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Sample records for vlsi technology wafers

  1. Overlay Tolerances For VLSI Using Wafer Steppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.; Rice, Rory

    1988-01-01

    In order for VLSI circuits to function properly, the masking layers used in the fabrication of those devices must overlay each other to within the manufacturing tolerance incorporated in the circuit design. The capabilities of the alignment tools used in the masking process determine the overlay tolerances to which circuits can be designed. It is therefore of considerable importance that these capabilities be well characterized. Underestimation of the overlay accuracy results in unnecessarily large devices, resulting in poor utilization of wafer area and possible degradation of device performance. Overestimation will result in significant yield loss because of the failure to conform to the tolerances of the design rules. The proper methodology for determining the overlay capabilities of wafer steppers, the most commonly used alignment tool for the production of VLSI circuits, is the subject of this paper. Because cost-effective manufacturing process technology has been the driving force of VLSI, the impact on productivity is a primary consideration in all discussions. Manufacturers of alignment tools advertise the capabilities of their equipment. It is notable that no manufacturer currently characterizes his aligners in a manner consistent with the requirements of producing very large integrated circuits, as will be discussed. This has resulted in the situation in which the evaluation and comparison of the capabilities of alignment tools require the attention of a lithography specialist. Unfortunately, lithographic capabilities must be known by many other people, particularly the circuit designers and the managers responsible for the financial consequences of the high prices of modern alignment tools. All too frequently, the designer or manager is confronted with contradictory data, one set coming from his lithography specialist, and the other coming from a sales representative of an equipment manufacturer. Since the latter generally attempts to make his

  2. High speed synchronizer card utilizing VLSI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speciale, Nicholas; Wunderlich, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    A generic synchronizer card capable of providing standard NASA communication block telemetry frame synchronization and quality control was fabricated using VLSI technology. Four VLSI chip sets are utilized to shrink all the required functions into a single synchronizer card. The application of VLSI technology to telemetry systems resulted in an increase in performance and a decrease in cost and size.

  3. Various Applications Of An Automated Wafer Inspection System In VLSI Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kimihiro; Takashima, Isamu; Aoki, Yasuo; Araki, Junichi

    1988-01-01

    Although the VLSI products produced in our manufacturing lines are mostly designed with 1 micron geometries, we expect the majority of products will shift to sub-micron design very soon. This article discusses results of our experiments to releaf human operators from the already difficult visual inspection tasks with a fully automated equipment. We have two groups of visual inspection tasks necessary on the VLSI manufacturing floor. One is Engineering Analysis and the other is in-line monitor, or Product Wafer Auditing. The former, Engineering Analysis, demands a variety of different measurements and inspections, such as line width, contact area, multilayer alignment precision and defect density. On the otherhand, Product Wafer Auditing, will need only one or two such functions per mo-nitoring point in the process, but will use the function more extensively, continuously, and repeatedly. In the manufacturing environment, where the ever pressing demand to increase yield is para-mount, it is crucial to reduce defect finding and analysing time. For that purpose, we need higher speed and accuracy for production wafer inspection than can be obtained with human inspectors. In this context, our experience on the KLA-2020, fully automated wafer inspection equipment has proven to be truely beneficial in the area of the following five different cases of evaluation of the KLA-2020, conducted in our plant. Case: 1. Visual inspection of the VLSI production wafer after aluminum dry-etching was studied in comparison with human operators. The result is that not only was the KLA-2020 much more thorough in detecting defects but also was much faster than any of the operators, by far. Case: 2. We applied the KLA-2020 to identify the cause of die, lost at probe test. We traced the killer defect, which was originated from the reticle. KLA-2020 is effective in reticle qualification. Case: 3. We found that the line-width instruments based upon laser scatterology cannot properly measure

  4. Full custom VLSI - A technology for high performance computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1990-01-01

    Full custom VLSI is presented as a viable technology for addressing the need for the computing capabilities required for the real-time health monitoring of spacecraft systems. This technology presents solutions that cannot be realized with stored program computers or semicustom VLSI; also, it is not dependent on current IC processes. It is argued that, while design time is longer, full custom VLSI produces the fastest and densest VLSI solution and that high density normally also yields low manufacturing costs.

  5. Wafer level reliability for high-performance VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Root, Bryan J.; Seefeldt, James D.

    1987-01-01

    As very large scale integration architecture requires higher package density, reliability of these devices has approached a critical level. Previous processing techniques allowed a large window for varying reliability. However, as scaling and higher current densities push reliability to its limit, tighter control and instant feedback becomes critical. Several test structures developed to monitor reliability at the wafer level are described. For example, a test structure was developed to monitor metal integrity in seconds as opposed to weeks or months for conventional testing. Another structure monitors mobile ion contamination at critical steps in the process. Thus the reliability jeopardy can be assessed during fabrication preventing defective devices from ever being placed in the field. Most importantly, the reliability can be assessed on each wafer as opposed to an occasional sample.

  6. Strategy For Yield Control And Enhancement In VLSI Wafer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, B.; Rickey, D.; Bane, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    In most fully utilized integrated circuit (IC) production facilities, profit is very closely linked with yield. In even the most controlled manufacturing environments, defects due to foreign material are a still major contributor to yield loss. Ideally, an IC manufacturer will have ample engineering resources to address any problem that arises. In the real world, staffing limitations require that some tasks must be left undone and potential benefits left unrealized. Therefore, it is important to prioritize problems in a manner that will give the maximum benefit to the manufacturer. When offered a smorgasbord of problems to solve, most people (engineers included) will start with what is most interesting or the most comfortable to work on. By providing a system that accurately predicts the impact of a wide variety of defect types, a rational method of prioritizing engineering effort can be made. To that effect, a program was developed to determine and rank the major yield detractors in a mixed analog/digital FET manufacturing line. The two classical methods of determining yield detractors are chip failure analysis and defect monitoring on drop in test die. Both of these methods have short comings: 1) Chip failure analysis is painstaking and very time consuming. As a result, the sample size is very small. 2) Drop in test die are usually designed for device parametric analysis rather than defect analysis. To provide enough wafer real estate to do meaningful defect analysis would render the wafer worthless for production. To avoid these problems, a defect monitor was designed that provided enough area to detect defects at the same rate or better than the NMOS product die whose yield was to be optimized. The defect monitor was comprehensive and electrically testable using such equipment as the Prometrix LM25 and other digital testers. This enabled the quick accumulation of data which could be handled statistically and mapped individually. By scaling the defect densities

  7. Potential impact of VLSI technologies on guided missile design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, H. A.; Kongelbeck, K. S.

    1985-08-01

    Some aspects of the anticipated impact of emerging VLSI technologies on tactical missiles, present and future generations are discussed. VLSI evolution represents a unique example of a very dynamic and pervasive trend in commercial and military applications. It is our opinion, however, that the characteristics of this trend are quite different in tactical missiles, not only compared to commercial electronics but even to strategic or space missiles. Considering the particular objectives and constraints as they seem common to most tactical guided missiles and smart munitions, the VLSI technologies should be almost tailored to this application. However, there are some perequisites to be considered to make the introduction of VLSIs successful. Here are some examples: careful planning to be in step with the maturity of the VLSI technology, sensible selection of targets for insertion or new designs and - quite importantly - consideration of program stability in terms of volume, rates, and changes. From a technical viewpoint alone, the current trend to light and small, 4- to 8-inch-diameter configuration whether ground or air-launched encourages an early insertion of VLSIs. Electronic packaging with unusual form factors, e.g., having a central hole for warhead effectiveness, high density and low weight, and low power dissipation, poses conflicting requirements to the missile designer. With very few exceptions, such as in magnetics or battery chemistry, the electronics sections cannot benefit from other technological breakthroughs. It is the evolution of monolithic large scale integration of circuits on Silicon and to a lesser degree on Gallium Arsenide which bears the main load to meeting these criteria of processing density at minimum power dissipation, and of providing an ever-increasing functional throughput. Those VLSI embodiments which appear to be most likely to influence missile electronics are defined. They may be divided into four categories, with some ranking

  8. VLSI Technology: Impact and Promise. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayoumi, Magdy

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the implications of very large scale integrated (VLSI) technology. The first section reviews the development of educational technology, particularly microelectronics technology, from the 1950s to the present. The implications…

  9. VLSI technology for smaller, cheaper, faster return link systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanzetta, Kathy; Ghuman, Parminder; Bennett, Toby; Solomon, Jeff; Dowling, Jason; Welling, John

    1994-01-01

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Application-specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) technology has enabled substantially smaller, cheaper, and more capable telemetry data systems. However, the rapid growth in available ASIC fabrication densities has far outpaced the application of this technology to telemetry systems. Available densities have grown by well over an order magnitude since NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) first began developing ASIC's for ground telemetry systems in 1985. To take advantage of these higher integration levels, a new generation of ASIC's for return link telemetry processing is under development. These new submicron devices are designed to further reduce the cost and size of NASA return link processing systems while improving performance. This paper describes these highly integrated processing components.

  10. GaAs VLSI technology and circuit elements for DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelson, James M.

    1990-10-01

    Recent progress in digital GaAs circuit performance and complexity is presented to demonstrate the current capabilities of GaAs components. High density GaAs process technology and circuit design techniques are described and critical issues for achieving favorable complexity speed power and cost tradeoffs are reviewed. Some DSP building blocks are described to provide examples of what types of DSP systems could be implemented with present GaAs technology. DIGITAL GaAs CIRCUIT CAPABILITIES In the past few years the capabilities of digital GaAs circuits have dramatically increased to the VLSI level. Major gains in circuit complexity and power-delay products have been achieved by the use of silicon-like process technologies and simple circuit topologies. The very high speed and low power consumption of digital GaAs VLSI circuits have made GaAs a desirable alternative to high performance silicon in hardware intensive high speed system applications. An example of the performance and integration complexity available with GaAs VLSI circuits is the 64x64 crosspoint switch shown in figure 1. This switch which is the most complex GaAs circuit currently available is designed on a 30 gate GaAs gate array. It operates at 200 MHz and dissipates only 8 watts of power. The reasons for increasing the level of integration of GaAs circuits are similar to the reasons for the continued increase of silicon circuit complexity. The market factors driving GaAs VLSI are system design methodology system cost power and reliability. System designers are hesitant or unwilling to go backwards to previous design techniques and lower levels of integration. A more highly integrated system in a lower performance technology can often approach the performance of a system in a higher performance technology at a lower level of integration. Higher levels of integration also lower the system component count which reduces the system cost size and power consumption while improving the system reliability

  11. Comparison of the radiation hardness of various VLSI technologies for defense applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    In this review the radiation hardness of various potential very large scale (VLSI) IC technologies is evaluated. IC scaling produces several countervailing trends. Reducing vertical dimensions tends to increase total dose hardness, while reducing lateral feature sizes may increase susceptibility to transient radiation effects. It is concluded that during the next decade at least, silicon complimentary MOS (CMOS), perhaps on an insulating substrate (SOI) will be the technology of choice for VLSI in defense systems.

  12. Deep sub-micron stud-via technology of superconductor VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpygo, Sergey K.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Weir, T.; Johnson, L. M.; Oliver, W. D.; Gouker, M. A.

    2014-02-01

    A fabrication process has been developed for fully planarized Nb-based superconducting interlayer connections (vias) with minimum size down to 250 nm for superconductor very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits with 8 and 10 superconducting layers on 200-mm wafers. Instead of etched contact holes in the interlayer dielectric it employs etched and planarized Nb pillars (studs) as connectors between adjacent wiring layers. Detailed results are presented for one version of the process that utilizes Nb/Al/Nb trilayers for each wiring layer instead of single Nb wiring layers. Nb studs are etched in the top layer of the trilayer to provide vertical connections between the wires etched in the bottom layer of the trilayer and the next wiring layer that is also deposited as a Nb/Al/Nb trilayer. This technology makes possible a dramatic increase in the density of superconducting digital circuits by reducing the area of interconnects with respect to presently utilized etched contact holes between superconducting layers and by enabling the use of stacked vias. Results on the fabrication and size dependence of electric properties of Nb studs with dimensions near the resolution limit of 248-nm photolithography are presented in the normal and superconducting states. Superconducting critical current density in the fabricated stud-vias is about 0.3 A μm-2 and approaches the depairing current density of Nb films.

  13. Deep sub-micron stud-via technology for superconductor VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpygo, Sergey K.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Weir, T.; Johnson, L. M.; Oliver, W. D.; Gouker, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    A fabrication process has been developed for fully planarized Nb-based superconducting inter-layer connections (vias) with minimum size down to 250 nm for superconductor very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits with 8 and 10 superconducting layers on 200-mm wafers. Instead of single Nb wiring layers, it utilizes Nb/Al/Nb trilayers for each wiring layer to form Nb pillars (studs) providing vertical connections between the wires etched in the bottom layer of the trilayer and the next wiring layer that is also deposited as a Nb/Al/Nb trilayer. This technology makes possible a dramatic increase in the density of superconducting digital circuits by reducing the area of interconnects with respect to presently utilized etched contact holes between superconducting layers and by enabling the use of stacked vias. Results on the fabrication and size dependence of electric properties of Nb studs with dimensions near the resolution limit of 248-nm photolithography are presented. Superconducting critical current density in the fabricated stud-vias is about 0.3 A/μm2 and approaches the depairing current density of Nb films.

  14. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; French, M.; Manolopoulos, S.; Tyndel, M.; Allport, P.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Hall, G.; Raymond, M.

    2003-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to tape. Because of the large number of pixels, data reduction is needed on the sensor itself or just outside. This brings in stringent requirements on the temporal noise as well as to the sensor uniformity, expressed as a Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN). A pixel architecture with an additional transistor is proposed. This architecture, coupled to correlated double sampling of the signal will allow cancellation of the two dominant noise sources, namely the reset or kTC noise and the FPN. A prototype has been designed in a standard 0.25 μm CMOS technology. It has also a structure for electrical calibration of the sensor. The prototype is functional and detailed tests are under way.

  15. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  16. A VLSI implementation of DCT using pass transistor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamath, S.; Lynn, Douglas; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    A VLSI design for performing the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) operation on image blocks of size 16 x 16 in a real time fashion operating at 34 MHz (worst case) is presented. The process used was Hewlett-Packard's CMOS26--A 3 metal CMOS process with a minimum feature size of 0.75 micron. The design is based on Multiply-Accumulate (MAC) cells which make use of a modified Booth recoding algorithm for performing multiplication. The design of these cells is straight forward, and the layouts are regular with no complex routing. Two versions of these MAC cells were designed and their layouts completed. Both versions were simulated using SPICE to estimate their performance. One version is slightly faster at the cost of larger silicon area and higher power consumption. An improvement in speed of almost 20 percent is achieved after several iterations of simulation and re-sizing.

  17. VLSI system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroga, S.

    A complete picture of LSI/VLSI system design is provided, encompassing both engineering and economic considerations. The subjects discussed include: cost analysis based on production volume, yield, chip size, design manpower and other factors; bipolar and MOS logic families, logic design procedures, and mask designs; use of ROMs and PLAs in logic design, along with design algorithms; a survey of CAD used in LSI/VLSI chip design. Also covered are: full-custom and semicustom designs; microprocessor and dedicated processor chips; system design and hardware-software tradeoffs; LSI/VLSI technological trends; new products realized by LSI/VLSI technology; future production and management problems.

  18. National solar technology roadmap: Wafer-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2007-06-01

    This report applies to all bulk-silicon-based PV technologies, including those based on Czochralski, multicrystalline, float-zone wafers, and melt-grown crystals that are 100 μm or thicker, such as ribbons, sheet, or spheral silicon.

  19. Product assurance technology for custom LSI/VLSI electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Jennings, G. A.; Moore, B. T.; Nixon, R. H.; Pina, C. A.; Sayah, H. R.; Sievers, M. W.; Stahlberg, N. F.

    1985-01-01

    The technology for obtaining custom integrated circuits from CMOS-bulk silicon foundries using a universal set of layout rules is presented. The technical efforts were guided by the requirement to develop a 3 micron CMOS test chip for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This chip contains both analog and digital circuits. The development employed all the elements required to obtain custom circuits from silicon foundries, including circuit design, foundry interfacing, circuit test, and circuit qualification.

  20. Wafer-level manufacturing technology of glass microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossner, U.; Hoeftmann, T.; Wieland, R.; Hansch, W.

    2014-08-01

    In high-tech products, there is an increasing demand to integrate glass lenses into complex micro systems. Especially in the lighting industry LEDs and laser diodes used for automotive applications require encapsulated micro lenses. To enable low-cost production, manufacturing of micro lenses on wafer level base using a replication technology is a key technology. This requires accurate forming of thousands of lenses with a diameter of 1-2 mm on a 200 mm wafer compliant with mass production. The article will discuss the technical aspects of a lens manufacturing replication process and the challenges, which need to be solved: choice of an appropriate master for replication, thermally robust interlayer coating, choice of replica glass, bonding and separation procedure. A promising approach for the master substrate material is based on a lens structured high-quality glass wafer with high melting point covered by a coating layer of amorphous silicon or germanium. This layer serves as an interlayer for the glass bonding process. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes allow a deposition of layer coatings with different hydrogen and doping content influencing their chemical and physical behavior. A time reduced molding process using a float glass enables the formation of high quality lenses while preserving the recyclability of the mother substrate. The challenge is the separation of the replica from the master mold. An overview of chemical methods based on optimized etching of coating layer through small channels will be given and the impact of glass etching on surface roughness is discussed.

  1. High data rate Reed-Solomon encoding and decoding using VLSI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Warner; Morakis, James

    Presented as an implementation of a Reed-Solomon encode and decoder, which is 16-symbol error correcting, each symbol is 8 bits. This Reed-Solomon (RS) code is an efficient error correcting code that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will use in future space communications missions. A Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) implementation of the encoder and decoder accepts data rates up 80 Mbps. A total of seven chips are needed for the decoder (four of the seven decoding chips are customized using 3-micron Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconduction (CMOS) technology) and one chip is required for the encoder. The decoder operates with the symbol clock being the system clock for the chip set. Approximately 1.65 billion Galois Field (GF) operations per second are achieved with the decoder chip set and 640 MOPS are achieved with the encoder chip.

  2. High data rate Reed-Solomon encoding and decoding using VLSI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Warner; Morakis, James

    1987-01-01

    Presented as an implementation of a Reed-Solomon encode and decoder, which is 16-symbol error correcting, each symbol is 8 bits. This Reed-Solomon (RS) code is an efficient error correcting code that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will use in future space communications missions. A Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) implementation of the encoder and decoder accepts data rates up 80 Mbps. A total of seven chips are needed for the decoder (four of the seven decoding chips are customized using 3-micron Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconduction (CMOS) technology) and one chip is required for the encoder. The decoder operates with the symbol clock being the system clock for the chip set. Approximately 1.65 billion Galois Field (GF) operations per second are achieved with the decoder chip set and 640 MOPS are achieved with the encoder chip.

  3. Wafer-scale micro-optics replication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Markus; Rudmann, Hartmut; Marty, Brigitte; Maciossek, Andreas

    2003-11-01

    For many high-volume applications of micro-optical elements and systems the most cost-effective fabrication technology is replication in polymer materials with techniques such as UV embossing, hot embossing, and injection molding. Replication significantly reduces the cost in volume production in comparison to silicon-based etched components. However, the temperature and humidity stability of most commercial polymers is not suitable for the application of replicated elements in areas such as telecom or datacom. A process based on UV-replication in chemically durable polymers has been developed. Technologies for all fabrication steps from mastering over tooling to replication on wafer-scale, post-processing and characterization are described. We present results of various projects with double-sided micro-optics for telecom/datacom and various sensor applications.

  4. A Wafer Transfer Technology for MEMS Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wiberg, Dean V.

    2001-01-01

    Adaptive optics systems require the combination of several advanced technologies such as precision optics, wavefront sensors, deformable mirrors, and lasers with high-speed control systems. The deformable mirror with a continuous membrane is a key component of these systems. This paper describes a new technique for transferring an entire wafer-level silicon membrane from one substrate to another. This technology is developed for the fabrication of a compact deformable mirror with a continuous facet. A 1 (mu)m thick silicon membrane, 100 mm in diameter, has been successfully transferred without using adhesives or polymers (i.e. wax, epoxy, or photoresist). Smaller or larger diameter membranes can also be transferred using this technique. The fabricated actuator membrane with an electrode gap of 1.5 (mu)m shows a vertical deflection of 0.37 (mu)m at 55 V.

  5. VLSI neuroprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1994-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic hardware implementations of highly parallel computing architectures address several ill-defined and/or computation-intensive problems not easily solved by conventional computing techniques. The concurrent processing architectures developed are derived from a variety of advanced computing paradigms including neural network models, fuzzy logic, and cellular automata. Hardware implementation technologies range from state-of-the-art digital/analog custom-VLSI to advanced optoelectronic devices such as computer-generated holograms and e-beam fabricated Dammann gratings. JPL's concurrent processing devices group has developed a broad technology base in hardware implementable parallel algorithms, low-power and high-speed VLSI designs and building block VLSI chips, leading to application-specific high-performance embeddable processors. Application areas include high throughput map-data classification using feedforward neural networks, terrain based tactical movement planner using cellular automata, resource optimization (weapon-target assignment) using a multidimensional feedback network with lateral inhibition, and classification of rocks using an inner-product scheme on thematic mapper data. In addition to addressing specific functional needs of DOD and NASA, the JPL-developed concurrent processing device technology is also being customized for a variety of commercial applications (in collaboration with industrial partners), and is being transferred to U.S. industries. This viewgraph p resentation focuses on two application-specific processors which solve the computation intensive tasks of resource allocation (weapon-target assignment) and terrain based tactical movement planning using two extremely different topologies. Resource allocation is implemented as an asynchronous analog competitive assignment architecture inspired by the Hopfield network. Hardware realization leads to a two to four order of magnitude speed-up over conventional

  6. Designing defect spins for wafer-scale quantum technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Koehl, William F.; Seo, Hosung; Galli, Giulia; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-11-27

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress in the development of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond, which is one of the leading candidates for quantum information technologies. The success of the NV center as a solid-state qubit has stimulated an active search for similar defect spins in other technologically important and mature semiconductors, such as silicon carbide. If successfully combined with the advanced microfabrication techniques available to such materials, coherent quantum control of defect spins could potentially lead to semiconductor-based, wafer-scale quantum technologies that make use of exotic quantum mechanical phenomena like entanglement. In this article, we describe the robust spin property of the NV center and the current status of NV center research for quantum information technologies. We then outline first-principles computational modeling techniques based on density functional theory to efficiently search for potential spin defects in nondiamond hosts suitable for quantum information applications. The combination of computational modeling and experimentation has proven invaluable in this area, and we describe the successful interplay between theory and experiment achieved with the divacancy spin qubit in silicon carbide.

