exercise for working the popliteus muscle. PMID:27134397

  2. Single Amino Acid Mutations in Drosophila Fascin Disrupt Actin Bundling Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cant, K.; Cooley, L.

    1996-01-01

    Fascins bundle actin filaments into large, tightly packed hexagonal arrays that support diverse cellular processes including microvillar projections and filopodial extensions. In Drosophila, fascin is encoded by the singed locus. Severe singed mutants have gnarled bristles and are female sterile due to a defect in rapid cytoplasm transport during oogenesis. In this paper, we report the results of a large EMS mutagenesis screen to generate new singed alleles. A mutation that changes glycine 409 to glutamic acid results in partial inactivation of fascin in vivo, singed(G409E) mutants have kinked bristles and are fertile with a mild nurse cell cytoplasm transport defect. This mutation is in a small conserved domain near the C-terminus of fascin. A mutation that changes serine 289 to asparagine almost completely inactivates fascin in vivo, singed(S289N) mutants have gnarled bristles and are sterile due to a severe defect in nurse cell cytoplasm transport caused by the absence of nurse cell cytoplasmic actin bundles. A subsequent EMS mutagenesis screen for dominant suppressors of singed(S289N) sterility revealed an intragenic suppressor mutation that changes serine 251 to phenylalanine and restores much of fascin's function. These two mutations, S289N and S251F, draw attention to a central domain in fascin. PMID:8722779

  3. In Vitro Hematological and In Vivo Vasoactivity Assessment of Dextran Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D.; Frame, Mary D.; Dewar, Anthony M.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    The intravenous, intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration of water solubilized graphene nanoparticles for biomedical applications will result in their interaction with the hematological components and vasculature. Herein, we have investigated the effects of dextran functionalized graphene nanoplatelets (GNP-Dex) on histamine release, platelet activation, immune activation, blood cell hemolysis in vitro, and vasoactivity in vivo. The results indicate that GNP-Dex formulations prevented histamine release from activated RBL-2H3 rat mast cells, and at concentrations ≥ 7 mg/ml, showed a 12–20% increase in levels of complement proteins. Cytokine (TNF-Alpha and IL-10) levels remained within normal range. GNP-Dex formulations did not cause platelet activation or blood cell hemolysis. Using the hamster cheek pouch in vivo model, the initial vasoactivity of GNP-Dex at concentrations (1–50 mg/ml) equivalent to the first pass of a bolus injection was a brief concentration-dependent dilation in arcade and terminal arterioles. However, they did not induce a pro-inflammatory endothelial dysfunction effect. PMID:24002570

  4. The effects of A. pyogenes on endometrial function in vitro, and on uterine and ovarian function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A.N.A.; Williams, E.J.; Sibley, K.; Herath, S.; Lane, E.A.; Fishwick, J.; Nash, D.M.; Rycroft, A.N.; Dobson, H.; Bryant, C.E.; Sheldon, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uterine bacterial infection after parturition causes endometritis, perturbs ovarian function and leads to infertility in cattle. Although endometritis is caused by mixed infections, endometrial pathology is associated with the presence of Arcanobacterium pyogenes. The aims of the present study were to determine the effects of A. pyogenes on endometrial function in vitro, and on uterine and ovarian function in vivo. Heat-killed A. pyogenes did not affect the production of prostaglandin F2α (PGF) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE) from endometrial explants, or purified populations of endometrial epithelial or stromal cells. However, the explants produced more PGF and PGE than controls when treated with a bacteria-free filtrate (BFF) cultured from A. pyogenes. Similarly, BFF stimulated PGF and PGE production by epithelial and stromal cells, respectively. So, BFF or control PBS was infused into the uterus of heifers (n = 7 per group) for 8 days, starting the day after estrus. Emergence of the follicle wave, dominant follicle or corpus luteum diameter, and peripheral plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, progesterone, PGFM, or acute phase protein concentrations were unaffected by the BFF infusion. In the live animal it is likely that the intact uterine mucosa limits the exposure of the endometrial cells to the exotoxin of A. pyogenes, whereas the cells are readily exposed to the toxin in vitro. PMID:17825901

  5. A non-linear mathematical model for the in vivo evaluation of the RES phagocytic function.

    PubMed

    Bondareva, I B; Parfenov, A S

    1995-01-01

    A new non-linear mathematical model was constructed in order to perform in vivo quantification of the RES phagocytic function. This method is based on the same technical facilities as used for the routine liver-spleen scintigraphy with radiocolloids [1, 2]. But kinetic modeling of dynamic Tc-99m-sulfur colloid data produced estimations of the functional RE-parameters: the clearance rate of the colloidal particles, the rate of phagocytosis, and the RES functional volume, which can not be obtained by classical approaches. This non-linear model was designed on the basis of the principal characteristics of particulate material interaction with macrophages (attachment, phagocytosis, digestion) [3, 4, 5]. The theoretically examined behavior of this in vivo mathematical model corresponds with the experimental behavior of the RES. The mathematical expression of the dynamics is the system of non-linear differential equations with constant coefficients that have no analytical solution. Fitting of the normalized heart blood time-activity curve was obtained to identify the unknown model parameters via non-linear regression. For this purpose general interactive PASCAL procedure IDPAR for a PDP-11/34 computer was used (an IBM PC version is also available). Two to three iterations were needed to estimate the set of unknown parameters for any patient study (1-1.5 min). A very good fitting was obtained between experimental and model curves in every case of different pathologies (error of the approximation is about 2-3%). Studies were performed using an in vivo bolus injection of 3.6 mg/80 kg commercially available colloid KOREN labeled with 3m-Ci 99m-Tc (analog of TCK-1). Our method was used to determine the RES functional parameters for patient groups with different levels of the RES dysfunction. Obtained results illustrate the possibilities of our technique to quantitatively estimate not only great pathology (portal cirrhosis), but also small changes of the RE-function (case of

  6. Women Ornament Themselves for Intrasexual Competition near Ovulation, but for Intersexual Attraction in Luteal Phase

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jin-Ying; Wang, Jia-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined women's attentional bias toward ornamental objects in relation to their menstrual phase as well as to motivations of intersexual courtship or intrasexual competition. In Experiment 1, 33 healthy heterosexual women were tested in a bias-assessment visual cuing task twice: once on a high-fertility day (during the ovulatory phase) and once on a low-fertility day (during the luteal phase). They paid greater attention to pictures of ornamental objects than to pictures of non-ornamental objects near ovulation, but not during the luteal phase, suggesting an ornamental bias during the high-fertility phase. In Experiment 2, before the visual cuing task, 40 participants viewed 10 same-sex or opposite-sex facial photographs with either high or low attractiveness as priming tasks to activate the intrasexual competition or intersexual courtship motives. Results showed that women's ornamental bias was dependent on the interaction of menstrual phase and mating motive. Specifically, the ornamental bias was observed on the high-fertility day when the subjects were primed with high-attractive same-sex images (intrasexual competition) and was observed on the low-fertility day when they were primed with high-attractive opposite-sex photographs (intersexual courtship). In conclusion, the present findings confirm the hypothesis that, during the high-fertility phase, women have an attentional bias toward ornamental objects and further support the hypothesis that the ornamental bias is driven by intrasexual competition motivation near ovulation, but driven by intersexual courtship motivation during the luteal phase. PMID:25180577

  7. Simulated conditions of microgravity suppress progesterone production by luteal cells of the pregnant rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. K.; Yang, H.; Sridaran, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether simulated conditions of microgravity induce changes in the production of progesterone by luteal cells of the pregnant rat ovary using an in vitro model system. The microgravity environment was simulated using either a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) bioreactor with free fall or a clinostat without free fall of cells. A mixed population of luteal cells isolated from the corpora lutea of day 8 pregnant rats was attached to cytodex microcarrier beads (cytodex 3). These anchorage dependent cells were placed in equal numbers in the HARV or a spinner flask control vessel in culture conditions. It was found that HARV significantly reduced the daily production of progesterone from day 1 through day 8 compared to controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that cells attached to the microcarrier beads throughout the duration of the experiment in both types of culture vessels. Cells cultured in chamber slide flasks and placed in a clinostat yielded similar results when compared to those in the HARV. Also, when they were stained by Oil Red-O for lipid droplets, the clinostat flasks showed a larger number of stained cells compared to control flasks at 48 h. Further, the relative amount of Oil Red-O staining per milligram of protein was found to be higher in the clinostat than in the control cells at 48 h. It is speculated that the increase in the level of lipid content in cells subjected to simulated conditions of microgravity may be due to a disruption in cholesterol transport and/or lesions in the steroidogenic pathway leading to a fall in the synthesis of progesterone. Additionally, the fall in progesterone in simulated conditions of microgravity could be due to apoptosis of luteal cells.

  8. Luteal Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors During Gestation and Postpartum in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Navas, Paola B.; Redondo, Analía L.; Cuello-Carrión, F. Darío; Roig, Laura M. Vargas; Valdez, Susana R.; Jahn, Graciela A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Progesterone (P4) is the main steroid secreted by the corpora lutea (CL) and is required for successful implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. Although adequate circulating levels of thyroid hormone (TH) are needed to support formation and maintenance of CL during pregnancy, TH signaling had not been described in this gland. We determined luteal thyroid hormone receptor isoforms (TR) expression and regulation throughout pregnancy and under the influence of thyroid status, and in vitro effects of triiodothyronine (T3) exposure on luteal P4 synthesis. Methods: Euthyroid female Wistar rats were sacrificed by decapitation on gestational day (G) 5, G10, G15, G19, or G21 of pregnancy or on day 2 postpartum (L2). Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism were induced in female Wistar rats by daily administration of thyroxine (T4; 0.25 mg/kg subcutaneously) or 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU; 0.1 g/L in drinking water), respectively. Luteal TR expression of mRNA was determined using real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and of protein using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Primary cultures of luteal cells and of luteinized granulosa cells were used to study in vitro effects of T3 on P4 synthesis. In addition, the effect of T3 on P4 synthesis under basal conditions and under stimulation with luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was evaluated. Results: TRα1, TRα2, and TRβ1 mRNA were present in CL, increasing during the first half and decreasing during the second half of pregnancy. At the protein level, TRβ1 was abundantly expressed during gestation reaching a peak at G19 and decreasing afterwards. TRα1 was barely expressed during early gestation, peaked at G19, and diminished thereafter. Expression of TRβ1 and TRα1 at the protein and mRNA level were not influenced by thyroid status. T3 neither modified P4 secretion from CL of pregnancy nor its synthesis in luteinized granulosa cells in

  9. Formulation/Preparation of Functionalized Nanoparticles for In Vivo Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Frank; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    Targeted cancer therapy allows the delivery of therapeutic agents to cancer cells without incurring undesirable side effects on the neighboring healthy tissues. Over the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in the development of advanced cancer therapeutics using targeted nanoparticles. Here we describe the preparation of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles formulated with biocompatible and biodegradable poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) copolymer and surface functionalized with the A10 2-fluoropyrimidine ribonucleic acid aptamers that recognize the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a well-characterized antigen expressed on the surface of prostate cancer cells. We show that the self-assembled nanoparticles can selectively bind to PSMA-targeted prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This formulation method may contribute to the development of highly selective and effective cancer therapeutic and diagnostic devices.

  10. In vivo function and comparative genomic analyses of the Drosophila gut microbiota identify candidate symbiosis factors

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Chaston, John M.; Wang, Yiping; Winans, Nathan J.; Sannino, David R.; Wong, Adam C. N.; Dobson, Adam J.; Kagle, Jeanne; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis is often characterized by co-evolutionary changes in the genomes of the partners involved. An understanding of these changes can provide insight into the nature of the relationship, including the mechanisms that initiate and maintain an association between organisms. In this study we examined the genome sequences of bacteria isolated from the Drosophila melanogaster gut with the objective of identifying genes that are important for function in the host. We compared microbiota isolates with con-specific or closely related bacterial species isolated from non-fly environments. First the phenotype of germ-free Drosophila (axenic flies) was compared to that of flies colonized with specific bacteria (gnotobiotic flies) as a measure of symbiotic function. Non-fly isolates were functionally distinct from bacteria isolated from flies, conferring slower development and an altered nutrient profile in the host, traits known to be microbiota-dependent. Comparative genomic methods were next employed to identify putative symbiosis factors: genes found in bacteria that restore microbiota-dependent traits to gnotobiotic flies, but absent from those that do not. Factors identified include riboflavin synthesis and stress resistance. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify protein coding genes for which fly-isolate sequences were more similar to each other than to other sequences, reasoning that these genes may have a shared function unique to the fly environment. This method identified genes in Acetobacter species that cluster in two distinct genomic loci: one predicted to be involved in oxidative stress detoxification and another encoding an efflux pump. In summary, we leveraged genomic and in vivo functional comparisons to identify candidate traits that distinguish symbiotic bacteria. These candidates can serve as the basis for further work investigating the genetic requirements of bacteria for function and persistence in the Drosophila gut. PMID:25408687

  11. Statistical mapping of functional olfactory connections of the rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cross, Donna J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Anzai, Yoshimi; Flexman, Jennifer A; Keogh, Bartholomew P; Kim, Yongmin; Maravilla, Kenneth R

    2004-12-01

    The olfactory pathway is a unique route into the brain. To better characterize this system in vivo, rat olfactory functional connections were mapped using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and manganese ion (Mn2+) as a transport-mediated tracer combined with newly developed statistical brain image analysis. Six rats underwent imaging on a 1.5-T MR scanner at pre-administration, and 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 h and 5.5, 7.5, 10.5, and 13.5 days post-administration of manganese chloride (MnCl2) into the right nasal cavity. Images were coregistered, pixel-intensity normalized, and stereotactically transformed to the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas, then averaged across subjects using automated image analysis software (NEUROSTAT). Images at each time point were compared to pre-administration using a one-sample t statistic on a pixel-by-pixel basis in 3-D and converted to Z statistic maps. Statistical mapping and group averaging improved signal to noise ratios and signal detection sensitivity. Significant transport of Mn2+ was observed in olfactory structures ipsilateral to site of Mn2+ administration including the bulb, lateral olfactory tract (lo) by 12 h and in the tubercle, piriform cortex, ventral pallidum, amygdala, and in smaller structures such as the anterior commissure after 24 h post-administration. MR imaging with group-wise statistical analysis clearly demonstrated bilateral transsynaptic Mn2+ transport to secondary and tertiary neurons of the olfactory system. The method permits in vivo investigations of functional neuronal connections within the brain. PMID:15589097

  12. Artemisia scoparia Enhances Adipocyte Development and Endocrine Function In Vitro and Enhances Insulin Action In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Allison J.; Fuller, Scott; Fedorcenco, Veaceslav; Beyl, Robbie; Burris, Thomas P.; Mynatt, Randall; Ribnicky, David M.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Failure of adipocytes to expand during periods of energy excess can result in undesirable metabolic consequences such as ectopic fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Blinded screening studies have indicated that Artemisia scoparia (SCO) extracts can enhance adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation in cultured adipocytes. The present study tested the hypothesis that SCO treatment modulates fat cell development and function in vitro and insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue in vivo. Methods In vitro experiments utilized a Gal4-PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD) fusion protein-luciferase reporter assay to examine PPARγ activation. To investigate the ability of SCO to modulate adipogenesis and mature fat cell function in 3T3-L1 cells, neutral lipid accumulation, gene expression, and protein secretion were measured by Oil Red O staining, qRT-PCR, and immunoblotting, respectively. For the in vivo experiments, diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD containing 1% w/w SCO for four weeks. Body weight and composition, food intake, and fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured. Phospho-activation and expression of insulin-sensitizing proteins in epididymal adipose tissue (eWAT) were measured by immunoblotting. Results Ethanolic extracts of A. scoparia significantly activated the PPARγ LBD and enhanced lipid accumulation in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. SCO increased the transcription of several PPARγ target genes in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells and rescued the negative effects of tumor necrosis factor α on production and secretion of adiponectin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in fully differentiated fat cells. DIO mice treated with SCO had elevated adiponectin levels and increased phosphorylation of AMPKα in eWAT when compared to control mice. In SCO-treated mice, these changes were also associated with decreased fasting insulin and glucose levels. Conclusion SCO has metabolically beneficial

  13. Administration of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist affects corpus luteum vascular stability and development and induces luteal apoptosis in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Leopoldina; Irusta, Griselda; Abramovich, Dalhia; Tesone, Marta; Parborell, Fernanda

    2011-03-30

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a complication of ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins followed by the administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to trigger the final steps of oocyte maturation. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs are thought to be effective in preventing this complication and a clinical trial has found a lower incidence of OHSS in patients treated with these molecules. Our aim was to analyze the in vivo effect of a GnRH-I agonist on corpus luteum development and regression, ANGPT-1, ANGPT-2 and Tie-2 protein expression and luteal blood vessel stabilization, the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and cell proliferation, in ovaries from an OHSS rat model. To this end immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were hyperstimulated and treated with a GnRH-I agonist from the start of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) administration until the day of hCG injection for 5 consecutive days. Blood and tissue samples were collected 48h after hCG injection. Vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF levels were evaluated in the peritoneal fluid by ELISA. Serum progesterone and estradiol were measured by RIA. Histological features of sectioned ovaries were assessed in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides. Luteal blood vessel stability, cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry for SMCA, PCNA, and TUNEL, respectively. P450scc, StAR, FLK-1, ANGPT-1, ANGPT-2, Tie-2 and PCNA protein levels were evaluated by Western blot from dissected corpora lutea (CL). The treatment with the GnRH-I agonist significantly decreased serum progesterone and estradiol levels as well as P450scc and StAR protein expression in the untreated OHSS group. In addition, the agonist significantly decreased the number of CL in the OHSS group, as compared with the untreated OHSS group. In the OHSS group, the area of periendothelial cells in the

  14. Contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography with picomolar sensitivity for functional in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liba, Orly; Sorelle, Elliott D.; Sen, Debasish; de La Zerda, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) enables real-time imaging of living tissues at cell-scale resolution over millimeters in three dimensions. Despite these advantages, functional biological studies with OCT have been limited by a lack of exogenous contrast agents that can be distinguished from tissue. Here we report an approach to functional OCT imaging that implements custom algorithms to spectrally identify unique contrast agents: large gold nanorods (LGNRs). LGNRs exhibit 110-fold greater spectral signal per particle than conventional GNRs, which enables detection of individual LGNRs in water and concentrations as low as 250 pM in the circulation of living mice. This translates to ~40 particles per imaging voxel in vivo. Unlike previous implementations of OCT spectral detection, the methods described herein adaptively compensate for depth and processing artifacts on a per sample basis. Collectively, these methods enable high-quality noninvasive contrast-enhanced imaging of OCT in living subjects, including detection of tumor microvasculature at twice the depth achievable with conventional OCT. Additionally, multiplexed detection of spectrally-distinct LGNRs was demonstrated to observe discrete patterns of lymphatic drainage and identify individual lymphangions and lymphatic valve functional states. These capabilities provide a powerful platform for molecular imaging and characterization of tissue noninvasively at cellular resolution, called MOZART.

  15. In vivo imaging of mitochondrial function in methamphetamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Takeshi; Yamato, Mayumi; Kudo, Wataru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Utsumi, Hideo; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2011-08-01

    Abuse of the powerfully addictive psychostimulant, methamphetamine, occurs worldwide. Recent studies have suggested that methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is related to oxidative stress. In response to nerve activation, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is rapidly activated. The enhancement of mitochondrial respiratory chain activation may induce oxidative stress in the brain. However, there is little experimental evidence regarding the mitochondrial function after methamphetamine administration in vivo. Here, we evaluated whether a single administration of methamphetamine induces ATP consumption and overactivation of mitochondria. We measured mitochondrial function in two different ways: by monitoring oxygen partial pressure using an oxygen-selective electrode, and by imaging of redox reactions using a nitroxyl radical (i.e., nitroxide) coupled with Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). A single administration of methamphetamine to Wistar rats induced dopaminergic nerve activation, ATP consumption and an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain function in both the striatum and cortex. Furthermore, antioxidant TEMPOL prevented the increase in mitochondrial oxidative damage and methamphetamine-induced sensitization. These findings suggest that energy-supplying reactions after dopaminergic nerve activation are associated with oxidative stress in both the striatum and cortex, leading to abnormal behavior. PMID:21624473

  16. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  17. In vivo functional human imaging using photoacoustic microscopy: response to ischemic and thermal stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Maslov, Konstantin; Cornelius, Lynn; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    We report results of two in vivo functional human imaging experiments using photoacoustic microscopy. In Experiment 1, the hemodynamic response to an ischemic event was measured. The palm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while periodic arterial occlusions were administered using a blood pressure cuff wrapped around the upper arm and inflated to ~280 mmHg. Significant relative decreases in oxygen saturation (sO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) were observed during periods of ischemia. Upon release of the occlusion, significant relative increases in sO2 and HbT due to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia were recorded. Experiment 2 explored the vascular response to a local, external thermal stimulus. Thermal hyperemia is a common physiological phenomenon and thermoregulation function in which blood flow to the skin is increased to more efficiently exchange heat with the ambient environment. The forearm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while the imaged surface was exposed to an elevated temperature of ~46°C. Due to thermal hyperemia, relative increases in sO2 and HbT were measured as the temperature of the surface was raised. These results may contribute as clinically relevant measures of vascular functioning for detection and assessment of vascular related diseases.

  18. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Subcortical Brain Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Liang, Chia-Pin; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2015-11-01

    The whisker system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the brain. Discrete neural modules represent each whisker in the somatosensory cortex (“barrels”), thalamus (“barreloids”), and brain stem (“barrelettes”). Stimulation of a single whisker evokes neural activity sequentially in its corresponding barrelette, barreloid, and barrel. Conventional optical imaging of functional activation in the brain is limited to surface structures such as the cerebral cortex. To access subcortical structures and image sensory-evoked neural activity, we designed a needle-based optical system using gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens. We performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi) with GRIN rod lens to visualize neural activity evoked in the thalamic barreloids by deflection of whiskers in vivo. We stimulated several whiskers together to determine the sensitivity of our approach in differentiating between different barreloid responses. We also carried out stimulation of different whiskers at different times. Finally, we used muscimol in the barrel cortex to silence the corticothalamic inputs while imaging in the thalamus. Our results show that it is possible to obtain functional maps of the sensory periphery in deep brain structures such as the thalamic barreloids. Our approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other core brain structures.

  19. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Subcortical Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Liang, Chia-Pin; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The whisker system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the brain. Discrete neural modules represent each whisker in the somatosensory cortex (“barrels”), thalamus (“barreloids”), and brain stem (“barrelettes”). Stimulation of a single whisker evokes neural activity sequentially in its corresponding barrelette, barreloid, and barrel. Conventional optical imaging of functional activation in the brain is limited to surface structures such as the cerebral cortex. To access subcortical structures and image sensory-evoked neural activity, we designed a needle-based optical system using gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens. We performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi) with GRIN rod lens to visualize neural activity evoked in the thalamic barreloids by deflection of whiskers in vivo. We stimulated several whiskers together to determine the sensitivity of our approach in differentiating between different barreloid responses. We also carried out stimulation of different whiskers at different times. Finally, we used muscimol in the barrel cortex to silence the corticothalamic inputs while imaging in the thalamus. Our results show that it is possible to obtain functional maps of the sensory periphery in deep brain structures such as the thalamic barreloids. Our approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other core brain structures. PMID:26612326

  20. Structure predicts function: Combining non-invasive electrophysiology with in-vivo histology

    PubMed Central

    Helbling, Saskia; Teki, Sundeep; Callaghan, Martina F.; Sedley, William; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Barnes, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach for combining high resolution MRI-based myelin mapping with functional information from electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The main contribution to the primary currents detectable with EEG and MEG comes from ionic currents in the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, aligned perpendicularly to the local cortical surface. We provide evidence from an in-vivo experiment that the variation in MRI-based myeloarchitecture measures across the cortex predicts the variation of the current density over individuals and thus is of functional relevance. Equivalent current dipole locations and moments due to pitch onset evoked response fields (ERFs) were estimated by means of a variational Bayesian algorithm. The myeloarchitecture was estimated indirectly from individual high resolution quantitative multi-parameter maps (MPMs) acquired at 800 μm isotropic resolution. Myelin estimates across cortical areas correlated positively with dipole magnitude. This correlation was spatially specific: regions of interest in the auditory cortex provided significantly better models than those covering whole hemispheres. Based on the MPM data we identified the auditory cortical area TE1.2 as the most likely origin of the pitch ERFs measured by MEG. We can now proceed to exploit the higher spatial resolution of quantitative MPMs to identify the cortical origin of M/EEG signals, inform M/EEG source reconstruction and explore structure–function relationships at a fine structural level in the living human brain. PMID:25529007

  1. Structure predicts function: combining non-invasive electrophysiology with in-vivo histology.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Saskia; Teki, Sundeep; Callaghan, Martina F; Sedley, William; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Griffiths, Timothy D; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Barnes, Gareth R

    2015-03-01

    We present an approach for combining high resolution MRI-based myelin mapping with functional information from electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The main contribution to the primary currents detectable with EEG and MEG comes from ionic currents in the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, aligned perpendicularly to the local cortical surface. We provide evidence from an in-vivo experiment that the variation in MRI-based myeloarchitecture measures across the cortex predicts the variation of the current density over individuals and thus is of functional relevance. Equivalent current dipole locations and moments due to pitch onset evoked response fields (ERFs) were estimated by means of a variational Bayesian algorithm. The myeloarchitecture was estimated indirectly from individual high resolution quantitative multi-parameter maps (MPMs) acquired at 800μm isotropic resolution. Myelin estimates across cortical areas correlated positively with dipole magnitude. This correlation was spatially specific: regions of interest in the auditory cortex provided significantly better models than those covering whole hemispheres. Based on the MPM data we identified the auditory cortical area TE1.2 as the most likely origin of the pitch ERFs measured by MEG. We can now proceed to exploit the higher spatial resolution of quantitative MPMs to identify the cortical origin of M/EEG signals, inform M/EEG source reconstruction and explore structure-function relationships at a fine structural level in the living human brain. PMID:25529007

  2. Contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography with picomolar sensitivity for functional in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liba, Orly; SoRelle, Elliott D.; Sen, Debasish; de la Zerda, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) enables real-time imaging of living tissues at cell-scale resolution over millimeters in three dimensions. Despite these advantages, functional biological studies with OCT have been limited by a lack of exogenous contrast agents that can be distinguished from tissue. Here we report an approach to functional OCT imaging that implements custom algorithms to spectrally identify unique contrast agents: large gold nanorods (LGNRs). LGNRs exhibit 110-fold greater spectral signal per particle than conventional GNRs, which enables detection of individual LGNRs in water and concentrations as low as 250 pM in the circulation of living mice. This translates to ~40 particles per imaging voxel in vivo. Unlike previous implementations of OCT spectral detection, the methods described herein adaptively compensate for depth and processing artifacts on a per sample basis. Collectively, these methods enable high-quality noninvasive contrast-enhanced imaging of OCT in living subjects, including detection of tumor microvasculature at twice the depth achievable with conventional OCT. Additionally, multiplexed detection of spectrally-distinct LGNRs was demonstrated to observe discrete patterns of lymphatic drainage and identify individual lymphangions and lymphatic valve functional states. These capabilities provide a powerful platform for molecular imaging and characterization of tissue noninvasively at cellular resolution, called MOZART. PMID:26987475

  3. Addition of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist for luteal phase support in in-vitro fertilization: an analysis of 2739 cycles

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Erhan; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan; Aytaç, Pınar Çağlar; Çoban, Gonca; Şimşek, Seda Yüksel; Çok, Tayfun; Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Objective Luteal phase is defective in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, and many regimens were tried for the very best luteal phase support (LPS). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist use, which was administered as an adjunct to the luteal phase support in IVF cycles, was suggested to improve pregnancy outcome measures in certain randomized studies. We analyzed the effects of addition of GnRH agonist to standard progesterone luteal support on pregnancy outcome measures, particularly the live birth rates. Material and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including 2739 IVF cycles. Long GnRH agonist and antagonist stimulation IVF cycles with cleavage-stage embryo transfer were included. Cycles were divided into two groups: Group A included cycles with single-dose GnRH agonist plus progesterone LPS and Group B included progesterone only LPS. Live birth rates were the primary outcome measures of the analysis. Miscarriage rates and multiple pregnancy rates were the secondary outcome measures. Results Live birth rates were not statistically different in GnRH agonist plus progesterone (Group A) and progesterone only (Group B) groups in both the long agonist and antagonist stimulation arms (40.8%/41.2% and 32.8%/34.4%, p<0.05 respectively). Moreover, pregnancy rates, implantation rates, and miscarriage rates were found to be similar between groups. Multiple pregnancy rates in antagonist cycles were significantly higher in Group A than those in Group B (12.0% and 6.9%, respectively). Conclusion A beneficial effect of a single dose of GnRH agonist administration as a luteal phase supporting agent is yet to be determined because of the wide heterogeneity of data present in literature. Well-designed randomized clinical studies are required to clarify any effect of luteal GnRH agonist addition on pregnancy outcome measures with different doses, timing, and administration routes of GnRH agonists. PMID:26097392

  4. The effect of cloprostenol on human luteal steroid and prostaglandin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, A N; Walker, F M; Watson, J

    1977-01-01

    1 Human luteal tissue slices from days 18, 21 and 25 of the menstrual cycle were superfused in vitro with Medium 199 alone or containing cloprostenol (1 microgram/ml). Concentrations of progesterone, oestradiol-17beta and prostaglandins F2alpha and E2 were determined in the superfusate samples. 2 Secretion of steroids and prostaglandins was maintained at an approximately constant level throughout the experiments (21 h in one case) when the tissue was perfused with M199 alone. 3 Superfusion with cloprostenol (1 microgram/ml) resulted in an initial depression of progesterone and oestradiol-17beta but this was not maintained, levels returning to control values or showing an increase, while superfusion with cloprostenol continued. Cloprostenol is not therefore considered to be luteolytic at this dose and under these conditions for human luteal tissue in vitro. 4 Superfusion with cloprostenol (1 microgram/ml) also resulted in a large stimulation of secretion of endogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha following a short lag phase. This stimulation was possibly due to the initial depression of progesterone secretion. A short-lived stimulation of prostaglandin E2 secretion was also observed. 5 The significance of the increase in prostaglandin E2 secretion and the interrelationships between the various changes observed with cloprostenol are difficult to interpret. PMID:890210

  5. Progesterone administration for luteal phase deficiency in human reproduction: an old or new issue?

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    Luteal phase deficiency (LPD) is described as a condition of insufficient progesterone exposure to maintain a regular secretory endometrium and allow for normal embryo implantation and growth. Recently, scientific focus is turning to understand the physiology of implantation, in particular the several molecular markers of endometrial competence, through the recent transcriptomic approaches and microarray technology. In spite of the wide availability of clinical and instrumental methods for assessing endometrial competence, reproducible and reliable diagnostic tests for LPD are currently lacking, so no type-IA evidence has been proposed by the main scientific societies for assessing endometrial competence in infertile couples. Nevertheless, LPD is a very common condition that may occur during a series of clinical conditions, and during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and hyperstimulation (COH) programs. In many cases, the correct approach to treat LPD is the identification and correction of any underlying condition while, in case of no underlying dysfunction, the treatment becomes empiric. To date, no direct data is available regarding the efficacy of luteal phase support for improving fertility in spontaneous cycles or in non-gonadotropin induced ovulatory cycles. On the contrary, in gonadotropin in vitro fertilization (IVF) and non-IVF cycles, LPD is always present and progesterone exerts a significant positive effect on reproductive outcomes. The scientific debate still remains open regarding progesterone administration protocols, specially on routes of administration, dose and timing and the potential association with other drugs, and further research is still needed. PMID:26585269

  6. Impact of hydrogel nanoparticle size and functionalization on in vivo behavior for lung imaging and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjian; Ibricevic, Aida; Cohen, Joel A; Cohen, Jessica L; Gunsten, Sean P; Fréchet, Jean M J; Walter, Michael J; Welch, Michael J; Brody, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    Polymer chemistry offers the possibility of synthesizing multifunctional nanoparticles which incorporate moieties that enhance diagnostic and therapeutic targeting of cargo delivery to the lung. However, since rules for predicting particle behavior following modification are not well-defined, it is essential that probes for tracking fate in vivo are also included. Accordingly, we designed polyacrylamide-based hydrogel particles of differing sizes, functionalized with a nona-arginine cell-penetrating peptide (Arg(9)), and labeled with imaging components to assess lung retention and cellular uptake after intratracheal administration. Radiolabeled microparticles (1-5 microm diameter) and nanoparticles (20-40 nm diameter) without and with Arg(9) showed diffuse airspace distribution by positron emission tomography imaging. Biodistribution studies revealed that particle clearance and extrapulmonary distribution was, in part, size dependent. Microparticles were rapidly cleared by mucociliary routes but, unexpectedly, also through the circulation. In contrast, nanoparticles had prolonged lung retention enhanced by Arg(9) and were significantly restricted to the lung. For all particle types, uptake was predominant in alveolar macrophages and, to a lesser extent, lung epithelial cells. In general, particles did not induce local inflammatory responses, with the exception of microparticles bearing Arg(9). Whereas microparticles may be advantageous for short-term applications, nanosized particles constitute an efficient high-retention and non-inflammatory vehicle for the delivery of diagnostic imaging agents and therapeutics to lung airspaces and alveolar macrophages that can be enhanced by Arg(9). Importantly, our results show that minor particle modifications may significantly impact in vivo behavior within the complex environments of the lung, underscoring the need for animal modeling. PMID:19852512

  7. Molecular organization and in vivo function of the cytoskeleton of amphibian erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeng Gea; Kerr, Louis M; Cohen, William D

    2007-08-01

    One prominent cytoskeletal feature of non-mammalian vertebrate erythrocytes is the marginal band (MB), composed of microtubules. However, there have been several reports of MB-associated F-actin. We have further investigated the function of MB-associated F-actin, using newt erythrocytes having large, thick MBs. Confocal microscopy revealed a distinctive band of F-actin colocalizing point- by-point with MB microtubules. Furthermore, the F-actin band was present in isolated elliptical MBs, but absent in membrane skeletons lacking MBs. F-actin depolymerizing agents did not affect F-actin band integrity in isolated MBs, indicating its non-dynamic state. However, exposure to elastase resulted in F-actin removal and MB circularization. These results provide evidence of a strong association of F-actin with MB microtubules in mature ellipsoidal erythrocytes. To assess the true extent of mechanical stress on the cytoskeleton, erythrocytes were observed by video microscopy during flow in vivo. Moving with long axis parallel to flow direction, cells underwent reversible shape distortion as they collided vigorously with other erythrocytes and vessel walls. In addition, cells twisted into figure-8 shapes, a cytoskeletal property that may provide physiological advantages during flow. Our results, together with those of others, yield a consistent picture in which developing erythrocytes undergo transition from spheroids to immature discoids to mature ellipsoids. The causal step in discoid formation is biogenesis of circular MBs with sufficient flexural rigidity to determine cell shape. F-actin binding to MB microtubules then creates a composite system, enhancing flexural rigidity to produce and maintain ellipsoidal shape during the physical challenges of blood flow in vivo. PMID:17508361

  8. Function and viability of human islets encapsulated in alginate sheets: in vitro and in vivo culture.

    PubMed

    Lamb, M; Storrs, R; Li, S; Liang, O; Laugenour, K; Dorian, R; Chapman, D; Ichii, H; Imagawa, D; Foster, C; King, S; Lakey, J R T

    2011-11-01

    Islet encapsulation offers an immune system barrier for islet transplantation, and encapsulation within an alginate sheetlike structure offers the ability to be retrievable after transplanted. This study aims to show that human islets encapsulated into islet sheets remain functional and viable after 8 weeks in culture or when transplanted into the subcutaneous space of rats. Human islets were isolated from cadaveric organs. Dissociation and purification were done using enzymatic digestion and a continuous Ficoll-UWD gradient. Purified human islets were encapsulated in alginate sheets. Human Islet sheets were either kept in culture, at 37°C and 5% CO(2), or transplanted subcutaneously into Lewis rats. After 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks, the human islet sheets were retrieved from the rats and assessed. The viability of the sheets was measured using fluorescein diacetate (FDA)/propidium iodide (PI), and function was measured through glucose-stimulated insulin release, in which the sheets were incubated for an hour in low-glucose concentration (2.8 mmol/L) and then high (28 mmol/L), then high (28 mmol/L) plus 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (50 μm). Human islet sheets remained both viable, above 70%, and functional, with a stimulation index (insulin secretion in high glucose divided by insulin secretion in low glucose) above 1.5, over 8 weeks of culture or subcutaneous transplantation. Islet transplantation continues to make advances in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. These preliminary results suggest that encapsulated islets sheets can survive and maintain islet viability and function in vivo, within the subcutaneous region. PMID:22099772

  9. In vivo mapping of the functional regions of the DEAD-box helicase Vasa

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mehrnoush; Lasko, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The maternally expressed Drosophila melanogaster DEAD-box helicase Vasa (Vas) is necessary for many cellular and developmental processes, including specification of primordial germ cells (pole cells), posterior patterning of the embryo, piRNA-mediated repression of transposon-encoded mRNAs, translational activation of gurken (grk) mRNA, and completion of oogenesis itself. Vas protein accumulates in the perinuclear nuage in nurse cells soon after their specification, and then at stage 10 Vas translocates to the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte. We produced a series of transgenic constructs encoding eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations affecting different regions of the protein, and analyzed in vivo which Vas functions each could support. We identified novel domains in the N- and C-terminal regions of the protein that are essential for localization, transposon repression, posterior patterning, and pole cell specification. One such functional region, the most C-terminal seven amino acids, is specific to Vas orthologues and is thus critical to distinguishing Vas from other closely related DEAD-box helicases. Surprisingly, we also found that many eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations that would be expected to abrogate DEAD-box helicase function localized to the nuage and posterior pole, and retained the capacity to support oogenesis, although they did not function in embryonic patterning, pole cell specification, grk activation, or transposon repression. We conclude from these experiments that Vas, a multifunctional protein, uses different domains and different molecular associations to carry out its various cellular and developmental roles. PMID:25795910

  10. In vivo assessment of contractile strength distinguishes differential gene function in skeletal muscle of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brit L; Gallagher, Thomas L; Rastogi, Neha; Davis, Jonathan P; Beattie, Christine E; Amacher, Sharon L; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-10-01

    The accessible genetics and extensive skeletal musculature of the zebrafish make it a versatile and increasingly used model for studying muscle contraction. We here describe the development of an in vivo assay for measuring the contractile force of intact zebrafish at the larval stage. In addition, as proof of applicability, we have used this assay to quantify contractile strength of zebrafish larvae in a morphant model of deranged rbfox function. Average maximum tetanic (180 Hz) whole body forces produced by wild-type larvae at 2, 3, 4, and 5 days postfertilization amounted to 3.0, 7.2, 9.1, and 10.8 mN, respectively. To compare at potentially different stages of muscle development, we developed an immunohistological assay for empirically determining the cross-sectional area of larval trunk skeletal muscle to quantify muscle-specific force per cross-sectional area. At 4-5 days postfertilization, specific force amounts to ∼ 300 mN/mm(2), which is similar to fully developed adult mammalian skeletal muscle. We used these assays to measure contractile strength in zebrafish singly or doubly deficient for two rbfox paralogs, rbfox1l and rbfox2, which encode RNA-binding factors shown previously to modulate muscle function and muscle-specific splicing. We found rbfox2 morphants produce maximal tetanic forces similar to wild-type larvae, whereas rbfox1l morphants demonstrate significantly impaired function. rbfox1l/rbfox2 morphants are paralyzed, and their lack of contractile force production in our assay suggests that paralysis is a muscle-autonomous defect. These quantitative functional results allow measurement of muscle-specific phenotypes independent of neural input. PMID:26251513

  11. In vivo mapping of the functional regions of the DEAD-box helicase Vasa.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mehrnoush; Lasko, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The maternally expressed Drosophila melanogaster DEAD-box helicase Vasa (Vas) is necessary for many cellular and developmental processes, including specification of primordial germ cells (pole cells), posterior patterning of the embryo, piRNA-mediated repression of transposon-encoded mRNAs, translational activation of gurken (grk) mRNA, and completion of oogenesis itself. Vas protein accumulates in the perinuclear nuage in nurse cells soon after their specification, and then at stage 10 Vas translocates to the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte. We produced a series of transgenic constructs encoding eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations affecting different regions of the protein, and analyzed in vivo which Vas functions each could support. We identified novel domains in the N- and C-terminal regions of the protein that are essential for localization, transposon repression, posterior patterning, and pole cell specification. One such functional region, the most C-terminal seven amino acids, is specific to Vas orthologues and is thus critical to distinguishing Vas from other closely related DEAD-box helicases. Surprisingly, we also found that many eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations that would be expected to abrogate DEAD-box helicase function localized to the nuage and posterior pole, and retained the capacity to support oogenesis, although they did not function in embryonic patterning, pole cell specification, grk activation, or transposon repression. We conclude from these experiments that Vas, a multifunctional protein, uses different domains and different molecular associations to carry out its various cellular and developmental roles. PMID:25795910

  12. Bridging the gap: functional healing of embryonic small intestine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A; Oltrabella, Francesca; Khalil, Basem A; Morabito, Antonino; Woolf, Adrian S

    2016-02-01

    The ability to grow embryonic organs ex vivo provides an opportunity to follow their differentiation in a controlled environment, with resulting insights into normal development. Additionally, similar strategies can be used to assess effects on organogenesis of physical and chemical manipulations. This study aimed to create an organ culture model with which to test physical manipulations to enhance healing of gut segments, thus generating a single functional organ. Embryonic mouse jejunum was isolated and cut into 2-3 mm tubes, which were placed in pairs, separated by a small gap, on semi-permeable supports. Each pair was linked by a nylon suture threaded through their lumens. After 3 days in organ culture fed by defined serum-free media, the rudiments differentiated to form tubes of smooth muscle surrounding a core of rudimentary villi. Of 34 such pairs, 74% had touching and well aligned proximate ends. Of these joined structures, 80% (59% of the total pairs) had a continuous lumen, as assessed by observing the trajectories of fluorescent dextrans injected into their distal ends. Fused organ pairs formed a single functional unit, as assessed by spontaneous contraction waves propagated along their lengths. In these healed intestines, peripherin(+) neurons formed a nexus in the zone of fusion, linking the rudiment pairs. In future, this system could be used to test whether growth factors enhance fusion. Such results should in turn inform the design of novel treatments for short bowel syndrome, a potentially fatal condition with a currently limited and imperfect range of therapies. PMID:26234729

  13. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J.; Denham, David B.; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S.

