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Sample records for volcano aleutian islands

  1. Preliminary Geology of Gareloi Volcano, Western Aleutian Islands (Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B. L.; Coombs, M.; Larsen, J.

    2004-12-01

    Gareloi Island consists of Gareloi volcano (1573 m elevation), and is located nearly 2000 km west of Anchorage and 120 km west of Adak in the western Aleutian (Andreanof) Islands. A geologic mapping operation was combined with the installation of a seismic monitoring network in September of 2003 by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. This work provided the first direct observations of Gareloi volcano since Robert Coats' four-day visit in 1945. Gareloi volcano is a stratovolcano 10 km by 8 km in diameter at its base with two summit craters separated by a narrow saddle. The southern crater is a 300-m-wide amphitheater formed by the partial collapse of its southern crater wall, and contains several active fumaroles. The northern crater is enclosed, although the intra-crater eruptive stratigraphy is abruptly interrupted by near-vertical local unconformities on the northwest wall, suggesting the occurrence of a sector collapse sometime in the past. Gareloi volcano is principally composed of intercalated trachytic lava flows, ranging from 0.5 m to more than 10 m in thickness. Two prominent valleys composed of thick lava flow packages on the SW flank are clearly U-shaped, suggesting that the oldest sequence of lava flows is of at least late Pleistocene age. Lavas erupted during the Pleistocene and Holocene range from basaltic trachyandesite to basaltic andesite in composition and contain plagioclase and clinopyroxene, with minor olivine, and rare hornblende. An explosive eruption in 1929 formed a SSE trending fissure of thirteen aligned craters, ranging from 80 to 1600 m in diameter. These craters extend from sea level up to the amphitheater of the southern crater (1160 m). Fall deposits from the 1929 eruption are interbedded with thin, laterally discontinuous pyroclastic flow deposits that are mainly limited to the island's southeastern flanks. Despite an abrupt change in color from light beige pumice clasts at the base of the 1929 fall deposit to black scoria at the top, the unit is homogeneous trachyandesite. Following the explosive phase of the eruption, 4 blocky trachyandesite lava flows emerged from craters below 600 m asl. All 1929 eruptive products contain plagioclase and clinopyroxene with scarce olivine. An effusive eruption during the 1980's from the center of the south crater amphitheater produced an elaborate blocky lava flow that extends 800 m in elevation down the SE flank. This lava flow is basaltic trachyandesite, and contains abundant coarsely sieved plagioclase phenocrysts with minor clinopyroxene and olivine. The majority of Gareloi lavas contain anomalously high concentrations of K, Na, and Rb and low concentrations of Mg compared to reported findings from other Aleutian lavas, including those of the western portion of the arc. This suggests that Gareloi magmas may be unique with respect to their source region and possibly storage conditions compared to other Aleutian volcanoes.

  2. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Akutan Volcano east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Power, John A.; Richter, Donlad H.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is a 1100-meter-high stratovolcano on Akutan Island in the east-central Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The volcano is located about 1238 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 56 kilometers east of Dutch Harbor/Unalaska. Eruptive activity has occurred at least 27 times since historical observations were recorded beginning in the late 1700?s. Recent eruptions produced only small amounts of fine volcanic ash that fell primarily on the upper flanks of the volcano. Small amounts of ash fell on the Akutan Harbor area during eruptions in 1911, 1948, 1987, and 1989. Plumes of volcanic ash are the primary hazard associated with eruptions of Akutan Volcano and are a major hazard to all aircraft using the airfield at Dutch Harbor or approaching Akutan Island. Eruptions similar to historical Akutan eruptions should be anticipated in the future. Although unlikely, eruptions larger than those of historical time could generate significant amounts of volcanic ash, fallout, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that would be hazardous to life and property on all sectors of the volcano and other parts of the island, but especially in the major valleys that head on the volcano flanks. During a large eruption an ash cloud could be produced that may be hazardous to aircraft using the airfield at Cold Bay and the airspace downwind from the volcano. In the event of a large eruption, volcanic ash fallout could be relatively thick over parts of Akutan Island and volcanic bombs could strike areas more than 10 kilometers from the volcano.

  3. Patterns in thermal emissions from the volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackett, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Using AVHRR data 1993-2011 and the Alaska Volcano Observatory's Okmok II Algorithm, the thermal emissions from all volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands were converted from temperature to power emission and examined for periodicity. The emissions were also summed to quantify the total energy released throughout the period. It was found that in the period April 1997 - January 2004 (37% of the period) the power emission from the volcanoes of the island arc declined sharply to constitute just 5.7% of the total power output for the period (138,311 MW), and this was attributable to just three volcanoes: Veniaminof (1.0%), Cleveland (1.5%) and Shishaldin (3.2%). This period of apparent reduced activity contrasts with the periods both before and after and is unrelated to the number of sensors in orbit at the time. What is also evident from the data set is that in terms of overall power emission over this period, the majority of emitted energy is largely attributable to those volcanoes which erupt with regularity (again, Veniaminof [29.7%], Cleveland [17%] and Shishaldin [11.4%]), as opposed to from the relatively few, large scale events (i.e. Reboubt [5.4%], Okmok [8.3%], Augustine [9.7%]; Pavlov [13.9%] being an exception). Sum power emission from volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands (1993-2011)

  4. August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska-resetting an Island Landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.E.; Nye, C.J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Neal, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kasatochi Island, the subaerial portion of a small volcano in the western Aleutian volcanic arc, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. Pyroclastic flows and surges swept the island repeatedly and buried most of it and the near-shore zone in decimeters to tens of meters of deposits. Several key seabird rookeries in taluses were rendered useless. The eruption lasted for about 24 hours and included two initial explosive pulses and pauses over a 6-hr period that produced ash-poor eruption clouds, a 10-hr period of continuous ash-rich emissions initiated by an explosive pulse and punctuated by two others, and a final 8-hr period of waning ash emissions. The deposits of the eruption include a basal muddy tephra that probably reflects initial eruptions through the shallow crater lake, a sequence of pumiceous and lithic-rich pyroclastic deposits produced by flow, surge, and fall processes during a period of energetic explosive eruption, and a fine-grained upper mantle of pyroclastic-fall and -surge deposits that probably reflects the waning eruptive stage as lake and ground water again gained access to the erupting magma. An eruption with similar impact on the island's environment had not occurred for at least several centuries. Since the 2008 eruption, the volcano has remained quiet other than emission of volcanic gases. Erosion and deposition are rapidly altering slopes and beaches. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  5. The 7-8 August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Scott, William E.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Schneider, David J.; Izbekov, Pavel; Nye, Christopher J.

    2010-12-01

    Kasatochi volcano in the central Aleutian Islands erupted unexpectedly on 7-8 August 2008. Kasatochi has received little study by volcanologists and has had no confirmed historical eruptions. The island is an important nesting area for seabirds and a long-term biological study site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. After a notably energetic preeruptive earthquake swarm, the volcano erupted violently in a series of explosive events beginning in the early afternoon of 7 August. Each event produced ash-gas plumes that reached 14-18 km above sea level. The volcanic plume contained large amounts of SO2 and was tracked around the globe by satellite observations. The cumulative volcanic cloud interfered with air travel across the North Pacific, causing many flight cancelations that affected thousands of travelers. Visits to the volcano in 2008-2009 indicated that the eruption generated pyroclastic flows and surges that swept all flanks of the island, accumulated several tens of meters of pyroclastic debris, and increased the diameter of the island by about 800 m. Pyroclastic flow deposits contain abundant accidental lithic debris derived from the inner walls of the Kasatochi crater. Juvenile material is crystal-rich silicic andesite that ranges from slightly pumiceous to frothy pumice. Fine-grained pyroclastic surge and fall deposits with accretionary lapilli cover the lithic-rich pyroclastic flow deposits and mark a change in eruptive style from episodic explosive activity to more continuous ash emission with smaller intermittent explosions. Pyroclastic deposits completely cover the island, but wave erosion and gully development on the flanks have begun to modify the surface mantle of volcanic deposits.

  6. Stratigraphic framework of Holocene volcaniclastic deposits, Akutan Volcano, east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc, but until recently little was known about its history and eruptive character. Following a brief but sustained period of intense seismic activity in March 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory began investigating the geology of the volcano and evaluating potential volcanic hazards that could affect residents of Akutan Island. During these studies new information was obtained about the Holocene eruptive history of the volcano on the basis of stratigraphic studies of volcaniclastic deposits and radiocarbon dating of associated buried soils and peat. A black, scoria-bearing, lapilli tephra, informally named the 'Akutan tephra,' is up to 2 m thick and is found over most of the island, primarily east of the volcano summit. Six radiocarbon ages on the humic fraction of soil A-horizons beneath the tephra indicate that the Akutan tephra was erupted approximately 1611 years B.P. At several locations the Akutan tephra is within a conformable stratigraphic sequence of pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are all part of the same eruptive sequence. The thickness, widespread distribution, and conformable stratigraphic association with overlying pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits indicate that the Akutan tephra likely records a major eruption of Akutan Volcano that may have formed the present summit caldera. Noncohesive lahar and pyroclastic-flow deposits that predate the Akutan tephra occur in the major valleys that head on the volcano and are evidence for six to eight earlier Holocene eruptions. These eruptions were strombolian to subplinian events that generated limited amounts of tephra and small pyroclastic flows that extended only a few kilometers from the vent. The pyroclastic flows melted snow and ice on the volcano flanks and formed lahars that traveled several kilometers down broad, formerly glaciated valleys, reaching the coast as thin, watery, hyperconcentrated flows or water floods. Slightly cohesive lahars in Hot Springs valley and Long valley could have formed from minor flank collapses of hydrothermally altered volcanic bedrock. These lahars may be unrelated to eruptive activity.

  7. The 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska: Reconnaissance Observations and Preliminary Physical Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Schneider, D. J.; Prejean, S. G.

    2008-12-01

    The August 7, 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano was the first documented historical eruption of this small (3 x 3 km) island volcano with a 1 km2 lake filled crater in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Reports of previous Kasatochi eruptions are unconfirmed and lacking in detail and little is known about the eruptive history. Three explosively-generated ash plumes reaching altitudes of 15 to 20 km were observed in satellite data and were preceded by some of the most intense seismicity yet recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) seismic network. Eruptive products on Kasatochi Island observed on August 22 and 23 consist of pumice-bearing, lithic-rich pyroclastic-flow deposits overlain by a 1-2 m thick sequence of fine- grained pyroclastic-surge, and -fall deposits all exposed at the coastline. These deposits completely blanket Kasatochi Island to a depth of many meters. Pyroclastic flows entered the sea and extended the coastline 300-400 m beyond prominent wave cut cliffs and sea stacks. Tide gauge data from Adak Island, 80 km to the west, indicate a small tsunami with maximum water amplitude of 20 cm, was initiated during the eruption. Kasatochi volcano lacks a real-time seismic monitoring network. Seismic activity was detected by AVO instruments on Great Sitkin Island 40 km to the west, and thus the timing of eruptive events is approximate. The eruption began explosively at 2201 UTC on August 7, and was followed by at least two additional strong eruptive bursts at 0150 UTC and 0435 UTC, August 8. Satellite data show a significant ash cloud associated with the 0435 UTC event followed by at least 14 hours of continuous ash emission. The lack of a strong ash signature in satellite data suggest that the first two plumes were ash poor. Satellite data also show a large emission of SO2 that entered the stratosphere. Correlation of eruptive periods with deposits on the island is not yet possible, but it appears that pyroclastic flows were emplaced during all three explosive events and the surge and fall deposits accumulated during the continuous phase of the third event only. The role of external water is under investigation, and observations on August 22 and 23 indicated several streams flowing from the base of the crater walls into a shallow lake in the bottom of the 1 km2 crater. The surge and fall deposits exposed on Kasatochi Island contain abundant accretionary lapilli indicating water involvement during the emplacement of these deposits. Tephra deposits observed on islands southwest of Kasatochi range in thickness from 6 cm, 30 km from the volcano, to minor amounts on eastern Adak Island, 80 km to the southwest. A fishing boat about 13 km southwest of Kasatochi received about 12 cm of coarse ash to medium lapilli tephra fall. Tephra deposits observed at 5 locations southwest of Kasatochi consist of single beds of normally graded medium to coarse lapilli tephra fall. The lack of recognizable stratigraphic breaks in the tephra deposits suggests that they were the products of a single fall event, likely the third explosion that produced the most ash rich plume.