  7. Multi-wafer bonding technology for the integration of a micromachined Mirau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Shan; Lullin, Justine; Froemel, Joerg; Wiemer, Maik; Bargiel, Sylwester; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Gessner, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents the multi-wafer bonding technology as well as the integration of electrical connection to the zscanner wafer of the micromachined array-type Mirau interferometer. A Mirau interferometer, which is a key-component of optical coherence tomography (OCT) microsystem, consists of a microlens doublet, a MOEMS Z-scanner, a focusadjustment spacer and a beam splitter plate. For the integration of this MOEMS device heterogeneous bonding of Si, glass and SOI wafers is necessary. Previously, most of the existing methods for multilayer wafer bonding require annealing at high temperature, i.e., 1100°C. To be compatible with MEMS devices, bonding of different material stacks at temperatures lower than 400°C has also been investigated. However, if more components are involved, it becomes less effective due to the alignment accuracy or degradation of surface quality of the not-bonded side after each bonding operation. The proposed technology focuses on 3D integration of heterogeneous building blocks, where the assembly process is compatible with the materials of each wafer stack and with position accuracy which fits optical requirement. A demonstrator with up to 5 wafers bonded lower than 400°C is presented and bond interfaces are evaluated. To avoid the complexity of through wafer vias, a design which creates electrical connections along vertical direction by mounting a wafer stack on a flip chip PCB is proposed. The approach, which adopts vertically-stacked wafers along with electrical connection functionality, provides not only a space-effective integration of MOEMS device but also a design where the Mirau stack can be further integrated with other components of the OCT microsystem easily.

  8. Fast integral rigorous modeling applied to wafer topography effect prediction on 2x nm bulk technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J.-C.; Le Denmat, J.-C.; Tishchenko, A.; Jourlin, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Reflection by wafer topography and underlying layers during optical lithography can cause unwanted overexposure in the resist [1]. In most cases, the use of bottom anti reflective coating limits this effect. However, this solution is not always suitable because of process complexity, cost and cycle time penalty, as for ionic implantation lithography process in 28nm bulk technology. As a consequence, computational lithography solutions are currently under development to simulate and correct wafer topographical effects [2], [3]. For ionic implantation source drain (SD) photolithography step, wafer topography influences resulting in implant pattern variation are various: active silicon areas, Poly patterns, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) and topographical transitions between these areas. In 28nm bulk SD process step, the large number of wafer stack variations involved in implant pattern modulation implies a complex modeling of optical proximity effects. Furthermore, those topography effects are expected to increase with wafer stack complexity through technology node downscaling evolution. In this context, rigorous simulation can bring significant value for wafer topography modeling evolution in R and D process development environment. Unfortunately, classical rigorous simulation engines are rapidly run time and memory limited with pattern complexity for multiple under layer wafer topography simulation. A presentation of a fast rigorous Maxwell's equation solving algorithm integrated into a photolithography proximity effects simulation flow is detailed in this paper. Accuracy, run time and memory consumption of this fast rigorous modeling engine is presented through the simulation of wafer topography effects during ionic implantation SD lithography step in 28nm bulk technology. Also, run time and memory consumption comparison is shown between presented fast rigorous modeling and classical rigorous RCWA method through simulation of design of interest. Finally

  9. High transmittance silicon terahertz polarizer using wafer bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ting-Yang; Tsai, Hsin-Cheng; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Luo, Chih-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Neng

    2015-08-01

    Due to the difficulties faced in fabricating robust Terahertz (THz) optical components with low Fresnel reflection loss, the need to increase the efficiency of THz system with reduced cost is still considered as one of the most essential tasks. In this report, a new low cost THz polarizer with robust structure is proposed and demonstrated. This new THz wire grid polarizer was based on an anti-reflection (AR) layer fabricated with low temperature metal bonding and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). After patterning Cu wire gratings and the corresponding In/Sn solder ring on the individual silicon wafers, the inner gratings were sealed by wafer-level Cu to In/Sn guard ring bonding, providing the protection against humidity oxidation and corrosion. With the low eutectic melting point of In/Sn solder, wafers could be bonded face to face below 150°C. Two anti-reflection layers on both outward surfaces were fabricated by DRIE. With the mixing of empty holes and silicon, the effective refractive index was designed to be the square root of the silicon refractive index. The central frequency of the anti-reflection layers was designed between 0.5THz to 2THz with an approximate bandwidth of 0.5THz. The samples were measured with a commercial free-standing wire grid polarizer by a THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) from 0.2THz to 2.2THz. The power transmittance is close to 100% at central frequency. Extinction ratio of the polarizer is between 20dB to 40dB depending on the frequency. The advantages of this new polarizer include high transmittance, robust structure and low cost with no precision optical alignment required.

  10. Product assurance technology for procuring reliable, radiation-hard, custom LSI/VLSI electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Allen, R. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Hicks, K. A.; Jennings, G. A.; Lin, Y.-S.; Pina, C. A.; Sayah, H. R.; Zamani, N.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced measurement methods using microelectronic test chips are described. These chips are intended to be used in acquiring the data needed to qualify Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's) for space use. Efforts were focused on developing the technology for obtaining custom IC's from CMOS/bulk silicon foundries. A series of test chips were developed: a parametric test strip, a fault chip, a set of reliability chips, and the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) chip, a test circuit for monitoring space radiation effects. The technical accomplishments of the effort include: (1) development of a fault chip that contains a set of test structures used to evaluate the density of various process-induced defects; (2) development of new test structures and testing techniques for measuring gate-oxide capacitance, gate-overlap capacitance, and propagation delay; (3) development of a set of reliability chips that are used to evaluate failure mechanisms in CMOS/bulk: interconnect and contact electromigration and time-dependent dielectric breakdown; (4) development of MOSFET parameter extraction procedures for evaluating subthreshold characteristics; (5) evaluation of test chips and test strips on the second CRRES wafer run; (6) two dedicated fabrication runs for the CRRES chip flight parts; and (7) publication of two papers: one on the split-cross bridge resistor and another on asymmetrical SRAM (static random access memory) cells for single-event upset analysis.

  11. VLSI array processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, E.

    1982-07-01

    The Arithmetic Processor Unit (APU) data base design check was completed. Minor design rule violations and design improvements were accomplished. The APU mask set has been fabricated and checked. Initial checking of all mask layers revealed a design rule problem in one layer. That layer was corrected, refabricated and checked out. The mask set has been delivered to the chip fabrication area. The fabrication process has been initiated. All work on the Array Processor Demonstration System (APDS) has been suspended at CHI until the additionally requested funding was received. That funding has been authorized and CHI will begin work on the APDS in July. The following activities are planned in the following quarter: 1) Complete fabrication of the first lot of VLSI APU devices. 2) Complete integration and check-out of the APDS simulator. 3) Complete integration and check-out of the APU breadboard. 4) Verify the VLSI APU wafer tests with the APU breadboard. 5) Complete check-out of the APDS using the APU breadboard.

  12. An electron-multiplying ‘Micromegas’ grid made in silicon wafer post-processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Heijne, E. H. M.; van der Putten, S.; Salm, C.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    A technology for manufacturing an aluminium grid onto a silicon wafer has been developed. The grid is fixed parallel and precisely to the wafer (anode) surface at a distance of 50 μm by means of insulating pillars. When some 400 V are applied between the grid and (anode) wafer, gas multiplication occurs: primary electrons from the drift space above the grid enter the holes and cause electron avalanches in the high-field region between the grid and the anode. Production and operational characteristics of the device are described. With this newly developed technology, CMOS (pixel) readout chips can be covered with a gas multiplication grid. Such a chip forms, together with the grid, an integrated device which can be applied as readout in a wide field of gaseous detectors.

  13. Direct wafer bonding technology for large-scale InGaAs-on-insulator transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Li, Jian; Kao, Yung-Chung

    2014-07-28

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V devices on Si wafers have been explored for realizing high device performance as well as merging electrical and photonic applications on the Si platform. Existing methodologies have unavoidable drawbacks such as inferior device quality or high cost in comparison with the current Si-based technology. In this paper, we present InGaAs-on-insulator (-OI) fabrication from an InGaAs layer grown on a Si donor wafer with a III-V buffer layer instead of growth on a InP donor wafer. This technology allows us to yield large wafer size scalability of III-V-OI layers up to the Si wafer size of 300 mm with a high film quality and low cost. The high film quality has been confirmed by Raman and photoluminescence spectra. In addition, the fabricated InGaAs-OI transistors exhibit the high electron mobility of 1700 cm{sup 2}/V s and uniform distribution of the leakage current, indicating high layer quality with low defect density.

  14. Heterostructurally integrated III-V semiconductors fabricated by wafer bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang Frank

    Integrating advanced microelectronic, photonic, and micromechanical devices, including nanoscale devices, into a three-dimensional architecture has become a key issue to realizing the advanced microintegrated systems for both electronic and biotechnological applications. Wafer bonding (wafer fusion) has been considered as one of the most promising technologies to integrate mismatched materials and devices into a chip level. One of the primary concerns of on-chip integration of mismatched micro- or nanodevices would be of material compatibility and interface structures at different length scales (including nanoscale), and the structural relations with the device electronic, optical, and mechanical performances. Accordingly, in the first section of this thesis work, the interface microstructures of wafer-bonded semiconductors, such as GaAs, InP, and GaN, have been systematically studied. The relations among the interface morphologies, chemistry, dislocation structures, and the wafer bonding processes have been determined. The electronic transport behaviors of both n-typed and p-typed majority and minority carriers at different wafer-bonded interface junctions with emphasis on the temporal correlations of electrical properties and interface microstructures from varied annealing processes have also been analyzed. Furthermore, the effects of the wafer rotation alignments on electrical characteristics of both n-n and p-n junctions have been investigated. Quantitative relations of interface conductivity of n-n junctions and ideality factor of p-n junctions at different alignment with varied annealing conditions have also been reported. Secondly, the adhesion, mechanical reliability, and wafer bondability of directly bonded GaAs, InP, and GaN semiconductors, together with their interfacial microfailure model, have also been carefully analyzed through the correlations between the wafer annealing processes, interface fracture energy and shear strength, and microfailure

  15. An aluminum-germanium eutectic structure for silicon wafer bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Quintana, I.; Ottaviani, G.; Tonini, R.; Felisari, L.; Garavaglia, M.; Oggioni, L.; Morin, D.

    2005-08-01

    An aluminum-germanium eutectic bonding technology has been used to uniformly bond two silicon wafers for MEMS packaging at temperatures as low as 450 °C, well below the aluminum-silicon eutectic temperature (577 °C). A device silicon wafer has been put in contact with a cap wafer where an aluminum film covered by a germanium film has been thermally evaporated. The annealing has been performed in a vacuum furnace under uniaxial pressure variable from 1.8 up to 30 kbar. The samples have been analyzed with various analytical techniques. 4He+ MeV Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) has been used to measure the thicknesses of the deposited films and to follow the aluminum-germanium intermixing, Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM) to control the uniformity of the bonding, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) associated with electron induced X-ray fluorescence to analyze composition, morphology and elements distribution in the film between the two bonded wafers. The temperatures for the annealing were selected above and below the Ge-Al the eutectic temperature. At temperatures below the eutectic no-bonding has been obtained for any applied pressure. Above the eutectic bonding occurs. The formation of a liquid film is mandatory to obtain a reproducible and robust bonding. The pressure is necessary to improve the contacts between the two wafers; its role in the metallurgy of the bonding needs to be explored.

  16. Wafer-level packaging and direct interconnection technology based on hybrid bonding and through silicon vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühne, Stéphane; Hierold, Christofer

    2011-08-01

    The presented wafer-level packaging technology enables the direct integration of electrical interconnects during low-temperature wafer bonding of a cap substrate featuring through silicon vias (TSVs) onto a MEMS device wafer. The hybrid bonding process is based on hydrophilic direct bonding of plasma-activated Si/SiO2 surfaces and the simultaneous interconnection of the device metallization layers with Cu TSVs by transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of ultra-thin AuSn connects. The direct bond enables precise geometry definition between device and cap substrate, whereas the TLP bonding does not require a planarization of the interconnect metallization before bonding. The complete process flow is successfully validated and the fabricated devices' characterization evidenced ohmic interconnects without interfacial voids in the TLP bond.

  17. A new VLSI compatible rapid thermal processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, D.; Mehta, S.; Parisi, N.; Russo, C. J.; Schwartz, V.

    Rapid thermal processing (RTP) is increasingly becoming a significant tool to meet the challenge of fabricating miniaturized MOS and bipolar devices. The primary advantages of RTP over conventional furnace annealing include the shorter heat cycle, well-controlled soak times at peak temperatures and the capability to rapidly change anneal ambients, thereby enhancing its flexibility as a process tool. The major applications of RTP in VLSI technology that are presently being pursued include: (i) implant-damage annealing/dopant activation, (ii) silicide formation, (iii) glass reflow, (iv) thin film growth/deposition (oxides, nitrides, oxy-nitrides) and (v) contact alloying. This paper discusses a new rapid thermal processor, RTP-800/8000, recently introduced by Varian. The discussion will include mechanical and electrical design, software, heating process compatibility, process uniformity and repeatability, process setup and noncontact temperature measurement. The heating system consists of a tungsten lamp array surrounded by a highly reflective mirror system designed to provide good temperature uniformity for wafer sizes up to 200 mm. The RTP-8000 has a serial cassette-to-cassette automatic wafer handling system. The RTP-800 possesses a single wafer, operator-assisted wafer handling system. The RTP-800/8000 has an automated multiple gas flow control and also has the optional capability of processing wafers in vacuum. An infrared optical pyrometer measures the wafer temperature from the backside of the wafer. In the RTP-8000, touch screen operation of the menu-driven recipes is easy with user-friendly software. A separate electroluminescent flat panel display provides information for maintenance and servicing and reports the system status. Process information is provided on this display in the RTP-800.

  18. Self-adaptive phosphor coating technology for wafer-level scale chip packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsong, Zhou; Haibo, Rao; Wei, Wang; Xianlong, Wan; Junyuan, Liao; Xuemei, Wang; Da, Zhou; Qiaolin, Lei

    2013-05-01

    A new self-adaptive phosphor coating technology has been successfully developed, which adopted a slurry method combined with a self-exposure process. A phosphor suspension in the water-soluble photoresist was applied and exposed to LED blue light itself and developed to form a conformal phosphor coating with self-adaptability to the angular distribution of intensity of blue light and better-performing spatial color uniformity. The self-adaptive phosphor coating technology had been successfully adopted in the wafer surface to realize a wafer-level scale phosphor conformal coating. The first-stage experiments show satisfying results and give an adequate demonstration of the flexibility of self-adaptive coating technology on application of WLSCP.

  19. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  20. A novel fabrication technology for anti-reflex wafer-level vacuum packaged microscanning mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldsen, M.; Hofmann, U.; Quenzer, H. J.; Janes, J.; Stolte, C.; Gruber, K.; Ites, M.; Sörensen, F.; Wagner, B.

    2008-02-01

    The use of microscanning mirrors in mobile laser projection systems demands for robust fabrication technologies. Dust, change in humidity and temperature can only be tolerated if the fragile devices are enclosed in a hermetic package. A novel fabrication process is presented based on two 30 micron thick epitaxially deposited silicon layers and a buried interconnection layer. This technology allows the fabrication of stacked combdrives for electrostatic mirror actuation and lateral feedthroughs needed for hermetic encapsulation with standard wafer bonding processes. High display resolution requires large scan angles of the mirror plate. Therefore, a fabrication technology for structured glass wafers is presented to provide deep cavities for large mirror plate movements. A solution for effective laser spot reflex suppression is presented based on a static tilt of the mirror plate in relation to the glass cover wafer during eutectic bonding. By doing so, the reflex generated at the glass surfaces is shifted out of the image area. The cavity pressure of packaged devices has been measured showing the necessity of a getter layer in order to provide cavity pressures below 1 mbar. The performance of a packaged device with integrated getter layer has been evaluated. A driving amplitude of only 6 V is needed to achieve scan angles of above 50 deg. White light interferometric measurements showed excellent planarity of the mirror plate with a radius of curvature of about 18 m.

  1. VLSI research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodersen, R. W.

    1984-04-01

    A scaled version of the RISC II chip has been fabricated and tested and these new chips have a cycle time that would outperform a VAX 11/780 by about a factor of two on compiled integer C programs. The architectural work on a RISC chip designed for a Smalltalk implementation has been completed. This chip, called SOAR (Smalltalk On a RISC), should run program s4-15 times faster than the Xerox 1100 (Dolphin), a TTL minicomputer, and about as fast as the Xerox 1132 (Dorado), a $100,000 ECL minicomputer. The 1983 VLSI tools tape has been converted for use under the latest UNIX release (4.2). The Magic (formerly called Caddy) layout system will be a unified set of highly automated tools that cover all aspects of the layout process, including stretching, compaction, tiling and routing. A multiple window package and design rule checker for this system have just been completed and compaction and stretching are partially implemented. New slope-based timing models for the Crystal timing analyzer are now fully implemented and in regular use. In an accuracy test using a dozen critical paths from the RISC II processor and cache chips it was found that Crystal's estimates were within 5-10% of SPICE's estimates, while being a factor of 10,000 times faster.

  2. Wafer topography modeling for ionic implantation mask correction dedicated to 2x nm FDSOI technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Jean-Christophe; Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Sungauer, Elodie; Robert, Frédéric; Yesilada, Emek; Armeanu, Ana-Maria; Entradas, Jorge; Sturtevant, John L.; Do, Thuy; Granik, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    Reflection by wafer topography and underlying layers during optical lithography can cause unwanted exposure in the resist [1]. This wafer stack effect phenomenon which is neglected for larger nodes than 45nm, is becoming problematic for 32nm technology node and below at the ionic implantation process. This phenomenon is expected to be attenuated by the use of anti-reflecting coating but increases process complexity and adds cost and cycle time penalty. As a consequence, an OPC based solution is today under evaluation to cope with stack effects involved in ionic implantation patterning [2] [3]. For the source drain (SD) ionic implantation process step on 28nm Fully Depleted Silicon-on-Insulator (FDSOI) technology, active silicon areas, poly silicon patterns, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI), Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) areas and the transitions between these different regions result in significant SD implant pattern critical dimension variations. The large number of stack variations involved in these effects implies a complex modeling to simulate pattern degradations. This paper deals with the characterization of stack effects on 28nm node using SOI substrates. The large number of measurements allows to highlight all individual and combined stack effects. A new modeling flow has been developed in order to generate wafer stack aware OPC model. The accuracy and the prediction of the model is presented in this paper.

  3. Interactions of double patterning technology with wafer processing, OPC and design flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Kevin; Cork, Chris; Miloslavsky, Alex; Luk-Pat, Gerry; Barnes, Levi; Hapli, John; Lewellen, John; Rollins, Greg; Wiaux, Vincent; Verhaegen, Staf

    2008-03-01

    Double patterning technology (DPT) is one of the main options for printing logic devices with half-pitch less than 45nm; and flash and DRAM memory devices with half-pitch less than 40nm. DPT methods decompose the original design intent into two individual masking layers which are each patterned using single exposures and existing 193nm lithography tools. The results of the individual patterning layers combine to re-create the design intent pattern on the wafer. In this paper we study interactions of DPT with lithography, masks synthesis and physical design flows. Double exposure and etch patterning steps create complexity for both process and design flows. DPT decomposition is a critical software step which will be performed in physical design and also in mask synthesis. Decomposition includes cutting (splitting) of original design intent polygons into multiple polygons where required; and coloring of the resulting polygons. We evaluate the ability to meet key physical design goals such as: reduce circuit area; minimize rework; ensure DPT compliance; guarantee patterning robustness on individual layer targets; ensure symmetric wafer results; and create uniform wafer density for the individual patterning layers.

  4. Customizable VLSI artificial neural network chips based on a novel technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C. Y.; Law, B.; Chapline, G.; Swenson, D.

    1993-09-14

    The human cerebral cortex contains approximately 10{sup 11} neurons and 10{sup 14} synapses. It thus seems logical that any technology intended to mimic human capabilities should have the ability to fabricate a very large number of neurons and even larger numbers of synapses. This paper describes an implementation of hardware neural networks using highly linear thin-film resistor technology and an 8-bit binary weight circuit to produce customizable artificial neural network chips and systems.

  5. A novel technology for fabricating customizable VLSI artificial neural network chips

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.; Law, B.; Chapline, G.; Swenson, D.

    1992-02-05

    This paper describes an implementation of hardware neural networks using highly linear thin-film resistor technology and an 8-bit binary weight circuit to produce customizable artificial neural network chips and systems. These neural networks are programmed using precision laser cutting and deposition. The fast turnaround of laser-based customization allows us to explore different neural network architectures and to rapidly program the synaptic weights. Our customizable chip allows us to expand an artificial network laterally and vertically. This flexibility permits us to build very large neural network systems.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of add-on price estimate for select silicon wafering technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    The cost of producing wafers from silicon ingots is a major component of the add-on price of silicon sheet. Economic analyses of the add-on price estimates and their sensitivity internal-diameter (ID) sawing, multiblade slurry (MBS) sawing and fixed-abrasive slicing technique (FAST) are presented. Interim price estimation guidelines (IPEG) are used for estimating a process add-on price. Sensitivity analysis of price is performed with respect to cost parameters such as equipment, space, direct labor, materials (blade life) and utilities, and the production parameters such as slicing rate, slices per centimeter and process yield, using a computer program specifically developed to do sensitivity analysis with IPEG. The results aid in identifying the important cost parameters and assist in deciding the direction of technology development efforts.

  7. Thin-film encapsulation technology for above-IC MEMS wafer-level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Cicek, Paul-Vahé; Nabki, Frederic; El-Gamal, Mourad

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a low-cost and low-temperature wafer-level packaging solution for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. Heat-sensitive polymer poly(propylene carbonate) is used as the sacrificial material to release the capping layer in a clean and fast manner. Free-standing caps made of amorphous silicon carbide films and as large as 450 µm in diameter are successfully fabricated. To demonstrate the validity of this technology, surface-micromachined Pirani vacuum gauges are fabricated as an example of MEMS devices and encapsulated. Capped Pirani gauges respond to pressure between 1 mTorr and 1 atm. The Pirani gauges are sealed with Parylene C films that exhibit near-hermetic properties and the initial sealing pressure for 300 µm diameter cavities is characterized to be in the range of tens of torr.

  8. VLSI Universal Noiseless Coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Robert F.; Lee, Jun-Ji; Fang, Wai-Chi

    1989-01-01

    Proposed universal noiseless coder (UNC) compresses stream of data signals for efficient transmission in channel of limited bandwidth. Noiseless in sense original data completely recoverable from output code. System built as very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit, compressing data in real time at input rates as high as 24 Mb/s, and possibly faster, depending on specific design. Approach yields small, lightweight system operating reliably and consuming little power. Constructed as single, compact, low-power VLSI circuit chip. Design of VLSI circuit chip made specific to code algorithms. Entire UNC fabricated in single chip, worst-case power dissipation less than 1 W.

  9. Novel wafer track-based resolution enhancement technology for 248-nm DUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tom X.; Gurer, Emir; Lewellen, John W.; Lee, Ed C.