    2004-05-01

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 °C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 × 103 mm3) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  14. Truncated HP1 lacking a functional chromodomain induces heterochromatinization upon in vivo targeting.

    PubMed

    Brink, Maartje C; van der Velden, Yme; de Leeuw, Wim; Mateos-Langerak, Julio; Belmont, Andrew S; van Driel, Roel; Verschure, Pernette J

    2006-01-01

    Packaging of the eukaryotic genome into higher order chromatin structures is tightly related to gene expression. Pericentromeric heterochromatin is typified by accumulations of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (MeH3K9) and global histone deacetylation. HP1 interacts with chromatin by binding to MeH3K9 through the chromodomain (CD). HP1 dimerizes with itself and binds a variety of proteins through its chromoshadow domain. We have analyzed at the single cell level whether HP1 lacking its functional CD is able to induce heterochromatinization in vivo. We used a lac-operator array-based system in mammalian cells to target EGFP-lac repressor tagged truncated HP1alpha and HP1beta to a lac operator containing gene-amplified chromosome region in living cells. After targeting truncated HP1alpha or HP1beta we observe enhanced tri-MeH3K9 and recruitment of endogenous HP1alpha and HP1beta to the chromosome region. We show that CD-less HP1alpha can induce chromatin condensation, whereas the effect of truncated HP1beta is less pronounced. Our results demonstrate that after lac repressor-mediated targeting, HP1alpha and HP1beta without a functional CD are able to induce heterochromatinization. PMID:16283356

  15. Polyglycerolsulfate Functionalized Gold Nanorods as Optoacoustic Signal Nanoamplifiers for In Vivo Bioimaging of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vonnemann, Jonathan; Beziere, Nicolas; Böttcher, Christoph; Riese, Sebastian B.; Kuehne, Christian; Dernedde, Jens; Licha, Kai; von Schacky, Claudio; Kosanke, Yvonne; Kimm, Melanie; Meier, Reinhard; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We have synthesized a targeted imaging agent for rheumatoid arthritis based on polysulfated gold nanorods. The CTAB layer on gold nanorods was first replaced with PEG-thiol and then with dendritic polyglycerolsulfate at elevated temperature, which resulted in significantly reduced cytotoxicity compared to polyanionic gold nanorods functionalized by non-covalent approaches. In addition to classical characterization methods, we have established a facile UV-VIS based BaCl2 agglomeration assay to confirm a quantitative removal of unbound ligand. With the help of a competitive surface plasmon resonance-based L-selectin binding assay and a leukocyte adhesion-based flow cell assay, we have demonstrated the high inflammation targeting potential of the synthesized gold nanorods in vitro. In combination with the surface plasmon resonance band of AuNRs at 780 nm, these findings permitted the imaging of inflammation in an in vivo mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis with high contrast using multispectral optoacoustic tomography. The study offers a robust method for otherwise difficult to obtain covalently functionalized polyanionic gold nanorods, which are suitable for biological applications as well as a low-cost, actively targeted, and high contrast imaging agent for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. This paves the way for further research in other inflammation associated pathologies, in particular, when photothermal therapy can be applied. PMID:24723984

  16. Effects of altered ventilatory patterns of rabbit pulmonary endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme function, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Catravas, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Because alveolar pressure can influence pulmonary blood flow, volume and surface area, the authors have studied the effects of airway pressure on endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) function in rabbit lungs in vivo, utilizing indicator dilution techniques with /sup 3/H-Benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (BPAP) as substate. Static inclation of the lungs to a pressure of 0 or 5 mmHg did not change percent transpulmonary metabolism and Amax/Km ratio in comparison to control measurements during conventional mechanical ventilation. When the inflation pressure was increased to 10 mmHg, percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP remained unaltered but Amax/Km decreased over 40% from control. This decrease was in close relation to the reduction in pulmonary blood flow. Addition of 5 cm H/sub 2/O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the mechanical ventilation also decreased Amax/Km values and pulmonary blood flow but did not influence percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP. These results suggest that the detected alterations in ACE kinetics were more likely due to hemodynamic changes than enzyme dysfunction. The authors propose that high static alveolar pressures as well as PEEP did not affect angiotensin converting enzyme function, but reduced the fraction of perfused microvessels reflected in changes in Amax/Km ratios.

  17. Twins, quadruplexes, and more: functional aspects of native and engineered RNA self-assembly in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lease, Richard A; Arluison, Véronique; Lavelle, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    The primacy and power of RNA in governing many processes of life has begun to be more fully appreciated in both the discovery and inventive sciences. A variety of RNA interactions regulate gene expression, and structural self-assembly underlies many of these processes. The understanding sparked by these discoveries has inspired and informed the engineering of novel RNA structures, control elements, and genetic circuits in cells. Many of these engineered systems are built up fundamentally from RNA-RNA interactions, often combining modular, rational design with functional selection and screening. It is therefore useful to review the particular class of RNA-based regulatory mechanisms that rely on RNA self-assembly either through homomeric (self-self) or heteromeric (self-nonself) RNA-RNA interactions. Structures and sequence elements within individual RNAs create a basis for the pairing interactions, and in some instances can even lead to the formation of RNA polymers. Example systems of dimers, multimers, and polymers are reviewed in this article in the context of natural systems, wherein the function and impact of self-assemblies are understood. Following this, a brief overview is presented of specific engineered RNA self-assembly systems implemented in vivo, with lessons learned from both discovery and engineering approaches to RNA-RNA self-assembly. PMID:23914307

  18. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  19. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development. PMID:26700795

  20. Animal Models for Studying the In Vivo Functions of Cell Cycle CDKs.

    PubMed

    Risal, Sanjiv; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Cdks (Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdk2) and a mitotic Cdk (Cdk1) are involved in cell cycle progression in mammals. Cyclins, Cdk inhibitors, and phosphorylations (both activating and inhibitory) at different cellular levels tightly modulate the activities of these kinases. Based on the results of biochemical studies, it was long believed that different Cdks functioned at specific stages during cell cycle progression. However, deletion of all three interphase Cdks in mice affected cell cycle entry and progression only in certain specialized cells such as hematopoietic cells, beta cells of the pancreas, pituitary lactotrophs, and cardiomyocytes. These genetic experiments challenged the prevailing biochemical model and established that Cdks function in a cell-specific, but not a stage-specific, manner during cell cycle entry and the progression of mitosis. Recent in vivo studies have further established that Cdk1 is the only Cdk that is both essential and sufficient for driving the resumption of meiosis during mouse oocyte maturation. These genetic studies suggest a minimal-essential cell cycle model in which Cdk1 is the central regulator of cell cycle progression. Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of the interphase Cdks by forming active complexes with A-, B-, E-, and D-type Cyclins in a stepwise manner. Thus, Cdk1 plays an essential role in both mitosis and meiosis in mammals, whereas interphase Cdks are dispensable. PMID:26231715

  1. In Vivo Functional Brain Imaging Approach Based on Bioluminescent Calcium Indicator GFP-aequorin.

    PubMed

    Lark, Arianna R; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    Functional in vivo imaging has become a powerful approach to study the function and physiology of brain cells and structures of interest. Recently a new method of Ca(2+)-imaging using the bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) has been developed. This new technique relies on the fusion of the GFP and aequorin genes, producing a molecule capable of binding calcium and - with the addition of its cofactor coelenterazine - emitting bright light that can be monitored through a photon collector. Transgenic lines carrying the GFP-aequorin gene have been generated for both mice and Drosophila. In Drosophila, the GFP-aequorin gene has been placed under the control of the GAL4/UAS binary expression system allowing for targeted expression and imaging within the brain. This method has subsequently been shown to be capable of detecting both inward Ca(2+)-transients and Ca(2+)-released from inner stores. Most importantly it allows for a greater duration in continuous recording, imaging at greater depths within the brain, and recording at high temporal resolutions (up to 8.3 msec). Here we present the basic method for using bioluminescent imaging to record and analyze Ca(2+)-activity within the mushroom bodies, a structure central to learning and memory in the fly brain. PMID:26779599

  2. Twins, quadruplexes, and more: functional aspects of native and engineered RNA self-assembly in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Richard A.; Arluison, Véronique; Lavelle, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The primacy and power of RNA in governing many processes of life has begun to be more fully appreciated in both the discovery and inventive sciences. A variety of RNA interactions regulate gene expression, and structural self-assembly underlies many of these processes. The understanding sparked by these discoveries has inspired and informed the engineering of novel RNA structures, control elements, and genetic circuits in cells. Many of these engineered systems are built up fundamentally from RNA–RNA interactions, often combining modular, rational design with functional selection and screening. It is therefore useful to review the particular class of RNA-based regulatory mechanisms that rely on RNA self-assembly either through homomeric (self–self) or heteromeric (self–nonself) RNA–RNA interactions. Structures and sequence elements within individual RNAs create a basis for the pairing interactions, and in some instances can even lead to the formation of RNA polymers. Example systems of dimers, multimers, and polymers are reviewed in this article in the context of natural systems, wherein the function and impact of self-assemblies are understood. Following this, a brief overview is presented of specific engineered RNA self-assembly systems implemented in vivo, with lessons learned from both discovery and engineering approaches to RNA–RNA self-assembly. PMID:23914307

  3. In Vivo Function of PTEX88 in Malaria Parasite Sequestration and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Costa Nunes, Jean; Stenzel, Werner; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-06-01

    Malaria pathology is linked to remodeling of red blood cells by eukaryotic Plasmodium parasites. Central to host cell refurbishment is the trafficking of parasite-encoded virulence factors through the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX). Much of our understanding of its function is based on experimental work with cultured Plasmodium falciparum, yet direct consequences of PTEX impairment during an infection remain poorly defined. Using the murine malaria model parasite Plasmodium berghei, it is shown here that efficient sequestration to the pulmonary, adipose, and brain tissue vasculature is dependent on the PTEX components thioredoxin 2 (TRX2) and PTEX88. While TRX2-deficient parasites remain virulent, PTEX88-deficient parasites no longer sequester in the brain, correlating with abolishment of cerebral complications in infected mice. However, an apparent trade-off for virulence attenuation was spleen enlargement, which correlates with a strongly reduced schizont-to-ring-stage transition. Strikingly, general protein export is unaffected in PTEX88-deficient mutants that mature normally in vitro. Thus, PTEX88 is pivotal for tissue sequestration in vivo, parasite virulence, and preventing exacerbation of spleen pathology, but these functions do not correlate with general protein export to the host erythrocyte. The presented data suggest that the protein export machinery of Plasmodium parasites and their underlying mechanistic features are considerably more complex than previously anticipated and indicate challenges for targeted intervention strategies. PMID:25820521

  4. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  5. Separate and combined effects of a 10-d exposure to hypoxia and inactivity on oxidative function in vivo and mitochondrial respiration ex vivo in humans.

    PubMed

    Salvadego, Desy; Keramidas, Michail E; Brocca, Lorenza; Domenis, Rossana; Mavelli, Irene; Rittweger, Jörn; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Grassi, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    An integrative evaluation of oxidative metabolism was carried out in 9 healthy young men (age, 24.1 ± 1.7 yr mean ± SD) before (CTRL) and after a 10-day horizontal bed rest carried out in normoxia (N-BR) or hypoxia (H-BR, FiO2 = 0.147). H-BR was designed to simulate planetary habitats. Pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2) and vastus lateralis fractional O2 extraction (changes in deoxygenated hemoglobin+myoglobin concentration, Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)] evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy) were evaluated in normoxia and during an incremental cycle ergometer (CE) and one-leg knee extension (KE) exercise (aimed at reducing cardiovascular constraints to oxidative function). Mitochondrial respiration was evaluated ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized vastus lateralis fibers. During CE V̇o2peak and Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)]peak were lower (P < 0.05) after both N-BR and H-BR than during CTRL; during KE the variables were lower after N-BR but not after H-BR. During CE the overshoot of Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)] during constant work rate exercise was greater in N-BR and H-BR than CTRL, whereas during KE a significant difference vs. CTRL was observed only after N-BR. Maximal mitochondrial respiration determined ex vivo was not affected by either intervention. In N-BR, a significant impairment of oxidative metabolism occurred downstream of central cardiovascular O2 delivery and upstream of mitochondrial function, possibly at the level of the intramuscular matching between O2 supply and utilization and peripheral O2 diffusion. Superposition of hypoxia on bed rest did not aggravate, and partially reversed, the impairment of muscle oxidative function in vivo induced by bed rest. The effects of longer exposures will have to be determined. PMID:27197861

  6. The past, present, and future of x-ray technology for in vivo imaging of function and form

    SciTech Connect

    Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.; Hourigan, K.; Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Hooper, S. B.

    2009-05-15

    Scientists and clinicians have a keen interest in studying not just the structure of physiological systems, but their motion also, or more generally their form and function. This paper focuses on the technologies that underpin in vivo measurements of form and function of the human body for both research and medical treatment. A concise literature review of x-ray imaging, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, laser Doppler velocimetry, and particle image velocimetry is presented. Additionally, a more detailed review of in vivo x-ray imaging is presented. Finally, two techniques, which the authors believe are representative of the present and future of in vivo x-ray imaging techniques, are presented.

  7. Balanced Hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Kidney Function In-Vivo without Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Martin Alexander; Baar, Wolfgang; Bruno, Raphael Romano; Wollborn, Jakob; Held, Christopher; Schneider, Reinhard; Flemming, Sven; Schlegel, Nicolas; Roewer, Norbert; Neuhaus, Winfried; Wunder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Volume therapy is a standard procedure in daily perioperative care, and there is an ongoing discussion about the benefits of colloid resuscitation with hydroxyethylstarch (HES). In sepsis HES should be avoided due to a higher risk for acute kidney injury (AKI). Results of the usage of HES in patients without sepsis are controversial. Therefore we conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of 6% HES 130/0.4 on kidney integrity with sepsis or under healthy conditions Sepsis was induced by standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis (sCASP). sCASP-group as well as control group (C) remained untreated for 24 h. After 18 h sCASP+HES group (sCASP+VOL) and control+HES (C+VOL) received 50 ml/KG balanced 6% HES (VOL) 130/0.4 over 6h. After 24h kidney function was measured via Inulin- and PAH-Clearance in re-anesthetized rats, and serum urea, creatinine (crea), cystatin C and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as well as histopathology were analysed. In vitro human proximal tubule cells (PTC) were cultured +/- lipopolysaccharid (LPS) and with 0.1–4.0% VOL. Cell viability was measured with XTT-, cell toxicity with LDH-test. sCASP induced severe septic AKI demonstrated divergent results regarding renal function by clearance or creatinine measure focusing on VOL. Soleley HES (C+VOL) deteriorated renal function without sCASP. Histopathology revealed significantly derangements in all HES groups compared to control. In vitro LPS did not worsen the HES induced reduction of cell viability in PTC cells. For the first time, we demonstrated, that application of 50 ml/KG 6% HES 130/0.4 over 6 hours induced AKI without inflammation in vivo. Severity of sCASP induced septic AKI might be no longer susceptible to the way of volume expansion. PMID:26340751

  8. Drug-based modulation of endogenous stem cells promotes functional remyelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Najm, Fadi J.; Madhavan, Mayur; Zaremba, Anita; Shick, Elizabeth; Karl, Robert T.; Factor, Daniel C.; Miller, Tyler E.; Nevin, Zachary S.; Kantor, Christopher; Sargent, Alex; Quick, Kevin L.; Schlatzer, Daniela M.; Tang, Hong; Papoian, Ruben; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B.; Jadhav, Ajit; Robinson, Andrew P.; Podojil, Joseph R.; Miller, Stephen D.; Miller, Robert H.; Tesar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) involves an aberrant autoimmune response and progressive failure of remyelination in the central nervous system (CNS). Prevention of neural degeneration and subsequent disability requires remyelination through the generation of new oligodendrocytes, but current treatments exclusively target the immune system. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are stem cells in the CNS and the principal source of myelinating oligodendrocytes1. OPCs are abundant in demyelinated regions of MS patients, yet fail to differentiate, thereby representing a cellular target for pharmacological intervention2. To discover therapeutic compounds for enhancing myelination from endogenous OPCs, we screened a library of bioactive small molecules on mouse pluripotent epiblast stem cell (EpiSC)-derived OPCs3–5. We identified seven drugs that functioned at nanomolar doses to selectively enhance the generation of mature oligodendrocytes from OPCs in vitro. Two drugs, miconazole and clobetasol, were effective in promoting precocious myelination in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures, and in vivo in early postnatal mouse pups. Systemic delivery of each of the two drugs significantly increased the number of new oligodendrocytes and enhanced remyelination in a lysolecithin-induced mouse model of focal demyelination. Administering each of the two drugs at the peak of disease in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of chronic progressive MS resulted in striking reversal of disease severity. Immune response assays showed that miconazole functioned directly as a remyelinating drug with no effect on the immune system, whereas clobetasol was a potent immunosuppressant as well as a remyelinating agent. Mechanistic studies showed that miconazole and clobetasol functioned in OPCs through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling, respectively. Furthermore, both drugs enhanced the generation of human

  9. Drug-based modulation of endogenous stem cells promotes functional remyelination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Najm, Fadi J; Madhavan, Mayur; Zaremba, Anita; Shick, Elizabeth; Karl, Robert T; Factor, Daniel C; Miller, Tyler E; Nevin, Zachary S; Kantor, Christopher; Sargent, Alex; Quick, Kevin L; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Tang, Hong; Papoian, Ruben; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B; Jadhav, Ajit; Robinson, Andrew P; Podojil, Joseph R; Miller, Stephen D; Miller, Robert H; Tesar, Paul J

    2015-06-11

    Multiple sclerosis involves an aberrant autoimmune response and progressive failure of remyelination in the central nervous system. Prevention of neural degeneration and subsequent disability requires remyelination through the generation of new oligodendrocytes, but current treatments exclusively target the immune system. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are stem cells in the central nervous system and the principal source of myelinating oligodendrocytes. These cells are abundant in demyelinated regions of patients with multiple sclerosis, yet fail to differentiate, thereby representing a cellular target for pharmacological intervention. To discover therapeutic compounds for enhancing myelination from endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, we screened a library of bioactive small molecules on mouse pluripotent epiblast stem-cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Here we show seven drugs function at nanomolar doses selectively to enhance the generation of mature oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells in vitro. Two drugs, miconazole and clobetasol, are effective in promoting precocious myelination in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures, and in vivo in early postnatal mouse pups. Systemic delivery of each of the two drugs significantly increases the number of new oligodendrocytes and enhances remyelination in a lysolecithin-induced mouse model of focal demyelination. Administering each of the two drugs at the peak of disease in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis results in striking reversal of disease severity. Immune response assays show that miconazole functions directly as a remyelinating drug with no effect on the immune system, whereas clobetasol is a potent immunosuppressant as well as a remyelinating agent. Mechanistic studies show that miconazole and clobetasol function in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells through mitogen-activated protein kinase and glucocorticoid receptor

  10. Adenosine A2A Agonist Improves Lung Function During Ex-vivo Lung Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Emaminia, Abbas; LaPar, Damien J.; Zhao, Yunge; Steidle, John F.; Harris, David A.; Linden, Joel; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel technique to assess, and potentially repair marginal lungs that may otherwise be rejected for transplantation. Adenosine has been shown to protect against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury through its A2A receptor. We hypothesized that combining EVLP with adenosine A2A receptor agonist treatment would enhance lung functional quality and increase donor lung usage. Methods Eight bilateral pig lungs were harvested and flushed with cold Perfadex. After 14 hours storage at 4°C, EVLP was performed for 5 hours on two explanted lung groups: 1) Control group lungs (n=4), were perfused with Steen Solution and Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and 2) treated group lungs (n=4) received 10μM CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor agonist, in a Steen Solution-primed circuit. Lung histology, tissue cytokines, gas analysis and pulmonary function were compared between groups. Results Treated lungs demonstrated significantly less edema as reflected by wet-dry weight ratio (6.6 vs. 5.2, p<0.03) and confirmed by histology. In addition, treated lung demonstrated significantly lower levels of interferon gamma (45.1 vs. 88.5, p<0.05). Other measured tissue cytokines (interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8) were lower in treatment group, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Oxygenation index was improved in the treated group (1.5 vs. 2.3, p<0.01) as well as mean airway pressure (10.3 vs. 13 p<0.009). Conclusions EVLP is a novel and efficient way to assess and optimize lung function and oxygen exchange within donor lungs, and the use of adenosine A2A agonist potentiates its potential. EVLP with the concomitant administration of A2A agonist may enhance donor lung quality and could increase the donor lung pool for transplantation. PMID:22051279

  11. Balanced Hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Kidney Function In-Vivo without Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schick, Martin Alexander; Baar, Wolfgang; Bruno, Raphael Romano; Wollborn, Jakob; Held, Christopher; Schneider, Reinhard; Flemming, Sven; Schlegel, Nicolas; Roewer, Norbert; Neuhaus, Winfried; Wunder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Volume therapy is a standard procedure in daily perioperative care, and there is an ongoing discussion about the benefits of colloid resuscitation with hydroxyethylstarch (HES). In sepsis HES should be avoided due to a higher risk for acute kidney injury (AKI). Results of the usage of HES in patients without sepsis are controversial. Therefore we conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of 6% HES 130/0.4 on kidney integrity with sepsis or under healthy conditions Sepsis was induced by standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis (sCASP). sCASP-group as well as control group (C) remained untreated for 24 h. After 18 h sCASP+HES group (sCASP+VOL) and control+HES (C+VOL) received 50 ml/KG balanced 6% HES (VOL) 130/0.4 over 6 h. After 24 h kidney function was measured via Inulin- and PAH-Clearance in re-anesthetized rats, and serum urea, creatinine (crea), cystatin C and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as well as histopathology were analysed. In vitro human proximal tubule cells (PTC) were cultured +/- lipopolysaccharid (LPS) and with 0.1-4.0% VOL. Cell viability was measured with XTT-, cell toxicity with LDH-test. sCASP induced severe septic AKI demonstrated divergent results regarding renal function by clearance or creatinine measure focusing on VOL. Soleley HES (C+VOL) deteriorated renal function without sCASP. Histopathology revealed significantly derangements in all HES groups compared to control. In vitro LPS did not worsen the HES induced reduction of cell viability in PTC cells. For the first time, we demonstrated, that application of 50 ml/KG 6% HES 130/0.4 over 6 hours induced AKI without inflammation in vivo. Severity of sCASP induced septic AKI might be no longer susceptible to the way of volume expansion. PMID:26340751

  12. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 KΩ impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future. PMID:22442134

  13. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Jason T; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A; Whalley, W Richard; Ginn, Timothy R; Nelson, Douglas C; Mortensen, Brina M; Martinez, Brian C; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming-these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that 'soil engineering in vivo', wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon-effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  14. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 KΩ impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future.

  15. Transdifferentiation of Fast Skeletal Muscle Into Functional Endothelium in Vivo by Transcription Factor Etv2

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Gustavo A.; Lindgren, Anne G.; Huang, Haigen; Yang, Hanshuo; Yao, Shaohua; Martin, Benjamin L.; Kimelman, David; Lin, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    Etsrp/Etv2 (Etv2) is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator of vascular development in vertebrates. Etv2 deficiency prevents the proper specification of the endothelial cell lineage, while its overexpression causes expansion of the endothelial cell lineage in the early embryo or in embryonic stem cells. We hypothesized that Etv2 alone is capable of transdifferentiating later somatic cells into endothelial cells. Using heat shock inducible Etv2 transgenic zebrafish, we demonstrate that Etv2 expression alone is sufficient to transdifferentiate fast skeletal muscle cells into functional blood vessels. Following heat treatment, fast skeletal muscle cells turn on vascular genes and repress muscle genes. Time-lapse imaging clearly shows that muscle cells turn on vascular gene expression, undergo dramatic morphological changes, and integrate into the existing vascular network. Lineage tracing and immunostaining confirm that fast skeletal muscle cells are the source of these newly generated vessels. Microangiography and observed blood flow demonstrated that this new vasculature is capable of supporting circulation. Using pharmacological, transgenic, and morpholino approaches, we further establish that the canonical Wnt pathway is important for induction of the transdifferentiation process, whereas the VEGF pathway provides a maturation signal for the endothelial fate. Additionally, overexpression of Etv2 in mammalian myoblast cells, but not in other cell types examined, induced expression of vascular genes. We have demonstrated in zebrafish that expression of Etv2 alone is sufficient to transdifferentiate fast skeletal muscle into functional endothelial cells in vivo. Given the evolutionarily conserved function of this transcription factor and the responsiveness of mammalian myoblasts to Etv2, it is likely that mammalian muscle cells will respond similarly. PMID:23853546

  16. Human whole-blood culture system for ex vivo characterization of designer-cell function.

    PubMed

    Schukur, Lina; Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Encapsulated designer cells implanted into mice are currently used to validate the efficacy of therapeutic gene networks for the diagnosis and treatment of various human diseases in preclinical research. Because many human conditions cannot be adequately replicated by animal models, complementary and alternative procedures to test future treatment strategies are required. Here we describe a novel approach utilizing an ex vivo human whole-blood culture system to validate synthetic biology-inspired designer cell-based treatment strategies. The viability and functionality of transgenic mammalian designer cells co-cultured with primary human immune cells were characterized. We demonstrated that transgenic mammalian designer cells required adequate insulation from the human blood microenvironment to maintain viability and functionality. The biomaterial alginate-(poly-l-lysine)-alginate used to encapsulate the transgenic designer cells did neither affect the viability of primary granulocytes and lymphocytes nor the functionality of lymphocytes. Additionally, alginate-encapsulated transgenic designer cells remained responsive to the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from the whole-blood culture upon exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF diffused into the alginate capsules, bound to the specific TNF receptors on the transgenic designer cells' surface and triggered the expression of the reporter gene SEAP (human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase) that was rewired to the TNF-specific signaling cascade. Human whole-blood culture systems can therefore be considered as valuable complementary assays to animal models for the validation of synthetic circuits in genetically modified mammalian cells and may speed up preclinical research in a world of personalized medicine. PMID:26348251

  17. Randomized Controlled Trial of "Mind Reading" and In Vivo Rehearsal for High-Functioning Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomeer, Marcus L.; Smith, Rachael A.; Lopata, Christopher; Volker, Martin A.; Lipinski, Alanna M.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; McDonald, Christin A.; Lee, Gloria K.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a computer software (i.e., "Mind Reading") and in vivo rehearsal treatment on the emotion decoding and encoding skills, autism symptoms, and social skills of 43 children, ages 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). Children in treatment (n = 22)…

  18. Development of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for in vivo Functional Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin

    Optical coherence tomography is a rapidly developing optical imaging modality capable of noninvasively providing depth resolved information of biological tissue at micrometer scale. In this thesis, we described several OCT technologies that can be used to double the imaging depth, realize functional vasculature imaging of biological tissue and increase the imaging speed of OCT system. Aim 1: Use of a scanner to introduce spatial frequency modulation to OCT spectral interferograms for in vivo full-range Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. A novel method was developed that could easily introduce a modulation frequency onto the X-direction (i.e., B-scan) of the FDOCT scanning system, enabling full-range Fourier-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (frFDOCT). Compared to the conventional FDOCT system, the newly developed frFDOCT system can provide increased system sensitivity and deeper imaging depth. The previous technology that can achieve frFDOCT either needed multiple steps for data capturing, which is time consuming, or required additional components which increased the system's complexity. The newly developed method generates a modulation spatial frequency in the spectral interferogram by simply offsetting the probe beam at the X-scanner. Aim 2: Using optical micro-angiography to achieve in vivo volumetric imaging of vascular perfusion within human retina and choroids. Optical Micro-Angiography (OMAG) is a functional extension of FDOCT technology. It can achieve visualization of vasculature network of biological tissue. In order to apply the OMAG method to image vasculature map of human retina and choroid, a phase compensation algorithm was developed, which could minimize the motion artifacts generated by the movements of human eye and head. Aim 3: Developing ultrahigh sensitive optical micro-angiography to achieve micro vasculature imaging of biological tissue. To improve the vasculature image quality, we developed ultrahigh sensitive OMAG (UHS

  19. Effect of duration of the GnRH agonists in the luteal phase in the outcome of assisted reproduction cycles.

    PubMed

    Geber, Selmo; Sampaio, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    The effect of long-acting GnRHa, in the luteal phase, during ART cycles varies from one patient to another. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of long-acting GnRHa in the luteal phase, in ART cycles, affects pregnancy rates according to the duration of its action in such phase. This is a retrospective study of 367 patients submitted to ovulation induction for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedures that used long-acting depot GnRHa for pituitary suppression. Patients were stratified according to the period of action of the agonist in the luteal phase: group 1, ≤ 6 days; group 2, 7 to 12 days; and group 3, >12 days. The following variables were analyzed: ovarian response, age, infertility causes and pregnancy rates. Group 1 (n = 53) had a mean age of 33.8 ± 4.55 years (23-44 years) and a pregnancy rate of 45.2%. In group 2 (n = 118), mean age was 33.7 ± 4.5 years (24-44 years) and the pregnancy rate was 38.9%. In group 3 (n = 196), mean age was 33.7 ± 4.4 years (23-43 years) and the pregnancy rate was 47.4%. Regardless of the duration of depot GnRHa action in the luteal phase, no significant association with pregnancy rates was found. PMID:23656392

  20. Functional integrity of the interrenal tissue of yellow perch from contaminated sites tested in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, C.; Brodeur, J.C.; Hontela, A.

    1995-12-31

    The normal activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) in response to capture is disrupted in fish subjected to life-long exposure to heavy metals, PCBs and PAHs. The ability to increase plasma cortisol in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from sites contaminated by heavy metals and organic compounds, and from a reference site was assessed by the Capture stress test and by the ACTH Challenge test, a new standardized in vivo method designed for field studies. The effects of seasonal factors, such as temperature and gonadal maturity on these tests were investigated. Measures of liver and muscle glycogen and histopathology were made to further characterize the biochemical and structural changes that may occur along with hormonal changes. The Capture stress test showed that an acute source of stress induced a lower cortisol response in fish from the highly contaminated site compared to the reference site, revealing a functional impairment of the HPI axis. The ACTH Challenge test showed that the hormonal responsiveness of the cortisol-secreting interrenal tissue, stimulated by a standard dose of ACTH injected i.p., was lower in fish from the highly contaminated site than the reference site. Spring is the season during which the impairment was the most evident. The possibility of using the reduced capacity of feral fish to respond to a standardized ACTH Challenge as an early bioindicator of toxic stress is discussed.

  1. Emergence of functional subnetworks in layer 2/3 cortex induced by sequential spikes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taekeun; Oh, Won Chan; Choi, Joon Ho; Kwon, Hyung-Bae

    2016-03-01

    During cortical circuit development in the mammalian brain, groups of excitatory neurons that receive similar sensory information form microcircuits. However, cellular mechanisms underlying cortical microcircuit development remain poorly understood. Here we implemented combined two-photon imaging and photolysis in vivo to monitor and manipulate neuronal activities to study the processes underlying activity-dependent circuit changes. We found that repeated triggering of spike trains in a randomly chosen group of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory cortex triggered long-term plasticity of circuits (LTPc), resulting in the increased probability that the selected neurons would fire when action potentials of individual neurons in the group were evoked. Significant firing pattern changes were observed more frequently in the selected group of neurons than in neighboring control neurons, and the induction was dependent on the time interval between spikes, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation. In addition, LTPc was associated with an increase of activity from a portion of neighboring neurons with different probabilities. Thus, our results demonstrate that the formation of functional microcircuits requires broad network changes and that its directionality is nonrandom, which may be a general feature of cortical circuit assembly in the mammalian cortex. PMID:26903616

  2. A yeast TCP-1-like protein is required for actin function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Vinh, D B; Drubin, D G

    1994-01-01

    We previously identified the ANC2 gene in a screen for mutations that enhance the defects caused by yeast actin mutations. Here we report that ANC2 is an essential gene that encodes a member of the TCP-1 family. TCP-1-related proteins are subunits of cytosolic heteromeric protein complexes referred to as chaperonins. These complexes can bind to newly synthesized actin and tubulin in vitro and can convert these proteins into an assembly-competent state. We show that anc2-1 mutants contain abnormal and disorganized actin structures, are defective in cellular morphogenesis, and are hypersensitive to the microtubule inhibitor benomyl. Furthermore, overexpression of wild-type Anc2p ameliorates defects in actin organization and cell growth caused by actin overproduction. Mutations in BIN2 and BIN3, two other genes that encode TCP-1-like proteins, also enhance the phenotypes of actin mutants. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that TCP-1-like proteins are required for actin and tubulin function in vivo. Images PMID:7916461

  3. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  4. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  5. Functional Blocking of Staphylococcus aureus Adhesins following Growth in Ex Vivo Media

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Ruth C.; Dissanayeke, Shobana R.; Cameron, Brian; Ferguson, David; Foster, Timothy J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2002-01-01

    Defining the role of Staphylococcus aureus adhesins in disease pathogenesis may depend on the use of bacteria grown in culture media that more closely reflect the human milieu than conventional broth. This study examined the functional effect on S. aureus adhesins following growth in an ex vivo medium containing a complex mixture of human proteins (used peritoneal dialysate) relative to growth in Todd-Hewitt broth. The adherence of S. aureus, cultured in dialysate, to fibronectin and fibrinogen was markedly reduced despite the expresion of full-length ClfA, ClfB, and fibronectin-binding proteins. Growth in dialysate resulted in the acquisition of a surface coat, as visualized by transmission electron microscopy, which was shown to contain fibronectin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulins. Adherence of S. aureus to fibrinogen following growth in dialysate was significantly reduced by expression of protein A but was restored following growth in immunoglobulin-depleted dialysate. We conclude that bacterial adherence to solid-phase protein is critically dependent on the culture medium, that S. aureus adhesins may become saturated with target protein prior to contact with solid surfaces, and that there is an interaction between fibrinogen-binding proteins and immunoglobulin bound to protein A following contact with host proteins. These findings have important implications for future studies of S. aureus adhesins. PMID:12228257

  6. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin. PMID:24445121

  7. Serotonin control of central dopaminergic function: focus on in vivo microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Vincenzo; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Pierucci, Massimo; Esposito, Ennio

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the functional interactions between serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) neuronal systems are discussed with the focus on microdialysis studies in the rodent brain (mainly rats). 5-HT by itself is involved both directly and indirectly via actions on complex neuronal circuitry, in the regulation of DA release through multiple 5-HT receptors, playing a critical role in the development of normal and abnormal behaviours. Recent evidence suggests that dysfunction of dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotransmitter systems contributes to various disorders including depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. Here we summarize recent neurochemical works that have extensively explored the role of 5-HT receptors in the control of DA central systems in both basal and drug-induced conditions, using in vivo microdialytic techniques. Several 5-HT receptor subtypes, including the 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptors, act to facilitate DA release, while the 5-HT(2C) receptor mediates an inhibitory effect of 5-HT on DA release. Taken together, neurochemical approaches using microdialysis can not only contribute to clarification of the physiological role of the serotonergic neuronal systems but may also be a powerful pharmacological approach for the development of therapeutic strategies to the treatment of depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. PMID:18772026

  8. Dissecting the Function and Assembly of Acentriolar Microtubule Organizing Centers in Drosophila Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Janina; Novak, Zsofia Anna; Raff, Jordan W.; Wainman, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs) are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2—the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems). We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs. PMID:26020779

  9. Dissecting the function and assembly of acentriolar microtubule organizing centers in Drosophila cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Janina; Novak, Zsofia Anna; Raff, Jordan W; Wainman, Alan

    2015-05-01

    Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs) are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2--the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems). We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs. PMID:26020779

  10. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro; Bartolome, Maria Visitacion; Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente; Salaices, Mercedes; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small

  11. Bridging the gap: functional healing of embryonic small intestine ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A.; Oltrabella, Francesca; Khalil, Basem A.; Morabito, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ability to grow embryonic organs ex vivo provides an opportunity to follow their differentiation in a controlled environment, with resulting insights into normal development. Additionally, similar strategies can be used to assess effects on organogenesis of physical and chemical manipulations. This study aimed to create an organ culture model with which to test physical manipulations to enhance healing of gut segments, thus generating a single functional organ. Embryonic mouse jejunum was isolated and cut into 2–3 mm tubes, which were placed in pairs, separated by a small gap, on semi‐permeable supports. Each pair was linked by a nylon suture threaded through their lumens. After 3 days in organ culture fed by defined serum‐free media, the rudiments differentiated to form tubes of smooth muscle surrounding a core of rudimentary villi. Of 34 such pairs, 74% had touching and well aligned proximate ends. Of these joined structures, 80% (59% of the total pairs) had a continuous lumen, as assessed by observing the trajectories of fluorescent dextrans injected into their distal ends. Fused organ pairs formed a single functional unit, as assessed by spontaneous contraction waves propagated along their lengths. In these healed intestines, peripherin+ neurons formed a nexus in the zone of fusion, linking the rudiment pairs. In future, this system could be used to test whether growth factors enhance fusion. Such results should in turn inform the design of novel treatments for short bowel syndrome, a potentially fatal condition with a currently limited and imperfect range of therapies. ©2015. The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd PMID:26234729

  12. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors. PMID:16478781

  13. Comparison of in vivo postexercise phosphocreatine recovery and resting ATP synthesis flux for the assessment of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, N M A; Ciapaite, J; Nicolay, K; Prompers, J J

    2010-11-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been used to assess skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in vivo by measuring 1) phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery after exercise or 2) resting ATP synthesis flux with saturation transfer (ST). In this study, we compared both parameters in a rat model of mitochondrial dysfunction with the aim of establishing the most appropriate method for the assessment of in vivo muscle mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced in adult Wistar rats by daily subcutaneous injections with the complex I inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) for 2 wk. In vivo (31)P MRS measurements were supplemented by in vitro measurements of oxygen consumption in isolated mitochondria. Two weeks of DPI treatment induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as evidenced by a 20% lower maximal ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria from DPI-treated rats oxidizing pyruvate plus malate. This was paralleled by a 46% decrease in in vivo oxidative capacity, determined from postexercise PCr recovery. Interestingly, no significant difference in resting, ST-based ATP synthesis flux was observed between DPI-treated rats and controls. These results show that PCr recovery after exercise has a more direct relationship with skeletal muscle mitochondrial function than the ATP synthesis flux measured with (31)P ST MRS in the resting state. PMID:20668212

  14. A genome-scale resource for in vivo tag-based protein function exploration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Sarov, Mihail; Murray, John I; Schanze, Kristin; Pozniakovski, Andrei; Niu, Wei; Angermann, Karolin; Hasse, Susanne; Rupprecht, Michaela; Vinis, Elisabeth; Tinney, Matthew; Preston, Elicia; Zinke, Andrea; Enst, Susanne; Teichgraber, Tina; Janette, Judith; Reis, Kadri; Janosch, Stephan; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Ejsmont, Radoslaw K; Slightam, Cindie; Xu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K; Reinke, Valerie; Stewart, A Francis; Snyder, Michael; Waterston, Robert H; Hyman, Anthony A

    2012-08-17

    Understanding the in vivo dynamics of protein localization and their physical interactions is important for many problems in biology. To enable systematic protein function interrogation in a multicellular context, we built a genome-scale transgenic platform for in vivo expression of fluorescent- and affinity-tagged proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans under endogenous cis regulatory control. The platform combines computer-assisted transgene design, massively parallel DNA engineering, and next-generation sequencing to generate a resource of 14,637 genomic DNA transgenes, which covers 73% of the proteome. The multipurpose tag used allows any protein of interest to be localized in vivo or affinity purified using standard tag-based assays. We illustrate the utility of the resource by systematic chromatin immunopurification and automated 4D imaging, which produced detailed DNA binding and cell/tissue distribution maps for key transcription factor proteins. PMID:22901814

  15. Internalization and degradation of human chorionic gonadotropin in ovine luteal cells: Kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, C.E.; Sawyer, H.R.; Niswender, G.D.

    1981-11-01

    Ovine luteal cells grown in suspensions and/or monolayer culture were used to study the rates of internalization and degradation of (/sup 125/I)hCG. At specified times after a 5- to 7-min exposure to (/sup 125/I)hCG, cells were treated with acidic buffer (pH 3.9) to elute membrane-bound hormone, which left the internalized radioactivity associated with the cell pellet. Radioactivity released into the medium during the incubation periods was subjected to 20% trichloroacetic acid and/or thin layer chromatography to monitor the extent of degradation of the radioactive hormone. Secretion of progesterone into the medium and exclusion of trypan blue were used to monitor the viability of the cells in each experiment. Radioactivity was lost from the plasma membrane with a tsub1/2 of 9.6 h, with approximately 85% of the radioactivity being lost within 24 h. Cell-associated radioactivity increased linearly with time to a plateau at 4 h, remained stable until 12 h, and then decreased between 12-24 h. The plateau between 4-12 h reflected an equilibrium between the (/sup 125/I)hCG which was internalized and degraded and the (/sup 125/I)hCG which was released into the medium. The degraded (/sup 125/I)hCG increased essentially linearly up to 24 h. These data suggest that the majority of (/sup 125/I)hCG bound to receptors in luteal cells is internalized and degraded. Less than 20% of the radioactivity bound initially to cells dissociated into the incubation medium and was trichloroacetic acid precipitable within 24 h. The internalization and degradation of (/sup 125/I)hCG was temperature dependent, with essentially no hCG internalized and/or degraded at 4C.