  8. Geology and 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Akutan Volcano, Eastern Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, M. L.; Jicha, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating and new whole-rock geochemical analyses are used to establish an eruptive chronology for Akutan volcano, Akutan Island, in the eastern Aleutian island arc. Akutan Island (166° W, 54.1° N) is the site of long-lived volcanism and the entire island comprises volcanic rocks as old as 3.3 Ma (Richter et al., 1998, USGS Open-File 98-135). Our current focus is on the 225 km2 western half of the island, which is home to the Holocene active cone, Holocene to latest Pleistocene satellite vents, and underlying middle Pleistocene volcanic basement rocks. Eruptive products span the tholeiitic-calc-alkaline boundary, are medium-K, and range from basalt to dacite. Furnace incremental heating experiments on groundmass separates of 38 samples resulted in 29 40Ar/39Ar ages. The remainder did not yield radiogenic 40Ar contents and are likely Holocene in age. The oldest ages (1251×10 and 1385×12 ka) are from a wedge of flat-lying dissected lavas north of the Holocene cone; these likely represent the upper part of the volcanic basement that underlies the entire island. Above a major unconformity lie basaltic andesite to dacite lavas that range from 765× 4 to 522×8 ka. The eroded remnants of the source volcano for these flows appears to crop out as a series of variably hydrothermally altered breccias and domes 5 km east-northeast of the current summit. A 625 m-tall eroded basaltic center, Lava Peak, sits 6 km northwest of the summit; its deeply incised western flank exposes lava flows and a plug. Two flows are dated at 598×16 and 602×15 ka. A high ridge 1.5 km south of the summit is made of oxidized, mostly andesitic lavas 284-249 ka old; these are presumably the remnants of an eruptive center located near the current cone. Flat Top Peak, 3.5 km southwest of the summit, produced almost exclusively basalts and six dated lavas range from 155×8 to 98×18 ka. Lavas from Flat Top (1065 m asl) are deeply eroded suggesting extensive ice cover during marine isotope stages 4-2. Cascade Bight, an eruptive center 4.5 km southeast of the caldera, has apparently been active in the Holocene as two experiments on basaltic andesite lavas yielded no radiogenic argon. Holocene lavas are also exposed along the upper walls of the ~1,600 yr old summit caldera (Waythomas, 1999, Bull Volc, v. 61, p. 141-161), including dissected 1296 m-tall Akutan Peak (the current summit), as well as low on the north and west flanks of the Akutan edifice. Holocene lavas, including those from Cascade Bight as well as Lava Point satellite vent on the NW coast, all fall along a single tholeiitic, basalt-to-dacite evolutionary trend that has lower K than Pleistocene lavas. Our results show that the focus of volcanism has shifted within the western half of Akutan Island over the last ~600 ka, and that on occasion multiple volcanic centers have been active over the same time period, including within the Holocene.

  9. What controls earthquakes at Aleutian arc volcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurman, H.; West, M. E.; Cameron, C.

    2012-12-01

    Alaska has around 100 Holocene active volcanoes spread over 3000 km of the Aleutian arc, from Mount Wrangell in southcentral Alaska to Buldir Island in the western Aleutian islands. The range in volcanic styles across the arc is as great as the distance that it spans, and so too is the accompanying volcano seismicity. This study examines whether there are systematic influences on volcano seismicity across the Aleutian arc that can account for distinctive patterns in earthquake behaviour, such as the paucity of deep (>20 km depth) volcanic earthquakes in the Cook Inlet region compared to volcanic earthquakes at the westernmost portion of the Alaska Peninsula. We investigate whether physical factors such as volcano size, geographic location relative to the subduction zone, the regional setting - including the type of crust and the distance between the vent and the ocean - and the local angle and rate of subduction affect volcano seismicity. We use continuous seismic data recorded over a 10-year period at 47 volcanoes to characterise patterns in seismicity. Our analyses consider the number and locations of hypocenters, waveform characteristics such as frequency content and magnitude, and the frequency and style of volcanic unrest during the study period.

  10. SAR-based Estimation of Glacial Extent and Velocity Fields on Isanotski Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, D.; Lee, A.; Parker, O. P.; Pressler, Y.; Guo, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Global studies show that Earth's glaciers are losing mass at increasing rates, creating a challenge for communities that rely on them as natural resources. Field observation of glacial environments is limited by cost and inaccessibility. Optical remote sensing is often precluded by cloud cover and seasonal darkness. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) overcomes these obstacles by using microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation to provide high resolution information on large spatial scales and in remote, atmospherically obscured environments. SAR is capable of penetrating clouds, operating in darkness, and discriminating between targets with ambiguous spectral signatures. This study evaluated the efficacy of two SAR Earth observation methods on small (< 7 km2) glaciers in rugged topography. The glaciers chosen for this study lie on Isanotski Volcano in Unimak Island, Aleutian Archipelago, USA. The local community on the island, the City of False Pass, relies on glacial melt for drinking water and hydropower. Two methods were used: (1) velocity field estimation based on Repeat Image Feature Tracking (RIFT) and (2) glacial boundary delineation based on interferometric coherence mapping. NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) single-polarized power images and JAXA Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band SAR (ALOS PALSAR) single-look complex images were analyzed over the period 2008-2011. UAVSAR image pairs were coregistered to sub-pixel accuracy and processed with the Coregistration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) feature tracking module to derive glacial velocity field estimates. Maximum glacier velocities ranged from 28.9 meters/year to 58.3 meters/year. Glacial boundaries were determined from interferometric coherence of ALOS PALSAR data and subsequently refined with masking operations based on terrain slope and segment size. Accuracy was assessed against hand-digitized outlines from high resolution UAVSAR power images, yielding 83.0% producer's accuracy (errors of omission) and 86.1% user's accuracy (errors of commission). These results represent a refinement of a decades-old entry from the USGS National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The information gained from this study could strengthen management practices by helping decision makers understand the ecological and economic consequences of glacial change. This procedure could be repeated in similar locations worldwide to provide communities with accurate, quantitative information about their changing glacial resources.

  11. Hazard communication by the Alaska Volcano Observatory Concerning the 2008 Eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adleman, J. N.; Cameron, C. E.; Neal, T. A.; Shipman, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The significant explosive eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes in 2008 tested the hazard communication systems at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) including a rigorous test of the new format for written notices of volcanic activity. AVO's Anchorage-based Operations facility (Ops) at the USGS Alaska Science Center serves as the hub of AVO's eruption response. From July 12 through August 28, 2008 Ops was staffed around the clock (24/7). Among other duties, Ops staff engaged in communicating with the public, media, and other responding federal and state agencies and issued Volcanic Activity Notices (VAN) and Volcano Observatory Notifications for Aviation (VONA), recently established and standardized products to announce eruptions, significant activity, and alert level and color code changes. In addition to routine phone communications with local, national and international media, on July 22, AVO held a local press conference in Ops to share observations and distribute video footage collected by AVO staff on board a U.S. Coast Guard flight over Okmok. On July 27, AVO staff gave a public presentation on the Okmok eruption in Unalaska, AK, 65 miles northeast of Okmok volcano and also spoke with local public safety and industry officials, observers and volunteer ash collectors. AVO's activity statements, photographs, and selected data streams were posted in near real time on the AVO public website. Over the six-week 24/7 period, AVO staff logged and answered approximately 300 phone calls in Ops and approximately 120 emails to the webmaster. Roughly half the logged calls were received from interagency cooperators including NOAA National Weather Service's Alaska Aviation Weather Unit and the Center Weather Service Unit, both in Anchorage. A significant number of the public contacts were from mariners reporting near real-time observations and photos of both eruptions, as well as the eruption of nearby Cleveland Volcano on July 21. As during the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska, the number of calls to Ops, emails to the webmaster, and the amount of data served via the AVO website greatly increased during elevated volcanic activity designated by the USGS aviation color code and volcano alert level. Lessons learned include, Ops staffing requirements during periods of high call volume, the need for ash fall hazard information in multiple languages, and the value of real-time observations of remote Aleutian eruptions made by local mariners. An important theme of public inquiries concerned the amount and potential climate impacts of the significant sulfur dioxide gas and ash plumes emitted by Okmok and Kasatochi, including specific questions on the amount of sulfur dioxide discharged during each eruption. The significant plumes produced at the onset of the Okmok and Kasatochi eruptions also had lengthy national and international aviation impacts and yet-to-be resolved hemispherical or possible global, climactic effects.

  12. Diverse deformation patterns of Aleutian volcanoes from InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-to-subcentimeter precision at a spatial resolution of tens of meters over an area of hundreds to thousands of square kilometers. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, InSAR has become an increasingly important measurement technique for constraining magma dynamics of volcanoes over remote regions such as the Aleutian Islands. The spatial pattern of surface deformation data derived from InSAR images enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper summarizes the diverse deformation patterns of the Aleutian volcanoes observed with InSAR and demonstrates that deformation patterns and associated magma supply mechanisms in the Aleutians are diverse and vary between volcanoes. These findings provide a basis for improved models and better understanding of magmatic plumbing systems.

  13. Massive edifice failure at Aleutian arc volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, M.L.; White, S.M.; Scholl, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Along the 450-km-long stretch of the Aleutian volcanic arc from Great Sitkin to Kiska Islands, edifice failure and submarine debris-avalanche deposition have occurred at seven of ten Quaternary volcanic centers. Reconnaissance geologic studies have identified subaerial evidence for large-scale prehistoric collapse events at five of the centers (Great Sitkin, Kanaga, Tanaga, Gareloi, and Segula). Side-scan sonar data collected in the 1980s by GLORIA surveys reveal a hummocky seafloor fabric north of several islands, notably Great Sitkin, Kanaga, Bobrof, Gareloi, Segula, and Kiska, suggestive of landslide debris. Simrad EM300 multibeam sonar data, acquired in 2005, show that these areas consist of discrete large blocks strewn across the seafloor, supporting the landslide interpretation from the GLORIA data. A debris-avalanche deposit north of Kiska Island (177.6?? E, 52.1?? N) was fully mapped by EM300 multibeam revealing a hummocky surface that extends 40??km from the north flank of the volcano and covers an area of ??? 380??km2. A 24-channel seismic reflection profile across the longitudinal axis of the deposit reveals a several hundred-meter-thick chaotic unit that appears to have incised into well-bedded sediment, with only a few tens of meters of surface relief. Edifice failures include thin-skinned, narrow, Stromboli-style collapse as well as Bezymianny-style collapse accompanied by an explosive eruption, but many of the events appear to have been deep-seated, removing much of an edifice and depositing huge amounts of debris on the sea floor. Based on the absence of large pyroclastic sheets on the islands, this latter type of collapse was not accompanied by large eruptions, and may have been driven by gravity failure instead of magmatic injection. Young volcanoes in the central and western portions of the arc (177?? E to 175?? W) are located atop the northern edge of the ??? 4000-m-high Aleutian ridge. The position of the Quaternary stratocones relative to the edge of the Aleutian ridge appears to strongly control their likelihood for, and direction of, past collapse. The ridge's steep drop to the north greatly increases potential runout length for slides that originate at the island chain. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Water in Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    In the past decade, baseline data have been obtained on pre-eruptive water contents for several volcanic arcs worldwide. One surprising observation is that parental magmas contain ~ 4 wt% H2O on average at each arc worldwide [1]. Within each arc, the variation from volcano to volcano is from 2 to 6 w% H2O, with few exceptions. The similar averages at different arcs are unexpected given the order of magnitude variations in the concentration of other slab tracers. H2O is clearly different from other tracers, however, being both a major driver of melting in the mantle and a major control of buoyancy and viscosity in the crust. Some process, such as mantle melting or crustal storage, apparently modulates the water content of mafic magmas at arcs. Mantle melting may deliver a fairly uniform product to the Moho, if the wet melt process includes a negative feedback. On the other hand, magmas with variable water content may be generated in the mantle, but a crustal filter may lead to magma degassing up to a common mid-to-upper crustal storage region. Testing between these two end-member scenarios is critical to our understanding of subduction dehydration, global water budgets, magmatic plumbing systems, melt generation and eruptive potential. The Alaska-Aleutian arc is a prime location to explore this fundamental problem in the subduction water cycle, because active volcanoes vary more than elsewhere in the world in parental H2O contents (based on least-degassed, mafic melt inclusions hosted primarily in olivine). For example, Shishaldin volcano taps magma with among the lowest H2O contents globally (~ 2 wt%) and records low pressure crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a shallow magma system (< 1 km bsl). At the other extreme, Augustine volcano is fed by a mafic parent that contains among the highest H2O globally (~ 7 wt%), and has evolved by deep crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a deep magma system (~ 14 km bsl). Do these magmas stall at different depths because of different crustal regimes or because of different primary magma compositions? Do magmas degas until they physically stall, or do they stall when they start to degas? One test of this is whether H2O contents correlate with tracers from the subduction zone that are not fractionated easily during crystal fractionation or degassing. We find a strong negative correlation between H2O/Ce (based on the maximum H2O measured in a given inclusion population) and Nb/Ce in eight Aleutian volcanoes, which is well explained by variable amounts of a slab fluid, but would be fortuitous, or strongly disturbed, if major degassing took place in the crust during magma ascent. Thus, geochemical data point to a strong slab-mantle control on H2O, that may set the future course of magma ascent, storage and eruption. Integrated studies are needed to test this prediction, including seismic imaging and geodetic response of the volcanic system, from the slab to the surface. [1] Plank, et al. (2011) Min. Mag. 75: 1648. [2] Zimmer, et al. (2010) J. Pet. 51: 2411-2444.