    2000-06-01

    248 nm DUV lithography has become a mainstream production technology for sub-0.25 micrometer feature sizes due to its superior process technology and improved cost of ownership (COO). As the semiconductor industry moves to sub-0.18 micron critical layer feature sizes, there is an enormous economic incentive to extend 248 nm technology towards smaller geometries. Traditionally, resolution enhancement technologies such as various illumination types (off-axis, annular ring and quadrapole) and phase shifted masks are based on the optimization of the diffracted aerial image wave front and they concentrate on the exposure tools and masks. In this paper we report a new novel resolution enhancement technology based on the wafer track. We have demonstrated that this new technology, along with the scanner-based resolution enhancement techniques, can substantially improve resolution capabilities and process latitudes of the 248 nm technology. Consequently, semiconductor manufacturers will be able to extend 248 nm DUV technology for smaller feature sizes than was possible before. Our new resolution enhancement technology allowed us to increase the contrast of an acetal-based DUV resist from about 5 to 13 by carefully controlling the environment during the post exposure bake process. This technology provided a continuous contrast knob that could be controlled and set based on the application. Increased photoresist contrast in turn made it possible to pattern 0.15 micrometer isolated lines and 0.2 micrometer dense lines using a 248 nm mercury lamp-based scanner with projection optics designed for 0.35 micrometer features. A DOF of 0.8 micrometer for 0.25 micrometer dense lines was achieved using this PEB- based resolution enhancement technology whereas conventional technology could not resolve 0.25 micrometer dense lines at all. Detailed lithographic characterization identified a 30% improvement in process latitude. Furthermore, cross sectional SEM studies revealed high quality

  10. 300 mm InGaAs-on-insulator substrates fabricated using direct wafer bonding and the Smart Cut™ technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiez, Julie; Sollier, Sébastien; Baron, Thierry; Martin, Mickaël; Gaudin, Gweltaz; Mazen, Frédéric; Madeira, Florence; Favier, Sylvie; Salaun, Amélie; Alcotte, Reynald; Beche, Elodie; Grampeix, Helen; Veytizou, Christelle; Moulet, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the first demonstration of 300 mm In0.53Ga0.47As-on-insulator (InGaAs-OI) substrates. The use of direct wafer bonding and the Smart Cut™ technology lead to the transfer of high quality InGaAs layer on large Si wafer size (300 mm) at low effective cost, taking into account the reclaim of the III-V on Si donor substrate. The optimization of the three key building blocks of this technology is detailed. (1) The III-V epitaxial growth on 300 mm Si wafers has been optimized to decrease the defect density. (2) For the first time, hydrogen-induced thermal splitting is made inside the indium phosphide (InP) epitaxial layer and a wide implantation condition ranges is observed on the contrary to bulk InP. (3) Finally a specific direct wafer bonding with alumina oxide has been chosen to avoid outgas diffusion at the alumina oxide/III-V compound interface.

  11. Image processing via VLSI: A concept paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1982-01-01

    Implementing specific image processing algorithms via very large scale integrated systems offers a potent solution to the problem of handling high data rates. Two algorithms stand out as being particularly critical -- geometric map transformation and filtering or correlation. These two functions form the basis for data calibration, registration and mosaicking. VLSI presents itself as an inexpensive ancillary function to be added to almost any general purpose computer and if the geometry and filter algorithms are implemented in VLSI, the processing rate bottleneck would be significantly relieved. A set of image processing functions that limit present systems to deal with future throughput needs, translates these functions to algorithms, implements via VLSI technology and interfaces the hardware to a general purpose digital computer is developed.

  12. Yield-driven multi-project reticle design and wafer dicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Andrew B.; Mandoiu, Ion; Xu, Xu; Zelikovsky, Alex

    2005-11-01

    The aggressive scaling of VLSI feature size and the pervasive use of advanced reticle enhancement technologies has lead to dramatic increases in mask costs, pushing prototype and low volume production designs at the limit of economic feasibility. Multiple project wafers (MPW), or "shuttle" runs, provide an attractive solution for such low volume designs, by providing a mechanism to share the cost of mask tooling among up to tens of designs. However, MPW reticle design and wafer dicing introduce complexities not encountered in typical, single-project wafers. Recent works on wafer dicing adopt some assumptions to reduce the problem complexity. Although using one or more assumptions makes the problem solvable, the feasibility or performance of the solutions may be degraded. Also, the delay cost associated with schedule alignment was ignored in all previous works. In this paper we propose a general MPW flow including four main steps: (1) schedule-aware project partitioning (2) multi-project reticle floorplanning, (3) wafer shot-map definition, and (4) wafer dicing plan definition. Our project partitioner provides the best trade-off between the mask cost and delay cost. Our reticle floorplaner can automatically clone a design to better fit given production volumes. The round wafer shot-map definition step allows extracting functional dies from partially printed reticle images. Finally, our dicing planner allows multiple side-to-side dicing plans for different wafers and image rows/columns within a wafer. Experiments on industry testcases show that our methods outperform significantly not only previous methods in the literature, but also reticle floorplans manually designed by experienced engineers.

  13. Process Control By Automated In-Process Wafer Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, K. L.; Sandland, P.; Singleton, R. M.

    1984-06-01

    This is the introduction of new technology developed specifically for the inprocess pattern inspection and measurement of very large scale integrated (VLSI) wafers. There is a current need for significant improvements in pattern inspection instrumentation in order to tighten process control and achieve more competitive yields and therefore die costs. For the tedious and detailed task of pattern inspection and measurement, automation is the indicated solution. The future of computerized manufacturing requires, most fundamentally, the automation of the instrumentation and control function. In this paper, a system, designated the KLA 2020 Wafer Inspector, is described which incorporates the basic functions required to measure variations in the patterning process: linear and area dimensional measurements, registration error measurement, comparison for defects down to submicron in size. It is capable of inspecting in-process wafers in order to gain the most immediate process feedback. The speed with which it does each of these tests, less than a second, allows significant increases in sample size and therefore statistical control. It is this technology which will make computer-controlled photo processing possible.

  14. Wafer bonding technology for new generation vacuum MEMS: challenges and promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, V.; Pabo, E.

    2015-05-01

    Various MEMS devices are incorporated into consumer electronic devices. A particular category of MEMS require vacuum packaging by wafer bonding with the need to encapsulate vacuum levels of 10-2 mbar or higher with long time stability. The vacuum requirement is limiting the choice of the wafer bonding process and raises significant challenges to the existing investigation methods (metrology) used for results qualification. From the broad range of wafer bonding processes only few are compatible with vacuum applications: fusion bonding, anodic bonding, glass frit bonding and metal-based bonding. The outgassing from the enclosed surfaces after bonding will affect the vacuum level in the cavity: in some cases, a getter material is used inside the device cavity to compensate for this outgassing. Additionally the selected bonding process must be compatible with the devices on the wafers being bonded. This work reviews the principles of vacuum encapsulation using wafer bonding. Examples showing the suitability of each process for specific applications types will be presented. A significant challenge in vacuum MEMS fabrication is the lack of analytical methods needed for process characterization or reliability testing. A short overview of the most used methods and their limitations will be presented. Specific needs to be addressed will be introduced with examples.

  15. Supercomputing with VLSI

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, S.

    1989-01-01

    Supercoprocessors (SCPs), highly parallel VLSI architectures tuned to solving a specific problem class, are shown to provide a means of cost-effective supercomputing. A methodology for building SCPs for different computation-intensive problems is described: two pragmatic constraints namely problem-size-independence and limited-bandwidth constraint are imposed on special-purposes architectures; a simple but powerful model of computation is used to derive general upper bounds on the speedup obtainable using such architectures. It is shown that bounds established by other authors for matrix multiplication and sorting, using problem-specific approaches, can be derived very simply using this model. Poisson Engine-I (PE-I), a prototype SCP, is a system for solving the Laplace equation using the finite difference approximation. PE-I uses a novel approach: asynchronous iteration methods are implemented using a fixed-size, synchronous array of simple processing elements. Architectural and algorithmic extensions to PE-I are briefly considered: the solution of a wider class of PDEs and the use of more sophisticated algorithms like the multigrid method are some of the issues addressed. The SCP methodology is applied to the problems of matrix-multiplication and sorting. For sorting, an SCP with superlinear speedup is outlined. For the matrix problem, the architecture and implementation details of SMP are described in detail. SMP, realized with about fifty chips using current technology, is capable of through-puts greater than 150 Mflops, and is also unique in being optimal with respect to the lowerbound derived using the SCP model. The use of a collection of sup SCPs is advanced as a cost-effective supercomputing alternative.

  16. The 1992 4th NASA SERC Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the fourth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design, co-sponsored by the IEEE, are presented. Each year this symposium is organized by the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the University of Idaho and is held in conjunction with a quarterly meeting of the NASA Data System Technology Working Group (DSTWG). One task of the DSTWG is to develop new electronic technologies that will meet next generation electronic data system needs. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The NASA SERC is proud to offer, at its fourth symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories, the electronics industry, and universities. These speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  17. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This annual report outlines the activities of the past year at the NASA SERC on VLSI Design. Highlights for this year include the following: a significant breakthrough was achieved in utilizing commercial IC foundries for producing flight electronics; the first two flight qualified chips were designed, fabricated, and tested and are now being delivered into NASA flight systems; and a new technology transfer mechanism has been established to transfer VLSI advances into NASA and commercial systems.

  18. VLSI in biomedical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, R; Jones, T

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores the nature of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) systems as applied to the area of medical imaging systems. A general discussion of imaging systems and the techniques employed therein will be presented. With this, the merits of VLSI solutions to the medical imaging problem are presented. Consideration is also given to programmable processors, such as off the shelf DSP processors, semi-custom, and full custom VLSI devices. Through the use of VLSI devices, many image processing algorithms can be integrated into a hardware solution. This has the advantage of increased computational capacity over solutions that would normally employ software techniques. PMID:7736415

  19. Verification of VLSI designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windley, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we explore the specification and verification of VLSI designs. The paper focuses on abstract specification and verification of functionality using mathematical logic as opposed to low-level boolean equivalence verification such as that done using BDD's and Model Checking. Specification and verification, sometimes called formal methods, is one tool for increasing computer dependability in the face of an exponentially increasing testing effort.

  20. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  1. VLSI Reed-Solomon Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Modular Reed-solomon encoder uses identical custom VLSI chips called "symbol slices." By cascading and properly interconnecting group of these chips, encoder is made for any desired error-correcting capability and interleaving level. VLSI encoder requires only one-tenth the number of chips required by conventional Reed-Solomon Circuit implemented with discrete IC's.

  2. Reliable VLSI sequential controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.; Shamanna, M.

    1990-01-01

    A VLSI architecture for synchronous sequential controllers is presented that has attractive qualities for producing reliable circuits. In these circuits, one hardware implementation can realize any flow table with a maximum of 2(exp n) internal states and m inputs. Also all design equations are identical. A real time fault detection means is presented along with a strategy for verifying the correctness of the checking hardware. This self check feature can be employed with no increase in hardware. The architecture can be modified to achieve fail safe designs. With no increase in hardware, an adaptable circuit can be realized that allows replacement of faulty transitions with fault free transitions.

  3. High-Throughput Multiple Dies-to-Wafer Bonding Technology and III/V-on-Si Hybrid Lasers for Heterogeneous Integration of Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xianshu; Cao, Yulian; Song, Junfeng; Hu, Xiaonan; Cheng, Yungbing; Li, Chengming; Liu, Chongyang; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Qijie; Lo, Patrick Guo-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Integrated optical light source on silicon is one of the key building blocks for optical interconnect technology. Great research efforts have been devoting worldwide to explore various approaches to integrate optical light source onto the silicon substrate. The achievements so far include the successful demonstration of III/V-on-Si hybrid lasers through III/V-gain material to silicon wafer bonding technology. However, for potential large-scale integration, leveraging on mature silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication technology and infrastructure, more effective bonding scheme with high bonding yield is in great demand considering manufacturing needs. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a high-throughput multiple dies-to-wafer (D2W) bonding technology which is then applied for the demonstration of hybrid silicon lasers. By temporarily bonding III/V dies to a handle silicon wafer for simultaneous batch processing, it is expected to bond unlimited III/V dies to silicon device wafer with high yield. As proof-of-concept, more than 100 III/V dies bonding to 200 mm silicon wafer is demonstrated. The high performance of the bonding interface is examined with various characterization techniques. Repeatable demonstrations of 16-III/V-die bonding to pre-patterned 200 mm silicon wafers have been performed for various hybrid silicon lasers, in which device library including Fabry-Perot (FP) laser, lateral-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) laser with side wall grating, and mode-locked laser (MLL). From these results, the presented multiple D2W bonding technology can be a key enabler towards the large-scale heterogeneous integration of optoelectronic integrated circuits (H-OEIC).

  4. Mixed voltage VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Rennels, David; Alkalaj, Leon

    1993-01-01

    A technique for minimizing the power dissipated in a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) chip by lowering the operating voltage without any significant penalty in the chip throughput even though low voltage operation results in slower circuits. Since the overall throughput of a VLSI chip depends on the speed of the critical path(s) in the chip, it may be possible to sustain the throughput rates attained at higher voltages by operating the circuits in the critical path(s) with a high voltage while operating the other circuits with a lower voltage to minimize the power dissipation. The interface between the gates which operate at different voltages is crucial for low power dissipation since the interface may possibly have high static current dissipation thus negating the gains of the low voltage operation. The design of a voltage level translator which does the interface between the low voltage and high voltage circuits without any significant static dissipation is presented. Then, the results of the mixed voltage design using a greedy algorithm on three chips for various operating voltages are presented.

  5. Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells with Wafer Bonding and Plasmonic Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanake, Katsuaki

    We fabricated a direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs dual-junction cell, to demonstrate a proof-of-principle for the viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The bonded interface is a metal-free n+GaAs/n +InP tunnel junction with highly conductive Ohmic contact suitable for solar cell applications overcoming the 4% lattice mismatch. The quantum efficiency spectrum for the bonded cell was quite similar to that for each of unbonded GaAs and InGaAs subcells. The bonded dual-junction cell open-circuit voltage was equal to the sum of the unbonded subcell open-circuit voltages, which indicates that the bonding process does not degrade the cell material quality since any generated crystal defects that act as recombination centers would reduce the open-circuit voltage. Also, the bonded interface has no significant carrier recombination rate to reduce the open circuit voltage. Engineered substrates consisting of thin films of InP on Si handle substrates (InP/Si substrates or epitaxial templates) have the potential to significantly reduce the cost and weight of compound semiconductor solar cells relative to those fabricated on bulk InP substrates. InGaAs solar cells on InP have superior performance to Ge cells at photon energies greater than 0.7 eV and the current record efficiency cell for 1 sun illumination was achieved using an InGaP/GaAs/InGaAs triple junction cell design with an InGaAs bottom cell. Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells from the InGaAsP-family of III-V materials grown epitaxially on InP substrates would also benefit from such an InP/Si substrate. Additionally, a proposed four-junction solar cell fabricated by joining subcells of InGaAs and InGaAsP grown on InP with subcells of GaAs and AlInGaP grown on GaAs through a wafer-bonded interconnect would enable the independent selection of the subcell band gaps from well developed materials grown on lattice matched substrates. Substitution of

  6. Neural Networks Of VLSI Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Silvio P.

    1991-01-01

    Concept for design of electronic neural network calls for assembly of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits of few standard types. Each VLSI chip, which contains both analog and digital circuitry, used in modular or "building-block" fashion by interconnecting it in any of variety of ways with other chips. Feedforward neural network in typical situation operates under control of host computer and receives inputs from, and sends outputs to, other equipment.

  7. VLSI Architectures for Computing DFT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Reed, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Simplifications result from use of residue Fermat number systems. System of finite arithmetic over residue Fermat number systems enables calculation of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of series of complex numbers with reduced number of multiplications. Computer architectures based on approach suitable for design of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits for computing DFT's. General approach not limited to DFT's; Applicable to decoding of error-correcting codes and other transform calculations. System readily implemented in VLSI.

  8. Enabling more capability within smaller pixels: advanced wafer-level process technologies for integration of focal plane arrays with readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple, Dorota S.; Vick, Erik P.; Lueck, Matthew R.; Malta, Dean; Skokan, Mark R.; Masterjohn, Christopher M.; Muzilla, Mark S.

    2014-05-01

    Over the past decade, the development of infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) has seen two trends: decreasing of the pixel size and increasing of signal-processing capability at the device level. Enabling more capability within smaller pixels can be achieved through the use of advanced wafer-level processes for the integration of FPAs with silicon (Si) readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we review the development of these wafer-level integration technologies, highlighting approaches in which the infrared sensor is integrated with three-dimensional ROIC stacks composed of multiple layers of Si circuitry interconnected using metal-filled through-silicon vias.

  9. Launching of multi-project wafer runs in ePIXfab with micron-scale silicon rib waveguide technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Cherchi, Matteo; Harjanne, Mikko; Ylinen, Sami; Kapulainen, Markku; Vehmas, Tapani

    2014-03-01

    Silicon photonics is a rapidly growing R&D field where universities, institutes and companies are all involved and the business expectations for the next few years are high. One of the key enabling elements that led to the present success of silicon photonics is ePIXfab. It is a consortium of institutes that has together offered multi-project wafer (MPW) runs, packaging services, training, and feasibility studies. These services have significantly lowered the barrier of various research groups and companies to start developing silicon photonics. Until now the MPW services have been offered by the ePIXfab partners IMEC, CEA-Leti and IHP, which all use CMOS-type silicon photonics technology with a typical silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide thickness of 220 nm. In November 2013 this MPW offering was expanded by the ePIXfab partner VTT that opened the access to its 3 μm SOI waveguide platform via ePIXfab MPW runs. This technology platform is complementary to the mainstream silicon photonics technology (220 nm) and it offers such benefits as very low losses, small polarization dependency, ultrabroadband operation and low starting costs

  10. VLSI MIL-STD-1750A processor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, M.; Winter, T.; Brauchmann, W.

    An American company is developing a VLSI program to design, fabricate, characterize, and deliver a family of General Purpose Computers optimized to execute MIL-STD-1750A Notice 1. The CPU architecture is fashioned in an extensible functional module configuration with a performance range from 0.9 MIPS to 1.5 MIPS (DAIS-type Mix). The three configurations which have emerged include baseline CPU, baseline CPU plus floating point accelerator, and 32-bit data path CPU (ISA Invisible). It is pointed out that these machines will employ multisource VLSI low power CMOS technology and will be fully qualified to meet military environmental specifications.

  11. Database approach to communication in VLSI design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, G.; Beetem, A.; Short, G.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes recent and planned work at Stanford in applying database technology to the problems of VLSI design. In particular, it addresses the issue of communication within a design's different representations and hierarchical levels in a multiple designer environment. We demonstrate the heretofore questioned utility of using commercial database systems, at least while developing a versatile, flexible, and generally efficient model and its associated communication paths. Completed work and results from initial work using DEC DBMS 20 is presented, including macro expansion within the database, and signalling of changes to higher structural levels. Considerable discussion regarding overall philosophy for continued work is also included.

  12. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties. PMID:17716003

  13. VLSI Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong H.; Chung, Young Mo; Lee, Sang Uk

    1992-11-01

    In this paper, a VLSI architecture for Reed-Solomon (RS) decoder based on the Berlekamp algorithm is proposed. The proposed decoder provides both erasure and error correcting capability. In order to reduce the chip area, we reformulate the Berlekamp algorithm. The proposed algorithm possesses a recursive structure so that the number of cells for computing the errata locator polynomial can be reduced. Moreover, in our approach, only one finite field multiplication per clock cycle is required for implementation, provided an improvement in the decoding speed. And the overall architecture features parallel and pipelined structure, making a real time decoding possible. It is shown that the proposed VLSI architecture is more efficient in terms of VLSI implementation than the architecture based on the recursive Euclid algorithm.

  14. Machining lead wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Schamaun, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Recently, MEC-6 machined some 4-inch-diameter lead wafers to precision tolerances. The tolerance on the wafer thickness was +-0.000080 inch. A diamond tool was used to machine the wafers on a Moore No. 3 lathe. This report discusses the methods used to machine the wafers, the fixtures used to hold the wafers, and the inspection methods and results.

  15. 3D integration approaches for MEMS and CMOS sensors based on a Cu through-silicon-via technology and wafer level bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, L.; Dempwolf, S.; Reuter, D.; Ecke, R.; Gottfried, K.; Schulz, S. E.; Knechtel, R.; Geßner, T.

    2015-05-01

    Technologies for the 3D integration are described within this paper with respect to devices that have to retain a specific minimum wafer thickness for handling purposes (CMOS) and integrity of mechanical elements (MEMS). This implies Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs) with large dimensions and high aspect ratios (HAR). Moreover, as a main objective, the aspired TSV technology had to be universal and scalable with the designated utilization in a MEMS/CMOS foundry. Two TSV approaches are investigated and discussed, in which the TSVs were fabricated either before or after wafer thinning. One distinctive feature is an incomplete TSV Cu-filling, which avoids long processing and complex process control, while minimizing the thermomechanical stress between Cu and Si and related adverse effects in the device. However, the incomplete filling also includes various challenges regarding process integration. A method based on pattern plating is described, in which TSVs are metalized at the same time as the redistribution layer and which eliminates the need for additional planarization and patterning steps. For MEMS, the realization of a protective hermetically sealed capping is crucial, which is addressed in this paper by glass frit wafer level bonding and is discussed for hermetic sealing of MEMS inertial sensors. The TSV based 3D integration technologies are demonstrated on CMOS like test vehicle and on a MEMS device fabricated in Air Gap Insulated Microstructure (AIM) technology.

  16. Recursive computer architecture for VLSI

    SciTech Connect

    Treleaven, P.C.; Hopkins, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    A general-purpose computer architecture based on the concept of recursion and suitable for VLSI computer systems built from replicated (lego-like) computing elements is presented. The recursive computer architecture is defined by presenting a program organisation, a machine organisation and an experimental machine implementation oriented to VLSI. The experimental implementation is being restricted to simple, identical microcomputers each containing a memory, a processor and a communications capability. This future generation of lego-like computer systems are termed fifth generation computers by the Japanese. 30 references.

  17. GaAs VLSI for aerospace electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, G.; Chan, P.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced aerospace electronics systems require high-speed, low-power, radiation-hard, digital components for signal processing, control, and communication applications. GaAs VLSI devices provide a number of advantages over silicon devices including higher carrier velocities, ability to integrate with high performance optical devices, and high-resistivity substrates that provide very short gate delays, good isolation, and tolerance to many forms of radiation. However, III-V technologies also have disadvantages, such as lower yield compared to silicon MOS technology. Achieving very large scale integration (VLSI) is particularly important for fast complex systems. At very short gate delays (less than 100 ps), chip-to-chip interconnects severely degrade circuit clock rates. Complex systems, therefore, benefit greatly when as many gates as possible are placed on a single chip. To fully exploit the advantages of GaAs circuits, attention must be focused on achieving high integration levels by reducing power dissipation, reducing the number of devices per logic function, and providing circuit designs that are more tolerant to process and environmental variations. In addition, adequate noise margin must be maintained to ensure a practical yield.

  18. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  19. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  20. VLSI mixed signal processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, A.; Premkumar, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    An economical and efficient VLSI implementation of a mixed signal processing system (MSP) is presented in this paper. The MSP concept is investigated and the functional blocks of the proposed MSP are described. The requirements of each of the blocks are discussed in detail. A sample application using active acoustic cancellation technique is described to demonstrate the power of the MSP approach.

