Science.gov

Sample records for voc emission sources

  1. [Inventory and environmental impact of VOCs emission from the typical anthropogenic sources in Sichuan province].

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Wang, Xing-Rui; He, Min; Guo, Wei-Guang

    2013-12-01

    Based on Sichuan province environmental statistical survey data and other relevant activity data, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from typical anthropogenic sources in Sichuan province were calculated for the year of 2011 by applying the emission factor method. Besides, ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation potentials of these typical anthropogenic sources were discussed. The total VOC emission from these sources was about 482 kt in Sichuan province, biomass burning, solvent utilization, industrial processes, storage and distribution of fuel, and fossil fuel combustion contributed 174 kt, 153 kt, 121 kt, 21 kt and 13 kt, respectively; architecture wall painting, furniture coating, wood decoration painting and artificial board were the major emission sectors of the solvent utilization; while for the industrial processes, 19.4% of VOCs emission was from the wine industry. Chengdu was the largest contributor compared to the other cities in Sichuan, whose VOCs emission from these typical anthropogenic sources in 2011 was 112 kt. OFP of these sources was 1,930 kt altogether. Solvent utilization contributed 50.5% of the total SOA formation potentials, biomass burning and industrial processes both contributed about 23% , with storage and distribution of fuel and fossil fuel combustion accounting for 1% and 1.4%, respectively. PMID:24640887

  2. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  3. Short-chain oxygenated VOCs: Emission and uptake by plants and atmospheric sources, sinks, and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Roger; Peñuelas, Josep; Filella, Iolanda

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have multiple atmospheric implications and play many roles in plant physiology and ecology. Among these VOCs, growing interest is being devoted to a group of short-chain oxygenated VOCs (oxVOCs). Technology improvements such as proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry are facilitating the study of these hydrocarbons and new data regarding these compounds is continuously appearing. Here we review current knowledge of the emissions of these oxVOCs by plants and the factors that control them, and also provide an overview of sources, sinks, and concentrations found in the atmosphere. The oxVOCs reviewed here are formic and acetic acids, acetone, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. In general, because of their water solubility (low gas-liquid partitioning coefficient), the plant-atmosphere exchange is stomatal-dependent, although it can also take place via the cuticle. This exchange is also determined by atmospheric mixing ratios. These compounds have relatively long atmospheric half-lives and reach considerable concentrations in the atmosphere in the range of ppbv. Likewise, under non-stressed conditions plants can emit all of these oxVOCs together at fluxes ranging from 0.2 up to 4.8 μg(C)g -1(leaf dry weight)h -1 and at rates that increase several-fold when under stress. Gaps in our knowledge regarding the processes involved in the synthesis, emission, uptake, and atmospheric reactivity of oxVOCs precludes the clarification of exactly what is conditioning plant-atmosphere exchange—and also when, how, and why this occurs—and these lacunae therefore warrant further research in this field.

  4. Anthropogenic sources of VOC in a football stadium: Assessing human emissions in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Patrick R.; Faber, Peter; Drewnick, Frank; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aerosol composition, carbon dioxide (CO2), and ozone (O3) were made inside Coface Arena in Mainz, Germany (49°59‧3″N, 8°13‧27″E) during a football match on April 20 2012. The VOC measurements were performed with a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). Observed VOCs could be classified into several distinct source categories including (1) human respiration/breath, (2) ozonolysis of skin oils, and (3) cigarette smoke/combustion. In this work, we present a detailed discussion on the scale and potential impacts of VOCs emitted as a result of these sources and their contributions on local and larger scales. Human emissions of VOCs have a negligible contribution to the global atmospheric budget (˜1% or less) for all those quantified in this study. However, fluxes as high as 0.02 g m-2 h-1 and 2 × 10-4 g m-2 h-1, for ethanol and acetone respectively are observed, suggesting the potential for significant impact on local air chemistry and perhaps regional scales. This study suggests that even in outdoor environments, situations exist where VOCs emitted as a result of human presence and activity are an important component of local air chemistry.

  5. VOC emissions of Grey poplar leaves as affected by salt stress and different N sources.

    PubMed

    Teuber, M; Zimmer, I; Kreuzwieser, J; Ache, P; Polle, A; Rennenberg, H; Schnitzler, J-P

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen nutrition and salt stress experiments were performed in a greenhouse with hydroponic-cultured, salt-sensitive Grey poplar (Populus x canescens) plants to study the combined influence of different N sources (either 1 mm NO(3) (-) or NH(4)(+)) and salt (up to 75 mm NaCl) on leaf gas exchange, isoprene biosynthesis and VOC emissions. Net assimilation and transpiration proved to be highly sensitive to salt stress and were reduced by approximately 90% at leaf sodium concentrations higher than 1,800 microg Na g dry weight (dw)(-1). In contrast, emissions of isoprene and oxygenated VOC (i.e. acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and acetone) were unaffected. There was no significant effect of combinations of salt stress and N source, and neither NO(3)(-) or NH(4)(+) influenced the salt stress response in the Grey poplar leaves. Also, transcript levels of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (PcDXR) and isoprene synthase (PcISPS) did not respond to the different N sources and only responded slightly to salt application, although isoprene synthase (PcISPS) activity was negatively affected at least in one of two experiments, despite high isoprene emission rates. A significant salt effect was the strong reduction of leaf dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) content, probably due to restricted availability of photosynthates for DMADP biosynthesis. Further consequences of reduced photosynthetic gas exchange and maintaining VOC emissions are a very high C loss, up to 50%, from VOC emissions related to net CO(2) uptake and a strong increase in leaf internal isoprene concentrations, with maximum mean values up to 6.6 microl x l(-1). Why poplar leaves maintain VOC biosynthesis and emission under salt stress conditions, despite impaired photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, is discussed. PMID:18211549

  6. Source identification of VOCs at an urban site of western India: Effect of marathon events and anthropogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, L. K.; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Devendra

    2016-03-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a high-resolution proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer at an urban site of Ahmedabad in India during the winter season in 2014. Mixing ratios of VOCs show large diurnal and day-to-day variations. Although strongly influenced by local emissions, periods of higher VOCs were observed during transport from the polluted Indo-Gangetic Plains than those from the cleaner Thar Desert. However with different rates, VOCs decreased exponentially with increasing wind speed. Relative abundance of methanol varied with weather conditions contributing highest and lowest under fog and clear-sky conditions, respectively. Among the compounds reported here, oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) contribute to a large fraction (67-85%) with methanol being most abundant (40-58%). In spite of predominant vehicular emissions, diurnal distribution and emission ratios (ERs) of several VOCs indicate the role of biogenic and secondary sources. The ratios of isoprene/benzene and OVOCs/benzene show significant enhancements during daytime suggesting their contributions from biogenic and secondary sources. During marathon and cyclothon events, mixing ratios of VOCs were 2-10 times higher compared to a normal Sunday. The ERs of VOCs estimated using the nighttime data on marathon day are well within the range of values reported for several megacities of the world. The average contributions of primary anthropogenic sources to acetaldehyde, acetone, and isoprene were 44 ± 06%, 45 ± 07%, and 63 ± 12%, respectively. During cloudy condition, the increase in anthropogenic contribution to acetaldehyde (~10%), acetone (9%) and isoprene (30%) is due to reduction in biogenic emissions and secondary formation of these VOCs.

  7. Source reduction of VOC and hazardous organic emissions from wood furniture coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.W.; McCrillis, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Under US EPA sponsorship, AeroVironment, Inc. and Adhesives Coating Co. are teaming up to develop and demonstrate a wood furniture coating system containing no volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and no hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), making it less hazardous to use, and emitting no detectable VOCs and HAPs during curing, therefore contributing significantly to emission reduction. Earlier work on a new topcoat showed excellent performance characteristics in terms of adhesion, gloss value, dry time, hardness, organic solvents content, and chemical/stain resistance. The VOC contents of both the clear topcoat and the white pigmented topcoat were less than 10 g/L, the detection list of the test method (EPA Method 24). This coating`s performance and properties compared favorably with those of other low-VOC waterborne coatings. Currently, low-/no-VOC stain and sealer wood coatings are being developed so that a complete low-/no-VOC wood coating system will be available for public use. The compatibility of coating components (a stain and sealer) to go with the topcoat is currently being evaluated. The complete system will be demonstrated at several furniture plants. A marketing plan of the developed products is part of this demonstration project.

  8. Screening the Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in China Based on Multi-effect Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere have adverse impacts via three main pathways: photochemical ozone formation, secondary organic aerosol production, and direct toxicity to humans. Few studies have integrated these effects to prioritize control measures for VOCs sources. In this study, we developed a multi-effect evaluation methodology based on updated emission inventories and source profiles, which was combined with ozone formation potential (OFP), secondary organic aerosol potential (SOAP), and VOC toxicity data to identify important emission sources and key species. We derived species-specific emission inventories for 152 sources. The OFPs, SOAPs, and toxicity of each source were determined, and the contribution and share of each source to each of these adverse effects was calculated. Weightings were given to the three adverse effects by expert scoring, and the integrated impact was determined. Using 2012 as the base year, solvent usage and industrial process were found to be the most important anthropogenic sources, accounting for 24.2 and 23.1% of the integrated environmental effect, respectively. This was followed by biomass burning, transportation, and fossil fuel combustion, all of which had a similar contribution ranging from 16.7 to 18.6%. The top five industrial sources, including plastic products, rubber products, chemical fiber products, the chemical industry, and oil refining, accounted for nearly 70.0% of industrial emissions. In China, emissions reductions are required for styrene, toluene, ethylene, benzene, and m/p-xylene. The 10 most abundant chemical species contributed 76.5% of the integrated impact. Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Guangdong were the five leading provinces when considering the integrated effects. Besides, the chemical mass balance model (CMB) was used to verify the VOCs inventories of 47 cities in China, so as to optimize our evaluation results. We suggest that multi-effect evaluation is necessary to

  9. Trends in selected ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and a comparison to mobile source emission trends in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo; Fuentes, Mark; Rieger, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Trends in ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) are compared to trends in VOC emissions from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles (LDGV) tested on chassis dynamometers and to trends observed in tunnel studies during the same period to understand the impacts of gasoline vehicle emissions on ambient VOC concentrations from 1999 to 2009. Annual median concentrations for most ambient VOCs decreased 40% from 1999 to 2009 in the SoCAB, based on data from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). Annual concentration decreases of most compounds, except 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, are highly correlated with the decrease of acetylene, a marker for tailpipe emissions from LDGV. This indicates that ambient VOC concentration decreases were likely due to tailpipe emission reductions from gasoline vehicles. Air Toxics Monitoring Network data also support this conclusion. Benzene concentration-normalized ratios for most compounds except ethane, propane, isoprene, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were stable even as these compound concentrations decreased significantly from 1999 to 2009. Such stability suggests that the main sources of ambient VOC were still the same from 1999 to 2009. The comparison of trends in dynamometer testing and tunnel studies also shows that tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of tunnel LDGV emissions. The pronounced changes in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane ratios due to the introduction of Phase 3 gasoline also confirm the substantial impact of LDGV emissions on ambient VOCs. Diurnal ambient VOC data also suggest that LDGV tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of ambient VOCs in the SoCAB in 2009. Our conclusion, which is that current inventory models underestimate VOC emissions from mobile sources, is consistent with that of several recent studies of ambient trends in the SoCAB. Our study showed that tailpipe emissions remained a bigger contributor to ambient VOCs than evaporative

  10. VOC emission source strengths of tankers during refuelling activities determined by spectroscopic remote sensing and inverse dispersion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus; Hoffmann, Herbert; Dormuth, Igor; Jahn, Carsten; Emeis, Stefan M.

    2002-02-01

    Tankers are a wide spread and important emission source of VOC's. Up to now emission data are available from measurements inside the storage tanks to investigate explosion protection only. Different emission reduction systems are under discussion such as vapor recovery units. The environmental impact of these alternatives shall be investigated. The VOC emissions of tankers were investigated in a river harbor. Fence-line monitoring by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) was performed to investigate different emission sources during activities of tankers in harbors. Benzene, toluene and p-xylene concentrations were measured by a mono-static DOAS using 3 retro-reflectors. The inverse method was applied on the basis of these non-intrusive measurements of effluent concentrations in the exhaust plume and meteorological measurements to determine the emission source strengths. Inversion of effluent's dispersion was performed by a Lagrangian model driven by wind fields of the Eulerian model MISKAM considering influences from buildings and the orography upon the streaming fields. The emission source strengths were determined from unloading and loading of gasoline, from ventilation of storage tanks of tankers into ambient air which is of common practice if the tankers are operated without load or if the tankers are to be refueled with a different product than before and from using the land-site gasoline vapor recovery unit in a tank farm for ventilation.

  11. VOC emissions from wet toner photocopy machines

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, J.L.; Howard, C.L.; Leto, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Indoor air pollution in office buildings affects millions of American workers every day. Potential sources of office indoor air pollution are photocopiers which emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during operation. A photocopier`s toner and dispersant contain heavy-treated naphtha, a mixture consisting primarily of decane, which is known to be toxic to humans. An experimental study was completed to characterize VOC emissions from a photocopier located on campus at the University of Texas at Austin. Experiments were completed to estimate the air turnover rate in the room, the VOC concentration in the room during photocopier operation, and a typical daily concentration profile. Based on these experiments, two emissions models were developed: (1) a mass balance on VOC concentration in the room, and (2) a mass balance on the amount of toner and dispersant used per copy. Room ventilation rate was determined to be approximately 1.5 air exchanges per hour. Photocopier emission rates were measured to be from 2 g/min to 9 g/min based on VOC concentration in the room, and were calculated to be 5.4 g/min based on toner and dispersant consumption. These high emission rates of potentially harmful VOCs indicate a need for implementation of measures to protect the health of those utilizing wet toner photocopy machines on a regular basis.

  12. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    PubMed

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground. PMID:21376441

  13. Source apportionment of ambient VOCs in Delhi City.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anjali; Sengupta, B; Dutta, S A

    2005-05-01

    Source apportionment using chemical mass balance (CMB) model was carried using a data set of 360 four hourly samples collected at 15 locations of five categories namely residential, commercial, industrial, traffic intersections and petrol pumps during August 2001-July 2002 in Delhi. The results indicate that emissions from diesel internal combustion engines dominate in Delhi. Vehicular exhaust and evaporative emissions also contribute significantly to VOCs in ambient air. Emission of VOCs associated with sewage sludge was also found to contribute to VOCs in Delhi's air. This points to the fact that open defecation and leaking sewage manholes are a problem in all categories of locations. PMID:15862846

  14. Source apportionment of ambient VOCS in Mumbai city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anjali

    Air pollution kills almost half a million Asians every year. Most of this pollution is emitted from buses, trucks, motorcycles and other forms of transport. As Asia's cities continue to expand, the rising number of vehicles has resulted in even greater pollution. Amongst the measures available to control, vehicular emission was engine modification, catalytic converters and fuel modifications. Some of these have led to emissions of some hazardous air pollutants (HAP) like volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOC emission is an area needing attention in air quality management. This paper discusses a study on VOC concentration at major sources like traffic junction, residential area, commercial areas, industrial areas and petrol pumps in Mumbai city. CMB8 Model has been used to apportion VOCs in Mumbai city. It was observed that evaporative emissions dominate in Mumbai. In order to control VOCs in air the management strategy should thus focus on cost effective vapor recovery systems at refueling stations and in vehicles. Effective inspection and maintenance programme can reduce evaporative and exhaust VOC emissions. Modifying certain fuel parameters, like reducing benzene content in petrol will as well reduce VOC content in air. The benzene content in petrol was 3% in the year 2001 in Mumbai. Adulteration also results in high levels of VOCs in air.

  15. Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric; Lootah, Nadia

    The gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system has been used to identify major volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sources in the UAE (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E). VOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the VOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. UAE is located at the edge of the Persian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in neighbouring Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Iran. VOCs emerging from these industries can be transported to the UAE with jet streams. The analysis of the collected air samples at three locations in Sharjah, UAE during the autumn and winter seasons indicates the presence of more than 100 VOC species. The concentrations of these species vary in magnitudes but the most prominent are: acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. The possible tracers for various emission sources have also been identified such as 2-methylpentane, 1, 3-butadiene and 2, 2-dimethlybutane for vehicle exhaust, the light hydrocarbons, namely n-butane, trans-2-butene, and n-pentane for gasoline vapor, and n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane for diesel vapor and asphalt application processes. As various emission sources are characterized by overlapping VOC species, the ratio of possible VOC tracers are used to quantify the contribution of different sources. Our aim in this paper is to explore and discuss possible impacts of transported emissions on the local VOC emission inventory from various sources for the UAE. This work is partially supported by Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at the American University of Sharjah, U.A.E.

  16. A model for predicting VOC emission from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are precursors to ground-level ozone. Measurements show that environmental conditions and silage properties influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage to V...

  17. VOC emissions from beech, birch, and oak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, J.; Folkers, A.; Koch, N.; Kleist, E.

    2003-04-01

    VOC emissions from beech (Fagus sylvatica), birch (Betula pendula), and oak (Quercus robur) were studied in continuously stirred tank reactors. Oak emitted nearly exclusively isoprene. The dependence of these isoprene emissions on temperature and photosynthetic radiation (PAR) could quite well be described with existing algorithms and the emission factors were fairly constant. Beech and birch emitted mainly short chained oxygenated VOC and monoterpenes. Temperature and PAR dependence of monoterpene emissions were superimposed by a slow frequency modulation. Hence, descriptions of these emissions with existing algorithms were not successful. Moreover, in some cases the emission pattern switched drastically. For birch it was observed that the plant switched from a sesquiterpene emitter to a monoterpene emitter. emission pattern plants. Emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and methanol were not affected by PAR. Here, the emission factors are determined by other factors not included in existing algorithms.

  18. GAS-PHASE MASS TRANSFER MODEL FOR PREDICTING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) EMISSION RATES FROM INDOOR POLLUTANT SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of the impact of sources on indoor pollutant concentrations and occupant exposure to indoor pollutants requires knowledge of the emission rates from the sources. Emission rates are often determined by chamber testing and the data from the chamber test are fitted to an em...

  19. Hot stuff controls for VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yewshenko, P.

    1995-12-01

    For close to three decades, American industry has paved the way and led the world in controlling volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. As more and more systems have been installed, the history of operation for the various types of systems has broadened dramatically, spurring significant technological advances, the traditional technologies and those on the cutting edge of VOC control. With the number of technologies available, the environmental professional may have a difficult task choosing the most strategic environmental solution. The conventional, traditional or proven methodology for VOC control has been incineration. Other technologies have been used for very specific applications. In deciding the specific type of incineration system to select, the environmental professional will look at a broad spectrum of evaluation factors. These include initial system cost, operational cost, maintenance requirements, reliability factors and most importantly, the projected success of achieving 99% VOC destruction efficiency. This article provides an overview of the basic differences among incineration technologies.

  20. Alternative control technology document: Control of VOC emissions from the application of agricultural pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    In many States, some of the ozone nonattainment areas are comprised primarily of agricultural counties where a potentially significant contribution to the ozone may result from area sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) emissions. A potential source of VOC emissions in agricultural counties is the release of organic compounds from the application of agricultural pesticides. The report provides technical information that State and local agencies can consider while developing strategies for reducing VOC emissions.

  1. Modeling the Effects of VOC and NOx Emission Sources on Ozone Formation in Houston during the TexAQS 2000 Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Guangfeng; Fast, Jerome D.

    2004-09-01

    A meteorological and chemical modeling system is used to determine the effect of ethene and propene point source emission rates on the magnitude and distribution of ozone in the vicinity of Houston. The model performance is evaluated using surface and airborne meteorological and chemical measurements made as part of the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. A simulation that employed the reported mobile, area, biogenic, and point source emissions produced ozone mixing ratios as high as 120 ppb and distributions of nitrogen oxides that were similar to measurements at most locations, but the model underestimated ozone mixing ratios greater than 140 ppb that were located just downwind of petrochemical facilities. When the point source emission rates of ethene and propene were increased by a factor of 10, the simulated peak ozone levels were in better agreement with surface, aircraft, and lidar observations. The magnitude of the simulated ethene and olefin concentrations were in better agreement with canister samples aloft as well; however, there was still a large amount of scatter in the results. While the highest ozone mixing ratios were produced just downwind of large point source emissions of VOCs, sensitivity simulations also showed that reductions in anthropogenic emissions of NOx would be needed to reduce ozone mixing ratios over a larger area.

  2. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  3. NEW BIOGENIC VOC EMISSIONS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We intend to develop new prognostic models for the prediction of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from forest ecosystems in the face of possible future changes in the climate and the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. These models will b...

  4. Wind tunnels vs. flux chambers: Area source emission measurements and the necessity for VOC and odour correction factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odour, and ammonia (NH3) with little regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. As a result, flux measurements have been highly variable and scientists have been in disagreement as to the better...

  5. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  6. Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

  7. Novel aqueous foams for suppressing VOC emission.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pankaj S; Mohanty, Kishore K

    2004-05-01

    Reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from crude oil/gasoline distribution and storage facilities is important in controlling environmental pollution and enhancing workplace safety. Stable aqueous foam formulations are developed to provide a mass transfer barrier to the emission of VOCs during loading of gasoline. Experiments are carried out in a bench-scale foam cell using liquid hexane as oil. The foam columns of 32 cm in height were able to suppress the plateau concentration of hexane vapors in the effluent by 87% under experimental conditions tested. Vapor suppression increased with foam height but was almost insensitive to liquid viscosity. These experiments are then upscaled from bench-scale to a vessel having an exposed surface area of roughly 2 orders of magnitude higher. Gasoline is used as oil in the upscaled experiments, and the concentrations of volatile hydrocarbons in the effluent are measured during oil loading. A 40-cm-thick foam column is found to reduce the emissions by 96% for foams prepared with deionized water and by 93.8% for foams prepared with 3.5 wt % NaCl brine for 10 h of oil loading. PMID:15180071

  8. Biogenic VOC emissions from fresh leaf mulch and wood chips of Grevillea robusta (Australian Silky Oak)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Rosemary; Galbally, Ian E.; Porter, Nichola; Weeks, Ian A.

    The emissions of VOC from freshly cut and shredded Grevillea robusta (Australian Silky Oak) leaves and wood have been measured. The VOC emissions from fresh leaf mulch and wood chips lasted typically for 30 and 20 h respectively, and consisted primarily of ethanol, ( E)-2-hexenal, ( Z)-3-hexen-1-ol and acetaldehyde. The integrated emissions of the VOCs were 0.38±0.04 g kg -1 from leaf mulch, and 0.022±0.003 g kg -1 from wood chips. These emissions represent a source of VOCs in urban and rural air that has previously been unquantified and is currently unaccounted for. These VOCs from leaf mulch and wood chips will contribute to both urban photochemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation. Any CH 4 emissions from leaf mulch and wood chips were <1×10 -11 g g dry mass -1 s -1.

  9. VOC signatures from North American oil and gas sources (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Marrero, J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Hartt, G.; Meinardi, S.; Schroeder, J.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008 and 2013 UC Irvine has used its whole air sampling (WAS) technique to investigate VOC source signatures from a range of oil and gas sources in North America, including five separate field campaigns at the Alberta oil sands (1 airborne, 4 ground-based); the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill (airborne and ship-based); the 2012 airborne Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) mission over oil and gas wells in Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma; and the 2013 ground-based Barnett Shale Campaign in Texas. Each campaign has characterized more than 80 individual C1-C10 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes and aromatics. For example, oil sands are an extra-heavy, unconventional crude oil that is blended with diluent in order to flow, and upgraded into synthetic crude oil. The VOC signature at the oil sands mining and upgrading facilities is alkane-rich, and the fuel gas associated with these operations has an i-butane/n-butane ratio similar to that of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In addition to light alkanes, enhanced levels of benzene were observed over US oil and natural gas wells during DC3, likely because of its use in hydrofracking fluid. A series of VOC emission ratios from North American petrochemical sources will be presented and compared, including oil sands, conventional oil and hydrofracking operations.

  10. Study of the effect of biogenic VOC emissions on regional ozone production and the implications for VOC or NO{sub x} control

    SciTech Connect

    Stockwell, W.R.; Kuhn, M.

    1998-12-31

    A key question for the development of air pollution control strategies is whether to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Significant levels of biogenic VOC emissions may greatly limit the effectiveness of VOC control strategies. Concerns have been raised because for many cities it has been suggested that biogenic emissions are a dominate source of VOCs. Biogenic emissions would be expected to contribute an even larger fraction of the VOC emissions on the regional scale than within urban areas. The authors used a new atmospheric chemistry mechanism, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), to perform ozone reactivity calculations to investigate the effects of biogenic emissions on the production of photooxidants in the atmosphere. The results show that incremental reactivity of isoprene is about the same as xylene and that the incremental reactivities of d-limonene and a-pinene are near those of toluene.

  11. Odorous VOC emission following land application of swine manure slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, David B.; Gilley, John; Woodbury, Bryan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Galvin, Geordie; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Li, Xu; Snow, Daniel D.

    2013-02-01

    Swine manure is often applied to crop land as a fertilizer source. Odor emissions from land-applied swine manure may pose a nuisance to downwind populations if manure is not applied with sufficient forethought. A research project was conducted to assess the time decay of odorous volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions following land application of swine manure. Three land application methods were compared: surface application, incorporation 24 h after surface application, and injection. Emission rates were measured in field plots using a small wind tunnel and sorbent tubes. VOCs including eight volatile fatty acids, five aromatics, and two sulfur-containing compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In most cases, a first order exponential decay model adequately described the flux versus time relationship for the 24 h period following land application, but the model sometimes overestimated flux in the 6-24 h range. The same model but with the time term squared adequately predicted flux over the entire 24 h period. Three compounds (4-methylphenol, skatole, and 4-ethylphenol) accounted for 93 percent of the summed odor activity value. First order decay constants (k) for these three compounds ranged from 0.157 to 0.996 h-1. When compared to surface application, injection of swine manure resulted in 80-95 percent lower flux for the most odorous aromatic compounds. These results show that VOC flux decreases rapidly following land application of swine manure, declining below levels of detection and near background levels after 4 to 8 h.

  12. Odorous VOC emission decay following land application of swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A research project was conducted to determine how VOC emissions degrade with time after land application of swine manure slurry, and to determine how VOC emissions are affected by land application method (surface application vs. injection). Swine slurry from a pull-plug barn was applied to researc...

  13. Characterization and measurement of VOC emissions from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing concern in the U.S. regarding the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from farms and their contribution to smog formation near ozone non-attainment areas. The few studies that have measured VOC emissions have identified mixed feed and the exposed silage face as major farm ...

  14. Pilot and Full Scale Measurements of VOC Emissions from Lumber Drying of Inland Northwest Species

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Lamb, Brian K.; Westberg, Halvor; Folk, Richard; Knighton, B; Grimsrud, E

    2004-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are precursors to ground level ozone. Ground level ozone is the major component of photochemical smog, and has been linked to a variety of adverse health effects. These health effects include cancer, heart disease, pneumonia and death. In order to reduce ground level ozone, VOC emissions are being more stringently regulated. One VOC source that may come under regulation is lumber drying. Drying lumber is known to emit VOC into the atmosphere. This research evaluates the validity of VOC emission measurements from a small-scale kiln to approximate VOC emissions from kilns at commercial mills. We also report emission factors for three lumber species commonly harvested in the northwest United States (Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, & grand fir). This work was done with a novel tracer ratio technique at a small laboratory kiln and a large commercial lumber drying facility. The measured emission factors were 0.51 g/kgOD for Douglas-fir, 0.7 g/kgOD for ponderosa pine, and 0.15 g/kgOD for grand fir. Aldehyde emission rates from lumber drying were also measured in some experiments. Results indicate that aldehyde emissions can constitute a significant percentage of the total VOC emissions.

  15. EVALUATION OF VOC (VOLATILE CARBON) EMISSIONS FROM WASTEWATER SYSTEMS (SECONDARY EMISSIONS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical objective of this project was to obtain data for evaluating volatile carbon (VOC) emissions from wastewater treatment facilities for the synthetic organic chemicals manufacturing industry (SOCMI). VOC emissions data were obtained using the Concentration-Profile tech...