  15. Case study: Bioremediation in the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, K.J.; Laford, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    This case study describes the design, construction, and operation of a bioremediation pile on Adak Island, which is located in the Aleutian Island chain. Approximately 1,900 m{sup 3} of petroleum-contaminated soil were placed in the bioremediation pile. The natural bioremediation process was enhanced by an oxygen and nutrient addition system to stimulate microbial activity. Despite the harsh weather on the island, after the first 6 months of operation, laboratory analyses of soil samples indicated a significant (80%) reduction in diesel concentrations.

  16. InSAR imaging of volcanic deformation over cloud-prone areas - Aleutian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-tosubcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of meters over a relatively large region. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, INSAR is an important technique for measuring ground-surface deformation of volcanoes over cloud-prone and rainy regions such as the Aleutian Islands, where only less than 5 percent of optical imagery is usable due to inclement weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from INSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper reviews the basics of INSAR for volcanic deformation mapping and the INSAR studies of ten Aleutian volcanoes associated with both eruptive and noneruptive activity. These studies demonstrate that all-weather INSAR imaging can improve our understanding of how the Aleutian volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  17. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  18. Criconematina (nematoda: tylenchida) from the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    A new genus (Cerchnotocriconema) and three new species (C. psephinum, Hemicycliophora anchitkaensis, and Paratylenchus amundseni) are described from Adak and Amchitka Islands in the Aleutian chain. The new genus differs from all other criconematid genera in having irregular, convex sculpturing consisting of small, oval plates on the anterior and posterior regions of each annule, with the mid-annular region minutely punctate or dentate. H. amchitkaensis n. sp. resembles H. sinilis Thorne and H. zuckermani Brzeski, but has only one head annule, instead of two. P. amundseni n. sp., which has a stylet 17 to 19 ..mu..m long, is similar to P. tatea Wu and Townsend and P. labiosus Anderson and Kimpinski, but differs by the presence of males and the possession of conoid-truncate lip region, functional spermatheca, and long male tail (c = 8.5 to 9.5). Seriespinula seymouri Wu (Mehta and Raski), Nothocriconema longulum (Gunhold) De Grisse and Loof, and Macroposthonia xenoplax (Raski) De Grisse and Loof are also reported from the islands.

  19. InSAR Imaging of Volcanic Deformation Over Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C.; Power, J.; Kwoun, O.; Rykhus, R.

    2005-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter to subcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of-meters over relatively large regions under all weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from InSAR images, enables the exploration of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of volcanic and tectonic processes. This paper summarizes our InSAR studies of more than a dozen Alaskan volcanoes, associated with both eruptive and non-eruptive activity. These examples include the pre-eruption inflation, co-eruption deflation, and post-eruption inflation at Okmok Volcano; magmatic intrusion and the associated tectonic stress release at Akutan Volcano; progressive aseismic inflation of Westdahl Volcano; magmatic intrusion at Mount Peulik Volcano and its relation to an earthquake swarm 30 km away; magmatic intrusion associated with a small eruption at Makushin Volcano in 1995; complex patterns of transient deformation during and after the 1992-1993 eruption at Seguam Volcano; surface subsidence caused by a decrease in pore fluid pressure in an active hydrothermal system beneath Kiska Volcano; compaction of young pyroclastic flow deposits at Augustine Volcano; persistent volcano-wide subsidence at Aniakchak Volcano; and lack of expected deformation associated with recent eruptions at Shishaldin, Pavlof, Cleveland, and Korovin Volcanoes. We conclude that the deformation patterns and the associated magma supply mechanisms over Aleutian Volcanoes are diverse and vary between volcanoes. These studies demonstrate that InSAR can improve our understanding on how the Aleutian Volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  20. 76 FR 3090 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Region; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Region; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Arbitration AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... extension of a currently approved collection. The Crab Rationalization Program allocates Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities through...

  1. 76 FR 3089 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Region Bering Sea & Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Region Bering Sea & Aleutian Islands Crab Permits AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... of a currently approved collection. The Crab Rationalization Program allocates Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities through...

  2. Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of February 7, ASTER captured this nighttime thermal infrared image of an eruption of Anatahan Volcano in the central Mariana Islands. The summit of the volcano is bright indicating there is a very hot area there. Streaming to the west is an ash plume, visible by the red color indicating the presence of silicate-rich particles. Dark grey areas are clouds that appear colder than the ocean. Anatahan is a stratovolcano that started erupting in May 2003, forming a new crater.

    The image covers an area of 56.3 x 41.8 km, and is located 16 degrees north latitude and 145.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  3. Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

    2010-08-29

    The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

  4. Avian mortality associated with a volcanic gas seep at Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bond, Alexander L.; Evans, William C.; Jones, Ian L.

    2012-01-01

    We identified natural pits associated with avian mortality at the base of Kiska Volcano in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska in 2007. Living, moribund, and dead birds were regularly found at low spots in a canyon between two lava flows during 2001–2006, but the phenomenon was attributed to natural trapping and starvation of fledgling seabirds (mostly Least Auklets, Aethia pusilla) at a colony site with >1 million birds present. However, 302 birds of eight species, including passerines, were found dead at the site during 2007–2010, suggesting additional factors were involved. Most carcasses showed no signs of injury and concentrations of dead birds had accumulated in a few distinctive low pits in the canyon. Gas samples from these locations showed elevated CO2 concentrations in late 2010. Analysis of carcasses indicated no evidence of blunt trauma or internal bleeding. Volcanic gases accumulating at these poorly ventilated sites may have caused the observed mortality, but are temporally variable. Most auklets breeding in the Aleutian Islands do so in recent lava flows that provide breeding habitat; our study documents a cost of this unusual habitat selection.

  5. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  6. 75 FR 38940 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Greenland Turbot in the Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Greenland Turbot in the Aleutian Islands Subarea of the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Greenland turbot in the Aleutian Islands subarea of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  7. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. PMID:21328563

  8. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for Gareloi Volcano, Gareloi Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2008-01-01

    Gareloi Volcano (178.794 degrees W and 51.790 degrees N) is located on Gareloi Island in the Delarof Islands group of the Aleutian Islands, about 2,000 kilometers west-southwest of Anchorage and about 150 kilometers west of Adak, the westernmost community in Alaska. This small (about 8x10 kilometer) volcano has been one of the most active in the Aleutians since its discovery by the Bering expedition in the 1740s, though because of its remote location, observations have been scant and many smaller eruptions may have gone unrecorded. Eruptions of Gareloi commonly produce ash clouds and lava flows. Scars on the flanks of the volcano and debris-avalanche deposits on the adjacent seafloor indicate that the volcano has produced large landslides in the past, possibly causing tsunamis. Such events are infrequent, occurring at most every few thousand years. The primary hazard from Gareloi is airborne clouds of ash that could affect aircraft. In this report, we summarize and describe the major volcanic hazards associated with Gareloi.

  9. Geothermal Drilling In The Aleutians Reveals New Insights On Volcanic History Of Akutan Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, two thermal gradient wells were drilled in the Hot Springs Bay Valley geothermal resource area on Akutan Island, Alaska. Well TG-2 was drilled in the region of hot springs occurrence near the mouth of the valley and reached a depth of 253 m (833'). Well TG-4 was drilled near the head of the valley, closer to the current volcano, and reached a depth of 457 m (1500'). The core recovered from these wells represent the only drill core extracted from an Aleutian volcano to date and reveals an important missing piece of the surficial eruptive and erosional history of the volcano that cannot be determined from surface evaluation of recent eruptive deposits laid down on 500 ka bedrock outcrops. No intrusive rocks were encountered, indicating a rich history of surficial activity. The core is dominated (46% of recovered core) by basaltic lava flow deposits (49-52 wt% SiO2), consistent with other observed deposits on the island. These flows are interspersed with andesite lava flows (20% of core, ranging from 53-58 wt% SiO2), abundant mass wasting deposits (27% of core) and a series of ash and ash tuff layers that are some of the most silicic deposits identified at Akutan (up to 66 wt% SiO2). Ash deposits are restricted to the upper 125 m in both wells, are significantly thicker in TG-4, and are difficult to correlate between the two wells. Mass wasting deposits are diverse, including a subset characterized by matrix-supported heterolithologic breccias enclosed in a crystalline basaltic lava host. A shell-rich zone at 273 meters depth indicates that the transition between sub-marine and sub-aerial activity may be recorded in the core.

  10. PBO-Style Seismic and Geodetic Monitoring at Frequently-Active Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, T. L.; Power, J. A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Tytgat, G.; Moran, S. C.; Lisowski, M.; Johnston, M. J.; Pauk, B. A.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Paskievitch, J. F.; Plucinski, T. A.; McNutt, S. R.; Petersen, T.; Mann, D.

    2002-12-01

    A major goal of EarthScope and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is to obtain real-time data on the dynamics of magma transport and the physical processes surrounding magmatic intrusions before, during, and after eruption. To accomplish this the PBO has selected five active Aleutian arc volcanic centers for instrumentation; Augustine, Pavlof, Unimak Island (the location of Isanotski, Shishaldin, Fisher Caldera, and Westdahl Volcano), Akutan, and Okmok. Six of these volcanoes have erupted within the last 20 years and four are known to be actively deforming. The frequency of eruptive activity at these volcanoes, as well as diverse chemistry of erupted products, makes these volcanic centers unique natural laboratories within the North American plate boundary system for studying active volcanism. During the summer of 2002 the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) began deployment of PBO-style networks consisting of continuous GPS receivers collocated with broadband seismometers at Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera. Five GPS receivers were installed in 2002, and are recording on-site. Three GPS receivers on Okmok radio data approximately 70 km to Dutch Harbor. The radio system provides full duplex serial communication between the instruments at each remote site and the central recording system in Dutch Harbor. Planned 2003 work includes adding broadband seismometers to the existing sites and adding three more sites for a total of four telemetered broadband-GPS sites on each volcano. These deployments complement short-period seismic networks that were deployed on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera in 1996 and 2002 and campaign GPS measurements begun in 1996 and 2000, respectively. The instruments installed this year and the addition of the broadband seismometers in 2003 will greatly improve our ability to study volcanic processes. Once the existing networks are enhanced by additional instrumentation through PBO, they will provide the opportunity to study the mechanics and geometry of magmatic intrusions, the implications of long-period and very-long-period seismic events, strain transients associated with magma transport, the degree of remote and static triggering of magmatic intrusions and earthquake swarms, and the interplay between magmatic systems and regional tectonics.

  11. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  12. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  13. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  14. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  15. Identification of parasitoses in a child burial from Adak Island (Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska).

    PubMed

    Bouchet, F; West, D; Lefèvre, C; Corbett, D

    2001-02-01

    Bothriocephalid (Diphyllobothrium pacificum) and Ascarid (Ascaris lumbricoides) eggs have been identified in a sample taken in the abdominal cavity of a child skeleton found in Zeto Point (ADK-011), an archaeological site on Adak Island in the Central Aleutian Islands (Alaska). PMID:11280043

  16. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat...

  17. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat...

  18. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat...

  19. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat...

  20. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat...

  1. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170 Section 7.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  3. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  5. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  7. A new sea star of the genus Leptasterias (Asteroidea: Asteriidae) from the Aleutian Islands.

    PubMed

    Clark, Roger N; Jewett, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    A new species of asteriid sea star of the genus Leptasterias (Order Forcipulatida) is described from the nearshore waters of the Aleutian Islands. Leptaterias tatei sp. nov. is distinguished from Leptasterias stolacantha Fisher, 1930, by the characteristics of the spines and pedicellariae. Geographic distribution is discussed and a key to the five-rayed Leptasterias of the Aleutian Islands is provided. PMID:25947530

  8. Observations of deep long-period (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Stihler, S.D.; White, R.A.; Moran, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-period (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. Observed wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML 2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a period of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences. At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These observations suggest a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.