  1. An efficient interpolation filter VLSI architecture for HEVC standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Lian, Xiaocong; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-12-01

    The next-generation video coding standard of High-Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is especially efficient for coding high-resolution video such as 8K-ultra-high-definition (UHD) video. Fractional motion estimation in HEVC presents a significant challenge in clock latency and area cost as it consumes more than 40 % of the total encoding time and thus results in high computational complexity. With aims at supporting 8K-UHD video applications, an efficient interpolation filter VLSI architecture for HEVC is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a new interpolation filter algorithm based on the 8-pixel interpolation unit is proposed in this paper. It can save 19.7 % processing time on average with acceptable coding quality degradation. Based on the proposed algorithm, an efficient interpolation filter VLSI architecture, composed of a reused data path of interpolation, an efficient memory organization, and a reconfigurable pipeline interpolation filter engine, is presented to reduce the implement hardware area and achieve high throughput. The final VLSI implementation only requires 37.2k gates in a standard 90-nm CMOS technology at an operating frequency of 240 MHz. The proposed architecture can be reused for either half-pixel interpolation or quarter-pixel interpolation, which can reduce the area cost for about 131,040 bits RAM. The processing latency of our proposed VLSI architecture can support the real-time processing of 4:2:0 format 7680 × 4320@78fps video sequences.

  2. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A new cleaning process for the metallic contaminants on a post-CMP wafer's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baohong, Gao; Yuling, Liu; Chenwei, Wang; Yadong, Zhu; Shengli, Wang; Qiang, Zhou; Baimei, Tan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new cleaning process using boron-doped diamond (BDD) film anode electrochemical oxidation for metallic contaminants on polished silicon wafer surfaces. The BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can efficiently prepare pyrophosphate peroxide, pyrophosphate peroxide can oxidize organic contaminants, and pyrophosphate peroxide is deoxidized into pyrophosphate. Pyrophosphate, a good complexing agent, can form a metal complex, which is a structure consisting of a copper ion, bonded to a surrounding array of two pyrophosphate anions. Three polished wafers were immersed in the 0.01 mol/L CuSO4 solution for 2 h in order to make comparative experiments. The first one was cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide, the second by RCA (Radio Corporation of America) cleaning, and the third by deionized (DI) water. The XPS measurement result shows that the metallic contaminants on wafers cleaned by the RCA method and by pyrophosphate peroxide is less than the XPS detection limits of 1 ppm. And the wafer's surface cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide is more efficient in removing organic carbon residues than RCA cleaning. Therefore, BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can be used for microelectronics cleaning, and it can effectively remove organic contaminants and metallic contaminants in one step. It also achieves energy saving and environmental protection.

  3. Novel spin-coating technology for 248-nm/193-nm DUV lithography and low-k spin on dielectrics of 200-mm/300-mm wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurer, Emir; Zhong, Tom X.; Lewellen, John W.; Lee, Ed C.

    2000-06-01

    An alternative coating technology was developed for 248 nm/193 nm DUV lithography and low-k spin on dielectric (SOD) materials used in the interconnect area. This is a 300 mm enabling technology which overcomes turbulent flow limitations above 2000 rpm and it prevents 40 - 60% reduction on the process latitudes of evaporation-related variables, common to 300 mm conventional coaters. Our new coating technology is fully enclosed and it is capable of controlling the solvent concentration above the resist film dynamically in the gas phase. This feature allows a direct control of the evaporation mass transfer which determines the quality of the final resist profiles. Following process advantages are reported in this paper: (1) Demonstrated that final resist film thickness can be routinely varied by 4000 angstrom at a fixed drying spin speed, thus minimizing the impact of turbulence wall for 300 mm wafers. (2) Evaporation control allows wider range of useful thickness from a fixed viscosity material. (3) Latitudes of evaporation-related process variables is about 40% larger than that of a conventional coater. (4) Highly uniform films of 0.05% were obtained for 8800 angstrom target thickness with tighter wafer-wafer profile control because of the enclosed nature of the technology. (5) Dynamic evaporation control facilitates resist consumption minimization. Preliminary results indicate feasibility of a 0.4 cc process of record (POR) for a 200 mm substrate. (6) Lower COO due to demonstrated relative insensitivity to environmental variables, robust resist consumption minimization and superior process capabilities. (7) Improved planarization and gap fill properties for the new generation photoresist/low-k SOD materials deposited using this enclosed coating technology.

  4. The Fifth NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The fifth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design had 13 sessions including Radiation Effects, Architectures, Mixed Signal, Design Techniques, Fault Testing, Synthesis, Signal Processing, and other Featured Presentations. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The presentations share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  5. VLSI Reed Solomon decoder design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Owsley, Patrick A.; Cameron, Kelly B.; Venbrux, Jack

    1986-01-01

    A Reed Solomon code is a highly efficient error correcting code that NASA will use in future space communication missions. A VLSI implementation of the decoder is presented that accepts data rates of 80 Mbits/second. A total of seven chips are needed and operate with the symbol clock being the system clock for the chip set. Approximately 1.65 billion Galois Field operations per second are achieved with this chip set.

  6. Mumford and Shah functional: VLSI analysis and implementation.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maurizio; Masera, Guido

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes the analysis of the Mumford and Shah functional from the implementation point of view. Our goal is to show results in terms of complexity for real-time applications, such as motion estimation based on segmentation techniques, of the Mumford and Shah functional. Moreover, the sensitivity to finite precision representation is addressed, a fast VLSI architecture is described, and results obtained for its complete implementation on a 0.13 microm standard cells technology are presented. PMID:16526435

  7. Improved self arbitrated VLSI asynchronous circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterrowd, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces an improved method for designing the class of CMOS VLSI asynchronous sequential circuits introduced in the paper by Sterling R. Whitaker and Gary K. Maki, 'Self Arbitrated VLSI Asynchronous Circuits.' Of main interest here is the simple design by inspection rules that arise from these circuits. This paper presents a variation on these circuits which reduces the number of transistors required.

  8. CCSDS Reed Solomon VLSI chip set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, K.; Whitaker, S.; Liu, N.; Liu, K.; Canaris, J.

    1990-01-01

    A highly efficient error correcting code has been selected by NASA as a CCSDS standard: the 16 symbol error correcting Reed Solomon code. A VLSI implementation of this decoder is described in this paper. A total of 4 full custom VLSI chips are needed that correct data in real time at an sustained rate of up to 80 Mbits/second.

  9. VLSI Processor For Vector Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Pixel intensities in each kernel compared simultaneously with all code vectors. Prototype high-performance, low-power, very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit designed to perform compression of image data by vector-quantization method. Contains relatively simple analog computational cells operating on direct or buffered outputs of photodetectors grouped into blocks in imaging array, yielding vector-quantization code word for each such block in sequence. Scheme exploits parallel-processing nature of vector-quantization architecture, with consequent increase in speed.

  10. Systolic VLSI for Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Chang, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional parallel computing method for real-time Kalman filtering is presented. The mathematical formulation of a Kalman filter algorithm is rearranged to be the type of Faddeev algorithm for generalizing signal processing. The data flow mapping from the Faddeev algorithm to a two-dimensional concurrent computing structure is developed. The architecture of the resulting processor cells is regular, simple, expandable, and therefore naturally suitable for VLSI chip implementation. The computing methodology and the two-dimensional systolic arrays are useful for Kalman filter applications as well as other matrix/vector based algebraic computations.

  11. Fast and area-efficient VLSI adders

    SciTech Connect

    Han, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    Area-time tradeoffs have been an important topic in VLSI research. This is because the cost of fabricating a circuit is an exponential function of its area. As a result, optimizing the area of a VLSI design is much more important than optimizing the speed of an algorithm. This dissertation examines area-time tradeoffs in VLSI for prefix computation using graph representations of the problem. Since the problem is intimately related to binary addition, results obtained lead to design of area-time efficient VLSI adders. This is a major goal of the work: to design very low latency-addition circuitry that is also area-efficient. To this end, a new graph representation is presented for prefix computation that leads to the design of a fast, area-efficient binary adder. The new graph is a combination of previously known graph representations for prefix computation, and its area is close to known lower bounds on the VLSI area of parallel prefix graphs. Using it, the author designed VLSI adders having area A = O(n log n) whose delay time is the lowest possible value, i.e., the fastest possible area-efficient VLSI adder. For the large number of inputs, the pipelined model of prefix circuit is presented. Also presented is a fault-tolerant model for the developed prefix circuit, based on the partitioning of the network.

  12. Using Ant Colony Optimization for Routing in VLSI Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Tamanna; Moses, Melanie

    2009-04-01

    Rapid advances in VLSI technology have increased the number of transistors that fit on a single chip to about two billion. A frequent problem in the design of such high performance and high density VLSI layouts is that of routing wires that connect such large numbers of components. Most wire-routing problems are computationally hard. The quality of any routing algorithm is judged by the extent to which it satisfies routing constraints and design objectives. Some of the broader design objectives include minimizing total routed wire length, and minimizing total capacitance induced in the chip, both of which serve to minimize power consumed by the chip. Ant Colony Optimization algorithms (ACO) provide a multi-agent framework for combinatorial optimization by combining memory, stochastic decision and strategies of collective and distributed learning by ant-like agents. This paper applies ACO to the NP-hard problem of finding optimal routes for interconnect routing on VLSI chips. The constraints on interconnect routing are used by ants as heuristics which guide their search process. We found that ACO algorithms were able to successfully incorporate multiple constraints and route interconnects on suite of benchmark chips. On an average, the algorithm routed with total wire length 5.5% less than other established routing algorithms.

  13. Fully-depleted silicon-on-sapphire and its application to advanced VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offord, Bruce W.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the widely recognized advantages of full dielectric isolation, e.g., reduced parasitic capacitance, transient radiation hardness, and processing simplicity, fully-depleted silicon-on-sapphire offers reduced floating body effects and improved thermal characteristics when compared to other silicon-on-insulator technologies. The properties of this technology and its potential impact on advanced VLSI circuitry will be discussed.

  14. Reconfigurable VLSI architecture for a database processor

    SciTech Connect

    Oflazer, K.

    1983-01-01

    This work brings together the processing potential offered by regularly structured VLSI processing units and the architecture of a database processor-the relational associative processor (RAP). The main motivations are to integrate a RAP cell processor on a few VLSI chips and improve performance by employing procedures exploiting these VLSI chips and the system level reconfigurability of processing resources. The resulting VLSI database processor consists of parallel processing cells that can be reconfigured into a large processor to execute the hard operations of projection and semijoin efficiently. It is shown that such a configuration can provide 2 to 3 orders of magnitude of performance improvement over previous implementations of the RAP system in the execution of such operations. 27 refs.

  15. A second generation 50 Mbps VLSI level zero processing system prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Jonathan C.; Shi, Jeff; Speciale, Nick; Bennett, Toby

    1994-01-01

    Level Zero Processing (LZP) generally refers to telemetry data processing functions performed at ground facilities to remove all communication artifacts from instrument data. These functions typically include frame synchronization, error detection and correction, packet reassembly and sorting, playback reversal, merging, time-ordering, overlap deletion, and production of annotated data sets. The Data Systems Technologies Division (DSTD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been developing high-performance Very Large Scale Integration Level Zero Processing Systems (VLSI LZPS) since 1989. The first VLSI LZPS prototype demonstrated 20 Megabits per second (Mbp's) capability in 1992. With a new generation of high-density Application-specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) and a Mass Storage System (MSS) based on the High-performance Parallel Peripheral Interface (HiPPI), a second prototype has been built that achieves full 50 Mbp's performance. This paper describes the second generation LZPS prototype based upon VLSI technologies.

  16. A coherent VLSI design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfield, P., Jr.; Glasser, L. A.; Knight, T. F., Jr.; Leiserson, C. E.; Rivest, R. L.

    1985-09-01

    The research discussed here is described in more detail in several published and unpublished reports cited. The CAD frame Schema has progressed to the point where it is useful for ample chip designs. The interface to CIF is complete, and work has begun on importing layout libraries. An interface to EDIF is being installed. Simulators can now be connected, and thought is going into organization of VLSI libraries. A plan for the distribution of Schema is now being worked out. Previous results on waveform bounding have been generalized to large classes of problems described in canonical control-theory form. Work has begun on models for interconnect taking account of line inductance. This domain is less general than RLC networks, and there is hope that some of the previously derived bounds still apply. During this period a novel device, the UV write-enabled PROM, was reported at a conference. Work continues on developing useful circuits employing this device.

  17. Wafer capping of MEMS with fab-friendly metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Inertial MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) sensors are normally sealed in hermetic enclosures. Some are assembled in hermetic packages but wafer level packaging has become much more important in recent years. Anodic bonding can be used to achieve wafer level seals between silicon and glass but most suppliers of inertial sensors screen print glass frit onto silicon cap wafers. After removing the organic vehicle, these patterned cap wafers are sealed to device wafer prior to wafer singulation and plastic packaging. Anodic and glass frit bonding are both cost-effective. However, they impose size, quality and performance limitations. Wafer level sealing with a metal removes some of these limitations but introduces other concerns. This paper will review the current wafer level hermetic processes followed by a description of a thermocompression metal seal technology that is compatible with IC fabrication.

  18. VLSI circuits and systems for microphotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachowicz, S.; Rassau, A.; Kim, C.; Lee, S.-M.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes various VLSI systems for microphotonic applications. The first project investigates an optimum phase design implementing a multi phase Opto-ULSI processor for multi-function capable optical networks. This research is oriented around the initial development of an 8 phase Opto-ULSI processor that implements a Beam Steering (BS) Opto-ULSI processor (OUP) for integrated intelligent photonic system (IIPS), while investigating the optimal phase characteristics and developing compensation for the nonlinearity of liquid crystal. The second part provides an insight into realisation of a novel 3-D configurable chip based on "sea-of-pixels" architecture, which is highly suitable for applications in multimedia systems as well as for computation of coefficients for generation of holograms required in optical switches. The paper explores strategies for implementation of distributed primitives for arithmetic processing. This entails optimisation of basic cells that would allow using these primitives as part of a 3-D "sea-of-pixel" configurable processing array. The concept of 3-D Soft-Chip Technology (SCT) entails integration of "Soft-Processing Circuits" with "Soft-Configurable Circuits", which effectively manipulates hardware primitives through vertical integration of control and data. Thus the notion of 3-D Soft-Chip emerges as a new design paradigm for content-rich multimedia, telecommunication and photonic-based networking system applications. Combined with the effective manipulation of configurable hardware arithmetic primitives, highly efficient and powerful soft configurable processing systems can be realized.

  19. Constant fan-in digital neural networks are VLSI-optimal

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents a theoretical proof revealing an intrinsic limitation of digital VLSI technology: its inability to cope with highly connected structures (e.g. neural networks). We are in fact able to prove that efficient digital VLSI implementations (known as VLSI-optimal when minimizing the AT{sup 2} complexity measure - A being the area of the chip, and T the delay for propagating the inputs to the outputs) of neural networks are achieved for small-constant fan-in gates. This result builds on quite recent ones dealing with a very close estimate of the area of neural networks when implemented by threshold gates, but it is also valid for classical Boolean gates. Limitations and open questions are presented in the conclusions.

  20. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  1. Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020—from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366’s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with today’s state-of-the-art technologies. 1366’s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366’s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

  2. Adhesive wafer bonding for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, Viorel; Glinsner, Thomas; Mittendorfer, Gerald; Wieder, Bernhard; Lindner, Paul

    2003-04-01

    Low temperature wafer bonding is a powerful technique for MEMS/MOEMS devices fabrication and packaging. Among the low temperature processes adhesive bonding focuses a high technological interest. Adhesive wafer bonding is a bonding approach using an intermediate layer for bonding (e.g. glass, polymers, resists, polyimides). The main advantages of this method are: surface planarization, encapsulation of structures on the wafer surface, particle compensation and decrease of annealing temperature after bonding. This paper presents results on adhesive bonding using spin-on glass and Benzocyclobutene (BCB) from Dow Chemicals. The advantages of using adhesive bonding for MEMS applications will be illustrated be presenting a technology of fabricating GaAs-on-Si substrates (up to 150 mm diameter) and results on BCB bonding of Si wafers (200 mm diameter).

  3. VLSI implementations of threshold logic-a comprehensive survey.

    PubMed

    Beiu, V; Quintana, J M; Avedillo, M J

    2003-01-01

    This paper is an in-depth review on silicon implementations of threshold logic gates that covers several decades. In this paper, we will mention early MOS threshold logic solutions and detail numerous very-large-scale integration (VLSI) implementations including capacitive (switched capacitor and floating gate with their variations), conductance/current (pseudo-nMOS and output-wired-inverters, including a plethora of solutions evolved from them), as well as many differential solutions. At the end, we will briefly mention other implementations, e.g., based on negative resistance devices and on single electron technologies. PMID:18244573

  4. The 1991 3rd NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1991-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented from the following sessions: (1) featured presentations 1; (2) very large scale integration (VLSI) circuit design; (3) VLSI architecture 1; (4) featured presentations 2; (5) neural networks; (6) VLSI architectures 2; (7) featured presentations 3; (8) verification 1; (9) analog design; (10) verification 2; (11) design innovations 1; (12) asynchronous design; and (13) design innovations 2.

  5. Extremely long life and low-cost 193nm excimer laser chamber technology for 450mm wafer multipatterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, Hiroaki; Katsuumi, Hisakazu; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Asayama, Takeshi; Kumazaki, Takahito; Kurosu, Akihiko; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2014-04-01

    193nm ArF excimer lasers are widely used as light sources for the lithography process of semiconductor production. 193nm ArF exicmer lasers are expected to continue to be the main solution in photolithography, since advanced lithography technologies such as multiple patterning and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) are being developed. In order to apply these technologies to high-volume semiconductor manufacturing, the key is to reduce the total operating cost. To reduce the total operating cost, life extension of consumable part and reduction of power consumption are an important factor. The chamber life time and power consumption are a main factor to decide the total operating cost. Therefore, we have developed the new technology for extension of the chamber life time and low electricity consumption. In this paper, we will report the new technology to extend the life time of the laser chamber and to reduce the electricity consumption.

  6. VLSI Implementation Of The Fast Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Paul M.; Ku, Walter H.

    1986-03-01

    A VLSI implementation of a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processor consisting of a mesh interconnection of complex floating-point butterfly units is presented. The Cooley-Tukey radix-2 Decimation-In-Frequency (DIF) formulation of the FFT was chosen since it offered the best overall compromise between the need for fast and efficient algorithmic computation and the need for a structure amenable to VLSI layout. Thus the VLSI implementation is modular, regular, expandable to various problem sizes and has a simple systolic flow of data and control. To evaluate the FFT architecture, VLSI area-time complexity concepts are used, but are now adapted to a complex floating-point number system rather than the usual integer ring representation. We show by our construction that the Thompson area-time optimum bound for the VLSI computation of an N-point FFT, area-time2oc = ORNlogN)1+a] can be attained by an alternative number representation, and hence the theoretical bound is a tight bound regardless of number system representation.

  7. The VLSI design of an error-trellis syndrome decoder for certain convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Jensen, J. M.; Hsu, I.-S.; Truong, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    A recursive algorithm using the error-trellis decoding technique is developed to decode convolutional codes (CCs). An example, illustrating the very large scale integration (VLSI) architecture of such a decode, is given for a dual-K CC. It is demonstrated that such a decoder can be realized readily on a single chip with metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor technology.

  8. The VLSI design of error-trellis syndrome decoding for convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Jensen, J. M.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    A recursive algorithm using the error-trellis decoding technique is developed to decode convolutional codes (CCs). An example, illustrating the very large scale integration (VLSI) architecture of such a decode, is given for a dual-K CC. It is demonstrated that such a decoder can be realized readily on a single chip with metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor technology.

  9. A VLSI design concept for parallel iterative algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. C.; Götze, J.

    2009-05-01

    Modern VLSI manufacturing technology has kept shrinking down to the nanoscale level with a very fast trend. Integration with the advanced nano-technology now makes it possible to realize advanced parallel iterative algorithms directly which was almost impossible 10 years ago. In this paper, we want to discuss the influences of evolving VLSI technologies for iterative algorithms and present design strategies from an algorithmic and architectural point of view. Implementing an iterative algorithm on a multiprocessor array, there is a trade-off between the performance/complexity of processors and the load/throughput of interconnects. This is due to the behavior of iterative algorithms. For example, we could simplify the parallel implementation of the iterative algorithm (i.e., processor elements of the multiprocessor array) in any way as long as the convergence is guaranteed. However, the modification of the algorithm (processors) usually increases the number of required iterations which also means that the switch activity of interconnects is increasing. As an example we show that a 25×25 full Jacobi EVD array could be realized into one single FPGA device with the simplified μ-rotation CORDIC architecture.

  10. Interconnection capacitance models for VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Shyh-Chyi; Liu, Patrick S.; Ru, Jien-Wen; Lin, Shi-Tron

    1998-06-01

    A new set of capacitance models is developed for delay estimation of VLSI interconnections. The set of models is derived for five representative wiring structures, with their combinations covering arbitrary VLSI layouts. A semi-empirical approach is adopted to deal with complicated geometry nature in VLSI and to allow for closed-form capacitance formulas to be developed to provide direct observation of capacitance variation vs process parameters as well as computational efficiency for circuit simulation. The formulas are given explicitly in terms of wire width, wire thickness, dielectric thickness and inter-wire spacing. The models show good agreement with numerical solutions from RAPHAEL and measurement data of fabricated capacitance test structures. The models are further applied and validated on a ring oscillator. It is shown that the frequency of the ring oscillator obtained from HSPICE simulation with our models agrees well with the bench measurement.

  11. Ultrafast nanoelectromechanical switches for VLSI power management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venumbaka, Sri Ramya

    Power consumption is a major concern in the present chip design industry. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology scaling has led to an exponential increase in the leakage power. The excessive power dissipation can result in more heat generation, which in turn increases the temperature. According to Intel's source, power density increased to a value of 1000 W/cm2 and is approaching the value which is equal to the radiation from the sun's surface (10000 W/cm2). This leads to reliability issues in nanometer-scale CMOS as Silicon starts melting at 1687K. To resolve this issue, we introduce a novel architecture to design nanoelectromechanical switches and implementation results with virtually zero leakage current, ˜1 V operation voltage, ˜1 GHz resonant frequency and nanometer-scale footprint. Microelectromechanical Switches (MEMS) have very low "on" and very high "off" resistances. Their switching voltages are usually high (5-50 V), switching speeds are usually low (1 MHz) and their footprints tend to be very large (many um2). We have designed and fabricated devices with very low actuation voltages and very high speed using tuning fork geometry compatible with conventional CMOS fabrication technologies. This unique switch geometry decreases the actuation voltage by a factor of 1.4 and doubles the switching speed. It consists of a cantilever beam that acts as a ground plane. Upon actuation, both the ground plane and the switch's main beam move towards each other that makes the center of mass stationary during switching and thus, the switching speed doubles. These tuning fork nanoelectromechanical switches can be readily implemented in Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits to manage leakage power. The thesis will describe the Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) structures, their characteristics, leakage reduction techniques, reliability of the devices and piezo actuator structures to determine contact resistance and longevity of switches.

  12. Associative Pattern Recognition In Analog VLSI Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Winner-take-all circuit selects best-match stored pattern. Prototype cascadable very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chips built and tested to demonstrate concept of electronic associative pattern recognition. Based on low-power, sub-threshold analog complementary oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) VLSI circuitry, each chip can store 128 sets (vectors) of 16 analog values (vector components), vectors representing known patterns as diverse as spectra, histograms, graphs, or brightnesses of pixels in images. Chips exploit parallel nature of vector quantization architecture to implement highly parallel processing in relatively simple computational cells. Through collective action, cells classify input pattern in fraction of microsecond while consuming power of few microwatts.