  16. Quantification of Methane and VOC Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Two Basins with High Ozone Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edie, R.; Robertson, A.; Snare, D.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2005, the Uintah Basin of Utah and the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming frequently exceeded the EPA 8-hour allowable ozone level of 75 ppb, spurring interest in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during oil and gas production. Debate continues over which stage of production (drilling, flowback, normal production, transmission, etc.) is the most prevalent VOC source. In this study, we quantify emissions from normal production on well pads by using the EPA-developed Other Test Method 33a. This methodology combines ground-based measurements of fugitive emissions with 3-D wind data to calculate the methane and VOC emission fluxes from a point source. VOC fluxes are traditionally estimated by gathering a canister of air during a methane flux measurement. The methane:VOC ratio of this canister is determined at a later time in the laboratory, and applied to the known methane flux. The University of Wyoming Mobile Laboratory platform is equipped with a Picarro methane analyzer and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer, which provide real-time methane and VOC data for each well pad. This independent measurement of methane and VOCs in situ reveals multiple emission sources on one well pad, with varying methane:VOC ratios. Well pad emission estimates of methane, benzene, toluene and xylene for the two basins will be presented. The different emission source VOC profiles and the limitations of real-time and traditional VOC measurement methods will also be discussed.

  17. Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Faulkner, D.; Sullivan, D.P.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Russell, M.L.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13-week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings.

  18. SUBSTRATE EFFECTS ON VOC EMISSIONS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of two substrates -- a stainless steel plate and a gypsum board -- on the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a latex paint were evaluated by environmental chamber tests. It was found that the amount of VOCs emitted from the painted stainless steel was 2 to...

  19. VOC EMISSIONS FROM AN AIR FRESHENER IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes results of tests, conducted in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) large chamber facility, that investigated emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from one electrical plug-in type air freshener with pine-scented refills. VOCs were measured ...

  20. [Process-based Emission Characteristics of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Paint Industry in the Yangtze River Delta, China].

    PubMed

    Mo, Zi-wei; Niu, He; Lu, Si-hua; Shao, Min; Gou, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission characteristics from solvent usage industry is essential to reduce PM2.5 and O3 in Yangtze River Delta region. In this work, VOCs source characteristics of ship container, shipbuilding, wood, and automobile painting industry were measured using canister-GC-MS/FID analysis system. The results showed that VOCs emitted from these industrial sectors were mainly aromatics, such as toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene, accounting for 79%-99% of total VOCs. The VOCs treatment facilities of activated carbon adsorption had little impact on changing the composition patterns of VOCs, while catalytic combustion treatments produced more alkenes. The combustion treatment of VOCs changed the maximum increment reactivity (MIR) of the VOCs emissions, and was thus very likely to change the ozone formation potentials. PMID:26387293

  1. Projection of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions in China for the period 2010-2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2011-12-01

    The future (2010-2020) anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions in China were projected in this study using 2005 as the reference year. The projections are based on the assumptions of a lower population growth rate (less than 1%), continuous economic development with high GDP growth, and increased urbanization. The results show that the national VOCs emissions would continuously increase from 19.4 Tg in 2005 to 25.9 Tg in 2020, even if China's legislative standards for VOCs emissions are implemented effectively in the future (assumed as control scenario I). The contributions of various emission sources were found to differ greatly in the period of 2010-2020. Solvent utilization would become the largest contributor rising from 22% to 37%, along with an increase for industrial processes from 17% to 24%. However, road vehicle emissions would rapidly decrease from 25% to 11% due to the strict VOCs emission limit standards in China, along with the decrease for stationary fuel combustion from 23% to 16% caused by the reduction of domestic biofuel consumption. Additionally, there would be a notable divergence among provincial emissions. The developed eastern and coastal regions would emit more VOCs than the relatively underdeveloped western and inland regions. Moreover, this divergence grows in the future. When we assumed stricter control measures for solvent utilization and industrial processes (control scenario II) for that period, the projections revealed national VOCs emissions per year would remain at about 20 Tg, if exhaust after-treatment systems are installed in newly-built factories (after 2005) for the most important industrial sources, and the market shares of "low/zero-VOCs" products in paints, adhesives and printing ink raise to the present levels of developed countries. The emission abatements of the two types of measures were estimated to be similar. While scenario II indicates that the sectoral and provincial differences of VOCs emissions

  2. VOC from Vehicular Evaporation Emissions: Status and Control Strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Man, Hanyang; Tschantz, Michael; Wu, Ye; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2015-12-15

    Vehicular evaporative emissions is an important source of volatile organic carbon (VOC), however, accurate estimation of emission amounts and scientific evaluation of control strategy for these emissions have been neglected outside of the United States. This study provides four kinds of basic emission factors: diurnal, hot soak, permeation, and refueling. Evaporative emissions from the Euro 4 vehicles (1.6 kg/year/car) are about four times those of U.S. vehicles (0.4 kg/year/car). Closing this emissions gap would have a larger impact than the progression from Euro 3 to Euro 6 tailpipe HC emission controls. Even in the first 24 h of parking, China's current reliance upon the European 24 h diurnal standard results in 508 g/vehicle/year emissions, higher than 32 g/vehicle/year from Tier 2 vehicles. The U.S. driving cycle matches Beijing real-world conditions much better on both typical trip length and average speed than current European driving cycles. At least two requirements should be added to the Chinese emissions standards: an onboard refueling vapor recovery to force the canister to be sized sufficiently large, and a 48-h evaporation test requirement to ensure that adequate purging occurs over a shorter drive sequence. PMID:26599318

  3. Ambient VOC Concentration and Emission Measurements during the MCMA 2002 and 2003 Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. K.; Velasco, E.; Allwine, E.; Pressley, S.; Westberg, H.; Knighton, B.; Rogers, T.; Grimsrud, E.; Jobson, T.; Alexander, M.; Prazeller, P.; Volkamer, R.; de Foy, B.; Molina, L.; Molina, M.; Grutter, M.; Bueno, E.; Blanco, S.; Wohrnschimmel, H.; Cardenas, B.; Arriaga, J. L.; Limon, M. T.; Escalona, S.; Iglesias, G. S.; Doskey, P.; Gaffney, J.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the MCMA 2002 and 2003 field campaigns in Mexico City, ambient VOC samples were collected from airshed boundary sites, central urban core sites and downwind urban receptor sites. Samples were also obtained during mobile vehicle chase operations designed to obtain data on direct vehicle emissions. During MCMA 2003, additional VOC data were collected including open, long path measurements at the Cenica and La Merced sites, direct eddy covariance flux measurements at Cenica, other canister and cartridge samples collected at La Merced and balloon profiles collected at Cenica. In addition, an automated continuous VOC sampling and analysis system was operated at Cenica. Collectively, the VOC data are consistent with previous measurements that show significantly higher levels of light alkanes compared to US cities. The levels of most other VOCs are also elevated compared to the median for US cities. Examination of the VOC data in terms of lumped VOC classes and suggests that some, but not all, classes are underestimated in the emission inventory by factors of 2 to 3. The use of ratios of individual VOC is useful for examining the effects of chemistry or nearby sources on measured VOC levels. Comparison of PTR-MS results with GC/FID data showed very good agreement for a number of aromatics, and the PTR-MS data for oxygenated VOC suggests that oxygenated VOC contribute an additional 20% to the overall VOC burden. The use of a fast olefin sensor (FOS) for continuous measurement of olefin concentrations was demonstrated, but only half of the FOS signal could be accounted for in terms of olefins identified from canister samples.

  4. Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

    2013-06-01

    A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM FIBERGLASS BOAT MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an assessment of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from fiberglass boat manufacturing. escription of the industry structure is presented, including estimates of the number of facilities, their size, and geographic distribution. he fiberglass boat manuf...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM FIBERGLASS BOAT MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an assessment of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from fiberglass boat manufacturing. Description of the industry structure is presented, including estimates of the number of facilities, their size, and geographic distribution. The fiberglass boat m...

  7. Simulation Chamber Investigations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Boreal Tree Emissions: Dependence on VOC Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Hohaus, T.; Mensah, A.; Spindler, C.; Tillmann, R.; Uerlings, R.; Dal Maso, M.; Rudich, Y.; Juergen, W.

    2008-12-01

    A considerable fraction of the organic aerosol component is of secondary origin, meaning it is formed through oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Plant emissions, e.g. monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, are a major source of VOCs in the troposphere. So far most laboratory and simulation chamber investigations on the potential to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from plant emissions focused on single VOCs such as a-pinene. In this study we investigated the formation and growth of SOA by ozonolysis and/or photo-oxidation of the VOCs emitted by several tree species such as spruce, pine and birch. The experiments were performed in the Plant chamber of the ICG-3 in Jülich under well defined conditions for the plant. VOC emissions were transferred to a reaction chamber which was operated as a continuously stirred tank reactor. SOA formation from the VOCs was initiated by an excess of ozone and OH radicals. The results are compared to a reference study with a-pinene as the only SOA precursor. Our results indicate that the general laboratory approach of studying the formation of SOA from single components can lead to a bias in both the mass yields and the mass spectral signatures observed. Plots of maximum SOA volumes versus the total amount of carbon fed into the reaction chamber led to approximately linear relationships. The intercepts of these plots were seen as threshold for SOA formation. It was observed that this threshold was lower for the mixture of VOCs emitted from spruce, pine, and birch than for a-pinene as single compound. We therefore conclude that the threshold for SOA formation from real plant mixtures may be much lower than the threshold obtained from laboratory experiments that were focussed on single VOCs. SOA formation from stress induced VOCs will be compared to non stress induced emissions. Possible feedbacks of climate change to VOC emissions and aerosol formation will be discussed based on our experimental observations.

  8. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Watson, J.J.; Jones, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. It includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds that possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The inventory shows total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of about 110,000 Gg/yr, about 10% lower than global VOC inventories developed by other researchers. The study identifies the U.S. as the largest emitter (21% of the total global VOC), followed by the USSR, China, India, and Japan. Globally, fuel wood combustion and savanna burning were among the largest VOC emission sources, accounting for over 35% of the total global VOC emissions. The production and use of gasoline, refuse disposal activities, and organic chemical and rubber manufacturing were also found to be significant sources of global VOC emissions.

  9. Contribution of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles toward total VOC emissions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The features of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles were examined. One potential source of evaporative emissions is mainly the so-called sigh of a fuel tank, which is a function of the daily temperature change and the volume not occupied by fuel. A theoretical equation was proposed for estimating the fuel vapor generation. It reproduced observed features well but underestimated the absolute values obtained in the experimental results. The widely used semi-empirical Reddy equation overestimates the results. The performance of a carbon canister was also evaluated. More than 95% of fuel vapor generation was trapped by the carbon canister. However, the canister worked for only one day because it adsorbed more VOC than that contained in the sigh alone. To estimate the evaporative emissions in the real world, the fuel tank temperature change while a car was parked in an outside car park was monitored and was found to be almost the same as the change in ambient air temperature; no other weather conditions had any effect. According to the findings in this study and data on frequency of car use, the annual amount of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles in Japan was estimated to be 4.6% of the total VOC emissions in Japan, making it the 6th-highest source of VOC. PMID:23422493

  10. Putting VOC Measurements During SOAS 2013 in Context of Historical Observations: How Have VOC Emissions in the Alabama Region Changed Since the SOS 1990 Study?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, K. F.; Koss, A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in atmospheric photochemistry. They react with atmospheric oxidants to form ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). VOCs are emitted from a variety of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. The Southeastern United States (SEUS) is heavily forested with high biogenic VOCs emissions. There are many anthropogenic air pollution sources in the region, including urban centers and power plants. This makes the SEUS an ideal location to study the chemistry of biogenic VOCs in the presence of anthropogenic emissions. The SEUS has hosted several large atmospheric chemistry field campaigns. The Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) took place in a forested site near Centerville, AL from June 1st to July 15th, 2013. SOAS included a comprehensive suite of instruments measuring VOCs, oxidants, aerosol properties and meteorology. During the campaign, in-situ gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to measure VOCs at the SOAS Centreville ground site. We put these VOC measurements in perspective of measurements from previous campaigns in the SEUS including the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS) campaign in the 1990s as well as measurements during June and July 1990 in a loblolly pine plantation in western Alabama as part of the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment program. We analyze how VOC levels vary within the region and how regional photochemistry has changed in recent decades.

  11. EVALUATION OF MAINTENANCE FOR FUGITIVE VOC EMISSIONS CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) has the responsibility for formulating regulations for the control of fugitive emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC). 'Fugitive emissions' generally refers to the diffuse release of vaporized hydrocarbon or...

  12. Estimation of Biogenic VOC Emissions From Ecosystems in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemankova, K.; Brechler, J.

    2008-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are one of the crucial elements in photochemical reactions in the atmosphere which lead to tropospheric ozone formation. While modelling concentration of low-level ozone proper information about VOC sources and sinks is necessary. VOC are emitted into the atmosphere both from anthropogenic and natural sources. It has been shown in previous studies (e.g. Simpson et al, 1995) that contribution of volatile organic compounds emitted from biogenic sources to total amount of VOC in the atmosphere can be significant. Our work focuses on estimation of VOC emissions from natural ecosystems, most importantly from forests, and its application in photochemical modelling. Preliminary results have shown that inclusion of biogenic emissions in model input data leads to improvement of resulting ozone concentration which encouraged us to work on detailed biogenic VOC emission estimation. Using grid of 1x1km CORINE Land Cover over the area of the Czech Republic, emissions from deciduous, coniferous and mixed forests were estimated aplying the algorithm of Guenther et al., 1995. According to data from Forest Management Institute each cell of model grid has been assigned a proportional composition of each of thirteen tree species which are the the main forest constituents in the Czech Republic. Aggregating data of tree species composition with land cover category emission factor of particular chemical compound (isoprene, monoterpenes) has been obtained for each cell. Annual emissions of VOC on hourly basis have been calculated for domain of the Czech Republic. Biogenic emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes were compared with the emission inventory of anthropogenic sources. The inventory is provided by Czech Hydrometeorological Institute and covers emissions from major stationary sources, area sources (including domestic heating) and mobile sources. Our results show that natural emissions are approximately half the amount of organic compounds emitted

  13. VOC Source and Inflow Characterization during the Deep Convective Cloud and Chemistry (DC3) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, N. J.; Hartt, G.; Barletta, B.; Simpson, I. J.; Schroeder, J.; Hung, Y.; Marrero, J.; Gartner, A.; Hirsch, C.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Zhang, Y.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Campos, T. L.; Emmons, L. K.

    2013-12-01

    More than 50 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign, which was based out of Salina, KS May 10 - June 30, 2012. DC3 investigated the impact of deep, mid-latitude continental convective clouds on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. The UCI Whole Air Sampler (WAS) measured VOCs on board the NASA DC-8 aircraft and the NCAR Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA) measured VOCs on board the NSF GV. Coordinated flights between the two aircraft produced a rich dataset with which to characterize the inflow and outflow of convective events. While probing storm inflow, numerous natural and anthropogenic sources were encountered, including oil and gas wells in Colorado, Texas, and Oklahoma, biomass burning, biogenic VOC emissions, and other anthropogenic sources (urban, feedlots, etc). The significant and widespread influence of oil and gas activities dominated VOC alkane distributions during DC3, in both inflow and outflow, effectively illustrating the connection between emission and fast vertical transport of VOCs into the free troposphere. We present a mass balance analysis of a flight over TX and OK, which allowed us to estimate oil and gas emissions in that region. The results from this analysis will be compared to previous work in the same area, as well as to emissions from other oil and gas regions and to model simulations from the Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-chem).

  14. Detection and quantification of methane and VOC emissions from oil and gas production operations using remote measurements, Interim report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved understanding of air pollutant emissions from oil and gas production operations is needed. With a steadily increasing number of production sources, the impact of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on regional ozone is potentially significant. As the separation dis...

  15. Contribution of traffic emissions to indoor airborne VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    The contribution of nearby vehicle traffic to indoor airborne volatile organic compound levels and to personal exposures was examined to determine the importance of this source. Indoor and outdoor levels of selected VOCs, aldehydes, ketones, and ethanol were measured at 10 homes in Toronto, on sidewalks near the traffic source, indoors and in the backyards or balconies of apartments (outdoors). Concurrently, air exchange rates were measured at each home with a perfluorocarbon tracer method. All the residences were within 1 km of urban intersections with traffic counts of more than 20,000 vehicles per day. Average concentrations of hexane, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, benzene and propionaldehyde decreased in the order: street level > indoor > outdoor. These compounds occur in vehicle emissions, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 24 to 88 % suggesting that traffic emissions contributed to indoor pollutant level through the process of air exchange. For other compounds different trends were observed. Indoors concentrations were greater than outdoors for ethylacetate, tetrachlorethane, pinene, limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and ethanol, for example. These compounds are common in consumer products, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 2 to 44%. The differences in street and backyard (outdoor) concentrations for some compounds were large due to the presence of nearby vehicles at street level sampling sites, indicating that the impact of traffic on human exposures (pedestrians on sidewalks and occupants of vehicles) is potentially large, compared to the impact of general background urban air pollutants.

  16. Chamber assessment of formaldehyde and VOC emissions from wood-based panels.

    PubMed

    Brown, S K

    1999-09-01

    Volatile organic emissions from particleboard, medium density fibreboard (MDF) and office furniture have been measured in dynamic environmental chambers, both small and room-sized. Characterisation of product emission properties in small chambers was possible when inter- and intra-sheet variations were considered. Formaldehyde emission factors for all products were approximately double European low-emission specifications and did not decay to the latter for several months. Long-term emission behaviour could not be predicted from short-term measurements. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions were low for the MDF product, higher for particleboard, and highest for laminated office furniture. The compounds emitted differed from those reported in other countries. VOC emissions from the sheet products decreased more quickly than formaldehyde, reaching low levels within two weeks, except for MDF which was found to become a low-level source of hexanal after several months. PMID:10439559

  17. VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) FUGITIVE EMISSION PREDICTIVE MODEL - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a mathematical model that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of various leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs on controlling volatile organic compound (VOC) fugitive emissions from chemical, petroleum, and other process units. The report also descr...

  18. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  19. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  20. SOURCES OF AIR POLLUTANTS INDOORS: VOC AND FINE PARTICULATE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The average concentrations of a large number of fine particle aerosol and VOC species measured in ten Boise ID residences in wintertime have been apportioned according to their contributions from all inside sources and all outside sources, regarded as two composite source categor...

  1. [Emission Characteristics of VOCs from Typical Restaurants in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Cui, Tong; Cheng, Jing-chen; He, Wan-qing; Ren, Pei-fang; Nie, Lei; Xu, Dong-yao; Pan, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Using the EPA method, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) , sampled from barbecue, Chinese and Western fast-food, Sichuan cuisine and Zhejiang cuisine restaurants in Beijing was investigated. VOCs concentrations and components from different cuisines were studied. The results indicated that based on the calibrated baseline ventilation volume, the VOCs emission level from barbecue was the highest, reaching 12.22 mg · m(-3), while those from fast-food of either Chinese or Western, Sichuan cuisine and Zhejiang cuisine were about 4 mg · m(-3). The components of VOCs from barbecue were different from those in the other cuisines, which were mainly propylene, 1-butene, n-butane, etc. The non-barbecue cuisines consisted of high concentration of alcohols, and Western fast-food contained relatively high proportion of aldehydes and ketones organic compounds. According to emission concentration of baseline ventilation volume, barbecue released more pollutants than the non-barbecue cuisines at the same scale. So, barbecue should be supervised and controlled with the top priority. PMID:26314095

  2. A refined 2010-based VOC emission inventory and its improvement on modeling regional ozone in the Pearl River Delta Region, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shasha; Zheng, Junyu; Lu, Qing; Yuan, Zibing; Huang, Zhijiong; Zhong, Liuju; Lin, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Accurate and gridded VOC emission inventories are important for improving regional air quality model performance. In this study, a four-level VOC emission source categorization system was proposed. A 2010-based gridded Pearl River Delta (PRD) regional VOC emission inventory was developed with more comprehensive source coverage, latest emission factors, and updated activity data. The total anthropogenic VOC emission was estimated to be about 117.4 × 10(4)t, in which on-road mobile source shared the largest contribution, followed by industrial solvent use and industrial processes sources. Among the industrial solvent use source, furniture manufacturing and shoemaking were major VOC emission contributors. The spatial surrogates of VOC emission were updated for major VOC sources such as industrial sectors and gas stations. Subsector-based temporal characteristics were investigated and their temporal variations were characterized. The impacts of updated VOC emission estimates and spatial surrogates were evaluated by modeling O₃ concentration in the PRD region in the July and October of 2010, respectively. The results indicated that both updated emission estimates and spatial allocations can effectively reduce model bias on O₃ simulation. Further efforts should be made on the refinement of source classification, comprehensive collection of activity data, and spatial-temporal surrogates in order to reduce uncertainty in emission inventory and improve model performance. PMID:25687669

  3. VOC emission into the atmosphere by trees and leaf litter in Polish forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorov, V.; Smolewska, M.; Tyszkiewicz, Z.

    2009-04-01

    It is generally recognized at present that the vegetation of continents is the principal source of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the atmosphere. The upper limit of the evaluation of global phytogenic VOC is 1100-1500 Tg/yr (Isidorov, 1990; Guenther et al., 1995). Although these global evaluations showing the place of phytogenic emission among of other VOC sources are important, evaluations for individual countries are also very important. This poster represents the results of the estimation of VOC emission from Polish forests. Calculations took into account the composition and age of forests. According to our estimation, the total VOC emission by the arboreal vegetation differs from 190 to 750 kt/yr, depending of weather conditions in different years. There are only few studies conducted on decaying plant material as a source of atmospheric VOCs, but still they are able to give evidence of the importance of this source. For Polish forests, the litter mass is estimated to be (16-19)106 t/yr. These organic materials undergo decomposition by mesofauna and microorganisms. In these processes volatile organic compounds (VOC) stored in the litter and secondary metabolites of litter-destroying fungi are emitted into the atmosphere. The scale of the phenomenon makes leaf litter an important VOC source in the atmosphere. The filling of numerous gaps in researches of VOC emissions from decomposing leaf litter demands carrying out of long term field experiments in various climatic conditions. In this communication we report also the results of 3.5-year experiment on qualitative and quantitative GC-MS investigations of VOC emitted into the gas phase from leaves litter of some species of deciduous and coniferous trees of Polish forests. Apart from terpenes and their oxygenated derivatives, which are usual in plant tissues, leaf litter intensively emits vast amounts of lower alcohols and carbonyl compounds. We suppose that these volatile substances are products

  4. Determination of Summertime VOC Emission Rates from Produced Water Ponds in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Woods, C.; Lyman, S.

    2013-12-01

    The observance of excess ozone concentrations in Utah's Uintah Basin over past several years has prompted several investigations into the extent and causes of the elevated ozone. Among these is the assessment of potential emissions of reactive VOCs. Evaporation ponds, used a remediation technique for treatment of contaminated production and other waters, are one potential source of significant VOC emissions and is estimated that there are around 160 such ponds within the Uintah Basin's oil and gas production areas. In June 2012 VOC emission rates for several reactive VOCs were derived for an evaporation facility consisting of a small inlet pond (≈0.03 acres) and two larger, serial ponds (≈4.3 acres each). The emission rates were determined over three sampling periods using an inverse modeling approach. Under this methodology, ambient VOC concentrations are determined at several downwind locations through whole-air collection into SUMMA canisters, followed by GC/MS quantification and compared with predicted concentrations using an EPA-approved dispersion model, AERMOD. The presumed emission rates used within the model were then adjusted until the modeled concentrations approach the observed concentrations. The derived emission rates for the individual VOCs were on the order of 10-3 g/s/m2 from the inlet pond and 10-6 g/s/m2 from the larger ponds. The emissions from the 1st pond in series after the inlet pond were about 3-4x the emissions from the 2nd pond. These combined emission rates are about an order of magnitude those reported for a single study in Colorado (Thoma, 2009). It should be noted, however, that the variability about each of the VOC emission rates was significant (often ×100% at the 95% confidence interval). Extrapolating these emission rates to the estimated total areas of all the evaporation ponds within Basin resulted in calculated Basin-wide VOC emissions 292,835 tons/yr. However, Bar-Ilan et al. (2009) estimated 2012 VOC oil and gas related

  5. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  6. Application of microwave energy in the control of DPM, oxides of nitrogen and VOC emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavkar, Sameer M.

    The emissions of DPM (diesel particulate matter), NOx (oxides of nitrogen), and toxic VOCs (volatile organic compounds) from diesel engine exhaust gases and other sources such as chemical process industry and manufacturing industry have been a great environmental and health concern. Most control technologies for these emissions require elevated temperatures. The use of microwave energy as a source of heat energy, however, has not been fully explored. In this study, the microwave energy was used as the energy source in three separate emission control processes, namely, the regeneration of diesel particulate filter (DPF) for DPM control, the NOx reduction using a platinum catalyst, and the VOC destruction involving a ceramic based material. The study has demonstrated that microwave heating is an effective method in providing heat for the studied processes. The control efficiencies associated with the microwave-assisted processes have been observed to be high and acceptable. Further research, however, is required for the commercial use of these technologies.

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... brake HP located at a major source that are meeting the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart ZZZZ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards...

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... brake HP located at a major source that are meeting the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart ZZZZ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards...

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... brake HP located at a major source that are meeting the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart ZZZZ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards...

  10. Preliminary insights into the chemical composition and emissions of urban VOCs in the East Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, S.; Borbon, A.; Afif, C.; Bechara, J.; Leonardis, T.; Fronval, I.; Waked, A.; Brioude, J.; Locoge, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Mediterranean region is an area where polluted air masses coming from Eastern and Central Europe increase air pollution, particularly during stagnation periods, together with intense solar radiation. It was demonstrated that the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea suffers from this kind of phenomena. Favorable weather conditions, remote sources, high urban and biogenic emissions lead to the formation of secondary pollutants (ozone and secondary organic aerosols, SOA), which may have significant impacts on health and climate. However, data are sparse in this region. The ECOCEM (Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the East Mediterranean - Beirut) project aims to improve our understanding of air pollution in this area by studying the composition of the gaseous and particulate phases in Beirut (Lebanon). Beirut is located on the eastern border of the Mediterranean basin. The goal of the project, which is taking place over two intensive field campaigns (July 2011 and February 2012), is to provide valuable observations on the composition and the temporal evolution of organics (summer versus winter),to identify and quantify the relative importance of sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aerosols (SOA) and to study the role of VOCs in the first oxidation steps of SOA formation. For that purpose, a large suite of primary and secondary VOCs (>60) were measured during the summertime campaign (July 2nd to July 17th 2011) at one suburban site in Beirut. Techniques encompass off-line sampling on carbonaceous sorbent tubes (2-hour time resolution) and liquid coil scrubbing (1-hour time resolution), an on-line GCFID (1-hour time resolution) and a PTR-MS (4-min time resolution). We will discuss here the atmospheric composition of VOCs in relation with their emissions. In particular, these data provide useful constraints to evaluate the first temporally and spatially resolved national emission inventory that was built for the year 2010. Preliminary results

  11. Emission and Photochemical Evolution of Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs): from Consumer Products to Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Kacarab, M.; Chen, C. L.; Price, D.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Missing emission sources contribute to potential problems in air quality modeling and human health. Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs) are widely used in consumer products and currently receive VOC exemptions based on their vapor pressure. However, 58.5 TPD LVP-VOC is estimated to emit in 2020 from consumer products in California based on government and industry inventory data. This work investigates the emission and photochemical evolution of major LVP-VOCs in consumer products to demonstrate LVP-VOC impacts on criteria air pollutants. LVP-VOC emission potential is investigated by offline gravimetric and online headspace tracking pure compounds and consumer product mixtures under ambient relevant conditions. Only 3 of the 14 pure LVP-VOCs were found to be atmospherically unavailable. All target LVP-VOCs are observed to evaporate from tested consumer product mixtures. We found improved thermodynamic parameters to predict LVP-VOC evaporation rate. LVP-VOCs photochemical evolution and their impact on ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation are evaluated by integrating SAPRC-11 modeling with laboratory studies in a 90 m3 dual environmental chamber at UC Riverside/CE-CERT. Simultaneous photooxidation experiments, with and without the LVP-VOC, are conducted in the presence of reactive organic gas (ROG) surrogate representing urban chemical smog. Further, LVP-VOC photochemical evolution pathway is investigated under various atmospheric activity (LVP + H2O2, LVP+NO or LVP+H2O2+NO) in the environmental chamber. Gas phase and particle phase mass spectrometers (SIFT-MS, Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrum and HR-ToF-MS, High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol mass Spectrometer) are applied to monitor the evolution of LVP-VOCs in the controlled atmosphere. The potential of LVP-VOC oxidation into ELVOC is also illustrated. We finally interpret the health risk and environmental concern related to LVP-VOC emission and photoxidation.