  9. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  10. A burial cave in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    West, Dixie; Lefèvre, Christine; Corbett, Debra; Crockford, Susan

    2003-01-01

    During the 1998 field season, the Western Aleutians Archaeological and Paleobiological Project (WAAPP) team located a cave in the Near Islands, Alaska. Near the entrance of the cave, the team identified work areas and sleeping/sitting areas surrounded by cultural debris and animal bones. Human burials were found in the cave interior. In 2000, with permission from The Aleut Corporation, archaeologists revisited the site. Current research suggests three distinct occupations or uses for this cave. Aleuts buried their dead in shallow graves at the rear of the cave circa 1,200 to 800 years ago. Aleuts used the front of the cave as a temporary hunting camp as early as 390 years ago. Finally, Japanese and American military debris and graffiti reveal that the cave was visited during and after World War II. Russian trappers may have also taken shelter there 150 to 200 years ago. This is the first report of Aleut cave burials west of the Delarof Islands in the central Aleutians. PMID:21755641

  11. Non-volcanic tremor in the Aleutian Islands captured by a mini-seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Prejean, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Aleutian Islands are an interesting place to study because of the presence of abundant seismicity, both subduction and volcano related. In addition to regular earthquakes, the Islands host both volcanic and non-volcanic tremor. To capture this rich variety of seismicity, we designed and installed a mini-seismic array on Akutan Island in 2012. Akutan is located in the eastern Aleutians just off the tip of the Alaska Peninsula, near the eastern edge of the 1957 Mw8.6 earthquake rupture zone. A mini-seismic array is particularly useful in this logistically challenging environment where land cover is limited. We recorded and analyzed about 2 months of data, and found both volcanic and non-volcanic events. Here we focus on non-volcanic tremor and its characteristics as captured by the Akutan array. Akutan Island and the surrounding area turn out to be prolific producers of tremor. An automatic beam-backprojection algorithm [Ghosh et al., 2009] detects almost daily tremor activity with durations ranging from several minutes to more than 3.5 hours. On average, beam-backprojection detects 1.3 hours of tremor activity per day and in total, it detects about 5 times more duration of tremor activity compared to a visual check for tremor signal using the existing seismic network. We observe tremor sources both west and east of the Akutan array. Western sources are the most active ones and their slowness parameters are consistent with the locations of low-frequency earthquakes detected by Brown et al., 2013. The eastern source area has not been identified previously and appears to be active for only a few times during this study, but shows continuous activity for several hours. In addition, we observe temporal evolution of slowness parameters consistent with steady tremor migration. Moreover, low frequency earthquakes with impulsive body wave phases are identified within the tremor signal. They show S-minus-P times consistent with their being located at the model plate interface [Hayes et al., 2012]. The mini-seismic array combined with a beam-backprojection algorithm is providing an enhanced image of tremor activity in the Aleutian Islands, by greatly improving the level of detection and resolution of locations. This would enable us to perform more intricate analyses of tectonic behavior of slow earthquake and tremor, their possible interaction with regular earthquakes and therefore help better understand the subduction dynamics of the study area. Comparison between tremor duration detected by the beam-backprojection and existing seismic network. On average, beam-backprojection detected ~5 times more duration of tremor activity compared to the detection using existing network.

  12. Origins of linguistic diversity in the Aleutian Islands.

    PubMed

    Berge, Anna

    2010-12-01

    The Aleut language, currently spoken along the Aleutian chain and the Pribilof and Commander islands, is the only language in its branch of the Eskimo-Aleut language family, and traditional methods of linguistic reconstruction have neither satisfactorily explained its relationship with languages on the Asian continent nor its development from Proto-Eskimo-Aleut. Linguistic reconstruction has always been important in understanding the prehistory and history of the Aleuts, and new approaches in comparative linguistics, more comprehensive information on typological features of neighboring languages, and continuing language documentation allow us to propose a rich and continuous history of contact with various groups of people. I evaluate evidence that the Aleut language may have been shaped by contact with neighbors in Asia and Alaska, eventually giving rise to its differentiation from the Eskimo languages. I look at dialect differentiation along the Aleutian chain and what this differentiation reveals about the migration trends of the Aleut along the chain. I look at the colonial expansion of the Aleut-speaking area and resulting additional varieties of Aleut in the historical period. Finally, I review the effects of the Russian and American colonial periods on the Aleut language and the severe endangerment that the language faces today as a result. I conclude that there is evidence of possible Aleut contact with both neighboring peoples; however, much of this evidence has not yet been subjected to systematic comparative reconstructions. Linguistic evidence supports theories of at least two westward expansions of Aleuts along the island chain, but it is not yet clear what motivated the dialect differentiations. Finally, I offer some thoughts on directions for future dialect studies and the continuing documentation of Aleut. PMID:21417884

  13. Modeling potential tsunami sources for deposits near Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Selle, S.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    In regions with little seismic data and short historical records of earthquakes, we can use preserved tsunami deposits and tsunami modeling to infer if, when and where tsunamigenic earthquakes have occurred. The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone in the region offshore of Unalaska Island is one such region where the historical and paleo-seismicity is poorly understood. This section of the subduction zone is not thought to have ruptured historically in a large earthquake, leading some to designate the region as a seismic gap. By modeling various historical and synthetic earthquake sources, we investigate whether or not tsunamis that left deposits near Unalaska Island were generated by earthquakes rupturing through Unalaska Gap. Preliminary field investigations near the eastern end of Unalaska Island have identified paleotsunami deposits well above sea level, suggesting that multiple tsunamis in the last 5,000 years have flooded low-lying areas over 1 km inland. Other indicators of tsunami inundation, such as a breached cobble beach berm and driftwood logs stranded far inland, were tentatively attributed to the March 9, 1957 tsunami, which had reported runup of 13 to 22 meters on Umnak and Unimak Islands, to the west and east of Unalaska. In order to determine if tsunami inundation could have reached the runup markers observed on Unalaska, we modeled the 1957 tsunami using GeoCLAW, a numerical model that simulates tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation. The published rupture orientation and slip distribution for the MW 8.6, 1957 earthquake (Johnson et al., 1994) was used as the tsunami source, which delineates a 1200 km long rupture zone along the Aleutian trench from Delarof Island to Unimak Island. Model results indicate that runup and inundation from this particular source are too low to account for the runup markers observed in the field, because slip is concentrated in the western half of the rupture zone, far from Unalaska. To ascertain if any realistic, earthquake-generated tsunami could account for the observed runup, we modeled tsunami inundation from synthetic MW 9.2 earthquakes rupturing along the trench between Atka and Unimak Islands, which indicate that the deposit runup observed on Unalaska is possible from a source of this size and orientation. Further modeling efforts will examine the April 1, 1946 Aleutian tsunami, as well as other synthetic tsunamigenic earthquake sources of varying size and location, which may provide insight into the rupture history of the Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone, especially in combination with more data from paleotsunami deposits. Johnson, Jean M., Tanioka, Yuichiro, Ruff, Larry J., Satake, Kenji, Kanamori, Hiroo, Sykes, Lynn R. "The 1957 great Aleutian earthquake." Pure and Applied Geophysics 142.1 (1994): 3-28.

  14. Hair methylmercury levels of mummies of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, G.M. Ponce, Rafael Bloom, Nicolas S. Knecht, Rick Loring, Stephen Middaugh, John P.

    2009-04-15

    Ancient human hair specimens can shed light on the extent of pre-historic exposures to methylmercury and provide valuable comparison data with current-day exposures, particularly for Indigenous Peoples who continue to rely upon local traditional food resources. Human hair from ancient Aleutian Island Native remains were tested for total and methylmercury (Hg, MeHg) and were radiocarbon dated. The remains were approximately 500 years old (1450 A.D.). For four adults, the mean and median total hair mercury concentration was 5.8 ppm (SD=0.9). In contrast, MeHg concentrations were lower with a mean of 1.2 ppm (SD=1.8) and a median of 0.54 ppm (0.12-3.86). For the five infants, the mean and median MeHg level was 1.2 ppm (SD=1.8) and 0.20 ppm (0.007-4.61), respectively. Segmental analyses showed variations in MeHg concentrations in 1-cm segments, consistent with fluctuations in naturally occurring exposure to mercury through dietary sources. The levels are comparable to or lower than those found in fish and marine mammal-eating populations today who rely far less on subsistence food than pre-historic humans. The findings are, therefore, compatible with increased anthropogenic release of trace metals during the past several centuries.

  15. Three new species of heteroderoidea (nematoda) from the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.C.

    1981-10-01

    Three new species of Heteroderoidea are described from Adak and Amchitka Islands in the Aleutian chain. Second-stage juveniles of Thecavermiculatus crassicrustata, n. sp., differ from those of T. gracililancea Robbins by having longer stylets (40 to 50 ..mu..m vs 19 to 22 ..mu..m). The female of T. crassicrustata has a longer neck, a more posterior excretory pore, and lacks a posterior protuberance. Meloidodera eurytyla, n. sp., differs from other Meloidodera spp. in that second-stage juveniles have longer stylets (32 to 35 ..mu..m) and much more massive styletknobs, while males have a longitudinally striated basal head annule. Meloidogyne subarctica, n. sp., can be separated from other Meloidogyne spp. by combinations of the following characteristics: perineal pattern with large oval areas in the tail region devoid of striae, arch with few unbroken striae; female excretory pore 1.5 to 2.5 x the stylet length from the anterior end; haploid chromosome number = 18; the spermatheca filled with sperm; stylet length of second-stage juveniles 13.5 to 15.4 ..mu..m.

  16. 76 FR 43658 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost Recovery Program AGENCY: National... under the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage for the 2011/2012 crab fishing year so...

  17. 76 FR 44297 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Allocating Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Allocating Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands King and Tanner Crab Fishery Resources.... SUMMARY: The Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab Rationalization Program (CR Program) allocates BSAI crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities. Amendment 30 would amend...

  18. 78 FR 46577 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost Recovery Program AGENCY: National... under the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage for the 2013/2014 crab fishing year so...

  19. 75 FR 43147 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost Recovery Program AGENCY: National... under the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage for the 2010/2011 crab fishing year so...

  20. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL..., Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and...

  1. Spawning phenology and geography of Aleutian Islands and eastern Bering Sea Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidetcher, Sandra K.; Hurst, Thomas P.; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Logerwell, Elizabeth A.

    2014-11-01

    Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) is an economically and ecologically important species in the southeastern Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, yet little is known about the spawning dynamics of Pacific cod in these regions. To address this knowledge gap, we applied a gross anatomical maturity key for Pacific cod to describe temporal and spatial patterns of reproductive status over three winter spawning seasons: 2005, 2006, and 2007. Maturity status of female Pacific cod was assessed by fishery observers during sampling of commercial catches and used to construct maps showing spawning activity in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands. Most spawning activity was observed on the Bering Sea shelf and Aleutian Island plateaus between 100 and 200 m depth. Data for those days when a high percentage of spawning stage fish were observed were used to identify areas with concentrations of spawning fish. Spawning concentrations were identified north of Unimak Island, in the vicinity of the Pribilof Islands, at the shelf break near Zhemchug Canyon, and adjacent to islands in the central and western Aleutian Islands along the continental shelf. The spawning season was found to begin in the last days of February or early March and extend through early to mid-April. Variation in spawning time (averaging ~10 days between years) may have been associated with a change from warm (2005) to cold (2007) climate conditions during the study period. Our information on Pacific cod spawning patterns will help inform fishery management decisions, models of spawning and larval dispersal and the spatial structure of the stock.

  2. Gabbroic and Peridotitic Enclaves from the 2008 Kasatochi Eruption, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentner, A.; Nadin, E. S.; Izbekov, P. E.; Nye, C. J.; Neill, O. K.