  16. Functional and fine structural changes in isolated rat lungs challenged with endotoxin ex vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, S.; Brasch, F.; Wollin, L.; Fehrenbach, H.; Richter, J.; Wendel, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate changes in rat lung functions caused by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to alterations in structure. The following four experimental groups were used: 1), control in vitro, perfusion for 150 minutes; 2), LPS in vitro, perfusion for 150 minutes and infusion of 5 mg of LPS after 40 minutes; 3), control ex vivo, perfusion for 10 minutes; and 4), LPS ex vivo, lungs perfused for 10 minutes from rats treated for 110 minutes with 20 mg/kg LPS intraperitoneally. Histologically, blood-derived leukocytes were detectable only in lungs from group 4, where neutrophils were found in capillaries, interstitium, and endothelial pouches. LPS treatment increased pulmonary resistance and decreased pulmonary compliance in group 4 (ex vivo), and, to a greater extent, in group 2 (in vitro). In these two groups, formation of giant lamellar bodies in the type II pneumocytes was observed. By histological examination, the bronchoconstriction induced by LPS in vitro was localized to the terminal bronchioles. At 2 hours after LPS treatment, no edema and no change in precapillary and postcapillary resistance, capillary pressure, vascular compliance, capillary permeability, and the wet/dry ratio was observed. Thus, our major findings are that LPS induced constriction of the terminal bronchioles in vitro, formation of giant lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes ex vivo and in vitro, and trapping of neutrophils in endothelial pouches in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7747816

  17. Protease proteomics: revealing protease in vivo functions using systems biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M

    2008-10-01

    Proteases irreversibly modify proteins by cleaving their amide bonds and are implicated in virtually every important biological process such as immunity, development and tissue repair. Accordingly, it is easy to see that deregulated proteolysis is a pathognomic feature of many diseases. Most of the current information available on proteases was acquired using in vitro methods, which reveals molecular structure, enzyme kinetics and active-site specificity. However, considerably less is known about the relevant biological functions and combined roles of proteases in moulding the proteome. Although models using genetically modified animals are powerful, they are slow to develop, they can be difficult to interpret, and while useful, they remain only models of human disease. Therefore, to understand how proteases accomplish their tasks in organisms and how they participate in pathology, we need to elucidate the protease degradome-the repertoire of proteases expressed by a cell, a tissue or an organism at a particular time-their expression level, activation state, their biological substrates, also known as the substrate degradome-the repertoire of substrates for each protease-and the effect of the activity of each protease on the pathways of the system under study. Achieving this goal is challenging because several proteases might cleave the same protein, and proteases also form pathways and interact to form the protease web [Overall, C.M., Kleifeld, O., 2006. Tumour microenvironment - opinion: validating matrix metalloproteinases as drug targets and anti-targets for cancer therapy. Nat. Rev. Cancer 6 (3), 227-239]. Hence, the net proteolytic potential of the degradome at a particular time on a substrate and pathway must also be understood. Proteomics offers one of the few routes to the understanding of proteolysis in complex in vivo systems and especially in man where genetic manipulations are impossible. The aim of this chapter is to review methods and tools that allow

  18. In vivo cGMP levels in frog photoreceptor cells as a function of light exposure.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, E K; Klotz, K L; Noelker, D M; Nelson, R; Chader, G J; Passonneau, J V

    1986-11-01

    By employing a combination of highly sensitive radioimmunoassays and histochemical techniques, an in vivo time course of cGMP levels has been determined in the outer segment, photoreceptor cell and outer plexiform layers of frog retina. Frogs (Rana pipiens) were dark-adapted overnight and either frozen rapidly (approximately 3 sec) in liquid nitrogen or exposed to periods of light varying between 0.1 sec and 2 hr before freezing. Frozen retinal sections were cut, freeze-dried, and samples of individual layers dissected out and analysed for cGMP. In the outer plexiform layer, there was a 42% drop in cGMP concentration after 2 sec of light (250 ft candles) followed by a 34% rise after 2 min; a steep concentration gradient formed around the layer after the 2 min exposure. In both the outer-segment layer and photoreceptor-cell layer (which includes outer segments, inner segments and outer nuclear layers), cGMP levels declined from a dark value of 56 mumol kg-1 (dry) to 9 mumol kg-1 (dry) as a result of increasing exposure to several types of light source: levels appear to be primarily a function of total ft candle min. Cyclic GMP concentrations at the longest exposures (2 min with a fiber optic light source or 2 hr with fluorescent room light) reached identical minimum levels. In the outer segments, a 15% decrease in cGMP was observed after 0.1 sec of light exposure. Although the freezing time is too long to be able to say whether the 15% decrease in cGMP at the 0.1 sec exposure is involved in transduction, the low identical levels reached gradually after longer exposures appear to indicate that a light-induced biochemical adjustment in cGMP metabolism occurs over a relatively long time period separate from the msec time course of the transduction process. PMID:3026825

  19. Enzymatic Characterization and In Vivo Function of Five Terminal Oxidases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takuro; Osamura, Tatsuya; Hirai, Takehiro; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has five aerobic terminal oxidases: bo3-type quinol oxidase (Cyo), cyanide-insensitive oxidase (CIO), aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase (aa3), and two cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases (cbb3-1 and cbb3-2). These terminal oxidases are differentially regulated under various growth conditions and are thought to contribute to the survival of this microorganism in a wide variety of environmental niches. Here, we constructed multiple mutant strains of P. aeruginosa that express only one aerobic terminal oxidase to investigate the enzymatic characteristics and in vivo function of each enzyme. The Km values of Cyo, CIO, and aa3 for oxygen were similar and were 1 order of magnitude higher than those of cbb3-1 and cbb3-2, indicating that Cyo, CIO, and aa3 are low-affinity enzymes and that cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 are high-affinity enzymes. Although cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 exhibited different expression patterns in response to oxygen concentration, they had similar Km values for oxygen. Both cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 utilized cytochrome c4 as the main electron donor under normal growth conditions. The electron transport chains terminated by cbb3-1 and cbb3-2 generate a proton gradient across the cell membrane with similar efficiencies. The electron transport chain of aa3 had the highest proton translocation efficiency, whereas that of CIO had the lowest efficiency. The enzymatic properties of the terminal oxidases reported here are partially in agreement with their regulatory patterns and may explain the environmental adaptability and versatility of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25182500

  20. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  1. In vivo functional characterization of the transmembrane histidine kinase KinC in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Devi, Seram Nganbiton; Vishnoi, Monika; Kiehler, Brittany; Haggett, Lindsey; Fujita, Masaya

    2015-05-01

    In response to starvation, Bacillus subtilis cells differentiate into different subsets, undergoing cannibalism, biofilm formation or sporulation. These processes require a multiple component phosphorelay, wherein the master regulator Spo0A is activated upon phosphorylation by one or a combination of five histidine kinases (KinA-KinE) via two intermediate phosphotransferases, Spo0F and Spo0B. In this study, we focused on KinC, which was originally identified as a sporulation kinase and was later shown to regulate cannibalism and biofilm formation. First, genetic experiments using both the domesticated and undomesticated (biofilm forming) strains revealed that KinC activity and the membrane localization are independent of both the lipid raft marker proteins FloTA and cytoplasmic potassium concentration, which were previously shown to be required for the kinase activity. Next, we demonstrated that KinC controls cannibalism and biofilm formation in a manner dependent on phosphorelay. For further detailed characterization of KinC, we established an IPTG-inducible expression system in the domesticated strain, in which biofilm formation is defective, for simplicity of study. Using this system, we found that the N-terminal transmembrane domain is dispensable but the PAS domain is needed for the kinase activity. An in vivo chemical cross-linking experiment demonstrated that the soluble and functional KinC (KinC(ΔTM1+2)) forms a tetramer. Based on these results, we propose a revised model in which KinC becomes active by forming a homotetramer via the N-terminal PAS domain, but its activity is independent of both the lipid raft and the potassium leakage, which was previously suggested to be induced by surfactin. PMID:25701730

  2. Inhibition of human platelet function in vitro and ex vivo by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Lages, B; Weiss, H J

    1989-03-15

    The effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in vitro, or ex vivo following APAP ingestion, on human platelet aggregation, 14C-5HT secretion, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) formation were assessed. APAP added in vitro to citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) inhibited aggregation, secretion, and TxB2 formation induced by collagen, epinephrine, arachidonate, and the ionophore A23187, but had no effect on the responses induced by the endoperoxide analog U44069. Arachidonate-induced responses were inhibited by lower concentrations of APAP than were the responses to the other agonists. In PRP obtained 1 hour after ingestion of 650 mg or 1000 mg APAP, arachidonate-induced TxB2 formation was inhibited by 40-99% in five subjects tested, whereas inhibition of collagen- or epinephrine-induced TxB2 formation was less consistent. Aggregation and secretion responses were not altered by APAP ingestion in 4 of the 5 subjects, but were inhibited in the remaining subject, who had the highest plasma APAP levels. In contrast to aspirin and indomethacin, APAP-induced inhibition of collagen-stimulated TxB2 formation could be partially overcome with increasing collagen concentrations. No such partial correction occurred with epinephrine, however. In washed platelet suspensions labeled with 3H-arachidonate, both APAP and aspirin inhibited the formation of labeled PGD2 and PGE2, as well as TxB2. These results suggest that APAP acts in human platelets as a reversible inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, as found previously in other tissues, and that recent APAP ingestion can, on occasion, produce inhibition of platelet functional responses measured in vitro. PMID:2499947

  3. Microtubule depolymerization normalizes in vivo myocardial contractile function in dogs with pressure-overload left ventricular hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Hamawaki, M.; Narishige, T.; Sato, H.; Nemoto, S.; DeFreyte, G.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper G, I. V.; Carabello, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because initially compensatory myocardial hypertrophy in response to pressure overloading may eventually decompensate to myocardial failure, mechanisms responsible for this transition have long been sought. One such mechanism established in vitro is densification of the cellular microtubule network, which imposes a viscous load that inhibits cardiocyte contraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the present study, we extended this in vitro finding to the in vivo level and tested the hypothesis that this cytoskeletal abnormality is important in the in vivo contractile dysfunction that occurs in experimental aortic stenosis in the adult dog. In 8 dogs in which gradual stenosis of the ascending aorta had caused severe left ventricular (LV) pressure overloading (gradient, 152+/-16 mm Hg) with contractile dysfunction, LV function was measured at baseline and 1 hour after the intravenous administration of colchicine. Cardiocytes obtained by biopsy before and after in vivo colchicine administration were examined in tandem. Microtubule depolymerization restored LV contractile function both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These and additional corroborative data show that increased cardiocyte microtubule network density is an important mechanism for the ventricular contractile dysfunction that develops in large mammals with adult-onset pressure-overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  4. Development of a fluorescence-based in vivo phagocytosis assay to measure mononuclear phagocyte system function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tartaro, Karrie; VanVolkenburg, Maria; Wilkie, Dean; Coskran, Timothy M; Kreeger, John M; Kawabata, Thomas T; Casinghino, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) which provides protection against infection is made up of phagocytic cells that engulf and digest bacteria or other foreign substances. Suppression of the MPS may lead to decreased clearance of pathogenic microbes. Drug delivery systems and immunomodulatory therapeutics that target phagocytes have a potential to inhibit MPS function. Available methods to measure inhibition of MPS function use uptake of radioactively-labeled cells or labor-intensive semi-quantitative histologic techniques. The objective of this work was to develop a non-radioactive quantitative method to measure MPS function in vivo by administering heat-killed E. coli conjugated to a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (Bioparticles(®)). Fluorescence of the Bioparticles(®) is increased at low pH when they are in phagocytic lysosomes. The amount of Bioparticles(®) phagocytosed by MPS organs in rats was determined by measuring fluorescence intensity in livers and spleens ex vivo using an IVIS(®) Spectrum Pre-clinical In Vivo Imaging System. Phagocytosis of the particles by peripheral blood neutrophils was measured by flow cytometry. To assess method sensitivity, compounds likely to suppress the MPS [clodronate-containing liposomes, carboxylate-modified latex particles, maleic vinyl ether (MVE) polymer] were administered to rats prior to injection of the Bioparticles(®). The E. coli particles consistently co-localized with macrophage markers in the liver but not in the spleen. All of the compounds tested decreased phagocytosis in the liver, but had no consistent effects on phagocytic activity in the spleen. In addition, administration of clodronate liposomes and MVE polymer increased the percentage of peripheral blood neutrophils that phagocytosed the Bioparticles(®). In conclusion, an in vivo rat model was developed that measures phagocytosis of E. coli particles in the liver and may be used to assess the impact of test compounds on MPS function. Still, the

  5. Set1 and MLL1/2 target distinct sets of functionally different genomic loci in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Elizabeth M.; Chitsazan, Alex D.; Seidel, Chris W.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is known to correlate with both active and poised genomic loci, yet many questions remain regarding its functional roles in vivo. We identify functional genomic targets of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and MLL1/2, in both the stem cells and differentiated tissue of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that, despite their common substrate, these enzymes target distinct genomic loci in vivo, which are distinguishable by the pattern each enzyme leaves on the chromatin template, i.e., the breadth of the H3K4me3 peak. Whereas Set1 targets are largely associated with the maintenance of the stem cell population, MLL1/2 targets are specifically enriched for genes involved in ciliogenesis. These data not only confirm that chromatin regulation is fundamental to planarian stem cell function, but also provide evidence for post-embryonic functional specificity of H3K4me3 methyltransferases in vivo. PMID:26711341

  6. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L.; Church, George M.; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H.; Gerber, Georg K.

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Here, our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  7. Set1 and MLL1/2 Target Distinct Sets of Functionally Different Genomic Loci In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elizabeth M; Chitsazan, Alex D; Seidel, Chris W; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-12-29

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is known to correlate with both active and poised genomic loci, yet many questions remain regarding its functional roles in vivo. We identify functional genomic targets of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and MLL1/2, in both the stem cells and differentiated tissue of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that, despite their common substrate, these enzymes target distinct genomic loci in vivo, which are distinguishable by the pattern each enzyme leaves on the chromatin template, i.e., the breadth of the H3K4me3 peak. Whereas Set1 targets are largely associated with the maintenance of the stem cell population, MLL1/2 targets are specifically enriched for genes involved in ciliogenesis. These data not only confirm that chromatin regulation is fundamental to planarian stem cell function but also provide evidence for post-embryonic functional specificity of H3K4me3 methyltransferases in vivo. PMID:26711341

  8. Influence of IL-3 functional fragment on cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanxi; Jiang, Wenhong; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) is a multiple hematopoietic growth factor, which enhances stem cell expansion and hematopoiesis regeneration in vitro and in vivo, when administrated in combination with other cytokines. However, the structure-function study of rhIL-3 remains rarely studied, so far. The purpose of this study was to recognize the short peptide with similar function as rhIL-3, and assess the hematopoietic efficacy in umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cell culture as well. Methods Two novel monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (C1 and E1) were generated against rhIL-3 using hybridoma technique. Eleven short peptides were depicted and synthesized to overlap covering the full length sequence of rhIL-3. ELISA was employed to distinguish the antibody-binding peptide from the negative peptides. In addition, the multi-potential hematopoiesis capabilities of the positive peptides were evaluated by adding 25 ng/mL of each peptide to the culture medium of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derived from UCB. Total nucleated cell number and the CD34+ cell number from each individual treatment group were calculated on day 7. Correlated antibodies at 0.5 or 2 molar fold to each peptide were also tested in the stem cell expansion experiment, to further confirm the bioactivity of the peptides. Results Two peptides were recognized by the novel generated antibodies, using ELISA. Peptide 3 and 8 exhibited comparable hematopoiesis potentials, with 25.01±0.14 fold, and 19.89±0.12 fold increase of total nucleated cell number on day 7, respectively, compared with the basal medium control (4.93±0.55 fold). These biological effects were neutralized by adding the corresponding mAb at a dose dependent manner. Conclusions Our results identified two specific regions of rhIL-3 responsible for HSC proliferation and differentiation, which were located from 28 to 49 amino acids (P3), and 107 to 127 amino acids (P8), respectively. The short peptide 3 and 8 might act

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of functionalized chitosan-Pluronic micelles loaded with myricetin on glioblastoma cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Jun-Jie; Tang, Xiang-Jun; Du, Li; Li, Fei

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a novel polymeric carrier based on chitosan-functionalized Pluronic P123/F68 micelles loaded with myricetin (MYR) to improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy for glioblastoma cancer. Following characterization and assessment of the cellular uptake and antitumor effects of MYR-loaded micelles (MYR-MCs) in vitro, the acute toxicity, blood-brain barrier (BBB) translocation, brain uptake and biodistribution in vivo were assessed. The results demonstrated that MYR-MCs exhibited improved cellular uptake and antitumor activity compared to free MYR in vitro, with a significantly enhanced anticancer effect in vivo following efficient transport across the BBB. However, MYR-MCs did not affect the brain endothelial, barrier function, the liver, heart or kidneys. Furthermore, MYR-MCs altered the expression of apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2, BAD and BAX, in mice. In conclusion, MYR-MCs may be considered an effective and promising drug delivery system for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:26970027

  10. CIZ1, a p21Cip1/Waf1-interacting protein, functions as a tumor suppressor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Rio; Watanabe, Wataru; Ueda, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Koller, Richard; Wolff, Linda; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Honda, Hiroaki

    2013-05-21

    CIZ1 is a nuclear protein involved in DNA replication and is also implicated in human diseases including cancers. To gain an insight into its function in vivo, we generated mice lacking Ciz1. Ciz1-deficient (Ciz1(-/-)) mice grew without any obvious abnormalities, and Ciz1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) did not show any defects in cell cycle status, cell growth, and DNA damage response. However, Ciz1(-/-) MEFs were sensitive to hydroxyurea-mediated replication stress and susceptible to oncogene-induced cellular transformation. In addition, Ciz1(-/-) mice developed various types of leukemias by retroviral insertional mutagenesis. These results indicate that CIZ1 functions as a tumor suppressor in vivo. PMID:23583447

  11. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  12. The feasibility of in vivo imaging of infiltrating blood cells for predicting the functional prognosis after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Kazuya; Saito, Takeyuki; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Kubota, Kensuke; Hara, Masamitsu; Murata, Masaharu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Okada, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI), a reliable prediction of the potential functional outcome is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategy. Despite recent advances in the field of neurological assessment, there is still no satisfactory methodology for predicting the functional outcome after SCI. We herein describe a novel method to predict the functional outcome at 12 hours after SCI using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. We produced three groups of SCI mice with different functional prognoses: 50 kdyn (mild), 70 kdyn (moderate) and 90 kdyn (severe). Only the locomotor function within 24 hours after SCI was unable to predict subsequent functional recovery. However, both the number of infiltrating neutrophils and the bioluminescence signal intensity from infiltrating blood cells were found to correlate with the severity of the injury at 12 hours after SCI. Furthermore, a strong linear relationship was observed among the number of infiltrating neutrophils, the bioluminescence signal intensity, and the severity of the injury. Our findings thus indicate that in vivo bioluminescence imaging is able to accurately predict the long-term functional outcome in the hyperacute phase of SCI, thereby providing evidence that this imaging modality could positively contribute to the future development of tailored therapeutic approaches for SCI. PMID:27156468

  13. The feasibility of in vivo imaging of infiltrating blood cells for predicting the functional prognosis after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kazuya; Saito, Takeyuki; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Kubota, Kensuke; Hara, Masamitsu; Murata, Masaharu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Okada, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI), a reliable prediction of the potential functional outcome is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategy. Despite recent advances in the field of neurological assessment, there is still no satisfactory methodology for predicting the functional outcome after SCI. We herein describe a novel method to predict the functional outcome at 12 hours after SCI using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. We produced three groups of SCI mice with different functional prognoses: 50 kdyn (mild), 70 kdyn (moderate) and 90 kdyn (severe). Only the locomotor function within 24 hours after SCI was unable to predict subsequent functional recovery. However, both the number of infiltrating neutrophils and the bioluminescence signal intensity from infiltrating blood cells were found to correlate with the severity of the injury at 12 hours after SCI. Furthermore, a strong linear relationship was observed among the number of infiltrating neutrophils, the bioluminescence signal intensity, and the severity of the injury. Our findings thus indicate that in vivo bioluminescence imaging is able to accurately predict the long-term functional outcome in the hyperacute phase of SCI, thereby providing evidence that this imaging modality could positively contribute to the future development of tailored therapeutic approaches for SCI. PMID:27156468

  14. Identification of anovulation and transient luteal function using a urinary pregnanediol-3-glucuronide ratio algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, A; Overstreet, J W; Snow-Harter, C; De Souza, M J; Gold, E B; Lasley, B L

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of a urinary pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG) ratio algorithm to identify anovulatory cycles was studied prospectively in two independent populations of women. Urinary hormone data from the first group was used to develop the algorithm, and data from the second group was used for its validation. PdG ratios were calculated by a cycles method in which daily PdG concentrations indexed by creatinine (CR) from cycle day 11 onward were divided by a baseline PdG (average PdG/Cr concentration for cycle days 6-10). In the interval method, daily PdG/CR concentrations from day 1 onward were divided by baseline PdG (lowest 5-day average of PdG/CR values throughout the collection period). Evaluation of the first study population (n = 6) resulted in cycles with PdG ratios > or = 3 for > or = 3 consecutive days being classified as ovulatory; otherwise they were anovulatory. The sensitivity and specificity of the PdG ratio algorithm to identify anovulatory cycles in the second population were 75% and 89.5%, respectively, for all cycles (n = 88); 50% and 88.3% for first cycles (n = 40) using the cycles method; 75% and 92.2%, respectively, for all cycles (n = 89); and 50% and 94.1% for first cycles (n = 40) using the interval method. The "gold standard" for anovulation was weekly serum samples < or = 2 ng/ml progesterone. The sensitivity values for all cycles and for the first cycle using both methods were underestimated because of apparent misclassification of cycles using serum progesterone due to infrequent blood collection. Blood collection more than once a week would have greatly improved the sensitivity and modestly improved the specificity of the algorithm. The PdG ratio algorithm provides an efficient approach for screening urine samples collected in epidemiologic studies of reproductive health in women. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 2. A Figure 2. B PMID:8732951

  15. EFFECT OF FOLLICLE SIZE AT TIME OF GNRH-INDUCED OVULATION ON LUTEAL FUNCTION AND FERTILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GnRH in fixed-time AI protocols results in the ovulation of a wide range of follicle sizes. Multiparous beef cows were assigned to one of three treatments: Cyclic or anestrous cows treated with the CO-Synch protocol and anestrous control cows. CO-Synch treated cows received GnRH (100 mcg; im) on d...

  16. Renal effects of nabumetone, a COX-2 antagonist: impairment of function in isolated perfused rat kidneys contrasts with preserved renal function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reichman, J; Cohen, S; Goldfarb, M; Shina, A; Rosen, S; Brezis, M; Karmeli, F; Heyman, S N

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 enzyme has been considered the physiologically important isoform for prostaglandin synthesis in the normal kidney. It has, therefore, been suggested that selective inhibitors of the 'inducible' isoform (COX-2) may be free from renal adverse effects. We studied the renal effects of the predominantly COX-2 antagonist nabumetone in isolated perfused kidneys. As compared with controls, kidneys removed after in vivo administration of oral nabumetone (15 mg/kg) disclosed altered renal function with reduced glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction, and urine volume and enhanced hypoxic outer medullary tubular damage. By contrast, renal function and morphology were not affected in vivo by nabumetone or its active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid. The latter agent (10-20 mg/kg i.v.) did not significantly alter renal microcirculation, as opposed to a selective substantial reduction in medullary blood flow noted with the nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.v.). In a rat model of acute renal failure, induced by concomitant administration of radiocontrast, nitric oxide synthase, and COX inhibitors, the decline in kidney function and the extent of hypoxic medullary damage with oral nabumetone (80 mg/kg) were comparable to a control group, and significantly less than those induced by indomethacin. In rats subjected to daily oral nabumetone for 3 consecutive weeks, renal function and morphology were preserved as well. Both nabumetone and 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid reduced renal parenchymal prostaglandin E2 to the same extent as indomethacin. It is concluded that while nabumetone adversely affects renal function and may intensify hypoxic medullary damage ex vivo, rat kidneys are not affected by this agent in vivo, both in acute and chronic studies. COX selectivity may not explain the renal safety of nabumetone. PMID:11701998

  17. Furin-processed antigens targeted to the secretory route elicit functional TAP1-/-CD8+ T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Medina, Francisco; Ramos, Manuel; Iborra, Salvador; de León, Patricia; Rodríguez-Castro, Marta; Del Val, Margarita

    2009-10-01

    Most pathogen-derived peptides recognized by CD8+ CTL are produced by proteasomes and delivered to the endoplasmic reticulum by the TAP transporters associated with Ag processing. Alternative proteases also produce antigenic peptides, but their actual relevance is unclear. There is a need to quantify the contribution of these supplementary pathways in vitro and in vivo. A well-defined TAP-independent secretory route of Ag processing involves the trans-Golgi network protease furin. Quantitation of this route by using OVA constructs encoded by vaccinia viruses indicates that it provides approximately one-third of all surface complexes of peptide and MHC class I molecules. Generation of the epitope carboxyl terminus is a dramatic rate-limiting step, since bypassing it increased efficiency by at least 1000-fold. Notably, the secretory construct activated a similar percentage of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells in wild type as in TAP1-deficient mice, which allow only secretory routes but which have a 10- to 20-fold smaller CD8 compartment. Moreover, these TAP1(-/-) OVA-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes accomplished elimination of epitope-bearing cells in vivo. The results obtained with this experimental system underscore the potential of secretory pathways of MHC class I Ag presentation to elicit functional CD8+ T lymphocytes in vivo and support the hypothesis that noncytosolic processing mechanisms may compensate in vivo for the lack of proteasome participation in Ag processing in persons genetically deficient in TAP and thus contribute to pathogen control. PMID:19752221

  18. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hye; Le Pichon, Claire E; Adolfsson, Oskar; Gafner, Valérie; Pihlgren, Maria; Lin, Han; Solanoy, Hilda; Brendza, Robert; Ngu, Hai; Foreman, Oded; Chan, Ruby; Ernst, James A; DiCara, Danielle; Hotzel, Isidro; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Atwal, Jasvinder; Lu, Yanmei; Bumbaca, Daniela; Pfeifer, Andrea; Watts, Ryan J; Muhs, Andreas; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ayalon, Gai

    2016-08-01

    The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau. PMID:27475227

  19. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on progesterone secretion and viability of cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Vazhoor, B; Yadav, V P; Gupta, M; Pathak, M C; Panda, R P; Khan, F A; Verma, M R; Maurya, V P; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the temporal (24, 48 and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, IGF-1, and EGF, respectively) production and secretion of progesterone (P4) in cultured luteal cells from different stages of estrous cycle as well as the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STARD1), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), anti-apoptotic gene PCNA, and pro-apoptotic gene BAX in luteal cells of mid-luteal phase in buffalo. Samples from early luteal phase (ELP; Day 1 to 4; n = 4), mid-luteal phase (MLP; Day 5 to 10; n = 4), and late luteal phase (LLP; Day 11 to 16; n = 4) of estrous cycle were collected. Progesterone was assayed by RIA, whereas mRNA expression was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results depicted that highest dose (100 ng/mL) of LH, IGF-1, and EGF and longer duration of time brought about a (P < 0.05) rise in P4 level and expression of steroidogenic enzymes and PCNA compared with the lower level(s) and control while, all treatments (P < 0.05) inhibited BAX expression in a time dependent-manner. Analysis of interaction between stage and treatments revealed that LH treatment (P < 0.05) increased P4 production compared with IGF-1 and EGF in ELP and MLP. However in LLP, treatment with IGF-1 and EGF significantly (P < 0.05) increased P4 production compared with LH treatment. Summarizing, our study explores the steroidogenic potential of LH and growth factors across different luteal stages in buffalo, which on promoting steroidogenic enzyme expression and cell viability culminated in enhanced P4 production in luteal cells. PMID:25263485

  20. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT

  1. HelioScan: a software framework for controlling in vivo microscopy setups with high hardware flexibility, functional diversity and extendibility.

    PubMed

    Langer, Dominik; van 't Hoff, Marcel; Keller, Andreas J; Nagaraja, Chetan; Pfäffli, Oliver A; Göldi, Maurice; Kasper, Hansjörg; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2013-04-30

    Intravital microscopy such as in vivo imaging of brain dynamics is often performed with custom-built microscope setups controlled by custom-written software to meet specific requirements. Continuous technological advancement in the field has created a need for new control software that is flexible enough to support the biological researcher with innovative imaging techniques and provide the developer with a solid platform for quickly and easily implementing new extensions. Here, we introduce HelioScan, a software package written in LabVIEW, as a platform serving this dual role. HelioScan is designed as a collection of components that can be flexibly assembled into microscope control software tailored to the particular hardware and functionality requirements. Moreover, HelioScan provides a software framework, within which new functionality can be implemented in a quick and structured manner. A specific HelioScan application assembles at run-time from individual software components, based on user-definable configuration files. Due to its component-based architecture, HelioScan can exploit synergies of multiple developers working in parallel on different components in a community effort. We exemplify the capabilities and versatility of HelioScan by demonstrating several in vivo brain imaging modes, including camera-based intrinsic optical signal imaging for functional mapping of cortical areas, standard two-photon laser-scanning microscopy using galvanometric mirrors, and high-speed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging using either acousto-optic deflectors or a resonant scanner. We recommend HelioScan as a convenient software framework for the in vivo imaging community. PMID:23416135

  2. Functionalized near-infrared quantum dots for in vivo tumor vasculature imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Ding, Hong; Law, Wing-Cheung; Cai, Hongxing; Zhang, Xihe; Vathy, Lisa A.; Bergey, Earl J.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we report the use of near-infrared (NIR)-emitting alloyed quantum dots (QDs) as efficient optical probes for high contrast in vivo imaging of tumors. Alloyed CdTe1 - xSex/CdS QDs were prepared in the non-aqueous phase using the hot colloidal synthesis approach. Water dispersion of the QDs were accomplished by their encapsulation within polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-grafted phospholipid micelles. For tumor-specific delivery in vivo, the micelle-encapsulated QDs were conjugated with the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide, which targets the αvβ3 integrins overexpressed in the angiogenic tumor vasculatures. Using in vivo NIR optical imaging of mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts, implanted both subcutaneously and orthotopically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered cRGD-conjugated QDs, but not the unconjugated ones, can efficiently target and label the tumors with high signal-to-noise ratio. Histopathological analysis of major organs of the treated mice showed no evidence of systemic toxicity associated with these QDs. These experiments suggest that cRGD-conjugated NIR QDs can serve as safe and efficient probes for optical bioimaging of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, by co-encapsulating these QDs and anticancer drugs within these micelles, we have demonstrated a promising theranostic, nanosized platform for both cancer imaging and therapy.

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns with Encapsulated Metallofullerenes and Exohedrally Functionalized Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfei; Ge, Jiechao; Shultz, M.D.; Chung, Eunna; Singh, Gurpreet; Shu, Chunying; Deck, Paul; Fatouros, Panos; Henderson, Scott; Corwin, Frank; Geohegan, David B; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Rylander, Nichole M; Rylander, Christopher; Gibson, Harry W; Dorn, Harry C

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) are new carbonaceous materials. In this paper, we report the first successful preparation of SWNHs encapsulating trimetallic nitride template endohedral metallofullerenes (TNT-EMFs). The resultant materials were functionalized by a high-speed vibration milling method and conjugated with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The successful encapsulation of TNT-EMFs and external functionalization with QDs provide a dual diagnostic platform for in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications of these new carbonaceous materials.

  4. Different processing of LH/hCG receptors in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellokumpu, S.

    1987-02-01

    The metabolic fate of LH/hCG receptors after exposure to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was examined in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1). Kinetic studies performed after pulse-labelling of the cells with (/sup 125/I)hCG indicated that the bound hormone was lost much more rapidly from the tumor cells than from the luteal cells. The tumor cells were also found to internalize and degrade the hormone more effectively than the luteal cells. Chemical cross-linking and analyses by SDS-PAGE of this material revealed that both cell types also released, in addition to intact hCG, two previously characterized receptor fragment-(/sup 125/I)hCG complexes (M/sub r/ 96,000 and 74,000) into the medium, although their amount was negligible in MLTC-1 cells. Possibly due to rapid discharge of the ligand from its receptor, no similar complexes could be detected inside the MLTC-1 cells, suggesting that they were released directly from the cell surface. However, the M/sub r/ 74,000 complex was observed inside MLTC-1 cells if chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent, was present during the incubations. This suggests that the internalized receptor also becomes degraded, at least when complexed to hCG. The results thus provide evidence that there exist two different mechanisms for proteolytic processing of LH/hCG receptors in these target cells. In tumor cells, the degradation seems to occur almost exclusively intracellularly, whereas in luteal cells a substantial portion of the receptors is also degraded at the cell surface.

  5. Coupling of vesicle tethering and Rab binding is required for in vivo functionality of the golgin GMAP-210

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keisuke; Roboti, Peristera; Mironov, Alexander A.; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are extended coiled-coil proteins believed to participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi apparatus. However, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering remains poorly defined, and alternative functions for golgins have been proposed. Moreover, although golgins bind to Rab GTPases, the functional significance of Rab binding has yet to be determined. In this study, we show that depletion of the golgin GMAP-210 causes a loss of Golgi cisternae and accumulation of numerous vesicles. GMAP-210 function in vivo is dependent upon its ability to tether membranes, which is mediated exclusively by the amino-terminal ALPS motif. Binding to Rab2 is also important for GMAP-210 function, although it is dispensable for tethering per se. GMAP-210 length is also functionally important in vivo. Together our results indicate a key role for GMAP-210–mediated membrane tethering in maintaining Golgi structure and support a role for Rab2 binding in linking tethering with downstream docking and fusion events at the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25473115

  6. In Vitro Matured Oocytes Are More Susceptible than In Vivo Matured Oocytes to Mock ICSI Induced Functional and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Salian, Sujit Raj; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of ICSI have been intensified recently due to increased risk of birth defects in ICSI born children. Although fertilization rate is significantly higher in ICSI cycles, studies have failed to demonstrate the benefits of ICSI in improving the pregnancy rate. Poor technical skill, and suboptimal in vitro conditions may account for the ICSI results however, there is no report on the effects of oocyte manipulations on the ICSI outcome. Objective The present study elucidates the influence of mock ICSI on the functional and genetic integrity of the mouse oocytes. Methods Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) level, mitochondrial status, and phosphorylation of H2AX were assessed in the in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI. Results A significant increase in ROS level was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P<0.05-0.001) whereas unique mitochondrial distribution pattern was found only in IVM oocytes (P<0.01-0.001). Importantly, differential H2AX phosphorylation was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P <0.001). Conclusion The data from this study suggests that mock ICSI can alter genetic and functional integrity in oocytes and IVM oocytes are more vulnerable to mock ICSI induced changes. PMID:25786120

  7. Hybrid fusions show that inter-monomer electron transfer robustly supports cytochrome bc{sub 1} function in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiert, Robert; Czapla, Monika; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • We used hybrid fusion bc{sub 1} complex to test inter-monomer electron transfer in vivo. • Cross-inactivated complexes were able to sustain photoheterotrophic growth. • Inter-monomer electron transfer supports catalytic cycle in vivo. • bc{sub 1} dimer is functional even when cytochrome b subunits come from different species. - Abstract: Electronic connection between Q{sub o} and Q{sub i} quinone catalytic sites of dimeric cytochrome bc{sub 1} is a central feature of the energy-conserving Q cycle. While both the intra- and inter-monomer electron transfers were shown to connect the sites in the enzyme, mechanistic and physiological significance of the latter remains unclear. Here, using a series of mutated hybrid cytochrome bc{sub 1}-like complexes, we show that inter-monomer electron transfer robustly sustains the function of the enzyme in vivo, even when the two subunits in a dimer come from different species. This indicates that minimal requirement for bioenergetic efficiency is to provide a chain of cofactors for uncompromised electron flux between the catalytic sites, while the details of protein scaffold are secondary.

  8. Sweet taste threshold for sucrose inversely correlates with depression symptoms in female college students in the luteal phase.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masanori; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Endo, Junko; Sakamoto, Reiko; Wada, Maki

    2015-03-15

    Influences of depression symptoms on the sweet taste threshold were investigated in healthy college students (30 males and 40 females). Depression symptoms were scored by SDS (Self-Rating Depression Scale), and anxiety levels by STAI (State- and Trait-Anxiety Inventory). Recognition thresholds for sucrose were determined. In female students, the menstrual phase on the day of the experiment was self-reported. Depression symptoms, anxiety levels, and the recognition threshold for sucrose were not different among the 3 groups, i.e. males, females in the follicular phase, and females in the luteal phase. Depression symptoms were positively correlated with state and trait anxiety in all groups. The sweet taste threshold was inversely correlated with depression symptoms (r=-0.472, p=0.031) and trait anxiety (r=-0.506, p=0.019) in females in the luteal phase. In males as well as females in the follicular phase, however, no correlation between sweet taste threshold and depression was found. The results show that the recognition threshold for sucrose reduces with increased depression in females with a higher anxiety trait, but only in the luteal phase. It is hypothesized that brain regions, which spatially overlap and are responsible for both aversive emotions and gustatory processing, are susceptible to periodic changes in gonadal hormones due to the menstrual cycle. PMID:25576640

  9. Comparative profiling of differentially expressed microRNAs between the follicular and luteal phases ovaries of goats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Long; Chen, Tao; Sui, Menghua; Han, Chunyang; Fang, Fugui; Ma, Yuehui; Chu, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Cuiyan; Ling, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    To explore if the regulation at post-transcriptional level of follicular phase (Fols) to luteal phase (Luts) transition occurs in the ovaries of Anhuai goats, the differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) of ovaries in the Fols and Luts were analyzed using Solexa sequencing in the study. In total, 320 known miRNAs were co-expressed in the two phases, 339 and 353 known miRNAs were expressed in the ovary in the Fols and Luts, respectively. In addition, 45 novel miRNAs were co-expressed in the two phases, 70 and 94 novel miRNAs were expressed in the ovary in the Fols and Luts, respectively. Let-7f was the highest expressed significantly different known miRNA in the two phases, and mir-159 was the highest expressed significantly different novel miRNA in the two phases, which may participate in the follicular-luteal transition of Anhuai goats. GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis were applied to analyze the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs detected in the two phases. The results will help to further understand the role of miRNAs in the regulation of follicular to luteal transition in goat ovaries. PMID:27610292

  10. In-Vivo functional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with stimulated Raman scattering fiber-laser source.

    PubMed

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger

    2014-02-01

    In this paper a multi-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system using stimulated Raman scattering is demonstrated for both phantom and in vivo imaging. A 1-ns pulse width ytterbium-doped fiber laser is coupled into a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber. Discrete Raman-shifted wavelength peaks extending to nearly 800 nm are generated with pulse energies sufficient for OR-PAM imaging. Bandpass filters are used to select imaging wavelengths. A dual-mirror galvanometer system was used to scan the focused outputs across samples of carbon fiber networks, 200μm dye-filled tubes, and Swiss Webster mouse ears. Photoacoustic signals were collected in transmission mode and used to create maximum amplitude projection C-scan images. Double dye experiments and in vivo oxygen saturation estimation confirmed functional imaging potential. PMID:24575346

  11. In-Vivo functional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with stimulated Raman scattering fiber-laser source

    PubMed Central

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a multi-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system using stimulated Raman scattering is demonstrated for both phantom and in vivo imaging. A 1-ns pulse width ytterbium-doped fiber laser is coupled into a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber. Discrete Raman-shifted wavelength peaks extending to nearly 800 nm are generated with pulse energies sufficient for OR-PAM imaging. Bandpass filters are used to select imaging wavelengths. A dual-mirror galvanometer system was used to scan the focused outputs across samples of carbon fiber networks, 200μm dye-filled tubes, and Swiss Webster mouse ears. Photoacoustic signals were collected in transmission mode and used to create maximum amplitude projection C-scan images. Double dye experiments and in vivo oxygen saturation estimation confirmed functional imaging potential. PMID:24575346

  12. Modifying the luteal phase support in natural cycle frozen-thawed embryo transfer improves cycle outcome.

    PubMed

    Haas, Jigal; Lantsberg, Daniel; Feldman, Noa; Manela, Daphna; Machtinger, Ronit; Dar, Shir; Rabinovici, Jaron; Orvieto, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    With the recent trend toward single embryo transfer (ET), cryopreservation of extraneous embryos is becoming increasingly prevalent. Several replacement protocols for frozen-thawed ET (FET) exist, with no advantage of one protocol over the others. All consecutive patients undergoing natural cycle Day-3 FET cycles between May 2012 and March 2015 in our IVF unit were evaluated. While following spontaneous ovulation, all patients received progesterone luteal support. Since June 2014, patients underwent the same aforementioned natural cycle FET cycles, with two additional injections, one of recombinant hCG (250 mcg) and the other of GnRH-agonist (triptorelin 0.1 mg), on the day of transfer and 4 d later, respectively. While the patients' clinical characteristics, the prevalence of embryos that survived the thawing process and the number of embryos transferred were comparable between the earlier as compared with the later period, implantation rate, positive β-hCG, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy rates were significantly higher during the later period. We, therefore, suggest that when natural cycle FET is offered, the addition of two injections of recombinant hCG and GnRH-agonist, on the day of transfer and 4 d later, respectively, might increase clinical pregancy rates. Further large prospective studies are needed to elucidate the aforementioned recommendation prior to its routine implementation. PMID:26288149

  13. Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes containing traces of iron as new negative MRI contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Doan, Bich-Thuy; Seguin, Johanne; Breton, Marie; Le Beherec, Ronan; Bessodes, Michel; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Banhart, Florian; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing traces of iron oxide were functionalized by noncovalent lipid-PEG or covalent carboxylic acid function to supply new efficient MRI contrast agents for in vitro and in vivo applications. Longitudinal (r(1)) and transversal (r(2)) water proton relaxivities were measured at 300 MHz, showing a stronger T(2) feature as an MRI contrast agent (r(2)/r(1)  = 190 for CO(2) H functionalisation). The r(2) relaxivity was demonstrated to be correlated to the presence of iron oxide in the SWNT-carboxylic function COOH, in comparison to iron-free ones. Biodistribution studies on mice after a systemic injection showed a negative MRI contrast in liver, suggesting the presence of the nanotubes in this organ until 48 h after i.v. injection. The presence of carbon nanotubes in liver was confirmed after ex vivo carbon extraction. Finally, cytotoxicity studies showed no apparent effect owing to the presence of the carbon nanotubes. The functionalized carbon nanotubes were well tolerated by the animals at the dose of 10 µg g(-1) body weight. PMID:22434627

  14. Chloroplastic thioredoxin m functions as a major regulator of Calvin cycle enzymes during photosynthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) regulate the activity of various chloroplastic proteins in a light-dependent manner. Five types of Trxs function in different physiological processes in the chloroplast of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous in vitro experiments have suggested that the f-type Trx (Trx f) is the main redox regulator of chloroplast enzymes, including Calvin cycle enzymes. To investigate the in vivo contribution of each Trx isoform to the redox regulatory system, we first quantified the protein concentration of each Trx isoform in the chloroplast stroma. The m-type Trx (Trx m), which consists of four isoforms, was the most abundant type. Next, we analyzed several Arabidopsis Trx-m-deficient mutants to elucidate the physiological role of Trx m in vivo. Deficiency of Trx m impaired plant growth and decreased the CO2 assimilation rate. We also determined the redox state of Trx target enzymes to examine their photo-reduction, which is essential for enzyme activation. In the Trx-m-deficient mutants, the reduction level of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase was lower than that in the wild type. Inconsistently with the historical view, our in vivo study suggested that Trx m plays a more important role than Trx f in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. PMID:26468055

  15. Role of Vascular Networks in Extending Glucose Sensor Function: Impact of Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis on Continuous Glucose Monitoring in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Antar, Omar; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of increased blood vessel (BV) density proximal to glucose sensors implanted in the interstitial tissue increases the accuracy and lifespan of sensors is accepted, despite limited existing experimental data. Interestingly, there is no previous data or even conjecture in the literature on the role of lymphatic vessels (LV) alone, or in combination with BV, in enhancing continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo. To investigate the impact of inducing vascular networks (BV and LV) at sites of glucose sensor implantation, we utilized adenovirus based local gene therapy of vascular endothelial cell growth factor-A (VEGF-A) to induce vessels at sensor implantation sites. The results of these studies demonstrated that 1) VEGF-A based local gene therapy increases vascular networks (blood vessels and lymphatic vessels) at sites of glucose sensor implantation; and 2) this local increase of vascular networks enhances glucose sensor function in vivo from 7 days to greater than 28 days post sensor implantation. This data provides “proof of concept” for the effective usage of local angiogenic factor (AF) gene therapy in mammalian models in an effort to extend CGM in vivo. It also supports the practice of a variety of viral and non-viral vectors as well as gene products (e.g. anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis genes) to engineer “implant friendly tissues” for the usage with implantable glucose sensors as well as other implantable devices. PMID:24243850

  16. 20-HETE Regulates the Angiogenic Functions of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Contributes to Angiogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H.; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G.; Falck, John R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Scicli, A. Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F–20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F–20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ∼1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A–20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  17. 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of human endothelial progenitor cells and contributes to angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G; Falck, John R; Arbab, Ali S; Scicli, A Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L; Yang, Jing; Guo, Austin M

    2014-03-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F-20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F-20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ~1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A-20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  18. Luteal expression of cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase genes in late pregnant rats: effect of luteinizing hormone and RU486.