  12. Estimates of ozone response to various combinations of NO(x) and VOC emission reductions in the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roselle, Shawn J.; Schere, Kenneth L.; Chu, Shao-Hang

    1994-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that controls on NO(x) emissions may be necessary, in addition to existing and future Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) controls, for the abatement of ozone (O3) over portions of the United States. This study compares various combinations of anthropogenic NO(x) and VOC emission reductions through a series of model simulations. A total of 6 simulations were performed with the Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) for a 9-day period in July 1988. Each simulation reduced anthropogenic NO(x) and VOC emissions across-the-board by different amounts. Maximum O3 concentrations for the period were compared between the simulations. Comparison of the simulations suggests that: (1) NO(x) controls may be more effective than VOC controls in reducing peak O3 over most of the eastern United States; (2) VOC controls are most effective in urban areas having large sources of emissions; (3) NO(x) controls may increase O3 near large point sources; and (4) the benefit gained from increasing the amount of VOC controls may lessen as the amount of NO(x) control is increased. This paper has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's peer and administrative review policies and approved for presentation and publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  13. VOCs Emissions from Multiple Wood Pellet Types and Concentrations in Indoor Air

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia; Ashley, William J.; Bregg, Sandar; Walier, Drew; LeBouf, Ryan; Hopke, Philip K.; Rossner, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Wood pellet storage safety is an important aspect for implementing woody biomass as a renewable energy source. When wood pellets are stored indoors in large quantities (tons) in poorly ventilated spaces in buildings, such as in basements, off-gassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can significantly affect indoor air quality. To determine the emission rates and potential impact of VOC emissions, a series of laboratory and field measurements were conducted using softwood, hardwood, and blended wood pellets manufactured in New York. Evacuated canisters were used to collect air samples from the headspace of drums containing pellets and then in basements and pellet storage areas of homes and small businesses. Multiple peaks were identified during GC/MS and GC/FID analysis, and four primary VOCs were characterized and quantified: methanol, pentane, pentanal, and hexanal. Laboratory results show that total VOCs (TVOCs) concentrations for softwood (SW) were statistically (p < 0.02) higher than blended or hardwood (HW) (SW: 412 ± 25; blended: 203 ± 4; HW: 99 ± 8, ppb). The emission rate from HW was the fastest, followed by blended and SW, respectively. Emissions rates were found to range from 10−1 to 10−5 units, depending upon environmental factors. Field measurements resulted in airborne concentrations ranging from 67 ± 8 to 5000 ± 3000 ppb of TVOCs and 12 to 1500 ppb of aldehydes, with higher concentrations found in a basement with a large fabric bag storage unit after fresh pellet delivery and lower concentrations for aged pellets. These results suggest that large fabric bag storage units resulted in a substantial release of VOCs into the building air. Occupants of the buildings tested discussed concerns about odor and sensory irritation when new pellets were delivered. The sensory response was likely due to the aldehydes. PMID:27022205

  14. VOC characteristics, emissions and contributions to SOA formation during hazy episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Wu, Fangkun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The pollution processes in Beijing were investigated from 18th October to 6th November 2013 to study the characteristics, SOA formation potential and contributing factors of VOC during hazy episodes. The mean concentrations of VOC were 67.4 ± 33.3 μg m-3 on clear days and have 5-7-fold increase in polluted periods. VOC concentrations rapidly increased at a visibility range of 4-5 km with the rate of 25%/km in alkanes, alkenes and halocarbons and the rate of 45%/km in aromatics. Analysis of the mixing layer height (MLH); wind speed and ratios of benzene/toluene (B/T), ethylbenzene/m,p-xylene (E/X), and isopentane/n-pentane (i/n) under different visibility conditions revealed that the MLH and wind speed were the 2 major factors affecting the variability of VOC during clear days and that local emissions and photochemical reactions were main causes of VOC variation on polluted days. Combined with the fractional aerosol coefficient (FAC) method, the SOA formation potentials of alkanes, alkenes and aromatics were 0.3 ± 0.2 μg m-3, 1.1 ± 1.0 μg m-3 and 6.5 ± 6.4 μg m-3, respectively. As the visibility deteriorated, the SOA formation potential increased from 2.1 μg m-3 to 13.2 μg m-3, and the fraction of SOA-forming aromatics rapidly increased from 56.3% to 90.1%. Initial sources were resolved by a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. Vehicle-related emissions were an important source of VOC at all visibility ranges, accounting for 23%-32%. As visibility declined, emissions from solvents and the chemical industry increased from 13.2% and 6.3% to 34.2% and 23.0%, respectively. Solvents had the greatest SOA formation ability, accounting for 52.5% on average on hazy days, followed by vehicle-related emissions (20.7%).

  15. [Study on the quantitative estimation method for VOCs emission from petrochemical storage tanks based on tanks 4.0.9d model].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Min-Yan; Zhang, Jian; He, Wan-Qing; Nie, Lei; Shao, Xia

    2013-12-01

    VOCs emission from petrochemical storage tanks is one of the important emission sources in the petrochemical industry. In order to find out the VOCs emission amount of petrochemical storage tanks, Tanks 4.0.9d model is utilized to calculate the VOCs emission from different kinds of storage tanks. VOCs emissions from a horizontal tank, a vertical fixed roof tank, an internal floating roof tank and an external floating roof tank were calculated as an example. The consideration of the site meteorological information, the sealing information, the tank content information and unit conversion by using Tanks 4.0.9d model in China was also discussed. Tanks 4.0.9d model can be used to estimate VOCs emissions from petrochemical storage tanks in China as a simple and highly accurate method. PMID:24640914

  16. Characteristics and source apportionment of VOCs measured in an industrial area of Nanjing, Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junlin; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Honglei; Li, Yongyu; Lin, Xu; Yang, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Based on the data of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected continuously in the Nanjing industrial area, the VOCs temporal variability, photochemical reactivity, differences in tracer ratios, and source apportionment by principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores (PCA/APCS) were analyzed. The results showed that the total VOC concentration was 43.5 ppbv, which was 45.1% alkanes, 25.3% alkenes, 7.3% alkynes and 22.3% aromatics. There was an obvious seasonal variation in the of VOCs, with a maximum in summer and minimum in winter, as well as in the VOC components, with alkanes and alkynes highest in winter, alkenes highest in summer, and aromatics highest in spring. The VOCs exhibited significant diurnal variations, i.e. high at night and low during the day. The concentrations of nighttime VOCs were highest to lowest as follows: summer > autumn > spring > winter. By contrast, the concentrations of daytime VOCs were highest to lowest as follows: winter > summer > spring > autumn. The diurnal variation of the VOCs was the largest in autumn and the smallest in winter. The largest diurnal variation of alkanes and alkenes occurred in autumn, whereas the largest diurnal variation of aromatics and alkynes occurred in spring. Using the propylene-equivalent method, alkenes had the highest concentration, followed by aromatics and alkanes. The ratios of T/B, E/B and X/B were 1.2, 1.0 and 0.8, respectively, possibly due to the aging air mass. Based on the specific pollutant ratio method, the observation site was greatly affected by the surrounding industrial areas. The source analysis of the VOCs in the PCA/APCS mode showed that the sources consisted of industrial production sources, automobile emission sources, combustion sources, industrial production volatilization sources, solvent use sources and biogenic emission sources; in addition, there were seasonal variations. Overall, the sources related to industrial production activities accounted for 45

  17. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air from Nisyros Island (Dodecanese Archipelago, Greece): Natural versus anthropogenic sources.

    PubMed

    Tassi, F; Capecchiacci, F; Giannini, L; Vougioukalakis, G E; Vaselli, O

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the chemical composition of VOCs in air and gas discharges collected at Nisyros Island (Dodecanese Archipelago, Greece). The main goals are i) to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic VOC sources and ii) to evaluate their impact on local air quality. Up to 63 different VOCs were recognized and quantitatively determined in 6 fumaroles and 19 air samples collected in the Lakki caldera, where fumarolic emissions are located, and the outer ring of the island, including the Mandraki village and the main harbor. Air samples from the crater area show significant concentrations of alkanes, alkenes, cyclic, aromatics, and S- and O-bearing heterocycles directly deriving from the hydrothermal system, as well as secondary O-bearing compounds from oxidation of primary VOCs. At Mandraki village, C6H6/Σ(methylated aromatics) and Σ(linear)/Σ(branched) alkanes ratios <1 allow to distinguish an anthropogenic source related to emissions from outlet pipes of touristic and private boats and buses. PMID:23747819

  18. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, R. H. F.; Baker, K. R.; Napelenok, S. L.; Tonnesen, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid models track sources through the physical and chemical processes important to the formation and transport of air pollutants. Photochemical model source apportionment has been used to track source impacts of specific sources, groups of sources (sectors), sources in specific geographic areas, and stratospheric and lateral boundary inflow on O3. The implementation and application of a source apportionment technique for O3 and its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model are described here. The Integrated Source Apportionment Method (ISAM) O3 approach is a hybrid of source apportionment and source sensitivity in that O3 production is attributed to precursor sources based on O3 formation regime (e.g., for a NOx-sensitive regime, O3 is apportioned to participating NOx emissions). This implementation is illustrated by tracking multiple emissions source sectors and lateral boundary inflow. NOx, VOC, and O3 attribution to tracked sectors in the application are consistent with spatial and temporal patterns of precursor emissions. The O3 ISAM implementation is further evaluated through comparisons of apportioned ambient concentrations and deposition amounts with those derived from brute force zero-out scenarios, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.58 and 0.99 depending on specific combination of target species and tracked precursor emissions. Low correlation coefficients occur for chemical regimes that have strong nonlinearity in O3 sensitivity, which demonstrates different functionalities between source apportionment and zero-out approaches, where appropriate use depends on whether source attribution or

  19. Influence of tree provenance on biogenic VOC emissions of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivimäenpää, Minna; Magsarjav, Narantsetseg; Ghimire, Rajendra; Markkanen, Juha-Matti; Heijari, Juha; Vuorinen, Martti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2012-12-01

    Resin-storing plant species such as conifer trees can release substantial amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere under stress circumstances that cause resin flow. Wounding can be induced by animals, pathogens, wind or direct mechanical damage e.g. during harvesting. In atmospheric modelling of biogenic VOCs, actively growing vegetation has been mostly considered as the source of emissions. Root systems and stumps of resin-storing conifer trees could constitute a significant store of resin after tree cutting. Therefore, we assessed the VOC emission rates from the cut surface of Scots pine stumps and estimated the average emission rates for an area with a density of 2000 stumps per ha. The experiment was conducted with trees of one Estonian and three Finnish Scots pine provenances covering a 1200 km gradient at a common garden established in central Finland in 1991. VOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes and less than 0.1% of the total emission was sesquiterpenes. α-Pinene (7-92% of the total emissions) and 3-carene (0-76% of the total emissions) were the dominant monoterpenes. Proportions of α-pinene and camphene were significantly lower and proportions of 3-carene, sabinene, γ-terpinene and terpinolene higher in the southernmost Saaremaa provenance compared to the other provenances. Total terpene emission rates (standardised to +20 °C) from stumps varied from 27 to 1582 mg h-1 m-2 when measured within 2-3 h after tree cutting. Emission rates decreased rapidly to between 2 and 79 mg h-1 m-2 at 50 days after cutting. The estimated daily terpene emission rates on a hectare basis from freshly cut stumps at a cut tree density of 2000 per ha varied depending on provenance. Estimated emission ranges were 100-710 g ha-1 d-1 and 137-970 g ha-1 d-1 in 40 and in 60 year-old forest stands, respectively. Our result suggests that emission directly from stump surfaces could be a significant source of monoterpene emissions for a few weeks after

  20. Speciated OVOC and VOC emission inventories and their implications for reactivity-based ozone control strategy in the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jiamin; Zheng, Junyu; Li, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhong, Zhuangmin; Zhong, Liuju; Lin, Hui

    2015-10-15

    The increasing ground-ozone (O3) levels, accompanied by decreasing SO2, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations benefited from air pollution control measures implemented in recent years, initiated a serious challenge to control Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China. Speciated VOC emission inventory is fundamental for estimating Ozone Formation Potentials (OFPs) to identify key reactive VOC species and sources in order to formulate efficient O3 control strategies. With the use of the latest bulk VOC emission inventory and local source profiles, this study developed the PRD regional speciated Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compound (OVOC) and VOC emission inventories to identify the key emission-based and OFP-based VOC sources and species. Results showed that: (1) Methyl alcohol, acetone and ethyl acetate were the major constituents in the OVOC emissions from industrial solvents, household solvents, architectural paints and biogenic sources; (2) from the emission-based perspective, aromatics, alkanes, OVOCs and alkenes made up 39.2%, 28.2%, 15.9% and 10.9% of anthropogenic VOCs; (3) from the OFP-based perspective, aromatics and alkenes become predominant with contributions of 59.4% and 25.8% respectively; (4) ethene, m/p-xylene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene and other 24 high OFP-contributing species were the key reactive species that contributed to 52% of anthropogenic emissions and up to 80% of OFPs; and (5) industrial solvents, industrial process, gasoline vehicles and motorcycles were major emission sources of these key reactive species. Policy implications for O3 control strategy were discussed. The OFP cap was proposed to regulate VOC control policies in the PRD region due to its flexibility in reducing the overall OFP of VOC emission sources in practice. PMID:26057544

  1. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    PubMed

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing. PMID:23374080

  2. Photochemical grid model implementation of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, R. H. F.; Baker, K. R.; Napelenok, S. L.; Tonnesen, G. S.

    2014-09-01

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid models track sources through the physical and chemical processes important to the formation and transport of air pollutants. Photochemical model source apportionment has been used to estimate impacts of specific sources, groups of sources (sectors), sources in specific geographic areas, and stratospheric and lateral boundary inflow on O3. The implementation and application of a source apportionment technique for O3 and its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC), for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model are described here. The Integrated Source Apportionment Method (ISAM) O3 approach is a hybrid of source apportionment and source sensitivity in that O3 production is attributed to precursor sources based on O3 formation regime (e.g., for a NOx-sensitive regime, O3 is apportioned to participating NOx emissions). This implementation is illustrated by tracking multiple emissions source sectors and lateral boundary inflow. NOx, VOC, and O3 attribution to tracked sectors in the application are consistent with spatial and temporal patterns of precursor emissions. The O3 ISAM implementation is further evaluated through comparisons of apportioned ambient concentrations and deposition amounts with those derived from brute force zero-out scenarios, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.58 and 0.99 depending on specific combination of target species and tracked precursor emissions. Low correlation coefficients occur for chemical regimes that have strong non-linearity in O3 sensitivity, which demonstrates different functionalities between source apportionment and zero-out approaches, depending on whether sources of interest are either to be accounted

  3. Biogenic and Anthropogenic VOC Emissions over the Central and Southern U.S.: Results from Recent Airborne Field Campaigns (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Riemer, D. D.; Hills, A. J.; Kaser, L.; Emmons, L. K.; Lamarque, J.; Blake, N. J.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Karl, T.; Yuan, B.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two years, the NCAR Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), capable of quantifying over 50 individual gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was deployed on two airborne field campaigns with flights over the central and southeast United States: Deep Convective Cloud and Chemistry (DC3), and Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks (NOMADSS). These studies provided opportunities to sample air masses dominated by individual emissions sources, including biomass burning, oil and gas extraction, biogenic activity, and marine emissions, as well as the impact of convection on recently emitted trace gases. Using observations of biogenic VOCs, including speciated monoterpenes, we will compare our findings with NCAR CESM CAM-chem model simulations using the MEGAN emissions inventory. Likewise, we will contrast our observations of anthropogenic VOCs over the continental U.S. to model simulations with anthropogenic inventories (e.g., NEI, EDGAR).

  4. VOC source-receptor relationships in Houston during TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchner, Michael; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    During the TRAMP field campaign in August-September 2006, C 2-C 10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured continuously and online at the urban Moody Tower (MT) site. This dataset was compared to corresponding VOC data sets obtained at six sites located in the highly industrialized Houston Ship Channel area (HSC). Receptor modeling was performed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) at all sites. Conditional probability functions (CPF) were used to determine the origin of the polluted air masses in the Houston area. A subdivision into daytime and nighttime was carried out to discriminate photochemical influences. Eight main source categories of industrial, mobile, and biogenic emissions were identified at the urban receptor site, seven and six, respectively, at the different HSC sites. At MT natural gas/crude oil contributed most to the VOC mass (27.4%), followed by liquefied petroleum gas (16.7%), vehicular exhaust (15.3%), fuel evaporation (14.3%), and aromatics (13.4%). Also petrochemical sources from ethylene (4.7%) and propylene (3.6%) play an important role. A minor fraction of the VOC mass can be attributed to biogenic sources mainly from isoprene (4.4%). Based on PMF analyses of different wind sectors, the total VOC mass was estimated to be twofold at MT with wind directions from HSC compared to air from a typical urban sector, for petrochemical compounds more than threefold. Despite the strong impact of air masses influenced by industrial sources at HSC, still about a third of the total mass contributions at MT can be apportioned to other sources, mainly motor vehicles and aromatic solvents. The investigation of diurnal variation in combination with wind directional frequencies revealed the greatest HSC impact at the urban site during the morning, and the least during the evening.

  5. Spatial/Temporal Variations and Source Apportionment of VOCs Monitored at Community Scale in an Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Zhu, Xianlei; Fan, Zhi-hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize spatial/temporal variations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a community-scale monitoring approach and identify the main sources of concern in Paterson, NJ, an urban area with mixed sources of VOCs. VOC samples were simultaneously collected from three local source-dominated (i.e., commercial, industrial, and mobile) sites in Paterson and one background site in Chester, NJ (located ∼58 km southwest of Paterson). Samples were collected using the EPA TO-15 method from midnight to midnight, one in every sixth day over one year. Among the 60 analyzed VOCs, ten VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were selected to examine their spatial/temporal variations. All of the 10 VOCs in Paterson were significantly higher than the background site (p<0.01). Ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene measured at the commercial site were significantly higher than the industrial/mobile sites (p<0.01). Seven VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were significantly different by season (p<0.05), that is, higher in cold seasons than in warm seasons. In addition, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene were significantly higher on weekdays than weekend days (p<0.05). These results are consistent with literature data, indicating the impact of anthropogenic VOC sources on air pollution in Paterson. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was applied for 24-hour integrated VOC measurements in Paterson over one year and identified six contributing factors, including motor vehicle exhausts (20%), solvents uses (19%), industrial emissions (16%), mobile+stationery sources (12%), small shop emissions (11%), and others (22%). Additional locational analysis confirmed the identified sources were well matched with point sources located upwind in

  6. Development of a multi-VOC reference material for quality assurance in materials emission testing.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Emission test chamber measurement is necessary to proof building materials as sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The results of such measurements are used to evaluate materials and label them according to their potential to emit harmful substances, polluting indoor air. If only labelled materials were installed indoors, this would improve indoor air quality and prevent negative impacts on human health. Because of the complex testing procedure, reference materials for the quality assurance are mandatory. Currently, there is a lack of such materials because most building products show a broad variation of emissions even within one batch. A previous study indicates lacquers, mixed with volatile organic pollutants, as reproducible emission source for a wide range of substances. In the present study, the curing of the lacquer-VOC mixture inside micro-chambers was optimised. Therefore, the humidity and the chamber flow were varied. Typical indoor air pollutants with a wide range of volatilities, for example, styrene, n-hexadecane, dimethyl and dibutyl phthalate were selected. It turned out that, under optimised curing parameters inside the micro-chamber, their emission can be reproduced with variations of less than 10 %. With this, a next important step towards a reference material for emission testing was achieved. PMID:25543146

  7. [Study of VOCs emission prediction and control based on dynamic CGE].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Xin; Wang, Yu-Fei; Hao, Zheng-Ping; Wang, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    Researches on controlling volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through macroeconomic policy from the view of cost-benefit analysis are very important for our country to improve the air environment. Based on our previous study, this paper predicted future VOCs emissions until 2020 under current policies with 2007 as reference year by using dynamic CGE model. Meanwhile, environmental tax was imposed in ten industries with high emission and the impacts of emissions and economic system were discussed. Finally, policy implementations for VOCs emission control were suggested for policy-makers. The results showed that environment tax could mitigate VOCs emission, but it also resulted in high cost. Owing to the highly related relationship between different sectors, although transport sector was not taxed, it also suffered a great economic influence. Thus, when using the tax policy for reducing VOCs, subsidy for special sector is necessary. PMID:24640924

  8. Do time-averaged, whole-building, effective volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions depend on the air exchange rate? A statistical analysis of trends for 46 VOCs in U.S. offices.

    PubMed

    Rackes, A; Waring, M S

    2016-08-01

    We used existing data to develop distributions of time-averaged air exchange rates (AER), whole-building 'effective' emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC), and other variables for use in Monte Carlo analyses of U.S. offices. With these, we explored whether long-term VOC emission rates were related to the AER over the sector, as has been observed in the short term for some VOCs in single buildings. We fit and compared two statistical models to the data. In the independent emissions model (IEM), emissions were unaffected by other variables, while in the dependent emissions model (DEM), emissions responded to the AER via coupling through a conceptual boundary layer between the air and a lumped emission source. For 20 of 46 VOCs, the DEM was preferable to the IEM and emission rates, though variable, were higher in buildings with higher AERs. Most oxygenated VOCs and some alkanes were well fit by the DEM, while nearly all aromatics and halocarbons were independent. Trends by vapor pressure suggested multiple mechanisms could be involved. The factors of temperature, relative humidity, and building age were almost never associated with effective emission rates. Our findings suggest that effective emissions in real commercial buildings will be difficult to predict from deterministic experiments or models. PMID:26010216

  9. Evaluation of speciated VOC emission factors for Air Force hush houses

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.D.; Stevens, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    Data published in: ``Engine and Hush House Emissions from a TF30-P109 Jet Engine Tested at Cannon Air Force Base, NM`` by Radian Corporation and ``Aircraft Emissions. Characterization: TF41-A2, TF30-P103 , and TF30-P109 Engines`` by Battelle are reviewed and compared. Specifically CO, NO{sub x}, and VOC emission factors using EPA Method 19 are addressed, with comparisons between JP-4 and JP-8 jet fuels. CO and NO{sub x} emissions for JP-4 and JP-8 jet fuels were found to be essentially the same. VOC emission data exhibited high variability. Problems inherent in speciated VOC emission testing are discussed. A limiting of speciated VOC emission testing, with emission factor estimation based on fuel content is proposed.

  10. Comparison of VOC and ammonia emissions from individual PVC materials, adhesives and from complete structures.

    PubMed

    Järnström, H; Saarela, K; Kalliokoski, P; Pasanen, A-L

    2008-04-01

    Emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia measured from six PVC materials and four adhesives in the laboratory were compared to the emission rates measured on site from complete structures. Significantly higher specific emission rates (SERs) were generally measured from the complete structures than from individual materials. There were large differences between different PVC materials in their permeability for VOCs originating from the underlying structure. Glycol ethers and esters from adhesives used in the installation contributed to the emissions from the PVC covered structure. Emissions of 2-ethylhexanol and TXIB (2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate) were common. High ammonia SERs were measured from single adhesives but their contribution to the emissions from the complete structure did not appear as obvious as for VOCs. The results indicate that three factors affected the VOC emissions from the PVC flooring on a structure: 1) the permeability of the PVC product for VOCs, 2) the VOC emission from the adhesive used, and 3) the VOC emission from the backside of the PVC product. PMID:17997159

  11. Modeling VOC emissions and air concentrations from the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R. ); Drivas, P.J. )

    1993-03-01

    During the two-week period following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) evaporated from the surface of the oil spill and were transported and dispersed throughout the region. To estimate the air concentrations of these VOCs, emissions and dispersion modeling was conducted for each hour during the first two weeks of the spill. A multicomponent evaporative emissions model was developed and applied to the oil spill; the model considered the evaporation of 15 specific compounds, including benzene and toluene. Both mass transfer from the surface of the spill and diffusion through the oil layer were considered in the emissions model. Maximum emissions of toluene were calculated to equal about 20,000 kg/hr, or about 5 g/m[sup 2] hr, at a time of eight hours after the initial oil spill. Meteorological data were acquired from sources and used to estimate hourly-averaged wind velocity over the spill. Air concentrations of specific components were calculated using the ATDL area source diffusion model and the Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model. Maximum hourly-averaged concentrations were predicted not to exceed 10 ppmv for any compound. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Wang, H. L.; Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Q.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zhou, M.; Jing, S. A.; Lu, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-03-01

    VOC species from vehicle exhaust and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of 9 gasoline vehicles, 7 diesel vehicles, 5 motorcycles, and 4 gas evaporation samples. The SOA mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were calculated based on the mixing ratio of individual VOC species. The SOA mass yields of gasoline and motorcycle exhaust were similar to the results of the published smog chamber study with the exception of that of diesel exhaust was 20% lower than experimental data (Gordon et al., 2013, 2014a, b). This suggests the requirement for further research on SVOC or LVOC emissions. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of vehicle mileage traveled and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors. The inventory-based vehicular initial emission ratio of OA to CO was 15.6 μg m-3 ppmv-1. The OA production rate reached 22.3 and 42.7 μg m-3 ppmv-1 under high-NOx and low-NOx conditions, respectively. To determine the vehicular contribution to OA pollution, the inventory-based OA formation ratios for vehicles were calculated with a photochemical-age-based parameterization method and compared with the observation-based OA formation ratios in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. The results indicated that VOC emissions from vehicle exhaust and gas evaporation only explained 15 and 22% of the total organic aerosols observed in summer and winter, respectively. SOA production only accounted for 25 and 18% of the total vehicular OA formation in summer and winter. VOC emissions from gasoline vehicles contribute 21-38% of vehicular OA formation after 6-24 h of photochemical aging. The results suggest that vehicle emissions are an important contributor to OA pollution in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. However, a large number of OA mass in the atmosphere still cannot be explained in this study. SOA formation contributions from other sources (e.g. coal burning

  13. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs) in environment - sources, potential human health impacts, and current remediation technologies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Binbin; Lei, Chao; Wei, Chaohai; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs), including polychloromethanes, polychloroethanes and polychloroethylenes, are widely used as solvents, degreasing agents and a variety of commercial products. These compounds belong to a group of ubiquitous contaminants that can be found in contaminated soil, air and any kind of fluvial mediums such as groundwater, rivers and lakes. This review presents a summary of the research concerning the production levels and sources of Cl-VOCs, their potential impacts on human health as well as state-of-the-art remediation technologies. Important sources of Cl-VOCs principally include the emissions from industrial processes, the consumption of Cl-VOC-containing products, the disinfection process, as well as improper storage and disposal methods. Human exposure to Cl-VOCs can occur through different routes, including ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact. The toxicological impacts of these compounds have been carefully assessed, and the results demonstrate the potential associations of cancer incidence with exposure to Cl-VOCs. Most Cl-VOCs thus have been listed as priority pollutants by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of China, Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. (U.S. EPA) and European Commission (EC), and are under close monitor and strict control. Yet, more efforts will be put into the epidemiological studies for the risk of human exposure to Cl-VOCs and the exposure level measurements in contaminated sites in the future. State-of-the-art remediation technologies for Cl-VOCs employ non-destructive methods and destructive methods (e.g. thermal incineration, phytoremediation, biodegradation, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and reductive dechlorination), whose advantages, drawbacks and future developments are thoroughly discussed in the later sections. PMID:25016450

  14. VOC Source - Receptor Relationships in Houston during TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchner, M.; Rappenglück, B.

    2009-04-01

    During the TexAQS-II field campaign in August and September 2006, C2 - C10 volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured continuously and online at the urban Moody Tower (MT) site. This data set was compared to corresponding VOC data sets obtained at six sites located in the highly industrialized Houston Ship Channel area (HSC). Receptor modeling was performed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) at all sites. Conditional probability functions were used to determine the origin of the polluted air masses in the Houston area. A subdivision into daytime and nighttime was carried out to discriminate photochemical influences. Eight main source categories of industrial, mobile, and biogenic emissions were identified at the urban receptor site, seven and six, respectively, at the different HSC sites. Amongst these categories, natural gas / crude oil, LPG, and vehicular exhaust contributed most to the total measured VOC mass, followed by fuel evaporation, aromatics, petrochemical sources from ethylene and propylene, and biogenic sources. Based on PMF analyses of different wind sectors, the total VOC mass was estimated to be twofold at MT with wind directions from HSC compared to air from a typical urban sector, for petrochemical compounds more than threefold. Despite the strong impact of air masses influenced by industrial sources at HSC, still a significant fraction of the total mass contributions at MT can be apportioned to other sources, mainly motor vehicles and aromatic solvents. The investigation of diurnal variation in combination with wind directional frequencies revealed the greatest HSC impact at the urban site during the morning, and the least during the evening.