    2012-12-01

    Kasatochi volcano of the Andreanof Islands in the western Aleutian Arc violently erupted over a two day period from August 7-8, 2008. The eruption involved multiple explosive events generating pyroclastic flows, which included abundant mafic and ultramafic enclaves that have since weathered out and accumulated in talus along the coast. These and other mafic enclaves sampled by modern island arc lavas provide insight into subduction magmatism because they emerge from a section of the subduction system that is less likely than shallower zones to be modified by magmatic processes such as mixing, assimilation, or fractionation. We present new whole rock, clinopyroxene, amphibole, plagioclase, and melt compositions from Kasatochi enclaves of the 2008 eruption. The highly crystalline (~40 vol. % phenocryst content), medium-K basaltic andesite host rock contains ~52-55 wt. % SiO2 and 0.6-0.9 wt. % K2O, and is composed of plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene, amphibole, and Ti-magnetite in a microlite-rich groundmass. Upon eruption, this magma sampled two distinct enclave populations: gabbro and peridotite. The gabbro has abundant amphibole (mostly magnesio-hastingsite) and plagioclase with minor clinopyroxene, olivine, and magnetite, while the peridotite is composed of olivine with minor amounts of clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. There is little textural variation amongst the peridotitic samples collected, but the gabbroic samples vary from layered to massive and cover a range in grain size from fine-grained to pegmatitic. The layered gabbros display centimeter-scale bands of alternating plagioclase- and amphibole-rich layers, with a strong preferential alignment of the amphibole grains. The coarser-grained samples are very friable, with ~10% pore space; disaggregation of these upon host-magma ascent likely formed the amphibole and plagioclase xenocrysts in the andesitic host. Based on the textural and compositional differences, we divide the enclaves into four groups, (1) fine-grained gabbro, (2) medium- to coarse-grained gabbro, (3) pegmatitic gabbro with crystals up to 11 cm long, and (4) medium-grained peridotite. Bulk analyses of the gabbros using LA-ICP-MS show strong light rare-earth element depletion typical of primitive melts and arc volcanics such as the South Sandwich Arc. Our data suggest that the enclaves are primitive, with plagioclase compositions of An92-96 and crystallization temperatures of 900-1100 deg. C. Initial thermobarometric analyses from compositions of amphibole in the gabbroic samples suggest different temperature-pressure conditions for crystallization of fine-grained and very coarse-grained gabbros. We interpret these rocks as hydrous cumulate-melt mixtures with primitive geochemistry that is similar to Aleutian xenoliths of Kanaga Island.

  3. Shishaldin volcano: Aleutian high-alumina basalts and the question of plagioclase accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fournelle, J.; Marsh, B.D. )

    1991-03-01

    High-alumina basalts (HABs) from volcanic arcs commonly contain 30%-50% (modal) plagioclase. It has been suggested that they reflect plagioclase addition and are not primary compositions. In rocks from the Aleutian volcano Shishaldin, the authors search for evidence of plagioclase accumulation: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and Na{sub 2}O vs. modal plagioclase; europium anomalies in HABs; plagioclase-liquid equilibrium; and the HAB groundmass. The HABs do not appear to be results of plagioclase addition to liquids of dacitic, Fe-Ti enriched, or high-Mg basaltic compositions. Plagioclase loss from HABs does appear to yield the Fe-Ti-enriched basalts. Shishaldin HABs may reflect near-primary compositions, and HAB phase equilibria may thus be useful in evaluating the origin of such arc basalts.

  4. Apparent Eruptive Response of Cascades and Alaska-Aleutian Arc Volcanoes to Major Deglaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.; Sisson, T. W.; Bacon, C. R.; Ferguson, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Precise argon ages of Pleistocene eruptive products from Cascades and Alaska-Aleutian arc volcanoes cluster in time following major deglaciations. Compilation of edifice-volume-weighted dates for over 700 lavas from 16 volcanoes are compared to marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS 2-8) of Bassinot et al. (1994, EPSL, v. 126, p. 91-108) and interpreted temperatures from the Vostok ice core (Petit et al., 1999, Nature, v. 399, p. 429-436). To assess relative time-volume relationships we weight the distribution of ages measured at each volcano by its total edifice volume. The abundance of ages scales with the number of mapped eruptive units, and may differ substantially from the true eruptive output. The distribution is also weighted inversely by the number of dates to account for centers with more or fewer dates. Stacked probability density functions yield significant peaks after MIS 6 and MIS 8. Veniaminof, Emmons Lake, Westdahl, Redoubt (Alaska-Aleutian arc), and Adams and Crater Lake (Cascades arc) have apparent eruptive episodes 135-110 ka (early MIS 5), coinciding with rapid warming of the oceans following the MIS 6 glacial. Veniaminof began growing at 250 ka (end MIS 8) and erupted more than 200 km3 of lava in MIS 7. Emmons Lake, Adams, Rainier, and Glacier Peak also have apparent growth peaks (abundant dated units) following MIS 8. Apparent correlation of eruptive episodes with deglaciations may result from depressurization of magmatic systems due to ice retreat resulting in enhanced decompression melting and/or diminished compressive stress on crustal magma reservoirs, poor preservation of lava sequences during glacial maxima, or coincidence. Next steps in this study include (1) more rigorous assessment of eruptive volumes of dated map units, (2) refining ice volume estimates during MIS 2, 6, and 8 at various centers by dating ice marginal lava flows and tuyas and by mapping moraines at selected volcanoes, (3) re-analyzing sequences previously dated by K/Ar to improve precision, and (4) extending the compilation to deglaciation following MIS 2.

  5. Chemical versus temporal controls on the evolution of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas at two volcanoes in the Alaska-Aleutian arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, R.; Turner, S.; Hawkesworth, C.; Bacon, C.R.; Nye, C.; Stelling, P.; Dreher, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska-Aleutian island arc is well known for erupting both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas. To investigate the relative roles of chemical and temporal controls in generating these contrasting liquid lines of descent we have undertaken a detailed study of tholeiitic lavas from Akutan volcano in the oceanic A1eutian arc and calc-alkaline products from Aniakchak volcano on the continental A1askan Peninsula. The differences do not appear to be linked to parental magma composition. The Akutan lavas can be explained by closed-system magmatic evolution, whereas curvilinear trace element trends and a large range in 87 Sr/86 Sr isotope ratios in the Aniakchak data appear to require the combined effects of fractional crystallization, assimilation and magma mixing. Both magmatic suites preserve a similar range in 226 Ra-230 Th disequilibria, which suggests that the time scale of crustal residence of magmas beneath both these volcanoes was similar, and of the order of several thousand years. This is consistent with numerical estimates of the time scales for crystallization caused by cooling in convecting crustal magma chambers. During that time interval the tholeiitic Akutan magmas underwent restricted, closed-system, compositional evolution. In contrast, the calc-alkaline magmas beneath Aniakchak volcano underwent significant open-system compositional evolution. Combining these results with data from other studies we suggest that differentiation is faster in calc-alkaline and potassic magma series than in tholeiitic series, owing to a combination of greater extents of assimilation, magma mixing and cooling.

  6. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Sound blue king crab. NVDC means the U.S. Coast Guard's National Vessel Documentation Center located in...) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. (a) Purpose. This section's purpose is to implement...

  7. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Specific Fishery or Program...

  8. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Sound blue king crab. NVDC means the U.S. Coast Guard's National Vessel Documentation Center located in...) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. (a) Purpose. This section's purpose is to implement...

  9. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Specific Fishery or Program...

  10. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Sound blue king crab. NVDC means the U.S. Coast Guard's National Vessel Documentation Center located in...) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. (a) Purpose. This section's purpose is to implement...

  11. 76 FR 68161 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Aleutian Islands Pollock Fishery Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... signed into law on January 23, 2004. Section 803 of this law allocates the Aleutian Islands (AI) directed... Aleut Corporation to authorize one or more agents for activities necessary for conducting the AI directed pollock fishery. Management provisions for the AI directed pollock fishery include:...

  12. Scrubbing masks magmatic degassing during repose at Cascade-Range and Aleutian-Arc volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, Robert B.; Janik, C.J.; Evans, William C.; Ritchie, B.E.; Counce, Dale; Poreda, R.J.; Iven, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Between 1992 and 1998, we sampled gas discharges from ?173°C fumaroles and springs at 12 quiescent but potentially restless volcanoes in the Cascade Range and Aleutian Arc (CRAA) including Mount Shasta, Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens, Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, Augustine Volcano, Mount Griggs, Trident, Mount Mageik, Aniakchak Crater, Akutan, and Makushin. For each site, we collected and analyzed samples to characterize the chemical (H2O, CO2, H2S, N2, CH4, H2, HCl, HF, NH3, Ar, O2, He) and isotopic (?13C of CO2, 3He/4He, 40Ar/36Ar, ?34S, ?13C of CH4, ?15N, and ?D and ?18O of water) compositions of the gas discharges, and to create baseline data for comparison during future unrest. The chemical and isotopic data show that these gases contain a magmatic component that is heavily modified from scrubbing by deep hydrothermal (150° - 350°C) water (primary scrubbing) and shallow meteoric water (secondary scrubbing). The impact of scrubbing is most pronounced in gas discharges from bubbling springs; gases from boiling-point fumaroles and superheated vents show progressively less impact from scrubbing. The most effective strategies for detecting gas precursors to future CRAA eruptions are to measure periodically the emission rates of CO2 and SO2, which have low and high respective solubilities in water, and to monitor continuously CO2 concentrations in soils around volcanic vents. Timely resampling of fumaroles can augment the geochemical surveillance program by watching for chemical changes associated with drying of fumarolic pathways (all CRAA sites), increases in gas geothermometry temperatures (Mount Mageik, Trident, Mount Baker, Mount Shasta), changes in ?13C of CO2 affiliated with magma movement (all CRAA site), and increases in 3He/4He coupled with intrusion of new magma (Mount Rainier, Augustine Volcano, Makushin, Mount Shasta). Repose magmatic degassing may discharge substantial amounts of S and Cl into the edifices of Mount Baker and several other CRAA volcanoes that is trapped by primary and secondary scrubbing. The consequent acidic fluids produce ongoing alteration in the 0.2- to 3-km-deep hydrothermal systems and in fields of boiling-point fumaroles near the surface. Such alteration may influence edifice stability and contribute to the formation of more-hazardous cohesive debris flows. In particular, we recommend further investigation of the volume, extent, and hazards of hydrothermal alteration at Mount Baker. Other potential hazards associated with the CRAA volcano hydrothermal systems include hydrothermal eruptions and, for deeper systems intruded by magma, deep-seated edifice collapse.

  13. Two new species of the cheilostome bryozoan Cheilopora from the Aleutian Islands.

    PubMed

    Kuklinski, Piotr; Grischenko, Andrei V; Jewett, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Cheilopora-C. peristomata and C. elfa-are described from the shallow water around Adak and Amchitka of the Andreanof and Rat island groups of the Aleutian Islands. Zooids of both new species have cormidial peristomes, composed by the distal (originating from neighbouring zooid) and proximal lappets. In contrast to previously described species, the strongly elevated peristomial lappets defining the secondary orifice confer the overall shape of an incomplete circle with deep U-shaped proximolateral pseudosinuses. Depending on angle of view, this gives a campanuliform or trifoliate outline to the secondary orifice, by which the new species differ from congeners. Together with previous discoveries from the Aleutians, these two new Cheilopora species are indicative of incomplete knowledge of the marine biodiversity of the region, including the distinctive character of the bryozoan fauna. There is a need for intensification of taxonomic effort along the island arc. PMID:26249408

  14. Influence of mesoscale anticyclonic eddies on zooplankton distribution south of the western Aleutian Islands during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yasuda, I.; Ueno, H.; Ishiyama, H.; Imai, I.

    2013-12-01

    Mesoscale anticyclonic eddies have been observed south of the Aleutian Islands located between the Bering Sea and the subarctic Pacific. Eddies farther east, in the Gulf of Alaska, are known to transport coastal water and coastal zooplankton to offshore open ocean. The impacts of mesoscale anticyclonic eddies formed south of the western Aleutian Islands (Aleutian eddies) on the zooplankton community are not fully understood. In the present study, we describe zooplankton population structures within an Aleutian eddy and outside the eddy during July 2010. Our field study was conducted at seven stations along 51°15?N from 171°21?E to 174°38?E (western line) and at four stations along 50°40?N from 176°24?E to 178°44?E (eastern line) on 7-8 July 2010. At each station, environmental data (temperature, salinity and fluorescence were measured by CTD/XCTD. Zooplankton samples were collected by vertical tow of 150 m depth to the surface using 100 ?m mesh size plankton net. Based on the sea level anomaly (SLA), the western line crossed an anticyclonic eddy but the eastern line did not cross the eddy (Fig. 1). This Aleutian eddy was formed south of Attu Island (52°54?N, 172°54?E) in mid-February 2010, and it moved southeastward in the next five months. The SLA near the eddy center, representing the strength of the eddy, continuously increased, and the area oscillated at one to two month periods overlain on a general increase from ~7,000 to ~18,000 km2. Large oceanic copepods, Neocalanus cristatus, Eucalanus bungii and Metridia pacifica were more abundant inside the eddy than the outside. Inside the eddy, the life stage distribution of N. cristatus was advanced than that outside, and Neocalanus spp. had accumulated more lipids. These conditions probably reflect the greater primary production in the eddy, production enhanced by nutrients advected into the eddy. Since the Aleutian eddy was formed in offshore waters and/or eddy-eddy interaction occurred after its formation, it contained mostly oceanic copepods. The sufficient food condition in the eddy presumably induced higher growth and survival rates of these oceanic copepods, resulting in the greater abundance, advanced development stages and greater lipid accumulation. Fig. 1. Sea level anomaly along the sampling lines on 7 July 2010 south of the western Aleutian Islands.

  15. SURFACE REMEDIATION IN THE ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A CASE STUDY OF AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, M. O.; Stahl, D. C.; Bechtel, J. A.