  13. Scriber for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.; Fortier, E. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for dividing silicon wafers into rectangular chips is characterized by a base including a horizontally oriented bed with a planar support surface, a vacuum chuck adapted to capture a silicon wafer seated on the support for translation in mutually perpendicular directions. A stylus support mounted on the bed includes a shaft disposed above and extended across the bed and a truck mounted on the shaft and supported thereby for linear translation along a path extended across the bed a vertically oriented scribe has a diamond tip supported by the truck also adapted as to engage a silicon wafer captured by the chuck and positioned beneath it in order to form score lines in the surface of the wafer as linear translation is imparted to the truck. A chuck positioning means is mounted on the base and is connected to the chuck for positioning the chuck relative to the stylus.

  14. Wafer characteristics via reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2010-10-19

    Various exemplary methods (800, 900, 1000, 1100) are directed to determining wafer thickness and/or wafer surface characteristics. An exemplary method (900) includes measuring reflectance of a wafer and comparing the measured reflectance to a calculated reflectance or a reflectance stored in a database. Another exemplary method (800) includes positioning a wafer on a reflecting support to extend a reflectance range. An exemplary device (200) has an input (210), analysis modules (222-228) and optionally a database (230). Various exemplary reflectometer chambers (1300, 1400) include radiation sources positioned at a first altitudinal angle (1308, 1408) and at a second altitudinal angle (1312, 1412). An exemplary method includes selecting radiation sources positioned at various altitudinal angles. An exemplary element (1650, 1850) includes a first aperture (1654, 1854) and a second aperture (1658, 1858) that can transmit reflected radiation to a fiber and an imager, respectfully.

  15. Analog VLSI-based modeling of the primate oculomotor system.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T K; Koch, C

    1999-01-01

    One way to understand a neurobiological system is by building a simulacrum that replicates its behavior in real time using similar constraints. Analog very large-scale integrated (VLSI) electronic circuit technology provides such an enabling technology. We here describe a neuromorphic system that is part of a long-term effort to understand the primate oculomotor system. It requires both fast sensory processing and fast motor control to interact with the world. A one-dimensional hardware model of the primate eye has been built that simulates the physical dynamics of the biological system. It is driven by two different analog VLSI chips, one mimicking cortical visual processing for target selection and tracking and another modeling brain stem circuits that drive the eye muscles. Our oculomotor plant demonstrates both smooth pursuit movements, driven by a retinal velocity error signal, and saccadic eye movements, controlled by retinal position error, and can reproduce several behavioral, stimulation, lesion, and adaptation experiments performed on primates. PMID:9950732

  16. Reciprocating Saw for Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.; Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Concept increases productivity and wafer quality. Cutting wafers from silicon ingots produces smooth wafers at high rates with reduced blade wear. Involves straight reciprocating saw blade and slight rotation of ingot between cutting strokes. Many parallel blades combined to cut many wafers simultaneously from ingot.

  17. Stable wafer-carrier system

    DOEpatents

    Rozenzon, Yan; Trujillo, Robert T; Beese, Steven C

    2013-10-22

    One embodiment of the present invention provides a wafer-carrier system used in a deposition chamber for carrying wafers. The wafer-carrier system includes a base susceptor and a top susceptor nested inside the base susceptor with its wafer-mounting side facing the base susceptor's wafer-mounting side, thereby forming a substantially enclosed narrow channel. The base susceptor provides an upward support to the top susceptor.

  18. SSI/MSI/LSI/VLSI/ULSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, George

    1984-01-01

    Discusses small-scale integrated (SSI), medium-scale integrated (MSI), large-scale integrated (LSI), very large-scale integrated (VLSI), and ultra large-scale integrated (ULSI) chips. The development and properties of these chips, uses of gallium arsenide, Josephson devices (two superconducting strips sandwiching a thin insulator), and future…

  19. Wafer level reliability testing: An idea whose time has come

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, O. D.

    1987-01-01

    Wafer level reliability testing has been nurtured in the DARPA supported workshops, held each autumn since 1982. The seeds planted in 1982 have produced an active crop of very large scale integration manufacturers applying wafer level reliability test methods. Computer Aided Reliability (CAR) is a new seed being nurtured. Users are now being awakened by the huge economic value of the wafer reliability testing technology.

  20. Wafer screening device and methods for wafer screening

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rupnowski, Przemyslaw

    2014-07-15

    Wafer breakage is a serious problem in the photovoltaic industry because a large fraction of wafers (between 5 and 10%) break during solar cell/module fabrication. The major cause of this excessive wafer breakage is that these wafers have residual microcracks--microcracks that were not completely etched. Additional propensity for breakage is caused by texture etching and incomplete edge grinding. To eliminate the cost of processing the wafers that break, it is best to remove them prior to cell fabrication. Some attempts have been made to develop optical techniques to detect microcracks. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to detect microcracks that are embedded within the roughness/texture of the wafers. Furthermore, even if such detection is successful, it is not straightforward to relate them to wafer breakage. We believe that the best way to isolate the wafers with fatal microcracks is to apply a stress to wafers--a stress that mimics the highest stress during cell/module processing. If a wafer survives this stress, it has a high probability of surviving without breakage during cell/module fabrication. Based on this, we have developed a high throughput, noncontact method for applying a predetermined stress to a wafer. The wafers are carried on a belt through a chamber that illuminates the wafer with an intense light of a predetermined intensity distribution that can be varied by changing the power to the light source. As the wafers move under the light source, each wafer undergoes a dynamic temperature profile that produces a preset elastic stress. If this stress exceeds the wafer strength, the wafer will break. The broken wafers are separated early, eliminating cost of processing into cell/module. We will describe details of the system and show comparison of breakage statistics with the breakage on a production line.

  1. A programmable analog VLSI neural network processor for communication receivers.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Bang, S H; Sheu, B J

    1993-01-01

    An analog VLSI neural network processor was designed and fabricated for communication receiver applications. It does not require prior estimation of the channel characteristics. A powerful channel equalizer was implemented with this processor chip configured as a four-layered perceptron network. The compact synapse cell is realized with an enhanced wide-range Gilbert multiplier circuit. The output neuron consists of a linear current-to-voltage converter and a sigmoid function generator with a controllable voltage gain. Network training is performed by the modified Kalman neuro-filtering algorithm to speed up the convergence process for intersymbol interference and white Gaussian noise communication channels. The learning process is done in the companion DSP board which also keeps the synapse weight for later use of the chip. The VLSI neural network processor chip occupies a silicon area of 4.6 mmx6.8 mm and was fabricated in a 2-mum double-polysilicon CMOS technology. System analysis and experimental results are presented. PMID:18267752

  2. AWV: high-throughput cross-array cross-wafer variation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Byoung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Yong; Greenberg, Gadi; Meshulach, Doron; Ravid, Erez; Levi, Shimon; Kan, Kobi; Shabtay, Saar; Cohen, Yehuda; Rotlevi, Ofer

    2008-03-01

    Minute variations in advanced VLSI manufacturing processes are well known to significantly impact device performance and die yield. These variations drive the need for increased measurement sampling with a minimal impact on Fab productivity. Traditional discrete measurements such as CDSEM or OCD, provide, statistical information for process control and monitoring. Typically these measurements require a relatively long time and cover only a fraction of the wafer area. Across array across wafer variation mapping ( AWV) suggests a new approach for high throughput, full wafer process variation monitoring, using a DUV bright-field inspection tool. With this technique we present a full wafer scanning, visualizing the variation trends within a single die and across the wafer. The underlying principle of the AWV inspection method is to measure variations in the reflected light from periodic structures, under optimized illumination and collection conditions. Structural changes in the periodic array induce variations in the reflected light. This information is collected and analyzed in real time. In this paper we present AWV concept, measurements and simulation results. Experiments were performed using a DUV bright-field inspection tool (UVision (TM), Applied Materials) on a memory short loop experiment (SLE), Focus Exposure Matrix (FEM) and normal wafers. AWV and CDSEM results are presented to reflect CD variations within a memory array and across wafers.

  3. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  4. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  5. Parallel optical interconnects utilizing VLSI/FLC spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Sheryl M.

    1991-12-01

    Interconnection architectures are a cornerstone of parallel computing systems. However, interconnections can be a bottleneck in conventional computer architectures because of queuing structures that are necessary to handle the traffic through a switch at very high data rates and bandwidths. These issues must find new solutions to advance the state of the art in computing beyond the fundamental limit of silicon logic technology. Today's optoelectronic (OE) technology in particular VLSI/FLC spatial light modulators (SLMs) can provide a unique and innovative solution to these issues. This paper reports on the motivations for the system, describes the major areas of architectural requirements, discusses interconnection topologies and processor element alternatives, and documents an optical arbitration (i.e., control) scheme using `smart' SLMs and optical logic gates. The network topology is given in section 2.1 `Architectural Requirements -- Networks,' but it should be noted that the emphasis is on the optical control scheme (section 2.4) and the system.

  6. Within-wafer CD variation induced by wafer shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-hao; Yang, Mars; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    In order to meet the increasing storage capacity demand and reduce bit cost of NAND flash memories, 3D stacked vertical flash cell array has been proposed. In constructing 3D NAND flash memories, the bit number per unit area is increased as increasing the number of stacked layers. However, the increased number of stacked layers has made the film stress control extremely important for maintaining good process quality. The residual film stress alters the wafer shape accordingly several process impacts have been readily observed across wafer, such as film deposition non-uniformity, etch rate non-uniformity, wafer chucking error on scanner, materials coating/baking defects, overlay degradation and critical dimension (CD) non-uniformity. The residual tensile and compressive stresses on wafers will result in concave and convex wafer shapes, respectively. This study investigates within-wafer CD uniformity (CDU) associated with wafer shape change induced by the 3D NAND flash memory processes. Within-wafer CDU was correlated with several critical parameters including different wafer bow heights of concave and convex wafer shapes, photo resists with different post exposure baking (PEB) temperature sensitivities, and DoseMapper compensation. The results indicated the trend of within-wafer CDU maintains flat for convex wafer shapes with bow height up to +230um and concave wafer shapes with bow height ranging from 0 ~ -70um, while the within-wafer CDU trends up from -70um to -246um wafer bow heights. To minimize the within-wafer CD distribution induced by wafer warpage, carefully tailoring the film stack and thermal budget in the process flow for maintaining the wafer shape at CDU friendly range is indispensable and using photo-resist materials with lower PEB temperature sensitivity is also suggested. In addition, DoseMapper compensation is also an alternative to greatly suppress the within-wafer CD non-uniformity but the photo-resist profile variation induced by across-wafer

  7. Architecture for VLSI design of Reed-Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The logic structure of a universal VLSI chip called the symbol-slice Reed-Solomon (RS) encoder chip is discussed. An RS encoder can be constructed by cascading and properly interconnecting a group of such VLSI chips. As a design example, it is shown that a (255,223) RD encoder requiring around 40 discrete CMOS ICs may be replaced by an RS encoder consisting of four identical interconnected VLSI RS encoder chips. Besides the size advantage, the VLSI RS encoder also has the potential advantages of requiring less power and having a higher reliability.

  8. A Parallel VLSI Direction Finding Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan; Deprettere, Ed F.

    1988-02-01

    In this paper, we present a parallel VLSI architecture that is matched to a class of direction (frequency, pole) finding algorithms of type ESPRIT. The problem is modeled in such a way that it allows an easy to partition full parallel VLSI implementation, using unitary transformations only. The hard problem, the generalized Schur decomposition of a matrix pencil, is tackled using a modified Stewart Jacobi approach that improves convergence and simplifies parameter computations. The proposed architecture is a fixed size, 2-layer Jacobi iteration array that is matched to all sub-problems of the main problem: 2 QR-factorizations, 2 SVD's and a single GSD-problem. The arithmetic used is (pipelined) Cordic.

  9. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  10. Leak detection utilizing analog binaural (VLSI) techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A detection method and system utilizing silicon models of the traveling wave structure of the human cochlea to spatially and temporally locate a specific sound source in the presence of high noise pandemonium. The detection system combines two-dimensional stereausis representations, which are output by at least three VLSI binaural hearing chips, to generate a three-dimensional stereausis representation including both binaural and spectral information which is then used to locate the sound source.

  11. Modular VLSI Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, In-Shek; Truong, Trieu-Kie

    1991-01-01

    Proposed Reed-Solomon decoder contains multiple very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chips of same type. Each chip contains sets of logic cells and subcells performing functions from all stages of decoding process. Full decoder assembled by concatenating chips, with selective utilization of cells in particular chips. Cost of development reduced by factor of 5. In addition, decoder programmable in field and switched between 8-bit and 10-bit symbol sizes.

  12. Modular VLSI Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed Reed-Solomon (RS) decoder assembled from very-large-scale integrated-circuit (VLSI) building blocks. Decoder exploits recursive forms in RS decoding algorithms. RS codes capable of correcting random or burst errors in telemetry and other data-communication signals. Because of small size and low power consumption, advantageous to employ several such decoders in parallel-processing scheme to increase decoding speed.

  13. VLSI Microsystem for Rapid Bioinformatic Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Lue, Jaw-Chyng

    2009-01-01

    A system comprising very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits is being developed as a means of bioinformatics-oriented analysis and recognition of patterns of fluorescence generated in a microarray in an advanced, highly miniaturized, portable genetic-expression-assay instrument. Such an instrument implements an on-chip combination of polymerase chain reactions and electrochemical transduction for amplification and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

  14. Systolic VLSI Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Decoder for digital communications provides high-speed, pipelined ReedSolomon (RS) error-correction decoding of data streams. Principal new feature of proposed decoder is modification of Euclid greatest-common-divisor algorithm to avoid need for time-consuming computations of inverse of certain Galois-field quantities. Decoder architecture suitable for implementation on very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) chips with negative-channel metaloxide/silicon circuitry.

  15. Minimum wafer thickness by rotated ingot ID wafering. [Inner Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The efficient utilization of materials is critical to certain device applications such as silicon for photovoltaics or diodes and gallium-gadolinium-garnet for memories. A variety of slicing techniques has been investigated to minimize wafer thickness and wafer kerf. This paper presents the results of analyses of ID wafering of rotated ingots based on predicted fracture behavior of the wafer as a result of forces during wafering and the properties of the device material. The analytical model indicated that the minimum wafer thickness is controlled by the depth of surface damage and the applied cantilever force. Both of these factors should be minimized. For silicon, a minimum thickness was found to be approximately 200 x 10 - 6th m for conventional sizes of rotated ingot wafering. Fractures through the thickness of the wafer rather than through the center supporting column were found to limit the minimum wafer thickness. The model suggested that the use of a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center supporting core and, with silicon, by using 111-line-type ingots could have potential for reducing minimum wafer thickness.

  16. Wafer plane inspection evaluated for photomask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Badger, Karen; Lawliss, Mark; Kodera, Yutaka; Azpiroz, Jaione Tirapu; Pang, Song; Zhang, Hongqin; Eugenieva, Eugenia; Clifford, Chris; Goonesekera, Arosha; Tian, Yibin

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to inspection, developed to enable high inspectability on fragmented mask features at the optimal defect sensitivity. It builds on well-established high resolution inspection capabilities to complement existing manufacturing methods. The production of defect-free photomasks is practical today only because of informed decisions on the impact of defects identified. The defect size, location and its measured printing impact can dictate that a mask is perfectly good for lithographic purposes. This inspection - verification - repair loop is timeconsuming and is predicated on the fact that detectable photomask defects do not always resolve or matter on wafer. This paper will introduce and evaluate an alternative approach that moves the mask inspection to the wafer plane. WPI uses a high NA inspection of the mask to construct a physical mask model. This mask model is used to create the mask image in the wafer plane. Finally, a threshold model is applied to enhance sensitivity to printing defects. WPI essentially eliminates the non-printing inspection stops and relaxes some of the pattern restrictions currently placed on incoming photomask designs. This paper outlines the WPI technology and explores its application to patterns and substrates representative of 32nm designs. The implications of deploying Wafer Plane Inspection will be discussed.

  17. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  18. Phase-Synchronization Early Epileptic Seizure Detector VLSI Architecture.

    PubMed

    Abdelhalim, K; Smolyakov, V; Genov, R

    2011-10-01

    A low-power VLSI processor architecture that computes in real time the magnitude and phase-synchronization of two input neural signals is presented. The processor is a part of an envisioned closed-loop implantable microsystem for adaptive neural stimulation. The architecture uses three CORDIC processing cores that require shift-and-add operations but no multiplication. The 10-bit processor synthesized and prototyped in a standard 1.2 V 0.13 μm CMOS technology utilizes 41,000 logic gates. It dissipates 3.6 μW per input pair, and provides 1.7 kS/s per-channel throughput when clocked at 2.5 MHz. The power scales linearly with the number of input channels or the sampling rate. The efficacy of the processor in early epileptic seizure detection is validated on human intracranial EEG data. PMID:23852175

  19. Cascaded VLSI Chips Help Neural Network To Learn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1993-01-01

    Cascading provides 12-bit resolution needed for learning. Using conventional silicon chip fabrication technology of VLSI, fully connected architecture consisting of 32 wide-range, variable gain, sigmoidal neurons along one diagonal and 7-bit resolution, electrically programmable, synaptic 32 x 31 weight matrix implemented on neuron-synapse chip. To increase weight nominally from 7 to 13 bits, synapses on chip individually cascaded with respective synapses on another 32 x 32 matrix chip with 7-bit resolution synapses only (without neurons). Cascade correlation algorithm varies number of layers effectively connected into network; adds hidden layers one at a time during learning process in such way as to optimize overall number of neurons and complexity and configuration of network.

  20. Replacing design rules in the VLSI design cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Paul; Kryszczuk, Krzysztof

    2012-03-01

    We make a case for the migration of Design Rule Check (DRC), the first step in the modern VLSI design process, to a model-based system. DRC uses a large set of rules to determine permitted designs. We argue that it is a legacy of the past: slow, labor intensive, ad-hoc, inaccurate and too restrictive. We envisage the replacement of DRC and printability simulation by a signal processing and machine learning-based approach for 22nm technology nodes and beyond. Such a process would produce fast, accurate, autonomous printability prediction for optical lithography. As such, we built a proof-of-concept demonstrator that can predict OPC problems using a trained classifier without the need to fall back on costly first-principle simulation. For one sample test site, and for the OPC Line Width error type OPC violation marker, the demonstrator obtained an Equal Error Rate of ca. 4%.

  1. The VLSI design of a Reed-Solomon encoder using Berlekamps bit-serial multiplier algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.; Hsu, I. S.; Wang, K.; Yeh, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Realization of a bit-serial multiplication algorithm for the encoding of Reed-Solomon (RS) codes on a single VLSI chip using NMOS technology is demonstrated to be feasible. A dual basis (255, 223) over a Galois field is used. The conventional RS encoder for long codes ofter requires look-up tables to perform the multiplication of two field elements. Berlekamp's algorithm requires only shifting and exclusive-OR operations.

  2. The VLSI implementation of a Reed-Solomon encoder using Berlekamp's bit-serial multiplier algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I.-S.; Reed, I. S.; Wang, K.; Yeh, C.-S.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Realization of a bit-serial multiplication algorithm for the encoding of Reed-Solomon (RS) codes on a single VLSI chip using NMOS technology is demonstrated to be feasible. A dual basis (255, 223) over a Galois field is used. The conventional RS encoder for long codes often requires look-up tables to perform the multiplication of two field elements. Berlekamp's algorithm requires only shifting and exclusive-OR operations.

  3. Image Compression on a VLSI Neural-Based Vector Quantizer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Oscal T.-C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a modified frequency-sensitive self-organization (FSO) algorithm for image data compression and the associated VLSI architecture. Topics discussed include vector quantization; VLSI neural processor architecture; detailed circuit implementation; and a neural network vector quantization prototype chip. Examples of images using the FSO…

  4. Parallel optimization algorithms and their implementation in VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Feeley, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Two new parallel optimization algorithms based on the simplex method are described. They may be executed by a SIMD parallel processor architecture and be implemented in VLSI design. Several VLSI design implementations are introduced. An application example is reported to demonstrate that the algorithms are effective.

  5. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  6. Wafer level warpage characterization of 3D interconnect processing wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yi; Ku, Yi-Sha

    2012-03-01

    We present a new metrology system based on a fringe reflection method for warpage characterizations during wafer thinning and temporary bonding processes. A set of periodic fringe patterns is projected onto the measuring wafer and the reflected fringe images are captured by a CCD camera. The fringe patterns are deformed due to the slope variation of the wafer surface. We demonstrate the use of phase-shit algorithms, the wafer surface slope variation and quantitative 3D surface profile even tiny dimples and dents on a wafer can be reconstructed. The experimental results show the warpages of the bonded wafer are below 20 μm after thinning down to the nominal thickness of 75 μm and 50 μm. The measurement precision is better than 2 um.

  7. Proceedings of the Low-Cost Solar Array Wafering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    The technology and economics of silicon ingot wafering for low cost solar arrays were discussed. Fixed and free abrasive sawing wire, ID, and multiblade sawing, materials, mechanisms, characterization, and innovative concepts were considered.

  8. VLSI architectures for geometrical mapping problems in high-definition image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper explores a VLSI architecture for geometrical mapping address computation. The geometric transformation is discussed in the context of plane projective geometry, which invokes a set of basic transformations to be implemented for the general image processing. The homogeneous and 2-dimensional cartesian coordinates are employed to represent the transformations, each of which is implemented via an augmented CORDIC as a processing element. A specific scheme for a processor, which utilizes full-pipelining at the macro-level and parallel constant-factor-redundant arithmetic and full-pipelining at the micro-level, is assessed to produce a single VLSI chip for HDTV applications using state-of-art MOS technology.

  9. VLSI architectures for geometrical mapping problems in high-definition image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.

    This paper explores a VLSI architecture for geometrical mapping address computation. The geometric transformation is discussed in the context of plane projective geometry, which invokes a set of basic transformations to be implemented for the general image processing. The homogeneous and 2-dimensional cartesian coordinates are employed to represent the transformations, each of which is implemented via an augmented CORDIC as a processing element. A specific scheme for a processor, which utilizes full-pipelining at the macro-level and parallel constant-factor-redundant arithmetic and full-pipelining at the micro-level, is assessed to produce a single VLSI chip for HDTV applications using state-of-art MOS technology.

  10. High throughput VLSI architecture for multiresolution integer motion estimation in high definition AVS video encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, HaiBing; Qi, Honggang; Xu, Hao; Xie, Xiaodong; Gao, Wen

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a hardware friendly multi-resolution motion estimation algorithm and VLSI architecture for high definition MPEG-like video encoder hardware implementation. By parallel searching and utilizing the high correlation in multi-resolution reference pixels, huge throughput and computation due to large search window are alleviated considerably. Sixteen way parallel processing element arrays with configurable multiplying technologies achieve fast search with regular data access and efficient data reuse. Also, the parallel arrays can be efficiently reused at three hierarchical levels for sequential motion vector refinement. The modified algorithm reaches a good balance between implementation complexity and search performance. Also, the logic circuit and on-chip SRAM consumption of the VLSI architecture are moderate.

  11. Biological basis for space-variant sensor design II: implications for VLSI sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojer, Alan S.; Schwartz, Eric L.