  15. Surface emission determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from a closed industrial waste landfill using a self-designed static flux chamber.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Perales, J F; Roca, F J; Guardino, X

    2014-02-01

    Closed landfills can be a source of VOC and odorous nuisances to their atmospheric surroundings. A self-designed cylindrical air flux chamber was used to measure VOC surface emissions in a closed industrial landfill located in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. The two main objectives of the study were the evaluation of the performance of the chamber setup in typical measurement conditions and the determination of the emission rates of 60 different VOC from that industrial landfill, generating a valuable database that can be useful in future studies related to industrial landfill management. Triplicate samples were taken in five selected sampling points. VOC were sampled dynamically using multi-sorbent bed tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) connected to SKC AirCheck 2000 pumps. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled with a capillary gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry detector. The emission rates of sixty VOC were calculated for each sampling point in an effort to characterize surface emissions. To calculate average, minimum and maximum emission values for each VOC, the results were analyzed by three different methods: Global, Kriging and Tributary area. Global and Tributary area methodologies presented similar values, with total VOC emissions of 237 ± 48 and 222 ± 46 g day(-1), respectively; however, Kriging values were lower, 77 ± 17 gd ay(-1). The main contributors to the total emission rate were aldehydes (nonanal and decanal), acetic acid, ketones (acetone), aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohols. Most aromatic hydrocarbon (except benzene, naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes) and aldehyde emission rates exhibited strong correlations with the rest of VOC of their family, indicating a possible common source of these compounds. B:T ratio obtained from the emission rates of the studied landfill suggested that the factors that regulate aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in the landfill emissions are different from the ones

  16. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from diesel trucks in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Shen, Xianbao; Ye, Yu; Cao, Xinyue; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Yingzhi; He, Kebin

    2015-02-01

    This paper is the first in our series of papers aimed at understanding the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of vehicles in Beijing by conducting on-board emission measurements. This paper focuses on diesel vehicles. In this work, 18 China III diesel vehicles, including seven light-duty diesel trucks (LDDTs), four medium-duty diesel trucks (MDDTs) and seven heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs), were examined when the vehicles were driven on predesigned fixed test routes in Beijing in China using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). Tedlar bag sampling and 2,4-dinitrophenyhydrazine (DNPH) cartridge sampling were used to collect VOC species, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to analyze these samples. We obtained the VOC emission factors and relative compositions for diesel trucks of different sizes under different driving patterns. In total, 64 VOC species were quantified in this study, including 25 alkanes, four alkenes, 13 aromatics, 13 carbonyls and nine other compounds. The emission factors of the total VOCs based on mileage traveled for HDDTs were higher than those of LDDTs and MDDTs. Carbonyls, aromatics and alkanes were the dominant VOC species. Carbonyls accounted for 42.7%-69.2% of the total VOCs in the three types of tested diesel trucks. The total VOC emission factors of the tested vehicles that were driven on non-highway routes were 1.5-2.0 times higher than those of the vehicles driven on the highway. As for the OFP calculation results, with increased vehicle size, the ozone formation potential presented an increasing trend. Among the VOC components, carbonyls were the primary contributor to OFP. In addition, the OFPs under non-highway driving cycles were 1.3-1.7 times those under highway driving cycles. The results of this study will be helpful in improving our understanding of VOCs emitted from on-road diesel trucks in China.

  17. Analysis and comparison of trends in concentrations and emissions of VOC and CO and VOC:CO ratios in urban European cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angiola, A.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Granier, C.; Law, K.; Monks, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2007, more than half of the world's population live in urban areas. Megacities, urban agglomerations with more than 10 million inhabitants, are rapidly increasing in number: in 1950 there were only two, New York and Tokyo with ~12 million, while by 2005 there were already 20, with Tokyo ranging the 35 millions. The urban atmospheres of these megacities are dominated by pollutants associated with vehicular emissions, as well as the formation of secondary pollutants responsible for photochemical smog. A comparative assessment of emissions and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and carbon monoxide (CO) ratios in London (L) and Paris (P) is hereby presented. The work is based on three recent studies by Baker et al. (2008), Parrish et al. (2009) and von Schneidemesser et al. (in press) where concentrations of these compounds were analyzed for 28 US cities in the former and some global megacities in the second and third studies. Considering the fact that VOC provide information on the main emissions sources of cities, these studies found that even though concentrations of VOC varied greatly among cities, the ratio with the combustion tracer CO remained rather constant and was very useful for city comparison, as well as a good indicator of traffic emissions. VOC patterns in ambient air concentrations were observed to be similar in most cities, being able to consider that deviations from those patterns could be the result of measurement problems. Nevertheless, the representation of these emissions in global inventories has large uncertainties. The goal of our study is to compare and contrast emission inventory estimates with measured ambient concentrations of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and CO, as well as NMHC:CO ratios. Within the European CityZen project we have built an updated global emissions inventory with the best available datasets of anthropogenic, biomass burning and natural sources. As part of this research we will follow the same

  18. Analysis of UK and European NOx and VOC emission scenarios in the Defra model intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Richard; Beevers, Sean; Chemel, Charles; Cooke, Sally; Francis, Xavier; Fraser, Andrea; Heal, Mathew R.; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Lingard, Justin; Redington, Alison; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Vieno, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Simple emission scenarios have been implemented in eight United Kingdom air quality models with the aim of assessing how these models compared when addressing whether photochemical ozone formation in southern England was NOx- or VOC-sensitive and whether ozone precursor sources in the UK or in the Rest of Europe (RoE) were the most important during July 2006. The suite of models included three Eulerian-grid models (three implementations of one of these models), a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model and two moving box air parcel models. The assignments as to NOx- or VOC-sensitive and to UK- versus RoE-dominant, turned out to be highly variable and often contradictory between the individual models. However, when the assignments were filtered by model performance on each day, many of the contradictions could be eliminated. Nevertheless, no one model was found to be the 'best' model on all days, indicating that no single air quality model could currently be relied upon to inform policymakers robustly in terms of NOx- versus VOC-sensitivity and UK- versus RoE-dominance on each day. It is important to maintain a diversity in model approaches.

  19. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles. PMID:23584189

  20. Concentrations and sources of VOCs in urban domestic and public microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y M; Harrad, S; Harrison, R M

    2001-03-15

    Concentrations of 15 VOCs including 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and styrene were measured in a wide range of urban microenvironments, viz: homes, offices, restaurants, pubs, department stores, coach and train stations, cinemas, libraries, laboratories, perfume shops, heavily trafficked roadside locations, buses, trains, and automobiles. For most target VOCs-including 1,3-butadiene and benzene-mean concentrations at heavily trafficked roadside locations were exceeded by those in automobiles and were comparable to those in pubs and train stations. With regard to indoor-outdoor relationships in homes, this study revealed higher mean indoor concentrations, no correlation between simultaneously measured indoor and outdoor concentrations, and significantly different patterns of diurnal variation. Thus-in poorly ventilated buildings-indoor emission source strength is considered a more significant influence on VOC concentrations than infiltration of outdoor air. In the six smoking homes studied, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was found to make a substantial contribution to concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. This finding was based on the significantly higher concentrations detected in smoking compared to nonsmoking homes, the significant correlation between 1,3-butadiene concentrations and those of 3-ethenylpyridine (an ETS marker), factor analysis, and the results of a source apportionment exercise based on ratios of 1,3-butadiene to 3-ethenylpyridine. PMID:11347947

  1. Contrasting winter and summer VOC mixing ratios at a forest site in the Western Mediterranean Basin: the effect of local biogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Filella, I.; Llusià, J.; Molowny-Horas, R.; Schallhart, S.; Metzger, A.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2011-12-01

    VOCs emitted in the local valley by the vegetation, thus enhancing O3 formation in this forested site. The only VOC species that showed a somewhat different daily pattern were monoterpenes because of their local biogenic emission. Isoprene also followed in part the daily pattern of monoterpenes, but only in summer when its biotic sources were stronger. The increase by one order of magnitude in the concentrations of these volatile isoprenoids highlights the importance of local biogenic summer emissions in these Mediterranean forested areas which also receive polluted air masses from nearby or distant anthropic sources.

  2. Contrasting winter and summer VOC mixing ratios at a forest site in the Western Mediterranean Basin: the effect of local biogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Filella, I.; Llusià, J.; Molowny-Horas, R.; Schallhart, S.; Metzger, A.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2011-07-01

    VOCs emitted in the local valley by the vegetation, thus enhancing O3 formation in this forested site. The only VOC species that showed a somewhat different daily pattern were monoterpenes because of their local biogenic emission. Isoprene also followed in part the daily pattern of monoterpenes, but only in summer when its biotic sources were stronger. The increase by one order of magnitude in the concentrations of these volatile isoprenoids highlights the importance of local biogenic summer emissions in these Mediterranean forested areas which also receive polluted air masses from nearby or distant anthropic sources.

  3. Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua; Qu, Hang; Zhou, Mengyi; Sun, Jin; Gou, Bin

    2015-11-15

    Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities were investigated in the Yangtze River Delta, China. Source samples were collected from various process units in the petrochemical, basic chemical, and chlorinated chemical plants, and were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. The results showed that propane (19.9%), propene (11.7%), ethane (9.5%) and i-butane (9.2%) were the most abundant species in the petrochemical plant, with propene at much higher levels than in petrochemical profiles measured in other regions. Styrene (15.3%), toluene (10.3%) and 1,3-butadiene (7.5%) were the major species in the basic chemical industry, while halocarbons, especially dichloromethane (15.2%) and chloromethane (7.5%), were substantial in the chlorinated chemical plant. Composite profiles were calculated using a weight-average approach based on the VOC emission strength of various process units. Emission profiles for an entire petrochemical-related industry were found to be process-oriented and should be established considering the differences in VOC emissions from various manufacturing facilities. The VOC source reactivity and carcinogenic risk potential of each process unit were also calculated in this study, suggesting that process operations mainly producing alkenes should be targeted for possible controls with respect to reducing the ozone formation potential, while process units emitting 1,3-butadiene should be under priority control in terms of toxicity. This provides a basis for further measurements of process-specific VOC emissions from the entire petrochemical industry. Meanwhile, more representative samples should be collected to reduce the large uncertainties. PMID:26179779

  4. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  5. VOC emissions, evolutions and contributions to SOA formation at a receptor site in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Hu, W. W.; Shao, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, W. T.; Lu, S. H.; Zeng, L. M.; Hu, M.

    2013-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by two online instruments (GC-FID/MS and PTR-MS) at a receptor site on Changdao Island (37.99° N, 120.70° E) in eastern China. Reaction with OH radical dominated chemical losses of most VOC species during the Changdao campaign. A photochemical-age-based parameterization method is used to calculate VOC emission ratios and to quantify the evolution of ambient VOCs. The calculated emission ratios of most hydrocarbons agree well with those obtained from emission inventory data, but determined emission ratios of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) are significantly higher than those from emission inventory data. The photochemical-age-based parameterization method is also used to investigate primary emissions and secondary formation of organic aerosol. The primary emission ratio of organic aerosol (OA) to CO is determined to be 14.9 μg m-3 ppm-1, and secondary organic aeorosols (SOA) are produced at an enhancement ratio of 18.8 μg m-3 ppm-1 to CO after 50 h of photochemical processing in the atmosphere. SOA formation is significantly higher than the level determined from VOC oxidation under both high-NOx (2.0 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO) and low-NOx conditions (6.5 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and higher alkanes (> C10) account for as high as 17.4% of SOA formation, which suggests semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) may be a large contributor to SOA formation during the Changdao campaign. The SOA formation potential of primary VOC emissions determined from field campaigns in Beijing and Pearl River Delta (PRD) is lower than the measured SOA levels reported in the two regions, indicating SOA formation is also beyond explainable by VOC oxidation in the two city clusters.

  6. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-11-01

    As volatile organic compounds (VOCs) significantly affect atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects), emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic VOC emission strengths are important. The aim of this work was to achieve a description of VOC emissions from poorly described tropical vegetation to be compared with the quite well investigated and highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. For this task, common plant species of both ecosystems were investigated. Sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area, which is known for its special diversity in VOC emitting plant species, were chosen. In contrast, little information is currently available regarding emissions of VOCs from tropical tree species at the leaf level. Twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin, i.e. Terra firme, Várzea and Igapó, were screened for emission of VOCs at leaf level with a branch enclosure system. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was quantitatively the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene > limonene > sabinene > β-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes, whereas in the case of plants from the Amazon region no sesquiterpenes were detected probably due to a lack of sensitivity in the measuring systems. On the other hand methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous emissions

  7. Estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water treatment ponds in Uintah Basin oil and gas field using modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Jones, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from produced-water treatment ponds are poorly characterized sources in oil and gas emission inventories that play a critical role in studying elevated winter ozone events in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S. Information gaps include un-quantified amounts and compositions of gases emitted from these facilities. The emitted gases are often known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, beside nitrogen oxides (NOX), are major precursors for ozone formation in the near-surface layer. Field measurement campaigns using the flux-chamber technique have been performed to measure VOC emissions from a limited number of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah. Although the flux chamber provides accurate measurements at the point of sampling, it covers just a limited area of the ponds and is prone to altering environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure). This fact raises the need to validate flux chamber measurements. In this study, we apply an inverse-dispersion modeling technique with evacuated canister sampling to validate the flux-chamber measurements. This modeling technique applies an initial and arbitrary emission rate to estimate pollutant concentrations at pre-defined receptors, and adjusts the emission rate until the estimated pollutant concentrations approximates measured concentrations at the receptors. The derived emission rates are then compared with flux-chamber measurements and differences are analyzed. Additionally, we investigate the applicability of the WATER9 wastewater emission model for the estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water ponds in the Uintah Basin. WATER9 estimates the emission of each gas based on properties of the gas, its concentration in the waste water, and the characteristics of the influent and treatment units. Results of VOC emission estimations using inverse-dispersion and WATER9 modeling techniques will be reported.

  8. Spatio-temporal distribution of VOC emissions in urban area based on receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojić, A.; Stanišić Stojić, S.; Mijić, Z.; Šoštarić, A.; Rajšić, S.

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of VOC were measured using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, together with NOx, NO2, NO, SO2, CO, and PM10 during winter 2014 in Belgrade, Serbia. For the purpose of source apportionment, receptor models Positive Matrix Factorization and Unmix were applied to the obtained dataset, both resolving six profiles. The reliable identification of pollutant sources, description of their characteristics, and estimation of their spatio-temporal distribution are presented through comprehensive analysis and comparison of receptor model solutions, with respect to meteorological data, planetary boundary layer height, and regional and long-range transport. For emissions from petrochemical industry and oil refinery a significant contribution of transport is observed, and hybrid receptor models were applied for identification of potential non-local source regions.

  9. Odorous VOC emissions following land application of swine manure slurry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine manure is often applied to crop land as a fertilizer source. Odor emissions from land-applied swine manure may pose a possible nuisance to downwind populations if not applied with sufficient forethought. A research project was conducted to assess the time decay of odorous volatile organic co...

  10. VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Wang, H. L.; Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Q.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zhou, M.; Jing, S. A.; Lu, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) species from vehicle exhausts and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of nine gasoline vehicles, seven diesel vehicles, five motorcycles, and four gas evaporation samples. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were estimated based on the mixing ratio of measured C2-C12 VOC species and inferred carbon number distributions. High aromatic contents were measured in gasoline exhausts and contributed comparatively more SOA yield. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of on-road traffic in Shanghai and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors from previous studies in the cities of China. The inventory-based vehicular organic aerosol (OA) productions to total CO emissions were compared with the observed OA to CO concentrations (ΔOA / ΔCO) in the urban atmosphere. The results indicate that vehicles dominate the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions and OA production, which contributed about 40 and 60 % of OA mass in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. Diesel vehicles, which accounted for less than 20 % of vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT), contribute more than 90 % of vehicular POA emissions and 80-90 % of OA mass derived by vehicles in urban Shanghai. Gasoline exhaust could be an important source of SOA formation. Tightening the limit of aromatic content in gasoline fuel will be helpful to reduce its SOA contribution. Intermediate-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs) in vehicle exhausts greatly contribute to SOA formation in the urban atmosphere of China. However, more experiments need to be conducted to determine the contributions of IVOCs to OA pollution in China.

  11. Human health risk evaluation of selected VOC, SVOC and particulate emissions from scented candles.

    PubMed

    Petry, Thomas; Vitale, Danielle; Joachim, Fred J; Smith, Ben; Cruse, Lynn; Mascarenhas, Reuben; Schneider, Scott; Singal, Madhuri

    2014-06-01

    Airborne compounds in the indoor environment arise from a wide variety of sources such as environmental tobacco smoke, heating and cooking, construction materials as well as outdoor sources. To understand the contribution of scented candles to the indoor load of airborne substances and particulate matter, candle emission testing was undertaken in environmentally controlled small and large emission chambers. Candle emission rates, calculated on the basis of measured chamber concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC, SVOC) and particulate matter (PM), were used to predict their respective indoor air concentrations in a standard EU-based dwelling using 2 models: the widely accepted ConsExpo 1-box inhalation model and the recently developed RIFM 2-box indoor air dispersion model. The output from both models has been used to estimate more realistic consumer exposure concentrations of specific chemicals and PM in candle emissions. Potential consumer health risks associated with the candle emissions were characterized by comparing the exposure concentrations with existing indoor or ambient air quality guidelines or, where not existent, to established toxicity thresholds. On the basis of this investigation it was concluded that under normal conditions of use scented candles do not pose known health risks to the consumer. PMID:24582651

  12. VOC emissions during outdoor ship painting and health-risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, Laure; Mandin, Corinne

    Painting of ship external surfaces in building or repair shipyards generates significant emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to the atmosphere. Such emissions have not been specifically regulated so far. The purpose of our study is therefore to evaluate the quantities and as far as possible the nature of the emitted VOC, to characterize the dispersion of these chemicals in the atmosphere and to assess the exposure and resulting health risks for surrounding populations. This study is focused on VOC emitted during outdoor work involving use of paints and solvents. VOC emissions are diffuse, since they come from the whole painted surfaces. A methodology for quantifying them is developed and tested, using information provided by ALSTOM—Chantiers de l'Atlantique and data found in paint technical sheets. Its reliability is checked against emission values established by ALSTOM or found in literature. Then, for two particular situations, construction on one hand, repair on the other hand, atmospheric dispersion of total VOC is simulated to assess the long-term impact (characterized by the plume extension and the annual mean concentrations) of these compounds. Finally, a health-risk assessment based on the estimates is carried out to evaluate the risks by inhalation for people living near the site. Considering the presumed composition of paints and the available reference toxicological values, total VOC are entirely assimilated to toluene. In both examples (construction and repair) and in the current state of knowledge, the calculated risk is not of health concern. Several ways for taking this study further are proposed: a more exhaustive collection of data relative to VOC and other substances contained in paints, on-site measurement of VOC in the ambient air, characterization of diffuse emissions related to other activities, such as purging or welding, and other pollutants, like particles.

  13. VOC emissions from residential combustion of Southern and mid-European woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtyugina, Margarita; Alves, Célia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Tarelho, Luís; Duarte, Márcio; Prozil, Sónia O.; Evtuguin, Dmitry V.; Pio, Casimiro

    2014-02-01

    Emissions of trace gases (carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC)), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from combustion of European beech, Pyrenean oak and black poplar in a domestic woodstove and fireplace were studied. These woods are widely used as biofuel in residential combustion in Southern and mid-European countries. VOCs in the flue gases were collected in Tedlar bags, concentrated in sorbent tubes and analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID). CO2 emissions ranged from 1415 ± 136 to 1879 ± 29 g kg-1 (dry basis). The highest emission factors for CO and THC, 115.8 ± 11.7 and 95.6 24.7 ± 6.3 g kg-1 (dry basis), respectively, were obtained during the combustion of black poplar in the fireplace. European beech presented the lowest CO and THC emission factors for both burning appliances. Significant differences in emissions of VOCs were observed among wood species burnt and combustion devices. In general the highest emission factors were obtained from the combustion of Pyrenean oak in the woodstove. Among the VOCs identified, benzene and related compounds were always the most abundant group, followed by oxygenated compounds and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The amount and the composition of emitted VOCs were strongly affected by the wood composition, the type of burning device and operating conditions. Emission data obtained in this work are useful for modelling the impact of residential wood combustion on air quality and tropospheric ozone formation.

  14. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, W. K.; Blake, D. R.; Cheng, Y.; Li, Y. S.; Fung, K.; Louie, P. K. K.; Park, D.

    2009-06-01

    Vehicle emissions of VOCs were determined in summer and winter of 2003 at the Shing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong. One hundred and ten VOCs were quantified in this study. The average concentration of the total measured VOCs at the inlet and outlet of the tunnel were 81 250 pptv and 117 850 pptv, respectively. Among the 110 compounds analyzed, ethene, ethyne and toluene were the most abundant species in the tunnel. The total measured VOC emission factors ranged from 67 mg veh-1 km-1 to 148 mg veh-1 km-1, with an average of 115 mg veh-1 km-1. The five most abundant VOCs observed in the tunnel were, in decreasing order, ethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These five most abundant species contributed over 38% of the total measured VOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were found to be associated with LPG-fueled taxi. And fair correlations were observed between marker species (ethene, i-pentane, n-nonane, BTEX) with fractions of gasoline-fueled or diesel-fueled vehicles. Moreover, ethene, ethyne, and propene are the key species that were abundant in the tunnel but not in gasoline vapors or LPG. In order to evaluate the ozone formation potential emissions in Hong Kong, the maximum increment reactivity is calculated. It was found that about 568 mg of O3 is induced by per vehicle per kilometer traveled. Among them, ethene, propene and toluene contribute most to the ozone-formation reactivity.

  15. The impact of NO x, CO and VOC emissions on the air quality of Zurich airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Gregor; Schäfer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Hoffmann, Herbert; Bauerfeind, Martina; Fleuti, Emanuel; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    To study the impact of emissions at an airport on local air quality, a measurement campaign at the Zurich airport was performed from 30 June 2004 to 15 July 2004. Measurements of NO, NO 2, CO and CO 2 were conducted with open path devices to determine real in-use emission indices of aircraft during idling. Additionally, air samples were taken to analyse the mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Temporal variations of VOC mixing ratios on the airport were investigated, while other air samples were taken in the plume of an aircraft during engine ignition. CO concentrations in the vicinity of the terminals were found to be highly dependent on aircraft movement, whereas NO concentrations were dominated by emissions from ground support vehicles. The measured emission indices for aircraft showed a strong dependence upon engine type. Our work also revealed differences from emission indices published in the emission data base of the International Civil Aviation Organisation. Among the VOC, reactive C 2-C 3 alkenes were found in significant amounts in the exhaust of an engine compared to ambient levels. Also, isoprene, a VOC commonly associated with biogenic emissions, was found in the exhaust, however it was not detected in refuelling emissions. The benzene to toluene ratio was used to discriminate exhaust from refuelling emission. In refuelling emissions, a ratio well below 1 was found, while for exhaust this ratio was usually about 1.7.

  16. Application and limitations of a mass transfer VOC emission model for a dry building material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, S.; Lungu, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission from building materials into air has been quantified, characterized and modeled. Internal diffusion of VOC through a material based on Fick's law of diffusion is the basis for mass transfer modeling of diffusive emission used to estimate VOC concentrations in air over time. Current mass transfer models have been shown to appropriately estimate air VOC concentrations at approximate room temperature, while other research has shown that temperature has a profound effect on the diffusion coefficient, D, of VOC in a material. Here, a mass transfer model is operated at 23 °C and 40 °C using input parameters applicable for each temperature. The model estimates are validated against environmental test chamber data for styrene emission from a vinyl ester resin thermoset composite material. The model correlates well with the 23 °C chamber data, but underestimates chamber data by as much as 10-4 at 264 h for the 40 °C modeling. This suggests that the model requires adjustment for predicting VOC air concentrations at temperatures other than 23 °C.

  17. Net in-cabin emission rates of VOCs and contributions from outside and inside the aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jun; Li, Zheng; Yang, Xudong

    2015-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of the most important types of air pollutants in aircraft cabin. Balancing source intensity of VOCs and ventilation strategies is an essential conducive way to obtain acceptable aircraft cabin environment. This paper intends to develop a simplified model by a case study to estimate the net VOC emission rates of cabin interior, and contributions from outside and inside the aircraft cabin. In-flight continuous measurements of total VOCs (TVOC) in cabin air were made in six domestic flights in March 2013. The results indicate that the concentrations of TVOC mostly ranged from 0.20 mg m-3 to 0.40 mg m-3 in cabin air, which first increased at ascent, and then kept elevated during cruise, and decreased at descent in general. For further ventilation information, carbon dioxide (CO2) in supply air and re-circulated air was simultaneously observed as a ventilation tracer to calculate the bleed air ratios, outside airflow rates and total airflow rates in these flights. And thus, the emission rates derived from cabin interior and contributions of TVOC from bleed air and cabin interior were estimated for the whole flight accordingly. Results indicate that during the cruise phase, TVOC in cabin air mainly came from cabin interiors. However, contributions from outside air also became significant during taxiing on the ground, ascent and descent phases. The simplified model would be useful for developing better control strategies of aircraft cabin air quality.

  18. Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas operations in Utah and Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Warneke, C.; Holloway, J. S.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Young, C. J.; Edwards, P.; Brown, S. S.; Wolfe, D. E.; Williams, E. J.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration has reported a sharp increase in domestic oil and natural gas production from "unconventional" reserves (e.g., shale and tight sands) between 2005 and 2012. The recent growth in drilling and fossil fuel production has led to environmental concerns regarding local air quality. Severe wintertime ozone events (greater than 100 ppb ozone) have been observed in Utah's Uintah Basin and Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin, both of which contain large natural gas fields. Raw natural gas is a mixture of approximately 60-95 mole percent methane while the remaining fraction is composed of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other non-hydrocarbon gases. We measured an extensive set of VOCs and other trace gases near two highly active areas of oil and natural gas production in Utah's Uintah Basin and Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin in order to characterize primary emissions of VOCs associated with these industrial operations and identify the key VOCs that are precursors for potential ozone formation. UBWOS (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study) was conducted in Uintah County located in northeastern Utah in January-February 2012. Two Colorado studies were conducted at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Weld County in northeastern Colorado in February-March 2011 and July-August 2012 as part of the NACHTT (Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower) and SONNE (Summer Ozone Near Natural gas Emissions) field experiments, respectively. The C2-C6 hydrocarbons were greatly enhanced for all of these studies. For example, the average propane mixing ratio observed during the Utah study was 58 ppb (median = 35 ppb, minimum = 0.8, maximum = 520 ppb propane) compared to urban averages which range between 0.3 and 6.0 ppb propane. We compare the ambient air composition from these studies to urban measurements in order to show that the VOC source signature from oil and natural gas operations is distinct and can be clearly

  19. Source apportionment of VOCs and the contribution to photochemical ozone formation during summer in the typical industrial area in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ping; An, Junlin; Xin, Jinyuan; Wu, Fangkun; Wang, Junxiu; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were continuously observated in a northern suburb of Nanjing, a typical industrial area in the Yangtze River Delta, in a summer observation period from 15th May to 31st August 2013. The average concentration of total VOCs was (34.40 ± 25.20) ppbv, including alkanes (14.98 ± 12.72) ppbv, alkenes (7.35 ± 5.93) ppbv, aromatics (9.06 ± 6.64) ppbv and alkynes (3.02 ± 2.01) ppbv, respectively. Source apportionment via Positive Matrix Factorization was conducted, and six major sources of VOCs were identified. The industry-related sources, including industrial emissions and industrial solvent usage, occupied the highest proportion, accounting for about 51.26% of the VOCs. Vehicular emissions occupied the second highest proportion, accounting for about 34.08%. The rest accounted for about 14.66%, including vegetation emission and liquefied petroleum gas/natural gas usage. Contributions of VOCs to photochemical O3 formation were evaluated by the application of a detailed chemical mechanism model (NCAR MM). Alkenes were the dominant contributors to the O3 photochemical production, followed by aromatics and alkanes. Alkynes had a very small impact on photochemical O3 formation. Based on the outcomes of the source apportionment, a sensitivity analysis of relative O3 reduction efficiency (RORE), under different source removal regimes such as using the reduction of VOCs from 10% to 100% as input, was conducted. The RORE was the highest (~ 20%-40%) when the VOCs from solvent-related sources decreased by 40%. The highest RORE values for vegetation emissions, industrial emissions, vehicle exhaust, and LPG/NG usage were presented in the scenarios of 50%, 80%, 40% and 40%, respectively.