    PubMed

    Stocco, C O; Chedrese, J; Deis, R P

    2001-10-01

    A decrease in serum progesterone at the end of pregnancy is essential for the induction of parturition in rats. We have previously demonstrated that LH participates in this process through: 1) inhibiting 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) activity and 2) stimulating progesterone catabolism by inducing 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD) activity. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of LH and progesterone on the luteal expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450(scc)), 3beta-HSD, and 20alpha-HSD genes. Gene expression was analyzed by Northern blot analysis 24 and 48 h after administration of LH or vehicle on Day 19 of pregnancy. StAR and 3beta-HSD mRNA levels were lower in LH-treated rats than in rats administered with vehicle at both time points studied. P450(scc) mRNA levels were unaffected by LH. The 20alpha-HSD mRNA levels were not different between LH and control rats 24 h after treatment; however, greater expression of 20alpha-HSD, with respect to controls, was observed in LH-treated rats 48 h after treatment. Luteal progesterone content dropped in LH-treated rats at both time points studied, whereas serum progesterone decreased after 48 h only. In a second set of experiments, the anti-progesterone RU486 was injected intrabursally on Day 20 of pregnancy. RU486 had no effect on 3beta-HSD or P450(scc) expression but increased 20alpha-HSD mRNA levels after 8 h treatment. In conclusion, the luteolytic effect of LH is mediated by a drop in StAR and 3beta-HSD expression without effect on P450(scc) expression. We also provide the first in vivo evidence indicating that a decrease in luteal progesterone content may be an essential step toward the induction of 20alpha-HSD expression at the end of pregnancy in rats. PMID:11566732

  19. Arginyltransferase is an ATP-Independent Self-Regulating Enzyme that Forms Distinct Functional Complexes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Han, Xuemei; Saha, Sougata; Xu, Tao; Rai, Reena; Zhang, Fangliang; Wolf, Yuri. I.; Wolfson, Alexey; Yates, John R.; Kashina, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Summary Posttranslational arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) plays an important role in cardiovascular development, cell motility and regulation of cytoskeleton and metabolic enzymes. This protein modification was discovered decades ago, however, the arginylation reaction and the functioning of ATE1 remained poorly understood due to the lack of good biochemical models. Here we report the development of an in vitro arginylation system, in which ATE1 function and molecular requirements can be tested using purified recombinant ATE1 isoforms supplemented with a controlled number of components. Our results show that arginylation reaction is a self-sufficient, ATP-independent process that can affect different sites in a polypeptide, and that arginyltransferases form different molecular complexes in vivo, associate with components of the translation machinery, and have distinct, partially overlapping subsets of substrates, suggesting that these enzymes play different physiological functions. PMID:21276945

  20. Measuring stem cell frequency in epidermis: A quantitative in vivo functional assay for long-term repopulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T. E.; Barland, C.; Alex, A. M.; Mancianti, M. L.; Lu, Y.; Cleaver, J. E.; Lawrence, H. J.; Ghadially, R.

    2003-09-01

    Epidermal stem cells play a central role in tissue homeostasis, wound repair, tumor initiation, and gene therapy. A major impediment to the purification and molecular characterization of epidermal stem cells is the lack of a quantitative assay for cells capable of long-term repopulation in vivo, such as exists for hematopoietic cells. The tremendous strides made in the characterization and purification of hematopoietic stem cells have been critically dependent on the availability of competitive transplantation assays, because these assays permit the accurate quantitation of long-term repopulating cells in vivo. We have developed an analogous functional assay for epidermal stem cells, and have measured the frequency of functional epidermal stem cells in interfollicular epidermis. These studies indicate that cells capable of long-term reconstitution of a squamous epithelium reside in the interfollicular epidermis. We find that the frequency of these long-term repopulating cells is 1 in 35,000 total epidermal cells, or in the order of 1 in 104 basal epidermal cells, similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and much lower than previously estimated in epidermis. Furthermore, these studies establish a novel functional assay that can be used to validate immunophenotypic markers and enrichment strategies for epidermal stem cells, and to quantify epidermal stem cells in various keratinocyte populations. Thus further studies using this type of assay for epidermis should aid in the progress of cutaneous stem cell-targeted gene therapy, and in more basic studies of epidermal stem cell regulation and differentiation.

  1. Defining the in vivo function of Siglec-F, a CD33-related Siglec expressed on mouse eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mai; Angata, Takashi; Cho, Jae Youn; Miller, Marina; Broide, David H.

    2007-01-01

    CD33-related Siglecs (CD33rSiglecs) are a family of sialic acid–recognizing lectins on immune cells whose biologic functions are unknown. We studied in vivo functions of Siglec-F, the CD33rSiglec expressed on mouse eosinophils, which are prominent in allergic processes. Induction of allergic lung inflammation in mice caused up-regulation of Siglec-F on blood and bone marrow eosinophils, accompanied by newly induced expression on some CD4+ cells, as well as quantitative up-regulation of endogenous Siglec-F ligands in the lung tissue and airways. Taken together with the tyrosine-based inhibitory motif in the cytosolic tail of Siglec-F, the data suggested a negative feedback loop, controlling allergic responses of eosinophils and helper T cells, via Siglec-F and Siglec-F ligands. To pursue this hypothesis, we created Siglec-F–null mice. Allergen-challenged null mice showed increased lung eosinophil infiltration, enhanced bone marrow and blood eosinophilia, delayed resolution of lung eosinophilia, and reduced peribronchial-cell apoptosis. Anti–Siglec-F antibody cross-linking also enhanced eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. These data support the proposed negative feedback role for Siglec-F, represent the first in vivo demonstration of biologic functions for any CD33rSiglec, and predict a role for human Siglec-8 (the isofunctional paralog of mouse Siglec-F) in regulating the pathogenesis of human eosinophil-mediated disorders. PMID:17272508

  2. Simple and effective exercise design for assessing in vivo mitochondrial function in clinical applications using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, Alison; Lupson, Victoria; Thankamony, Ajay; Dunger, David B.; Savage, David B.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Kemp, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing recognition of diseases associated with dysfunction of mitochondria poses an urgent need for simple measures of mitochondrial function. Assessment of the kinetics of replenishment of the phosphocreatine pool after exercise using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide an in vivo measure of mitochondrial function; however, the wider application of this technique appears limited by complex or expensive MR-compatible exercise equipment and protocols not easily tolerated by frail participants or those with reduced mental capacity. Here we describe a novel in-scanner exercise method which is patient-focused, inexpensive, remarkably simple and highly portable. The device exploits an MR-compatible high-density material (BaSO4) to form a weight which is attached directly to the ankle, and a one-minute dynamic knee extension protocol produced highly reproducible measurements of post-exercise PCr recovery kinetics in both healthy subjects and patients. As sophisticated exercise equipment is unnecessary for this measurement, our extremely simple design provides an effective and easy-to-implement apparatus that is readily translatable across sites. Its design, being tailored to the needs of the patient, makes it particularly well suited to clinical applications, and we argue the potential of this method for investigating in vivo mitochondrial function in new cohorts of growing clinical interest. PMID:26751849

  3. In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways: Assembling old parts to build novel and functional structures

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Alejandro; Sebai, Sarra C; Sauveplane, Vincent; Ramaen, Odile; Pandjaitan, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    In our recent article “In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways by homeologous recombination in mitotic cells” we proposed a useful alternative to directed evolution methods that permits the generation of yeast cell libraries containing recombinant metabolic pathways from counterpart genes. The methodology was applied to generate single mosaic genes and intragenic mosaic pathways. We used flavonoid metabolism genes as a working model to assembly and express evolved pathways in DNA repair deficient cells. The present commentary revises the principles of gene and pathway mosaicism and explores the scope and perspectives of our results as an additional tool for synthetic biology. PMID:25482082

  4. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuhong; Huang, Yuju; Liang, Yin; Ho, Yuchin; Wang, Yichen; Chang, Lung-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-γ or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC) activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-γ-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-γ and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm) cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-γ-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-γ selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications. PMID:19660111

  5. A preliminary study on the induction of dioestrous ovulation in the mare – a possible method for inducing prolonged luteal phase

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Ylva; Dalin, Anne-Marie; Santesson, Malin; Kindahl, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Background Strong oestrous symptoms in the mare can cause problems with racing, training and handling. Since long-acting progesterone treatment is not permitted in mares at competition (e.g. according to FEI rules), there is a need for methods to suppress unwanted cyclicity. Spontaneous dioestrous ovulations in the late luteal phase may cause a prolongation of the luteal phase in mares. Methods In this preliminary study, in an attempt to induce ovulation during the luteal phase, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (3000 IU) was injected intramuscularly in four mares (experimental group) in the luteal phase when a dioestrous follicle ≥ 30 mm was detected. A fifth mare included in this group was not treated due to no detectable dioestrous follicles ≥ 30 mm. Four control mares were similarly injected with saline. The mares were followed with ultrasound for 72 hours post injection or until ovulation. Blood samples for progesterone analysis were obtained twice weekly for one month and thereafter once weekly for another two to four months. Results Three of the hCG-treated mares ovulated within 72 hours after treatment and developed prolonged luteal phases of 58, 68 and 82 days respectively. One treated mare never ovulated after the hCG injection and progesterone levels fell below 3 nmol/l nine days post treatment. Progesterone levels in the control mares were below 3 nmol/l within nine days after saline injection, except for one mare, which developed a spontaneously prolonged luteal phase of 72 days. Conclusion HCG treatment may be a method to induce prolonged luteal phases in the mare provided there is a dioestrous follicle ≥ 30 mm that ovulates post-treatment. However, the method needs to be tested on a larger number of mares to be able to draw conclusions regarding its effectiveness. PMID:16987391

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Tumor Targeted Photothermal Cancer Therapy Using Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung Eun; Sharker, Shazid Md; Jeong, Ji Hoon; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2015-11-01

    Despite the tremendous progress that photothermal therapy (PTT) has recently achieved, it still has a long way to go to gain the effective targeted photothermal ablation of tumor cells. Driven by this need, we describe a new class of targeted photothermal therapeutic agents for cancer cells with pH responsive bioimaging using near-infrared dye (NIR) IR825, conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-g-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEG-g-PDMA, PgP), and hyaluronic acid (HA) anchored reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid nanoparticles. The obtained rGO nanoparticles (PgP/HA-rGO) showed pH-dependent fluorescence emission and excellent near-infrared (NIR) irradiation of cancer cells targeted in vitro to provide cytotoxicity. Using intravenously administered PTT agents, the time-dependent in vivo tumor target accumulation was exactly defined, presenting eminent photothermal conversion at 4 and 8 h post-injection, which was demonstrated from the ex vivo biodistribution of tumors. These tumor environment responsive hybrid nanoparticles generated photothermal heat, which caused dominant suppression of tumor growth. The histopathological studies obtained by H&E staining demonstrated complete healing from malignant tumor. In an area of limited successes in cancer therapy, our translation will pave the road to design stimulus environment responsive targeted PTT agents for the safe eradication of devastating cancer. PMID:26451914

  7. A Functional CT Contrast Agent for In Vivo Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongyuan; Wang, Zhiming; Huang, Chusen; Gu, Xiaoli; Jia, Ti; Zhang, Amin; Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Lan; Luo, Xianfu; Zhao, Xuesong; Jia, Nengqin; Miao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia, which has been well established as a key feature of the tumor microenvironment, significantly influences tumor behavior and treatment response. Therefore, imaging for tumor hypoxia in vivo is warranted. Although some imaging modalities for detecting tumor hypoxia have been developed, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and optical imaging, these technologies still have their own specific limitations. As computed tomography (CT) is one of the most useful imaging tools in terms of availability, efficiency, and convenience, the feasibility of using a hypoxia-sensitive nanoprobe (Au@BSA-NHA) for CT imaging of tumor hypoxia is investigated, with emphasis on identifying different levels of hypoxia in two xenografts. The nanoprobe is composed of Au nanoparticles and nitroimidazole moiety which can be electively reduced by nitroreductase under hypoxic condition. In vitro, Au@BSA-NHA attain the higher cellular uptake under hypoxic condition. Attractively, after in vivo administration, Au@BSA-NHA can not only monitor the tumor hypoxic environment with CT enhancement but also detect the hypoxic status by the degree of enhancement in two xenograft tumors with different hypoxic levels. The results demonstrate that Au@BSA-NHA may potentially be used as a sensitive CT imaging agent for detecting tumor hypoxia. PMID:27345304

  8. Probing cell type–specific functions of Gi in vivo identifies GPCR regulators of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Regard, Jean B.; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Cano, David A.; Camerer, Eric; Yin, Liya; Zheng, Yao-Wu; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Hebrok, Matthias; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo roles of the hundreds of mammalian G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are incompletely understood. To explore these roles, we generated mice expressing the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin, a known inhibitor of Gi/o signaling, under the control of the ROSA26 locus in a Cre recombinase–dependent manner (ROSA26PTX). Crossing ROSA26PTX mice to mice expressing Cre in pancreatic β cells produced offspring with constitutive hyperinsulinemia, increased insulin secretion in response to glucose, and resistance to diet-induced hyperglycemia. This phenotype underscored the known importance of Gi/o and hence of GPCRs for regulating insulin secretion. Accordingly, we quantified mRNA for each of the approximately 373 nonodorant GPCRs in mouse to identify receptors highly expressed in islets and examined the role of several. We report that 3-iodothyronamine, a thyroid hormone metabolite, could negatively and positively regulate insulin secretion via the Gi-coupled α2A-adrenergic receptor and the Gs-coupled receptor Taar1, respectively, and protease-activated receptor–2 could negatively regulate insulin secretion and may contribute to physiological regulation of glucose metabolism. The ROSA26PTX system used in this study represents a new genetic tool to achieve tissue-specific signaling pathway modulation in vivo that can be applied to investigate the role of Gi/o-coupled GPCRs in multiple cell types and processes. PMID:17992256

  9. Functionalized biocompatible WO3 nanoparticles for triggered and targeted in vitro and in vivo photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharker, Shazid Md; Kim, Sung Min; Lee, Jung Eun; Choi, Kyung Ho; Shin, Gyojic; Lee, Sangkug; Lee, Kang Dae; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Sung Young

    2015-11-10

    We report on dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid (HA-D), a mussel-inspired facile capping material that can modify tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoparticles to be both biocompatible and targetable, allowing precise delivery (WO3-HA) to a tumor site. Near-infrared (NIR) irradiated WO3-HA showed a rapid and substantial rise in photothermal heat to complete in vitro thermolysis of malignant MDAMB and A549 cancer cellsbut was found to be relatively less sensitive to normal MDCK cells. A long-term in vivo investigation of ~10 nm HA thickness on WO3 (WO3-HA) nanoparticles demonstrated efficient photo-thermal conversion with time-dependent tumor target accumulation. This long-termin vivo survival study ofWO3-HA showed promising biocompatibility, with a complete recovery from malignant tumor. Due to the importance of keeping simplicity in the design of therapeutic nanoparticles, we therefore expect that this facile scheme (HA-D) would contribute to the biocompatible development of versatile metallic nanoparticles for photothermal applications. PMID:26381897

  10. Circulating angiogenic cell function is inhibited by cortisol in vitro and associated with psychological stress and cortisol in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; Derakhshandeh, Ronak; Flores, Abdiel J; Narayan, Shilpa; Mendes, Wendy Berry; Springer, Matthew L

    2016-05-01

    Psychological stress and glucocorticoids are associated with heightened cardiovascular disease risk. We investigated whether stress or cortisol would be associated with reduced circulating angiogenic cell (CAC) function, an index of impaired vascular repair. We hypothesized that minority-race individuals who experience threat in interracial interactions would exhibit reduced CAC function, and that this link might be explained by cortisol. To test this experimentally, we recruited 106 African American participants for a laboratory interracial interaction task, in which they received socially evaluative feedback from Caucasian confederates. On a separate day, a subset of 32 participants (mean age=26years, 47% female) enrolled in a separate biological substudy and provided blood samples for CAC isolation and salivary samples to quantify the morning peak in cortisol (the cortisol awakening response, CAR). CAC function was quantified using cell culture assays of migration to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and secretion of VEGF into the culture medium. Heightened threat in response to an interracial interaction and trait anxiety in vivo were both associated with poorer CAC migratory function in vitro. Further, threat and poorer sustained attention during the interracial interaction were associated with a higher CAR, which in turn, was related to lower CAC sensitivity to glucocorticoids. In vitro, higher doses of cortisol impaired CAC migratory function and VEGF protein secretion. The glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 reversed this functional impairment. These data identify a novel, neuroendocrine pathway by which psychological stress may reduce CAC function, with potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:26925833

  11. Pregnancy Rate Following Luteal Phase Support in Iranian Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Saberi, Hamidreza; Moraveji, Seyed Alireza; Bazarganipour, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the efficacy of luteal phase support (LPS) using intravaginal progesterone (P) on pregnancy rate in Iranian women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) who used a combination for ovulation induction consisting of letrozole or clomi- phene citrate (CC) and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG). Materials and Methods This was a randomized clinical trial undertaken in a fertility clinic in Kashan, Isfahan Province, Iran. A total of 198 patients completed treatment and follow up. Base on chosen ovulation induction programs, they were divided into two following group: i. CC group (n=98) used a combination consisting of CC (100 mg×5 day) and HMG (150 IU×5 day) and ii. letrozole group (n=100) used a combination consisting of letrozole (5 mg×5 day) and HMG (150 IU×5 day). After human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration (5000 IU), the patients (n=122) who randomly re- ceived intravaginal P (Cyclogest, 400 mg daily) were included in LPS group, while the rest (n=123) were included in non-P cycles group. The outcome was the comparison of chemical pregnancy rate between the groups. Results Our findings showed that LPS was associated with a 10% higher pregnancy rate than in non-P cycles, although this difference did not reach statistical significant (p=0.08). LPS improved pregnancy rate in both CC (4%) and letrozole (6%) groups. In addition, patients who used letrozole for ovulation induction along with intravaginal P showed higher pregnancy rates than CC group. Conclusion Administration of vaginal P for LPS may improve the pregnancy rate in women with PCOS using letrozole or CC in combination with HMG for ovulation induc- tion (Registration Number: IRCT201206072967N4). PMID:25379150

  12. Premenstrual dysphoria and luteal stress in dominant-social-status female macaques.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mingqi; Zhao, Qitao; Wei, Sheng; Zhang, Huiyun; Wang, Haijun

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to extend our previous work to develop nonhuman primate model for prospectively studying the mechanism underlying premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Thirty young dominant-status female monkeys were randomly divided into the control group, the model group, and JQP group. For two consecutive menstrual cycles, from day 18 to 22, monkeys in the model and JQP groups were housed and immobilized singly in specially designed isolation cages for 5-6 hours per day. At the same time, the pharmaceutical interference effect of jingqianping (JQP) granule, a traditional Chinese medicine specifically used to cure PMDD patients, was tested using monkeys in the JQP group. The behavior and facial expressions of monkeys were photographed with an automatic vidicon and were quantitatively analyzed by "the emotion evaluation scale of female experimental macaque." Changes in serum level of progesterone and estradiol were measured with RIA, and serum level of 5-HT, noradrenaline, and dopamine were measured with HPLC. After experiencing mentioned above stress, 70% of monkeys of model group showed PMDD symptoms during three consecutive menstrual cycles. Estradiol and progesterone serum level decreased (P < 0.01). Moreover, the peak value of secreted hormones in their follicular phase did not occur. Serum level of 5-HT and dopamine were significantly lower (P < 0.01), but the serum noradrenaline level was higher (P < 0.01). Moreover, in monkeys administered by JQP granule, both PMDD symptoms and the anormal serum level of neurotransmitters could be obviously reversed. This special luteal-phase treatment on dominant-social-status monkeys might be a feasible way to create models mimicking PMDD. PMID:24371458

  13. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  14. The rare DAT coding variant Val559 perturbs DA neuron function, changes behavior, and alters in vivo responses to psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Mergy, Marc A; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Gresch, Paul J; Gantz, Stephanie C; Williams, John; Davis, Gwynne L; Wheeler, C Austin; Stanwood, Gregg D; Hahn, Maureen K; Blakely, Randy D

    2014-11-01

    Despite the critical role of the presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) in DA clearance and psychostimulant responses, evidence that DAT dysfunction supports risk for mental illness is indirect. Recently, we identified a rare, nonsynonymous Slc6a3 variant that produces the DAT substitution Ala559Val in two male siblings who share a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with other studies identifying the variant in subjects with bipolar disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previously, using transfected cell studies, we observed that although DAT Val559 displays normal total and surface DAT protein levels, and normal DA recognition and uptake, the variant transporter exhibits anomalous DA efflux (ADE) and lacks capacity for amphetamine (AMPH)-stimulated DA release. To pursue the significance of these findings in vivo, we engineered DAT Val559 knock-in mice, and here we demonstrate in this model the presence of elevated extracellular DA levels, altered somatodendritic and presynaptic D2 DA receptor (D2R) function, a blunted ability of DA terminals to support depolarization and AMPH-evoked DA release, and disruptions in basal and psychostimulant-evoked locomotor behavior. Together, our studies demonstrate an in vivo functional impact of the DAT Val559 variant, providing support for the ability of DAT dysfunction to impact risk for mental illness. PMID:25331903

  15. The rare DAT coding variant Val559 perturbs DA neuron function, changes behavior, and alters in vivo responses to psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Mergy, Marc A.; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Gresch, Paul J.; Gantz, Stephanie C.; Williams, John; Davis, Gwynne L.; Wheeler, C. Austin; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Hahn, Maureen K.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the critical role of the presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) in DA clearance and psychostimulant responses, evidence that DAT dysfunction supports risk for mental illness is indirect. Recently, we identified a rare, nonsynonymous Slc6a3 variant that produces the DAT substitution Ala559Val in two male siblings who share a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with other studies identifying the variant in subjects with bipolar disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previously, using transfected cell studies, we observed that although DAT Val559 displays normal total and surface DAT protein levels, and normal DA recognition and uptake, the variant transporter exhibits anomalous DA efflux (ADE) and lacks capacity for amphetamine (AMPH)-stimulated DA release. To pursue the significance of these findings in vivo, we engineered DAT Val559 knock-in mice, and here we demonstrate in this model the presence of elevated extracellular DA levels, altered somatodendritic and presynaptic D2 DA receptor (D2R) function, a blunted ability of DA terminals to support depolarization and AMPH-evoked DA release, and disruptions in basal and psychostimulant-evoked locomotor behavior. Together, our studies demonstrate an in vivo functional impact of the DAT Val559 variant, providing support for the ability of DAT dysfunction to impact risk for mental illness. PMID:25331903

  16. Functional optical coherence tomography for high-resolution mapping of cilia beat frequency in the mouse oviduct in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Burton, Jason C.; Behringer, Richard R.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-02-01

    Since mouse is a superior model for genetic analysis of human disorders, reproductive studies in mice have significant implications on further understanding of fertility and infertility in humans. Fertilized oocytes are transported through the reproductive tract by motile cilia lining the lumen of the oviduct as well as by oviduct contractions. While the role of cilia is well recognized, ciliary dynamics in the oviduct is not well understood, largely owing to the lack of live imaging approaches. Here, we report in vivo micro-scale mapping of cilia and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the mouse oviduct using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This functional imaging method is based on spectral analysis of the OCT speckle variations produced by the beat of cilia in the oviduct, which does not require exogenous contrast agents. Animal procedures similar to the ones used for production of transgenic mice are utilized to expose the reproductive organs for imaging in anesthetized females. In this paper, we first present in vivo structural imaging of the mouse oviduct capturing the oocyte and the preimplantation embryo and then show the result of depth-resolved high-resolution CBF mapping in the ampulla of the live mouse. These data indicate that this structural and functional OCT imaging approach can be a useful tool for a variety of live investigations of mammalian reproduction and infertility.

  17. PEG-mediated synthesis of highly dispersive multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles: their physicochemical properties and function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Conroy; Du, Kim; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest; Stephen, Zachary; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Ratner, Buddy; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-04-27

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been developed for a wide range of applications in nanomedicine, such as serving as tumor-targeted drug carriers and molecular imaging agents. To function in vivo, the development of these novel materials must overcome several challenging requirements including biocompatibility, stability in physiological solutions, nontoxicity, and the ability to traverse biological barriers. Here we report a PEG-mediated synthesis process to produce well-dispersed, ultrafine, and highly stable iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo applications. Utilizing a biocompatible PEG coating bearing amine functional groups, the produced nanoparticles serve as an effective platform with the ability to incorporate a variety of targeting, therapeutic, or imaging ligands. In this study, we demonstrated tumor-specific accumulation of these nanoparticles through both magnetic resonance and optical imaging after conjugation with chlorotoxin, a peptide with high affinity toward tumors of the neuroectodermal origin, and Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Furthermore, we performed preliminary biodistribution and toxicity assessments of these nanoparticles in wild-type mice through histological analysis of clearance organs and hematology assay, and the results demonstrated the relative biocompatibility of these nanoparticles. PMID:20232826

  18. trpm7 Regulation of in Vivo Cation Homeostasis and Kidney Function Involves Stanniocalcin 1 and fgf23

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo, Michael R.; Budi, Erine H.; Parichy, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (trpm7) channel kinase is a primary regulator of magnesium homeostasis in vitro. Here we show that trpm7 is an important regulator of cation homeostasis as well as kidney function in vivo. Using zebrafish trpm7 mutants, we show that early larvae exhibit reduced levels of both total magnesium and total calcium. Accompanying these deficits, we show that trpm7 mutants express higher levels of stanniocalcin 1 (stc1), a potent regulator of calcium homeostasis. Using transgenic overexpression and morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown, we demonstrate that stc1 modulates both calcium and magnesium levels in trpm7 mutants and in the wild type and that levels of these cations are restored to normal in trpm7 mutants when stc1 activity is blocked. Consistent with defects in both calcium and phosphate homeostasis, we further show that trpm7 mutants develop kidney stones by early larval stages and exhibit increased levels of the anti-hyperphosphatemic factor, fibroblast growth factor 23 (fgf23). Finally, we demonstrate that elevated fgf23 expression contributes to kidney stone formation by morpholino knockdown of fgf23 in trpm7 mutants. Together, these analyses reveal roles for trpm7 in regulating cation homeostasis and kidney function in vivo and implicate both stc1 and fgf23 in these processes. PMID:20881241

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of titanium surface functional groups under various surface modification and their behaviors in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiong; Wang, Yingbo; Yang, Xiudong; Zhang, Qiyi; Zhao, Zhanfeng; Weng, Lu-Tao; Leng, Yang

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, surface functional groups of titanium surfaces gone through different treatments, including acid etched treatment (AE), nitric acid treatment (NT), heat treatment (HT), and alkali treatment (AT), and their behaviors in vitro and in vivo was thoroughly studied by spectroscopic analysis. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that the rank of bioactivity of various surfaces was AE < NT < HT < AT. XPS analysis indicated that AT greatly increased the OH group concentration on the titanium surface whereas HT reduced the OH group concentration. Thus, OH group difference could not be a good explanation of bioactivity difference. On the other hand, ToF-SIMS analysis demonstrated the TiOH+/Ti+ ratios of various surfaces correlated well with the bioactivity and the surface energies, which implied that Ti-OH could play an important role in the bioactivity. This detail investigation of the relationship between surface functional groups and surface bioactivity could help us to broaden the knowledge about the mechanism of bioactivity and to design next generation bioactive materials. PMID:17618503

  20. Functional adaptation in long bones: establishing in vivo values for surface remodeling rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Cowin, S C; Hart, R T; Balser, J R; Kohn, D H

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we describe a computational means, based on beam theory, for application of the theory of adaptive elasticity to examples of real bone geometries. The results of the animal experiments were taken from the literature, and each documented the temporal evolution of a change in bone shape after a significant change in the mechanical loading environment of the bone. For each of these studies, we establish preliminary estimates of the in vivo values of the surface remodeling rate coefficients--the key parameters in the theory of surface remodeling. Our preliminary parameter estimates are established by comparison of published animal experimental results with surface remodeling theory predictions generated by the computational method. PMID:4077864

  1. In vivo functional photoacoustic tomography of traumatic brain injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jung-Taek; Song, Kwang-Hyung; Li, Meng-Lin; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the potential of photoacoustic tomography for the study of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats in vivo. Based on spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography that can detect the absorption rates of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobins, the blood oxygen saturation and total blood volume in TBI rat brains were visualized. Reproducible cerebral trauma was induced using a fluid percussion TBI device. The time courses of the hemodynamic response following the trauma initiation were imaged with multi-wavelength photoacoustic tomography with bandwidth-limited spatial resolution through the intact skin and skull. In the pilot set of experiments, trauma induced hematomas and blood oxygen saturation level changes were detected, a finding consistent with the known physiological responses to TBI. This new imaging method will be useful for future studies on TBI-related metabolic activities and the effects of therapeutic agents.

  2. Preferential accumulation within tumors and in vivo imaging by functionalized luminescent dendrimer lanthanide complexes

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Marco A.; Shade, Chad M.; Uh, Hyounsoo; Kwan, Shu Ying; Bischof, Matthias; Thompson, Zachary P.; Gogick, Kristy A.; Meier, Adam R.; Strein, Timothy G.; Bartlett, David L.; Modzelewski, Ruth A.; Lee, Yong J.; Petoud, Stéphane; Brown, Charles Komen

    2011-01-01

    We have created a dendrimer complex suitable for preferential accumulation within liver tumors and luminescence imaging by substituting thirty-two naphthalimide fluorophores on the surface of the dendrimer and incorporating eight europium cations within the branches. We demonstrate the utility and performance of this luminescent dendrimer complex to detect hepatic tumors generated via direct subcapsular implantation or via splenic injections of colorectal cancer cells (CC531) into WAG/RijHsd rats. Luminescence imaging of the tumors after injection of the dendrimer complex via hepatic arterial infusion revealed that the dendrimer complex can preferentially accumulate within liver tumors. Further investigation indicated that dendrimer luminescence in hepatic tumors persisted in vivo. Due to the incorporation of lanthanide cations, this luminescence agent presents a strong resistance against photobleaching. These studies show the dendrimer complex has great potential to serve as an innovative accumulation and imaging agent for the detection of metastatic tumors in our rat hepatic model. PMID:21925728

  3. Increased osteoblast function in vitro and in vivo through surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongyuan; Hu, Beibei; Tang, Chu; Wu, Yunpeng; Sun, Pengfei; Zhang, Xianlong; Jia, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography has significant influence on good and fast osseointegration of biomedical implants. In this work, ultrasonic shot peening was conducted to modify titanium to produce nanograined (NG) surface. Its ability to induce new bone formation was evaluated using an in vivo animal model. We demonstrated that the NG surface enhanced osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization in in vitro experiments compared to coarse-grained titanium surface. Push-out test, histological observations, fluorescent labeling, and histomorphometrical analysis consistently indicated that the NG surfaces developed have the higher osseointegration than coarse-grained surfaces. Those results suggest that ultrasonic shot peening has the potential for future use as a surface modification method in biomedical application. PMID:26229463

  4. Molecular imaging of gene expression and protein function in vivo with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay; Luker, Gary D; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-10-01

    Molecular imaging is broadly defined as the characterization and measurement of biological processes in living animals, model systems, and humans at the cellular and molecular level using remote imaging detectors. One underlying premise of molecular imaging is that this emerging field is not defined by the imaging technologies that underpin acquisition of the final image per se, but rather is driven by the underlying biological questions. In practice, the choice of imaging modality and probe is usually reduced to choosing between high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to address a given biological system. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) inherently use image-enhancing agents (radiopharmaceuticals) that are synthesized at sufficiently high specific activity to enable use of tracer concentrations of the compound (picomolar to nanomolar) for detecting molecular signals while providing the desired levels of image contrast. The tracer technologies strategically provide high sensitivity for imaging small-capacity molecular systems in vivo (receptors, enzymes, transporters) at a cost of lower spatial resolution than other technologies. We review several significant PET and SPECT advances in imaging receptors (somatostatin receptor subtypes, neurotensin receptor subtypes, alpha(v)beta(3) integrin), enzymes (hexokinase, thymidine kinase), transporters (MDR1 P-glycoprotein, sodium-iodide symporter), and permeation peptides (human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat conjugates), as well as innovative reporter gene constructs (herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase, somatostatin receptor subtype 2, cytosine deaminase) for imaging gene promoter activation and repression, signal transduction pathways, and protein-protein interactions in vivo. PMID:12353250

  5. Insulin-Producing Endocrine Cells Differentiated In Vitro From Human Embryonic Stem Cells Function in Macroencapsulation Devices In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ambruzs, Dana M.; Moorman, Mark A.; Bhoumik, Anindita; Cesario, Rosemary M.; Payne, Janice K.; Kelly, Jonathan R.; Haakmeester, Carl; Srijemac, Robert; Wilson, Alistair Z.; Kerr, Justin; Frazier, Mauro A.; Kroon, Evert J.; D’Amour, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    The PEC-01 cell population, differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), contains pancreatic progenitors (PPs) that, when loaded into macroencapsulation devices (to produce the VC-01 candidate product) and transplanted into mice, can mature into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells and other pancreatic endocrine cells involved in glucose metabolism. We modified the protocol for making PEC-01 cells such that 73%–80% of the cell population consisted of PDX1-positive (PDX1+) and NKX6.1+ PPs. The PPs were further differentiated to islet-like cells (ICs) that reproducibly contained 73%–89% endocrine cells, of which approximately 40%–50% expressed insulin. A large fraction of these insulin-positive cells were single hormone-positive and expressed the transcription factors PDX1 and NKX6.1. To preclude a significant contribution of progenitors to the in vivo function of ICs, we used a simple enrichment process to remove remaining PPs, yielding aggregates that contained 93%–98% endocrine cells and 1%–3% progenitors. Enriched ICs, when encapsulated and implanted into mice, functioned similarly to the VC-01 candidate product, demonstrating conclusively that in vitro-produced hESC-derived insulin-producing cells can mature and function in vivo in devices. A scaled version of our suspension culture was used, and the endocrine aggregates could be cryopreserved and retain functionality. Although ICs expressed multiple important β cell genes, the cells contained relatively low levels of several maturity-associated markers. Correlating with this, the time to function of ICs was similar to PEC-01 cells, indicating that ICs required cell-autonomous maturation after delivery in vivo, which would occur concurrently with graft integration into the host. Significance Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects approximately 1.25 million people in the U.S. alone and is deadly if not managed with insulin injections. This paper describes the production of insulin

  6. In vivo Function and Membrane Binding Properties are Correlated for Escherichia coli LamB Signal Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Martha S.; Gierasch, Lila M.; Zlotnick, Adam; Lear, James D.; Degrado, William F.

    1985-05-01

    Wild-type and pseudorevertant signal peptides of the lamB gene product of Escherichia coli interact with lipid systems whereas a nonfunctional deletion mutant signal peptide does not. This conclusion is based on (i) interaction of synthetic signal peptides with a lipid monolayer-water surface, (ii) conformational changes induced by presence of lipid vesicles in an aqueous solution of signal peptide, and (iii) capacities of the peptides to promote vesicle aggregation. Analysis of the signal sequences and previous conformational studies suggest that these lipid interaction properties may be attributable to the tendency of the functional signal peptides to adopt α -helical conformations. Although the possibility of direct interaction between the signal peptide and membrane lipids during protein secretion is controversial, the results suggest that conformationally related amphiphilicity and consequent membrane affinity of signal sequences are important for function in vivo.

  7. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  8. Functional photoacoustic tomography for non-invasive imaging of cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume in rat brain in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Xie, Xueyi; Ku, Geng; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2005-04-01

    Based on the multi-wavelength laser-based photoacoustic tomography, non-invasive in vivo imaging of functional parameters, including the hemoglobin oxygen saturation and the total concentration of hemoglobin, in small-animal brains was realized. The high sensitivity of this technique is based on the spectroscopic differences between oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin while its spatial resolution is bandwidth-limited by the photoacoustic signals rather than by the optical diffusion as in optical imaging. The point-by-point distributions of blood oxygenation and blood volume in the cerebral cortical venous vessels, altered by systemic physiological modulations including hyperoxia, normoxia and hypoxia, were visualized successfully through the intact skin and skull. This technique, with its prominent intrinsic advantages, can potentially accelerate the progress in neuroscience and provide important new insights into cerebrovascular physiology and brain function that are of great significance to the neuroscience community.