    1991-03-01

    We analyze the characteristics of a synthetic sensor comparable with respect to field width and resolution to the primate visual system. We estimate that 150 pixels are sufficient using a logarithmic sensor geometry and demonstrate that this calculation is consistent with known characteristics of biological vision e. g. the number of fibers in the optic nerve. To obtain the field width and resolution of the primate eye with a uniform sensor requires between iOiO'' times the number of pixels estimated for the comparable log sensor. Another interesting observation is that the field width and resolution of a conventional 512x512 sensor can be obtained with around 5000 pixels using the log geometry. We conclude with consideration of the prospects for achieving human-like performance with contemporary VLSI technology and briefly discuss progress on space-variant VLSI sensor design.

  12. Some practical issues in the design and application of a VLSI FEC chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Nicholson, Robert D.; Onotera, Larry Y.

    1989-09-01

    Forward error correction (FEC) has become a general requirement for digital satellite communications. The dominant technology is the use of convolutional codes with Viterbi decoding. A single-chip VLSI implementation of a convolutional encoder and Viterbi decoder for constraint length seven has been completed recently. In the design and application of the FEC chip, several practical issues had to be addressed. These include the determination of the maximum variation in path metric, generation of a convolutional encoded sequence with maximum number of transitions for symbol timing recovery, use of a unique word to detect the phase ambiguity, use of sliding window data quality monitor to resolve an ambiguous state, etc. This paper presents solutions to these problems. Although specific results are given for the standard constraint-length seven code, the methods used to obtain these results are general and can be applied to other codes. Features and implementation of the VLSI FEC chip are also discussed.

  13. Interferometric metrology of wafer nanotopography for advanced CMOS process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John F.; Koliopoulos, Chris L.; Tang, Shouhong

    2001-12-01

    According to industry standards (SEMI M43, Guide for Reporting Wafer Nanotopography), Nanotopography is the non- planar deviation of the whole front wafer surface within a spatial wavelength range of approximately 0.2 to 20 mm and within the fixed quality area (FQA). The need for precision metrology of wafer nanotopography is being actively addressed by interferometric technology. In this paper we present an approach to mapping the whole wafer front surface nanotopography using an engineered coherence interferometer. The interferometer acquires a whole wafer raw topography map. The raw map is then filtered to remove the long spatial wavelength, high amplitude shape contributions and reveal the nanotopography in the filtered map. Filtered maps can be quantitatively analyzed in a variety of ways to enable statistical process control (SPC) of nanotopography parameters. The importance of tracking these parameters for CMOS gate level processes at 180-nm critical dimension, and below, is examined.

  14. Unifying parametrized VLSI Jacobi algorithms and architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprettere, Ed F. A.; Moonen, Marc

    1993-11-01

    Implementing Jacobi algorithms in parallel VLSI processor arrays is a non-trivial task, in particular when the algorithms are parametrized with respect to size and the architectures are parametrized with respect to space-time trade-offs. The paper is concerned with an approach to implement several time-adaptive Jacobi-type algorithms on a parallel processor array, using only Cordic arithmetic and asynchronous communications, such that any degree of parallelism, ranging from single-processor up to full-size array implementation, is supported by a `universal' processing unit. This result is attributed to a gracious interplay between algorithmic and architectural engineering.

  15. VLSI Reed-Solomon Encoder With Interleaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, In-Shek; Deutsch, L. J.; Truong, Trieu-Kie; Reed, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    Size, weight, and susceptibility to burst errors reduced. Encoding system built on single very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chip produces (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code with programmable interleaving up to depth of 5. (225,223) RS encoder includes new remainder-and-interleaver unit providing programmable interleaving of code words. Remainder-and-interleaver unit contains shift registers and modulo-2 adders. Signals on "turn" and "no-turn" lines control depth of interleaving. Based on E. R. Berlekamp's bit-serial multiplication algorithm for (225,223) RS encoder over Galois Field (2 to the 8th power).

  16. Augmented reality for wafer prober

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenkrantz, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    The link between wafer manufacturing and wafer test is often weak: without common information system, Test engineers have to read locations of test structures from reference documents and search them on the wafer prober screen. Mask Data Preparation team is ideally placed to fill this gap, given its relationship with both design and manufacturing sides. With appropriate design extraction scripts and design conventions, mask engineers can provide exact wafer locations of all embedded test structures to avoid a painful camera search. Going a step further, it would be a great help to provide to wafer probers a "map" of what was build on wafers. With this idea in mind, mask design database can simply be provided to Test engineers; but the real added value would come from a true integration of real-wafer camera views and design database used for wafer manufacturing. As proven by several augmented reality applications, like Google Maps' mixed Satellite/Map view, mixing a real-world view with its theoretical model is very useful to understand the reality. The creation of such interface can only be made by a wafer prober manufacturer, given the high integration of these machines with their control panel. But many existing software libraries could be used to plot the design view matching the camera view. Standard formats for mask design are usually GDSII and OASIS (SEMI P39 standard); multiple free software and commercial viewers/editors/libraries for these formats are available.

  17. Neural algorithms on VLSI concurrent architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Caviglia, D.D.; Bisio, G.M.; Parodi, G.

    1988-09-01

    The research concerns the study of neural algorithms for developing CAD tools with A.I. features in VLSI design activities. In this paper the focus is on optimization problems such as partitioning, placement and routing. These problems require massive computational power to be solved (NP-complete problems) and the standard approach is usually based on euristic techniques. Neural algorithms can be represented by a circuital model. This kind of representation can be easily mapped in a real circuit, which, however, features limited flexibility with respect to the variety of problems. In this sense the simulation of the neural circuit, by mapping it on a digital VLSI concurrent architecture seems to be preferrable; in addition this solution offers a wider choice with regard to algorithms characteristics (e.g. transfer curve of neural elements, reconfigurability of interconnections, etc.). The implementation with programmable components, such as transputers, allows an indirect mapping of the algorithm (one transputer for N neurons) accordingly to the dimension and the characteristics of the problem. In this way the neural algorithm described by the circuit is reduced to the algorithm that simulates the network behavior. The convergence properties of that formulation are studied with respect to the characteristics of the neural element transfer curve.

  18. Laser Microchemistry : A Powerful Tool For VLSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonneau, Didier; Guern, Yves; Pelous, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Interconnection direct writing on ICs is possible by localized laser-assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition. Recently we have developed and marketed a new laser microchemistry tool particularly designed for VLSI prototypes rewiring. By dissociating Ni(CO)4 molecules, Ni lines can be written at speeds higher than 5 gm/s under laser induced temperature as low as 400°C. At the same temperature tungsten stripes can be driven from decomposition of WF6-H2 mixtures. However the tungsten deposition rate is about two orders of magnitude lower than the nickel growth rate in the same temperature conditions. The resistivities of the deposits are in both cases around 10 μΩ.cm. Silicon dioxide layers can be promoted from dissociation of a Si2H6-N20 mixture under surface temperature around 500°C. These metal and insulator deposition basic steps have been integrated in a complete metal bridging process suitable for the last interconnection level of a VLSI circuit. This process has been firstly estimated from a functional point of view, by electrical characterizations realized on test patterns entirely drawn by laser chemistry. At least, by measuring the time necessary to perform a metal bridge, the process has been evaluated from an economical point of view.

  19. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  20. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the

  1. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  2. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors.

    PubMed

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram. PMID:17603568

  3. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping LER and defect density on production wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabtay, Saar; Blumberg, Yuval; Levi, Shimon; Greenberg, Gadi; Harel, Daniel; Conley, Amiad; Meshulach, Doron; Kan, Kobi; Dolev, Ido; Kumar, Surender; Mendel, Kalia; Goto, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Naoaki; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Shinichi; Nagaoka, Shirou; Sekito, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) constitute a higher percentage of the line-width and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include: scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, lithography stack thickness and composition variations, exposure variations, etc. These process variations in advanced VLSI manufacturing processes, specifically in memory devices where CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations, are well known to significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or Optical Critical Dimension (OCD) metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time and cover only a small fraction of the wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials® and Nikon Corporation®, on the implementation of a complementary method to the CD-SEM and OCD tools, to monitor post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM), is based on measuring variations in the light reflected from periodic structures, under optimized illumination and collection conditions, and is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV brightfield (BF) wafer inspection tool. It will be shown that full polarization control in illumination and collection paths of the wafer inspection tool is critical to enable to set an optimized Process Variation Monitoring recipe.

  4. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  5. NASA Space Engineering Research Center Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) is proud to offer, at its second symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories and the electronics industry. These featured speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design. Questions of reliability in the space environment along with new directions in CAD and design are addressed by the featured speakers.

  6. Finite element computation with parallel VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, J.; Salama, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel processing computer consisting of a 16-bit microcomputer as a master processor which controls and coordinates the activities of 8086/8087 VLSI chip set slave processors working in parallel. The hardware is inexpensive and can be flexibly configured and programmed to perform various functions. This makes it a useful research tool for the development of, and experimentation with parallel mathematical algorithms. Application of the hardware to computational tasks involved in the finite element analysis method is demonstrated by the generation and assembly of beam finite element stiffness matrices. A number of possible schemes for the implementation of N-elements on N- or n-processors (N is greater than n) are described, and the speedup factors of their time consumption are determined as a function of the number of available parallel processors.

  7. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  8. An efficient VLSI architecture for template matching

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganathan, N.; Venugopal, S.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we describe a new special purpose VLSI architecture for template matching, based on a technique known as moment preserving pattern matching (MPPM). This technique first converts the given gray scale image and template into binary form using the moment preserving quantization method and then uses a pairing function to compute the similarity measure. The technique yields accurate results comparable to other approaches but involves simpler computations. The proposed architecture is systolic in nature and achieves a high degree of parallelism and pipelining. It is shown that the proposed architecture is much simpler, achieves higher speed, has a lower hardware complexity and utilizes lesser memory than other special purpose architectures for template matching.

  9. Implementation of optical interconnections for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Wennie H.; Bergman, Larry A.; Johnston, Alan R.; Guest, Clark C.; Esener, Sadik C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress in implementing optical interconnections for VLSI. Four areas are covered: (1) the holographic optical element (HOE), (2) the laser sources, (3) the detectors and associated circuits forming an optically addressed gate, and (4) interconnection experiments in which five gates are actuated from one source. A laser scanner system with a resolution of 12 x 20 microns has been utilized to generate the HOEs. Diffraction efficiency of the HOE and diffracted spot size have been measured. Stock lasers have been modified with a high-frequency package for interconnect experiments, and buried heterostructure fabrication techniques have been pursued. Measurements have been made on the fabricated photodetectors to determine dark current, responsivity, and response time. The optical gates and the overall chip have been driven successfully with an input light beam, as well as with the optical signal interconnected through the one to five holograms.

  10. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duluk, J. F.; Linscott, I. R.; Peterson, A. M.; Burr, J.; Ekroot, B.; Twicken, J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artificially created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incorporate many innovative circuits and architectural features.

  11. VLSI Design of a Turbo Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi

    2007-01-01

    A very-large-scale-integrated-circuit (VLSI) turbo decoder has been designed to serve as a compact, high-throughput, low-power, lightweight decoder core of a receiver in a data-communication system. In a typical contemplated application, such a decoder core would be part of a single integrated circuit that would include the rest of the receiver circuitry and possibly some or all of the transmitter circuitry, all designed and fabricated together according to an advanced communication-system-on-a-chip design concept. Turbo codes are forward-error-correction (FEC) codes. Relative to older FEC codes, turbo codes enable communication at lower signal-to-noise ratios and offer greater coding gain. In addition, turbo codes can be implemented by relatively simple hardware. Therefore, turbo codes have been adopted as standard for some advanced broadband communication systems.

  12. Hierarchical Design and Verification for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shostak, R. E.; Elliott, W. D.; Levitt, K. N.

    1983-01-01

    The specification and verification work is described in detail, and some of the problems and issues to be resolved in their application to Very Large Scale Integration VLSI systems are examined. The hierarchical design methodologies enable a system architect or design team to decompose a complex design into a formal hierarchy of levels of abstraction. The first step inprogram verification is tree formation. The next step after tree formation is the generation from the trees of the verification conditions themselves. The approach taken here is similar in spirit to the corresponding step in program verification but requires modeling of the semantics of circuit elements rather than program statements. The last step is that of proving the verification conditions using a mechanical theorem-prover.

  13. PLA realizations for VLSI state machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.; Liu, K.

    1990-01-01

    A major problem associated with state assignment procedures for VLSI controllers is obtaining an assignment that produces minimal or near minimal logic. The key item in Programmable Logic Array (PLA) area minimization is the number of unique product terms required by the design equations. This paper presents a state assignment algorithm for minimizing the number of product terms required to implement a finite state machine using a PLA. Partition algebra with predecessor state information is used to derive a near optimal state assignment. A maximum bound on the number of product terms required can be obtained by inspecting the predecessor state information. The state assignment algorithm presented is much simpler than existing procedures and leads to the same number of product terms or less. An area-efficient PLA structure implemented in a 1.0 micron CMOS process is presented along with a summary of the performance for a controller implemented using this design procedure.

  14. Analog VLSI neural network integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kub, F. J.; Moon, K. K.; Just, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two analog very large scale integration (VLSI) vector matrix multiplier integrated circuit chips were designed, fabricated, and partially tested. They can perform both vector-matrix and matrix-matrix multiplication operations at high speeds. The 32 by 32 vector-matrix multiplier chip and the 128 by 64 vector-matrix multiplier chip were designed to perform 300 million and 3 billion multiplications per second, respectively. An additional circuit that has been developed is a continuous-time adaptive learning circuit. The performance achieved thus far for this circuit is an adaptivity of 28 dB at 300 KHz and 11 dB at 15 MHz. This circuit has demonstrated greater than two orders of magnitude higher frequency of operation than any previous adaptive learning circuit.

  15. Periodic binary sequence generators: VLSI circuits considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback shift registers are efficient periodic binary sequence generators. Polynomials of degree r over a Galois field characteristic 2(GF(2)) characterize the behavior of shift registers with linear logic feedback. The algorithmic determination of the trinomial of lowest degree, when it exists, that contains a given irreducible polynomial over GF(2) as a factor is presented. This corresponds to embedding the behavior of an r-stage shift register with linear logic feedback into that of an n-stage shift register with a single two-input modulo 2 summer (i.e., Exclusive-OR gate) in its feedback. This leads to Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuit architecture of maximal regularity (i.e., identical cells) with intercell communications serialized to a maximal degree.

  16. Synthesis algorithm of VLSI multipliers for ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, O. H.; Eldin, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    Multipliers are critical sub-blocks in ASIC design, especially for digital signal processing and communications applications. A flexible multiplier synthesis tool is developed which is capable of generating multiplier blocks for word size in the range of 4 to 256 bits. A comparison of existing multiplier algorithms is made in terms of speed, silicon area, and suitability for automated synthesis and verification of its VLSI implementation. The algorithm divides the range of supported word sizes into sub-ranges and provides each sub-range with a specific multiplier architecture for optimal speed and area. The algorithm of the synthesis tool and the multiplier architectures are presented. Circuit implementation and the automated synthesis methodology are discussed.

  17. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duluk, J. F.; Linscott, I. R.; Peterson, A. M.; Burr, J.; Ekroot, B.; Twicken, J.

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artifically created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incoporate many innovative circuits and architectural features.

  18. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI.

    PubMed

    Duluk, J F; Linscott, I R; Peterson, A M; Burr, J; Ekroot, B; Twicken, J

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artificially created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incorporate many innovative circuits and architectural features. PMID:11537749

  19. VLED for Si wafer-level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Fu; Chen, Chiming; Yen, Jui-Kang; Chen, Yung-Wei; Tsou, Chingfu; Chang, Chunming; Doan, Trung; Tran, Chuong Anh

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we introduced the advantages of Vertical Light emitting diode (VLED) on copper alloy with Si-wafer level packaging technologies. The silicon-based packaging substrate starts with a <100> dou-ble-side polished p-type silicon wafer, then anisotropic wet etching technology is done to construct the re-flector depression and micro through-holes on the silicon substrate. The operating voltage, at a typical cur-rent of 350 milli-ampere (mA), is 3.2V. The operation voltage is less than 3.7V under higher current driving conditions of 1A. The VLED chip on Si package has excellent heat dissipation and can be operated at high currents up to 1A without efficiency degradation. The typical spatial radiation pattern emits a uniform light lambertian distribution from -65° to 65° which can be easily fit for secondary optics. The correlated color temperature (CCT) has only 5% variation for daylight and less than 2% variation for warm white, when the junction temperature is increased from 25°C to 110°C, suggesting a stable CCT during operation for general lighting application. Coupled with aspheric lens and micro lens array in a wafer level process, it has almost the same light distribution intensity for special secondary optics lighting applications. In addition, the ul-tra-violet (UV) VLED, featuring a silicon substrate and hard glass cover, manufactured by wafer level pack-aging emits high power UV wavelengths appropriate for curing, currency, document verification, tanning, medical, and sterilization applications.

  20. Development of a monolithic, multi-MEMS microsystem on a chip demonstrating iMEMS{trademark} VLSI technology. R and D status report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-17

    This quarter saw the first silicon from the iMEMS{reg_sign} test chip, with complete circuits and beam structures. The wafers looked fine cosmetically and the circuits functioned as designed, but the beams suffered an anomaly that the authors have never seen before. Diagnostic work is under way to sort out the root cause, and other wafers are coming out this quarter to see if it was a one-time anomaly. Work on the process-development front has slowed because of the construction of a dedicated fabrication line for the last-generation process. With the current robust market place for ADI`s business, the existing fabrication line has been operating at 100% capacity. On the device front, great progress has been made by both Berkeley and ADI in the area of gyroscopes. Measurements of close to a degree per second or better have been made for gyros of all three axes and of both single- (linear) and double- (rotary) axis devices. In addition, ADI has designed a gyro that can be packaged in air that very well might meet some of the low-precision needs. Accelerometers of several new formats have been designed and several have been implemented in silicon. First samples of the ADXL 181 designed especially for the fuzing, safe and arming application have been assembled and are in characterization by ADI and others. In addition, 2-axis, Z-axis and digital output designs have been demonstrated. A 3-axis micro-watt accelerometer has been designed and is in fabrication. A 2-axis design for tilt applications is also nearing silicon realization. This portfolio of linear accelerometers, and even angular versions of the same provide, an arsenal of capability for specialized needs as they arise in both commercial and military applications.

  1. Further investigation of EUV process sensitivities for wafer track processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradon, Neil; Nafus, K.; Shite, H.; Kitano, J.; Kosugi, H.; Goethals, M.; Cheng, S.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.; Baudemprez, B.; Van Den Heuvel, D.

    2010-04-01

    As Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography technology shows promising results below 40nm feature sizes, TOKYO ELECTRON LTD.(TEL) is committed to understanding the fundamentals needed to improve our technology, thereby enabling customers to meet roadmap expectations. TEL continues collaboration with imec for evaluation of Coater/Developer processing sensitivities using the ASML Alpha Demo Tool for EUV exposures. The results from the collaboration help develop the necessary hardware for EUV Coater/Developer processing. In previous work, processing sensitivities of the resist materials were investigated to determine the impact on critical dimension (CD) uniformity and defectivity. In this work, new promising resist materials have been studied and more information pertaining to EUV exposures was obtained. Specifically, post exposure bake (PEB) impact to CD is studied in addition to dissolution characteristics and resist material hydrophobicity. Additionally, initial results show the current status of CDU and defectivity with the ADT/CLEAN TRACK ACTTM 12 lithocluster. Analysis of a five wafer batch of CDU wafers shows within wafer and wafer to wafer contribution from track processing. A pareto of a patterned wafer defectivity test gives initial insight into the process defects with the current processing conditions. From analysis of these data, it's shown that while improvements in processing are certainly possible, the initial results indicate a manufacturable process for EUV.

  2. Wafer Replacement Cluster Tool (Presentation);

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, H. M.

    2008-04-01

    This presentation on wafer replacement cluster tool discusses: (1) Platform for advanced R and D toward SAI 2015 cost goal--crystal silicon PV at area costs closer to amorphous Si PV, it's 15% efficiency, inexpensive substrate, and moderate temperature processing (<800 C); (2) Why silicon?--industrial and knowledge base, abundant and environmentally benign, market acceptance, and good efficiency; and (3) Why replace wafers?--expensive, high embedded energy content, and uses 50-100 times more silicon than needed.

  3. Wafer handling and placement tool

    DOEpatents

    Witherspoon, Linda L.

    1988-01-05

    A spring arm tool is provided for clamp engaging and supporting wafers while the tool is hand held. The tool includes a pair of relatively swingable jaw element supporting support arms and the jaw elements are notched to enjoy multiple point contact with a wafer peripheral portion. Also, one disclosed form of the tool includes remotely operable workpiece ejecting structure carried by the jaw elements thereof.

  4. Time memory cell VLSI for the PHENIX drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Sagara, M.; Emura, T.

    1998-06-01

    A high-precision Time-to-Digital-Converter VLSI, TMC-PHX1, was developed for the PHENIX drift chamber. The chip contains 4 channels of TDC with two stages of data buffering and one level of trigger buffering required in very high rate experiments. In addition to a fixed data size readout, the chip also supports a zero-suppression mode readout. The chip records both rising and falling edge timings, and has a least timing count of 0.83 ns/bit and 1.66 ns/bit respectively. A level 1 buffer has a recording depth of 6.8 {micro}sec and a readout FIFO has a depth of 128 words. High precision timing was derived from an asymmetric ring oscillator stabilized with a PLL. The chip runs at 4 times faster clock (37.6 MHz) of the RHIC bunch clock, and was fabricated with 0.5 {micro}m CMOS gate-array technology.

  5. A new method of VLSI conform design for MOS cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. H.; Wach, W.; Mueller-Glaser, K. D.

    An automated method for the design of specialized SSI/LSI-level MOS cells suitable for incorporation in VLSI chips is described. The method uses the symbolic-layout features of the CABBAGE computer program (Hsueh, 1979; De Man et al., 1982), but restricted by a fixed grid system to facilitate compaction procedures. The techniques used are shown to significantly speed the processes of electrical design, layout, design verification, and description for subsequent CAD/CAM application. In the example presented, a 211-transistor, parallel-load, synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counter cell was designed in 9 days, as compared to 30 days for a manually-optimized-layout version and 3 days for a larger, less efficient cell designed by a programmable logic array; the cell areas were 0.36, 0.21, and 0.79 sq mm, respectively. The primary advantage of the method is seen in the extreme ease with which the cell design can be adapted to new parameters or design rules imposed by improvements in technology.