  20. Uptake and emission of VOCs near ground level below a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Vlasenko, A.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C.; Makar, P. A.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.; Brown, S.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of the atmosphere/forest canopy exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires insight into deposition, emission, and chemical reactions of VOCs below the canopy. Currently, uncertainties in canopy processes, such as stomatal uptake, deposition, and sub-canopy chemistry, make it difficult to derive biogenic VOC emission inventories from canopy VOC concentration gradients. Between 18 July and 9 August 2009, VOCs were measured with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at 6 heights between 1 and 6 m beneath a 23 m high mixed-forest canopy. Measured VOCs included methanol, isoprene, acetone, methacrolein + methyl vinyl ketone (MACR+MVK), monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. There are pronounced differences in the behaviour of isoprene and its by-products and that of the terpenes. Non-terpene fluxes are predominantly downward. In contrast, the terpene fluxes are significantly upward. A 1-dimensional canopy model was used to compare results to measurements with and without surface deposition of isoprene and MACR+MVK and emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Results suggest deposition velocities of 27 mm s-1 for isoprene and 12 mm s-1 for MACR+MVK and daytime surface emission rates of 63 μg m-2 h-1 for monoterpenes. The modelled isoprene surface deposition is approximately 2% of the canopy top isoprene emissions and the modelled emissions of monoterpenes comprise approximately 15 to 27% of the canopy-top monoterpene emissions to the atmosphere. These results suggest that surface monoterpene emissions are significant for forest canopy/atmosphere exchange for this mixed forest location and surface uptake is relatively small for all the species measured in this study.

  1. Assessment of VOC emissions and their control from baker's yeast manufacturing facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, R.; Williamson, M.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Control Technology Center (CTC) conducted a study to obtain information on the baker's yeast manufacturing industry. Baker's yeast is produced by a fermentation process that generates large quantities of ethanol and acetaldehyde. Currently, 13 facilities produce baker's yeast in the United States. The volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rate from a typical facility is estimated at 82 megagrams per year (90 tons per year). The majority of these emissions occurs in the final trade fermentations. The VOC emission alternatives that were evaluated during the study were process control measures to reduce the formation of VOC emissions as well as wet scrubbers, carbon adsorbers, incinerators, condensers, and biological filters to control VOC emissions. Of these approaches, it appears that process control measures, catalytic incinerators, or a combination of add-on control techniques (e.g., wet scrubbers followed by an incinerator or a biological filter) are the most feasible approaches for controlling yeast process emissions. Based on the results of the study, the control efficiency associated with the add-on control systems is estimated to be 95 to 98 percent. The report contains information on the baker's yeast fermentation process, the number and locations of yeast plants, the potential emissions from the process, and an evaluation of potential emission control options.

  2. Sources of long-lived atmospheric VOCs at the rural boreal forest site, SMEAR II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Kajos, M. K.; Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Aalto, J.; Ryyppö, T.; Nieminen, T.; Hakola, H.; Rinne, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a long-term volatile organic compound (VOCs) concentration data set, measured at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland during the years 2006-2011, was analyzed in order to identify source areas and profiles of the observed VOCs. VOC mixing ratios were measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Four-day HYSPLIT 4 (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) backward trajectories and the Unmix 6.0 receptor model were used for source area and source composition analysis. Two major forest fire events in Russia took place during the measurement period. The effect of these fires was clearly visible in the trajectory analysis, lending confidence to the method employed with this data set. Elevated volume mixing ratios (VMRs) of non-biogenic VOCs related to forest fires, e.g. acetonitrile and aromatic VOCs, were observed. Ten major source areas for long-lived VOCs (methanol, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene, and toluene) observed at the SMEAR II site were identified. The main source areas for all the targeted VOCs were western Russia, northern Poland, Kaliningrad, and the Baltic countries. Industrial areas in northern continental Europe were also found to be source areas for certain VOCs. Both trajectory and receptor analysis showed that air masses from northern Fennoscandia were less polluted with respect to both the VOCs studied and other trace gases (CO, SO2 and NOx), compared to areas of eastern and western continental Europe, western Russia, and southern Fennoscandia.

  3. VOC Measurements in the Northern Colorado Front Range Metropolitan Area: Investigating the Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Emissions on O3 Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeleira, A.; Farmer, D.; Fischer, E. V.; Pollack, I. B.; Zaragoza, J.

    2015-12-01

    Authors: Ilana Pollock1,2, Jake Zaragoza2, Emily V. Fischer2, Delphine K. Farmer11. Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 2. Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO During summer months, the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) of Colorado consistently violates the 75 ppbv 8-hour EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ambient ozone (O3), despite continued reduction in anthropogenic emissions. The region has been deemed an O3 non-attainment zone since 2008. Ground-level O3 is produced from photochemical catalytic cycles involving OH radicals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and NOx (NO + NO2). VOC emissions in the NFRMA are dominated by anthropogenic sources and influenced by biogenic and agricultural sources, while NOx emissions are mainly from automobile exhaust. A growing concern in the region is the role of oil and natural gas (ONG) on VOC concentrations and the potential for O3 production. Increases in local VOC emissions will likely cause subsequent increase in local O3 concentrations as PO3 increases in a region that is already affected by high O3episodes. As a part of the SONGNEX 2015 (Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus) campaign, we measured a broad suite of speciated VOCs during two 8-week deployments (March-May 2015, July-September 2015) at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO. VOC measurements were made with a custom-online multichannel gas chromatography system (50+ compounds hourly), along with measurements of O3, SO2, NOx, NOy, PAN, CO, CO2, and CH4. We use these data to investigate the role of different VOC sources, and ONG in particular, in contributing to VOC reactivity and thus instantaneous O3 production. Preliminary analysis of the Spring VOC data indicates that VOC reactivity is dominated by light alkanes typical of ONG emissions - specifically propane, consistent with previous winter-time studies. We will use the observed temperature

  4. VOC emissions, evolutions and contributions to SOA formation at a receptor site in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Hu, W. W.; Shao, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, W. T.; Lu, S. H.; Zeng, L. M.; Hu, M.

    2013-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by two online instruments (GC-FID/MS and PTR-MS) at a receptor site on Changdao Island (37.99° N, 120.70° E) in eastern China. Reaction with OH radical dominated the chemical loss of most VOC species during the Changdao campaign. A photochemical age based parameterization method is used to calculate VOC emission ratios and to quantify the evolution of ambient VOCs. The calculated emission ratios of most hydrocarbons agree well with those obtained from emission inventory, but the emission ratios of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) are significantly lower than those from emission inventory. The photochemical age based parameterization method is also used to investigate primary emissions and secondary formation of organic aerosol. The primary emission ratio of OA to CO are determined to be 14.9 μg m-3 ppm-1 and SOA are produced at an enhancement ratio of 18.8 μg m-3 ppm-1 to CO after 50 h of photochemical processing in the atmosphere. SOA formation is significantly higher than the level determined from VOC oxidation under both high-NOx (2.0 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO) and low-NOx condition (6.5 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and higher alkanes (>C10) account for as high as 17.4% of SOA formation, which suggests semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) may be a large contributor to SOA formation during the Changdao campaign. SOA formation potential of primary VOC emissions determined from both field campaigns and emission inventory in China are lower than the measured SOA levels reported in Beijing and Pearl River Delta (PRD), indicating SOA formation cannot be explained by VOC oxidation in this regions. SOA budget in China is estimated to be 5.0-13.7 Tg yr-1, with a fraction of at least 2.7 Tg yr-1 from anthropogenic emissions, which are much higher than the previous estimates from regional models.

  5. Characterization of VOC Emission from Materials in Vehicular Environment at Varied Temperatures: Correlation Development and Validation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yang, Tao; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Lan; Ge, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    The steady state VOC concentration in automobile cabin is taken as a good indicator to characterize the material emission behaviors and evaluate the vehicular air quality. Most studies in this field focus on experimental investigation while theoretical analysis is lacking. In this paper we firstly develop a simplified physical model to describe the VOC emission from automobile materials, and then derive a theoretical correlation between the steady state cabin VOC concentration (Ca) and temperature (T), which indicates that the logarithm of Ca/T0.75 is in a linear relationship with 1/T. Experiments of chemical emissions in three car cabins at different temperatures (24°C, 29°C, 35°C) were conducted. Eight VOCs specified in the Chinese National Standard GB/T 27630-2011 were taken for analysis. The good agreement between the correlation and experimental results from our tests, as well as the data taken from literature demonstrates the effectiveness of the derived correlation. Further study indicates that the slope and intercept of the correlation follows linear association. With the derived correlation, the steady state cabin VOC concentration different from the test conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be helpful for analyzing temperature-dependent emission phenomena in automobiles and predicting associated health risks. PMID:26452146

  6. Characterization of VOC Emission from Materials in Vehicular Environment at Varied Temperatures: Correlation Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yang, Tao; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Lan; Ge, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    The steady state VOC concentration in automobile cabin is taken as a good indicator to characterize the material emission behaviors and evaluate the vehicular air quality. Most studies in this field focus on experimental investigation while theoretical analysis is lacking. In this paper we firstly develop a simplified physical model to describe the VOC emission from automobile materials, and then derive a theoretical correlation between the steady state cabin VOC concentration (Ca) and temperature (T), which indicates that the logarithm of Ca/T0.75 is in a linear relationship with 1/T. Experiments of chemical emissions in three car cabins at different temperatures (24°C, 29°C, 35°C) were conducted. Eight VOCs specified in the Chinese National Standard GB/T 27630–2011 were taken for analysis. The good agreement between the correlation and experimental results from our tests, as well as the data taken from literature demonstrates the effectiveness of the derived correlation. Further study indicates that the slope and intercept of the correlation follows linear association. With the derived correlation, the steady state cabin VOC concentration different from the test conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be helpful for analyzing temperature-dependent emission phenomena in automobiles and predicting associated health risks. PMID:26452146

  7. VOC emissions of smouldering combustion from Mediterranean wildfires in central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtyugina, Margarita; Calvo, Ana Isabel; Nunes, Teresa; Alves, Célia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Tarelho, Luís; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-01-01

    Emissions of trace gases and C5-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from Mediterranean wildfires occurring in Portugal in summer 2010 were studied. Fire smoke was collected in Tedlar bags and analysed for CO, CO2, total hydrocarbons (THC) and VOCs. The CO, CO2 and THC emission factors (EFs) were 206 ± 79, 1377 ± 142 and 8.1 ± 9 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. VOC emissions from Mediterranean wildfires were reported for the first time. Aromatic hydrocarbons were major components of the identified VOC emissions. Among them, benzene and toluene were dominant compounds with EFs averaging 0.747 ± 0.303 and 0.567 ± 0.422 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. Considerable amounts of oxygenated organic volatile compounds (OVOCs) and isoprenoids were detected. 2-Furaldehyde and hexanal were the most abundant measured OVOCs with EFs of 0.337 ± 0.259 and 0.088 ± 0.039 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. The isoprenoid emissions were dominated by isoprene (EF = 0.207 ± 0.195 g kg-1 dry biomass burned) and α-pinene (EF = 0.112 ± 0.093 g kg-1 dry biomass burned). Emission data obtained in this work are useful for validating and improving emission inventories, as well for carrying out modelling studies to assess the effects of vegetation fires on air pollution and tropospheric chemistry.

  8. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, , N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2013-09-01

    Emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission strengths are needed to determine the impact of VOC on atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects). The aim of this work was to contribute with measurements of tree species from the poorly described tropical vegetation in direct comparison with the quite well-investigated, highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. VOC emission from sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area were compared with twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin by an emission screening at leaf level using branch enclosures. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. The average loss rates of VOC carbon in relation to the net CO2 assimilation were found below 4% and indicating normal unstressed plant behavior. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a large variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were identified as monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene < limonene < sabinene < ß-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes. In the case of Amazonian plants no sesquiterpenes were detected. However, missing of sesquiterpenes may also be due to a lack of sensitivity of the measuring systems. Furthermore, our screening activities cover only 1% of tree species of such tropical areas as estimated based on recent biodiversity reports. Methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were found to be common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous

  9. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from light-duty gasoline vehicles in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinyue; Yao, Zhiliang; Shen, Xianbao; Ye, Yu; Jiang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    This study is the third in a series of three papers aimed at characterizing the VOC emissions of vehicles in Beijing. In this study, 30 light-duty vehicles fueled with gasoline were evaluated using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) as they were driven on a predesigned, fixed test route. All of the tested vehicles were rented from private vehicle owners and spanned regulatory compliance guidelines ranging from Pre-China I to China IV. Alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and some additional species in the exhaust were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Carbonyls were collected on 2,4-dinitrophenyhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Overall, 74 VOC species were detected from the tested vehicles, including 22 alkanes, 6 alkenes, 1 alkyne, 16 aromatics, 3 cyclanes, 10 halohydrocarbons, 12 carbonyls and 4 other compounds. Alkanes, aromatics and carbonyls were the dominant VOCs with weight percentages of approximately 36.4%, 33.1% and 17.4%, respectively. The average VOC emission factors and standard deviations of the Pre-China I, China I, China II, China III and China IV vehicles were 469.3 ± 200.1, 80.7 ± 46.1, 56.8 ± 37.4, 25.6 ± 11.7 and 14.9 ± 8.2 mg/km, respectively, which indicated that the VOC emissions significantly decreased under stricter vehicular emission standards. Driving cycles also influenced the VOC emissions from the tested vehicles. The average VOC emission factors based on the travel distances of the tested vehicles under urban driving cycles were greater than those under highway driving cycles. In addition, we calculated the ozone formation potential (OFP) using the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) method. The results of this study will be helpful for understanding the true emission levels of light-duty gasoline vehicles and will provide information for controlling VOC emissions from vehicles in Beijing, China.

  10. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the food and drink industries of the European community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passant, Neil R.; Richardson, Stephen J.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Gibson, N.; Woodfield, M. J.; van der Lugt, Jan Pieter; Wolsink, Johan H.; Hesselink, Paul G. M.

    Estimates were made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the atmosphere as a result of the industrial manufacture and processing of food and drink in the European Community. The estimates were based on a review of literature sources, industrial and government contacts and recent measurements. Data were found on seven food manufacturing sectors (baking, vegetable oil extraction, solid fat processing, animal rendering, fish meal processing, coffee production and sugar beet processing) and three drink manufacturing sectors (brewing, spirit production and wine making). The principle of a data quality label is advocated to illustrate the authors' confidence in the data, and to highlight areas for further research. Emissions of ethanol from bread baking and spirit maturation were found to be the principle sources. However, significant losses of hexane and large quantities of an ill-defined mixture of partially oxidized hydrocarbons were noted principally from seed oil extraction and the drying of plant material, respectively. This latter mixture included low molecular weight aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones, amines and esters. However, the precise composition of many emissions were found to be poorly understood. The total emission from the food and drink industry in the EC was calculated as 260 kt yr -1. However, many processes within the target industry were found to be completely uncharacterized and therefore not included in the overall estimate (e.g. soft drink manufacture, production of animal food, flavourings, vinegar, tea, crisps and other fried snacks). Moreover, the use of data quality labels illustrated the fact that many of our estimates were based on limited data. Hence, further emissions monitoring is recommended from identified sources (e.g. processing of sugar beet, solid fat and fish meal) and from uncharacterized sources.

  11. Evaluation of non-enteric sources of non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions from dairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Myeong Y.; Beene, Matt; Ashkan, Shawn; Krauter, Charles; Hasson, Alam S.

    2010-02-01

    Dairies are believed to be a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in Central California, but few studies have characterized VOC emissions from these facilities. In this work, samples were collected from six sources of VOCs (Silage, Total Mixed Rations, Lagoons, Flushing Lanes, Open Lots and Bedding) at six dairies in Central California during 2006-2007 using emission isolation flux chambers and polished stainless steel canisters. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. Forty-eight VOCs were identified and quantified in the samples, including alcohols, carbonyls, alkanes and aromatics. Silage and Total Mixed Rations are the dominant sources of VOCs tested, with ethanol as the major VOC present. Emissions from the remaining sources are two to three orders of magnitude smaller, with carbonyls and aromatics as the main components. The data suggest that animal feed rather than animal waste are the main source of non-enteric VOC emissions from dairies.

  12. Urban stress-induced biogenic VOC emissions and SOA-forming potentials in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Xie, Junfei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wang, Yuesi; Grote, Rüdiger; Block, Katja; Wildt, Jürgen; Mentel, Thomas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Hallquist, Mattias; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2016-03-01

    Trees can significantly impact the urban air chemistry by the uptake and emission of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are involved in ozone and particle formation. Here we present the emission potentials of "constitutive" (cBVOCs) and "stress-induced" BVOCs (sBVOCs) from the dominant broadleaf woody plant species in the megacity of Beijing. Based on the municipal tree census and cuvette BVOC measurements on leaf level, we built an inventory of BVOC emissions, and assessed the potential impact of BVOCs on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in 2005 and 2010, i.e., before and after realizing the large tree-planting program for the 2008 Olympic Games. We found that sBVOCs, such as fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids, and sesquiterpenes, constituted a significant fraction ( ˜ 40 %) of the total annual BVOC emissions, and we estimated that the overall annual BVOC budget may have doubled from ˜ 4.8 × 109 g C year-1 in 2005 to ˜ 10.3 × 109 g C year-1 in 2010 due to the increase in urban greening, while at the same time the emission of anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) decreased by 24 %. Based on the BVOC emission assessment, we estimated the biological impact on SOA mass formation potential in Beijing. Constitutive and stress-induced BVOCs might produce similar amounts of secondary aerosol in Beijing. However, the main contributors of SOA-mass formations originated from anthropogenic sources (> 90 %). This study demonstrates the general importance to include sBVOCs when studying BVOC emissions. Although the main problems regarding air quality in Beijing still originate from anthropogenic activities, the present survey suggests that in urban plantation programs, the selection of low-emitting plant species has some potential beneficial effects on urban air quality.

  13. Composition and emissions of VOCs in main- and side-stream smoke of research cigarettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Simone M.; Batterman, S. A.; Jia, Chunrong

    It is well known that mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke contains a vast number of chemical substances. Previous studies have emphasized SS smoke rather than MS smoke to which smokers are exposed, and most have used chamber tests that have several disadvantages such as wall losses. Emissions from standard research cigarettes have been measured, but relatively few constituents have been reported, and only the 1R4F (low nicotine) cigarette type has been tested. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of total, MS and SS smoke emissions for the 1R5F (ultra low nicotine), 2R4F (low nicotine), and 1R3F (standard nicotine) research cigarettes research cigarettes, including emission factors for a number of toxic compounds (e.g., benzene) and tobacco smoke tracers (e.g., 2,5-dimethyl furan). Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) are quantified using a dynamic dilution emission measurement system that is shown to produce accurate, rapid and reproducible results for over 30 VOCs and PM. SS and MS emissions were accurately apportioned based on a mass balance of total emissions. As expected, SS emissions greatly exceeded MS emissions. The ultra low nicotine cigarette had lower emissions of most VOCs compared to low and standard nicotine cigarettes, which had similar emissions. Across the three types of cigarettes, emissions of benzene (296-535 μg cig -1), toluene (541-1003 μg cig -1), styrene (90-162 μg cig -1), 2-dimethyl furan (71-244 μg cig -1), naphthalene (15-18 μg cig -1) and other VOCs were generally comparable to or somewhat higher than literature estimates using chamber tests.

  14. The influence of CO{sub 2} concentrations on VOC emissions from soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Goliff, W.S.; Sims, D.A.; Zielinska, B.

    1999-07-01

    A flow-through plant enclosure method was used to collect VOCs emitted from soybeans (Glycine max) grown at the Biological Sciences Center at the Desert Research Institute. Samples of leaf emissions were collected on Tenax-Carbosieve cartridges and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the Organic Analytical Laboratory at DRI. Samples of VOCs were also collected in 6 liter stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. Among the VOCs observed were {alpha}-pinene and limonene. The soybeans were grown in two plant enclosures with carbon dioxide levels of 250 ppm and 1,000 ppm. Leaf emissions from soybeans grown in the enclosure with 250 ppm CO{sub 2} showed higher concentrations of {alpha}-pinene, while limonene concentrations remained unchanged.

  15. A Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccot, Stephen D.; Watson, Joel J.; Jones, Julian W.

    1992-06-01

    As part of an effort to assess the potential impacts associated with global climate change, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development is supporting global atmospheric chemistry research by developing global scale estimates of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions (excluding methane). Atmospheric chemistry models require, as one input, an emissions inventory of VOCs. Consequently, a global inventory of anthropogenic VOC emissions has been developed. The inventory includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds which possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The technical approach used to develop this inventory involved four major steps. The first step was to identify the major anthropogenic sources of VOC emissions in the United States and to group these sources into 28 general source groups. Source groups were developed to represent general categories such as "sources associated with oil and natural gas production" and more specific categories such as savanna buming. Emission factors for these source groups were then developed using different techniques and data bases. For example, emission factors for oil and natural gas production were estimated by dividing the United States' emissions from oil and gas production operations by the amount of oil and natural gas produced in the United States. Multiplication of these emission factors by production/consumption statistics for other countries yielded global VOC emission estimates for specific source groups within those countries. The final step in development of the VOC inventory was to distribute emissions into 10° by 10° grid cells using detailed maps of population and industrial activity. The results of this study show total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of

  16. Effect of heat waves on VOC emissions from vegetation and urban air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, G.; Kuik, F.; Lauer, A.; Bonn, B.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase carbon storage, storm water control, provision of space for recreation, as well as poverty alleviation. Although these multiple benefits speak positively for urban greening programs, the programs do not take into account how close human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Elevated temperatures together with anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants distinguish the urban system. Urban and sub-urban vegetation responds to ambient changes and reacts with pollutants. Neglecting this coupling may lead to unforeseen drawbacks of urban greening programs. The potential for emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions to produce ozone has long been recognized. This potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how heat waves affect emissions of VOC from urban vegetation and corresponding ground-level ozone. In this study we use Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in Berlin, Germany during the 2006 heat wave. VOC emissions from vegetation are simulated with MEGAN 2.0 coupled with WRF-CHEM. Our preliminary results indicate that contribution of VOCs from vegetation to ozone formation may increase by more than twofold during the heat wave period. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas under changing climate and discuss associated tradeoffs.

  17. The effectiveness of circulating aeration in air and high purity oxygen systems for control of VOC emissions from aeration basins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Keener, T.C.; Bishop, P.L.; Orton, T.L.; Wang, M.; Siddiqui, K.F.

    1997-12-31

    A simple steady state circulating aeration system (CAS) model has been used to study the effects of volatility and degradability on the fate of VOCs in both air and high purity oxygen (HPO) systems. With increase of circulation ratio in an air CAS, air emissions by stripping can be significantly reduced for compounds of low degradabilities and high volatilities. Enhancement of biodegradation is more significant for compounds of high degradabilities and volatilities. A large portion of VOCs will remain in the wastewater when circulation ratio is high, especially for VOCs that are difficult to degrade. In HPO systems, emissions by stripping are much less than air systems. However, VOCs will remain in the wastewater if they have poor degradabilities. Volatilities of VOCs are not important in HPO systems. Due to their wide range and large uncertainties, degradation rate constants are a major factor determining the effectiveness of a CAS for VOC emission control

  18. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A STANDARD TEST METHOD FOR VOC EMISSIONS FROM INTERIOR LATEX AND ALKYD PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives details of a small-chamber test method, developed by EPA for characterizing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from inte-rior latex and alkyd paints. Current knowledge about VOC, including haz-ardous air pollutant, emissions from in-terior paints generated...

  19. MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF REFINERY AND SYNFUELS VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) EMISSION DATA. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT AND APPENDIX A

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a model for estimating emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum refineries and synfuel plants. The model, responding to a need to define a consistent and comprehensive approach for estimating VOC emissions from these tw...

  20. MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF REFINERY AND SYNFUELS VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) EMISSION DATA. VOLUME 2. APPENDICES B AND C

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a model for estimating emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum refineries and synfuel plants. The model, responding to a need to define a consistent and comprehensive approach for estimating VOC emissions from these tw...

  1. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A STANDARD TEST METHOD FOR VOC EMISSIONS FROM INTERIOR LATEX PAINT AND ALKYD PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives details of a small-chamber test method developed by the EPA for characterizing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior latex and alkyd paints. Current knowledge about VOC, including hazardous air pollutant, emissions from interior paints generated...

  2. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for Volatile Organic Compound... Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a... with a vapor collection system designed to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced...

  3. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for Volatile Organic Compound... Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a... with a vapor collection system designed to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced...

  4. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for Volatile Organic Compound... Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a... with a vapor collection system designed to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced...

  5. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for Volatile Organic Compound... Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a... with a vapor collection system designed to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced...

  6. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for Volatile Organic Compound... Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a... with a vapor collection system designed to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced...

  7. Ozone Trends Across the United States over a Period of Decreasing NOx and VOC Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work, we evaluate ambient ozone trends at urban, suburban, and rural monitoring sites across the United States over a period of decreasing NOx and VOC emissions (1998–2013). We find that decreasing ozone trends generally occur in the summer, in less urbanized areas,...

  8. SUMMARY OF JOINT DOD, EPA RESEARCH TO CONTROL VOC AND TOXIC EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the results of joint projects conducted during last 6 years by the Department of Defense and EPA to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic emissions. ajor emphasis has been on product coating and metal finishing: (1) paint stripping using plastic...

  9. THE EFFECTS OF AN OILY-PHASE ON VOC EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research findings will substantially improve the existing knowledge base related to VOC and HAP emissions from three phase systems (oil, water, air). Results should be of interest to both the regulating and regulated communities of Texas in the context that the rel...

  10. Observational constraints on biogenic VOC emission model estimates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Chemistry and transport models require accurate estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in order to simulate the atmospheric constituents controlling air quality and climate, such as ozone and particles, and so the uncertainties associated with BVOC estimates may be limiting the development of effective air quality and climate management strategies. BVOC emission models include driving variables and algorithms that span scales from the leaf level to entire landscapes. While considerable effort has been made to improve BVOC emission models in the past decades, there have been relatively few attempts to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimates or to rigorously assess emission modeling approaches. This presentation will summarize the availability of observations that can be used to constrain BVOC emission models including flux measurements (leaf enclosure, above canopy tower, and aircraft platforms) and ambient concentrations of BVOC and their products. Results from studies targeting specific BVOC emission processes (e.g., the response of isoprene emission to drought and the response of monoterpene emissions to bark beetle attack) will be shown and the application of these observations for BVOC model evaluation will be discussed. In addition, the results from multi-scale BVOC emission studies (leaf enclosure, whole canopy flux tower, regional aircraft eddy covariance) will be presented and a approach for incorporating these observations into a community model testbed will be described and used to evaluate regional BVOC emission models.

  11. An above-canopy flux network for improving and evaluating biogenic VOC emission models: GLOBal Organic Emissions NETwork (GLOBOENET) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.; Turnipseed, A.; Duhl, T.; Shertz, S.; Karl, T.; Monson, R.; Litvak, M. E.; Jardine, K. J.; Abrell, L.; Geron, C.; Seco, R.