  9. An ES cell system for rapid, spatial and temporal analysis of gene function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Junhao; Barrow, Jeffery; McMahon, Jill; Vaughan, Joe; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a versatile genetic system for rapid analysis of mammalian gene function. In this, loss of reporter activity in a novel embryonic stem (ES) cell line enables rapid identification of targeting to the ubiquitously expressed Rosa26 locus. Subsequent regulation of gene activity is governed by a dual regulatory strategy utilizing two drugs, Tamoxifen and Doxycycline. To illustrate this approach, a dominant allele of Smoothened was introduced into this cell line, enabling regulated activation of Hedgehog signaling. By coupling Cre-loxP dependent activation with tetracycline dependent transcription in a single allele, we established a conditional method to control Smoothened activity and neural progenitor specification in differentiating ES cells in vitro and in chimeric embryos in vivo When crossed to an appropriate Cre driver strain, gene activity can also be temporally regulated within a specific cell lineage. This platform will facilitate rapid analysis of gene function in the mouse. PMID:16221970

  10. Lipopolysaccharide enhances FcγR-dependent functions in vivo through CD11b/CD18 up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, C; Miliani De Marval, P; Vermeulen, M; Isturiz, M A; Palermo, M S

    1999-01-01

    Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcγR) mediate several defence mechanisms in the course of inflammatory and infectious diseases. In Gram-negative infections, cellular wall lipopolysaccharides (LPS) modulate different immune responses. We have recently demonstrated that murine LPS in vivo treatment significantly increases FcγR-dependent clearance of immune complexes (IC). In addition, we and others have reported the induction of adhesion molecules on macrophages and neutrophils by LPS in vivo and by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in vitro. The aim of this paper was to investigate CD11b/CD18 participation in LPS enhancing effects on Fcγ-dependent functionality of tissue macrophages. Our results have demonstrated that LPS can enhance antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and IC-triggered cytotoxicity (IC-Ctx), two reactions which involve the Fcγ-receptor but different lytic mechanisms. In vitro incubation of splenocytes from LPS-treated mice with anti-CD11b/CD18 abrogated ADCC and IC-Ctx enhancement, without affecting FcγR expression. Similar results were obtained with physiological concentrations of fibrinogen. In this way cytotoxic values of LPS-splenocytes decreased to the basal levels of control mice. Time and temperature requirements for such inhibition strongly suggested that anti-CD11b/CD18 could modulate intracellular signals leading to downregulation of FcγR functionality. Data presented herein support the hypothesis that functional and/or physical associations between integrins and FcγR could be critical for the modulation of effector functions during an inflammatory response. PMID:10447764

  11. Form and function of the corpus luteum during the human menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    BAERWALD, A. R.; ADAMS, G. P.; PIERSON, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To characterize the growth and regression of the corpus luteum (CL) during an interovulatory interval (IOI) using serial transvaginal ultrasonography. Methods Fifty healthy women of reproductive age with a history of regular menstrual cycles underwent daily transvaginal ultrasonography for one IOI. Measurements of luteal area and luteal numerical pixel value (NPV) were recorded each day after ovulation until the CL could no longer be detected. Blood was drawn every third day during the IOI to measure serum concentrations of progesterone and estradiol-17β. Results Corpora lutea were of two morphological types: those with a central fluid-filled cavity (CFFC) (78%) and those without (22%). Eighty-eight percent of women exhibited a CL containing a CFFC 2 days after ovulation, followed by 34% 13 days after ovulation and 2% 27 days after ovulation. Luteal area, progesterone concentration and estradiol concentration increased for approximately the first 6 days following ovulation followed by a subsequent decline. Luteal NPV decreased from days 1 to 11 and increased during days 11–16. Changes in luteal area, NPV, progesterone and estradiol concentrations did not differ in women with two versus three waves of follicular development. Conclusions Peak luteal function, as determined by maximum luteal area, progesterone concentration and estradiol concentration, is observed 6 days following ovulation. Luteal NPV is reflective of morphological and endocrinological changes in the CL. The development of a CFFC during luteinization is a normal physiological phenomenon. The CL can be detected, but is not functional, during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. PMID:15846762

  12. Profiling of Luteal Transcriptome during Prostaglandin F2-Alpha Treatment in Buffalo Cows: Analysis of Signaling Pathways Associated with Luteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Suganthi, Hepziba; Rudraiah, Medhamurthy

    2014-01-01

    In several species including the buffalo cow, prostaglandin (PG) F2α is the key molecule responsible for regression of corpus luteum (CL). Experiments were carried out to characterize gene expression changes in the CL tissue at various time points after administration of luteolytic dose of PGF2α in buffalo cows. Circulating progesterone levels decreased within 1 h of PGF2α treatment and evidence of apoptosis was demonstrable at 18 h post treatment. Microarray analysis indicated expression changes in several of immediate early genes and transcription factors within 3 h of treatment. Also, changes in expression of genes associated with cell to cell signaling, cytokine signaling, steroidogenesis, PG synthesis and apoptosis were observed. Analysis of various components of LH/CGR signaling in CL tissues indicated decreased LH/CGR protein expression, pCREB levels and PKA activity post PGF2α treatment. The novel finding of this study is the down regulation of CYP19A1 gene expression accompanied by decrease in expression of E2 receptors and circulating and intra luteal E2 post PGF2α treatment. Mining of microarray data revealed several differentially expressed E2 responsive genes. Since CYP19A1 gene expression is low in the bovine CL, mining of microarray data of PGF2α-treated macaques, the species with high luteal CYP19A1 expression, showed good correlation between differentially expressed E2 responsive genes between both the species. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that PGF2α interferes with luteotrophic signaling, impairs intra-luteal E2 levels and regulates various signaling pathways before the effects on structural luteolysis are manifest. PMID:25102061

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Endocervical Tissues Reveals Distinct Gene Expression in the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Arslan, Sevim; Coon, John S; Hope, Thomas J; Kim, J Julie

    2016-06-01

    The endocervix plays an important role in providing appropriate protective mechanisms of the upper female reproductive tract (FRT) while at the same time providing the appropriate milieu for sperm transport. Hormone fluctuations throughout the menstrual cycle contribute to changes in the mucosal environment that render the FRT vulnerable to infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to identify genes in human endocervix tissues that were differentially expressed in the follicular versus the luteal phases of the menstrual cycle using gene expression profiling. A microarray using the IIlumina platform was performed with eight endocervix tissues from follicular and four tissues from luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Data analysis revealed significant differential expression of 110 genes between the two phases, with a P value <0.05 and a fold change cutoff of 1.5. Categorization of these genes, using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, MetaCore from Thomson Reuters, and DAVID, revealed genes associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and cell-matrix interactions, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism, as well as immune regulation in the follicular phase tissues. In luteal phase tissues, genes associated with chromatin remodeling, inflammation, angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and immune cell regulation were predominately expressed. Using samples from additional patients' tissues, select genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR; immunohistochemical staining was also done to examine protein levels. This is the first microarray analysis comparing gene expression in endocervix tissues in cycling women. This study identified key genes and molecular pathways that were differentially regulated during the menstrual cycle. PMID:27170437

  14. Cocoa flavanols and platelet and leukocyte function: recent in vitro and ex vivo studies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Heptinstall, Stan; May, Jane; Fox, Sue; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Zhao, Lian

    2006-01-01

    There is growing interest in possible beneficial effects of specific dietary components on cardiovascular health. Platelets and leukocytes contribute to arterial thrombosis and to inflammatory processes. Previous studies performed in vitro have demonstrated inhibition of platelet function by (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin, flavan-3-ols (flavanols) that are present in several foods including some cocoas. Also, some modest inhibition of platelet function has been observed ex vivo after the consumption of flavanol-containing cocoa products by healthy adults. So far there are no reports of effects of cocoa flavanols on leukocytes. This paper summarizes 2 recent investigations. The first was a study of the effects of cocoa flavanols on platelet and leukocyte function in vitro. The second was a study of the effects of consumption of a flavanol-rich cocoa beverage by healthy adults on platelet and leukocyte function ex vivo. Measurements were made of platelet aggregation, platelet-monocyte conjugate formation (P/M), platelet-neutrophil conjugate formation (P/N), platelet activation (CD62P on monocytes and neutrophils), and leukocyte activation (CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils) in response to collagen and/or arachidonic acid. In the in vitro study several cocoa flavanols and their metabolites were shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, P/M, P/N, and platelet activation. Their effects were similar to those of aspirin and the effects of a cocoa flavanol and aspirin did not seem to be additive. There was also inhibition of monocyte and neutrophil activation by flavanols, but this was not replicated by aspirin. 4'-O-methyl-epicatechin, 1 of the known metabolites of the cocoa flavanol (-)-epicatechin, was consistently effective as an inhibitor of platelet and leukocyte activation. The consumption of a flavanol-rich cocoa beverage also resulted in significant inhibition of platelet aggregation, P/M and P/N, and platelet activation induced by collagen. The inhibitory effects

  15. The functional basis of c-myc and bcl-2 complementation during multistep lymphomagenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marin, M C; Hsu, B; Stephens, L C; Brisbay, S; McDonnell, T J

    1995-04-01

    Oncogenes are known to be deregulated by chromosomal translocations occurring at high frequency in specific malignancies. Among the most well characterized of these are c-myc, associated with the t(8;14) in Burkitt's lymphomas, and bcl-2, associated with the t(14;18) in follicular lymphomas. In addition to their role in regulating rates of proliferation, it is known that oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can also regulate rates of apoptotic cell death. The contribution of c-myc and bcl-2 to the regulation of cell death during lymphomagenesis in vivo is assessed using bcl-2-Ig and emu-myc trangenic mice and bcl-2/myc hybrid transgenic mice. Translocations between the endogenous c-myc gene and immunoglobulin loci, e.g., t(12;15), are common in lymphomas arising in the bcl-2-Ig mice. Furthermore, bcl-2/c-myc double transgenic mice exhibit accelerated lymphomagenesis, indicating cooperation between these two oncogenes. Genetic complementation of c-myc and bcl-2 during lymphomagenesis resulted from the suppression of c-myc-associated apoptosis. Other genes are likely involved in regulating cell death during multistep lymphomagenesis. PMID:7698223

  16. A conserved docking site modulates substrate affinity for calcineurin, signaling output, and in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jagoree; Li, Huiming; Hogan, Patrick G; Cyert, Martha S

    2007-03-23

    Calcineurin, the conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphatase, mediates diverse aspects of Ca(2+)-dependent signaling. We show that substrates bind calcineurin with varying strengths and examine the impact of this affinity on signaling. We altered the calcineurin-docking site, or PxIxIT motif, in Crz1, the calcineurin-regulated transcription factor in S. cerevisiae, to decrease (Crz1(PVIAVN)) or increase (Crz1(PVIVIT)) its affinity for calcineurin. As a result, the Ca(2+)-dependent dephosphorylation and activation of Crz1(PVIAVN) are decreased, whereas Crz1(PVIVIT) is constitutively dephosphorylated and hyperactive. Surprisingly, the physiological consequences of altering calcineurin-Crz1 affinity depend on the growth conditions. Crz1(PVIVIT) improves yeast growth under several environmental stress conditions but causes a growth defect during alkaline stress, most likely by titrating calcineurin away from other substrates or regulators. Thus, calcineurin-substrate affinity determines the Ca(2+) concentration dependence and output of signaling in vivo as well as the balance between different branches of calcineurin signaling in an overall biological response. PMID:17386265

  17. Ex vivo generation of functional immune cells by mitochondria-targeted photosensitization of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marrache, Sean; Tundup, Smanla; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the immune system for potent immune therapy against cancer is potentially a revolutionary method to eradicate cancer. Tumors stimulated with photosensitizers (PSs) not only kill cancer cells but also help to boost the immune system. We recently reported that tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generated by delivery of a mitochondria-acting PS zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to MCF-7 breast cancer cells followed by laser irradiation can lead to ex vivo stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). The antigens generated from the breast cancer cells were also found to cause significant DC maturation and the activated DCs were able to stimulate T cells to cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. In this protocol, we describe methods to engineer a mitochondria-targeted biodegradable nanoparticle (NP) formulation, T-ZnPc-NPs for delivery of ZnPc to the mitochondria of MCF-7 cells, subsequent photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a long wavelength laser irradiation to produce TAAs, DC stimulation by the TAAs to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and matured DC-driven T-cell activation. PMID:25634271

  18. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of μa and μs' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that μa ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and μs' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  19. In vivo human knee joint dynamic properties as functions of muscle contraction and joint position.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Nuber, G; Butler, J; Bowen, M; Rymer, W Z

    1998-01-01

    Information on the dynamic properties (joint stiffness, viscosity and limb inertia) of the human knee joint is scarce in the literature, especially for actively contracting knee musculature. A joint driving device was developed to apply small-amplitude random perturbations to the human knee at several flexion angles with the subject maintaining various levels of muscle contraction. It was found that joint stiffness and viscosity increased with muscle contraction substantially, while limb inertia was constant. Stiffness produced by the quadriceps was highest at 30 degrees flexion and decreased with increasing or decreasing flexion angle, while knee flexors produced highest stiffness at 90 degree flexion. When knee flexion was < 60 degrees, stiffness produced by the quadriceps was higher than that of the hamstrings and gastrocnemius at the same level of background muscle torque, while knee flexor muscles produced higher stiffnesses than the quadriceps at 90 degree flexion. Similar but less obvious trends were observed for joint viscosity. Passive joint stiffness at full knee extension was significantly higher than in more flexed positions. Surprisingly, as the knee joint musculature changed from relaxed to contracting at 50% MVC, system damping ratio remained at about 0.2. This outcome potentially simplifies neuromuscular control of the knee joint. In contrast, the natural undamped frequency increased more than twofold, potentially making the knee joint respond more quickly to the central nervous system commands. The approach described here provides us with a potentially valuable tool to quantify in vivo dynamic properties of normal and pathological human knee joints. PMID:9596540

  20. Pharmacokinetic and toxicological evaluation of multi-functional thiol-6-fluoro-6-deoxy-d-glucose gold nanoparticles in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Wilson; Xiong, Yeping; Chen, Jie; Yang, Xiaoyan; Song, Kun; Yang, Xiaohong; Kong, Beihua; Wilson, John; Xing, James Z.

    2012-09-01

    We synthesized a novel, multi-functional, radiosensitizing agent by covalently linking 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-d-glucose (6-FDG) to gold nanoparticles (6-FDG-GNPs) via a thiol functional group. We then assessed the bio-distribution and pharmacokinetic properties of 6-FDG-GNPs in vivo using a murine model. At 2 h, following intravenous injection of 6-FDG-GNPs into the murine model, approximately 30% of the 6-FDG-GNPs were distributed to three major organs: the liver, the spleen and the kidney. PEGylation of the 6-FDG-GNPs was found to significantly improve the bio-distribution of 6-FDG-GNPs by avoiding unintentional uptake into these organs, while simultaneously doubling the cellular uptake of GNPs in implanted breast MCF-7 adenocarcinoma. When combined with radiation, PEG-6-FDG-GNPs were found to increase the apoptosis of the MCF-7 breast adenocarinoma cells by radiation both in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that GNPs reach their maximal concentrations at a time window of two to four hours post-injection, during which optimal radiation efficiency can be achieved. PEG-6-FDG-GNPs are thus novel nanoparticles that preferentially accumulate in targeted cancer cells where they act as potent radiosensitizing agents. Future research will aim to substitute the 18F atom into the 6-FDG molecule so that the PEG-6-FDG-GNPs can also function as radiotracers for use in positron emission tomography scanning to aid cancer diagnosis and image guided radiation therapy planning.

  1. Structure-function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    SciTech Connect

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-09-27

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins.

  2. In vivo relationship between pelvis motion and deep fascia displacement of the medial gastrocnemius: anatomical and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos; González Blanche, Alberto; López Sánchez, David; Cerda, Mauricio; Sanzana-Cuche, Rodolfo; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Different authors have modelled myofascial tissue connectivity over a distance using cadaveric models, but in vivo models are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pelvic motion and deep fascia displacement in the medial gastrocnemius (MG). Deep fascia displacement of the MG was evaluated through automatic tracking with an ultrasound. Angular variation of the pelvis was determined by 2D kinematic analysis. The average maximum fascia displacement and pelvic motion were 1.501 ± 0.78 mm and 6.55 ± 2.47 °, respectively. The result of a simple linear regression between fascia displacement and pelvic motion for three task executions by 17 individuals was r = 0.791 (P < 0.001). Moreover, hamstring flexibility was related to a lower anterior tilt of the pelvis (r = 0.544, P < 0.024) and a lower deep fascia displacement of the MG (r = 0.449, P < 0.042). These results support the concept of myofascial tissue connectivity over a distance in an in vivo model, reinforce the functional concept of force transmission through synergistic muscle groups, and grant new perspectives for the role of fasciae in restricting movement in remote zones. PMID:26467242

  3. Cathelicidins Have Direct Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus In Vitro and Protective Function In Vivo in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Silke M.; Gwyer Findlay, Emily; McFarlane, Amanda J.; Fitch, Paul M.; Böttcher, Bettina; Colegrave, Nick; Paras, Allan; Jozwik, Agnieszka; Chiu, Christopher; Schwarze, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of respiratory tract infection in infants, causing significant morbidity and mortality. No vaccine or specific, effective treatment is currently available. A more complete understanding of the key components of effective host response to RSV and novel preventative and therapeutic interventions are urgently required. Cathelicidins are host defense peptides, expressed in the inflamed lung, with key microbicidal and modulatory roles in innate host defense against infection. In this article, we demonstrate that the human cathelicidin LL-37 mediates an antiviral effect on RSV by inducing direct damage to the viral envelope, disrupting viral particles and decreasing virus binding to, and infection of, human epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, exogenously applied LL-37 is protective against RSV-mediated disease in vivo, in a murine model of pulmonary RSV infection, demonstrating maximal efficacy when applied concomitantly with virus. Furthermore, endogenous murine cathelicidin, induced by infection, has a fundamental role in protection against disease in vivo postinfection with RSV. Finally, higher nasal levels of LL-37 are associated with protection in a healthy human adult RSV infection model. These data lead us to propose that cathelicidins are a key, nonredundant component of host defense against pulmonary infection with RSV, functioning as a first point of contact antiviral shield and having additional later-phase roles in minimizing the severity of disease outcome. Consequently, cathelicidins represent an inducible target for preventative strategies against RSV infection and may inform the design of novel therapeutic analogs for use in established infection. PMID:26873992

  4. pH-responsive drug release from functionalized electrospun poly(caprolactone) scaffolds under simulated in vivo environment.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Manisha; Boominathan, Vijay P; Ferreira, Tracie; Sengupta, Sukalyan; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2016-09-01

    The difference in the tumor environment from the normal healthy tissue can be therapeutically exploited to develop new strategies for controlled and site-specific drug delivery. In the present study, a continuous flow system is designed to represent the in vivo environment of a tumor tissue and drug release is studied at different pH that represents normal tissue pH, tumor tissue pH, and stomach pH. The results obtained from these experiments were translated to a human embryonic kidney cell culture system and the effect of drug released from these functionalized PCL scaffolds on cell viability was studied. A significant decrease in cell viability was observed with the doxorubicin hydrochloride concentration that would be released at acidic pH, either present as a result of tumor extracellular environment or could be achieved via fabrication of a composite scaffold with a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel containing acid. In the end, a study using zebrafish as an animal model is also undertaken in order to study the drug release from the scaffolds in vivo. PMID:27316576

  5. Optimization of a Model Corrected Blood Input Function from Dynamic FDG-PET Images of Small Animal Heart In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K

    2013-10-01

    Quantitative evaluation of dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of mouse heart in vivo is challenging due to the small size of the heart and limited intrinsic spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Here, we optimized a compartment model which can simultaneously correct for spill over and partial volume effects for both blood pool and the myocardium, compute kinetic rate parameters and generate model corrected blood input function (MCBIF) from ordered subset expectation maximization - maximum a posteriori (OSEM-MAP) cardiac and respiratory gated (18)F-FDG PET images of mouse heart with attenuation correction in vivo, without any invasive blood sampling. Arterial blood samples were collected from a single mouse to indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. In order to establish statistical significance, venous blood samples from n=6 mice were obtained at 2 late time points, when SP contamination from the tissue to the blood is maximum. We observed that correct bounds and initial guesses for the PV and SP coefficients accurately model the wash-in and wash-out dynamics of the tracer from mouse blood. The residual plot indicated an average difference of about 1.7% between the blood samples and MCBIF. The downstream rate of myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki (0.15±0.03 min(-1)), compared well with Ki obtained from arterial blood samples (P=0.716). In conclusion, the proposed methodology is not only quantitative but also reproducible. PMID:24741130

  6. In Vivo Characterization of Traumatic Brain Injury Neuropathology with Structural and Functional Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    LEVINE, BRIAN; FUJIWARA, ESTHER; O’CONNOR, CHARLENE; RICHARD, NADINE; KOVACEVIC, NATASA; MANDIC, MARINA; RESTAGNO, ADRIANA; EASDON, CRAIG; ROBERTSON, IAN H.; GRAHAM, SIMON J.; CHEUNG, GORDON; GAO, FUQIANG; SCHWARTZ, MICHAEL L.; BLACK, SANDRA E.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative neuroimaging is increasingly used to study the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on brain structure and function. This paper reviews quantitative structural and functional neuroimaging studies of patients with TBI, with an emphasis on the effects of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), the primary neuropathology in TBI. Quantitative structural neuroimaging has evolved from simple planometric measurements through targeted region-of-interest analyses to whole-brain analysis of quantified tissue compartments. Recent studies converge to indicate widespread volume loss of both gray and white matter in patients with moderate-to-severe TBI. These changes can be documented even when patients with focal lesions are excluded. Broadly speaking, performance on standard neuropsychological tests of speeded information processing are related to these changes, but demonstration of specific brain-behavior relationships requires more refined experimental behavioral measures. The functional consequences of these structural changes can be imaged with activation functional neuroimaging. Although this line of research is at an early stage, results indicate that TBI causes a more widely dispersed activation in frontal and posterior cortices. Further progress in analysis of the consequences of TBI on neural structure and function will require control of variability in neuropathology and behavior. PMID:17020478

  7. Mouse and zebrafish Hoxa3 orthologues have nonequivalent in vivo protein function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lizhen; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance; Amemiya, Chris T.; Condie, Brian G.; Manley, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    Hox genes play evolutionarily conserved roles in specifying axial position during embryogenesis. A prevailing paradigm is that changes in Hox gene expression drive evolution of metazoan body plans. Conservation of Hox function across species, and among paralogous Hox genes within a species, supports a model of functional equivalence. In this report, we demonstrate that zebrafish hoxa3a (zfhoxa3a) expressed from the mouse Hoxa3 locus can substitute for mouse Hoxa3 in some tissues, but has distinct or null phenotypes in others. We further show, by using an allele encoding a chimeric protein, that this difference maps primarily to the zfhoxa3a C-terminal domain. Our data imply that the mouse and zebrafish proteins have diverged considerably since their last common ancestor, and that the major difference between them resides in the C-terminal domain. Our data further show that Hox protein function can evolve independently in different cell types or for specific functions. The inability of zfhoxa3a to perform all of the normal roles of mouse Hoxa3 illustrates that Hox orthologues are not always functionally interchangeable. PMID:20498049

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Ferrocyanide Functionalized Nanopourous Silica Decorporation Agent for Cesium in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO2). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation, and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium (137Cs); based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Group I was administered 137Cs (~40 μgeq/kg) by intravenous (iv) injection and oral gavage; Group II was administered pre-bound 137Cs-SAMMS and sequential 137Cs + SAMMS (~61 ngeq/kg) by oral gavage; and Group III evaluated orally administered 137Cs (~0.06 μgeq/kg) followed by 0.1 g of either SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 hour and blood, urine and fecal samples were collected for 137Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered 137Cs was rapidly and well absorbed (~100% relative to iv dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces & tissues) were very comparable to the iv dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound 137Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with ~1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the 137Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS & Prussian blue both effectively captured available 137Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS out performs Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at

  9. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment. PMID:27086034

  10. Lack of CAR impacts neuronal function and cerebrovascular integrity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boussadia, Baddreddine; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Rousset, Marie-Claude; de Bock, Frederic; Lassere, Frederic; Ghosh, Chaitali; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Janigro, Damir; Marchi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a group of transcription factors emerging as players in normal and pathological CNS development. Clinically, an association between the constitutive androstane NR (CAR) and cognitive impairment was proposed, however never experimentally investigated. We wished to test the hypothesis that the impact of CAR on neurophysiology and behavior is underlined by cerebrovascular-neuronal modifications. We have used CAR(-/-) C57BL/6 and wild type mice and performed a battery of behavioral tests (recognition, memory, motor coordination, learning and anxiety) as well as longitudinal video-electroencephalographic recordings (EEG). Brain cell morphology was assessed using 2-photon or electron microscopy and fluorescent immunohistochemistry. We observed recognition memory impairment and increased anxiety-like behavior in CAR(-/-) mice, while locomotor activity was not affected. Concomitantly to memory deficits, EEG monitoring revealed a decrease in 3.5-7Hz waves during the awake/exploration and sleep periods. Behavioral and EEG abnormalities in CAR(-/-) mice mirrored structural changes, including tortuous fronto-parietal penetrating vessels. At the cellular level we found reduced ZO-1, but not CLDN5, tight junction protein expression in cortical and hippocampal isolated microvessel preparations. Interestingly, the neurotoxin kainic acid, when injected peripherally, provoked a rapid onset of generalized convulsions in CAR(-/-) as compared to WT mice, supporting the hypothesis of vascular permeability. The morphological phenotype of CAR(-/-) mice also included some modifications of GFAP/IBA1 glial cells in the parenchymal or adjacent to collagen-IV(+) or FITC(+) microvessels. Neuronal defects were also observed including increased cortical NEUN(+) cell density, hippocampal granule cell dispersion and increased NPY immunoreactivity in the CA1 region in CAR(-/-) mice. The latter may contribute to the in vivo phenotype. Our results indicate that behavioral

  11. In vivo stem cell function of interleukin-3-induced blast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, J.; Okada, S.; Suda, J.; Nagayoshi, K.; Nakauchi, H.; Hatake, K.; Miura, Y.; Suda, T. )

    1991-07-15

    The treatment of mice with high doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) results in an enrichment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors. Using this procedure, the authors obtained a new class of murine hematopoietic colonies that had very high secondary plating efficiencies in vitro and could differentiate into not only myeloid cells but also into lymphoid lineage cells. The phenotypes of interleukin-3 (IL-3) induced blast colony cells were Thy-1-positive and lineage-marker-negative. They examined whether these blast colony cells contained primitive hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and could reconstitute hematopoietic tissues in lethally irradiated mice. Blast colony cells could generate macroscopic visible spleen colonies on days 8 and 12, and 5 {times} 10(3) blast cells were sufficient to protect them from lethally irradiation. It was shown that 6 or 8 weeks after transplantation of 5 {times} 10(3) blast cells, donor male cells were detected in the spleen and thymus of the female recipients but not in the bone marrow by Southern blot analysis using Y-encoded DNA probe. After 10 weeks, bone marrow cells were partially repopulated from donor cells. In a congenic mouse system, donor-derived cells (Ly5.2) were detected in the thymus and spleen 6 weeks after transplantation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses showed that B cells and macrophages developed from donor cells in the spleen. In the thymus, donor-derived cells were found in CD4, CD8 double-positive, single-positive, and double-negative populations. Reconstitution of bone marrow was delayed and myeloid and lymphoid cells were detected 10 weeks after transplantation. These results indicate that IL-3-induced blast cells contain the primitive hematopoietic stem cells capable of reconstituting hematopoietic organs in lethally irradiated mice.

  12. Functional role of gap junctions in cytokine-induced leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Véliz, Loreto P; González, Francisco G; Duling, Brian R; Sáez, Juan C; Boric, Mauricio P

    2008-09-01

    To assess the hypothesis that gap junctions (GJs) participate on leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the inflammatory response, we compared leukocyte adhesion and transmigration elicited by cytokine stimulation in the presence or absence of GJ blockers in the hamster cheek pouch and also in the cremaster muscle of wild-type (WT) and endothelium-specific connexin 43 (Cx43) null mice (Cx43e(-/-)). In the cheek pouch, topical tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 150 ng/ml, 15 min) caused a sustained increment in the number of leukocytes adhered to venular endothelium (LAV) and located at perivenular regions (LPV). Superfusion with the GJ blockers 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA; 75 microM) or 18-beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (50 microM) abolished the TNF-alpha-induced increase in LAV and LPV; carbenoxolone (75 microM) or oleamide (100 microM) reduced LAV by 50 and 75%, respectively, and LPV to a lesser extent. None of these GJ blockers modified venular diameter, blood flow, or leukocyte rolling. In contrast, glycyrrhizin (75 microM), a non-GJ blocker analog of AGA, was devoid of effect. Interestingly, when AGA was removed 90 min after TNF-alpha stimulation, LAV started to rise at a similar rate as in control. Conversely, application of AGA 90 min after TNF-alpha reduced the number of previously adhered cells. In WT mice, intrascrotal injection of TNF-alpha (0.5 microg/0.3 ml) increased LAV (fourfold) and LPV (threefold) compared with saline-injected controls. In contrast to the observations in WT animals, TNF-alpha stimulation did not increase LAV or LPV in Cx43e(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate an important role for GJ communication in leukocyte adhesion and transmigration during acute inflammation in vivo and further suggest that endothelial Cx43 is key in these processes. PMID:18599597

  13. The biological functions of miRNAs: lessons from in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Vidigal, Joana A.; Ventura, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Despite their clear importance as a class of regulatory molecules, pinpointing the relevance of individual miRNAs has been challenging. Studies querying miRNA functions by overexpressing or silencing specific miRNAs have yielded data that are often at odds with those collected from loss-of-functions models. In addition, knockout studies suggest that many conserved miRNAs are dispensable for animal development or viability. In this review we discuss these observations in the context of our current knowledge of miRNA biology and review the evidence implicating miRNA-mediated gene regulation in the mechanisms that ensure biological robustness. PMID:25484347

  14. Proliferation of Functional Hair Cells in Vivo in the Absence of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Cyrille; Huang, Mingqian; Karimi, Kambiz; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Hinds, Philip W.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.; Corey, David P.; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2005-02-01

    In mammals, hair cell loss causes irreversible hearing and balance impairment because hair cells are terminally differentiated and do not regenerate spontaneously. By profiling gene expression in developing mouse vestibular organs, we identified the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) as a candidate regulator of cell cycle exit in hair cells. Differentiated and functional mouse hair cells with a targeted deletion of Rb1 undergo mitosis, divide, and cycle, yet continue to become highly differentiated and functional. Moreover, acute loss of Rb1 in postnatal hair cells caused cell cycle reentry. Manipulation of the pRb pathway may ultimately lead to mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  15. The biological functions of miRNAs: lessons from in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, Joana A; Ventura, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Despite their clear importance as a class of regulatory molecules, pinpointing the relevance of individual miRNAs has been challenging. Studies querying miRNA functions by overexpressing or silencing specific miRNAs have yielded data that are often at odds with those collected from loss-of-functions models. In addition, knockout studies suggest that many conserved miRNAs are dispensable for animal development or viability. In this review, we discuss these observations in the context of our current knowledge of miRNA biology and review the evidence implicating miRNA-mediated gene regulation in the mechanisms that ensure biological robustness. PMID:25484347

  16. Follicular characteristics and luteal development after follicle-stimulating hormone induced multiple ovulations in heifers.

    PubMed

    Glick, G; Hogeg, M; Moallem, U; Lavon, Y; Wolfenson, D

    2013-01-01

    A protocol based on small doses of FSH was examined for the induction of double or triple (multiple) ovulations in cattle. Ovulation rate, follicular characteristics, and luteal responses were determined. In Exp. 1, three groups of estrous-synchronized, cyclic Holstein heifers were treated once daily, on d 3 to 6 of the cycle, with a FSH product (Folltropin-V): large FSH dose (total of 150 mg; n=18), medium FSH dose (total of 130 mg, n=12), and small FSH dose (total of 80 mg; n=7). Controls received saline (n=6). Prostaglandin F(2α) was injected on d 6, ultrasound-guided aspiration of surplus follicles (if needed) was performed on d 7, and GnRH was injected on d 8 to induce ovulation. The large FSH dose induced growth of more (2.6±0.3, P<0.05) large follicles than controls on d 8; medium and small FSH doses insufficiently stimulated growth of <2 large follicles. Ovulation rates were determined in subgroups of heifers (n=10, 13, 4, and 6, respectively). The large FSH dose induced greater rates (P<0.01) of mostly double and triple ovulations (90% multiple ovulations, 70% double ovulations), most of which (89%) were bilateral, with only 2 out of 10 heifers requiring aspiration of surplus follicles. Medium and small FSH doses induced fewer multiple ovulations (38% and 25%, respectively). Estradiol concentrations on d 8 did not differ among treatments, but the concentration per large follicle in controls was greater (P<0.05) than in FSH treatments. Mean corpus luteum (CL) volume in single-ovulation controls was greater (P<0.05) than that of multiple ovulations in the large FSH group and total CL volume and progesterone concentrations were numerically greater in multiple ovulations. In Exp. 2, the characteristics of follicles aspirated on d 7 from large FSH (n=11) and control heifers (n=10) were compared. Based on estradiol-to-progesterone ratio, 57% of the large FSH-treated follicles were classified as codominant/healthy follicles and 43% as subordinate/early atretic

  17. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  18. IN VITRO/IN VIVO COMPARISON OF YOLK SAC FUNCTION AND EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yolk sac function and development of rat embryos grown in vitro for 24 hrs starting on day 10.5 were compared to those of embryos grown in utero. he embryos grown in vitro had significantly fewer somites, shorter crown-rump length and smaller yolk sac diameter when compared to th...

  19. Heparin inhibition of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, M; McNeill, P M; Carlson, P L; Kermode, J C; Adelman, B; Conroy, R; Marques, D

    1991-01-01

    The intravenous administration of heparin to patients before open heart surgery reduced ristocetin cofactor activity by 58% (P less than 0.01, t test), and this impairment of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function was closely related to plasma heparin levels (r2 = 0.9), but not to plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We hypothesized that heparin may inhibit vWF-dependent platelet hemostatic functions by directly binding vWF in solution and interfering with vWF-GpIb binding. Using the in vitro techniques of ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, fluorescent flow cytometric measurement of vWF-platelet binding, and conventional radioligand binding assays we observed that heparin inhibited both vWF-dependent platelet function and vWF-platelet binding in a parallel and dose-dependent manner. Heparin also inhibited platelet agglutination induced by bovine vWF and inhibited the binding of human asialo-vWF to platelets in ristocetin-free systems. The inhibitory potency of heparin was not dependent upon its affinity for antithrombin III, but was molecular weight dependent: homogeneous preparations of lower molecular weight were less inhibitory. Heparin impairment of vWF function may explain why some hemorrhagic complications of heparin therapy are not predictable based on techniques for monitoring the conventional anticoagulant effects of heparin. PMID:2022745

  20. Effects of intraluteal implants of prostaglandin E1 or E2 on angiogenic growth factors in luteal tissue of Angus and Brahman cows.

    PubMed

    Weems, Yoshie S; Ma, Yan; Ford, Stephen P; Nett, Terry M; Vann, Rhonda C; Lewis, Andrew W; Neuendorff, Don A; Welsh, Thomas H; Randel, Ronald D; Weems, Charles W

    2014-12-01

    Previously, it was reported that intraluteal implants containing prostaglandin E1 or E2 (PGE1 and PGE2) in Angus or Brahman cows prevented luteolysis by preventing loss of mRNA expression for luteal LH receptors and luteal unoccupied and occupied LH receptors. In addition, intraluteal implants containing PGE1 or PGE2 upregulated mRNA expression for FP prostanoid receptors and downregulated mRNA expression for EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors. Luteal weight during the estrous cycle of Brahman cows was reported to be lesser than that of Angus cows but not during pregnancy. The objective of this experiment was to determine whether intraluteal implants containing PGE1 or PGE2 alter vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1), and angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) protein in Brahman or Angus cows. On Day 13 of the estrous cycle, Angus cows received no intraluteal implant and corpora lutea were retrieved, or Angus and Brahman cows received intraluteal silastic implants containing vehicle, PGE1, or PGE2 on Day 13 and corpora lutea were retrieved on Day 19. Corpora lutea slices were analyzed for VEGF, FGF-2, ANG-1, and ANG-2 angiogenic proteins via Western blot. Day-13 Angus cow luteal tissue served as preluteolytic controls. Data for VEGF were not affected (P > 0.05) by day, breed, or treatment. PGE1 or PGE2 increased (P < 0.05) FGF-2 in luteal tissue of Angus cows compared with Day-13 and Day-19 Angus controls but decreased (P < 0.05) FGF-2 in luteal tissue of Brahman cows when compared w Day-13 or Day-19 Angus controls. There was no effect (P > 0.05) of PGE1 or PGE2 on ANG-1 in Angus luteal tissue when compared with Day-13 or Day-19 controls, but ANG-1 was decreased (P < 0.05) by PGE1 or PGE2 in Brahman cows when compared with Day-19 Brahman controls. ANG-2 was increased (P < 0.05) on Day 19 in Angus Vehicle controls when compared with Day-13 Angus controls, which was prevented (P < 0.05) by PGE1 but not by PGE2 in Angus

  1. Synthesis, in vitro, and in vivo evaluation of novel functionalized quaternary ammonium curcuminoids as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Solano, Lucas N; Nelson, Grady L; Ronayne, Conor T; Lueth, Erica A; Foxley, Melissa A; Jonnalagadda, Sravan K; Gurrapu, Shirisha; Mereddy, Venkatram R

    2015-12-15

    Novel functionalized quaternary ammonium curcuminoids have been synthesized from piperazinyl curcuminoids and Baylis-Hillman reaction derived allyl bromides. These molecules are found to be highly water soluble with increased cytotoxicity compared to native curcumin against three cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2, MDA-MB-231, and 4T1. Preliminary in vivo toxicity evaluation of a representative curcuminoid 5a in healthy mice indicates that this molecule is well tolerated based on normal body weight gains compared to control group. Furthermore, the efficacy of 5a has been tested in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model of MIAPaCa-2 and has been found to exhibit good tumor growth inhibition as a single agent and also in combination with clinical pancreatic cancer drug gemcitabine. PMID:26561365

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of Mind Reading and In Vivo Rehearsal for High-Functioning Children with ASD.

    PubMed

    Thomeer, Marcus L; Smith, Rachael A; Lopata, Christopher; Volker, Martin A; Lipinski, Alanna M; Rodgers, Jonathan D; McDonald, Christin A; Lee, Gloria K

    2015-07-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a computer software (i.e., Mind Reading) and in vivo rehearsal treatment on the emotion decoding and encoding skills, autism symptoms, and social skills of 43 children, ages 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). Children in treatment (n = 22) received the manualized protocol over 12 weeks. Primary analyses indicated significantly better posttest performance for the treatment group (compared to controls) on 3 of the 4 measures of emotion decoding and encoding and these were maintained at 5-week follow-up. Analyses of secondary measures favored the treatment group for 1 of the 2 measures; specifically, ASD symptoms were significantly lower at posttest and follow-up. PMID:25643864

  3. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bric, Anka; Miething, Cornelius; Bialucha, Carl Uli; Scuoppo, Claudio; Zender, Lars; Krasnitz, Alexander; Xuan, Zhenyu; Zuber, Johannes; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; McCombie, Richard W.; Hemann, Michael T.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor suppressor gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a well-characterized mouse lymphoma model, we identified over ten candidate tumor suppressors, including Sfrp1, Numb, Mek1, and Angiopoietin 2. Several components of the DNA damage response machinery were also identified, including Rad17, which acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that responds to oncogenic stress and whose loss is associated with poor prognosis in human patients. Our results emphasize the utility of in vivo RNAi screens, identify and validate a diverse set of tumor suppressors, and have therapeutic implications. PMID:19800577

  4. DNAM-1-based chimeric antigen receptors enhance T cell effector function and exhibit in vivo efficacy against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; Alcon, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies hold great potential for treating cancers, and new CARs that can target multiple tumor types and have the potential to target non-hematological malignancies are needed. In this study, the tumor recognition ability of a natural killer cell-activating receptor, DNAM-1 was harnessed to design CARs that target multiple tumor types. DNAM-1 ligands, PVR and nectin-2, are expressed on primary human leukemia, myeloma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. DNAM-1 CARs exhibit high tumor cell cytotoxicity but low IFN-γ secretion in vitro. In contrast to other CAR designs, co-stimulatory domains did not improve the expression and function of DNAM-1 CARs. A DNAM-1/CD3zeta CAR reduced tumor burden in a murine melanoma model in vivo. In conclusion, DNAM-1-based CARs may have the potential to treat PVR and nectin-2 expressing hematological and solid tumors. PMID:25549845

  5. Facile Peptides Functionalization of Lanthanide-Based Nanocrystals through Phosphorylation Tethering for Efficient in Vivo NIR-to-NIR Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chi; Wang, Peiyuan; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Lei; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Lu, Yiqing; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Peptide modification of nanoparticles is a challenging task for bioapplications. Here, we show that noncovalent surface engineering based on ligand exchange of peptides for lanthanide based upconversion and downconversion near-infrared (NIR) luminescent nanoparticles can be efficiently realized by modifying the hydroxyl functional group of a side grafted serine of peptides into a phosphate group (phosphorylation). By using the phosphorylated peptide with the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) targeting motifs as typical examples, the modification allows improving the selectivity, sensitivity, and signal-to-noise ratio for the cancer targeting and bioimaging and reducing the toxicity derived from nonspecific interactions of nanoparticles with cells. The in vivo NIR bioimaging signal could even be detected at low injection amounts down to 20 μg per animal. PMID:26750555

  6. Detection of low-amplitude in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; T'so, Dan; Pattichis, Marios; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Abramoff, Michael; Soliz, Peter

    2006-02-01

    In the early stages of some retinal diseases, such as glaucoma, loss of retinal activity may be difficult to detect with today's clinical instruments. Many of today's instruments focus on detecting changes in anatomical structures, such as the nerve fiber layer. Our device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. The functional imager uses a patterned stimulus at wavelength of 535nm. An intrinsic functional signal is collected at a near infrared wavelength. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by imaging system noise. In this paper, we analyze the video sequences from a set of 60 experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats. Using a set of statistical techniques known as Independent Component Analysis (ICA), we estimate the signals present in the videos. Through controlled simulation experiments, we quantify the limits of signal strength in order to detect the physiological signal of interest. The results of the analysis show that, in principle, signal levels of 0.1% (-30dB) can be detected. The study found that in 86% of the animal experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted. The analysis of the different responses extracted from the videos can give an insight of the functional processes present during the stimulation of the retina.