    2002-02-25

    Amchitka Island, Alaska, was at one time an integral player in the nation's defense program. Located in the North Pacific Ocean in the Aleutian Island archipelago, the island was intermittently inhabited by several key government agencies, including the U.S. Army, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy), and the U.S. Navy. Since 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted extensive investigations on Amchitka to determine the nature and extent of contamination resulting from historic nuclear testing. The uninhabited island was the site of three high-yield nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. These test locations are now part of the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's Environmental Management Program. In the summer of 2001, the DOE launched a large-scale remediation effort on Amchitka to perform agreed-upon corrective actions to the surface of the island. Due to the lack of resources available on Amchitka and logistical difficulties with conducting work at such a remote location, the DOE partnered with the Navy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to share certain specified costs and resources. Attempting to negotiate the partnerships while organizing and implementing the surface remediation on Amchitka proved to be a challenging endeavor. The DOE was faced with unexpected changes in Navy and USACE scope of work, accelerations in schedules, and risks associated with construction costs at such a remote location. Unfavorable weather conditions also proved to be a constant factor, often slowing the progress of work. The Amchitka Island remediation project experience has allowed the DOE to gain valuable insights into how to anticipate and mitigate potential problems associated with future remediation projects. These lessons learned will help the DOE in conducting future work more efficiently, and can also serve as a guide for other agencies performing similar work.

  16. Seismic array processing and computational infrastructure for improved monitoring of Alaskan and Aleutian seismicity and volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Kent Gordon

    We constructed a near-real-time system, called Iceworm, to automate seismic data collection, processing, storage, and distribution at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC). Phase-picking, phase association, and interprocess communication components come from Earthworm (U.S. Geological Survey). A new generic, internal format for digital data supports unified handling of data from diverse sources. A new infrastructure for applying processing algorithms to near-real-time data streams supports automated information extraction from seismic wavefields. Integration of Datascope (U. of Colorado) provides relational database management of all automated measurements, parametric information for located hypocenters, and waveform data from Iceworm. Data from 1997 yield 329 earthquakes located by both Iceworm and the AEIC. Of these, 203 have location residuals under 22 km, sufficient for hazard response. Regionalized inversions for local magnitude in Alaska yield Msb{L} calibration curves (logAsb0) that differ from the Californian Richter magnitude. The new curve is 0.2\\ Msb{L} units more attenuative than the Californian curve at 400 km for earthquakes north of the Denali fault. South of the fault, and for a region north of Cook Inlet, the difference is 0.4\\ Msb{L}. A curve for deep events differs by 0.6\\ Msb{L} at 650 km. We expand geographic coverage of Alaskan regional seismic monitoring to the Aleutians, the Bering Sea, and the entire Arctic by initiating the processing of four short-period, Alaskan seismic arrays. To show the array stations' sensitivity, we detect and locate two microearthquakes that were missed by the AEIC. An empirical study of the location sensitivity of the arrays predicts improvements over the Alaskan regional network that are shown as map-view contour plots. We verify these predictions by detecting an Msb{L} 3.2 event near Unimak Island with one array. The detection and location of four representative earthquakes illustrates the expansion of geographic coverage from array processing. Measurements at the arrays of systematic azimuth residuals, between 5sp° and 50sp° from 203 Aleutian events, reveal significant effects of heterogeneous structure on wavefields. Finally, algorithms to automatically detect earthquakes in continuous array data are demonstrated with the detection of an Aleutian earthquake.

  17. Abundance, trends and distribution of baleen whales off Western Alaska and the central Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Waite, Janice M.; Laake, Jeffrey L.; Wade, Paul R.

    2006-11-01

    Large whales were extensively hunted in coastal waters off Alaska, but current distribution, population sizes and trends are poorly known. Line transect surveys were conducted in coastal waters of the Aleutian Islands and the Alaska Peninsula in the summer of 2001-2003. Abundances of three species were estimated by conventional and multiple covariate distance sampling (MCDS) methods. Time series of abundance estimates were used to derive rates of increase for fin whales ( Balaenoptera physalus) and humpback whales ( Megaptera novaeangliae). Fin whales occurred primarily from the Kenai Peninsula to the Shumagin Islands, but were abundant only near the Semidi Islands and Kodiak. Humpback whales were found from the Kenai Peninsula to Umnak Island and were more abundant near Kodiak, the Shumagin Islands and north of Unimak Pass. Minke whales ( B. acutorostrata) occurred primarily in the Aleutian Islands, with a few sightings south of the Alaska Peninsula and near Kodiak Island. Humpback whales were observed in large numbers in their former whaling grounds. In contrast, high densities of fin whales were not observed around the eastern Aleutian Islands, where whaling occurred. Average abundance estimates (95% CI) for fin, humpback and minke whales were 1652 (1142-2389), 2644 (1899-3680), and 1233 (656-2315), respectively. Annual rates of increase were estimated at 4.8% (95% CI=4.1-5.4%) for fin and 6.6% (5.2-8.6%) for humpback whales. This study provides the first estimate of the rate of increase of fin whales in the North Pacific Ocean. The estimated trends are consistent with those of other recovering baleen whales. There were no sightings of blue or North Pacific right whales, indicating the continued depleted status of these species.

  18. The Detection, Characterization and Tracking of Recent Aleutian Island Volcanic Ash Plumes and the Assessment of Their Impact on Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, John J.; Hudnall, L. A.; Matus, A.; Krueger, A. J.; Trepte, C. r.

    2010-01-01

    The Aleutian Islands of Alaska are home to a number of major volcanoes which periodically present a significant hazard to aviation. During summer of 2008, the Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes experienced moderate eruptive events. These were followed a dramatic, major eruption of Mount Redoubt in late March 2009. The Redoubt case is extensively covered in this paper. Volcanic ash and SO2 from each of these eruptions dispersed throughout the atmosphere. This created the potential for major problems for air traffic near the ash dispersions and at significant distances downwind. The NASA Applied Sciences Weather Program implements a wide variety of research projects to develop volcanic ash detection, characterization and tracking applications for NASA Earth Observing System and NOAA GOES and POES satellites. Chemistry applications using NASA AURA satellite Ozone Monitoring System (OMI) retrievals produced SO2 measurements to trace the dispersion of volcanic aerosol. This work was complimented by advanced multi-channel imager applications for the discrimination and height assignment of volcanic ash using NASA MODIS and NOAA GOES and POES imager data. Instruments similar to MODIS and OMI are scheduled for operational deployment on NPOESS. In addition, the NASA Calipso satellite provided highly accurate measurements of aerosol height and dispersion for the calibration and validation of these algorithms and for corroborative research studies. All of this work shortens the lead time for transition to operations and ensures that research satellite data and applications are operationally relevant and utilized quickly after the deployment of operational satellite systems. Introduction

  19. A new population of Aleutian shield fern (Polystichum aleuticum C. Christens.) on Adak Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S.L.; Talbot, S. S.

    2002-01-01

    We report and describe a new population of the endangered Aleutian shield fern (Polystichum aleuticum C. Christens.) discovered on Mount Reed, Adak Island, Alaska. The new population is located at a lower elevation than the other known populations, placing the species' known elevational range between 338 m and 525 m. The discovery of this population is significant because it increases the total number of known populations and individuals for the species.

  20. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, C.J. . Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK . Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. . Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. . Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  1. The importance of parental magma composition to calc-alkaline and tholeiitic evolution: Evidence from Umnak Island in the Aleutians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Daniel M.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Goldstein, Steven L.; Franks, Andrew L.

    1992-01-01

    Okmok and Recheshnoi are adjacent volcanoes on the island of Umnak in the Aleutian Arc. Ninety-five new chemical analyses of lavas from the two volcanoes show that Okmok exhibits a classical tholeiitic and Recheshnoi a calc-alkaline differentiation trend. Both volcanoes have erupted lavas that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite. This allows investigation of differences in both the differentiation systematics and the parental magma compositions. In contrast to the predictions of many recent models for calc-alkaline and tholeiitic volcanism, the major and trace element data show that the parental magmas for the two volcanoes have different compositions. These different parental compositions might themselves be produced by in situ differentiation or other complex fractionation processes from a very magnesian parental magma (16% MgO) with Okmok being derived by low-pressure fractionation and Recheshnoi by in situ fractionation at higher pressures. An alternative and simpler explanation is that the inferred high-MgO Okmok parent and the Recheshnoi parent are derived by different extents of melting in the mantle wedge. Modelling based on the rare earth elements suggests approximately 7% melting for the calc-alkaline parent and 20% for the tholeiitic parent. For these two volcanoes therefore, there may be a correlation between extent of melting and the tendency to follow a calc-alkaline or tholeiitic differentiation trend. Larger enrichments of highly fluid-mobile elements such as boron and cesium in the tholeiitic Okmok source suggest that variability in the volume of fluid flux from the slab may be responsible for the different extents of melting. If the partial melting model is applied generally to the Aleutian Arc, it provides an alternative explanation for the volcanic regularities of the arc described by Kay et al. (1982). Smaller extents of melting lead to less melt, fractionation at higher pressures, often including hydrous phases, a preponderance of plutonic rather than volcanic rocks, and smaller calc-alkaline volcanoes. Large tholeiitic volcanoes are often associated with fracture zones on the subducting Pacific plate (Kay et al., 1982; Marsh, 1982). Since fracture zones are more extensively altered than average oceanic crust and might also serve as sediment traps, they could serve as sources of a larger volatile flux from the slab, leading to greater extents of melting and large, tholeiitic volcanoes. If this explanation is correct, then the origin of the volcanic segmentation of the arc may be found within the subducted slab. This contrasts with the alternative model of control by the stress regime of the overlying plate (Kay et al., 1982; Singer and Myers, 1990; Kay and Kay, 1991). Inferences from Okmok and Recheshnoi may also apply to global variations in convergent margin chemistry. In general, arcs built On thick crust tend to be more calc-alkaline in character. On the Basis of the negative correlation between convergent margin crustal thickness and inferred extent of melting (Plank and Langmuir, 1988), lower extents of melting may contribute to a tendency towards calc-alkaline differentiation on a global basis.

  2. Deep, Carbon Dioxide-Rich Degassing of Pavlof Volcano, Aleutian arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangan, M.; Sisson, T.; Hankins, B.

    2006-12-01

    Pavlof is the most active volcanic center in the Aleutian arc with more than 40 eruptions in the last 250 years. Lava fountains and strombolian-to-vulcanian activity since the late Pleistocene built a steep-sided basaltic- andesite stratovolcano rising 2733 m a.s.l. Seismic monitoring (in place since the 1970's) shows the tendency of Pavlof to erupt without extensive precursors. Of the 22 monitored eruptions between 1973 and 1996, 18 occurred with < 24 hours of above-background seismicity (McNutt, 1989; Neal and McGimsey, 1997). Upper mantle to lower crustal long-period (LP) earthquakes are a notable geophysical feature of Pavlof (and other Aleutian volcanoes) during repose periods (Power et al, 2004). LP earthquakes, with their emergent onsets, extended codas and narrow frequency spectra (1-3 Hz), are widely attributed to the motions of fluid (melt, gas, or aqueous) in fractures or reservoirs. At Pavlof, LPs are detected as sporadic single events at depths of 18-36 km or as clusters with co-located volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) typical of brittle fracture. Rapid injection (VT) and degassing (LP) of CO2-H2O saturated Pavlof magmas may account for deep LP-VT clusters. We are in the early stages of an experimental study of CO2-rich degassing of Pavlof magma with the aim of quantifying the physiochemical mechanisms of deep, fluid-driven seismicity in active volcanic regions. We use newly developed methods for conducting controlled decompressions (1200 to 400 MPa) of volatile-added silicate melts in piston-cylinder presses. At 1200 MPa and 1125°C, a vapor-saturated Pavlof basaltic- andesite melt with 2 wt% dissolved H2O has 8500 ppm dissolved CO2 (FTIR). Rapid decompression of these mixed-volatile melts to 400 MPa triggers nucleation and growth of bubbles containing nearly pure CO2 vapor. Equilibrium between melt and vapor is re-established after ~ 1 hr at the final pressure with dissolved volatile concentrations of 2 wt% H2O and 2000 ppm CO2, and 5 vol% coexisting bubbles. The experiments are visually compelling with an initially homogeneous bubble suspension (7E6-2E7 bubbles/cm3melt) that rapidly becomes unstable. The instability is two-stage (bubble wave feeds secondary plumes), and results in a foam layer at the top of the capsule. We are struck by the speed at which this process occurs (< 1 hr). The hydrodynamics of bubble wave and secondary plume instabilities was modeled numerically in the context of vesicle layers observed in lava flows (Manga, 1996). It may also have application to the rapid-fire magma injection and gas expulsion scenario needed to explain VT-LP clustering.