    2009-12-01

    The first estimates of global total biogenic VOC emissions were reported almost 50 years ago. Observations over the following three decades were incorporated into a monthly biogenic VOC emission inventory on a 1 degree by 1 degree grid, called the GEIA natural VOC emission inventory, in the early 1990s and began to be widely used in global chemistry and transport models. Also in the 1990s, regulatory air quality modelers began to routinely include regional biogenic VOC emission inventories using procedures such as BEIS/BEIS2/BEIS3. These approaches are still used today although there have been advances in the past two decades that have improved our understanding of the processes controlling biogenic VOC emissions. Current models, including the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), have integrated some of this information and are being incorporated as on-line components of coupled models. A major limitation in the advancement and evaluation of these models is the lack of suitable observations from representative ecosystems. We have initiated a community activity, called GLOBOENET, to address the need for observations that can be used to improve and evaluate these models. GLOBOENET is enhancing existing flux towers, such as those participating in FLUXNET, by adding biogenic VOC flux measurements to sites that are well characterized and are already measuring fluxes of CO2, water and energy. The biogenic VOC flux measurements are made with a low-cost and low-power Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system that has been evaluated by comparison to a PTRMS eddy covariance system. This presentation will describe the GLOBOENET approach and present some initial results. This includes seasonal and interannual variations at a forested site in Colorado that demonstrates the importance of climate, phenology and stress-induced emissions. Results from additional sites in Arizona, North Carolina, Michigan and New Mexico will also be shown and a strategy for

  12. New observations of VOC emissions and concentrations in, above, and around the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Ormeno, E.; Holzinger, R.; Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T. R.; Guenther, A. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Harley, R. A.; Karlik, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Large portions of the Central Valley of California are out of compliance with current state and federal air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, and the relative importance of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC emissions to their photochemical production in this region remains uncertain. In 2009-2011 multiple measurement campaigns were completed investigating the VOC emission inventory and concentration distributions. In 2009 BVOC emissions from more than 20 species of major agricultural crops in California were measured in a greenhouse using branch enclosures by both PTRMS and in-situ GC. Overall, crops were found to emit low amounts of BVOC compared to the natural forests surrounding the valley. Crops mainly emitted methanol and terpenes, with a broad array of other species emitted at lower levels, and all the measured crops showed negligible emissions of isoprene. Navel oranges were the largest crop BVOC emitters measured so a full year of flux measurements were made in an orange grove near Visalia in 2010 by eddy covariance(EC)-PTRMS with two multi-week periods of concentration measurements by hourly in-situ GC, and one month of high mass resolution flux measurements by EC-PTR-TOF-MS. The dominant BVOC emissions from the orange grove were methanol and terpenes, followed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and a low level of emissions for many other species. In 2011 aircraft eddy covariance measurements of BVOC fluxes were made by EC-PTRMS covering a large area of California as part of the California Airborne Bvoc Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign aimed at improving BVOC emission models on regional scales, mainly profiling BVOC emissions from oak woodlands surrounding the Central Valley. In 2010, hourly in-situ VOC measurements were made via in-situ GC in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel. Measurements by

  13. Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, T. M.; Müller, M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Karl, T.; Graus, M.; Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Brilli, F.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+ - water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmolC m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  14. VOC Emission and Deposition Eddy Covariance Fluxes above Grassland using PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, T. M.; Müller, M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Karl, T.; Graus, M.; Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Brilli, F.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2010-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+ - water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmolC m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  15. Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, T. M.; Müller, M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Karl, T.; Graus, M.; Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Brilli, F.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2010-09-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+-water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmol C m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  16. Calix[4]arene coated QCM sensors for detection of VOC emissions: Methylene chloride sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Temel, Farabi; Tabakci, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the sensing studies of QCM sensors with coated some calixarene derivatives bearing different functional groups for some selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) such as acetone, acetonitrile, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride (MC), N,N-dimethylformamide, 1,4-dioxane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, xylene, methanol, n-hexane and toluene. The initial experiments have revealed that whole the calix[4]arene modified QCM sensors exhibited strongest sensing ability to MC emissions. Thus, the detailed studies were performed for only MC emissions after the determination of relatively more effective calix-coated QCM sensors for MC emissions in aqueous media. The results demonstrated that QCM sensor coated with calix-7 bearing both amino and imidazole groups was most useful sensor for MC emissions with 54.1ppm of detection limit. Moreover, it was understood that cyclic structures, H-bonding capabilities and also good preorganization properties of calixarene derivatives played an important role in VOC sensing processes. PMID:27130112

  17. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-01

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.

  18. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  19. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: compounds, sources, and implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission r...

  20. Organic liquids storage tanks volatile organic compounds (VOCS) emissions dispersion and risk assessment in developing countries: the case of Dar-es-Salaam City, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Msafiri M

    2006-05-01

    The emission estimation of nine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from eight organic liquids storage tanks companies in Dar-es-Salaam City Tanzania has been done by using US EPA standard regulatory storage tanks emission model (TANKS 4.9b). Total VOCs atmospheric emission has been established to be 853.20 metric tones/yr. It has been established further that petrol storage tanks contribute about 87% of total VOCs emitted, while tanks for other refined products and crude oil were emitting 10% and 3% of VOCs respectively. Of the eight sources (companies), the highest emission value from a single source was 233,222.94 kg/yr and the lowest single source emission value was 6881.87 kg/yr. The total VOCs emissions estimated for each of the eight sources were found to be higher than the standard level of 40,000 kg/yr per source for minor source according to US EPA except for two sources, which were emitting VOCs below the standard level. The annual emissions per single source for each of the VOCs were found to be below the US EPA emissions standard which is 2,000 kg/yr in all companies except the emission of hexane from company F1 which was slightly higher than the standard. The type of tanks used seems to significantly influence the emission rate. Vertical fixed roof tanks (VFRT) emit a lot more than externally floating roof tanks (EFRT) and internally floating roof tanks (IFRT). The use of IFRT and EFRT should be encouraged especially for storage of petrol which had highest atmospheric emission contribution. Model predicted atmospheric emissions are less than annual losses measured by companies in all the eight sources. It is possible that there are other routes for losses beside atmospheric emissions. It is therefore important that waste reduction efforts in these companies are directed not only to reducing atmospheric emissions, but also prevention of the spillage and leakage of stored liquid and curbing of the frequently reported illegal siphoning of stored products

  1. Urban stress-induced biogenic VOC emissions impact secondary aerosol formation in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardo, A.; Xie, J.; Zheng, X.; Wang, Y.; Grote, R.; Block, K.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hallquist, M.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schnitzler, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    Trees can significantly impact the urban air chemistry by the uptake and emission of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are involved in ozone and particle formation. Here we present the emission potentials of "constitutive" (cBVOCs) and "stress-induced" BVOCs (sBVOCs) from the dominant broadleaf woody plant species in the megacity of Beijing. Based on an inventory of BVOC emissions and the tree census, we assessed the potential impact of BVOCs on secondary particulate matter formation in 2005 and 2010, i.e., before and after realizing the large tree-planting program for the 2008 Olympic Games. We found that sBVOCs, such as fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids and sesquiterpenes, constituted a significant fraction (∼ 15 %) of the total annual BVOC emissions, and we estimated that the overall annual BVOC budget may have doubled from ∼ 3.6 × 109 g C year-1 in 2005 to ∼ 7.1 × 109 g C year-1 in 2010 due to the increase in urban greens, while at the same time, the emission of anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) could be lowered by 24 %. Based on our BVOC emission assessment, we estimated the biological impact on SOA mass formation in Beijing. Compared to AVOCs, the contribution of biogenic precursors (2-5 %) for secondary particulate matter in Beijing was low. However, sBVOCs can significantly contribute (∼ 40 %) to the formation of total secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources; apparently, their annual emission increased from 1.05 μg m-3 in 2005 to 2.05 μg m-3 in 2010. This study demonstrates that biogenic and, in particular, sBVOC emissions contribute to SOA formation in megacities. However, the main problems regarding air quality in Beijing still originate from anthropogenic activities. Nevertheless, the present survey suggests that in urban plantation programs, the selection of plant species with low cBVOC and sBVOC emission potentials have some possible beneficial effects on urban air quality.

  2. Uptake and emission of VOCs near ground level below a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Vlasenko, A.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C.; Makar, P. A.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.; Brown, S.

    2014-09-01

    Understanding of the atmosphere/forest canopy exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires insight into the deposition, emission, and chemical reactions of VOCs below the canopy. Between 18 July and 9 August 2009, VOCs were measured with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at six heights between 1 and 6 m beneath a 23 m high mixed-forest canopy. Measured VOCs included methanol, isoprene, acetone, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MACR + MVK), monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes. There are pronounced differences in the behaviour of isoprene and its by-products and that of the terpenes. Non-terpene mixing ratios increase with height, suggesting predominantly downward fluxes. In contrast, the terpene mixing ratios decrease with height, suggesting upward fluxes. A 1-D canopy model was used to compare results to measurements with and without surface deposition of isoprene and MACR + MVK and emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Results suggest deposition velocities of 2.7 mm s-1 for isoprene and 1.2 mm s-1 for MACR + MVK and daytime surface emission rates of 63 μg m-2 h-1 for monoterpenes. The modelled isoprene surface deposition is approximately 2% of the canopy-top isoprene emissions and the modelled emissions of monoterpenes comprise approximately 15 to 27% of the canopy-top monoterpene emissions to the atmosphere. These results suggest that surface monoterpene emissions are significant for forest canopy/atmosphere exchange for this mixed-forest location and surface uptake is relatively small for all the species measured in this study.

  3. Reduction of VOC emissions from aeration basins using mobil hoods and circulating aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hongwei; Keener, T.C.; Bishop, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    As regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) with large treatment capacities will be required to reduce their emissions of volatile organic hazardous air pollutants, primarily from the aeration basins. Previous studies indicate that circulating aeration may significantly reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, most of which are from the upstream portion of the aeration basin. Based on these findings, circulating aeration facilitated by partial tank covering using mobile hoods is proposed as an effective emission control strategy. Using this technology, less VOCs will be stripped into and concentrated in reduced amount of off-gases which can be efficiently treated by conventional control technologies. Compared with fixed rigid covers of aeration basins, mobile hoods are inexpensive to construct and easy to operate.

  4. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Dairy Cows and Their Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Holzinger, R.; Mitloehner, F.; Goldstein, A.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are typically defined as those directly emitted from plants, but approximately 6% of global net primary production is consumed by cattle that carry out enteric fermentation and then emit VOCs that could also be considered biogenic. Current regulatory estimates suggest that dairy cattle in central California emit VOCs at rates comparable to those from passenger vehicles in the region, and thus contribute significantly to the extreme non-attainment of ozone standards there. We report PTR-MS measurements of ammonia and VOCs, and cavity-enhanced-absorption gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measurements of CH4, emitted from dairy cattle in various stages of pregnancy/lactation and their waste. Experiments were conducted in chambers at UC Davis that simulate freestall cow housing conditions. CH4 fluxes ranged from 125-374 lb/cow/year. The compounds with the highest fluxes from '3 cows+waste' treatments were: ammonia (1-18), methanol (0-2.3), acetone+propanal (0.2-0.7), dimethylsulfide (0-0.4), and mass 109 (likely ID = p-cresol; 0-0.3) in lb/cow/year. Mass 60 (likely ID = trimethylamine) and acetic acid were also abundant. There were 10s of additional compounds with detectable, but small, emissions. A few compounds that were likely emitted (i.e. ethanol, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine) were not quantified by the PTR-MS. The total flux for all measured organic gases (TOG = CH4 + PTR-MS VOCs(including acetone+propanal)) averaged 246±45 lb/cow/year for '3 cows+waste' treatments, and was dominated by methane (>98%). TOG flux for 'waste only' treatments averaged 1.1±0.1 lb/cow/year, and was instead dominated by VOC (>84%). The PTR-MS VOCs as a percent of TOG (0.6±0.2%) emitted from '3 cows+waste' treatments in chamber conditions was a factor of 10 smaller than that currently estimated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition, the ozone forming potentials of the most abundant VOCs are only about 10% those of typical combustion or plant

  5. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. t includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and ...

  6. Challenges in using flux chambers to measure ammonia and VOC emissions from open feedlot pen surfaces and retention ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few methodologies currently available to estimate ammonia and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from livestock operations have been adequately validated for accuracy. Flow-through flux chambers and wind tunnels are sometimes used; however, ammonia and VOC flux from pen or pond surfaces are a...

  7. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from oil and natural gas activities: compositional comparison of 13 major shale basins via NOAA airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Aikin, K. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Warneke, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Graus, M.; Tokarek, T. W.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The recent and unprecedented increase in natural gas production from shale formations is associated with a rise in the production of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including natural gas plant liquids (e.g., ethane, propane, and butanes) and liquid lease condensate (e.g., pentanes, hexanes, aromatics and cycloalkanes). Since 2010, the production of natural gas liquids and the amount of natural gas vented/flared has increased by factors of ~1.28 and 1.57, respectively (U.S. Energy and Information Administration), indicating an increasingly large potential source of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. Emission of VOCs may affect local and regional air quality due to the potential to form tropospheric ozone and organic particles as well as from the release of toxic species such as benzene and toluene. The 2015 Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNex) campaign studied emissions from oil and natural gas activities across the central United States in order to better understand their potential air quality and climate impacts. Here we present VOC measurements from 19 research flights aboard the NOAA WP-3D over 11 shale basins across 8 states. Non-methane hydrocarbons were measured using an improved whole air sampler (iWAS) with post-flight analysis via a custom-built gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The whole air samples are complimented by higher-time resolution measurements of methane (Picarro spectrometer), ethane (Aerodyne spectrometer), and VOCs (H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometer). Preliminary analysis show that the Permian Basin on the New Mexico/Texas border had the highest observed VOC mixing ratios for all basins studied. We will utilize VOC enhancement ratios to compare the composition of methane and VOC emissions for each basin and the associated reactivities of these gases with the hydroxyl radical, OH, as a proxy for potential ozone formation.

  8. Characterization of VOC Emissions from Various Components of Dairy Farming and their effect on San Joaquin Valley Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M. M.; Meinardi, S.; Krauter, C.; Blake, D.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley Air Basin in Central California is classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a serious non-attainment area for health-based eight-hour federal ozone (smog) standard (1). In August 2005, the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District issued a report identifying dairies as a main source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter in the valley (2). Among these compounds, we have found that ethanol, methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde are produced in major quantities throughout the San Joaquin valley as by-products of yeast fermentation of silage and photochemical oxidation. These oxygenates, especially ethanol, play an important role in ozone (O3) formation within the valley. Three different types of sampling protocols were employed in order to determine the degree of enhancement of the four oxygenates in the valley air shed, as well as to determine their sources, emission profiles and emission rates. An assessment of the emissions of these oxygenates in the valley was achieved using data obtained on low altitude flights through the valley and from ground level samples collected thoughout the valley. The photochemical production of ozone was calculated for each of the four oxygenates and approximately one hundred other quantified VOCs. Based on the Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) scale and concentrations of each oxygenate in the atmosphere, as much as 20% of O3 production in the valley is from ethanol and its photochemical by-product acetaldehyde. Our findings suggest that improvement to the valley air quality may be obtained by focusing on instituting new silage containment practices and regulations. 1. Lindberg, J. "Analysis of the San Joaquin Valley 2007 Ozone Plan." State of California Air Resources Board. Final Draft Staff Report. 5/30/2007. 2. Crow, D., executive director/APCO. "Air Pollution Control Officer's Determination of VOC Emisison Factors for Dairies." San Joaquin Valley Air

  9. Effect of VOC emissions from vegetation on urban air quality during hot periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, Galina; Kuik, Friderike; Bonn, Boris; Lauer, Axel; Grote, Ruediger; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase of carbon storage, storm water control, and recreational space, as well as at poverty alleviation. These urban greening programs, however, do not take into account how closely human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Compared with the surroundings of cities, elevated temperatures together with high anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants are quite typical in urban systems. Urban and sub-urban vegetation respond to changes in meteorology and air quality and can react to pollutants. Neglecting this coupling may lead to unforeseen negative effects on air quality resulting from urban greening programs. The potential of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants to produce ozone has long been recognized. This ozone formation potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how emissions of VOC from urban vegetation affect corresponding ground-level ozone and PM10 concentrations in summer and especially during heat wave periods. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in the Berlin-Brandenburg region, Germany during the two summers of 2006 (heat wave) and 2014 (reference period). VOC emissions from vegetation are calculated by MEGAN 2.0 coupled online with WRF-CHEM. Our preliminary results indicate that the contribution of VOCs from vegetation to ozone formation may increase by more than twofold during heat wave periods. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas in the context of a changing climate and discuss potential tradeoffs of urban greening programs.

  10. Behavior of VOCs and carbonyl compounds emission from different types of wallpapers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, Arong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m²·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products. PMID:24747540

  11. Behavior of VOCs and Carbonyl Compounds Emission from Different Types of Wallpapers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, ARong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m2·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products. PMID:24747540

  12. Temporal variation of VOC emission from solvent and water based wood stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Loiotile, Annamaria Demarinis; Fracchiolla, Roberta; Palmisani, Jolanda; Saracino, Maria Rosaria; Tutino, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Solvent- and water-based wood stains were monitored using a small test emission chamber in order to characterize their emission profiles in terms of Total and individual VOCs. The study of concentration-time profiles of individual VOCs enabled to identify the compounds emitted at higher concentration for each type of stain, to examine their decay curve and finally to estimate the concentration in a reference room. The solvent-based wood stain was characterized by the highest Total VOCs emission level (5.7 mg/m3) that decreased over time more slowly than those related to water-based ones. The same finding was observed for the main detected compounds: Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes, Styrene, alpha-Pinene and Camphene. On the other hand, the highest level of Limonene was emitted by a water-based wood stain. However, the concentration-time profile showed that water-based product was characterized by a remarkable reduction of the time of maximum and minimum emission: Limonene concentration reached the minimum concentration in about half the time compared to the solvent-based product. According to AgBB evaluation scheme, only one of the investigated water-based wood stains can be classified as a low-emitting product whose use may not determine any potential adverse effect on human health.

  13. Improving continuous monitoring of VOC emissions from alternative fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of alternative fertilizers, such as biosolids, to agricultural fields is an environmentally beneficial practice. Biosolids provide producers with a ready source of organic matter and plant nutrients instead of using commercial fertilizers. However, concerns regarding nuisance odors cause...

  14. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser. PMID:25464701

  15. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser. PMID:25508332

  16. VOC PREVENTION OPTIONS FOR SURFACE COATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses some of the volatile organic compound (VOC) prevention options for surface coating. Most small surface coating industries are considered to be stationary area sources. Although stationary area sources may account for as much as 50% of national VOC emissions, t...

  17. Investigation of the emissions and profiles of a wide range of VOCs during the Clean air for London project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Rachel; Lidster, Richard; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Lee, James; Hopkins, James; Whalley, Lisa; Lewis, Alistair

    2014-05-01

    The majority of the World's population live in polluted urbanized areas. Poor air quality is shortening life expectancy of people in the UK by an average 7-8 months and costs society around £20 billion per year.[1] Despite this, our understanding of atmospheric processing in urban environments and its effect on air quality is incomplete. Air quality models are used to predict how air quality changes given different concentrations of pollution precursors, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The urban environment of megacities pose a unique challenge for air quality measurements and modelling, due to high population densities, pollution levels and complex infrastructure. For over 60 years the air quality in London has been monitored, however the existing measurements are limited to a small group of compounds. In order to fully understand the chemical and physical processes that occur in London, more intensive and comprehensive measurements should be made. The Clean air for London (ClearfLo) project was conducted to investigate the air quality, in particular the boundary layer pollution, of London. A relatively new technique, comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) [2] was combined with a well-established dual channel GC (DC-GC) [3] system to provide a more comprehensive measurement of VOCs. A total of 78 individual VOCs (36 aliphatics, 19 monoaromatics, 21 oxygenated and 2 halogenated) and 10 groups of VOCs (8 aliphatic, 1 monoaromatic and 1 monoterpene) from C1-C13+ were quantified. Seasonal and diurnal profiles of these VOCs have been found which show the influence of emission source and chemical processing. Including these extra VOCs should enhance the prediction capability of air quality models thus informing policy makers on how to potentially improve air quality in megacities. References 1. House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee, Air Quality: A follow-up report, Ninth Report of session 2012-12. 2. Lidster, R.T., J.F. Hamilton

  18. Dynamic relationship between the VOC emissions from a Scots pine stem and the tree water relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Chan, Tommy; Aalto, Juho; Kolari, Pasi; Rissanen, Kaisa; Hakola, Hannele; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana

    2013-04-01

    The stems of coniferous trees contain huge storages of oleoresin. The composition of oleoresin depends on e.g. tree species, age, provenance, health status, and environmental conditions. Oleoresin is under pressure in the extensive network of resin ducts in wood and needles. It flows out from a mechanically damaged site to protect the tree by sealing the wounded site. Once in contact with air, volatile parts of oleoresin evaporate, and the residual compounds harden to make a solid protective seal over damaged tissues. The hardening time of the resin depends on evaporation rate of the volatiles which in turn depends on temperature. The storage is also toxic to herbivores and attracts predators that restrict the herbivore damage. Despite abundant knowledge on emissions of volatile isoprenoids from foliage, very little is known about their emissions from woody plant parts. We set up an experiment to measure emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes as well as two oxygenated VOCs, methanol and acetone, from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stem and branches. The measurements were started in early April and continued until mid-June, 2012. Simultaneously, we measured the dynamics of whole stem and xylem diameter changes, stem sap flow rate and foliage transpiration rate. These measurements were used to estimate A) pressure changes inside the living stem tissue and the water conducting xylem, B) the refilling of stem water stores after winter dehydration (the ratio of sap flow at the stem base to water loss by foliage), and C) the increase in tree water transport capacity (the ratio of maximum daily sap flow rate to the diurnal variation in xylem pressure) during spring due to winter embolism refilling and/or the temperature dependent root water uptake capacity. The results show that already very early in spring, significant VOC emissions from pine stem can be detected, and that they exhibit a diurnal cycle similar to that of ambient temperature. During the highest emission

  19. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  20. Field emission electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, A.K.; Cohen, M.L.

    2000-05-02

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm{sup 2} at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  1. The Amazonian Floodplains, an ecotype with challenging questions on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another factor usually overlooked but very important for the tropical rainforest in Amazonia is regular flooding. According to recent estimates, the total Amazonian floodplain area easily ranges up to 700,000 km^2, including whitewater river floodplains (várzea) blackwater regions (igapó) and further clearwater regions. Regarding the total Amazonian wetlands the area sums up to more than 2.000.000 km^2, i.e. 30% of Amazonia. To survive the flooding periods causing anoxic conditions for the root system of up to several months, vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies. One is to switch over the root metabolism to fermentation, thus producing ethanol as one of the main products. Ethanol is a toxic metabolite which is transported into the leaves by the transpiration stream. From there it can either be directly emitted into the atmosphere, or can be re-metabolized to acetaldehyde and/or acetate. All of these compounds are volatile enough to be partly released into the atmosphere. We observed emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid under root anoxia. Furthermore, plant stress induced by flooding also affected leaf primary physiological processes as well as other VOC emissions such as the release of isoprenoids and other volatiles. For example, Hevea spruceana could be identified as a monoterpene emitting tree species behaving differently upon anoxia depending on the origin, with increasing emissions of the species from igapó and decreasing with the corresponding species from várzea. Contrasting such short term inundations, studies of VOC emissions under long term conditions (2-3 months) did not confirm the ethanol/acetaldehyde emissions, whereas emissions of other VOC species decreased considerably. These results demonstrate that the transfer of our knowledge

  2. Derived Emission Rates and Photochemical Production Rates of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Associated with Oil and Natural Gas Operations in the Uintah Basin, UT During a Wintertime Ozone Formation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Graus, M.; Yuan, B.; Edwards, P. M.; Brown, S. S.; Wild, R. J.; Roberts, J. M.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Uintah Basin, an oil and natural gas extraction field in Utah, experienced extremely high levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ozone during the winter of 2013 - up to 100 ppmv carbon and 150 ppbv O3. Here we interpret VOCs measured during an ozone formation event from 31 Jan 2013 to 8 Feb 2013. Ratios of VOCs show strong diurnal cycles and week-long trends. A simple analysis was applied to ratios of aromatic VOCs measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) to explain these trends and to estimate emission rates of aromatic VOCs from oil and natural gas extraction, VOC emission ratios relative to benzene, and ambient [OH]. The analysis incorporates the following assumptions: (1) the source composition of emitted VOCs and their emission rates were temporally and spatially constant, and (2) the removal of VOCs was governed by reaction with OH, diurnal profile of which is constrained by measured photolysis rates. The main findings are (1) the emission rate of methane, extrapolated from the emission rate of benzene, is on the same order as an independent estimate from aircraft measurements of methane in 2012, (2) the derived aromatic emission ratios are consistent with source contributions from both oil and gas producing wells, and (3) calculated daily OH concentrations are low, peaking at 1x106 molecules cm-3. The analysis was extended to investigate secondary production of oxygenated VOCs measured by PTR-MS. The analysis is able to explain daytime production, but it does not adequately explain nighttime behavior, which may be affected by complex deposition to snow and ice surfaces. The relative carbon mass of primary and secondary compounds was calculated and compared to observations. At the end of the ozone formation event (day 6), our analysis predicts that secondary (oxidized) VOCs should comprise about 40% of total carbon mass. However, only 12% of these compounds are accounted for by measured oxygenated VOCs and organic aerosol

  3. Long-term variations in natural, terrestrial VOC emissions: 1000-1990 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, J. C.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-12-01

    Natural vegetation emits large amounts of volatile organic compounds (e.g. monoterpenes and isoprene) into the atmosphere. Estimates of the total global source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the past millennium range between 1050 and 1100 Tg yr-1 (Adams et al. 2001). BVOCs have multiple impacts on atmospheric chemistry, for example they are believed to affect ozone formation, decrease the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere and substantially alter the concentrations of tropospheric aerosol in continental regions (Seinfeld et al., 1998). Organic compounds constitute 20-90% of the submicron aerosol mass, depending on location. Most of this contribution is secondary, meaning that the emitted VOCs are oxidized in the atmosphere followed by gas-to-particle conversion of the oxidation products (Jimenez et al., 2009). BVOCs emitted by vegetation are the dominant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere (Guenther et al., 1995). Estimates on the present-day organic aerosol budgets are improving rapidly, but it is unclear how the organic aerosol fraction has evolved in the past. Such information is, however, needed for accurate estimates on the climate forcing caused by aerosols. Understanding the factors that have governed BVOC emissions in the past is a prerequisite for completing this task. We evaluate the variability of global fluxes of isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes over the last millennium using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) (Guenther et al., 2006). MEGAN estimates the emission activity of BVOCs using meteorological (Air temperature, solar radiation, soil moisture) and landcover (Plant Functional Types (PFTs) and Leaf Area Index (LAI)) inputs. The model is driven off-line using meteorological fields from existing Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) (Jungclaus et al. 2010) millennium simulations, and reconstructions of the global changes PFTs and LAI (Kaplan et al., 2010

  4. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from rural vehicles and their ozone formation potential in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Wu, Bobo; Shen, Xianbao; Cao, Xinyue; Jiang, Xi; Ye, Yu; He, Kebin

    2015-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of papers aimed at understanding volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from motor vehicles in Beijing using on-board emission measurements, focusing specifically on rural vehicles (RVs). In this work, 13 RVs, including 6 different 3-wheel (3-W) RVs and 7 different 4-wheel (4-W) RVs, were examined using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS) as the vehicles were driven on predesigned fixed test routes in rural areas of Beijing. Overall, 50 VOC species were quantified in this study, including 18 alkanes, 5 alkenes, 11 aromatics, 13 carbonyls and 3 other compounds. The average emission factor (EF) of the total VOCs for the 4-W RVs based on the distance traveled was 326.2 ± 129.3 mg/km, which is 2.5 times greater than that of the 3-W RVs. However, the VOC emissions for the 3-W RVs had higher EFs based on their CO2 emissions due to the different fuel economies of the two types of RVs. Formaldehyde, toluene, acetaldehyde, m-xylene, p-xylene, isopentane, benzene, ethylbenzene, n-pentane, 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane and butenal were the dominant VOC species from the RVs, accounting for an average of 68.6% of the total VOC emissions. Overall, the RVs had high proportions of aromatics and carbonyls. The ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were 670.6 ± 227.2 and 1454.1 ± 643.0 mg O3/km for the 3-W and 4-W RVs, respectively, and approximately 60%-70% of the OFP resulted from carbonyls. We estimated that the 3-W and 4-W RVs accounted for approximately 50% and 10%, respectively, of the total OFP caused by diesel vehicles (including diesel trucks and RVs) in Beijing in 2012. Thus, more attention should be given to VOC emissions and their impact on ozone formation.

  5. Evaluations of NOx and highly reactive VOC emission inventories in Texas and their implications for ozone plume simulations during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; McKeen, S. A.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Trainer, M.; Richter, A.; Angevine, W. M.; Atlas, E.; Bianco, L.; Boersma, F. K.; Brioude, J.; Burrows, J. P.; de Gouw, J.; Fried, A.; Gleason, J.; Hilboll, A.; Mellqvist, J.; Peischl, J.; Richter, D.; Rivera, C.; Ryerson, T.; Te Lintel Hekkert, S.; Walega, J.; Warneke, C.; Weibring, P.; Williams, E.