  7. Blockade of CTLA-4 on CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells abrogates their function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Read, Simon; Greenwald, Rebecca; Izcue, Ana; Robinson, Nicholas; Mandelbrot, Didier; Francisco, Loise; Sharpe, Arlene H; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-10-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells (T(R)) that express CD25 and the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in immune homeostasis, preventing immune pathological responses to self and foreign Ags. CTLA-4 is expressed by a high percentage of these cells, and is often considered as a marker for T(R) in experimental and clinical analysis. However, it has not yet been proven that CTLA-4 has a direct role in T(R) function. In this study, using a T cell-mediated colitis model, we demonstrate that anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment inhibits T(R) function in vivo via direct effects on CTLA-4-expressing T(R), and not via hyperactivation of colitogenic effector T cells. Although anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment completely inhibits T(R) function, it does not reduce T(R) numbers or their homing to the GALT, suggesting the Ab mediates its function by blockade of a signal required for T(R) activity. In contrast to the striking effect of the Ab, CTLA-4-deficient mice can produce functional T(R), suggesting that under some circumstances other immune regulatory mechanisms, including the production of IL-10, are able to compensate for the loss of the CTLA-4-mediated pathway. This study provides direct evidence that CTLA-4 has a specific, nonredundant role in the function of normal T(R). This role has to be taken into account when targeting CTLA-4 for therapeutic purposes, as such a strategy will not only boost effector T cell responses, but might also break T(R)-mediated self-tolerance. PMID:16982872

  8. Assessing structural and functional responses of murine hearts to acute and sustained β-adrenergic stimulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Sarah-Lena; Weeks, Kate L.; Ranieri, Antonella; Avkiran, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Given the importance of β-adrenoceptor signalling in regulating cardiac structure and function, robust protocols are required to assess potential alterations in such regulation in murine models in vivo. Methods Echocardiography was performed in naïve and stressed (isoprenaline; 30 μg/g/day s.c. for up to 14 days) mice, in the absence or presence of acute β-adrenergic stimulation (dobutamine 0.75 μg/g, i.p.). Controls received saline infusion and/or injection. Hearts were additionally analysed gravimetrically, histologically and biochemically. Results In naïve mice, acute β-adrenoceptor stimulation with dobutamine increased heart rate, left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening (LVFS), ejection fraction (LVEF) and wall thickness and decreased LV diameter (p < 0.05). In stressed mice, dobutamine failed to induce further inotropic and chronotropic responses. Furthermore, following dobutamine injection, these mice exhibited lower LVEF and LVFS at identical heart rates, relative to corresponding controls. Sustained isoprenaline infusion induced LV hypertrophy (increased heart weight, heart weight/body weight ratio, heart weight/tibia length ratio and LV wall thickness (p < 0.05)) by 3 days, with little further change at 14 days. In contrast, increases in LVEF and LVFS were seen only at 14 days (p < 0.05). Discussion We describe protocols for and illustrative data from the assessment of murine cardiac responses to acute and sustained β-adrenergic stimulation in vivo, which would be of value in determining the impact of genetic or pharmacological interventions on such responses. Additionally, our data indicate that acute dobutamine stimulation unmasks early signs of LV dysfunction in the remodelled heart, even at a stage when basal function is enhanced. PMID:26836145

  9. HIV Type 1 Infection Up-Regulates TLR2 and TLR4 Expression and Function in Vivo and in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Juan C.; Stevenson, Mario; Latz, Eicke

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in innate immunity against pathogens. Their stimulation induces the activation of NF-κB, an important inducer of HIV-1 replication. In recent years, an increasing number of studies using several cells types from HIV-infected patients indicate that TLRs play a key role in regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and viral pathogenesis. In the present study, the effect of HIV-1 stimulation of monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subpopulations from healthy donors on the expression and functions of TLR2 and TLR4 was examined. In addition, and to complete the in vitro study, the expression pattern of TLR2 and TLR4 in 49 HIV-1-infected patients, classified according to viral load and the use of HAART, was determined and compared with 25 healthy subjects. An increase of TLR expression and production of proinflammatory cytokines were observed in MDMs and PBMCs infected with HIV-1 in vitro and in response to TLR stimulation, compared to the mock. In addition, an association between TLR expression and up-regulation of CD80 in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) was observed. The ex vivo analysis indicated increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs), but only of TLR2 in monocytes obtained from HIV-1-infected patients, compared to healthy subjects. Remarkably, the expression was higher in cells from patients who do not use HAART. In monocytes, there was a positive correlation between both TLRs and viral load, but not CD4+ T cell numbers. Together, our in vitro and ex vivo results suggest that TLR expression and function can be up-regulated in response to HIV-1 infection and could affect the inflammatory response. We propose that modulation of TLRs represents a mechanism to promote HIV-1 replication or AIDS progression in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:22280204

  10. Enhanced Control of In Vivo Bone Formation with Surface Functionalized Alginate Microbeads Incorporating Heparin and Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Liu, Jing; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a surface functionalization delivery platform incorporating heparin onto strontium alginate microbeads surfaces would convert this “naive carriers” into “mini-reservoirs” for localized in vivo delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) that will induce functional bone regeneration. In vitro evaluation confirmed that (1) heparin incorporation could immobilize and prolong rhBMP-2 release for approximately 3 weeks; (2) a significant decrease (p<0.01) in rhBMP-2 burst release is attainable depending on initial protein load; and (3) rhBMP-2 released from surface functionalized microbeads retained bioactivity and stimulated higher alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured C2C12 cells when compared with daily administration of fresh bolus rhBMP-2. Subsequently, surface functionalized microbeads were used for in vivo delivery of rhBMP-2 at local sites of posterolateral spinal fusion surgery in rats. The microbeads were loaded into the pores of medical-grade polyepsilone caprolactone-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds before implantation. Results revealed robust bone formation and a biomechanically solid fusion after 6 weeks. When compared with a control group consisting of an equivalent amount of rhBMP-2 that was directly adsorbed onto bare-surfaced microbeads with no heparin, a 5.3-fold increase in bone volume fraction and a 2.6-fold increase in bending stiffness (flexion/extension) were observed. When compared with collagen sponge carriers of rhBMP-2, a 1.5-fold and a 1.3-fold increase in bone volume fraction and bending stiffness were observed, respectively. More importantly, 3D micro-computed tomography images enabled the visualization of a well-contained newly formed bone at ipsilateral implant sites with surface functionalized rhBMP-2 delivery. This was absent with collagen sponge carriers where newly formed bone tissue was poorly contained and crossed over the posterior midline to

  11. Enhanced control of in vivo bone formation with surface functionalized alginate microbeads incorporating heparin and human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Liu, Jing; Goh, James Cho Hong; Wong, Hee-Kit

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a surface functionalization delivery platform incorporating heparin onto strontium alginate microbeads surfaces would convert this "naive carriers" into "mini-reservoirs" for localized in vivo delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) that will induce functional bone regeneration. In vitro evaluation confirmed that (1) heparin incorporation could immobilize and prolong rhBMP-2 release for approximately 3 weeks; (2) a significant decrease (p<0.01) in rhBMP-2 burst release is attainable depending on initial protein load; and (3) rhBMP-2 released from surface functionalized microbeads retained bioactivity and stimulated higher alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured C(2)C(12) cells when compared with daily administration of fresh bolus rhBMP-2. Subsequently, surface functionalized microbeads were used for in vivo delivery of rhBMP-2 at local sites of posterolateral spinal fusion surgery in rats. The microbeads were loaded into the pores of medical-grade polyepsilone caprolactone-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds before implantation. Results revealed robust bone formation and a biomechanically solid fusion after 6 weeks. When compared with a control group consisting of an equivalent amount of rhBMP-2 that was directly adsorbed onto bare-surfaced microbeads with no heparin, a 5.3-fold increase in bone volume fraction and a 2.6-fold increase in bending stiffness (flexion/extension) were observed. When compared with collagen sponge carriers of rhBMP-2, a 1.5-fold and a 1.3-fold increase in bone volume fraction and bending stiffness were observed, respectively. More importantly, 3D micro-computed tomography images enabled the visualization of a well-contained newly formed bone at ipsilateral implant sites with surface functionalized rhBMP-2 delivery. This was absent with collagen sponge carriers where newly formed bone tissue was poorly contained and crossed over the posterior midline to contralateral

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of goat oviductal epithelial cells at the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrus cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, H; Onodera, M; Sugawara, S

    1993-01-01

    The luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in various regions of the oviducts of the goats at the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Marked cyclic changes were observed on the surface of the epithelium in the fimbriae, ampulla and ampullar-isthmic junction, but few changes were found in the isthmus or uterotubal junction. The epithelium of the fimbriae, ampulla, and ampullar-isthmic junction of oviducts in the follicular phase was extensively ciliated and most of the cilia extended above the apical processes of the nonciliated cells. In the luteal phase, many ciliated cells were hidden by the bulbous processes of the nonciliated cells. In the isthmus and at the uterotubal junction, the apical surfaces of the nonciliated cells were flat or gently rounded at both phases of the oestrous cycle. The results demonstrate that regional variations are associated with the cyclic changes in the epithelial cells of the goat oviduct. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:8300425

  13. Body Size in Relation to Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites (EM) among Premenopausal Women during the Luteal Phase

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Eliassen, A. Heather; Xu, Xia; Matthews, Charles E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism profiles may play an important role in the relationship between body size and breast carcinogenesis. Previously, we observed inverse associations between current body mass index (BMI) and plasma levels of parent estrogens (estrone and estradiol) among premenopausal women during both follicular and luteal phases. Using data from the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II), we assessed whether height, current BMI, and BMI at age 18 were associated with the urinary concentrations of 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites (jointly referred to as EM) measured during the luteal phase among 603 premenopausal women. We observed inverse associations with total EM for height (Ptrend=0.01) and current BMI (Ptrend=0.01), but not BMI at age 18 (Ptrend=0.26). Six EMs were 18–27% lower in women with a height 68+ inches versus ≤62 inches, primarily in the methylated catechol pathway (Ptrend=0.04). Eight EMs were 18–50% lower in women with a BMI of 30+ versus <20, primarily in the 2-catechol and methylated catechol pathways (Ptrend<0.001 for both). Our results suggest that height and current BMI are associated with estrogen metabolism profiles in premenopausal women. Further studies with timed urine and blood collections are required to confirm and extend our findings. PMID:23011724

  14. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis

  15. Effects of TAK-637, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, on colonic function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okano, S; Nagaya, H; Ikeura, Y; Natsugari, H; Inatomi, N

    2001-08-01

    Substance P (SP) is an important neurotransmitter that mediates various gut functions; however, its precise pathophysiological role remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of SP on colonic function and the effect of TAK-637 [(aR,9R)-7-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-8,9,10,11-tetrahydro-9-methyl-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7H-[1,4]diazocino[2,1-g][1,7]naphthyridine-6,13-dione] a new neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on colonic responses to SP or stress in Mongolian gerbils. SP and the selective NK1 agonist [pGlu6]SP6-11 significantly increased fecal pellet output. TAK-637 reduced [pGlu6]SP6-11-induced defecation, but did not significantly affect neurokinin A-, 5-hydroxytryptamine- or carbachol-stimulated defecation. Oral TAK-637 decreased restraint stress-stimulated fecal pellet output with an ID50 value of 0.33 mg/kg. Ondansetron and atropine, but not the peripheral kappa-receptor agonist trimebutine, also reduced restraint stress-stimulated defecation. TAK-637 inhibited the increase in fecal pellet output stimulated by intracerebroventricular injection of corticotropin-releasing factor, but did not affect the stress-induced increase in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Denervation of the sensory neurons with capsaicin did not affect stress-stimulated defecation. These results suggest that NK1 receptors in the enteric plexus play an important role in stress-induced changes in colonic function, and that TAK-637 may be useful in the treatment of functional bowel diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:11454917

  16. Macrophage functions measured by magnetic microparticles in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Winfried; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Häussinger, Karl; Heyder, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse ferrimagnetic iron-oxide particles of 1.4 μm geometric diameter were used to study alveolar macrophage functions (phagocytosis, phagosome transport) and cytoskeletal integrity in healthy subjects and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in cultured macrophages. Dysfunctions in phagocytosis, in phagosome transport and cytoskeletal integrity correlated with an impaired alveolar clearance and could be induced in vitro by cytoskeletal drugs.

  17. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Taro; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which dopamine signaling causes these phenotypes requires an understanding of the dynamics of dopamine release. Here we report the effects of dDAT expression on behavioral traits. We show that dDAT expression in a subset of dopaminergic neurons is sufficient for normal sleep. dDAT expression in other cell types such as Kenyon cells and glial cells can also rescue the short sleep phenotype of dDAT mutants. dDAT mutants also show a down-regulation of the D1-like dopamine receptor dDA1, and this phenotype is rescued when dDAT is expressed in the same cell types in which it rescues sleep. On the other hand, dDAT overexpression in mushroom bodies, which are the target of memory forming dopamine neurons, abolishes olfactory aversive memory. Our data demonstrate that expression of extrasynaptic dopamine transporters can rescue some aspects of dopamine signaling in dopamine transporter mutants. These results provide novel insights into regulatory systems that modulate dopamine signaling. PMID:25232310

  18. In vitro and in vivo studies of macrophage functions in amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, M; Chadee, K

    1988-01-01

    Experimental intrahepatic inoculation of the gerbil with Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites was used as a model of liver amebiasis to study the cellular immune response elicited by the parasite. It was shown that abscess-derived macrophages (5 to 20 days old) were deficient in their capacity to develop a respiratory burst, to secrete and express membrane-bound interleukin-1-like activity, and to kill E. histolytica trophozoites as well as to respond to lymphokines in vitro. However, macrophages isolated from the spleen and peritoneal cavities from the same infected animals were not significantly down regulated in these functions. Splenocytes from infected gerbils were shown to develop a strong responsiveness to amebic antigen, whereas their response to concanavalin A was suppressed. Crude E. histolytica extracts or conditioned medium down regulated murine BALB/c macrophage accessory and effector cell functions in vitro in a manner similar to abscess-derived macrophages, whereas crude extracts of the nonvirulent E. histolytica-like Laredo strain did not. Our results indicate that intrinsic or secreted products or both from E. histolytica are actively regulating macrophage functions at the abscess site and can possibly mediate other immunoregulatory mechanisms at distant targets. PMID:2903124

  19. Independent component analysis for the detection of in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; Pattichis, Marios; Abramoff, Michael; T'so, Dan; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Soliz, Peter

    2007-02-01

    To overcome the difficulty in detection of loss of retinal activity, a functional-Retinal Imaging Device (f-RID) was developed. The device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by noise. In this paper, we present a new Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm used to analyze the video sequences from a set of experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats and humans. The ICA algorithm with priors (ICA-P) uses information about the stimulation paradigms to increase the signal detection thresholds when compared to traditional ICA algorithms. The results of the analysis show that we can detect signal levels as low as 0.01% of the total reflected intensity. Also, improvement of up to 30dB in signal detection over traditional ICA algorithms is achieved. The study found that in more than 80% of the in-vivo experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted.

  20. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  1. Phenotyping Mouse Pulmonary Function In Vivo with the Lung Diffusing Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Fallica, Jonathan; Ramakrishnan, Amritha; Datta, Kausik; Gabrielson, Matthew; Horton, Maureen; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is now the primary animal used to model a variety of lung diseases. To study the mechanisms that underlie such pathologies, phenotypic methods are needed that can quantify the pathologic changes. Furthermore, to provide translational relevance to the mouse models, such measurements should be tests that can easily be done in both humans and mice. Unfortunately, in the present literature few phenotypic measurements of lung function have direct application to humans. One exception is the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, which is a measurement that is routinely done in humans. In the present report, we describe a means to quickly and simply measure this diffusing capacity in mice. The procedure involves brief lung inflation with tracer gases in an anesthetized mouse, followed by a 1 min gas analysis time. We have tested the ability of this method to detect several lung pathologies, including emphysema, fibrosis, acute lung injury, and influenza and fungal lung infections, as well as monitoring lung maturation in young pups. Results show significant decreases in all the lung pathologies, as well as an increase in the diffusing capacity with lung maturation. This measurement of lung diffusing capacity thus provides a pulmonary function test that has broad application with its ability to detect phenotypic structural changes with most of the existing pathologic lung models. PMID:25590416

  2. A USPL functional system with articulated mirror arm for in-vivo applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Dehn, Claudia; Oehme, Bernd; Bourauel, Christoph; Frentzen, Mathias

    Ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) systems for dental application have overcome many of their initial disadvantages. However, a problem that has not yet been addressed and solved is the beam delivery into the oral cavity. The functional system that is introduced in this study includes an articulated mirror arm, a scanning system as well as a handpiece, allowing for freehand preparations with ultra-short laser pulses. As laser source an Nd:YVO4 laser is employed, emitting pulses with a duration of tp < 10 ps at a repetition rate of up to 500 kHz. The centre wavelength is at 1064 nm and the average output power can be tuned up to 9 W. The delivery system consists of an articulated mirror arm, to which a scanning system and a custom made handpiece are connected, including a 75 mm focussing lens. The whole functional system is compact in size and moveable. General characteristics like optical losses and ablation rate are determined and compared to results employing a fixed setup on an optical table. Furthermore classical treatment procedures like cavity preparation are being demonstrated on mammoth ivory. This study indicates that freehand preparation employing an USPL system is possible but challenging, and accompanied by a variety of side-effects. The ablation rate with fixed handpiece is about 10 mm3/min. Factors like defocussing and blinding affect treatment efficiency. Laser sources with higher average output powers might be needed in order to reach sufficient preparation speeds.

  3. The Relationship between Dyslipidemia and Acute Axonal Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kwai, Natalie C. G.; Nigole, William; Poynten, Ann M.; Brown, Christopher; Krishnan, Arun V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. Treatment largely consists of symptom alleviation and there is a need to identify therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of DPN. The objective of this study was to utilise novel neurophysiological techniques to investigate axonal function in patients with type 2 diabetes and to prospectively determine their relationship to serum lipids in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Seventy-one patients with type 2 diabetes were consecutively recruited and tested. All patients underwent thorough clinical neurological assessments including nerve conduction studies, and median motor axonal excitability studies. Studies were also undertaken in age matched normal control subjects(n = 42). Biochemical studies, including serum lipid levels were obtained in all patients. Patient excitability data was compared to control data and linear regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between serum triglycerides and low density lipoproteins and excitability parameters typically abnormal in type 2 diabetic patients. Results Patient mean age was 64.2±2.3 years, mean glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c%) was 7.8±0.3%, mean triglyceride concentration was 1.6±0.1 mmol/L and mean cholesterol concentration was 4.1±0.2mmol/L. Compared to age matched controls, median motor axonal excitability studies indicated axonal dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients as a whole (T2DM) and in a subgroup of the patients without DPN (T2DM-NN). These included reduced percentage threshold change during threshold electrotonus at 10–20ms depolarising currents (TEd10–20ms)(controls 68.4±0.8, T2DM63.9±0.8, T2DM-NN64.8±1.6%,P<0.05) and superexcitability during the recovery cycle (controls-22.5±0.9, T2DM-17.5±0.8, T2DM-NN-17.3±1.6%,P<0.05). Linear regression analysis revealed no associations between changes in axonal function and either serum triglyceride or low density

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterizations of Pichinde Viral Nucleoprotein Exoribonuclease Functions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qinfeng; Shao, Junjie; Lan, Shuiyun; Zhou, Yanqin; Xing, Junji; Dong, Changjiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, and there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures against these diseases. Previous structural and functional analyses of arenavirus nucleoproteins (NPs) revealed a conserved DEDDH exoribonuclease (RNase) domain that is important for type I interferon (IFN) suppression, but the biological roles of the NP RNase in viral replication and host immune suppression have not been well characterized. Infection of guinea pigs with Pichinde virus (PICV), a prototype arenavirus, can serve as a surrogate small animal model for arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers. In this report, we show that mutation of each of the five RNase catalytic residues of PICV NP diminishes the IFN suppression activity and slightly reduces the viral RNA replication activity. Recombinant PICVs with RNase catalytic mutations can induce high levels of IFNs and barely grow in IFN-competent A549 cells, in sharp contrast to the wild-type (WT) virus, while in IFN-deficient Vero cells, both WT and mutant viruses can replicate at relatively high levels. Upon infection of guinea pigs, the RNase mutant viruses stimulate strong IFN responses, fail to replicate productively, and can become WT revertants. Serial passages of the RNase mutants in vitro can also generate WT revertants. Thus, the NP RNase function is essential for the innate immune suppression that allows the establishment of a productive early viral infection, and it may be partly involved in the process of viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses, such as Lassa, Lujo, and Machupo viruses, can cause severe and deadly hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, and there are limited preventative and treatment options against these diseases. Development of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs depends on a better mechanistic understanding of the conserved arenavirus proteins in viral infection. The nucleoprotein (NPs) of all arenaviruses carry a unique exoribonuclease (RNase) domain

  5. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography Enables In Vivo Physiological Assessment of Retinal Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-01

    Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) changes have been observed in retinal photoreceptors, suggesting a unique biomarker for eye disease detection. However, clinical deployment of IOS imaging is challenging due to unclear IOS sources and limited signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Here, by developing high spatiotemporal resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and applying an adaptive algorithm for IOS processing, we were able to record robust IOSs from single-pass measurements. Transient IOSs, which might reflect an early stage of light phototransduction, are consistently observed in the photoreceptor outer segment almost immediately (<4 ms) after retinal stimulation. Comparative studies of dark- and light-adapted retinas have demonstrated the feasibility of functional OCT mapping of rod and cone photoreceptors, promising a new method for early disease detection and improved treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye diseases that can cause photoreceptor damage.

  6. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26721684

  7. A novel RNA oligonucleotide improves liver function and inhibits liver carcinogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reebye, V.; Sætrom, P.; Mintz, P.J.; Huang, K.W.; Swiderski, P.; Peng, L.; Liu, C.; Liu, X.X.; Jensen, S.; Zacharoulis, D.; Kostomitsopoulos, N.; Kasahara, N.; Nicholls, J.P.; Jiao, L.R.; Pai, M.; Mizandari, M.; Chikovani, T.; Emara, M.M.; Haoudi, A.; Tomalia, D.A.; Rossi, J.J.; Habib, N.A.; Spalding, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurs predominantly in patients with liver cirrhosis. Here, we show an innovative RNA-based targeted approach to enhance endogenous albumin production whilst reducing liver tumour burden. We designed short-activating RNAs (saRNA) to enhance expression of C/EBPα (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α), a transcriptional regulator and activator of albumin gene expression. Increased levels of both C/EBPα and albumin mRNA in addition to a 3-fold increase in albumin secretion and 50% decrease in cell proliferation was observed in C/EBPα-saRNA transfected HepG2 cells. Intravenous injection of C/EBPα-saRNA in a cirrhotic rat model with multifocal liver tumours increased circulating serum albumin by over 30% showing evidence of improved liver function. Tumour burden decreased by 80% (p = 0.003) with a 40% reduction in a marker of pre-neoplastic transformation. Since C/EBPα has known anti-proliferative activities via retinoblastoma, p21 and cyclins; we used mRNA expression liver cancer specific microarray in C/EBPα-saRNA transfected HepG2 cells to confirm down-regulation of genes strongly enriched for negative regulation of apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. Up-regulated genes were enriched for tumour suppressors and positive regulators of cell differentiation. A quantitative PCR and Western-blot analysis of C/EBPα-saRNA transfected cells suggested that in addition to the known anti-proliferative targets of C/EBPα, we also observed suppression of IL6R, c-Myc and reduced STAT3 phosphorylation. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that a novel injectable saRNA-oligonucleotide that enhances C/EBPα expression successfully reduces tumour burden and simultaneously improves liver function in a clinically relevant liver cirrhosis/HCC model. PMID:23929703

  8. Brain basis of early parent–infant interactions: psychology, physiology, and in vivo functional neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P.; Kose, Samet; Strathearn, Lane

    2015-01-01

    Parenting behavior critically shapes human infants’ current and future behavior. The parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social experiences, forming templates of what they can expect from others and how to best meet others’ expectations. In this review, we focus on the neurobiology of parenting behavior, including our own functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain imaging experiments of parents. We begin with a discussion of background, perspectives and caveats for considering the neurobiology of parent–infant relationships. Then, we discuss aspects of the psychology of parenting that are significantly motivating some of the more basic neuroscience research. Following that, we discuss some of the neurohormones that are important for the regulation of social bonding, and the dysregulation of parenting with cocaine abuse. Then, we review the brain circuitry underlying parenting, proceeding from relevant rodent and nonhuman primate research to human work. Finally, we focus on a study-by-study review of functional neuroimaging studies in humans. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support aspects of parent response to infants, including the emotion, attention, motivation, empathy, decision-making and other thinking that are required to navigate the complexities of parenting. Specifically, infant stimuli activate basal forebrain regions, which regulate brain circuits that handle specific nurturing and caregiving responses and activate the brain’s more general circuitry for handling emotions, motivation, attention, and empathy – all of which are crucial for effective parenting. We argue that an integrated understanding of the brain basis of parenting has profound implications for mental health. PMID:17355399

  9. Development of optical neuroimaging to detect drug-induced brain functional changes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in prefrontal function play a crucial role in compulsive cocaine use, which is a hallmark of addiction. Dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex might result from effects of cocaine on neurons as well as from disruption of cerebral blood vessels. However, the mechanisms underlying cocaine's neurotoxic effects are not fully understood, partially due to technical limitations of current imaging techniques (e.g., PET, fMRI) to differentiate vascular from neuronal effects at sufficiently high temporal and spatial resolutions. We have recently developed a multimodal imaging platform which can simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebrovascular hemodynamics, hemoglobin oxygenation and intracellular calcium fluorescence for monitoring the effects of cocaine on the brain. Such a multimodality imaging technique (OFI) provides several uniquely important merits, including: 1) a large field-of-view, 2) high spatiotemporal resolutions, 3) quantitative 3D imaging of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) networks, 4) label-free imaging of hemodynamic changes, 5) separation of vascular compartments (e.g., arterial and venous vessels) and monitoring of cortical brain metabolic changes, 6) discrimination of cellular (neuronal) from vascular responses. These imaging features have been further advanced in combination with microprobes to form micro-OFI that allows quantification of drug effects on subcortical brain. In addition, our ultrahigh-resolution ODT (μODT) enables 3D microangiography and quantitative imaging of capillary CBF networks. These optical strategies have been used to investigate the effects of cocaine on brain physiology to facilitate the studies of brain functional changes induced by addictive substance to provide new insights into neurobiological effects of the drug on the brain.

  10. Hepatic sirtuin 1 is dispensable for fibrate-induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonzo, Jessica A.; Brocker, Chad; Jiang, Changtao; Wang, Rui-Hong; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) mediates metabolic remodeling, resulting in enhanced mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids. In addition to the physiological stimuli of fasting and high-fat diet, PPARα is activated by the fibrate class of drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an important regulator of energy homeostasis, was downregulated in fibrate-treated wild-type mice, suggesting PPARα regulation of Sirt1 gene expression. The impact of SIRT1 loss on PPARα functionality in vivo was assessed in hepatocyte-specific knockout mice that lack the deacetylase domain of SIRT1 (Sirt1ΔLiv). Knockout mice were treated with fibrates or fasted for 24 h to activate PPARα. Basal expression of the PPARα target genes Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14 was reduced in Sirt1ΔLiv mice compared with wild-type mice. However, no difference was observed between wild-type and Sirt1ΔLiv mice in either fasting- or fibrate-mediated induction of PPARα target genes. Similar to the initial results, there was no difference in fibrate-activated PPARα gene induction. To assess the relationship between SIRT1 and PPARα in a pathophysiological setting, Sirt1ΔLiv mice were maintained on a high-fat diet for 14 wk, followed by fibrate treatment. Sirt1ΔLiv mice exhibited increased body mass compared with control mice. In the context of a high-fat diet, Sirt1ΔLiv mice did not respond to the cholesterol-lowering effects of the fibrate treatment. However, there were no significant differences in PPARα target gene expression. These results suggest that, in vivo, SIRT1 deacetylase activity does not significantly impact induced PPARα activity. PMID:24496310

  11. Regulation of translation in haloarchaea: 5'- and 3'-UTRs are essential and have to functionally interact in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Mariam; Soppa, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Recently a first genome-wide analysis of translational regulation using prokaryotic species had been performed which revealed that regulation of translational efficiency plays an important role in haloarchaea. In fact, the fractions of genes under differential growth phase-dependent translational control in the two species Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii were as high as in eukaryotes. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms of translational regulation in archaea. Therefore, two genes exhibiting opposing directions of regulation were selected to unravel the importance of untranslated regions (UTRs) for differential translational control in vivo.Differential translational regulation in exponentially growing versus stationary phase cells was studied by comparing translational efficiencies using a reporter gene system. Translational regulation was not observed when 5'-UTRs or 3'-UTRs alone were fused to the reporter gene. However, their simultaneous presence was sufficient to transfer differential translational control from the native transcript to the reporter transcript. This was true for both directions of translational control. Translational regulation was completely abolished when stem loops in the 5'-UTR were changed by mutagenesis. An "UTR-swap" experiment demonstrated that the direction of translational regulation is encoded in the 3'-UTR, not in the 5'-UTR. While much is known about 5'-UTR-dependent translational control in bacteria, the reported findings provide the first examples that both 5'- and 3'-UTRs are essential and sufficient to drive differential translational regulation in a prokaryote and therefore have to functionally interact in vivo. The current results indicate that 3'-UTR-dependent translational control had already evolved before capping and polyadenylation of transcripts were invented, which are essential for circularization of transcripts in eukaryotes. PMID:19214227

  12. Lack of in vitro effect of aglepristone on IFN-γ and IL-4 production by resting and mitogen-activated T cells of luteal bitches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aglepristone (RU534) is an antiprogestin used for pregnancy termination, parturition induction and conservative pyometra treatment in bitches. Its molecular structure is similar to mifepristone, an antiprogestin used in human medicine. Mifepristone has been shown to suppress proliferation and cytokine production by T cells, whereas the effect of aglepristone on T cell function remains elusive. The purpose of this project was to investigate the in vitro influence of RU534 on IFN-γ and IL-4 synthesis by peripheral blood T cells isolated from healthy bitches (N = 16) in luteal phase. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were incubated with three different dosages of aglepristone, or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), with or without mitogen. The production of cytokines by resting or mitogen-activated T cells was determined by intercellular staining and flow cytometry analysis or ELISA assay, respectively. Results Our results showed no statistically significant differences in the percentage of IFN-γ and IL-4-synthesizing CD4+ or CD8+ resting T cells between untreated and aglepristone-treated cells at 24 and 48 hours post treatment. Moreover, mitogen-activated PBMCs treated with RU534 displayed similar concentration of IFN-γ and IL-4 in culture supernatants to those observed in mitogen-activated DMSO-treated PBMCs. Presented results indicate that administration of aglepristone for 48 hours has no influence on IFN-γ and IL-4 synthesis by resting and mitogen-activated T cells isolated from diestral bitches. Conclusions We conclude that antiprogestins may differentially affect T cell function depending on the animal species in which they are applied. PMID:24284004

  13. In Vivo Transplantation of Enteric Neural Crest Cells into Mouse Gut; Engraftment, Functional Integration and Long-Term Safety

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Julie E.; McCann, Conor J.; Natarajan, Dipa; Choudhury, Shanas; Boesmans, Werend; Delalande, Jean-Marie; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Burns, Alan J.; Thapar, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enteric neuropathies are severe gastrointestinal disorders with unsatisfactory outcomes. We aimed to investigate the potential of enteric neural stem cell therapy approaches for such disorders by transplanting mouse enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) into ganglionic and aganglionic mouse gut in vivo and analysing functional integration and long-term safety. Design Neurospheres generated from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expressing ENCCs selected from postnatal Wnt1-cre;R26R-YFP/YFP murine gut were transplanted into ganglionic hindgut of wild-type littermates or aganglionic hindgut of Ednrbtm1Ywa mice (lacking functional endothelin receptor type-B). Intestines were then assessed for ENCC integration and differentiation using immunohistochemistry, cell function using calcium imaging, and long-term safety using PCR to detect off-target YFP expression. Results YFP+ ENCCs engrafted, proliferated and differentiated into enteric neurons and glia within recipient ganglionic gut. Transplanted cells and their projections spread along the endogenous myenteric plexus to form branching networks. Electrical point stimulation of endogenous nerve fibres resulted in calcium transients (F/F0 = 1.16±0.01;43 cells, n = 6) in YFP+ transplanted ENCCs (abolished with TTX). Long-term follow-up (24 months) showed transplanted ENCCs did not give rise to tumours or spread to other organs (PCR negative in extraintestinal sites). In aganglionic gut ENCCs similarly spread and differentiated to form neuronal and glial networks with projections closely associated with endogenous neural networks of the transition zone. Conclusions Transplanted ENCCs successfully engrafted into recipient ganglionic and aganglionic gut showing appropriate spread, localisation and, importantly, functional integration without any long-term safety issues. This study provides key support for the development and use of enteric neural stem cell therapies. PMID:26824433

  14. Multiple In Vivo Biological Processes Are Mediated by Functionally Redundant Activities of Drosophila mir-279 and mir-996

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kailiang; Jee, David; de Navas, Luis F.; Duan, Hong; Lai, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    While most miRNA knockouts exhibit only subtle defects, a handful of miRNAs are profoundly required for development or physiology. A particularly compelling locus is Drosophila mir-279, which was reported as essential to restrict the emergence of CO2-sensing neurons, to maintain circadian rhythm, and to regulate ovarian border cells. The mir-996 locus is located near mir-279 and bears a similar seed, but they otherwise have distinct, conserved, non-seed sequences, suggesting their evolutionary maintenance for separate functions. We generated single and double deletion mutants of the mir-279 and mir-996 hairpins, and cursory analysis suggested that miR-996 was dispensable. However, discrepancies in the strength of individual mir-279 deletion alleles led us to uncover that all extant mir-279 mutants are deficient for mature miR-996, even though they retain its genomic locus. We therefore engineered a panel of genomic rescue transgenes into the double deletion background, allowing a pure assessment of miR-279 and miR-996 requirements. Surprisingly, detailed analyses of viability, olfactory neuron specification, and circadian rhythm indicate that miR-279 is completely dispensable. Instead, an endogenous supply of either mir-279 or mir-996 suffices for normal development and behavior. Sensor tests of nine key miR-279/996 targets showed their similar regulatory capacities, although transgenic gain-of-function experiments indicate partially distinct activities of these miRNAs that may underlie that co-maintenance in genomes. Altogether, we elucidate the unexpected genetics of this critical miRNA operon, and provide a foundation for their further study. More importantly, these studies demonstrate that multiple, vital, loss-of-function phenotypes can be rescued by endogenous expression of divergent seed family members, highlighting the importance of this miRNA region for in vivo function. PMID:26042831

  15. In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Structure, Function, Perfusion and Viability Using Cardiac Micro-computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    van Deel, Elza; Ridwan, Yanto; van Vliet, J. Nicole; Belenkov, Sasha; Essers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The use of Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) for in vivo studies of small animals as models of human disease has risen tremendously due to the fact that MicroCT provides quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) anatomical data non-destructively and longitudinally. Most importantly, with the development of a novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA160, functional and metabolic assessment of the heart became possible. However, prior to the advent of commercial MicroCT scanners equipped with X-ray flat-panel detector technology and easy-to-use cardio-respiratory gating, preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in small animals required a MicroCT technologist with advanced skills, and thus were impractical for widespread implementation. The goal of this work is to provide a practical guide to the use of the high-speed Quantum FX MicroCT system for comprehensive determination of myocardial global and regional function along with assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability in healthy mice and in a cardiac ischemia mouse model induced by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). PMID:26967592

  16. In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Structure, Function, Perfusion and Viability Using Cardiac Micro-computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    van Deel, Elza; Ridwan, Yanto; van Vliet, J Nicole; Belenkov, Sasha; Essers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The use of Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) for in vivo studies of small animals as models of human disease has risen tremendously due to the fact that MicroCT provides quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) anatomical data non-destructively and longitudinally. Most importantly, with the development of a novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA160, functional and metabolic assessment of the heart became possible. However, prior to the advent of commercial MicroCT scanners equipped with X-ray flat-panel detector technology and easy-to-use cardio-respiratory gating, preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in small animals required a MicroCT technologist with advanced skills, and thus were impractical for widespread implementation. The goal of this work is to provide a practical guide to the use of the high-speed Quantum FX MicroCT system for comprehensive determination of myocardial global and regional function along with assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability in healthy mice and in a cardiac ischemia mouse model induced by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). PMID:26967592

  17. Rapid Immunomagnetic Negative Enrichment of Neutrophil Granulocytes from Murine Bone Marrow for Functional Studies In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hasenberg, Mike; Köhler, Anja; Bonifatius, Susanne; Borucki, Katrin; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Achilles, Julia; Männ, Linda; Baumgart, Kathleen; Schraven, Burkhart; Gunzer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) mediate early immunity to infection but can also cause host damage if their effector functions are not controlled. Their lack or dysfunction is associated with severe health problems and thus the analysis of PMN physiology is a central issue. One prerequisite for PMN analysis is the availability of purified cells from primary organs. While human PMN are easily isolated from peripheral blood, this approach is less suitable for mice due to limited availability of blood. Instead, bone marrow (BM) is an easily available reservoir of murine PMN, but methods to obtain pure cells from BM are limited. We have developed a novel protocol allowing the isolation of highly pure untouched PMN from murine BM by negative immunomagnetic isolation using a complex antibody cocktail. The protocol is simple and fast (∼1 h), has a high yield (5–10*106 PMN per animal) and provides a purity of cells equivalent to positive selection (>80%). Most importantly, cells obtained by this method are non-activated and remain fully functional in vitro or after adoptive transfer into recipient animals. This method should thus greatly facilitate the study of primary murine PMN in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21383835

  18. Functions of sensor 1 and sensor 2 regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc6p in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoko; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Stillman, Bruce; Mizushima, Tohru

    2002-05-01

    Cdc6p is a key regulator of the cell cycle in eukaryotes and is a member of the AAA(+) (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) family of proteins. In this family of proteins, the sensor 1 and sensor 2 regions are important for their function and ATPase activity. Here, site-directed mutagenesis has been used to examine the role of these regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc6p in controlling the cell cycle progression and initiation of DNA replication. Two important amino acid residues (Asn(263) in sensor 1 and Arg(332) in sensor 2) were identified as key residues for Cdc6p function in vivo. Cells expressing mutant Cdc6p (N263A or R332E) grew slowly and accumulated in the S phase. In cells expressing mutant Cdc6p, loading of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex of proteins was decreased, suggesting that the slow progression of S phase in these cells was due to inefficient MCM loading on chromatin. Purified wild type Cdc6p but not mutant Cdc6p (N263A and R332E) caused the structural modification of origin recognition complex proteins. These results are consistent with the idea that Cdc6p uses its ATPase activity to change the conformation of origin recognition complex, and then together they recruit the MCM complex. PMID:11827963

  19. In vivo functional protein-protein interaction: nuclear targeted hsp90 shifts cytoplasmic steroid receptor mutants into the nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K I; Devin, J; Cadepond, F; Jibard, N; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1994-01-01

    In target tissue extracts, heat shock protein hsp90 has been found associated to all unliganded steroid receptors. Modulation of important functions of these receptors, including prevention of DNA binding and optimization of transcriptional activity, has been attributed to hsp90. However no unequivocal in vivo demonstration of interaction between receptors and hsp90 has been presented. We targeted chicken hsp90, a mainly cytoplasmic protein, with the nucleoplasmin nuclear localization signal (90NLS). After transfection into COS-7 cells, 90NLS was found in the nucleus with specific immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy techniques. A human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant devoid of NLS sequence was also expressed in COS-7 cells and found exclusively cytoplasmic. Coexpression of 90NLS and of the cytoplasmic human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant led to complete nuclear localization of the receptor, indicating its piggyback transport by 90NLS and thus physical and functional interaction between the two proteins in the absence of hormone. The same nuclear localization was obtained after cotransfection of 90NLS and a cytoplasmic rabbit progesterone receptor mutant. Finally, coexpression of wild-type rabbit progesterone receptor (nuclear) and wildtype hsp90 (cytoplasmic) into COS-7 cells provoked partial relocalization of hsp90 into the nucleus. These experiments lay the groundwork on which to study hsp90 as a chaperone, regulating activities of steroid receptors and possibly participating in their nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8278390

  20. Stomatin-Like Protein 2 Is Required for In Vivo Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Formation and Optimal Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Chang, Yu-Han; Wai, Timothy; König, Tim; Dunn, Stanley D.; Langer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mainly mitochondrial protein that is widely expressed and is highly conserved across evolution. We have previously shown that SLP-2 binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 to form specialized membrane microdomains in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which are associated with optimal mitochondrial respiration. To determine how SLP-2 functions, we performed bioenergetic analysis of primary T cells from T cell-selective Slp-2 knockout mice under conditions that forced energy production to come almost exclusively from oxidative phosphorylation. These cells had a phenotype characterized by increased uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Since formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes (RCS) may correlate with more efficient electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that the defect in mitochondrial respiration in SLP-2-deficient T cells was due to deficient RCS formation. We found that in the absence of SLP-2, T cells had decreased levels and activities of complex I-III2 and I-III2-IV1-3 RCS but no defects in assembly of individual respiratory complexes. Impaired RCS formation in SLP-2-deficient T cells correlated with significantly delayed T cell proliferation in response to activation under conditions of limiting glycolysis. Altogether, our findings identify SLP-2 as a key regulator of the formation of RCS in vivo and show that these supercomplexes are required for optimal cell function. PMID:25776552

  1. Functional assessment of glioma pathogenesis by in vivo multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging and in vitro analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nai-Wei; Chang, Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Ting; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors with poor prognosis. In this study, we report a novel approach combining both in vivo multi-parametric MRI and in vitro cell culture assessments to evaluate the pathogenic development of gliomas. Osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic factor, has been implicated in the formation and progression of various human cancers, including gliomas, through its functions in regulating cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and migration. Using rat C6 glioma model, the combined approach successfully monitors the acquisition and decrease of cancer hallmarks. We show that knockdown of the expression of OPN reduces C6 cell proliferation, survival, viability and clonogenicity in vitro, and reduces tumor burden and prolongs animal survival in syngeneic rats. OPN depletion is associated with reduced tumor growth, decreased angiogenesis, and an increase of tumor-associated metabolites, as revealed by T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images, Ktrans maps, and 1H-MRS, respectively. These strategies allow us to define an important role of OPN in conferring cancer hallmarks, which can be further applied to assess the functional roles of other candidate genes in glioma. In particular, the non-invasive multi-parametric MRI measurement of cancer hallmarks related to proliferation, angiogenesis and altered metabolism may serve as a useful tool for diagnosis and for patient management. PMID:27198662

  2. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment. PMID:26234690

  3. Functional assessment of glioma pathogenesis by in vivo multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging and in vitro analyses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nai-Wei; Chang, Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Ting; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors with poor prognosis. In this study, we report a novel approach combining both in vivo multi-parametric MRI and in vitro cell culture assessments to evaluate the pathogenic development of gliomas. Osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic factor, has been implicated in the formation and progression of various human cancers, including gliomas, through its functions in regulating cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and migration. Using rat C6 glioma model, the combined approach successfully monitors the acquisition and decrease of cancer hallmarks. We show that knockdown of the expression of OPN reduces C6 cell proliferation, survival, viability and clonogenicity in vitro, and reduces tumor burden and prolongs animal survival in syngeneic rats. OPN depletion is associated with reduced tumor growth, decreased angiogenesis, and an increase of tumor-associated metabolites, as revealed by T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images, K(trans) maps, and 1H-MRS, respectively. These strategies allow us to define an important role of OPN in conferring cancer hallmarks, which can be further applied to assess the functional roles of other candidate genes in glioma. In particular, the non-invasive multi-parametric MRI measurement of cancer hallmarks related to proliferation, angiogenesis and altered metabolism may serve as a useful tool for diagnosis and for patient management. PMID:27198662