  6. A VLSI architecture for high performance CABAC encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania, Hassan; Sudharsanan, Subramania

    2005-07-01

    One key technique for improving the coding e+/-ciency of H.264 video standard is the entropy coder, context- adaptive binary arithmetic coder (CABAC). However the complexity of the encoding process of CABAC is signicantly higher than the table driven entropy encoding schemes such as the Hu®man coding. CABAC is also bit serial and its multi-bit parallelization is extremely di+/-cult. For a high denition video encoder, multi-giga hertz RISC processors will be needed to implement the CABAC encoder. In this paper, we provide an e+/-cient, pipelined VLSI architecture for CABAC encoding along with an analysis of critical issues. The solution encodes a binary symbol every cycle. An FPGA implementation of the proposed scheme capable of 104 Mbps encoding rate and test results are presented. An ASIC synthesis and simulation for a 0.18 ¹m process technology indicates that the design is capable of encoding 190 million binary symbols per second using an area of 0.35 mm2. ¤

  7. A bioinspired collision detection algorithm for VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadri, J.; Linan, G.; Stafford, R.; Keil, M. S.; Roca, E.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a bioinspired algorithm for collision detection is proposed, based on previous models of the locust (Locusta migratoria) visual system reported by F.C. Rind and her group, in the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The algorithm is suitable for VLSI implementation in standard CMOS technologies as a system-on-chip for automotive applications. The working principle of the algorithm is to process a video stream that represents the current scenario, and to fire an alarm whenever an object approaches on a collision course. Moreover, it establishes a scale of warning states, from no danger to collision alarm, depending on the activity detected in the current scenario. In the worst case, the minimum time before collision at which the model fires the collision alarm is 40 msec (1 frame before, at 25 frames per second). Since the average time to successfully fire an airbag system is 2 msec, even in the worst case, this algorithm would be very helpful to more efficiently arm the airbag system, or even take some kind of collision avoidance countermeasures. Furthermore, two additional modules have been included: a "Topological Feature Estimator" and an "Attention Focusing Algorithm". The former takes into account the shape of the approaching object to decide whether it is a person, a road line or a car. This helps to take more adequate countermeasures and to filter false alarms. The latter centres the processing power into the most active zones of the input frame, thus saving memory and processing time resources.

  8. Design and implementation of highly parallel pipelined VLSI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delange, Alphonsus Anthonius Jozef

    A methodology and its realization as a prototype CAD (Computer Aided Design) system for the design and analysis of complex multiprocessor systems is presented. The design is an iterative process in which the behavioral specifications of the system components are refined into structural descriptions consisting of interconnections and lower level components etc. A model for the representation and analysis of multiprocessor systems at several levels of abstraction and an implementation of a CAD system based on this model are described. A high level design language, an object oriented development kit for tool design, a design data management system, and design and analysis tools such as a high level simulator and graphics design interface which are integrated into the prototype system and graphics interface are described. Procedures for the synthesis of semiregular processor arrays, and to compute the switching of input/output signals, memory management and control of processor array, and sequencing and segmentation of input/output data streams due to partitioning and clustering of the processor array during the subsequent synthesis steps, are described. The architecture and control of a parallel system is designed and each component mapped to a module or module generator in a symbolic layout library, compacted for design rules of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) technology. An example of the design of a processor that is a useful building block for highly parallel pipelined systems in the signal/image processing domains is given.

  9. A hierarchical approach to test generation for CMOS VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weening, Edward Christiaan

    A hierarchical approach to the automatic test pattern generation for large digital VLSI circuits, fabricated in CMOS technology, is developed and implemented. The use of information on the circuit's hierarchy, which is readily available from most modern CAD (Computer Aided Design) systems, speeds up the test generation process considerably and enhances the quality of the tests generated. The hierarchical test generation tool can also be integrated in future CAD systems making test generation and testability enhancement during circuit design feasible. The hierarchical approach is described at the switch, functional, and behavioral level. A test pattern generation algorithm at the switch level is presented. Test generation and fault simulation algorithms both using OBDD (Ordered Binary Decision Diagram) functional descriptions of the circuit modules are presented. A test plan generation method at the behavioral level is presented. Practical results show that the hierarchical approach to test generation is more efficient than a conventional, non-hierarchical approach, especially for switch level faults. The results also show that the use of Design For Testability (DFT) circuitry is supported at the behavioral level.

  10. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. S.; Park, H. M.; Joo, K. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  11. Wafer level test solutions for IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessmann, Sebastian; Werner, Frank-Michael

    2014-05-01

    Wafer probers provide an established platform for performing electrical measurements at wafer level for CMOS and similar process technologies. For testing IR sensors, the requirements are beyond the standard prober capabilities. This presentation will give an overview about state of the art IR sensor probing systems reaching from flexible engineering solutions to automated production needs. Cooled sensors typically need to be tested at a target temperature below 80 K. Not only is the device temperature important but also the surrounding environment is required to prevent background radiation from reaching the device under test. To achieve that, a cryogenic shield is protecting the movable chuck. By operating that shield to attract residual gases inside the chamber, a completely contamination-free test environment can be guaranteed. The use of special black coatings are furthermore supporting the removal of stray light. Typically, probe card needles are operating at ambient (room) temperature when connecting to the wafer. To avoid the entrance of heat, which can result in distorted measurements, the probe card is fully embedded into the cryogenic shield. A shutter system, located above the probe field, is designed to switch between the microscope view to align the sensor under the needles and the test relevant setup. This includes a completely closed position to take dark current measurements. Another position holds a possible filter glass with the required aperture opening. The necessary infrared sources to stimulate the device are located above.

  12. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  13. A single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (225, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-11-01

    A description of a single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of the dual basis multiplication algorithm. The same architecture can be applied to design VLSI chips to compute various kinds of number theoretic transforms.

  14. A single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (225, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of the dual basis multiplication algorithm. The same architecture can be applied to design VLSI chips to compute various kinds of number theoretic transforms.

  15. A new VLSI complex integer multiplier which uses a quadratic-polynomial residue system with Fermat numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyu, H. C.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Chang, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    A quadratic-polynomial Fermat residue number system (QFNS) has been used to compute complex integer multiplications. The advantage of such a QFNS is that a complex integer multiplication requires only two integer multiplications. In this article, a new type Fermat number multiplier is developed which eliminates the initialization condition of the previous method. It is shown that the new complex multiplier can be implemented on a single VLSI chip. Such a chip is designed and fabricated in CMOS-Pw technology.

  16. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  17. Investigation of optimized wafer sampling with multiple integrated metrology modules within photolithography equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Ted L.; Makimura, Eri

    2007-03-01

    Micron Technology, Inc., explores the challenges of defining specific wafer sampling scenarios for users of multiple integrated metrology modules within a Tokyo Electron Limited (TEL) CLEAN TRACK TM LITHIUS TM. With the introduction of integrated metrology (IM) into the photolithography coater/developer, users are faced with the challenge of determining what type of data is required to collect to adequately monitor the photolithography tools and the manufacturing process. Photolithography coaters/developers have a metrology block that is capable of integrating three metrology modules into the standard wafer flow. Taking into account the complexity of multiple metrology modules and varying across-wafer sampling plans per metrology module, users must optimize the module wafer sampling to obtain their desired goals. Users must also understand the complexity of the coater/developer handling systems to deliver wafers to each module. Coater/developer systems typically process wafers sequentially through each module to ensure consistent processing. In these systems, the first wafer must process through a module before the next wafer can process through a module, and the first wafer must return to the cassette before the second wafer can return to the cassette. IM modules within this type of system can reduce throughput and limit flexible wafer selections. Finally, users must have the ability to select specific wafer samplings for each IM module. This case study explores how to optimize wafer sampling plans and how to identify limitations with the complexity of multiple integrated modules to ensure maximum metrology throughput without impact to the productivity of processing wafers through the photolithography cell (litho cell).

  18. Low-frequency noise reduction in vertical MOSFETs having tunable threshold voltage fabricated with 60 nm CMOS technology on 300 mm wafer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamoto, Takuya; Ma, Yitao; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, DC and low-frequency noise (LFN) characteristics have been investigated with actual measurement data in both n- and p-type vertical MOSFETs (V-MOSFETs) for the first time. The V-MOSFETs which was fabricated on 300 mm bulk silicon wafer process have realized excellent DC performance and a significant reduction of flicker (1/f) noise. The measurement results show that the fabricated V-MOSFETs with 60 nm silicon pillar and 100 nm gate length achieve excellent steep sub-threshold swing (69 mV/decade for n-type and 66 mV/decade for p-type), good on-current (281 µA/µm for n-type 149 µA/µm for p-type), low off-leakage current (28.1 pA/µm for n-type and 79.6 pA/µm for p-type), and excellent on-off ratio (1 × 107 for n-type and 2 × 106 for p-type). In addition, it is demonstrated that our fabricated V-MOSFETs can control the threshold voltage (Vth) by changing the channel doping condition, which is the useful and low-cost technique as it has been widely used in the conventional bulk planar MOSFET. This result indicates that V-MOSFETs can control Vth more finely and flexibly by the combined the use of the doping technique with other techniques such as work function engineering of metal-gate. Moreover, it is also shown that V-MOSFETs can suppress 1/f noise (L\\text{gate}WS\\text{Id}/I\\text{d}2 of 10-13-10-11 µm2/Hz for n-type and 10-12-10-10 µm2/Hz for p-type) to one or two order lower level than previously reported nanowire type MOSFET, FinFET, Tri-Gate, and planar MOSFETs. The results have also proved that both DC and 1/f noise performances are independent from the bias voltage which is applied to substrate or well layer. Therefore, it is verified that V-MOSFETs can eliminate the effects from substrate or well layer, which always adversely affects the circuit performances due to this serial connection.

  19. Characterization of inorganic resist for VLSI fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, W.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation concentrates on the study of the image formation mechanisms of the Ge/sub 0.1/Se/sub 0.9/ resist and the assessment of the resist for VLSI fabrication. A laboratory Ge/sub 0.1/Se/sub 0.9/ resist process was established. A simulation program for the exposure model of the resist was written and incorporated into the SAMPLE program. The model describes the Ag transport mechanisms in the resist system which are the lateral diffusion and photobleaching of Ag in the Ag/sub 2/Se layer and the vertical photodoping of Ag from the Ag/sub 2/Se to the Ge/sub 0.1/Se/sub 0.9/ layer. Laboratory experiment and computer simulation has been used to study the four exposure phenomena: edge sharpening, contrast enhancement, feature-dependent amplification and feature-dependent photodoping suppression. The phenomena result from the photobleaching and lateral diffusion mechanisms which occur in the sensitized layer of the resist system during the exposure process. The conditions under which these phenomena occur was identified. Their practical impact on the resolution capability of the resist has been evaluated. For normal exposures (<150mJ/cm/sup 2/), these phenomena do not occur. The mechanism of Ag photodoping Ge/sub 0.1/Se/sub 0.9/ glass was studied. The photodoping was found to obey Fick's diffusion law.

  20. Performance optimization of digital VLSI circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Marple, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Designers of digital VLSI circuits have virtually no computer tools available for the optimization of circuit performance. Instead, a designer relies extensively on circuit-analysis tools, such as circuit simulation (SPICE) and/or critical-delay-path analysis. A circuit-analysis approach to digital design is very labor-intensive and seldom produces a circuit with optimum area/delay or power/delay trade off. The goal of this research is to provide a synthesis approach to the design of digital circuits by finding the sizes of transistors that optimize circuits by finding the sizes of transistors that optimize circuit performance (delay, area, power). Solutions are found that are optimum for all possible delay paths of a given circuit and not for just a single path. The approach of this research is to formulate the problem of area/delay or power/delay optimization as a nonlinear program. Conditions for optimality are then established using graph theory and Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Finally, the use of augmented-Lagrangian and projected-Lagrangian algorithms are reviewed for the solution of the nonlinear programs. Two computer programs, PLATO and COP, were developed by the author to optimize CMOS PLA's (PLATO) and general CMOS circuits (COP). These tools provably find the globally optimum transistor sizes for a given circuit. Results are presented for PLA's and small- to medium-sized cells.

  1. Thermomechanical global response of the EUVL wafer during exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jaehyuk; Martin, Carl J.; Engelstad, Roxann L.; Lovell, Edward G.

    2002-07-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the leading technologies for Next-Generation Lithography. Continued progress in its development will be facilitated by characterizing all sources of distortion in the chip fabrication process. These include the thermal distortions of the wafer caused by deposited EUVL energy during scanning exposure. Absorbed energy from the beam produces temperature increases and structural displacements in the wafer, which directly contribute to pattern placement errors and image blur. Because of the vacuum conditions of EUVL systems, wafer chucking will be electrostatic, which has a number of advantages over mechanical clamping systems. The goals of this research are to predict the transient temperature increases and corresponding displacements (locally and globally) consistent with the thermomechanical boundary conditions of the wafer. Both thermal and structural finite element models were constructed to numerically simulate wafer exposure. The response of the wafer is relatively sensitive to the interface conditions between the substrate and electrostatic chuck. Thus, parametric studies of the response to changes in the contact conductance and the friction coefficient were performed and are presented in this paper.

  2. Development of Megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1980-09-01

    The major goals to develop a cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three-in.-diameter wafers per hour and to reduce the process cost were achieved. The new system consists of an ammonia-hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32-in.-spaced, ion-implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of Megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room-temperature, high-velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis. The following factors contribute to the improved effectiveness of the process: (1) recirculation and filtration of the cleaning solution permit it to be used for at least 100,000 wafers with only a relatively small amount of chemical make-up before discarding; (2) uniform cleanliness is achieved because both sides of the wafer are Megasonically scrubbed to remove particulate impurities; (3) the novel dryer permits wafers to be dried in a high-velocity room-temperature air stream on a moving belt in their quartz carriers; and (4) the personnel safety of such a system is excellent and waste disposal has no adverse ecological impact. With the addition of mechanical transfer arms, two systems like the one developed will produce enough cleaned wafers for a 30-MW/year production facility. A projected scale-up well within the existing technology would permit a system to be assembled that produces about 12,745 wafers per hour; about 11 such systems, each occupying about 110 square feet, would be needed for each cleaning stage of a 500-MW/year production facility.

  3. Wafer sampling by regression for systematic wafer variation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byungsool; McNames, James; Whitefield, Bruce; Rudolph, Paul; Zola, Jeff

    2005-05-01

    In-line measurements are used to monitor semiconductor manufacturing processes for excessive variation using statistical process control (SPC) chart techniques. Systematic spatial wafer variation often occurs in a recognizable pattern across the wafer that is characteristic of a particular manufacturing step. Visualization tools are used to associate these patterns with specific manufacturing steps preceding the measurement. Acquiring the measurements is an expensive and slow process. The number of sites measured on a wafer must be minimized while still providing sufficient data to monitor the process. We address two key challenges to effective wafer-level monitoring. The first challenge is to select a small sample of inspection sites that maximize detection sensitivity to the patterns of interest, while minimizing the confounding effects of other types of wafer variation. The second challenge is to develop a detection algorithm that maximizes sensitivity to the patterns of interest without exceeding a user-specified false positive rate. We propose new sampling and detection methods. Both methods are based on a linear regression model with distinct and orthogonal components. The model is flexible enough to include many types of systematic spatial variation across the wafer. Because the components are orthogonal, the degree of each type of variation can be estimated and detected independently with very few samples. A formal hypothesis test can then be used to determine whether specific patterns are present. This approach enables one to determine the sensitivity of a sample plan to patterns of interest and the minimum number of measurements necessary to adequately monitor the process.

  4. On testing VLSI chips for the big Viterbi decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general technique that can be used in testing very large scale integrated (VLSI) chips for the Big Viterbi Decoder (BVD) system is described. The test technique is divided into functional testing and fault-coverage testing. The purpose of functional testing is to verify that the design works functionally. Functional test vectors are converted from outputs of software simulations which simulate the BVD functionally. Fault-coverage testing is used to detect and, in some cases, to locate faulty components caused by bad fabrication. This type of testing is useful in screening out bad chips. Finally, design for testability, which is included in the BVD VLSI chip design, is described in considerable detail. Both the observability and controllability of a VLSI chip are greatly enhanced by including the design for the testability feature.

  5. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

  6. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, S.R.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

  7. A single chip VLSI Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.

    1986-02-01

    A new VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The transform decoding technique used in a previous design is replaced by a time domain algorithm. A new architecture that implements such an algorithm permits efficient pipeline processing with minimum circuitry. A systolic array is also developed to perform erasure corrections in the new design. A modified form of Euclid's algorithm is implemented by a new architecture that maintains the throughput rate with less circuitry. Such improvements result in both enhanced capability and a significant reduction in silicon area, therefore making it possible to build a pipeline (31,15)RS decoder on a single VLSI chip.

  8. A radial basis function neurocomputer implemented with analog VLSI circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Steven S.; Chau, Paul M.; Tawel, Raoul

    1992-01-01

    An electronic neurocomputer which implements a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is described. The RBFNN is a network that utilizes a radial basis function as the transfer function. The key advantages of RBFNNs over existing neural network architectures include reduced learning time and the ease of VLSI implementation. This neurocomputer is based on an analog/digital hybrid design and has been constructed with both custom analog VLSI circuits and a commercially available digital signal processor. The hybrid architecture is selected because it offers high computational performance while compensating for analog inaccuracies, and it features the ability to model large problems.

  9. Architecture for VLSI design of Reed-Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the logic structure of the universal VLSI symbol-slice Reed-Solomon (RS) encoder chip, from a group of which an RS encoder may be constructed through cascading and proper interconnection. As a design example, it is shown that an RS encoder presently requiring approximately 40 discrete CMOS ICs may be replaced by an RS encoder consisting of four identical, interconnected VLSI RS encoder chips, offering in addition to greater compactness both a lower power requirement and greater reliability.

  10. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  11. A single chip VLSI Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The transform decoding technique used in a previous design is replaced by a time domain algorithm. A new architecture that implements such an algorithm permits efficient pipeline processing with minimum circuitry. A systolic array is also developed to perform erasure corrections in the new design. A modified form of Euclid's algorithm is implemented by a new architecture that maintains the throughput rate with less circuitry. Such improvements result in both enhanced capability and a significant reduction in silicon area, therefore making it possible to build a pipeline (31,15)RS decoder on a single VLSI chip.

  12. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V.; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Ranjbar Kermany, Atieh; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  13. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. PMID:25053702

  14. High performance VLSI telemetry data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesney, J.; Speciale, N.; Horner, W.; Sabia, S.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's deployment of major space complexes such as Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) will demand increased functionality and performance from ground based telemetry acquisition systems well above current system capabilities. Adaptation of space telemetry data transport and processing standards such as those specified by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards and those required for commercial ground distribution of telemetry data, will drive these functional and performance requirements. In addition, budget limitations will force the requirement for higher modularity, flexibility, and interchangeability at lower cost in new ground telemetry data system elements. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the design and development of generic ground telemetry data system elements, over the last five years, has resulted in significant solutions to these problems. This solution, referred to as the functional components approach includes both hardware and software components ready for end user application. The hardware functional components consist of modern data flow architectures utilizing Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's) developed specifically to support NASA's telemetry data systems needs and designed to meet a range of data rate requirements up to 300 Mbps. Real-time operating system software components support both embedded local software intelligence, and overall system control, status, processing, and interface requirements. These components, hardware and software, form the superstructure upon which project specific elements are added to complete a telemetry ground data system installation. This paper describes the functional components approach, some specific component examples, and a project example of the evolution from VLSI component, to basic board level functional component, to integrated telemetry data system.

  15. Silicon wafer-based tandem cells: The ultimate photovoltaic solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.

    2014-03-01

    Recent large price reductions with wafer-based cells have increased the difficulty of dislodging silicon solar cell technology from its dominant market position. With market leaders expected to be manufacturing modules above 16% efficiency at 0.36/Watt by 2017, even the cost per unit area (60-70/m2) will be difficult for any thin-film photovoltaic technology to significantly undercut. This may make dislodgement likely only by appreciably higher energy conversion efficiency approaches. A silicon wafer-based cell able to capitalize on on-going cost reductions within the mainstream industry, but with an appreciably higher than present efficiency, might therefore provide the ultimate PV solution. With average selling prices of 156 mm quasi-square monocrystalline Si photovoltaic wafers recently approaching 1 (per wafer), wafers now provide clean, low cost templates for overgrowth of thin, wider bandgap high performance cells, nearly doubling silicon's ultimate efficiency potential. The range of possible Si-based tandem approaches is reviewed together with recent results and ultimate prospects.

  16. Allowable silicon wafer thickness versus diameter for ingot rotation ID wafering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Inner diameter (ID) wafering of ingot rotation reduce the ID saw blade diameter was investigated. The blade thickness can be reduced, resulting in minimal kerf loss. However, significant breakage of wafers occurs during the rotation wafering as the wafer thickness decreases. Fracture mechanics was used to develop an equation relating wafer thickness, diameter and fracture behavior at the point of fracture by using a model of a wafer, supported by a center column and subjected to a cantilever force. It is indicated that the minimum allowable wafer thickness does not increase appreciably with increasing wafer diameter and that fracture through the thickness rather than through the center supporting column limits the minimum allowable wafer thickness. It is suggested that the minimum allowable wafer thickness can be reduced by using a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center core and by using 111 ingots.

  17. Wafer-scale Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Davila, Antonio; Zand, Katayoun; Douglas, Wallace C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial metabolic and biophysical parameters are associated with degenerative diseases and the aging process. To evaluate these biochemical parameters, current technology requires several hundred milligrams of isolated mitochondria for functional assays. Here, we demonstrate manufacturable wafer-scale mitochondrial functional assay lab-on-a-chip devices, which require mitochondrial protein quantities three orders of magnitude less than current assays, integrated onto 4” standard silicon wafer with new fabrication processes and materials. Membrane potential changes of isolated mitochondria from various well-established cell lines such as human HeLa cell line (Heb7A), human osteosarcoma cell line (143b) and mouse skeletal muscle tissue were investigated and compared. This second generation integrated lab-on-a-chip system developed here shows enhanced structural durability and reproducibility while increasing the sensitivity to changes in mitochondrial membrane potential by an order of magnitude as compared to first generation technologies. We envision this system to be a great candidate to substitute current mitochondrial assay systems. PMID:22627274

  18. CMOS VLSI Layout and Verification of a SIMD Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Jianqing

    1996-01-01

    A CMOS VLSI layout and verification of a 3 x 3 processor parallel computer has been completed. The layout was done using the MAGIC tool and the verification using HSPICE. Suggestions for expanding the computer into a million processor network are presented. Many problems that might be encountered when implementing a massively parallel computer are discussed.

  19. Hybrid VLSI/QCA Architecture for Computing FFTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarres, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A data-processor architecture that would incorporate elements of both conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry and quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) has been proposed to enable the highly parallel and systolic computation of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). The proposed circuit would complement the QCA-based circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, namely Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42; Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20855) Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 32; and Bit-Serial Adder Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20869), Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 35. The cited prior articles described the limitations of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA. To recapitulate: In a VLSI circuit, signal paths that are required not to interact with each other must not cross in the same plane. In contrast, for reasons too complex to describe in the limited space available for this article, suitably designed and operated QCAbased signal paths that are required not to interact with each other can nevertheless be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes.

  20. A special purpose silicon compiler for designing supercomputing VLSI systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, N.; Murugavel, P.; Kamakoti, V.; Shankarraman, M. J.; Rangarajan, S.; Mallikarjun, M.; Karthikeyan, B.; Prabhakar, T. S.; Satish, V.; Venkatasubramaniam, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    Design of general/special purpose supercomputing VLSI systems for numeric algorithm execution involves tackling two important aspects, namely their computational and communication complexities. Development of software tools for designing such systems itself becomes complex. Hence a novel design methodology has to be developed. For designing such complex systems a special purpose silicon compiler is needed in which: the computational and communicational structures of different numeric algorithms should be taken into account to simplify the silicon compiler design, the approach is macrocell based, and the software tools at different levels (algorithm down to the VLSI circuit layout) should get integrated. In this paper a special purpose silicon (SPS) compiler based on PACUBE macrocell VLSI arrays for designing supercomputing VLSI systems is presented. It is shown that turn-around time and silicon real estate get reduced over the silicon compilers based on PLA's, SLA's, and gate arrays. The first two silicon compiler characteristics mentioned above enable the SPS compiler to perform systolic mapping (at the macrocell level) of algorithms whose computational structures are of GIPOP (generalized inner product outer product) form. Direct systolic mapping on PLA's, SLA's, and gate arrays is very difficult as they are micro-cell based. A novel GIPOP processor is under development using this special purpose silicon compiler.