    2011-07-01

    Satellite and aircraft observations made during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) detected strong urban, industrial and power plant plumes in Texas. We simulated these plumes using the Weather Research and Forecasting - Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model with input from the US EPA's 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI-2005), in order to evaluate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the cities of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth. We compared the model results with satellite retrievals of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns and airborne in-situ observations of several trace gases including NOx and a number of VOCs. The model and satellite NO2 columns agree well for regions with large power plants and for urban areas that are dominated by mobile sources, such as Dallas. However, in Houston, where significant mobile, industrial, and in-port marine vessel sources contribute to NOx emissions, the model NO2 columns are approximately 50 %-70 % higher than the satellite columns. Similar conclusions are drawn from comparisons of the model results with the TexAQS 2006 aircraft observations in Dallas and Houston. For Dallas plumes, the model-simulated NO2 showed good agreement with the aircraft observations. In contrast, the model-simulated NO2 is ~60 % higher than the aircraft observations in the Houston plumes. Further analysis indicates that the NEI-2005 NOx emissions over the Houston Ship Channel area are overestimated while the urban Houston NOx emissions are reasonably represented. The comparisons of model and aircraft observations confirm that highly reactive VOC emissions originating from industrial sources in Houston are underestimated in NEI-2005. The update of VOC emissions based on Solar Occultation Flux measurements during the field campaign leads to improved model simulations of ethylene, propylene, and formaldehyde. Reducing NOx emissions in the Houston Ship Channel and increasing highly reactive VOC

  6. Evaluations of NOx and highly reactive VOC emission inventories in Texas and their implications for ozone plume simulations during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; McKeen, S. A.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Trainer, M.; Richter, A.; Angevine, W. M.; Atlas, E.; Bianco, L.; Boersma, K. F.; Brioude, J.; Burrows, J. P.; de Gouw, J.; Fried, A.; Gleason, J.; Hilboll, A.; Mellqvist, J.; Peischl, J.; Richter, D.; Rivera, C.; Ryerson, T.; Te Lintel Hekkert, S.; Walega, J.; Warneke, C.; Weibring, P.; Williams, E.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite and aircraft observations made during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) detected strong urban, industrial and power plant plumes in Texas. We simulated these plumes using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model with input from the US EPA's 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI-2005), in order to evaluate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the cities of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth. We compared the model results with satellite retrievals of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns and airborne in-situ observations of several trace gases including NOx and a number of VOCs. The model and satellite NO2 columns agree well for regions with large power plants and for urban areas that are dominated by mobile sources, such as Dallas. However, in Houston, where significant mobile, industrial, and in-port marine vessel sources contribute to NOx emissions, the model NO2 columns are approximately 50%-70% higher than the satellite columns. Similar conclusions are drawn from comparisons of the model results with the TexAQS 2006 aircraft observations in Dallas and Houston. For Dallas plumes, the model-simulated NO2 showed good agreement with the aircraft observations. In contrast, the model-simulated NO2 is ~60% higher than the aircraft observations in the Houston plumes. Further analysis indicates that the NEI-2005 NOx emissions over the Houston Ship Channel area are overestimated while the urban Houston NOx emissions are reasonably represented. The comparisons of model and aircraft observations confirm that highly reactive VOC emissions originating from industrial sources in Houston are underestimated in NEI-2005. The update of VOC emissions based on Solar Occultation Flux measurements during the field campaign leads to improved model simulations of ethylene, propylene, and formaldehyde. Reducing NOx emissions in the Houston Ship Channel and increasing highly reactive VOC emissions

  7. A standard reference for chamber testing of material VOC emissions: Design principle and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yinping; Xiong, Jianyin; Li, Mu

    2012-02-01

    Environmental chambers are widely used to test formaldehyde and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from indoor materials and furniture. However, there is a lack of a proven method to assess the precision of the test results of the chamber system. In this paper, we describe a new standard reference, LIFE (liquid-inner tube diffusion-film-emission), to address this problem. This reference has the following salient features: (1) Constant emission rate, with less than 3.0% change with an ambient airflow speed (>0.014 m/s) at furniture emission range (0.1-1.0 mg/m 3 in a 30 m 3 chamber with air change rate of 1/h) under standard chamber test conditions as specified by ISO 16000-9 (23 °C, 50% RH); (2) Long duration of emissions, on the order of 1000 h; (3) Easy to store, apply and maintain. The design principle and criteria of the LIFE reference are presented. An analytical model and dimensionless analysis were applied to optimize the factors influencing the emission rate, and experiments were conducted to validate the analytical results. In addition, the equivalent emission parameters of the reference, i.e., the initial emittable concentration, the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient, were determined through a three-parameter optimizing regression. This can then be used to check the reliability of a chamber method for testing these three parameters. The developed standard reference should prove useful for calibrating chamber systems for indoor material/furniture VOC emissions tests.

  8. Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds and Observations of VOC Oxidation at Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, K. A.; Pho, T.; Vasta, A.; Lee, B. H.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to oxidant concentrations and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in forested environments depends on the emission rates of these compounds. Recent findings have suggested that the emission rates of BVOCs and the range of species emitted could be larger than previously thought. In this study, Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to obtain fast (<1 Hz) measurements of the predominant BVOC species, including isoprene, monoterpenes, and oxygenated BVOCs, above the canopy at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA) during the summers of 2005, 2007, and 2008. Together with vertical wind data, these measurements are used to determine fluxes of BVOCs out of the forest using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method. Concentrations of additional VOCs, including methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein and terpene oxidation products were also measured. Isoprene is the dominant emitted species, with peak emission rates and midday mixing ratios of ca. 4 mg isoprene m-2 h-1 and ca. 5 ppbv, respectively. Isoprene emission rates are expected to vary with temperature and radiation (PAR) levels, and are compared to standard emission algorithms based on these parameters. Interannual variability in isoprene emission rates is also observed, and contributing factors are explored. In contrast to isoprene, maximum monoterpene concentrations typically were less than 1 ppbv and occurred in the early evening, with a local minimum at midday. Monoterpene fluxes are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of isoprene. The amplitude of the flux diurnal cycle suggests monoterpene emissions at Harvard Forest may exhibit light dependence as well as temperature dependence. Fluxes of oxygenated VOCs, including methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and oxygenated terpenes that have rarely been observed previously, are also reported, and the dependence of their emission rates on factors such as time of year

  9. Effects of long-term and short-term warming on VOC emissions from a Subarctic heath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valolahti, Hanna; Faubert, Patrick; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2013-04-01

    It is predicted that the temperature increase during the next 100 years will be highest in the high latitudes. Temperature is also the main factor affecting the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by plants. In the Subarctic, the VOC emissions appear to be even more sensitive to temperature changes than in temperate systems, probably because the plant species are adapted to colder climate. The arctic ecosystems are very sensitive to any disturbances, and therefore it is important to study climate change effects and predict future responses in these areas. Long-term climate change experiment with elevated temperature and litter addition treatments has been running on a subarctic heath in Abisko, North Sweden since 1999. Five treatments (1. unmanipulated control, 2. long-term warming, 3. short-term warming, 4. litter addition and 5. litter addition + warming) are replicated in six blocks. In 2010, eight vegetation-soil-chamber-based VOC collection campaigns were made. VOCs were collected into adsorbent cartridges, which were analyzed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Point quadrant analysis was used to investigate the species composition in the different treatments, and the vegetation data was used as an explaining factor for the different VOC emission profiles between treatments. Elevated temperature significantly increased the total VOC emission from the subarctic heath. Most significant effects were found for the emissions of isoprene and sesquiterpenes. The short-term and long-term temperature treatments differed for the emissions of total terpenoids. According to these results, elevated temperature has both long- and short term effects on VOC-emissions. In the short term, direct temperature effect increases VOC-emissions. In the long term, indirect effects via vegetation changes dominate. After the release into the atmosphere, the lifetime of VOCs is from seconds to days. They participate in secondary organic aerosol formation

  10. Prediction of short-term and long-term VOC emissions from SBR bitumen-backed carpet under different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Chen, Q.; Bluyssen, P.M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents two models for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from carpet. One is a numerical model using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique for short-term predictions, the other an analytical model for long-term predictions. The numerical model can (1) deal with carpets that are not new, (2) calculate the time-dependent VOC distributions in a test chamber or room, and (3) consider the temperature effect on VOC emissions. Based on small-scale chamber data, both models were used to examine the VOC emissions under different temperatures from polypropene styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) bitumen-backed carpet. The short-term predictions show that the VOC emissions under different temperatures can be modeled solely by changing the carpet diffusion coefficients. A formulation of the Arrhenius relation was used to correlate the dependence of carpet diffusion coefficient with temperature. The long-term predictions show that it would take several years to bake out the VOCs, and temperature would have a major impact on the bake-out time.

  11. VOC emissions from Norway spruce ( Picea abies L. [Karst]) twigs in the field—Results of a dynamic enclosure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabmer, W.; Kreuzwieser, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Cojocariu, C.; Graus, M.; Rennenberg, H.; Steigner, D.; Steinbrecher, R.; Hansel, A.

    During the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used for online determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by Norway spruce ( Picea abies L. [Karst]) twigs in a dynamic sampling enclosure. Emissions of isoprenoids (isoprene and monoterpenes) and oxygenated VOC (OVOC; acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, and ethanol) were investigated. Emissions showed clear diurnal patterns with high daytime emission rates amounting to 1.8 μg C g -1 dwt h -1 for the sum of monoterpenes and in the range of 0.1 to 0.6 μg C g -1 dwt h -1 for isoprene>acetone>ethanol>methanol. Data were used to validate existing models on isoprene and monoterpene emissions and to discuss environmental and physiological factors affecting VOC emissions. Isoprene and acetaldehyde emission rates were best modelled applying the Guenther 1993 temperature and solar radiation algorithm. Emissions of monoterpenes, acetone and ethanol were best described by a temperature-only exponential algorithm. Using these model approaches a maximum emission variability of 66% was covered (isoprene). Poor r2 values ranging from 0.15 to 0.42 were typical for oxygenated VOC emission modelling indicating the need for model improvement e.g. development of process-based models describing the emission as a result of biochemical de novo synthesis as well as physico-chemical transport properties inside the leaves.

  12. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L.; Medvedev, Dmitry

    2004-07-28

    Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented.

  13. StreamVOC--A Deterministic Source-Apportionment Model to Estimate Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in Rivers and Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asher, William E.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the construction and verification of the model, StreamVOC, that estimates (1) the time- and position-dependent concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and streams as well as (2) the source apportionment (SA) of those concentrations. The model considers how different types of sources and loss processes can act together to yield a given observed VOC concentration. Reasons for interest in the relative and absolute contributions of different sources to contaminant concentrations include the need to apportion: (1) the origins for an observed contamination, and (2) the associated human and ecosystem risks. For VOCs, sources of interest include the atmosphere (by absorption), as well as point and nonpoint inflows of VOC-containing water. Loss processes of interest include volatilization to the atmosphere, degradation, and outflows of VOC-containing water from the stream to local ground water. This report presents the details of StreamVOC and compares model output with measured concentrations for eight VOCs found in the Aberjona River at Winchester, Massachusetts. Input data for the model were obtained during a synoptic study of the stream system conducted July 11-13, 2001, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The input data included a variety of basic stream characteristics (for example, flows, temperature, and VOC concentrations). The StreamVOC concentration results agreed moderately well with the measured concentration data for several VOCs and provided compound-dependent SA estimates as a function of longitudinal distance down the river. For many VOCs, the quality of the agreement between the model-simulated and measured concentrations could be improved by simple adjustments of the model input parameters. In general, this study illustrated: (1) the considerable difficulty of quantifying correctly the locations and magnitudes of ground-water-related sources of

  14. Spatial and seasonal variation and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a heavily industrialized region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumanoglu, Yetkin; Kara, Melik; Altiok, Hasan; Odabasi, Mustafa; Elbir, Tolga; Bayram, Abdurrahman

    2014-12-01

    Source apportionment is generally applied to a time series of pollutant concentrations measured at a single site. However, in a complex airshed having multiple pollutant sources, it may be helpful to collect samples from several sites to ensure that some of them have low contributions from specific sources. Ambient air samples (n = 160) were collected by passive sampling during four seasons in 2009 and 2010 at forty different sites in Aliaga, Turkey to determine the spatial, seasonal variations and possible sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Fifty-eight VOCs (Σ58VOC) were detected. Σ58VOC concentrations ranged between 0.1 and 1770 μg m-3 (avg ± SD, 67 ± 193 μg m-3). Aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally predominant with a high percentage of contribution (31%-88%) at all sites. Aromatic VOCs were the second highest group (8-50%), followed by halogenated VOCs (1-24%) and oxygenated VOCs (0.04-5.9%). Highly variable spatial distribution of ambient VOC concentrations suggested that the major sources in this region were industrial plants. Generally, VOC concentrations were higher in summer than in winter probably due to increased volatilization from their sources at higher ambient temperatures. However, high atmospheric VOC concentrations were also observed in winter and fall near the petroleum refinery and petrochemical complex, probably due to the calm conditions and high atmospheric stability that is commonly encountered during the winter months in the area, restricting the dilution of pollutants. The newest version of EPA PMF (V5.0) (Positive Matrix Factorization) having the capability of handling multiple site data was used for source apportionment. Refinery and petroleum products, petrochemical industry, solvent use and industrial processes, and vehicle exhaust were the identified VOC sources in the study area, contributing 56%, 22%, 12%, and 10%, respectively to the Σ58VOC concentrations. Carcinogenic risks due to lifetime exposure to seven VOCs

  15. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  16. Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-16

    land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  17. Testing VOC emission measurement techniques in wood-coating industrial processes and developing a cost-effective measurement methodology.

    PubMed

    Ojala, S; Lassi, U; Keiski, R L

    2006-01-01

    Availability of reliable emission measurements of concentrated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) bear great significance in facilitating the selection of a feasible emission abatement technique. There are numerous methods, which can be used to measure VOC emissions, however, there is no single method that would allow sampling of the whole range of volatile organics. In addition, research efforts are usually directed to the development of measuring VOCs in diluted concentrations. Therefore, there is a need for a novel measurement method, which can give reliable results while entailing simple operations and low costs. This paper represents a development effort of finding a reliable measurement procedure. A methodology is proposed and used to measure solvent emissions from coating processes. PMID:15893795

  18. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    PubMed

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    attribution. CMB methods have been developed over the past several decades to quantify sources of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions and atmospheric particulate matter. These emerging capabilities for making measurements of methane and species coemitted with methane, rapidly, precisely, and at relatively low cost, used together with CMB methods of source attribution can lead to a better understanding of methane emission sources. Application of the CMB approach to source attribution in the Barnett Shale oil and gas production region in Texas demonstrates both the importance of extensive and simultaneous source testing in the region being analyzed and the potential of CMB method to quantify the relative strengths of methane emission sources. PMID:27314507

  19. Global emissions of terpenoid VOCs from terrestrial vegetation in the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, A.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the millennial variability (1000 A.D.-2000 A.D.) of global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene, and sesquiterpene, and Lund-Potsdam-Jena-General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission trends were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have significant short-term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively), and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1(15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1(10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1(10% and 4% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  20. Global emissions of terpenoid VOCs from terrestrial vegetation in the last millennium

    PubMed Central

    Acosta Navarro, J C; Smolander, S; Struthers, H; Zorita, E; Ekman, A M L; Kaplan, J O; Guenther, A; Arneth, A; Riipinen, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the millennial variability (1000 A.D.–2000 A.D.) of global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene, and sesquiterpene, and Lund-Potsdam-Jena-General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission trends were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have significant short-term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr−1 (13% and 19% less than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively), and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr−1(15% and 20% less than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr−1(10% and 6% higher than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr−1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr−1(10% and 4% higher than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation. PMID:25866703

  1. Modelling VOC source impacts on high ozone episode days observed at a mountain summit in Hong Kong under the influence of mountain-valley breezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, S. H. M.; Saunders, S. M.; Guo, H.; Ling, Z. H.; Jiang, F.; Wang, X. M.; Wang, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    A top-down approach to evaluate high ozone (O3) formation, attributed to different emission sources, is developed for anti-cyclonic conditions in a region of Hong Kong influenced by meso-scale circulations. A near-explicit photochemical model coupled with the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.2) is used to investigate the chemical characteristics in the region. Important features have been enhanced in this model including the photolysis rates, simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) Radiation Model, as well as hourly variation of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) concentration input from on-site sampling. In general, the combined model gives a reasonably good representation of high O3 levels in the region. The model successfully captured a multi-day O3 event in the autumn of 2010. Source apportionment via Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was carried out on the sampled VOC data, to determine the major sources in the region. Based on the outcomes of the PMF source apportionment, a sensitivity analysis using the developed photochemical model was conducted and used to estimate O3 reduction under different source removal regimes. Results indicate that vehicular emissions are the dominant VOC source contributing to O3 formation. This study has demonstrated a potentially efficient secondary pollutants control methodology, using a combined field measurements and modelling approach.

  2. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  3. Light-duty vehicle PM and VOC speciated emissions at differing ambient temperatues with ethanol blend gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the rise in the use of ethanol-blend gasoline in the U.S., interest is increasing in how these fuel blends affect PM and VOC emissions. EPA conducted a study characterizing emissions from two flex-fuel and one non-flex-fueled light-duty vehicles operated on a chassis dynamom...

  4. Variability of HCHO over the Southeastern United States observed from space: Implications for VOC emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Mickley, L. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Cohan, D. S.; Li, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chance, K.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) have been used as proxies for biogenic isoprene emissions, but the observed multiscale variability of HCHO is still not well understood. We use OMI and GOME2 HCHO column densities at 0.5x0.5 degree resolution to investigate both fine-scale and interannual patterns of HCHO variability in the Southeastern United States. By several statistical methods (step-wise variable selection, principle component analysis, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), we find that temperature is the most important meteorological variable controlling HCHO, with implications for better understanding the variability of isoprene emissions. Both OMI and GOME2 observe a turnover of HCHO at high temperatures (307~310 K), as expected from process models of isoprene emission. Daily GOME2 and OMI HCHO column densities match well (R=0.91, bias = 9%) in 2007-2008, implying that GOME2 data can provide continuity following the degradation of OMI data after 2008. We used the fine-pixel information from OMI to search for HCHO enhancements in urban areas such as Houston that could serve as proxy for anthropogenic VOC emissions. We could find no such enhancements, including in winter. This illustrates the complete dominance of biogenic over anthropogenic VOC emissions in the Southeastern United States. Using the long-term archive of HCHO satellite measurements compiled by de Smedt et al. [GRL, 37, L18808, 2010], we find a significant decline in HCHO column density over the Southeastern United States from 1996 to 2011. Such a trend might be related to changes in ecosystem type or function.

  5. Biogenic voc emissions development and its impacts on regional o3 in PRD, china

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuemei; Shuping, Situ; Guenther, Alex; Chen, Fei; Wu, Zhiyong

    2010-05-01

    The new Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has been coupled with WRF-Chem to investigate the influence of biogenic violate organic carbon (BVOC ) emissions on the regional distribution of O3 and SOA concentration in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. MEGAN first estimate an emission factor which represents the net above-canopy emission rate expected at optimal conditions, and use a number of environmental correction factor based on photosynthetically activated radiation (PAR) and leaf temperature to adjust the emission rate due to deviations from optimal conditions. Total emissions are the sum of emissions estimated for each plant functional type (PFT) in a given grid cell. Our model simulations estimated showed: (1) Total annual BVOCs emissions were 339.01× 106 kg, which is 40.68% of annual AVOCs emissions and 28.91% of total VOCs emission in PRD in 2006. Isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and OVOCs contributed about 31.94%, 39.23%, 3.27% and 25.56% of the estimated total annual emissions respectively. α- pinene and β- pinene were the major components in monoterpene, which contributed 28.09% and 26.98% to the total annual monoterpene emissions respectively;β-caryophyllene andα-farnesene were two important sesquiterpene, and they contributed to 22.31% and 18.76% of the annual sesquiterpene emissions.(2) BVOCs emissions have large variations in their spatial distributions, which were mainly resulted from the differences in the geographical distribution of vegetation. Their emission amounts were larger in the places where urbanization were relative lower and plants distributions were higher.(3) Emissions of terpenoids had significant annual and diurnal variations and the largest emission rate occurred at 13:00 local time while the amount of emission in summer is the largest.(4) There were significant terpenoids emission rate (≥1.21.2 kg km-2h-1) in the remote areas in PRD region where the emissions of AVOCs were low, and

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 63, subpart ZZZZ, Table 2A do not have to comply with the CO emission standards of... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards...

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart ZZZZ, Table 2a do not have to comply with the CO emission... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP...

  8. On-line field measurements of VOC emissions from a spruce tree at SMEAR Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Noe, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated VOC emissions from a Norway spruce tree (Picea abies) in a hemi-boreal mixed forest in September and October 2012, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry techniques, applied in a dynamic branch enclosure system that was automatically operated with an electrical compressor. Parallel to BVOC measurements a vast amount of atmospheric (CO2, CH4, H2O, CO, particles) and meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, photosynthetic active radiation, wind speed and direction, precipitation) parameters were measured in the ambient atmosphere and inside the cuvette enclosure (temperature, relative humidity, O3). Prior to the measuring period, an innovatory experimental setup was built at Järvselja forest station, in order to accomplish the detection of BVOC and minimize sampling losses. Therefore, a new inlet line, consisting of 19.4m of heated and isolated glass tube was constructed. The new inlet system applied, allowed the on-line detection and calculation of sesquiterpene (SQT) emission rates for the first time in a hemi-boreal forest site. It total, 12 atmospheric relevant BVOCs were continuously monitored for a three week period and the emission rates were derived. Along with diurnal profiles and continuous timeless, some interesting observations showed the possibility of ozone effect on SQT emissions, the possibility of radiation effect on MT emissions, the higher induced emissions due to mechanical stress and the possibility for a valid intercomparison between different spruce trees located in mountain Kleiner Feldberg (Germany) and in Järvseja forest station (Estonia).

  9. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  10. Seasonal and species-specific response of VOC emissions by Mediterranean woody plant to elevated ozone concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llusià, J.; Peñuelas, J.; Gimeno, B. S.

    Although certain factors controlling plant emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are reasonably well understood, the influence of elevated ozone concentrations as abiotic stress is mostly unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of ozone concentrations on seasonal biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by different Mediterranean plant species in open top chambers (OTC). Three ozone treatments were established: filtered air (F), non-filtered air (NF), and fumigated air (NF+) adding 40 nl l -1 of ozone over NF. We studied the response of VOC emission in saplings of four Mediterranean woody plant species and subspecies: Ceratonia siliqua L., Olea europaea L., Quercus ilex spp. ilex L., and Quercus ilex spp. rotundifolia L. as representative of natural Mediterranean vegetation. No visible symptoms were detected on the leaves. No significant effect was found on net photosynthetic rates or stomatal conductance except for an increase in net photosynthetic rates in Quercus ilex ilex in spring and summer and an overall slight increase in Quercus ilex rotundifolia. Emissions of the total VOCs from Ceratonia siliqua in summer, and from Olea europaea and Quercus ilex rotundifolia in spring increased in ozone fumigated OTC in comparison with F or NF OTC. Decreased emissions were found in Quercus ilex rotundifolia in summer. There were no significant differences between ozone fumigation treatments for the other plant species and seasons. When considering particular VOCs, the results were also variable among species and time of the year. While α-pinene emissions decreased with ozone fumigation in Olea europaea, α-pinene and limonene emissions increased in Quercus ilex ilex. The responses of these particular VOCs did not always match the responses of total VOCs. In spite of this strong variability, when considering overall annual data for all species and seasons, there were increased net photosynthetic rates (37%) and limonene (95%) and total VOC (45

  11. Forecasting of VOC emissions from traffic and industry using classification and regression multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Stojić, Andreja; Maletić, Dimitrije; Stanišić Stojić, Svetlana; Mijić, Zoran; Šoštarić, Andrej

    2015-07-15

    In this study, advanced multivariate methods were applied for VOC source apportionment and subsequent short-term forecast of industrial- and vehicle exhaust-related contributions in Belgrade urban area (Serbia). The VOC concentrations were measured using PTR-MS, together with inorganic gaseous pollutants (NOx, NO, NO2, SO2, and CO), PM10, and meteorological parameters. US EPA Positive Matrix Factorization and Unmix receptor models were applied to the obtained dataset both resolving six source profiles. For the purpose of forecasting industrial- and vehicle exhaust-related source contributions, different multivariate methods were employed in two separate cases, relying on meteorological data, and on meteorological data and concentrations of inorganic gaseous pollutants, respectively. The results indicate that Boosted Decision Trees and Multi-Layer Perceptrons were the best performing methods. According to the results, forecasting accuracy was high (lowest relative error of only 6%), in particular when the forecast was based on both meteorological parameters and concentrations of inorganic gaseous pollutants. PMID:25828408

  12. Influence of Precision of Emission Characteristic Parameters on Model Prediction Error of VOCs/Formaldehyde from Dry Building Material

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wenjuan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-01-01

    Mass transfer models are useful in predicting the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde from building materials in indoor environments. They are also useful for human exposure evaluation and in sustainable building design. The measurement errors in the emission characteristic parameters in these mass transfer models, i.e., the initial emittable concentration (C0), the diffusion coefficient (D), and the partition coefficient (K), can result in errors in predicting indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentrations. These errors have not yet been quantitatively well analyzed in the literature. This paper addresses this by using modelling to assess these errors for some typical building conditions. The error in C0, as measured in environmental chambers and applied to a reference living room in Beijing, has the largest influence on the model prediction error in indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentration, while the error in K has the least effect. A correlation between the errors in D, K, and C0 and the error in the indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentration prediction is then derived for engineering applications. In addition, the influence of temperature on the model prediction of emissions is investigated. It shows the impact of temperature fluctuations on the prediction errors in indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentrations to be less than 7% at 23±0.5°C and less than 30% at 23±2°C. PMID:24312497

  13. First Airborne PTR-ToF-MS Measurements of VOCs in a Biomass Burning Plume: Primary Emissions and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Mikoviny, Tomas; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert; Weinheimer, Andrew; Fried, Alan; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-04-01

    The NASA DISCOVER-AQ mission saw the first airborne deployment of a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The newly developed instrument records full mass spectra at 10 Hz and resolves pure hydrocarbons from their oxygenated isobars (e.g. isoprene and furan). Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at high spatio-temporal resolution (0.1 s or 10 m) improve our capabilities in characterizing primary emissions from fires and in studying chemical transformations in aging plumes. A biomass-burning plume from a forest understory fire was intercepted by the NASA P-3B near Dublin, GA, USA on September 29, 2013. VOCs were measured at high time resolution along with CO, CO2, NOx, O3, HCHO, aerosols and other air quality and meteorological parameters. Repeated measurements in the immediate proximity of the fire were used to determine VOC emission ratios and their temporal variations. Repeated longitudinal and transversal plume transects were carried out to study plume aging within the first hour of emission. We will discuss the observed OH-NOx-VOC chemistry (including O3 formation), the observed changes in the elemental composition of VOCs (e.g. O:C ratios) and the observed formation of SOA.

  14. First Airborne PTR-ToF-MS Measurements of VOCs in a Biomass Burning Plume: Primary Emissions and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthaler, A.; Müller, M.; Eichler, P.; Mikoviny, T.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Yang, M. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Fried, A.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA DISCOVER-AQ mission saw the first airborne deployment of a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The newly developed instrument records full mass spectra at 10 Hz and resolves pure hydrocarbons from their oxygenated isobars (e.g. isoprene and furan). Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at high spatio-temporal resolution (0.1 s or 10 m) improve our capabilities in characterizing primary emissions from fires and in studying chemical transformations in aging plumes. A biomass-burning plume from a forest understory fire was intercepted by the NASA P-3B near Dublin, GA, USA on September 29, 2013. VOCs were measured at high time resolution along with CO, CO2, NOx, O3, HCHO, aerosols and other air quality and meteorological parameters. Repeated measurements in the immediate proximity of the fire were used to determine VOC emission ratios and their temporal variations. Repeated longitudinal and transversal plume transects were carried out to study plume aging within the first hour of emission. We will discuss the observed OH-NOx-VOC chemistry (including O3 formation), the observed changes in the elemental composition of VOCs (e.g. O:C ratios) and the observed formation of SOA.