  4. Functional assessment of the ex vivo vocal folds through biomechanical testing: A review.

    PubMed

    Dion, Gregory R; Jeswani, Seema; Roof, Scott; Fritz, Mark; Coelho, Paulo G; Sobieraj, Michael; Amin, Milan R; Branski, Ryan C

    2016-07-01

    The human vocal folds are complex structures made up of distinct layers that vary in cellular and extracellular composition. The mechanical properties of vocal fold tissue are fundamental to the study of both the acoustics and biomechanics of voice production. To date, quantitative methods have been applied to characterize the vocal fold tissue in both normal and pathologic conditions. This review describes, summarizes, and discusses the most commonly employed methods for vocal fold biomechanical testing. Force-elongation, torsional parallel plate rheometry, simple-shear parallel plate rheometry, linear skin rheometry, and indentation are the most frequently employed biomechanical tests for vocal fold tissues and each provide material properties data that can be used to compare native tissue to diseased or treated tissue. Force-elongation testing is clinically useful, as it allows for functional unit testing, while rheometry provides physiologically relevant shear data, and nanoindentation permits micrometer scale testing across different areas of the vocal fold as well as whole organ testing. Thoughtful selection of the testing technique during experimental design to evaluate a hypothesis is critical to optimize biomechanical testing of vocal fold tissues. PMID:27127075

  5. In vivo selection of lethal mutations reveals two functional domains in arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Geslain, R; Martin, F; Delagoutte, B; Cavarelli, J; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    2000-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and a genetic screening in yeast, we isolated 26 mutations that inactivate Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS). The mutations were identified and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding proteins were tested after purification of the expression products in Escherichia coli. The effects were interpreted in the light of the crystal structure of ArgRS. Eighteen functional residues were found around the arginine-binding pocket and eight others in the carboxy-terminal domain of the enzyme. Mutations of these residues all act by strongly impairing the rates of tRNA charging and arginine activation. Thus, ArgRS and tRNA(Arg) can be considered as a kind of ribonucleoprotein, where the tRNA, before being charged, is acting as a cofactor that activates the enzyme. Furthermore, by using different tRNA(Arg) isoacceptors and heterologous tRNA(Asp), we highlighted the crucial role of several residues of the carboxy-terminal domain in tRNA recognition and discrimination. PMID:10744027

  6. Functional in vivo interactions between JNK1 and JNK2 isoforms in obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tuncman, Gürol; Hirosumi, Jiro; Solinas, Giovanni; Chang, Lufen; Karin, Michael; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2006-07-11

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are key regulators of inflammation and interfere with insulin action in cultured cells and whole animals. Obesity increases total JNK activity, and JNK1, but not JNK2, deficiency results in reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, a higher-than-normal level of JNK activation is observed in Jnk2(-/-) mice, particularly in the liver, indicating an interaction between the isoforms that might have masked the metabolic activity of JNK2 in isolated mutant mice. To address the role of the JNK2 isoform in metabolic homeostasis, we intercrossed Jnk1(-/-) and Jnk2(-/-) mice and examined body weight and glucose metabolism in the resulting mutant allele combinations. Among all of the viable genotypes examined, we observed only reduced body weight and increased insulin sensitivity in Jnk1(-/-) and Jnk1(+/-)Jnk2(-/-) mice. These two groups of mice also exhibited reduced total JNK activity and cytokine expression in liver tissue compared with all other genotypes examined. These data indicate that the JNK2 isoform is also involved in metabolic regulation, but its function is not obvious when JNK1 is fully expressed because of regulatory crosstalk between the two isoforms. PMID:16818881

  7. The Myxococcus xanthus dsg gene product performs functions of translation initiation factor IF3 in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, L V; Cheng, Y L; Kaiser, D

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Dsg protein is 50% identical to that of translation initiation factor IF3 of Escherichia coli, the product of its infC gene. Anti-E. coli IF3 antibodies cross-react with the Dsg protein. Tn5 insertion mutations in dsg are lethal. When ample nutrients are available, however, certain dsg point mutant strains grow at the same rate as wild-type cells. Under the starvation conditions that induce fruiting body development, these dsg mutants begin to aggregate but fail to develop further. The level of Dsg antigen, as a fraction of total cell protein, does not change detectably during growth and development, as expected for a factor essential for protein synthesis. The amount of IF3 protein in E. coli is known to be autoregulated at the translational level. This autoregulation is lost in an E. coli infC362 missense mutant. The dsg+ gene from Myxococcus xanthus restores normal autoregulation to the infC362 mutant strain. Dsg is distinguished from IF3 of E. coli, other enteric bacteria, and Bacillus stearothermophilus by having a C-terminal tail of 66 amino acids. Partial and complete deletion of this tail showed that it is needed for certain vegetative and developmental functions but not for viability. Images PMID:8113185

  8. Genetic Variation Determines PPARγ Function and Anti-diabetic Drug Response In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Soccio, Raymond E; Chen, Eric R; Rajapurkar, Satyajit R; Safabakhsh, Pegah; Marinis, Jill M; Dispirito, Joanna R; Emmett, Matthew J; Briggs, Erika R; Fang, Bin; Everett, Logan J; Lim, Hee-Woong; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Steger, David J; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Voight, Benjamin F; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2015-07-01

    SNPs affecting disease risk often reside in non-coding genomic regions. Here, we show that SNPs are highly enriched at mouse strain-selective adipose tissue binding sites for PPARγ, a nuclear receptor for anti-diabetic drugs. Many such SNPs alter binding motifs for PPARγ or cooperating factors and functionally regulate nearby genes whose expression is strain selective and imbalanced in heterozygous F1 mice. Moreover, genetically determined binding of PPARγ accounts for mouse strain-specific transcriptional effects of TZD drugs, providing proof of concept for personalized medicine related to nuclear receptor genomic occupancy. In human fat, motif-altering SNPs cause differential PPARγ binding, provide a molecular mechanism for some expression quantitative trait loci, and are risk factors for dysmetabolic traits in genome-wide association studies. One PPARγ motif-altering SNP is associated with HDL levels and other metabolic syndrome parameters. Thus, natural genetic variation in PPARγ genomic occupancy determines individual disease risk and drug response. PMID:26140591

  9. Functional characterization of a chimeric soluble Fas ligand polymer with in vivo anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Daburon, Sophie; Devaud, Christel; Costet, Pierre; Morello, Aurore; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Maillasson, Mike; Hargous, Nathalie; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Bonneu, Marc; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Legembre, Patrick; Capone, Myriam; Moreau, Jean-François; Taupin, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Binding of ligand FasL to its receptor Fas triggers apoptosis via the caspase cascade. FasL itself is homotrimeric, and a productive apoptotic signal requires that FasL be oligomerized beyond the homotrimeric state. We generated a series of FasL chimeras by fusing FasL to domains of the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor receptor gp190 which confer homotypic oligomerization, and analyzed the capacity of these soluble chimeras to trigger cell death. We observed that the most efficient FasL chimera, called pFasL, was also the most polymeric, as it reached the size of a dodecamer. Using a cellular model, we investigated the structure-function relationships of the FasL/Fas interactions for our chimeras, and we demonstrated that the Fas-mediated apoptotic signal did not solely rely on ligand-mediated receptor aggregation, but also required a conformational adaptation of the Fas receptor. When injected into mice, pFasL did not trigger liver injury at a dose which displayed anti-tumor activity in a model of human tumor transplanted to immunodeficient animals, suggesting a potential therapeutic use. Therefore, the optimization of the FasL conformation has to be considered for the development of efficient FasL-derived anti-cancer drugs targeting Fas. PMID:23326557

  10. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  11. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patricia J; Jones, Laura N; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C; English, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  12. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Patricia J.; Jones, Laura N.; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; English, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  13. In Vivo Functions of CPSF6 for HIV-1 as Revealed by HIV-1 Capsid Evolution in HLA-B27-Positive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Matthew S.; Dubose, Brittany N.; Burse, Mallori J.; Aiken, Christopher; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The host protein CPSF6 possesses a domain that can interact with the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein. CPSF6 has been implicated in regulating HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, its functional significance for HIV-1 replication has yet to be firmly established. Here we provide evidence for two divergent functions of CPSF6 for HIV-1 replication in vivo. We demonstrate that endogenous CPSF6 exerts an inhibitory effect on naturally occurring HIV-1 variants in individuals carrying the HLA-B27 allele. Conversely, we find a strong selective pressure in these individuals to preserve CPSF6 binding, while escaping from the restrictive activity by CPSF6. This active maintenance of CPSF6 binding during HIV-1 CA evolution in vivo contrasts with the in vitro viral evolution, which can reduce CPSF6 binding to evade from CPSF6-mediated restriction. Thus, these observations argue for a beneficial role of CPSF6 for HIV-1 in vivo. CPSF6-mediated restriction renders HIV-1 less dependent or independent from TNPO3, RanBP2 and Nup153, host factors implicated in HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, viral evolution that maintains CPSF6 binding in HLA-B27+ subjects invariably restores the ability to utilize these host factors, which may be the major selective pressure for CPSF6 binding in vivo. Our study uncovers two opposing CA-dependent functions of CPSF6 in HIV-1 replication in vivo; however, the benefit for binding CPSF6 appears to outweigh the cost, providing support for a vital function of CPSF6 during HIV-1 replication in vivo. PMID:24415937

  14. Function of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments during in-vivo motion of the ankle joint complex

    PubMed Central

    de Asla, Richard J; Kozánek, Michal; Wan, Lu; Rubash, Harry E; Li, Guoan

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the numerous in-vitro studies on the mechanical properties and simulated injury mechanisms of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), the in-vivo biomechanical behavior of these two ligaments has not yet been described. Methods Apparent length of the ATFL and CFL was measured in four ankles in healthy male subjects between 32 and 45 years of age (two left and two right) during a dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and supination-pronation arc of motion using a combined dual-orthogonal fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging technique. Results The ATFL elongated from the neutral position at 16.3 +/- 3.0 mm to 20.8 +/- 2.7 mm at maximal plantarflexion and shortened significantly from the neutral position to 13.9 +/- 2.9 mm at maximal dorsiflexion (p = 0.01). The CFL shortened from the neutral position at 28.0 +/- 2.9 mm to 26.6 +/- 2.2 mm at maximal plantarflexion (p = 0.08) and elongated significantly from the neutral position to 29.9 +/- 3.0 mm at maximal dorsiflexion (p = 0.003). The ATFL elongated significantly from 14.8 +/- 2.5 mm at maximal pronation to 17.4 +/- 3.0 mm at maximal supination (p = 0.08). At the same time, the CFL shortened from 31.0 +/- 3.8 mm at maximal pronation to 26.9 +/- 3.6 mm at maximal supination (p = 0.02). Conclusion The results showed that the ATFL elongates more during plantarflexion and supination whereas the CFL increases in length with dorsiflexion and pronation. Concurrently, these data also demonstrated the reciprocal function between the two ligaments. While one shortens, the other one elongates. The different elongation of the ATFL and CFL during the same motion arc suggests that under excessive loading conditions the ATFL might be more vulnerable in plantarflexion and supination while the CFL might be more susceptible to injury in dorsiflexion and pronation. Furthermore, in the case of surgical reconstruction the grafts used to reconstruct the two ligaments may need to be

  15. In vivo evidence of a functional association between immune cells in blood and brain in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kanegawa, Naoki; Collste, Karin; Forsberg, Anton; Schain, Martin; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Jucaite, Aurelija; Lekander, Mats; Olgart Höglund, Caroline; Kosek, Eva; Lampa, Jon; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Varrone, Andrea; Cervenka, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Microglia, the resident macrophages in the central nervous system, are thought to be maintained by a local self-renewal mechanism. Although preclinical and in vitro studies have suggested that the brain may contain immune cells also from peripheral origin, the functional association between immune cells in the periphery and brain at physiological conditions is poorly understood. We examined 32 healthy individuals using positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]PBR28, a radioligand for the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) which is expressed both in brain microglia and blood immune cells. In 26 individuals, two measurements were performed with varying time intervals. In a subgroup of 19 individuals, of which 12 had repeat examinations, leukocyte numbers in blood was measured on each day of PET measurements. All individuals were genotyped for TSPO polymorphism and categorized as high, mixed, and low affinity binders. We assessed TSPO binding expressed as total distribution volume of [(11)C]PBR28 in brain and in blood cells. TSPO binding in brain was strongly and positively correlated to binding in blood cells both at baseline and when analyzing change between two PET examinations. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between change of leukocyte numbers and change in TSPO binding in brain, and a trend-level correlation to change in TSPO binding in blood cells. These in vivo findings indicate an association between immunological cells in blood and brain via intact BBB, suggesting a functional interaction between these two compartments, such as interchange of peripherally derived cells or a common regulatory mechanism. Measurement of radioligand binding in blood cells may be a way to control for peripheral immune function in PET studies using TSPO as a marker of brain immune activation. PMID:26820224

  16. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing (Different Hybrids, Paste, and Pomace) on Inhibition of Platelet Function In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0 g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0 g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  17. Immunologic effector mechanisms of a standardized mistletoe extract on the function of human monocytes and lymphocytes in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Lucie; von Baehr, Volker; Liebenthal, Christa; von Baehr, Rüdiger; Volk, Hans-Dieter

    2006-07-01

    Even though mistletoe extracts have been in clinical use for centuries their exact mode of action is still unknown. Currently, the application scheme for registered preparations is a dose-escalating scheme to thus reduce side effects. In this study, healthy controls and patients were evaluated for their immunologic response to treatment with a standardized mistletoe extract (Iscador). It shows a strong effect as adjuvant that induces TNF-alpha and IL-12, which was partly mediated via CD14. Desensitization of the TNF-alpha response could be shown after repeated application in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Iscador induces a specific lymphocyte sensitization upon multiple injections and production of IgG1- and IgG3 -mistletoe antibodies. Remarkably, a systemic bystander effect (heterologous immunity against other recall antigens) was observed after long-term treatment. In conclusion, dose-escalation reduces the monocyte-related clinical side effects. A T-lymphocyte sensitization stimulates mainly a specific Th1 response. The most interesting clinical long-term effect is the bystander stimulation of various memory T cells that might mediate in vivo antitumor and antiinfectious T-cell response under mistletoe-extract immunization. PMID:16705487

  18. Effect of tomato industrial processing (different hybrids, paste, and pomace) on inhibition of platelet function in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Azúa, Rosio; Treuer, Adriana; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Cortacáns, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Astudillo, Luis; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Healthy eating is among its safeguards, especially the daily intake of fruits and vegetables. In this context it has been shown that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) presents antiplatelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antiplatelet activity of fresh hybrid tomato process (nine hybrids: Apt 410, H 9888, Bos 8066, Sun 6366, AB3, HMX 7883, H 9665, H 7709, and H 9997), paste and its by-product of industrial processes (pomace). We assessed antiplatelet activity ex vivo and bleeding time in rats that ingested 0.1 and 1.0 g/kg of pomace each day. In studies in vitro, no significant differences in antiplatelet activity was observed in fresh tomato hybrids. Furthermore, the agro-industrial process did not affect the antiplatelet activity of paste and pomace. Likewise, pomace intake of 1.0 g/kg per day prolonged bleeding time and reduced ex vivo platelet aggregation in rats. The data obtained indicate that tomato has one or more compounds that caused antiplatelet activity. Regular consumption of tomato and its industrial derivatives could be part of a CVD prevention regimen. PMID:24325459

  19. Husbandry Factors and the Resumption of Luteal Activity in Open and Zero-Grazed Dairy Cows in Urban and Peri-Urban Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kanyima, BM; Båge, R; Owiny, DO; Ntallaris, T; Lindahl, J; Magnusson, U; Nassuna-Musoke, MG

    2014-01-01

    Contents The study investigated the influence of selected husbandry factors on interval to resumption of post-partum cyclicity among dairy cows in urban and peri-urban Kampala. A prospective study of 85 day post-partum period of 59 dairy cows in open (n = 38) and zero grazing (n = 21) systems was conducted on 24 farms. Cows of parity 1–6 were recruited starting 15–30 days post-partum. Progesterone (P4) content in milk taken at 10–12 day intervals was analysed using ELISA. The cow P4 profiles were classified into ‘normal’ (< 56 days), ‘delayed’ (> 56 days), ‘ceased’ or ‘prolonged’ (if started < 56 days but with abnormal P4 displays) resumption of luteal activity and tested for association with husbandry and cow factors. Of the 59 cows, luteal activity in 81.4% resumed normally and in 18.6%, delayed. Only 23.7% maintained regular luteal activity, while the others had ceased (10.2%), prolonged (37.3%) or unclear luteal activity (20.3%). There were no differences between open and zero-grazed cows. Milk production was higher (p < 0.05) in zero than open grazing, in urban than peri-urban and in cows fed on brew waste (p < 0.001) compared with mill products and banana peels. Results suggest that luteal activity resumes normally in a majority of cows, although only a minority experienced continued normal cyclicity once ovulation had occurred, in the two farming systems irrespective of feed supplements or water, and that supplementing with brew waste is beneficial for milk production. PMID:24930481

  20. Alterations at the Cross-Bridge Level Are Associated with a Paradoxical Gain of Muscle Function In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding α-tropomyosinslow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8–9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occuring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo. PMID:25268244

  1. EFFECT OF OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLE BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS ON EX VIVO VASCULAR FUNCTION OF AORTAS RECOVERED FROM NORMAL AND TYPE 2 DIABETIC RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Oil Combustion Particle Bioavailable Constituents on Ex Vivo Vascular Function of Aortae Recovered from Healthy and Early Type 2 Diabetic Rats
    KL Dreher1, SE Kelly2, SD Proctor2, and JC Russell2. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, US EPA, RTP, NC;...

  2. Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydoxylase-2 attenuates hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenghong; Pang, Xunsheng; Tang, Zonghao; Yin, Dingzhong; Wang, Zhengchao

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent angiogenesis has a crucial role in the corpus luteum formation and their functional maintenances in mammalian ovaries. A previous study by our group reported that activation of hypoxia‑inducible factor (HIF)‑1α signaling contributes to the regulation of VEGF expression in the luteal cells (LCs) in response to hypoxia and human chorionic gonadotropin. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that HIF prolyl‑hydroxylases (PHDs) are expressed in LCs and overexpression of PHD2 attenuates the expression of VEGF induced by hypoxia in LCs. PHD2-overexpressing plasmid was transfected into LC2 cells, and successful plasmid transfection and expression was confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, the present study investigated changes of HIF‑1α and VEGF expression after incubation under hypoxic conditions and PHD2 transfection. PHD2 expression was significantly higher expressed than the other two PHD isoforms, indicating its major role in LCs. Moreover, a significant increase of VEGF mRNA expression was identified after incubation under hypoxic conditions, which was, however, attenuated by PHD2 overexpression in LCs. Further analysis also indicated that this hypoxia‑induced increase in the mRNA expression of VEGF was consistent with increases in the protein levels of HIF‑1α, which is regulated by PHD-mediated degradation. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that PHD2 is the main PHD expressed in LCs and hypoxia‑induced VEGF expression can be attenuated by PHD2 overexpression through HIF‑1α‑mediated mechanisms in LCs. This PHD2-mediated transcriptional activation may be one of the mechanisms regulating VEGF expression in LCs during mammalian corpus luteum development. PMID:25975603

  3. Embryo-luteal cells co-culture: an in vitro model to evaluate steroidogenic and prostanoid bovine early embryo-maternal interactions.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana; Batista, Mariana; Diniz, Patrícia; Mateus, Luisa; Lopes-da-Costa, Luís

    2013-02-01

    The role of progesterone (P(4)) and prostaglandins (PGs) in bovine early embryonic development and embryo-maternal crosstalk is almost unknown. Here, the in vitro steroidogenic (P(4)) and prostanoid (PGE(2) and PGF(2α)) interactions between bovine embryos and luteal cells (LC) were evaluated. In two experiments, embryos (n = 1.900) were either co-cultured with LC or cultured alone, from days 2 to 7 (day 0 = in vitro insemination). LC were also cultured alone, and medium was used as a control, all groups being cultured either with or without oil overlay of culture medium. Oil overlay of culture medium significantly decreased the amount of P(4), but not of PGE(2) and PGF(2α) measured in culture medium. Embryos and LC had transcripts of genes coding for enzymes of the PGs (PTGS2, PGES, and PGFS) and P(4) (StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD) synthesis pathways, and produced P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) into culture medium. Co-culture with LC exerted an embryotrophic effect, significantly increasing blastocyst yield and quality. This indicates a possible direct effect of LC in early embryo development. Embryos did not exert a luteotrophic effect upon LC. This may indicate that early embryos (until day 7) probably do not exert influence in LC main function. It is suggested that production of P(4), PGE(2), and PGF(2α) by early embryos may be associated to autocrine signaling leading to events in development and to paracrine signaling in the endometrium leading to local uterine receptivity. PMID:23358866

  4. Bisphenol A Exposure during Adulthood Causes Augmentation of Follicular Atresia and Luteal Regression by Decreasing 17β-Estradiol Synthesis via Downregulation of Aromatase in Rat Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Gee; Chung, Jin-Yong; Park, Ji-Eun; Oh, Seunghoon; Yoon, Yong-Dal; Yoo, Ki Soo; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) has been detected in human body fluids, such as serum and ovarian follicular fluids. Several reports indicated that BPA exposure is associated with the occurrence of several female reproductive diseases resulting from the disruption of steroid hormone biosynthesis in the adult ovary. Objective: We hypothesized that long-term exposure to low concentrations of BPA disrupts 17β-estradiol (E2) production in granulosa cells via an alteration of steroidogenic proteins in ovarian cells. Methods: Adult female rats received BPA for 90 days by daily gavage at doses of 0, 0.001, or 0.1 mg/kg body weight. We determined serum levels of E2, testosterone (T), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). We also analyzed the expressions of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3β-HSD), and aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) in the ovary. Results: Exposure to BPA significantly decreased E2 serum concentration, which was accompanied by augmented follicular atresia and luteal regression via increase of caspase-3–associated apoptosis in ovarian cells. After BPA exposure, P450arom and StAR protein levels were significantly decreased in granulosa cells and theca-interstitial (T-I) cells, respectively. However, P450scc and 3β-HSD protein levels remained unchanged. The increase in LH levels appeared to be associated with the decreased synthesis of T in T-I cells after BPA exposure via homeostatic positive feedback regulation. Conclusions: BPA exposure during adulthood can disturb the maintenance of normal ovarian functions by reducing E2. The steroidogenic proteins StAR and P450arom appear to be targeted by BPA. PMID:23512349

  5. Readthrough acetylcholinesterase (AChE-R) and regulated necrosis: pharmacological targets for the regulation of ovarian functions?

    PubMed

    Blohberger, J; Kunz, L; Einwang, D; Berg, U; Berg, D; Ojeda, S R; Dissen, G A; Fröhlich, T; Arnold, G J; Soreq, H; Lara, H; Mayerhofer, A

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation, differentiation and death of ovarian cells ensure orderly functioning of the female gonad during the reproductive phase, which ultimately ends with menopause in women. These processes are regulated by several mechanisms, including local signaling via neurotransmitters. Previous studies showed that ovarian non-neuronal endocrine cells produce acetylcholine (ACh), which likely acts as a trophic factor within the ovarian follicle and the corpus luteum via muscarinic ACh receptors. How its actions are restricted was unknown. We identified enzymatically active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in human ovarian follicular fluid as a product of human granulosa cells. AChE breaks down ACh and thereby attenuates its trophic functions. Blockage of AChE by huperzine A increased the trophic actions as seen in granulosa cells studies. Among ovarian AChE variants, the readthrough isoform AChE-R was identified, which has further, non-enzymatic roles. AChE-R was found in follicular fluid, granulosa and theca cells, as well as luteal cells, implying that such functions occur in vivo. A synthetic AChE-R peptide (ARP) was used to explore such actions and induced in primary, cultured human granulosa cells a caspase-independent form of cell death with a distinct balloon-like morphology and the release of lactate dehydrogenase. The RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 and the MLKL-blocker necrosulfonamide significantly reduced this form of cell death. Thus a novel non-enzymatic function of AChE-R is to stimulate RIPK1/MLKL-dependent regulated necrosis (necroptosis). The latter complements a cholinergic system in the ovary, which determines life and death of ovarian cells. Necroptosis likely occurs in the primate ovary, as granulosa and luteal cells were immunopositive for phospho-MLKL, and hence necroptosis may contribute to follicular atresia and luteolysis. The results suggest that interference with the enzymatic activities of AChE and/or interference with necroptosis may be novel

  6. Comparison of transient and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions during the luteal and follicular phases of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Gurbuzler, Levent; Yelken, Kursat; Aladag, Ibrahim; Eyibilen, Ahmet; Koc, Sema

    2012-08-01

    We conducted a study to examine cochlear activity in women with a naturally occurring menstrual cycle by measuring transient otoacoustic emissions (TOAEs) and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Our study population was made up of 11 women aged 20 to 40 years (mean: 35.6) who were not taking a contraceptive medication or hormone therapy. Measurements of TOAEs and DPOAEs were made during both the follicular phase and the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. We found no statistically significant difference in any of the TOAE amplitude values between the two phases. Although a sharp decrease at the 0.75 kHz frequency was seen in DPOAEs during both phases, none of the amplitude values in the tested frequencies were significantly different between the two phases. The absence of TOAE and DPOAE amplitude changes suggests that it is unnecessary to take into account the phase of the menstrual cycle when interpreting the results of otoacoustic emissions testing. PMID:22930081

  7. eCG concentrations, luteal structures, return to cyclicity, and postabortion fertility in embryo transfer recipient mares.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Arango, J; Aguilar, J J; Vettorazzi, M L; Martínez-Boví, R

    2015-10-01

    The present study characterizes the relationship between the levels of eCG, ovarian morphology, resumption of cyclicity, and fertility in postaborted embryo transfer recipient mares. A total of 32 pregnant recipient mares carrying a male fetus were aborted at approximately 65 days of gestation by single transcervical administration of cloprostenol. In addition, 25 gestation age-matched mares were used as nonaborted controls. The concentration of progesterone, but not of eCG, differed significantly between controls and aborted mares 48 hours after abortion. Of treated mares, 84.4% (27 of 32) expelled the fetus within 48 hours of treatment. The eCG concentration and the number of supplementary luteal structures were lower in mares aborted in November (equivalent to May in Northern Hemisphere) than in January. A total of 6.2%, 37.5%, and 56.2% of the mares entered anestrus, ovulated normally, and had 1 to 2 consecutive anovulatory cycles, respectively. The mean interval from abortion to the first ovulation was 28.5 ± 3.3 days (range, 5-65 days). The correlation between the levels of eCG at abortion and the interval to the first ovulation was poor (r = 0.38; P = 0.03). Of aborted mares, 90% (18 of 20) were reused and became pregnant after embryo transfer at a mean of 57.6 ± 4.4 days after abortion (range, 19-103 days) and eCG concentration of 0.9 ± 0.3 IU/mL (range, 0.1-3.6 IU/mL). In conclusion, the levels of eCG at the time of abortion were extremely variable and did not correlate well with the number of luteal structures or the interval from abortion to the first ovulation. PMID:26143362

  8. Sexual polymorphisms of vomeronasal 1 receptor family gene expression in bulls, steers, and estrous and early luteal-phase heifers

    PubMed Central

    KUBO, Haruna; OTSUKA, Midori; KADOKAWA, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    Vomeronasal 1 receptors (V1R) are a family of receptors for intraspecies chemosignals, including pheromones, and are expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and vomeronasal organ (VO). Even in the well-studied rodents, it is unclear which members of the V1R family cause sexual polymorphisms, as there are numerous genes and it is difficult to quantify their expressions individually. Bovine species carry only 34 V1R homologs, and the OE and VOs are large enough to sample. Here, V1R expression was quantified in the OE and VOs of individual bovines. Based on the 34 gene sequences, we obtained a molecular dendrogram consisting of four clusters and six independent branches. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to obtain gene expression profiles in the VOs and OE of 5 Japanese Black bulls, 5 steers, 7 estrous heifers and 6 early luteal-phase heifers. Ten genes showed significant between-group differences, and 22 showed high expression in VOs than in OE. The bulls showed higher expression of one gene more in OE and another in VOs (both P<0.05) than did steers; both genes belonged to the first cluster. No genes were expressed more abundantly in steers than in bulls. The estrous heifers showed higher expression of a gene of the second cluster in OE, and a gene of the third cluster in VOs (both P<0.05) than did early luteal-phase heifers. These results suggest V1R expression exhibits sexual polymorphisms in cattle. PMID:26477467

  9. Sexual polymorphisms of vomeronasal 1 receptor family gene expression in bulls, steers, and estrous and early luteal-phase heifers.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Haruna; Otsuka, Midori; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2016-02-01

    Vomeronasal 1 receptors (V1R) are a family of receptors for intraspecies chemosignals, including pheromones, and are expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and vomeronasal organ (VO). Even in the well-studied rodents, it is unclear which members of the V1R family cause sexual polymorphisms, as there are numerous genes and it is difficult to quantify their expressions individually. Bovine species carry only 34 V1R homologs, and the OE and VOs are large enough to sample. Here, V1R expression was quantified in the OE and VOs of individual bovines. Based on the 34 gene sequences, we obtained a molecular dendrogram consisting of four clusters and six independent branches. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to obtain gene expression profiles in the VOs and OE of 5 Japanese Black bulls, 5 steers, 7 estrous heifers and 6 early luteal-phase heifers. Ten genes showed significant between-group differences, and 22 showed high expression in VOs than in OE. The bulls showed higher expression of one gene more in OE and another in VOs (both P<0.05) than did steers; both genes belonged to the first cluster. No genes were expressed more abundantly in steers than in bulls. The estrous heifers showed higher expression of a gene of the second cluster in OE, and a gene of the third cluster in VOs (both P<0.05) than did early luteal-phase heifers. These results suggest V1R expression exhibits sexual polymorphisms in cattle. PMID:26477467

  10. Quantitative in vivo islet potency assay in normoglycemic nude mice correlates with primary graft function after clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Robert; Gmyr, Valery; Kremer, Bertrand; Hubert, Thomas; Soudan, Benoit; Lukowiak, Bruno; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Pattou, Francois; Kerr-Conte, Julie

    2008-07-27

    Reliable assays are critically needed to monitor graft potency in islet transplantation (IT). We tested a quantitative in vivo islet potency assay (QIVIPA) based on human C-peptide (hCP) measurements in normoglycemic nude mice after IT under the kidney capsule. QIVIPA was initially tested by transplanting incremental doses of human islets. hCP levels in mice were correlated with the number of transplanted islet equivalents (r(2) = 0.6, P<0.01). We subsequently evaluated QIVIPA in eight islet preparations transplanted in type 1 diabetic patients. Conversely to standard criteria including islet mass, viability, purity, adenosine triphosphate content, or glucose stimulated insulin secretion, hCP in mice receiving 1% of the final islet product was correlated to primary graft function (hCP increase) after IT (r(2)=0.85, P<0.01). QIVIPA appears as a reliable test to monitor islet graft potency, applicable to validate new methods to produce primary islets or other human insulin secreting cells. PMID:18645503

  11. Optimization of an ex vivo wound healing model in the adult human skin: Functional evaluation using photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Garcia, Jenifer; Sebastian, Anil; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-09-01

    Limited utility of in vitro tests and animal models of human repair, create a demand for alternative models of cutaneous healing capable of functional testing. The adult human skin Wound Healing Organ Culture (WHOC) provides a useful model, to study repair and enable evaluation of therapies such as the photodynamic therapy (PDT). Thus, the aim here was to identify the optimal WHOC model and to evaluate the role of PDT in repair. Wound geometry, system of support, and growth media, cellular and matrix biomarkers were investigated in WHOC models. Subsequently, cellular activity, extracellular matrix remodeling, and oxidative stress plus gene and protein levels of makers of wound repair measured the effect of PDT on the optimized WHOC. WHOCs embedded in collagen and supplemented DMEM were better organized showing stratified epidermis and compact dermis with developing neo-epidermis. Post-PDT, the advancing reepithelialization tongue was 3.5 folds longer, and was highly proliferative with CK-14 plus p16 increased (p < 0.05) compared to controls. The neo-epidermis was fully differentiated forming neo-collagen. Proliferating nuclear antigen, p16, COLI, COLIII, MMP3, MMP19, and α-SMA were significantly more expressed (p < 0.05) in dermis surrounding the healing wound. In conclusion, an optimal model of WHOC treated with PDT shows increased reepithelialization and extracellular matrix reconstruction and remodeling, supporting evidence toward development of an optimal ex vivo wound healing model. PMID:26094764

  12. Nature, Source and Function of Pigments in Tardigrades: In Vivo Raman Imaging of Carotenoids in Echiniscus blumi

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Alois; Guidetti, Roberto; Altiero, Tiziana; Sergo, Valter; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic aquatic animals with remarkable abilities to withstand harsh physical conditions such as dehydration or exposure to harmful highly energetic radiation. The mechanisms responsible for such robustness are presently little known, but protection against oxidative stresses is thought to play a role. Despite the fact that many tardigrade species are variously pigmented, scarce information is available about this characteristic. By applying Raman micro-spectroscopy on living specimens, pigments in the tardigrade Echiniscus blumi are identified as carotenoids, and their distribution within the animal body is visualized. The dietary origin of these pigments is demonstrated, as well as their presence in the eggs and in eye-spots of these animals, together with their absence in the outer layer of the animal (i.e., cuticle and epidermis). Using in-vivo semi-quantitative Raman micro-spectroscopy, a decrease in carotenoid content is detected after inducing oxidative stress, demonstrating that this approach can be used for studying the role of carotenoids in oxidative stress-related processes in tardigrades. This approach could be thus used in further investigations to test several hypotheses concerning the function of these carotenoids in tardigrades as photo-protective pigments against ionizing radiations or as antioxidants defending these organisms against the oxidative stress occurring during desiccation processes. PMID:23185564

  13. In vivo kinetics of the uremic toxin p-cresyl sulfate in mice with variable renal function.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jingwei; Zhang, Wenli; Zhu, Zhengbin; Zhu, Jinzhou; Du, Run; Jing, Yajun; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Ruiyan

    2014-12-01

    Uremic toxins such as p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) are associated with increased mortality for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, but in vivo PCS toxicity studies are limited due to the lack of a standard animal model. To establish such a model, we measured the pharmacokinetics of PCS in mice with variable renal function. Male Balb/c mice subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy (CRF), unilateral nephrectomy (UNX), or no surgery (controls) were given PCS (po, 50 mg/kg). Blood samples were collected over time and plasma PCS concentrations were measured. Over 4 h, PCS was significantly higher in the plasma of CRF mice (63.28 ± 2.76 mg/L), compared to UNX mice (3.11 ± 0.64 mg/L) and controls (0.39 ± 0.12 mg/L). The PCS half-life was greatest in CRF mice (12.07 ± 0.12 h), compared to 0.79 ± 0.04 h in UNX mice and 0.48 ± 0.02 h in control mice. However, the potential presence of additional uremic toxins along with PCS in CRF mice and rapid PCS clearance in control mice suggest that the UNX mouse would be a better PCS model to study toxicity. PMID:25256665

  14. Molecular crowding impacts the structure of apolipoprotein A-I with potential implications on in vivo metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Petrlova, Jitka; Hilt, Silvia; Budamagunta, Madhu; Domingo-Espín, Joan; Voss, John C; Lagerstedt, Jens O

    2016-10-01

    The effect molecular crowding, defined as the volume exclusion exerted by one soluble inert molecule upon another soluble molecule, has on the structure and self-interaction of lipid-free apoA-I were explored. The influence of molecular crowding on lipid-free apoA-I oligomerization and internal dynamics has been analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of nitroxide spin label at selected positions throughout the protein sequence and at varying concentrations of the crowding agent Ficoll-70. The targeted positions include sites previously shown to be sensitive for detecting intermolecular interaction via spin-spin coupling. Circular dichroism was used to study secondary structural changes in lipid-free apoA-I imposed by increasing concentrations of the crowding agent. Crosslinking and SDS-PAGE gel analysis was employed to further characterize the role molecular crowding plays in inducing apoA-I oligomerization. It was concluded that the dynamic apoA-I structure and oligomeric state was altered in the presence of the crowding agent. It was also found that the C-terminal was slightly more sensitive to molecular crowding. Finally, the data described the region around residue 217 in the C-terminal domain of apoA-I as the most sensitive reporter of the crowding-induced self-association of apoA-I. The implications of this behavior to in vivo functionality are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 683-692, 2016. PMID:27122373

  15. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and

  16. Potential electron mediators to extract electron energies of RBC glycolysis for prolonged in vivo functional lifetime of hemoglobin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kettisen, Karin; Bülow, Leif; Sakai, Hiromi

    2015-04-15

    Developing a functional blood substitute as an alternative to donated blood for clinical use is believed to relieve present and future blood shortages, and to reduce the risks of infection and blood type mismatching. Hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) encapsulates a purified and concentrated human-derived Hb solution in a phospholipid vesicle (liposome). The in vivo safety and efficacy of HbV as a transfusion alternative have been clarified. Auto-oxidation of ferrous Hb in HbV gradually increases the level of ferric methemoglobin (metHb) and impairs the oxygen transport capabilities. The extension of the functional half-life of HbV has recently been proposed using an electron mediator, methylene blue (MB), which acts as a shuttle between red blood cells (RBC) and HbV. MB transfers electron energies of NAD(P)H, produced by RBC glycolysis, to metHb in HbV. Work presented here focuses on screening of 15 potential electron mediators, with appropriate redox potential and water solubility, for electron transfer from RBC to HbV. The results are assessed with regard to the chemical properties of the candidates. The compounds examined in this study were dimethyl methylene blue (DMB), methylene green, azure A, azure B, azure C, toluidine blue (TDB), thionin acetate, phenazine methosulfate, brilliant cresyl blue, cresyl violet, gallocyanine, toluylene blue, indigo carmine, indigotetrasulfonate, and MB. Six candidates were found to be unsuitable because of their insufficient diffusion across membranes, or overly high or nonexistent reactivity with relevant biomolecules. However, 9 displayed favorable metHb reduction. Among the suitable candidates, phenothiazines DMB and TDB exhibited effectiveness like MB did. In comparison to MB, they showed faster reduction by electron-donating NAD(P)H, coupled with showing a lower rate of reoxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen. Ascertaining the best electron mediator can provide a pathway for extending the lifetime and efficiency of

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the effects of piperine on P-gp function and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yi; Chin Tan, Theresa May; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Piperine, a major component of black pepper, is used as spice and nutrient enhancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and prolonged piperine exposure on cellular P-gp expression and function in vitro and in vivo. Piperine at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, determined by MTT assay to be non-cytotoxic, was observed to inhibit P-gp mediated efflux transport of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin across L-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell monolayers. The acute inhibitory effect was dependent on piperine concentration, with abolishment of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin polarized transport attained at 50 {mu}M of piperine. In contrast, prolonged (48 and 72 h) co-incubation of Caco-2 cell monolayers with piperine (50 and 100 {mu}M) increased P-gp activity through an up-regulation of cellular P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA levels. The up-regulated protein was functionally active, as demonstrated by a higher degree of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin efflux across the cell monolayers, but the induction was readily reversed by the removal of the spice from the culture medium. Peroral administration of piperine at the dose of 112 {mu}g/kg body weight/day to male Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days also led to increased intestinal P-gp levels. However, there was a concomitant reduction in the rodent liver P-gp although the kidney P-gp level was unaffected. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when piperine is to be co-administered with drugs that are P-gp substrates, particularly for patients whose diet relies heavily on pepper.