  3. MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS OF A RESIDENT FRESHWATER FORAGE FISH AT ADAK ISLAND, ALEUTIAN ARCHIPELAGO, ALASKA

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Leah A.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Willacker, James J.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    The Aleutian Archipelago is an isolated arc of over 300 volcanic islands stretching 1,600 km across the interface of the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean. Although remote, some Aleutian Islands were heavily impacted by military activities from World War II until recently and were exposed to anthropogenic contaminants, including mercury (Hg). Mercury is also delivered to these islands via global atmospheric transport, prevailing ocean currents, and biotransport by migratory species. Mercury contamination of freshwater ecosystems is poorly understood in this region. Total Hg (THg) concentrations were measured in threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) collected from eight lakes at Adak Island, an island in the center of the archipelago with a long military history. Mean THg concentrations for fish whole-body homogenates for all lakes ranged from 0.314 to 0.560 mg/kg dry weight. Stickleback collected from seabird-associated lakes had significantly higher concentrations of THg compared to non-seabird lakes, including all military lakes. The δ13C stable isotope ratios of stickleback collected from seabird lakes suggest an input of marine-derived nutrients and/or marine-derived Hg. PMID:22912068

  4. 77 FR 74161 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Allocating Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Program. Regulations implementing these amendments were published on March 2, 2005 (70 FR 10174), and are... blue king crab, and Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab. The North Region is north of 54 20' N... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Allocating Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands King and Tanner Crab Fishery...

  5. Dispersal and behavior of pacific halibut hippoglossus stenolepis in the bering sea and Aleutian islands region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seitz, A.C.; Loher, T.; Norcross, B.L.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, it is assumed that eastern Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis belong to a single, fully mixed population extending from California through the Bering Sea, in which adult halibut disperse randomly throughout their range during their lifetime. However, we hypothesize that hali but dispersal is more complex than currently assumed and is not spatially random. To test this hypo thesis, we studied the seasonal dispersal and behavior of Pacific halibut in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI). Pop-up Archival Transmitting tags attached to halibut (82 to 154 cm fork length) during the summer provided no evidence that individuals moved out of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands region into the Gulf of Alaska during the mid-winter spawning season, supporting the concept that this region contains a separate spawning group of adult halibut. There was evidence for geographically localized groups of halibut along the Aleutian Island chain, as all of the individuals tagged there displayed residency, with their movements possibly impeded by tidal currents in the passes between islands. Mid-winter aggregation areas of halibut are assumed to be spawning grounds, of which 2 were previously unidentified and extend the species' presumed spawning range ~1000 km west and ~600 km north of the nearest documented spawning area. If there are indeed independent spawning groups of Pacific halibut in the BSAI, their dynamics may vary sufficiently from those of the Gulf of Alaska, so that specifically accounting for their relative segregation and unique dynamics within the larger population model will be necessary for correctly predicting how these components may respond to fishing pressure and changing environmental conditions.?? Inter-Research 2011.

  6. Genetic structure of the Common Eider in the western Aleutian Islands prior to fox eradication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Wilson, Robert E.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Williams, Jeffrey C.; Byrd, G. Vernon; McCracken, Kevin G.

    2013-01-01

    Since the late 18th century bird populations residing in the Aleutian Archipelago have been greatly reduced by introduced arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). We analyzed data from microsatellite, nuclear intron, and mitochondrial (mtDNA) loci to examine the spatial genetic structure, demography, and gene flow among four Aleutian Island populations of the Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) much reduced by introduced foxes. In mtDNA, we found high levels of genetic structure within and between island groups (ΦST = 0.643), but we found no population subdivision in microsatellites or nuclear introns. Differences in genetic structure between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes are consistent with the Common Eider's breeding and winter biology, as females are highly philopatric and males disperse. Nevertheless, significant differences between islands in the mtDNA of males and marginal significance (P =0.07) in the Z-linked locus Smo 1 suggest that males may also have some level of fidelity to island groups. Severe reduction of populations by the fox, coupled with females' high philopatry, may have left the genetic signature of a bottleneck effect, resulting in the high levels of genetic differentiation observed in mtDNA (ΦST = 0.460–0.807) between islands only 440 km apart. Reestablishment of the Common Eider following the fox's eradication was likely through recruitment from within the islands and bolstered by dispersal from neighboring islands, as suggested by the lack of genetic structure and asymmetry in gene flow between Attu and the other Near Islands.

  7. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table 24 to Part 679... Table 24 to Part 679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area...

  8. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table 24 to Part 679... Table 24 to Part 679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area...

  9. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table 24 to Part 679 Wildlife and... 24 to Part 679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open...

  10. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table 24 to Part 679... Table 24 to Part 679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area...

  11. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table 24 to Part 679... Table 24 to Part 679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area...

  12. USGS Scientists Engaged in Field Work on the Aleutian Islands

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Three geologists scramble down a hillside on Sedanka Island that overlooks Stardust Bay. The geologists documented driftlogs stranded at elevations up to 60 ft above sea level and over 0.5 mile inland. The driftlogs, one visible in the lower right of the photo, were probably carried inland and depos...

  13. An introduced predator alters Aleutian Island plant communities by thwarting nutrient subsidies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maron, J.L.; Estes, J.A.; Croll, D.A.; Danner, E.M.; Elmendorf, S.C.; Buckelew, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    The ramifying effects of top predators on food webs traditionally have been studied within the framework of trophic cascades. Trophic cascades are compelling because they embody powerful indirect effects of predators on primary production. Although less studied, indirect effects of predators may occur via routes that are not exclusively trophic. We quantified how the introduction of foxes onto the Aleutian Islands transformed plant communities by reducing abundant seabird populations, thereby disrupting nutrient subsidies vectored by seabirds from sea to land. We compared soil and plant fertility, plant biomass and community composition, and stable isotopes of nitrogen in soil, plants, and other organisms on nine fox-infested and nine historically fox-free islands across the Aleutians. Additionally, we experimentally augmented nutrients on a fox-infested island to test whether differences in plant productivity and composition between fox-infested and fox-free islands could have arisen from differences in nutrient inputs between island types. Islands with historical fox infestations had soils low in phosphorus and nitrogen and plants low in tissue nitrogen. Soils, plants, slugs, flies, spiders, and bird droppings on these islands had low d15N values indicating that these organisms obtained nitrogen from internally derived sources. In contrast, soils, plants, and higher trophic level organisms on fox-free islands had elevated d15N signatures indicating that they utilized nutrients derived from the marine environment. Furthermore, soil phosphorus (but not nitrogen) and plant tissue nitrogen were higher on fox-free than fox-infested islands. Nutrient subsidized fox-free islands supported lush, high biomass plant communities dominated by graminoids. Fox-infested islands were less graminoid dominated and had higher cover and biomass of low-lying forbs and dwarf shrubs. While d15N profiles of soils and plants and graminoid biomass varied with island size and distance from shore, after accounting for these effects differences between fox-infested and fox-free islands still existed. Fertilization over four years caused a 24-fold increase in graminoid biomass and a shift toward a more graminoid dominated plant community typical of fox-free islands. These results indicate that apex predators can influence plant productivity and composition through complex interaction web pathways involving both top-down forcing and bottom-up nutrient exchanges across systems. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  14. Status and distribution of the Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris along the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak and Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madison, Erica N.; Piatt, John F.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Romano, Marc D.; van Pelt, Thomas I.; Nelson, S. Kim; Williams, Jeffrey C.; DeGange, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    The Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris is adapted for life in glacial-marine ecosystems, being concentrated in the belt of glaciated fjords in the northern Gulf of Alaska from Glacier Bay to Cook Inlet. Most of the remaining birds are scattered along coasts of the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, where they reside in protected bays and inlets, often in proximity to remnant glaciers or recently deglaciated landscapes. We summarize existing information on Kittlitz's Murrelet in this mainly unglaciated region, extending from Kodiak Island in the east to the Near Islands in the west. From recent surveys, we estimated that ~2400 Kittlitz's Murrelets were found in several large embayments along the Alaska Peninsula, where adjacent ice fields feed silt-laden water into the bays. On Kodiak Island, where only remnants of ice remain today, observations of Kittlitz's Murrelets at sea were uncommon. The species has been observed historically around the entire Kodiak Archipelago, however, and dozens of nest sites were found in recent years. We found Kittlitz's Murrelets at only a few islands in the Aleutian chain, notably those with long complex shorelines, high mountains and remnant glaciers. The largest population (~1600 birds) of Kittlitz's Murrelet outside the Gulf of Alaska was found at Unalaska Island, which also supports the greatest concentration of glacial ice in the Aleutian Islands. Significant populations were found at Atka (~1100 birds), Attu (~800) and Adak (~200) islands. Smaller numbers have been reported from Unimak, Umnak, Amlia, Kanaga, Tanaga, Kiska islands, and Agattu Island, where dozens of nest sites have been located in recent years. Most of those islands have not been thoroughly surveyed, and significant pockets of Kittlitz's Murrelets may yet be discovered. Our estimate of ~6000 Kittlitz's Murrelets along the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands is also likely to be conservative because of the survey protocols we employed (i.e. early seasonal timing of surveys, strip transects).

  15. Alaska Open-file Report 144 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites Aleutian Arc, Atka Island to Becherof Lake -- Preliminary Results and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J.; Moorman, M.A.; Liss, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Twenty of more than 30 thermal spring areas reported to exist in the Aleutian arc extending from Atka Island to Becherof Lake were investigated during July and August, 1980. Thermal activity of three of these sites had diminished substantially or no longer existed. At least seven more sites where thermal-spring activity is probable or certain were not visited because of their remoteness or because of time constraints. The existence of several other reported thermal spring sites could not be verified; these sites are considered questionable. On the basis of geothermometry, subsurface reservoir temperatures in excess of 150 C are estimated for 10 of the thermal spring sites investigated. These sites all occur in or near regions of Recent volcanism. Five of the sites are characterized by fumaroles and steaming ground, indicating the presence of at least a shallow vapor-dominated zone. Two, the Makushin Valley and Glacier Valley thermal areas, occur on the flanks of active Mukushin Volcano located on Unalaska Island, and may be connected to a common source of heat. Gas geothermometry suggests that the reservoir feeding the Kliuchef thermal field, located on the flanks of Kliuchef volcano of northeast Atka Island, may be as high as 239 C.

  16. Insights Into Aleutian Volcanism from Insar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Dzurisin, D.

    2013-12-01

    With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has become an increasingly important technique for studying magma dynamics at volcanoes in remote regions, such as the Aleutian Islands. The spatial distribution of surface deformation derived from InSAR data enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. To study Aleutian volcanism, we processed nearly 12,000 SAR images acquired by ERS-1, JERS-1, ERS-2, Radarsat-1, Envisat, ALOS, and TerraSAR-X from the early 1990s to 2010. We combined these SAR images to produce about 25,000 interferograms, which we analyzed for evidence of surface deformation at most of the arc's Holocene volcanoes. Where surface displacements were sufficiently strong, we used analytical models to estimate the location, shape, and volume change of deformation sources. This paper summarizes deformation processes at Aleutian volcanoes observed with InSAR, including: (1) time-variant volcanic inflation and magmatic intrusion, (2) deformation preceding and accompanying seismic swarms , (3) persistent volcano-wide subsidence at calderas that last erupted tens of years ago, (4) episodic magma intrusion and associated tectonic stress release, (5) subsidence caused by a decrease in pore fluid pressure in active hydrothermal systems, (6) subsidence of surface lava and pyroclastic flows, and (7) a lack of deformation at some volcanoes with recent eruptions, where deformation might be expected. Among the inferred mechanisms are magma accumulation in and withdrawal from crustal magma reservoirs, pressurization/depressurization of hydrothermal systems, and thermo-elastic contraction of young lava flows. Our work demonstrates that deformation patterns and associated magma supply mechanisms at Aleutian volcanoes are diverse and vary in both space and time. By combining InSAR results with information from the geologic record, accounts of historical eruptions, and data from seismology, petrology, gas geochemistry, and other sources, we have developed conceptual models for the magma plumbing systems and behaviors of many volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. We realize that these models are simplistic, but it is our hope that they will serve as foundations that will be refined as additional information becomes available. Finally, we have compared our InSAR observations from the Aleutians with those from the Andes and Indonesia to highlight the similarities and differences in volcanism between volcanic arcs [Lu and Dzurisin, 2013]. Lu, Z., and D. Dzurisin, InSAR Imaging of Aleutian Volcanoes: Monitoring a Volcanic Arc from Space', Springer Praxis Books, Geophysical Sciences, ISBN 978-3-642-00347-9, December 2013.