  15. Trends in the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on chassis dynamometers in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo; Fuentes, Mark; Rieger, Paul

    2014-02-01

    We present fleet average VOC emission rate trends for the longest running in-use light-duty gasoline Vehicle Surveillance Program (VSP) in Southern California. Tailpipe emissions data from a limited number of vehicles tested as part of the VSP show that the 2003 fleet average emissions decreased by about 80% for most VOCs relative to the 1995 fleet. Vehicle evaporative emission rates decreased more than 90% for most compounds from the 1999 to the 2003 fleet. Tailpipe benzene-normalized emission rate ratios for most compounds were relatively stable. Evaporative emission rate ratios and weight percentages have changed significantly from the 1999 fleet to the 2003 fleet indicating a significant change in the evaporative emission species patterns. The tailpipe NMHC (Non-Methane HydroCarbon) emission reductions observed between the 1995 fleet and the 2003 fleet likely resulted from the retirement of non-catalyst vehicles in the fleets (49%) and the combined effect of the turn-over of catalyst-equipped vehicles and switch to Phase III gasoline (27%). Our results are consistent with those observed in the Swiss tunnel study. Benzene-normalized emission rate ratios for C2 compounds, aldehydes, and 1,3 butadiene are much higher in tailpipe exhaust than those in evaporative emissions. C4-C5 hydrocarbon ratios in evaporative emissions are much higher than those in exhaust. C8 aromatic compound ratios are comparable for tailpipe and evaporative emissions (hot-soak). Such ratio differences can be used to estimate the relative contributions of vehicle exhaust and evaporative emission to ambient VOCs. The contribution of emissions from malfunctioning vehicles to total fleet emissions increased from 16% to 32% for the 1995 fleet to the 2003 fleet even though the percentage of malfunctioning vehicles in the fleet decreased from 10% to 5%. Most malfunctioning vehicles are vehicles that are at least 10 years old and generally have higher acetylene emission rate ratios. The effective

  16. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid m...

  17. Livermore Site Southeast Corner VOC Source Study-B419/511 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, P A; Maley, M P; Aarons, G F; Gregory, S

    2000-06-01

    A passive soil gas study was conducted in the Building 419/511 (B419/511) area to screen for volatile organic compound (VOC) source locations in June 2000. Results of this study are presented with the most recent ground water contaminant plume maps, as well as the historic surface vapor analysis and soil contamination maps. Limited analytical data exists for the area directly north and west of B419. Because of extensive VOCs in ground water directly under the north end of B419, it is important to determine if the contaminant plume migrated to that location or if it originated from activities at B419. The results of this and previous investigations will aid in defining (1) the source(s) of contamination, (2) the placement and management of future remediation wells, and (3) remediation strategies. A brief description of the building's function and contamination summary is presented in Section 1.1. Section 1.2 presents the methodology used for the passive soil gas study. Section 1.3 is a discussion of the passive soil gas study and the hydrogeologic analysis. Concluding remarks and recommendations for future source investigations and remediation designs are found in Section 1.4.

  18. Modeling the effects of VOC/NOx emissions on ozone synthesis in the cascadia airshed of the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Barna, M; Lamb, B; Westberg, H

    2001-07-01

    A modeling system consisting of MM5, Calmet, and Calgrid was used to investigate the sensitivity of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) reductions on ozone formation within the Cascadia airshed of the Pacific Northwest. An ozone episode that occurred on July 11-14, 1996, was evaluated. During this event, high ozone levels were recorded at monitors downwind of Seattle, WA, and Portland, OR, with one monitor exceeding the 1 hr/120 ppb National Ambient Air Quality Standard (at 148 ppb), and six monitors above the proposed 8 hr/80 ppb standard (at 82-130 ppb). For this particular case, significant emissions reductions, between 25 and 75%, would be required to decrease peak ozone concentrations to desired levels. Reductions in VOC emissions alone, or a combination of reduced VOC and NOx emissions, were generally found to be most effective; reducing NOx emissions alone resulted in increased ozone in the Seattle area. When only VOC emissions were curtailed, ozone reductions occurred in the immediate vicinity of densely populated areas, while NOx reductions resulted in more widespread ozone reductions. PMID:15658221

  19. National survey of MTBE and other VOCs in community drinking-water sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clawges, Rick M.; Rowe, Barbara L.; Zogorski, John S.

    2001-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is added to gasoline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase the octane level and to reduce carbon monoxide and ozone levels in the air. The chemical properties and widespread use of MTBE can result in contamination of private and public drinking-water sources. MTBE contamination is a concern in drinking water because of the compound's low taste and odor threshold and potential human-health effects.

  20. Specification of Biogenic VOC Emission Data in the Coupled System of Regional Climate and Atmospheric Chemistry/Aerosols Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemankova, K.; Huszar, P.

    2009-12-01

    Coupling of regional climate model RegCM (Pal et al., 2007) and atmospheric chemistry/aerosols model CAMx (Environ, 2006) is being developed at our department under the CECILIA project (EC 6th FP) with the aim to study climate forcing due to atmospheric chemistry/aerosols on regional scale. Regional climate model RegCM with the resolution of 10 km drives transport, chemistry and dry/wet deposition of the CAMx model being operated on the Central and Eastern European domain and consequently the radiative active agents from the CAMx model enter the radiative transfer schemes for the calculation of heating rate changes in the regional climate model. In order to increase the accuracy of land cover data in this model system, a new input dataset has been prepared and used for the calculation of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources. This dataset is mainly based on the single tree species database from the european project of JRC in Ispra - Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Uses in Europe (AFOLU) which covers most of the model domain. For the locations where AFOLU data were not available, i.e. basically non-EU areas, the USGS Eurasia land cover database has been used. Both databases are available in 1 km resolution. Emission factors for new land cover categories were obtained either from the laboratory measurements or from the literature. The Guenther et al. (1995) model algorithm has been used for the calculation of biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission fluxes. Effects of new land cover and BVOC emission data on the CAMx model simulations of low level ozone in the year 2000 have been studied. Improvement of model results when compared with the measured data may be seen, especially in the simulation of extreme values such as ozone summer maxima. References: - ENVIRON Corp., 2006. CAMx User’s Guide, version 4.40 - Guenther A., Hewitt N., Erickson D., Fall R., Geron Ch., Graedel T., Harley P., Klinger L., Lerdau M., McKay W. A., Pierce T., Scholes

  1. Characterization of VOCs Across Pennsylvania: Assessing Emissions from Rural, Forested, Agricultural and Natural Gas Drilling-Impacted Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannas, A. M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Ramos-Garcés, F.; Wang, D. K.; Martins, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of both biogenic and anthropogenic origin are important to troposphere chemistry, particularly the formation of photochemical smog and secondary organic aerosol. There is concern that increased natural gas exploration may lead to increased emissions of certain VOCs during well development and due to fugitive emissions from operational well sites and pipelines. For a six-day period in June 2012, a variety of VOCs were measured using canister sampling from a mobile measurement platform. Transects from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania were studied, with samples obtained in rural, forested, urban, farm-impacted and gas well-impacted sites. As expected, biogenic VOCs and isoprene oxidation products were enhanced in forested regions, while anthropogenic non-methane hydrocarbons were enhanced in urban areas. BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) was enhanced in urban areas, but the concentrations of BTEX measured near developing and existing natural gas sites were similar to rural and forested sites. Halogenated hydrocarbons and Freon compounds were consistent at all site locations. We will discuss the specific concentrations and signatures of these compounds and assess the potential impact of agricultural activities and gas well development on the observed VOC concentrations and variability.

  2. RERANKING OF AREA SOURCES IN LIGHT OF SEASONAL/ REGIONAL EMISSION FACTORS AND STATE/LOCAL NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an effort to provide a better understanding of air pollution area sources and their emissions, to prioritize their importance as emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and to identify sources for which better emission estimation methodologies a...

  3. Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Zhang, J.; Lusztyk, E.; Magee, R.J.

    1998-12-31

    VOC emission profile is an important parameter to describe the building materials and consumer products for their impact on indoor air quality (IAQ). Emission profiles are dependent on the test conditions. It is therefore very important to standardize testing conditions in order to compare emission factors and decay constants reported by various testing laboratories. Standard chamber test conditions (Chamber temperature of 23 C, relative humidity of 50 %, air change rate of 1 ACH, and specimen loading ratio of 0.4 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}) have been proposed for using small environment chamber (0.05 m{sup 3}) by an international consortium research program led by the Institute for Research in Construction, NRCC. VOC emissions (excluding formaldehyde) from three building materials, a particleboard, a carpet with rubber backing and a vinyl floor tile were measured under above defined test conditions. Samples of the chamber air were collected using multi-sorbent tubes during the chamber tests, and analyzed by thermal desorption (TD) GC/FID. GC peaks were identified using TD/GC/MS. Major VOCs emitted were solvents, aldehydes, C10-and C15-terpenes for the particleboard, alkanes, alkenes and 4-phenyl cyclohexene for the carpet. VOC emissions from vinyl floor tile were dominated by a mixture of two alkyl propanoates, which eluted late (at about 230 C) on GC column. Total VOCs in the chamber air reached at 1100, 210 and 2400 m g/m3 for the particleboard, carpet and vinyl floor tile respectively. The analytical variation was around 5 to 10 % judged by a number of duplicates analyzed during the tests. First order exponential decay model and power law decay model were used to describe the emission factor decay from 12 h after the start of dynamic chamber tests. The power law model was found to better fit the experimental data than the first order decay model.

  4. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  5. EMISSIONS OF BIOGENIC OXIDANT AND PM PRECURSORS: VERY HIGH REACTIVITY VOCS AND SURFACE LAYER CHEMISTRY ABOVE FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) -- chemicals emitted naturally by the green foliage of a forest, for example -- have been repeatedly shown to be important contributors to ozone pollution levels in many parts of the country. Recently, both the National Rese...

  6. CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) EMISSIONS BY CATALYTIC INCINERATION. VOLUME 1. ASSESSMENT OF CATALYTIC INCINERATION AND COMPETING CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is part of a two-phase EPA effort to assess the performance, suitability, and costs of various technologies to control emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In Phase 1, information was assembled from the literature on the use and cost of using catalytic incin...

  7. Light-Duty GDI Vehicle PM and VOC Speciated Emissions at Differing Ambient Temperatures with Ethanol Blend Gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the rise in the use of ethanol-blend gasoline in the US and more manufacturers implementing gasoline direct injection (GDI) technologies, interest is increasing in how these fuel blends affect PM and VOC emissions in GDI technology vehicles. EPA conducted a study characteri...

  8. Surface application of soybean peroxidase and calcium peroxide for reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure slurry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate and compare topical and fully mixed treatments of soybean peroxidase and calcium peroxide (SBP/CaO2) for reducing odorous volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from swine manure slurry. The five treatments consisted of a control, the fully mixed ...

  9. ESTIMATION OF THE RATE OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM SOLVENT-BASED INDOOR COATING MATERIALS BASED ON PRODUCT FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two computational methods are proposed for estimation of the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from solvent-based indoor coating materials based on the knowledge of product formulation. The first method utilizes two previously developed mass transfer models with ...

  10. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  11. Simulation of VOC emissions from treatment of an industrial wastewater in a biological treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, R.K.; Larson, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    At an Air Products` chemical plant, wastewater is treated biologically prior to its discharge to a nearby river. The wastewater treatment system consists of a large aeration basin with gravity clarification for solids-liquid separation. The aeration basin utilizes floating surface aerators for providing oxygen and mixing energy and treats an average of 1.2 MGD of wastewater flow. The biological system operates at a 4 day HRT and F/M (TOC basis) of 0.06 and consistently produces a final effluent low in BOD and TSS. A number of pertinent organic compounds such as acetaldehyde, methanol, methyl acetate and vinyl acetate are present in the waste feed to the bio-system. EPA modeling data for a completely mixed biological system suggests that a large fraction of the organic compounds in the feed may be air stripping causing high reportable SARA emission numbers. It is believed that EPA model overstates the VOC emissions to air from a well operated biological system. This project was initiated to simulate the biological wastewater treatment system and to determine relative emission of the four named compounds to air.

  12. Source and risk apportionment of selected VOCs and PM₂.₅ species using partially constrained receptor models with multiple time resolution data.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ho-Tang; Chou, Charles C-K; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Hopke, Philip K; Wu, Chang-Fu

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to identify and quantify the sources of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by using a partially constrained source apportionment model suitable for multiple time resolution data. Hourly VOC, 12-h and 24-h PM2.5 speciation data were collected during three seasons in 2013. Eight factors were retrieved from the Positive Matrix Factorization solutions and adding source profile constraints enhanced the interpretability of source profiles. Results showed that the evaporative emission factor was the largest contributor (25%) to VOC mass concentration, while the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass concentration was soil dust/regional transport related factor (26%). In terms of risk prioritization, traffic/industry related factor was the major cause for benzene, ethylbenzene, Cr, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (29-69%) while petrochemical related factor contributed most to the Ni risk (36%). This indicated that a larger contributor to mass concentration may not correspond to a higher risk. PMID:26057474

  13. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources. Final report, March 1988-September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.J.; Probert, J.A.; Piccot, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    The report describes a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. The inventory, one input to atmospheric chemistry models required to estimate the global atmospheric concentration of ozone, is part of an assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with global climate change. Study results show total global anthropogenic emissions of about 121 million short tons of VOCs per year. The U.S. is the largest emitter with 21% of the total. Globally, fuelwood combustion and savanna burning are the largest sources, together accounting for over 35% of global VOC emissions. The approach used to develop the inventory involved: (1) identifying the major anthropogenic sources of VOC emissions in the U.S. and grouping them into categories; (2) developing emission factors by dividing the U.S. emissions by the amount of production or consumption of the related commodity in the U.S.; (3) multiplying the U.S. emission factors by production/consumption statistics for other countries to yield global VOC emission estimates; and (4) geographically distributing the emissions.

  14. ATLAS OF SOURCE EMISSION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An atlas of various source emission particles characterized by electron optical techniques has been compiled for use by air pollution investigators. The particles studied were emitted by mobile, stationary, and natural sources. Sources included automobiles, manufacturing operatio...

  15. LOW-VOC COATINGS FOR AUTOMOBILE REFINISHING USING NOVEL POLYMER RESINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coating operations release a significant portion of the non-mobile source, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air. The U.S. EPA's Emissions Characterization and Prevention Branch has formulated novel low-VOC coatings for the automotive refinishing sector that reduce VOC l...

  16. Reduction of VOC emission from natural flours filled biodegradable bio-composites for automobile interior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Lee, Byoung-Ho; Kim, Sumin; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Yun, Ju-Ho; Yoo, Seung-Eul; Sohn, Jong Ryeul

    2011-03-15

    Various experiments, such as the thermal extract (TE) method, field and emission cell (FLEC) method and 20 L small chamber, were performed to examine the total volatile organic compound (TVOC) emissions from bio-composites. The TVOC of neat poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was ranged from 0.26 mg/m(2)h to 4.11 mg/m(2)h with increasing temperature. For both PLA bio-composites with pineapple flour and destarched cassava flour, the temperature increased from 0.30 mg/m(2)h to 3.72 mg/m(2)h and from 0.19 mg/m(2)h to 8.74 mg/m(2)h, respectively. The TVOC emission factors of all samples increased gradually with increasing temperature. Above 70°C, both PLA-P and PLA-C composites had higher TVOC emission factors than neat PLA due to the rapid emission of natural volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as furfural (2-furancarboxyaldehyde). PLA composites containing 30 wt% flour had high 1,4-dioxane reduction ability, >50%. The TVOC of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) was emitted rapidly from 50 °C to 90 °C due to succinic acid from the pyrolysis of PBS. The TVOC emission factors of PLA bio-composite and PBS bio-composites were reduced using the bake-out method (temperature at 70 °C and baking time 5h). The initial TVOC emission factors of the PLA and PBS bio-composites with pineapple flour and destarched cassava flour were reduced by the baking treatment using FLEC. The TVOC factors from PLA and PBS decreased until 5 days and were commonly maintained a relatively constant value after 5 days using 20L small chamber. The decrease in TVOC emission showed a similar trend to that of the TE and FLEC method. This method confirmed the beneficial effect of the baking treatment effect for polypropylene and linear density polyethylene (LDPE). PMID:20739121

  17. Ongoing evaluation of sources and factors affecting emissions from engineered wood products

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.L.; Martin, C.B.; Sheldon, L.S.; Baskir, J.N.; Howard, E.M.

    1998-09-01

    The paper describes an ongoing evaluation of sources and factors affecting emissions from engineered wood products. It summarizes early results from emissions testing of engineered wood products. These tests have shown the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the alcohol, aldehyde/ketone, ester, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon, monoterpene, sesquiterpene, indene, and alkyl ether chemical families from engineered wood samples. This information will be used to target pollution prevention approaches, such as alternate materials and production technologies for raw board and engineered wood products, for reducing VOC emissions.

  18. RESEARCH AREA -- MOBILE SOURCE OZONE PRECURSOR EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING (ATMOSPHERIC PROTECTION BRANCH - AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program is to characterize mobile source emissions which are one of the largest sources of tropospheric ozone precursor emissions (CO, NOx, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the U.S. Due to the dynamic operation of motor vehicles, emissions are highl...

  19. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured at an urban site of Beijing: intercomparisons, emission ratios and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Shao, M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Bon, D.; Wang, M.; Lu, S.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were used to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in August - September, 2010 (summer) and December, 2010 - January, 2011 (winter) at an urban site on campus of Peking University. During the summer campaign, other instruments were also deployed at the site, including a custom-built GC-MS/FID, a GC-FID/PID, whole air samples (WAS) collected in canisters, and DNPH cartridges. VOCs concentrations measured by PTR-MS in the summer campaign compared well with the GC methods for most of the measured compounds. VOCs concentrations in winter strongly correlated with the combustion tracer CO for both hydrocarbons and oxygenates VOCs (OVOCs) and emission ratios to CO were calculated from linear fits of ambient concentrations. Emission ratios of aromatics in winter were significantly lower than those in summer, which may be due to: (1) higher CO emissions from coal burning for space heating in winter of Beijing; (2) higher industrial/solvent evaporations of aromatics in summer. The VOCs dataset with 19 species from PTR-MS and 56 species from GC-MS/FID was used for PMF analysis. A solution of five factors with no rotation (fPeak=0) was determined to be the best fit. Uncertainties of PMF analysis were explored by bootstrap method. The five factors included a fresh primary emissions factor (Factor 1, 27%), an aged primary emissions factor (Factor 2, 19%), a secondary & aged factor (Factor 3, 33%), a biogenic factor (Factor 4, 4%) and an industrial-like factor (Factor 5, 17%). The fresh and aged primary factor correlated well with NOx and CO, respectively. And the secondary & aged factor correlated well with PAN and Ox (O3+NO2). The contributions in different factors for various hydrocarbons are dependent on their reactivity. Comparing the obtained factor profiles shows that the aged primary emission factor and the secondary & aged factor are photochemically connected with the fresh primary emission factor. It suggested

  20. [Emission strength and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in Shanghai during 2010 EXPO].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Li; Chen, Chang-Hong; Huang, Hai-Ying; Wang, Qian; Chen, Yi-Ran; Huang, Cheng; Li, Li; Zhang, Gang-Feng; Chen, Ming-Hua; Lou, Sheng-Rong; Qiao, Li-Ping

    2012-12-01

    The emission strength of VOCs was estimated in the study, based on the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measurement results. Air mass backward trajectories were computed and cluster analysis was done combining with the corresponding air pollution indexes and VOCs concentrations. Source apportionment of VOCs was studied using receptor model. According to this study, VOCs emission in Shanghai per hour resulted in the VOCs concentration increment of (5.98 +/- 3.18) x 10(-9) during 2010 EXPO (from 1st May to 31st October in 2010), which was decreased by about 1 x 10(-9) compared to that in the same period of 2009. Under the control of the air masses roughly from the east (40%), the API was lower than 50. Influenced by the air masses from the northwest, the air quality was the worst with the average API higher than 70. The air masses from the southwest also resulted in bad air quality, with API higher than 60. The air masses originated from the west accounted for 25%, followed by the south and north air mass (20%). The VOCs concentrations were positively related to API in the same air mass, R2 = 0.599. During the 2010 EXPO, the emission related to vehicles including exhaust and gasoline evaporation contributed the largest amount of VOCs, approximately about -40%, followed by industry including industrial processes and coal combustion (30% - 40%), and solvent use and painting (20%). The biogenic emission was also considerable and accounted for 6% of VOCs in summer. PMID:23379136

  1. Emissions of ozone precursors from stationary sources:. a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placet, M.; Mann, C. O.; Gilbert, R. O.; Niefer, M. J.

    This paper discusses and critiques methods used to estimate emissions of, and create both aggregate and detailed modeling inventories for, nitrogen oxides (NO x), volatile organic compounds (VOC) and carbon monoxide (CO), the main pollutants involved in ozone formation. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and methods to project emissions into the future are also briefly discussed. Many improvements have been made in emissions inventories over the past decade. For example, the required use of continuous emission monitors (CEMS) has produced site-specific emissions estimates from almost all US electric utility power plants, which are the major stationary source of NO x. However, many data quality issues remain. For example, the overall quality of standardized emission factors is very poor. In addition, uncertainties have been introduced by use of simplistic assumptions on the existent level of emission control. Even the use of CEMS has not eliminated uncertainty in emissions from power plants, because methods to deal with missing data can introduce bias. Emissions data for Mexico are not comprehensive, making ozone modeling in US border regions difficult. Data for VOC speciation is outdated, and crude data is often used to disaggregate emissions to the fine level of spatial and temporal detail needed for atmospheric modeling. It is difficult to make general statements about the importance of each of these problems, because there are no reliable estimates of the overall uncertainty of emissions values, and because the impact of emission inventory errors is very site specific. The Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) initiated by the US Environmental Protection Agency promises to enhance the quality of future inventories, mainly through communication of best practices among state agencies. Further inventory improvement efforts must be focused on problems that most strongly influence poor prediction of ozone concentrations. Targets for improvement could be

  2. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter identifies and describes major industrial sources of methane (CH4) emissions. or each source type examined, it identifies CH4 release points and discusses in detail the factors affecting emissions. t also summarizes and discusses available global and country-specific ...

  3. Source apportionment of VOCs in the Los Angeles area using positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven G.; Frankel, Anna; Hafner, Hilary R.

    Eight 3-h speciated hydrocarbon measurements were collected daily by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) as part of the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) program during the summers of 2001-03 at two sites in the Los Angeles air basin, Azusa and Hawthorne. Over 30 hydrocarbons from over 500 samples at Azusa and 600 samples at Hawthorne were subsequently analyzed using the multivariate receptor model positive matrix factorization (PMF). At Azusa and Hawthorne, five and six factors were identified, respectively, with a good comparison between predicted and measured mass. At Azusa, evaporative emissions (a median of 31% of the total mass), motor vehicle exhaust (22%), liquid/unburned gasoline (27%), coatings (17%), and biogenic emissions (3%) factors were identified. Factors identified at Hawthorne were evaporative emissions (a median of 34% of the total mass), motor vehicle exhaust (24%), industrial process losses (15%), natural gas (13%), liquid/unburned gasoline (13%), and biogenic emissions (1%). Together, the median contribution from mobile source-related factors (exhaust, evaporative emissions, and liquid/unburned gasoline) was 80% and 71% at Azusa and Hawthorne, respectively, similar to previous source apportionment results using the chemical mass balance (CMB) model. There is a difference in the distribution among mobile source factors compared to the CMB work, with an increase in the contribution from evaporative emissions, though the cause (changes in emissions or differences between models) is unknown.

  4. Acoustic emission source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promboon, Yajai

    The objective of the research program was development of reliable source location techniques. The study comprised two phases. First, the research focused on development of source location methods for homogeneous plates. The specimens used in the program were steel railroad tank cars. Source location methods were developed and demonstrated for empty and water filled tanks. The second phase of the research was an exploratory study of source location method for fiber reinforced composites. Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of wave propagation were carried out. This data provided the basis for development of a method using the intersection of the group velocity curves for the first three wave propagation modes. Simplex optimization was used to calculate the location of the source. Additional source location methods have been investigated and critically examined. Emphasis has been placed on evaluating different methods for determining the time of arrival of a wave. The behavior of wave in a water filled tank was studied and source location methods suitable for use in this situation have been examined through experiment and theory. Particular attention is paid to the problem caused by leaky Lamb waves. A preliminary study into the use of neural networks for source location in fiber reinforced composites was included in the research program. A preliminary neural network model and the results from training and testing data are reported.

  5. Assessment of neurobehavioral response in humans to low-level volatile organic compound (VOC) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.A.

    1991-06-01

    Occupants of sick buildings often complain of CNS symptoms including headache and memory loss, but little objective evidence of neurobehavioral effects exists. Available evidence of neurobehavioral effects of low level VOC exposure representative of new buildings is reviewed. Methods suitable for studying the neurobehavioral effects of low-level VOC exposure--including computerized behavioral tests, balance tests and sensory evoked potentials--are reviewed. The use of computerized behavioral tests in conjunction with symptom questionnaires is recommended for low-level VOC studies.

  6. Macro-meso two-scale model for predicting the VOC diffusion coefficients and emission characteristics of porous building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jianyin; Zhang, Yinping; Wang, Xinke; Chang, Dongwu

    Through the observation of the pore structure and mercury intruding porosimetry (MIP) experiments of some typical porous building materials, we found that the diffusion coefficient of the material can be expressed by that of a representative elementary volume (REV) in which the pore structure can be simplified as a connection in series of macro and meso pores. Based upon that, a macro-meso two-scale model for predicting the diffusion coefficient of porous building materials is proposed. In contrast to the traditional porous mass transfer model for determining the diffusion coefficient described in the literature [Blondeau, P., Tiffonnet, A.L., Damian, A., Amiri, O., Molina, J.L., 2003. Assessment of contaminant diffusivities in building materials from porosimetry tests. Indoor Air 13, 302-310; Seo, J., Kato, S., Ataka, Y., Zhu, Q., 2005. Evaluation of effective diffusion coefficient in various building materials and absorbents by mercury intrusion porosimetry. In Proceedings of the Indoor Air, Beijing, China, pp. 1854-1859], the proposed model relates the volatile organic compound (VOC) diffusion coefficient of building material not only to the porosity of the building material, but also to the pore size distribution and pore connection modes. To verify the model, a series of experiments of VOC emissions of three types of medium-density board were conducted. The comparison of the model and experimental results shows that the proposed model agrees much better with the experimental results than the traditional models in the literature. More validation for other building materials is needed. The proposed model is useful for predicting the VOC diffusion coefficient of porous building materials and for developing low VOC emission building materials.

  7. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  8. Measurements of industrial emissions of VOCs, NH3, NO2 and SO2 in Texas using the Solar Occultation Flux method and mobile DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Rivera, C.; Lefer, B.; Patel, M.

    2007-12-01

    Solar Occultation Flux (SOF) measurements of olefines and alkanes have been conducted to pin-point and quantify the largest sources of olefines and alkanes in the vicinity of Houston and in south eastern Texas during September 2006. The SOF measurements were part of the extensive summer campaign TexAQS 2006, included in the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II). The SOF technique is an optical method utilizing the absorption of direct solar infrared radiation in the 1.8-14 micrometer range for retrieval of total columns of various species such as ethylene, propylene, ammonia and alkanes. The instrument is carried on a mobile platform, making it possible to conduct transects of the emission plume downwind an industry, and thus integrate all the molecules of the plume cross section in real time. By multiplying with the plume wind speed, the total flux emerging from the source is obtained. Flux estimates with SOF were obtained for the large petrochemical and refining complexes around the Houston area. This was done in parallell with airborne plume studies by other parties. The primary research goal was to supply a data set for emission inventory comparisons and for input to models looking at the strong ozone production in Texas. The SOF measurements show that the hourly gas emissions from the Houston Ship channel area correspond to about 1 metric ton of ethylene, 1.5 tons of propylene, 12 tons of alkanes, 1/4 ton of NH3 and about 5 tons of SO2 and NO2. For the VOCs this is an order of magnitude or greater than reported VOC emissions in the 2004 inventory.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF NEUROBEHAVIORAL RESPONSE IN HUMANS TO LOW-LEVEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupants of sick buildings often complain of CNS symptoms including headache and memory loss, but little objective evidence of neurobehavioral effects exists. vailable evidence of neurobehavioral effects of low level VOC exposure representative of new buildings is reviewed. etho...

  10. VOC Control: Current practices and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, E.C.; Mukhopadhyay, N. )

    1993-07-01

    One of the most formidable challenges posed by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is the search for efficient and economical control strategies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are precursors to ground-level ozone, a major component in the formation of smog. Under the CAAA, thousands of currently unregulated sources will be required to reduce or eliminate VOC emissions. In addition, sources that are currently regulated may seek to evaluate alternative VOC control strategies to meet stricter regulatory requirements such as the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements in Title III of the CAAA. Because of the increasing attention being given to VOC control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Center for Waste Reduction Technologies (CWRT) initiated a study of VOC control technologies and regulatory initiatives. A key objective of the project was to identify and describe existing VOC control technologies and air regulations, as well as emerging technologies and forthcoming regulations. That work is the basis for this article.