  18. The protein interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase II with SFH2p and its in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mee-Kyung; Hong, Seung-Keun; Oh, Young-Mee; Kim, Il-Han

    2003-09-12

    Previously, we reported that the yeast cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase type II isoform (cTPx II), a member of the TSA/AhpC family, showed a very low peroxidase activity when compared with other cytoplasmic yeast isoforms, and that cTPx II mutant (cTPx II Delta) showed a severe growth retardation compared with that of the wild-type cells. To reveal the physiological function of cTPx II in yeast cell growth, we searched for proteins which react with cTPx II. In this study, we identified a novel interaction between cTPx II and CSR1p using the yeast two-hybrid system. CSR1p (SFH2p) has been known to be one member of Sec14 homologous (SFH2) proteins. SFH2p exhibits phosphatidylinositol transfer protein activity. Interestingly, we found that cTPx II selectively bound to SFH2p among the five types of SFH proteins and Sec14p. The interaction required the dimerization of cTPx II. In addition, SFH2p also specifically bound to cTPx II among the yeast thiol peroxidase isoforms. The selective interaction of the dimer form of cTPx II (the oxidized form) with SFH2p was also confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. The growth retardation, clearly reflected by the length of the lag phase, of cTPx II Delta was rescued by deleting SFH2p in the cTPx II Delta strain. The SFH2 Delta strain did not show any growth retardation. In addition, the double mutant showed a higher susceptibility to oxidative stress. This finding provides the first in vivo demonstration of the specific interaction of cTPx II with SFH2p in an oxidative stress-sensitive manner and a novel physiological function of the complex of cTPx II and SFH2p. PMID:12824182

  19. Thymoquinone strongly inhibits fMLF-induced neutrophil functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boudiaf, Kaouthar; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Marie, Jean-Claude; Derradji, Yacine; Benboubetra, Mustapha; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-03-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are key players in host defense against pathogens through the robust production of superoxide anion by the NADPH oxidase and the release of antibacterial proteins from granules. However, inappropriate release of these agents in the extracellular environment induces severe tissue injury, thereby contributing to the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Many studies have been carried out to identify molecules capable of inhibiting phagocyte functions, in particular superoxide anion production, for therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we show that thymoquinone (TQ), the major component of the volatile oil from Nigella sativa (black cumin) seeds strongly inhibits fMLF-induced superoxide production and granules exocytosis in neutrophils. The inhibition of superoxide anion was not due to a scavenger effect, as TQ did not inhibit superoxide anion produced by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Interestingly, TQ impaired the phosphorylation on Ser-304 and Ser-328 of p47(PHOX), a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase. TQ also attenuated specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of gp91(PHOX) and CD11b, and release of myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, both the PKC and MAPK pathways, which are involved in p47(PHOX) phosphorylation and granules exocytosis, respectively, were inhibited by TQ in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. Finally, in a model of pleurisy induced by λ-carrageenan in rats, TQ reduced neutrophil accumulation in the pleural space, showing that it not only inhibits PMN functions in vitro, but also exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. Thus, TQ possesses promising anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential. PMID:26774451

  20. Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in mouse angiotensinogen does not affect AngII-dependent functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Congqing; Xu, Yinchuan; Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Cassis, Lisa A; Wang, Jian-an; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Renin cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) releases angiotensin I (AngI) in the initial step of producing all angiotensin peptides. It has been suggested recently that redox regulation of a disulfide bond in AGT involving Cys18-Cys137 may be important to its renin cleavage efficiency in vivo. The purpose of this study was to test this prediction in a mouse model by comparing AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice expressing wild-type AGT versus a mutated form of AGT lacking the disulfide bond. Wild-type (hepAGT+/+) and hepatocyte-specific AGT-deficient (hepAGT-/-) littermates were developed in an low-density lipoprotein receptor -/- background. hepAGT+/+ mice were injected intraperitoneally with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a null insert. hepAGT-/- mice were injected with AAV containing a null insert, wild-type AGT or Cys18Ser and Cys137Ser mutated AGT. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. Administration of AAV containing either form of AGT led to similar plasma AGT concentrations in hepAGT-/- mice. High plasma renin concentrations in hepAGT-/- mice were suppressed equally by both forms of AGT, which were accompanied by comparable increases of plasma AngII concentrations similar to hepAGT+/+ mice. AAV-driven expression of both forms of AGT led to equivalent increases of systolic blood pressure and augmentation of atherosclerotic lesion size in hepAGT-/- mice. These measurements were comparable to systolic blood pressure and atherosclerotic lesions in hepAGT+/+ mice. These data indicate that the Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in AGT is dispensable for AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice. PMID:25691624

  1. The Cys18-Cys137 Disulfide Bond in Mouse Angiotensinogen Does Not Affect AngII-dependent Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Congqing; Xu, Yinchuan; Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Wang, Jian-an; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Renin cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) releases angiotensin I (AngI) in the initial step of producing all angiotensin peptides. It has been suggested recently that redox regulation of a disulfide bond in AGT involving Cys18-Cys137 may be important to its renin cleavage efficiency in vivo. The purpose of this study was to test this prediction in a mouse model by comparing AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice expressing wild-type AGT versus a mutated form of AGT lacking the disulfide bond. Wild-type (hepAGT+/+) and hepatocyte-specific AGT deficient (hepAGT−/−) littermates were developed in an LDL receptor −/− background. hepAGT+/+ mice were injected intraperitoneally with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a null insert. hepAGT−/− mice were injected with AAV containing a null insert, wild-type AGT, or Cys18Ser and Cys137Ser mutated AGT. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. Administration of AAV containing either form of AGT led to similar plasma AGT concentrations in hepAGT−/− mice. High plasma renin concentrations in hepAGT−/− mice were suppressed equally by both forms of AGT, which were accompanied by comparable increases of plasma AngII concentrations similar to hepAGT+/+ mice. AAV-driven expression of both forms of AGT led to equivalent increases of systolic blood pressure and augmentation of atherosclerotic lesion size in hepAGT−/− mice. These measurements were comparable to systolic blood pressure and atherosclerotic lesions in hepAGT+/+ mice. These data indicate that the Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in AGT is dispensable for AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice. PMID:25691624

  2. The relationship between fatty acid profiles in milk identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and onset of luteal activity in Norwegian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Martin, A D; Afseth, N K; Kohler, A; Randby, Å; Eknæs, M; Waldmann, A; Dørum, G; Måge, I; Reksen, O

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of milk fatty acids as predictors of onset of luteal activity (OLA), 87 lactations taken from 73 healthy Norwegian Red cattle were surveyed over 2 winter housing seasons. The feasibility of using frozen milk samples for dry-film Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) determination of milk samples was also tested. Morning milk samples were collected thrice weekly (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) for the first 10 wk in milk (WIM). These samples had bronopol (2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol) added to them before being frozen at -20°C, thawed, and analyzed by ELISA to determine progesterone concentration and the concentrations of the milk fatty acids C4:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, and cis-9 C18:1 as a proportion of total milk fatty acid content using dry-film FTIR, and averaged by WIM. Onset of luteal activity was defined as the first day that milk progesterone concentrations were >3 ng/mL for 2 successive measurements; the study population was categorized as early (n=47) or late (n=40) OLA, using the median value of 21 DIM as the cutoff. Further milk samples were collected 6 times weekly, from morning and afternoon milkings, these were pooled by WIM, and one proportional sample was analyzed fresh for fat, protein, and lactose content by the dairy company Tine SA, using traditional FTIR spectrography in the wet phase of milk. Daily energy-balance calculations were performed in 42 lactations and averaged by WIM. Animals experiencing late OLA had a more negative energy balance in WIM 1, 3, 4, and 5, with the greatest differences been seen in WIM 3 and 4. A higher proportion of the fatty acids were medium chained, C14:0 and C16:0, in the early than in the late OLA group from WIM 1. In WIM 4, the proportion of total fatty acid content that was C16:0 predicted late OLA, with 74% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The long-chain proportion of the fatty acids C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1 were lower in the early than in the late OLA group. Differences were greatest in

  3. Apoptosis-Related Factors in the Luteal Phase of the Domestic Cat and Their Involvement in the Persistence of Corpora Lutea in Lynx.

    PubMed

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Braun, Beate C; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland formed in the ovary after ovulation and is the major source of progesterone. In the Iberian and Eurasian lynx, CL physiologically persist after parturition and retain their capacity to produce progesterone, thus suppressing the ovarian activity. This unique reproductive characteristic has a big impact on the success of assisted reproduction techniques in the endangered Iberian lynx. The mechanisms behind CL persistence are not yet understood and require extensive studies on potential luteotropic and luteolytic factors in felids. Because the apoptosis system has been shown to be involved in structural regression of CL in many species, we aimed to investigate the capacity of perCL to undergo apoptosis. In addition, we performed initial studies on the apoptosis system in the luteal phase of the domestic cat. No previous research on this system has been made in this species. Our factors of interest included agents of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, i.e., pro-survival B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), the executioner caspase-3 (CASP3), as well as of the extrinsic pathway, i.e., pro-apoptotic receptor FAS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors (pro-apoptotic TNFRSF1A and pro-survival TNFRSF1B). We analyzed the relative mRNA levels of these factors, as well as protein localization of CASP3 and TNF during stages of pregnancy and the non-pregnant luteal phase in CL of domestic cats. The same factors were investigated in freshly ovulated CL (frCL) and perCL of Iberian and Eurasian lynx, which were histologically analyzed. All factors were present in the CL tissue of both domestic cat and lynx throughout all analyzed stages. The presence of pro-apoptotic factors BAX, CASP3, FAS and TNFRSF1A in perCL of the Eurasian and Iberian lynx might indicate the potential sensitivity of perCL to apoptotic signals. The expression of pro-survival factors BCL2 and TNFRSF1B was

  4. Apoptosis-Related Factors in the Luteal Phase of the Domestic Cat and Their Involvement in the Persistence of Corpora Lutea in Lynx

    PubMed Central

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Braun, Beate C.; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland formed in the ovary after ovulation and is the major source of progesterone. In the Iberian and Eurasian lynx, CL physiologically persist after parturition and retain their capacity to produce progesterone, thus suppressing the ovarian activity. This unique reproductive characteristic has a big impact on the success of assisted reproduction techniques in the endangered Iberian lynx. The mechanisms behind CL persistence are not yet understood and require extensive studies on potential luteotropic and luteolytic factors in felids. Because the apoptosis system has been shown to be involved in structural regression of CL in many species, we aimed to investigate the capacity of perCL to undergo apoptosis. In addition, we performed initial studies on the apoptosis system in the luteal phase of the domestic cat. No previous research on this system has been made in this species. Our factors of interest included agents of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, i.e., pro-survival B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), the executioner caspase-3 (CASP3), as well as of the extrinsic pathway, i.e., pro-apoptotic receptor FAS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors (pro-apoptotic TNFRSF1A and pro-survival TNFRSF1B). We analyzed the relative mRNA levels of these factors, as well as protein localization of CASP3 and TNF during stages of pregnancy and the non-pregnant luteal phase in CL of domestic cats. The same factors were investigated in freshly ovulated CL (frCL) and perCL of Iberian and Eurasian lynx, which were histologically analyzed. All factors were present in the CL tissue of both domestic cat and lynx throughout all analyzed stages. The presence of pro-apoptotic factors BAX, CASP3, FAS and TNFRSF1A in perCL of the Eurasian and Iberian lynx might indicate the potential sensitivity of perCL to apoptotic signals. The expression of pro-survival factors BCL2 and TNFRSF1B was

  5. Effect of different doses of equine chorionic gonadotropin on follicular and luteal dynamics and P/AI of high-producing Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Ayres, H; Sales, J N S; Souza, A H; Rodrigues, C A; Baruselli, P S

    2013-07-01

    The hypotheses of this study were (1) that the administration of 400IU eCG in a TAI protocol would increase ovarian follicular growth and diameter of the largest follicle (LF), volume of the CL, and produce an earlier rise on serum concentration of progesterone (P4) to ultimately improve P/AI compared to non-treated high-producing Holstein cows; and (2) that 600IU of eCG could enhance any potential effects of a greater gonadotropin treatment upon follicular and luteal size and function, improving P/AI. Cows were subjected to a protocol of synchronization of ovulation for timed artificial insemination (TAI): D0-P4 device insert and estradiol benzoate, D8-P4 device removal and PGF2α; Experiment 1, D10PM - GnRH plus TAI; and Experiment 2, D10AM - GnRH, D10PM - TAI. In Experiment 1, at P4 device removal, cows were assigned to one of the two treatments to receive none (n=232) or 400IU (n=232) of eCG. In Experiment 2, again at P4 device removal, cows were assigned to one of the three treatments to receive no eCG, (n=166) 400 (n=145) or 600IU (n=145) of eCG. Pregnancy was diagnosed 35 days after TAI. Ultrasonographic examination of both ovaries was done in a subset of cows in Experiments 1 [no eCG (n=27) and 400IU eCG (n=14)], and 2 [no eCG (n=15), 400IU eCG (n=14) and 600IU eCG (n=11)]. Exams were conducted at device removal (D8) and TAI (D10) to measure the diameter of the LF; then twice daily from D10 to 13, to determine time to ovulation and the maximum diameter of the LF; and then 3 (D14), 6 (D17), 9 (D20) and 12 (D23) days after presumed ovulation, concurrent with blood sampling, to measure the volume of the CL and serum concentration of P4. In both studies, eCG (400 or 600IU)-treated cows had similar diameter of the LF on D8 and D10, growth rate of the LF from Days 8 to 10, ovulation rate, time to ovulation, volume of the CL, serum concentration of P4 and P/AI as compared to control animals. Thus, adding either 400 or 600IU eCG to TAI protocols was inefficient to

  6. Specific Schistosoma mansoni rat T cell clones. I. Generation and functional analysis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pestel, J; Dissous, C; Dessaint, J P; Louis, J; Engers, H; Capron, A

    1985-06-01

    In an attempt to determine the role of schistosome-specific T cells in the immune mechanisms developed during schistosomiasis, Schistosoma mansoni-specific T cells and clones were generated in vitro and some of their functions analyzed in vitro and in vivo in the fischer rat model. The data presented here can be summarized as follows: a) Lymph node cells (LNC) from rats primed with the excretory/secretory antigens-incubation products (IPSm) of adult worms proliferate in vitro only in response to the homologous schistosome antigens and not to unrelated antigens (Ag) such as ovalbumin (OVA) or Dipetalonema viteae and Fasciola hepatica parasite extracts. b) After in vitro restimulation of the primed LNC population with IPSm in the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and maintenance in IL 2-containing medium, the frequency of IPSm-specific T cells is increased and the T cells can be restimulated only in the presence of APC possessing the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. c) Following appropriate limiting dilution assays (LDA) (1 cell/well), 10 IPSm-specific T cell clones were obtained, and two of four maintained in culture were tested for their helper activity because they expressed only the W3/13+ W3/25+ surface phenotypes. d) The two highly proliferating IPSm-specific T cell clones (G5 and E23) exhibit an IPSm-dependent helper activity, as shown by the increase in IgG production by IPSm-primed B cells. e) IPSm-T cell clone (G5) as well as IPSm-T cell lines when injected in S. mansoni-infested rats can exert an in vivo helper activity, which is characterized by an accelerated production of IgG antibodies specific for the previously identified 30 to 40 kilodaltons (kd) schistosomula surface antigens (Ag). As recent studies have demonstrated that rat monoclonal antibodies recognize some incubation products of adult S. mansoni as well as one of the 30 to 40 kd schistosomula surface antigens, and taking into account the fact that the T cell

  7. Urinary Concentrations of Phthalate Metabolites and Bisphenol A and Associations with Follicular-Phase Length, Luteal-Phase Length, Fecundability, and Early Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jukic, Anne Marie; Calafat, Antonia M.; McConnaughey, D. Robert; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Baird, Donna D.; Calafat, Antonia M.; McConnaughey, D. Robert; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Baird, Donna D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Certain phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) show reproductive effects in animal studies and potentially affect human ovulation, conception, and pregnancy loss. Objectives We investigated these chemicals in relation to follicular- and luteal-phase lengths, time to pregnancy, and early pregnancy loss (within 6 weeks of the last menstrual period) among women attempting pregnancy. Methods Women discontinuing contraception provided daily first-morning urine specimens and recorded days with vaginal bleeding for up to 6 months. Specimens had previously been analyzed for estrogen and progesterone metabolites and human chorionic gonadotropin. A total of 221 participants contributed 706 menstrual cycles. We measured 11 phthalate metabolites and BPA in pooled urine from three specimens spaced throughout each menstrual cycle. We analyzed associations between chemical concentrations and outcomes using linear mixed models for follicular- and luteal-phase lengths, discrete-time fecundability models for time to pregnancy, and logistic regression for early pregnancy loss. Results Higher concentrations of monocarboxyoctyl phthalate (MCOP) were associated with shorter luteal phase [2nd tertile vs. 1st tertile: –0.5 days (95% CI: –0.9, –0.1), 3rd vs. 1st: –0.4 days (95% CI: –0.8, 0.01), p = 0.04]. BPA was also associated with shorter luteal phase [2nd vs. 1st: –0.8 days (95% CI: –1.2, –0.4), 3rd vs. 1st: –0.4 days (95% CI: –0.8, 0.02), p = 0.001]. Conclusions BPA and MCOP (or its precursors) were associated with shorter luteal phase. Menstrual cycle–specific estimates of urinary BPA and phthalate metabolites were not associated with detrimental alterations in follicular-phase length, time to pregnancy, or early pregnancy loss, and in fact, DEHP [di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] metabolites {MEOHP [mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate] and ΣDEHP} were associated with reduced early loss. These findings should be confirmed in future human studies. Citation Jukic

  8. Application of an Amine Functionalized Biopolymer in the Colonic Delivery of Glycyrrhizin: A Design and In Vivo Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar De, Amit; Datta, Sriparna; Mukherjee, Arup

    2013-01-01

    In our current study, a newer amine functionalized guar gum derivative was studied for its efficacy in colonic drug delivery. Glycyrrhizic acid mono-ammonium salt was used as the model drug. Drug-loaded microparticles were formulated by ionic crosslinking using sodium tripolyphosphate. The Scanning Electron Microscopic study revealed spherical particles of sizes from 4.9 ± 3.8 μm to 6.9 ± 3.9 μm. The FT-IR studies presented a possible interaction between the drug and the polymer. The drug was encapsulated in amorphous form as observed from the powder X-Ray Diffraction studies. A cumulative drug release study was carried out in simulated gastric, intestinal, and colonic fluids. The cumulative drug release studies presented a burst release followed by a sustained release of the drug in simulated colonic fluid containing rat cecal contents. The drug-polymer ratio was optimised using a 32 factorial design by taking the amounts of glycyrrhizic acid (X1) and guar gum alkyl amine (X2) as the independant variables. The percent cumulative drug release at 240 mins (Q240), 720 mins (Q720), and at 1,440 mins (Q1440) were considered as the dependant variables. The efficacy of the optimized formulation was studied in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced rat colitis model. The tissue’s nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and myeloperoxidase activities were found to be much lower in the microparticle-treated group compared to free drug-treated group. The histology of the colonic tissue from the treated group of animals revealed almost no infiltration of inflammatory cells in the tissue for the microparticle-treated group of animals. The synthesized amine derivative of guar gum was found to be better in vitro with a better in vivo efficacy in the colonic delivery of glycyrrhizic acid monoammonium salt and can be considered as a newer modified biopolymer for colonic drug delivery. PMID:24482776

  9. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca’ Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2/FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2/FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40–84] vs. 39 [36–46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  10. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca' Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2 /FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2 /FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40-84] vs. 39 [36-46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  11. Model of pediatric pituitary hormone deficiency separates the endocrine and neural functions of the LHX3 transcription factor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Stephanie C; Malik, Raleigh E; Showalter, Aaron D; Sloop, Kyle W; Rhodes, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of most pediatric hormone deficiency diseases is poorly understood. Children with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) have insufficient levels of multiple anterior pituitary hormones causing short stature, metabolic disease, pubertal failure, and often have associated nervous system symptoms. Mutations in developmental regulatory genes required for the specification of the hormone-secreting cell types of the pituitary gland underlie severe forms of CPHD. To better understand these diseases, we have created a unique mouse model of CPHD with a targeted knockin mutation (Lhx3 W227ter), which is a model for the human LHX3 W224ter disease. The LHX3 gene encodes a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, which has essential roles in pituitary and nervous system development in mammals. The introduced premature termination codon results in deletion of the carboxyl terminal region of the LHX3 protein, which is critical for pituitary gene activation. Mice that lack all LHX3 function do not survive beyond birth. By contrast, the homozygous Lhx3 W227ter mice survive, but display marked dwarfism, thyroid disease, and female infertility. Importantly, the Lhx3 W227ter mice have no apparent nervous system deficits. The Lhx3 W227ter mouse model provides a unique array of hormone deficits and facilitates experimental approaches that are not feasible with human patients. These experiments demonstrate that the carboxyl terminus of the LHX3 transcription factor is not required for viability. More broadly, this study reveals that the in vivo actions of a transcription factor in different tissues are molecularly separable. PMID:21149718

  12. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further

  13. Assessment of blood clot formation and platelet receptor function ex vivo in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Collins, K S; Balasubramaniam, K; Viswanathan, G; Natasari, A; Tarn, J; Lendrem, D; Mitchell, S; Zaman, A; Ng, W F

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) shares clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is associated with an increased thromboembolic risk; however, it is unclear whether pSS patients are susceptible to thromboembolic diseases. In this study, we examined ex vivo blood clot formation (clot strength, rates of clot formation and lysis) in pSS using thromboelastography (TEG) and platelet aggregation to common agonists using multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA). We also investigated the relationship between TEG/MEA parameters and clinical/laboratory features of pSS. Design Case control. Setting Secondary care, single centre. Participants 34 pSS patients, 11 SLE patients and 13 healthy volunteers (all women) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes: TEG and MEA parameters between three subject groups. Secondary outcomes: The relationships between TEG/MEA and clinical/laboratory parameters analysed using bivariate correlation analysis with corrections for multiple testing. Results All TEG and MEA parameters were similar for the three subject groups. After corrections for multiple testing, interleukin (IL)-1α and Macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-1α remain correlated inversely with clot strength (r=−0.686, p=0.024 and r=−0.730, p=0.012, respectively) and overall coagulability (r=−0.640, p=0.048 and r=−0.648, p=0.048). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that several cytokines such as MIP-1α, IL-17a, IL-1α and Interferon (IFN)-γ may be key predictors of clot strength and overall coagulability in pSS. Conclusions Clot kinetics and platelet receptor function are normal in pSS. Several cytokines correlate with clot strength and overall coagulability in pSS. PMID:23793707

  14. Lessons from the dissection of the activation functions (AF-1 and AF-2) of the estrogen receptor alpha in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Abot, Anne; Valera, Marie-Cécile; Laurell, Henrik; Gourdy, Pierre; Lenfant, Françoise

    2013-06-01

    Estrogens influence most of the physiological processes in mammals, including but not limited to reproduction, cognition, behavior, vascular system, metabolism and bone integrity. Given this widespread role for estrogen in human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen influence the pathophysiology of numerous diseases, including cancer (of the reproductive tract as breast, endometrial but also colorectal, prostate,…), as well as neurodegenerative, inflammatory-immune, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and osteoporosis. These actions are mediated by the activation of estrogen receptors (ER) alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), which regulate target gene transcription (genomic action) through two independent activation functions (AF)-1 and AF-2, but can also elicit rapid membrane initiated steroid signals (MISS). Targeted ER gene inactivation has shown that although ERβ plays an important role in the central nervous system and in the heart, ERα appears to play a prominent role in most of the other tissues. Pharmacological activation or inhibition of ERα and/or ERβ provides already the basis for many therapeutic interventions, from hormone replacement at menopause to prevention of the recurrence of breast cancer. However, the use of these estrogens or selective estrogen receptors modulators (SERMs) have also induced undesired effects. Thus, an important challenge consists now to uncouple the beneficial actions from other deleterious ones. The in vivo molecular "dissection" of ERα represents both a molecular and integrated approach that already allowed to delineate in mouse the role of the main "subfunctions" of the receptor and that could pave the way to an optimization of the ER modulation. PMID:23200732

  15. In vivo vascularization of MSC-loaded porous hydroxyapatite constructs coated with VEGF-functionalized collagen/heparin multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kai; Li, Bo; Lou, Lixia; Xu, Yufeng; Ye, Xin; Yao, Ke; Ye, Juan; Gao, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and adequate vascularization is vital to the long-term success of porous orbital enucleation implants. In this study, porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds coated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-functionalized collagen (COL)/heparin (HEP) multilayers (porosity 75%, pore size 316.8 ± 77.1 μm, VEGF dose 3.39 ng/mm3) were fabricated to enhance vascularization by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to endothelial cells. The in vitro immunofluorescence staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and western blotting results demonstrated that the expression of the endothelial differentiation markers CD31, Flk-1, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) was significantly increased in the HA/(COL/HEP)5/VEGF/MSCs group compared with the HA/VEGF/MSCs group. Moreover, the HA/(COL/HEP)5 scaffolds showed a better entrapment of the MSCs and accelerated cell proliferation. The in vivo assays showed that the number of newly formed vessels within the constructs after 28 d was significantly higher in the HA/(COL/HEP)5/VEGF/MSCs group (51.9 ± 6.3/mm2) than in the HA (26.7 ± 2.3/mm2) and HA/VEGF/MSCs (38.2 ± 2.4/mm2) groups. The qRT-PCR and western blotting results demonstrated that the HA/(COL/HEP)5/VEGF/MSCs group also had the highest expression of CD31, Flk-1, and vWF at both the mRNA and protein levels. PMID:26794266

  16. Application of an amine functionalized biopolymer in the colonic delivery of glycyrrhizin: a design and in vivo efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Kumar De, Amit; Datta, Sriparna; Mukherjee, Arup

    2013-12-01

    In our current study, a newer amine functionalized guar gum derivative was studied for its efficacy in colonic drug delivery. Glycyrrhizic acid mono-ammonium salt was used as the model drug. Drug-loaded microparticles were formulated by ionic crosslinking using sodium tripolyphosphate. The Scanning Electron Microscopic study revealed spherical particles of sizes from 4.9 ± 3.8 μm to 6.9 ± 3.9 μm. The FT-IR studies presented a possible interaction between the drug and the polymer. The drug was encapsulated in amorphous form as observed from the powder X-Ray Diffraction studies. A cumulative drug release study was carried out in simulated gastric, intestinal, and colonic fluids. The cumulative drug release studies presented a burst release followed by a sustained release of the drug in simulated colonic fluid containing rat cecal contents. The drug-polymer ratio was optimised using a 3(2) factorial design by taking the amounts of glycyrrhizic acid (X1) and guar gum alkyl amine (X2) as the independant variables. The percent cumulative drug release at 240 mins (Q240), 720 mins (Q720), and at 1,440 mins (Q1440) were considered as the dependant variables. The efficacy of the optimized formulation was studied in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced rat colitis model. The tissue's nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and myeloperoxidase activities were found to be much lower in the microparticle-treated group compared to free drug-treated group. The histology of the colonic tissue from the treated group of animals revealed almost no infiltration of inflammatory cells in the tissue for the microparticle-treated group of animals. The synthesized amine derivative of guar gum was found to be better in vitro with a better in vivo efficacy in the colonic delivery of glycyrrhizic acid monoammonium salt and can be considered as a newer modified biopolymer for colonic drug delivery. PMID:24482776

  17. Cilostazol Improves Proangiogenesis Functions in Human Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells through the Stromal Cell-Derived Factor System and Hybrid Therapy Provides a Synergistic Effect In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shih-Ya; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Li, Yi-Heng; Cho, Chung-Lung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cilostazol on proangiogenesis functions in human early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vitro and the therapeutic implication of hybrid therapy with cilostazol and human early EPCs in vivo. Cilostazol significantly increased colony-forming units and enhanced differentiation of EPCs toward endothelial lineage. Treatments resulted in antiapoptotic effects and stimulated proliferation and migration and in vitro vascular tube formation through activation of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Blood flow recovery and capillary density in murine ischemic hindlimbs were significantly improved in cilostazol-treated, human early EPCs-treated, and cotreatment groups. The effects were attenuated with SDF-1α inhibition. Plasma SDF-1α levels were significantly higher in 3 active treatment groups after surgery, with greatest effects observed in hybrid therapy. The angiogenic effects of transplanted EPCs pretreated with cilostazol ex vivo were superior to untreated EPCs using in vivo Matrigel assay. Implanted EPCs were incorporated into the capillary, with pretreatment or cotreatment with cilostazol resulting in enhanced effects. Taken together, cilostazol promotes a large number of proangiogenic functions in human early EPCs through activation of SDF-1/CXCR4/PI3K/Akt signaling, and hybrid therapy provides a synergistic effect in vivo. Cotreatment may be beneficial in ischemic disease. PMID:27595100

  18. Cilostazol Improves Proangiogenesis Functions in Human Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells through the Stromal Cell-Derived Factor System and Hybrid Therapy Provides a Synergistic Effect In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Shih-Ya; Li, Yi-Heng; Cho, Chung-Lung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cilostazol on proangiogenesis functions in human early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vitro and the therapeutic implication of hybrid therapy with cilostazol and human early EPCs in vivo. Cilostazol significantly increased colony-forming units and enhanced differentiation of EPCs toward endothelial lineage. Treatments resulted in antiapoptotic effects and stimulated proliferation and migration and in vitro vascular tube formation through activation of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Blood flow recovery and capillary density in murine ischemic hindlimbs were significantly improved in cilostazol-treated, human early EPCs-treated, and cotreatment groups. The effects were attenuated with SDF-1α inhibition. Plasma SDF-1α levels were significantly higher in 3 active treatment groups after surgery, with greatest effects observed in hybrid therapy. The angiogenic effects of transplanted EPCs pretreated with cilostazol ex vivo were superior to untreated EPCs using in vivo Matrigel assay. Implanted EPCs were incorporated into the capillary, with pretreatment or cotreatment with cilostazol resulting in enhanced effects. Taken together, cilostazol promotes a large number of proangiogenic functions in human early EPCs through activation of SDF-1/CXCR4/PI3K/Akt signaling, and hybrid therapy provides a synergistic effect in vivo. Cotreatment may be beneficial in ischemic disease. PMID:27595100

  19. Relationship between in vitro sperm functional tests and in vivo fertility of rams following cervical artificial insemination of ewes with frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    O' Meara, C M; Hanrahan, J P; Prathalingam, N S; Owen, J S; Donovan, A; Fair, S; Ward, F; Wade, M; Evans, A C O; Lonergan, P

    2008-03-01

    Several procedures have been proposed to assess structural and functional characteristics of cryopreserved ram semen but none so far have yielded consistent relationships with in vivo fertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate several sperm function tests as potential markers of in vivo ram fertility (determined by pregnancy rate in ewes) using frozen-thawed semen. In experiment 1, frozen-thawed straws (n=3 per ram) of semen from three high and three low fertility rams were assessed using fluorescent microscopy for (1) progressive motility, (2) viability and, (3) acrosomal status. In experiment 2, frozen-thawed straws (n=3 per ram) of semen from 18 rams of known fertility were analysed using either computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) for eight motion characteristics or flow cytometric staining for: (1) viability and acrosomal status, (2) plasma membrane status and capacitation-like changes, and (3) live cells following an osmotic resistance test (ORT). In experiment 3, platelet-activating factor (PAF) was isolated from straws (n=2 per ram) of semen using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantified using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry for 18 rams. In experiment 1, no association was found between motility, viability (% live) or acrosomal status (% damaged, % intact and % reacted) and in vivo fertility. In experiment 2, no correlation was found between motility (CASA), viability (% live), acrosomal status (% live, % live intact and % reacted), capacitation status (% capacitated, % non-capacitated), plasma membrane stability (% dead) and % live cells following ORT and ram in vivo fertility. In experiment 3, there was no relationship between PAF content in spermatozoa and ram fertility. In conclusion, we were unable to relate the in vivo fertility of rams with in vitro functional tests of their frozen-thawed semen and suggest that the fertility of a given semen sample cannot easily be quantified using available in vitro tests. PMID

  20. Integrating EMR-Linked and In Vivo Functional Genetic Data to Identify New Genotype-Phenotype Associations

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Jonathan D.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Weeke, Peter E.; Delaney, Jessica T.; Wells, Quinn S.; Bastarache, Lisa; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Josh C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of electronic medical records (EMR) with genetic data has created the potential for implementing reverse genetic approaches in humans, whereby the function of a gene is inferred from the shared pattern of morbidity among homozygotes of a genetic variant. We explored the feasibility of this approach to identify phenotypes associated with low frequency variants using Vanderbilt's EMR-based BioVU resource. We analyzed 1,658 low frequency non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) with a minor allele frequency (MAF)<10% collected on 8,546 subjects. For each nsSNP, we identified diagnoses shared by at least 2 minor allele homozygotes and with an association p<0.05. The diagnoses were reviewed by a clinician to ascertain whether they may share a common mechanistic basis. While a number of biologically compelling clinical patterns of association were observed, the frequency of these associations was identical to that observed using genotype-permuted data sets, indicating that the associations were likely due to chance. To refine our analysis associations, we then restricted the analysis to 711 nsSNPs in genes with phenotypes in the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) or knock-out mouse phenotype databases. An initial comparison of the EMR diagnoses to the known in vivo functions of the gene identified 25 candidate nsSNPs, 19 of which had significant genotype-phenotype associations when tested using matched controls. Twleve of the 19 nsSNPs associations were confirmed by a detailed record review. Four of 12 nsSNP-phenotype associations were successfully replicated in an independent data set: thrombosis (F5,rs6031), seizures/convulsions (GPR98,rs13157270), macular degeneration (CNGB3,rs3735972), and GI bleeding (HGFAC,rs16844401). These analyses demonstrate the feasibility and challenges of using reverse genetics approaches to identify novel gene-phenotype associations in human subjects using low frequency variants. As increasing amounts of rare variant data are

  1. Contribution to More Patient-Friendly ART Treatment: Efficacy of Continuous Low-Dose GnRH Agonist as the Only Luteal Support—Results of a Prospective, Randomized, Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Pirard, Céline; Loumaye, Ernest; Wyns, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate intranasal buserelin for luteal phase support and compare its efficacy with standard vaginal progesterone in IVF/ICSI antagonist cycles. Methods. This is a prospective, randomized, open, parallel group study. Forty patients underwent ovarian hyperstimulation with human menopausal gonadotropin under pituitary inhibition with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, while ovulation trigger and luteal support were achieved using intranasal GnRH agonist (group A). Twenty patients had their cycle downregulated with buserelin and stimulated with hMG, while ovulation trigger was achieved using 10,000 IU human chorionic gonadotropin with luteal support by intravaginal progesterone (group B). Results. No difference was observed in estradiol levels. Progesterone levels on day 5 were significantly lower in group A. However, significantly higher levels of luteinizing hormone were observed in group A during the entire luteal phase. Pregnancy rates (31.4% versus 22.2%), implantation rates (22% versus 15.4%), and clinical pregnancy rates (25.7% versus 16.7%) were not statistically different between groups, although a trend towards higher rates was observed in group A. No luteal phase lasting less than 10 days was recorded in either group. Conclusion. Intranasal administration of buserelin is effective for providing luteal phase support in IVF/ICSI antagonist protocols. PMID:25945092

  2. Contribution to More Patient-Friendly ART Treatment: Efficacy of Continuous Low-Dose GnRH Agonist as the Only Luteal Support-Results of a Prospective, Randomized, Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Pirard, Céline; Loumaye, Ernest; Laurent, Pascale; Wyns, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate intranasal buserelin for luteal phase support and compare its efficacy with standard vaginal progesterone in IVF/ICSI antagonist cycles. Methods. This is a prospective, randomized, open, parallel group study. Forty patients underwent ovarian hyperstimulation with human menopausal gonadotropin under pituitary inhibition with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, while ovulation trigger and luteal support were achieved using intranasal GnRH agonist (group A). Twenty patients had their cycle downregulated with buserelin and stimulated with hMG, while ovulation trigger was achieved using 10,000 IU human chorionic gonadotropin with luteal support by intravaginal progesterone (group B). Results. No difference was observed in estradiol levels. Progesterone levels on day 5 were significantly lower in group A. However, significantly higher levels of luteinizing hormone were observed in group A during the entire luteal phase. Pregnancy rates (31.4% versus 22.2%), implantation rates (22% versus 15.4%), and clinical pregnancy rates (25.7% versus 16.7%) were not statistically different between groups, although a trend towards higher rates was observed in group A. No luteal phase lasting less than 10 days was recorded in either group. Conclusion. Intranasal administration of buserelin is effective for providing luteal phase support in IVF/ICSI antagonist protocols. PMID:25945092

  3. Improved In Vitro and In Vivo Biocompatibility of Graphene Oxide through Surface Modification: Poly(Acrylic Acid)-Functionalization is Superior to PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Zhu, Jianqiang; Wang, Fanfan; Xiong, Yunjing; Wu, Yakun; Wang, Qiuquan; Weng, Jian; Zhang, Zhihong; Chen, Wei; Liu, Sijin

    2016-03-22

    The unique physicochemical properties of two-dimensional (2D) graphene oxide (GO) could greatly benefit the biomedical field; however, recent research demonstrated that GO could induce in vitro and in vivo toxicity. We determined the mechanism of GO induced toxicity, and our in vitro experiments revealed that pristine GO could impair cell membrane integrity and functions including regulation of membrane- and cytoskeleton-associated genes, membrane permeability, fluidity and ion channels. Furthermore, GO induced platelet depletion, pro-inflammatory response and pathological changes of lung and liver in mice. To improve the biocompatibility of pristine GO, we prepared a series of GO derivatives including aminated GO (GO-NH2), poly(acrylamide)-functionalized GO (GO-PAM), poly(acrylic acid)-functionalized GO (GO-PAA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized GO (GO-PEG), and compared their toxicity with pristine GO in vitro and in vivo. Among these GO derivatives, GO-PEG and GO-PAA induced less toxicity than pristine GO, and GO-PAA was the most biocompatible one in vitro and in vivo. The differences in biocompatibility were due to the differential compositions of protein corona, especially immunoglobulin G (IgG), formed on their surfaces that determine their cell membrane interaction and cellular uptake, the extent of platelet depletion in blood, thrombus formation under short-term exposure and the pro-inflammatory effects under long-term exposure. Overall, our combined data delineated the key molecular mechanisms underlying the in vivo and in vitro biological behaviors and toxicity of pristine GO, and identified a safer GO derivative that could be used for future applications. PMID:26855010

  4. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  5. Ex vivo Enzymatic Treatment of Aged CD4 T Cells Restores Cognate T-cell Helper Function and Enhances Antibody Production in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perkey, Eric; Miller, Richard A.; Garcia, Gonzalo G.

    2012-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have shown that CD4 T cells from old mice have defects in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, immune synapse formation, activation, and proliferation. We have reported that removing a specific set of surface glycoproteins by ex vivo treatment with O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase (OSGE) can reverse many aspects of the age-related decline in CD4 T cell function. However, the specific mechanism by which this process occurs remains unclear, and it is unknown whether this enzymatic treatment can also restore important aspects of adaptive immunity in vivo. By using an in vivo model of the immune response based on adoptive transfer of CD4 T cells from pigeon cytochrome C (PCC)-specific transgenic H-2(k/k) TCR-Vα11Vβ3 CD4+ mice to syngeneic hosts, we now demonstrat that aging diminishes CD28 costimulatory signals in CD4 T cells. These age-associated defects include changes in phosphorylation of AKT and expression of glucose transporter type I, inducible T-cell costimulatory molecule, and CD40 ligand, suggesting that the lack of CD28 costimulation contributes to age-dependent loss of CD4 function. All of these deficits can be reversed by ex vivo OSGE treatment. Blocking B7-CD28 interactions on T cells prevents OSGE-mediated restoration of T cell function, suggesting that changes in surface glycosylation, including CD28, may be responsible for age-related costimulation decline. Finally, we showed that the age-related decline in CD4 cognate helper function for immunoglobin G production and long-term humoral immunity can also be restored by OSGE treatments of CD4 T cells prior to adoptive transfer. PMID:23136198

  6. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Prevents the Luteal Phase Increase in Plasma Allopregnanolone Levels and Mitigates Symptoms in Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pedro E; Rubinow, David R; Nieman, Lynnette K; Koziol, Deloris E; Morrow, A Leslie; Schiller, Crystal E; Cintron, Dahima; Thompson, Karla D; Khine, Khursheed K; Schmidt, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Changes in neurosteroid levels during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle may precipitate affective symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we stabilized neurosteroid levels by administering the 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride to block conversion of progesterone to its neurosteroid metabolite allopregnanolone in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and in asymptomatic control women. Sixteen women with prospectively confirmed PMDD and 16 control women participated in one of two separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trials, each lasting three menstrual cycles. After one menstrual cycle of single-blind placebo, participants were randomized to receive, for the next two menstrual cycles, either double-blind placebo or dutasteride (low-dose 0.5 mg/day in the first eight PMDD and eight control women or high-dose 2.5 mg/day in the second group of women). All women completed the daily rating form (DRF) and were evaluated in clinic during the follicular and luteal phases of each menstrual cycle. Main outcome measures were the DRF symptoms of irritability, sadness, and anxiety. Analyses were performed with SAS PROC MIXED. In the low-dose group, no significant effect of dutasteride on PMDD symptoms was observed compared with placebo (ie, symptom cyclicity maintained), and plasma allopregnanolone levels increased in women with PMDD from follicular to the luteal phases, suggesting the absence of effect of the low-dose dutasteride on 5α-reductase. In contrast, the high-dose group experienced a statistically significant reduction in several core PMDD symptoms (ie, irritability, sadness, anxiety, food cravings, and bloating) on dutasteride compared with placebo. Dutasteride had no effect on mood in controls. Stabilization of allopregnanolone levels from the follicular to the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle by blocking the conversion of progesterone to its 5α-reduced neurosteroid metabolite mitigates symptoms in PMDD. These data

  7. Impact of buserelin acetate or hCG administration on day 12 post-ovulation on subsequent luteal profile and conception rate in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Pandey, A K; Ghuman, S P S; Dhaliwal, G S; Kumar, Ajeet; Agarwal, S K

    2013-01-30

    The present study investigated the impact of gonadotropic hormone administration on day 12 post-ovulation on subsequent luteal profile and conception rate in buffaloes. All the buffaloes (n=48) were estrus synchronized by a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)), administered 11 days apart, followed by insemination during mid to late estrus. To examine the effect of mid-luteal phase hormonal treatment, buffaloes were randomly divided into control (normal saline, n=14), d12-BA (buserelin acetate, 20μg, n=17) and d12-hCG (hCG, 3000IU, n=17) groups. Ovaries were scanned on the day of induced estrus to measure the preovulatory follicle (POF) diameter and on days 5, 12, 16 and 21 post-ovulation to examine the alterations in corpus luteum (CL) diameter. On the day of each sonography, blood samples were collected for the estimation of plasma progesterone. In treatment groups, luteal profile (CL diameter and plasma progesterone) on day 16-21 post-ovulation was better (P<0.05) as well as first service conception rate was higher (52.9% in each treatment group vs. 28.6%, P>0.05) compared to controls. All the pregnant buffaloes exhibited higher (P<0.05) plasma progesterone on various post-ovulation days than their respective non-pregnant counterparts. Treatment-induced accessory corpus luteum (ACL) formation was observed in 58.8 per cent and 70.6 per cent buffaloes of d12-BA and d12-hCG group, respectively, that also had higher (P<0.05) plasma progesterone compared to controls. Compared to the spontaneous CL, the diameter of ACL was less (P<0.05) in the treatment groups. In conclusion, buserelin acetate and hCG administration on day 12 post-ovulation leads to accessory CL formation, improves luteal profile and consequently increases conception rate in buffaloes. PMID:23201300

  8. Hypothyroidism prolongs corpus luteum function in the pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Hapon, María Belén; Motta, Alicia B; Ezquer, Marcelo; Bonafede, Melisa; Jahn, Graciela A

    2007-01-01