  1. An Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment for VLSI Built with COSMOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelides, Marios C.; Agius, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents Bigger Bits, an interactive multimedia learning environment that teaches students about VLSI within the context of computer electronics. The system was built with COSMOS (Content Oriented semantic Modelling Overlay Scheme), which is a modelling scheme that we developed for enabling the semantic content of multimedia to be used…

  2. Single-Chip VLSI Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Howard M.; Truong, Trieu-Kie; Hsu, In-Shek; Deutsch, Leslie J.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient utilization of computing elements reduces size while preserving throughput. VLSI architecture is pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder for correction of errors and erasures. Uses transform circuit to compute syndrome polynomial. Erasure information enters decoder as binary sequence. Applied to variety of digital communications involving error-correcting RS codes.

  3. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  4. A Sharp methodology for VLSI layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapat, Shekhar

    1993-01-01

    The layout problem for VLSI circuits is recognized as a very difficult problem and has been traditionally decomposed into the several seemingly independent sub-problems of placement, global routing, and detailed routing. Although this structure achieves a reduction in programming complexity, it is also typically accompanied by a reduction in solution quality. Most current placement research recognizes that the separation is artificial, and that the placement and routing problems should be solved ideally in tandem. We propose a new interconnection model, Sharp and an associated partitioning algorithm. The Sharp interconnection model uses a partitioning shape that roughly resembles the musical sharp 'number sign' and makes extensive use of pre-computed rectilinear Steiner trees. The model is designed to generate strategic routing information along with the partitioning results. Additionally, the Sharp model also generates estimates of the routing congestion. We also propose the Sharp layout heuristic that solves the layout problem in its entirety. The Sharp layout heuristic makes extensive use of the Sharp partitioning model. The use of precomputed Steiner tree forms enables the method to model accurately net characteristics. For example, the Steiner tree forms can model both the length of the net and more importantly its route. In fact, the tree forms are also appropriate for modeling the timing delays of nets. The Sharp heuristic works to minimize both the total layout area by minimizing total net length (thus reducing the total wiring area), and the congestion imbalances in the various channels (thus reducing the unused or wasted channel area). Our heuristic uses circuit element movements amongst the different partitioning blocks and selection of alternate minimal Steiner tree forms to achieve this goal. The objective function for the algorithm can be modified readily to include other important circuit constraints like propagation delays. The layout technique

  5. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-02-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  6. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-01-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  7. Optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) for VLSI micro/nano-photonic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, S. G.; O, B. H.; Park, S. G.; Kim, K. H.; Kang, J. K.; Chin, I.; Kwon, Y. K.; Choi, Y. W.

    2005-01-01

    We present, in the form of review, the results of our study on the design, fabrication and assembly of optical printed circuit boards (O-PCBs) for VLSI micro/nano-photonic applications. The O-PCBs are designed to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards, substrates or chips, in a manner similar to the electrical printed circuit boards (E-PCBs). We have assembled and constructed O-PCBs using optical waveguide arrays and circuits made of polymer materials and have examined their information handling performances. We also designed power beam splitters and waveguide filters using nano-scale photonic band-gap crystals. We discuss scientific and technological issues concerning the processes of miniaturization, interconnection and integration of polymer optical waveguide devices and arrays for O-PCB and VLSI micro/nano-photonics as applicable to board-to-board, chip-to-chip, and intra-chip integration for computers, telecommunications, and transportation systems.

  8. The design plan of a VLSI single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1987-11-01

    The very large-scale integration (VLSI) architecture of a single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder for decoding both errors and erasures is described. A decoding failure detection capability is also included in this system so that the decoder will recognize a failure to decode instead of introducing additional errors. This could happen whenever the received word contains too many errors and erasures for the code to correct. The number of transistors needed to implement this decoder is estimated at about 75,000 if the delay for received message is not included. This is in contrast to the older transform decoding algorithm which needs about 100,000 transistors. However, the transform decoder is simpler in architecture than the time decoder. It is therefore possible to implement a single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder with today's VLSI technology. An implementation strategy for the decoder system is presented. This represents the first step in a plan to take advantage of advanced coding techniques to realize a 2.0 dB coding gain for future space missions.

  9. The design plan of a VLSI single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The very large-scale integration (VLSI) architecture of a single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder for decoding both errors and erasures is described. A decoding failure detection capability is also included in this system so that the decoder will recognize a failure to decode instead of introducing additional errors. This could happen whenever the received word contains too many errors and erasures for the code to correct. The number of transistors needed to implement this decoder is estimated at about 75,000 if the delay for received message is not included. This is in contrast to the older transform decoding algorithm which needs about 100,000 transistors. However, the transform decoder is simpler in architecture than the time decoder. It is therefore possible to implement a single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder with today's VLSI technology. An implementation strategy for the decoder system is presented. This represents the first step in a plan to take advantage of advanced coding techniques to realize a 2.0 dB coding gain for future space missions.

  10. High-accuracy inspection of defects and profile of wafers by phase measuring deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Huimin; Wu, Yuxiang; Zhao, Biyu; Ou, Zhonghua; Liu, Yong

    2014-09-01

    The demands of the less-defective and high-flatness wafers are urgent in many wafer based technologies ranging from micro-electronics to the current photovoltaic industry. As the wafer becomes thinner and larger to cope with the advances in those industries, there is an increasing possibility of the emerging of crack and warp on the wafer surface. High-accuracy inspection of defects and profile are thus necessary to ensure the reliability of device. Phase measuring deflectometry(PMD) is a fast, cost-effective and high accuracy measurement technology which has been developed in recent years. As a slope measurement technology, PMD possesses a high sensitivity. Very small slope variation will lead to a large variation of the phase. PMD is very possible to have a good performance in the wafer inspection. In this paper, the requirements of the wafer inspection in the industries are discussed, and compatibility of PMD and those requirements is analyzed. In the experimental work, PMD gets the slope information of the wafer surface directly. The curvature or height information can be acquired simply by the derivation or integral of the slope. PMD is proved to make a superior result in high-precision defect detecting and shape measurement of wafer by the analysis of experiment results.

  11. On-wafer magnetic resonance of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles A. E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Booth, James C.; Kabos, Pavel; Usselman, Robert J.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance measurements of ferumoxytol and TEMPO were made using an on-wafer transmission line technique with a vector network analyzer, allowing for broadband measurements of small sample volumes (4 nL) and small numbers of spins (1 nmol). On-wafer resonance measurements were compared with standard single-frequency cavity-based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using a new power conservation approach and the results show similar line shape. On-wafer magnetic resonance measurements using integrated microfluidics and microwave technology can significantly reduce the cost and sample volumes required for EPR spectral analysis and allow for integration of EPR with existing lab-on-a-chip processing and characterization techniques for point-of-care medical diagnostic applications.

  12. Micromachined VLSI 3D electronics. Final report for period September 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J.; Hsueh, K.L.

    2001-03-31

    The phase I program investigated the construction of electronic interconnections through the thickness of a silicon wafer. The novel aspects of the technology are that the length-to-width ratio of the channels is as high as 100:1, so that the minimum amount of real estate is used for contact area. Constructing a large array of these through-wafer interconnections will enable two circuit die to be coupled on opposite sides of a silicon circuit board providing high speed connection between the two.

  13. Temperature Dependent Electrical Properties of PZT Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, T.; Sen, S.; Seal, A.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical and electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) wafers were investigated and compared with PZT bulk. PZT wafers were prepared by tape casting technique. The transition temperature of both the PZT forms remained the same. The transition from an asymmetric to a symmetric shape was observed for PZT wafers at higher temperature. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33) values obtained were 560 pc/N and 234 pc/N, and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p) values were 0.68 and 0.49 for bulk and wafer, respectively. The reduction in polarization after fatigue was only ~3% in case of PZT bulk and ~7% for PZT wafer.

  14. Mask qualification strategies in a wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnert, Carmen; Kunowski, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Having consistent high quality photo masks is one of the key factors in lithography in the wafer fab. Combined with stable exposure- and resist processes, it ensures yield increases in production and fast learning cycles for technology development and design evaluation. Preventive controlling of incoming masks and quality monitoring while using the mask in production is essential for the fab to avoid yield loss or technical problems caused by mask issues, which eventually result in delivery problems to the customer. In this paper an overview of the procedures used for mask qualification and production release, for both logic and DRAM, at Infineon Dresden is presented. Incoming qualification procedures, such as specification checks, incoming inspection, and inline litho process window evaluation, are described here. Pinching and electrical tests, including compatibility tests for mask copies for high volume products on optimized litho processes, are also explained. To avoid mask degradation over lifetime, re-inspection checks are done for re-qualification while using the mask in production. The necessity of mask incoming inspection and re-qualification, due to the repeater printing from either the processing defects of the original mask or degrading defects of being used in the fab (i.e. haze, ESD, and moving particles, etc.), is demonstrated. The need and impact of tight mask specifications, such as CD uniformity signatures and corresponding electrical results, are shown with examples of mask-wafer CD correlation.

  15. Support apparatus for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Torres, Kenneth J.

    2003-06-10

    A support apparatus for minimizing gravitational stress in semiconductor wafers, and particularly silicon wafers, during thermal processing. The support apparatus comprises two concentric circular support structures disposed on a common support fixture. The two concentric circular support structures, located generally at between 10 and 70% and 70 and 100% and preferably at 35 and 82.3% of the semiconductor wafer radius, can be either solid rings or a plurality of spaced support points spaced apart from each other in a substantially uniform manner. Further, the support structures can have segments removed to facilitate wafer loading and unloading. In order to withstand the elevated temperatures encountered during semiconductor wafer processing, the support apparatus, including the concentric circular support structures and support fixture can be fabricated from refractory materials, such as silicon carbide, quartz and graphite. The claimed wafer support apparatus can be readily adapted for use in either batch or single-wafer processors.

  16. Knowledge-based synthesis of custom VLSI physical design tools: First steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setliff, Dorothy E.; Rutenbar, Rob A.

    A description is given of how program synthesis techniques can be applied to the synthesis of technology-sensitive VLSI physical design tools. Physical design refers to the process of reducing a structural description of a piece of hardware down to the geometric layout of an integrated circuit. Successful physical design tools must cope with shifting technology and application environments. The goal is to automatically generate a tool's implementation to match the application. The authors describe a synthesis architecture that combines knowledge of the application domain and knowledge of generic programming mechanics. The approach uses a very high-level language to describe algorithms, domain and programming knowledge to select appropriate algorithms and data structures, and code generation to arrive at final executable code. Results are presented detailing the performance and implementation of ELF, a prototype generator for wire-routing applications. Comparisons between a hand-crafted router and an automatically synthesized router are presented.

  17. Fault model development for fault tolerant VLSI design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, C. R.; Lala, P. K.; Ali, A. M.; Visweswaran, G. S.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-05-01

    Fault models provide systematic and precise representations of physical defects in microcircuits in a form suitable for simulation and test generation. The current difficulty in testing VLSI circuits can be attributed to the tremendous increase in design complexity and the inappropriateness of traditional stuck-at fault models. This report develops fault models for three different types of common defects that are not accurately represented by the stuck-at fault model. The faults examined in this report are: bridging faults, transistor stuck-open faults, and transient faults caused by alpha particle radiation. A generalized fault model could not be developed for the three fault types. However, microcircuit behavior and fault detection strategies are described for the bridging, transistor stuck-open, and transient (alpha particle strike) faults. The results of this study can be applied to the simulation and analysis of faults in fault tolerant VLSI circuits.

  18. Noise-margin limitations on gallium-arsenide VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Stephen I.; Sundaram, Mani

    1988-01-01

    Two factors which limit the complexity of GaAs MESFET VLSI circuits are considered. Power dissipation sets an upper complexity limit for a given logic circuit implementation and thermal design. Uniformity of device characteristics and the circuit configuration determines the electrical functional yield. Projection of VLSI complexity based on these factors indicates that logic chips of 15,000 gates are feasible with the most promising static circuits if a maximum power dissipation of 5 W per chip is assumed. While lower power per gate and therefore more gates per chip can be obtained by using a popular E/D FET circuit, yields are shown to be small when practical device parameter tolerances are applied. Further improvements in materials, devices, and circuits wil be needed to extend circuit complexity to the range currently dominated by silicon.

  19. New fabrication method of glass packages with inclined optical windows for micromirrors on wafer level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchly, Vanessa; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim; Hofmann, Ulrich; Janes, Joachim; Jensen, Björn; Benecke, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    For many applications it is inevitable to protect MEMS devices against environmental impacts like humidity which can affect their performance. Moreover recent publications demonstrates that micro mirrors can achieve very large optical scan angles at moderate driving voltages even exceeding 100 degrees when hermetically sealed under vacuum. While discrete chips may be evacuated and sealed on single die level using small can packages like TO housings, it is obvious that for high volume production a much more economical solution for the realisation of transparent optical packages already on wafer level must be developed. However, since any laser beam crossing a transparent glass surface is partly reflected even when anti-reflective coatings are applied, the construction of a wafer level optical housing suitable for laser projection purpose requires more than the integration of simple plane glass cap. The use of inclined optical windows avoids the occurrence of intense reflections of the incident laser beam in the projected images. This paper describes a unique technology to fabricate glass packages with inclined optical windows for micro mirrors on 8 inch wafers. The new process uses a high temperature glass forming process based on subsequent wafer bonding. A borosilicate glass wafer is bonded together with two structured silicon wafers. By grinding both sides of the wafer stack, a pattern of isolated silicon structures is defined. This preprocessed glass wafer is bonded thereon on a third structured silicon wafer, wherein the silicon islands are inserted into the cavities. By setting a defined pressure level inside the cavities during the final wafer bonding, the silicon glass stack extruded and it is out of plane during a subsequent annealing process at temperatures above the softening point of the glass. Finally the silicon is selectively removed in a wet etching process. This technique allows the fabrication of 8 inch glass wafers with oblique optical surfaces

  20. Radiation hardness and annealing tests of a custom VLSI device

    SciTech Connect

    Breakstone, A.; Parker, S.; Adolphsen, C.; Litke, A.; Schwarz, A.; Turala, M.; Lueth, V.; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA . Inst. for Particle Physics; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA )

    1986-10-01

    Several NMOS custom VLSI ( Microplex'') circuits have been irradiated with a 500 rad/hr {sup 60}Co source. With power off three of four chips tested have survived doses exceeding 1 Mrad. With power on at a 25% duty cycle, all chips tested failed at doses ranging from 10 to 130 krad. Annealing at 200{degree}C was only partially successful in restoring the chips to useful operating conditions. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A VLSI single chip 8-bit finite field multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Shao, H. M.; Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) architecture and layout for an 8-bit finite field multiplier is described. The algorithm used in this design was developed by Massey and Omura. A normal basis representation of finite field elements is used to reduce the multiplication complexity. It is shown that a drastic improvement was achieved in this design. This multiplier will be used intensively in the implementation of an 8-bit Reed-Solomon decoder and in many other related projects.

  2. A VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.; Reed, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    A pipeline structure of a transform decoder similar to a systolic array was developed to decode Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. An important ingredient of this design is a modified Euclidean algorithm for computing the error locator polynomial. The computation of inverse field elements is completely avoided in this modification of Euclid's algorithm. The new decoder is regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  3. High performance LWIR microbolometer with Si/SiGe quantum well thermistor and wafer level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roer, Audun; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Wolla, Erik; Hohler, Erling; Kittilsland, Gjermund

    2011-11-01

    An uncooled microbolometer with peak responsivity in the long wave infrared region of the electromagnetic radiation is developed at Sensonor Technologies. It is a 384 x 288 focal plane array with a pixel pitch of 25μm, based on monocrystalline Si/SiGe quantum wells as IR sensitive material. The high sensitivity (TCR) and low 1/f noise are the main performance characteristics of the product. The frame rate is maximum 60Hz and the output interface is digital (LVDS). The quantum well thermistor material is transferred to the read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) by direct wafer bonding. The ROIC wafer containing the released pixels is bonded in vacuum with a silicon cap wafer, providing hermetic encapsulation at low cost. The resulting wafer stack is mounted in a standard ceramic package. In this paper the architecture of the pixels and the ROIC, the wafer packaging and the electro-optical measurement results are presented.

  4. Fault sensitivity and wear-out analysis of VLSI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gwan Seung

    1994-07-01

    This thesis describes simulation approaches to conduct fault sensitivity and wear-out failure analysis of VLSI systems. A fault-injection approach to study transient impact in VLSI systems is developed. Through simulated fault injection at the device level and, subsequent fault propagation at the gate functional and software levels, it is possible to identify critical bottlenecks in dependability. Techniques to speed up the fault simulation and to perform statistical analysis of fault-impact are developed. A wear-out simulation environment is also developed to closely mimic dynamic sequences of wear-out events in a device through time, to localize weak location/aspect of target chip and to allow generation of TTF (Time-to-failure) distribution of VLSI chip as a whole. First, an accurate simulation of a target chip and its application code is performed to acquire trace data (real workload) on switch activity. Then, using this switch activity information, wear-out of the each component in the entire chip is simulated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  5. ULYSSES - an expert-system-based VLSI design environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Ulysses is a VLSI computer-aided design (CAD) environment which effectively addresses the problems associated with CAD tool integration. Specifically, Ulysses allows the integration of CAD tools into a design automation (DA) system, the codification of a design methodology, and the representation of a design space. Ulysses keeps track of the progress of a design and allows exploration of the design space. The environment employs artificial intelligence techniques, functions as an interactive expert system, and interprets descriptions of design tasks encoded in the scripts language. An integrated-circuit silicon compilation task is presented as an example of the ability of Ulysses to automatically execute CAD tools to solve a problem where inferencing is required to obtain a viable VLSI layout. The inferencing mechanism, in the form of a controlled production system, allows Ulysses to recover when routing channel congestion or over-constrained leaf-cell boundary conditions make it impossible for CAD tools to complete layouts. Also, Ulysses allows the designer to intervene while design activities are being carried out. Consistency-maintenance rules encoded in the scripts language enforce geometric floor-plan consistency when CAD tools fail and when the designer makes adjustments to a VLSI chip layout.

  6. Wafer CD variation for random units of track and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Ackmann, Paul; Richter, Frank; Kurth, Karin; Maelzer, Stephanie; Hsieh, Michael; Schurack, Frank; GN, Fang Hong

    2012-03-01

    After wafer processing in a scanner the process of record (POR) flows in a photo track are characterized by a random correlation between post exposure bake (PEB) and development (DEV) units of the photo track. The variation of the critical dimensions (CD) of the randomly correlated units used for PEB and DEV should be as small as possible - especially for technology nodes of 28nm and below. Even a point-to-point error of only 1nm could affect the final product yield results due to the relatively narrow process window of 28nm tech-node. The correlation between reticle measurements to target (MTT) and wafer MTT may in addition be influenced by the random correlation between units used for PEB and DEV. The polarization of the light source of the scanner is one of the key points for the wafer CD performance too - especially for the critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) performance. We have investigated two track flows, one with fixed and one with random unit correlation. The reticle used for the experiments is a 28nm active layer sample reticle. The POR track flow after wafer process in the scanner is characterized by a random correlation between PEB- and DEV-units. The set-up of the engineering (ENG) process flow is characterized by a fixed unit correlation between PEB- and development-units. The critical dimension trough pitch (CDTP) and linearity performance is demonstrated; also the line-end performance for two dimensional (2D) structures is shown. The sub-die of intra-field CDU for isolated and dense structures is discussed as well as the wafer intra-field CD performance. The correlation between reticle MTT and wafer intra-field MTT is demonstrated for track POR and ENG processes. For different polarization conditions of the scanner source, the comparison of CDU for isolated and dense features has been shown. The dependency of the wafer intra-field MTT with respect to different polarization settings of the light source is discussed. The correlation between reticle

  7. Sensor-based driving of a car with fuzzy inferencing VLSI chips and boards. [Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the sensor-based driving of a car in a-priori unknown environments using human-like'' reasoning schemes. The schemes are implemented on custom-designed VLSI fuzzy inferencing boards and are used to investigate two control modes for driving a car on the basis of very sparse and imprecise range data. In the first mode, the car navigates fully autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver's aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up, slow down, stop, or back up depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor channels to perceive the environment. Sample results are presented which illustrate the feasibility of developing autonomous navigation systems and robust safety enhancing driver's aid using the new fuzzy inferencing VLSI hardware and human-like'' reasoning schemes.

  8. Wafer-bonded surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berini, Pierre; Mattiussi, Greg; Lahoud, Nancy; Charbonneau, Robert

    2007-02-01

    Direct wafer bonding and thinning were explored as an approach for constructing long-range surface plasmon waveguides. The structures consist of a thin metal stripe deposited into a shallow trench etched into one of the claddings, to which another cladding of the same material is directly bonded. The approach was developed first using Pyrex wafers in order to assess feasibility and then using lithium niobate wafers. Optical and electro-optical measurements validate the approach.

  9. Impact of VLSI/VHSIC on satellite on-board signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanstoos, J. V.; Ruedger, W. H.; Snyder, W. E.; Kelly, W. L.

    Forecasted improvements in IC fabrication techniques, such as the use of X-ray lithography, are expected to yield submicron circuit feature sizes within the decade of the 1980s. As dimensions decrease, reliability, cost, speed, power consumption and density improvements will be realized which have a significant impact on the capabilities of onboard spacecraft signal processing functions. This will in turn result in increases of the intelligence that may be deployed on spaceborne remote sensing platforms. Among programs oriented toward such goals are the silicon-based Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) researches sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense, and efforts toward the development of GaAs devices which will compete with silicon VLSI technology for future applications. GaAs has an electron mobility which is five to six times that of silicon, and promises commensurate computation speed increases under low field conditions.

  10. VLSI Potentiostat Array With Oversampling Gain Modulation for Wide-Range Neurotransmitter Sensing.

    PubMed

    Stanacevic, M; Murari, K; Rege, A; Cauwenberghs, G; Thakor, N V

    2007-03-01

    A 16-channel current-measuring very large-scale integration (VLSI) sensor array system for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of electroactive neurotransmiters like dopamine and nitric-oxide is presented. Each channel embeds a current integrating potentiostat within a switched-capacitor first-order single-bit delta-sigma modulator implementing an incremental analog-to-digital converter. The duty-cycle modulation of current feedback in the delta-sigma loop together with variable oversampling ratio provide a programmable digital range selection of the input current spanning over six orders of magnitude from picoamperes to microamperes. The array offers 100-fA input current sensitivity at 3.4-muW power consumption per channel. The operation of the 3 mm times3 mm chip fabricated in 0.5-mum CMOS technology is demonstrated with real-time multichannel acquisition of neurotransmitter concentration. PMID:23851522