  17. Bimodal geochemical evolution at Sheveluch stratovolcano, Kamchatka, Russia: Consequence of a complex subduction at the junction of the Kuril Kamchatka and Aleutian island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlito, Carmelo

    2011-03-01

    Adak-type andesites erupted as domes at Sheveluch volcano (Kamchatka Russia) have been associated with partial melting of the Pacific plate subducting under Kamchatka. The heat for melting at the plate edge has been proposed to be provided by an asthenosphere upwelling north of the junction of Kuril Kamchatka and Aleutian island arcs. However, Sheveluch volcano is composed of two volcano-stratigraphic units bounded by a caldera episode. The lava sequence from the pre-caldera stage of Sheveluch has not previously been considered in the petrogenetic model and in the consequent geodynamic reconstruction. New petrochemical data from the post-caldera domes and the pre-caldera lavas, together with a review of the petrochemical characteristics of northern Kamchatka volcanics reveal a more complex story. Rocks at Sheveluch display a bimodal geochemical and petrological signature, which cannot be derived from a common parent magma: the pre-caldera lavas are high-Al 2O 3 basaltic andesites, similar to the products of Kliuchevskoi and other volcanoes in northern Kamchatka, and can be associated with partial melting of the mantle wedge hydrated by the subducting slab. The post-caldera andesitic domes, with high Mg#, Cr and Ni signature, are slab primary melts which have assimilated the peridotite in the overlying mantle wedge. A possible mechanism to explain the observations is that beneath Sheveluch two distinct slabs with different subduction angle and pressure/temperature paths are responsible for the two geochemical signatures. A reappraisal of geophysical data indicates that between the western Aleutians and northern Kamchatka there is a transform zone where the Pacific plate is torn apart and decoupled. It is proposed that a portion of the slab was led to subduct at low angle north of the transform zone and travelled west for a long distance. The frictionally heated metabasalt in the slab can yield acidic melts at the amphibolite-eclogite transition ~ 70 km beneath Sheveluch. The ascending melts interact with the peridotite to produce the high Mg-andesites erupted by the present-day volcano. South of the junction, the dehydration of the Pacific slab undergoing high angle subduction would cause partial melting of the peridotite in the mantle wedge and produce melts which will evolve as high Al 2O 3 basaltic andesites erupted in the pre-caldera phase. Sheveluch volcano can therefore be considered the only known example in the world in which two paradigmatic models for magma genesis at colliding margins are not mutually exclusive but are both necessary to explain the products of two distinct evolutionary phases.

  18. 77 FR 44216 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

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  1. 75 FR 7205 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

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    ... final rule implementing the Crab Rationalization Program (Program) was published on March 2, 2005 (70 FR... fishery would be caused in the time it would take to follow standard rulemaking procedures (62 FR 44421... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program; Emergency...

  2. 75 FR 21600 - Groundfish Fisheries of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Area and the Gulf of Alaska; King and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program; Public Meeting AGENCY: National... crab fisheries managed under the BSAI Crab Rationalization program. The CIE, operated by Northern Taiga... products. The BSAI Crab Economic Data Report (EDR) program administered by NMFS began collecting...

  4. 50 CFR 600.1108 - Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Longline catcher processor subsector of... Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1108 Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and... catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock groundfish...

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    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Longline catcher processor subsector of... Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1108 Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and... catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock groundfish...

  6. 50 CFR 600.1108 - Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock...

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    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Longline catcher processor subsector of... Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1108 Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and... catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock groundfish...

  7. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS...

  8. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt....

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... published on March 2, 2005 (70 FR 10174), and are located at 50 CFR part 680. Regulations implementing the... 2011 and 2012 harvest specifications (75 FR 76352, December 8, 2010), NMFS will publish the final... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program AGENCY:...

  13. 75 FR 38430 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Greenland Turbot in the Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the BSAI (75 FR 11788, March 12, 2010). In... specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11788, March 12, 2010). The harvest specification for the 2010... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Greenland Turbot in the Aleutian Islands Subarea of the Bering Sea and...

  14. 77 FR 44172 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

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    ... tons (mt) by the final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish of the BSAI (77 FR 10669... biological catch in the final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (77 FR 10669... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY:...

  15. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    ... COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Specific Fishery or Program Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations... endorsement fisheries, are: (1) Bristol Bay red king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is Bristol Bay red king crab), (2) Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Area C. opilio and C. bairdi...

  16. 76 FR 55276 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Octopus in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

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    2011-09-07

    ... of the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011) and an apportionment from the non-specified reserve of groundfish (76 FR 17360, March 29, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(2), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Octopus in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands AGENCY: National Marine...

  17. Little late Holocene strain accumulation and release on the Aleutian megathrust below the Shumagin Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witter, Robert C.; Briggs, Richard W.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Koehler, Richard D.; Barnhart, William D.

    2014-04-01

    Can a predominantly creeping segment of a subduction zone generate a great (M > 8) earthquake? Despite Russian accounts of strong shaking and high tsunamis in 1788, geodetic observations above the Aleutian megathrust indicate creeping subduction across the Shumagin Islands segment, a well-known seismic gap. Seeking evidence for prehistoric great earthquakes, we investigated Simeonof Island, the archipelago's easternmost island, and found no evidence for uplifted marine terraces or subsided shorelines. Instead, we found freshwater peat blanketing lowlands, and organic-rich silt and tephra draping higher glacially smoothed bedrock. Basal peat ages place glacier retreat prior to 10.4 ka and imply slowly rising (<0.2 m/ka) relative sea level since ~3.4 ka. Storms rather than tsunamis probably deposited thin, discontinuous deposits in coastal sites. If rupture of the megathrust beneath Simeonof Island produced great earthquakes in the late Holocene, then coseismic uplift or subsidence was too small (?0.3 m) to perturb the onshore geologic record.

  18. Little late Holocene strain accumulation and release on the Aleutian megathrust below the Shumagin Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witter, Robert C.; Briggs, Richard W.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Koehler, Richard D.; Barnhart, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Can a predominantly creeping segment of a subduction zone generate a great (M?>?8) earthquake? Despite Russian accounts of strong shaking and high tsunamis in 1788, geodetic observations above the Aleutian megathrust indicate creeping subduction across the Shumagin Islands segment, a well-known seismic gap. Seeking evidence for prehistoric great earthquakes, we investigated Simeonof Island, the archipelago's easternmost island, and found no evidence for uplifted marine terraces or subsided shorelines. Instead, we found freshwater peat blanketing lowlands, and organic-rich silt and tephra draping higher glacially smoothed bedrock. Basal peat ages place glacier retreat prior to 10.4?ka and imply slowly rising (<0.2?m/ka) relative sea level since ~3.4?ka. Storms rather than tsunamis probably deposited thin, discontinuous deposits in coastal sites. If rupture of the megathrust beneath Simeonof Island produced great earthquakes in the late Holocene, then coseismic uplift or subsidence was too small (?0.3?m) to perturb the onshore geologic record.

  19. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  20. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Bruce Albert

    2014-05-07

    The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

  1. Genetic differentiation of the Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris in the Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birt, T.P.; Mackinnon, D.; Piatt, J.F.; Friesen, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the distribution of genetic variation within and among local populations of the Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris is needed for effective conservation of this rare and declining species. We compared variation in a 429 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial control region and 11 microsatellite loci among 53 Kittlitz's Murrelets from three sites in the western Aleutian Islands (Attu Island) and Gulf of Alaska (Glacier Bay and Kachemak Bay). We found that birds in these two regions differ genetically in three assessments: (1) global and pairwise indices of genetic differentiation were significantly greater than zero, (2) mitochondrial haplotypes differed by a minimum of nine substitutions, and (3) molecular assignments indicated little gene flow between regions. The data suggest that birds in these regions have been genetically isolated for an extended period. We conclude that Kittlitz's Murrelets from Attu Island and from the Gulf of Alaska represent separate evolutionarily significant units, and should be treated as such for conservation. Genetic data for Kittlitz's Murrelets from the remainder of the breeding range are urgently needed.

  2. Prehistoric Lahar and Tephra Sequences on Mt. Cleveland, Islands of Four Mountains, Eastern Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, K.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Bridges, D.; Dehn, J.

    2005-12-01

    We provide the first geochronology for prehistoric activity of Mt. Cleveland, which has erupted 23 times historically and as recently as June, 2005. The lowest stratigraphically-exposed dacite indicates Cleveland already had a significant volume by 1.4+/-0.3 Ma (1 s.d.) based on a total gas age of a groundmass separate analyzed by 40Ar/39Ar. We describe two locations on the northern vegetated flank of Mt. Cleveland that expose interbedded lahar and tephra sequences that provide geochronologically-constrained comparisons with modern lahar deposits. Four calibrated radiocarbon dates were obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (1 s.d. quoted). Beach cliffs (9 m high) on the northeast shore expose at least four debris flows, a thick ash and a probable paleosol. Three debris flows form the base of the exposure and organic material from the top finest-grained lahar gives a calibrated age of 3652+/-43 yr BP. This layer grades upward to a 2-5 cm thick, extremely hard and oxidized layer with abundant root material, some of which is burned. We interpret this to be a soil baked by an overlying fine-grained ash (50 cm thick). Charred organics from the baked soil yielded an especially important age of 2758+/-20 yr BP giving a maximum age for the eruption of the ash. Root material in a debris flow from just above the ash gives a calibrated age of 1753+/-59 yr BP, thus bracketing the eruption of the ash. The second location, located in a ravine on the north flank, is a sequence of distal lahars with at least four interbedded tephras. Coarse sand layers, some of which are oxidized, separate these ashes. Also intercalated between two ashes is a fine silt layer 20 cm thick with preserved stems and grass leaves, which yielded a calibrated age of 9082+/-58 yr BP. Previous work showed that the 2001 eruptions on the western and southern flanks emplaced debris flows that are overlain by lava and highlights the role of snowfields in creating this sequence. Unlike the recent phase, prehistoric lahars on the northern flank of Mt. Cleveland are not interbedded with lava, but instead occur with tephra sequences that will help unravel Holocene activity of the volcanoes in the Islands of Four Mountains.

  3. Late Holocene coastal stratigraphy of Sitkinak Island reveals Aleutian-Alaska megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis southwest of Kodiak Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. R.; Briggs, R. W.; Kemp, A.; Haeussler, P. J.; Engelhart, S. E.; Dura, T.; Angster, S. J.; Bradley, L.

    2012-12-01

    Uncertainty in earthquake and tsunami prehistory of the Aleutian-Alaska megathrust westward of central Kodiak Island limit assessments of southern Alaska's earthquake hazard and forecasts of potentially damaging tsunamis along much of North America's west coast. Sitkinak Island, one of the Trinity Islands off the southwest tip of Kodiak Island, lies at the western end of the rupture zone of the 1964 Mw9.2 earthquake. Plafker reports that a rancher on the north coast of Sitkinak Island observed ~0.6 m of shoreline uplift immediately following the 1964 earthquake, and the island is now subsiding at about 3 mm/yr (PBO GPS). Although a high tsunami in 1788 caused the relocation of the first Russian settlement on southwestern Kodiak Island, the eastern extent of the megathrust rupture accompanying the tsunami is uncertain. Interpretation of GPS observations from the Shumagin Islands, 380 km southwest of Kodiak Island, suggests an entirely to partially creeping megathrust in that region. Here we report the first stratigraphic evidence of tsunami inundation and land-level change during prehistoric earthquakes west of central Kodiak Island. Beneath tidal and freshwater marshes around a lagoon on the south coast of Sitkinak Island, 27 cores and tidal outcrops reveal the deposits of four to six tsunamis in 2200 years and two to four abrupt changes in lithology that may correspond with coseismic uplift and subsidence over the past millennia. A 2- to 45-mm-thick bed of clean to peaty sand in sequences of tidal sediment and freshwater peat, identified in more than one-half the cores as far inland as 1.5 km, was probably deposited by the 1788 tsunami. A 14C age on Scirpus seeds, double 137Cs peaks at 2 cm and 7 cm depths (Chernobyl and 1963?), a consistent decline in 210Pb values, and our assumption of an exponential compaction rate for freshwater peat, point to a late 18th century age for the sand bed. Initial 14C ages suggest that two similar extensive sandy beds, identified in eight cores at higher tidal and freshwater sites, date from about 1.5 ka and 2.0 ka, respectively. A younger silty sand bed, <10 cm beneath the now-eroding low marsh around the lagoon, may record the 1964 tsunami. Correlations of two to three other sandy beds are too uncertain to infer their deposition by tsunamis. Stratigraphic contacts found only in cores and outcrops of the <0.8- to 1-ka tidal section fringing the lagoon may mark coseismic uplift (peat over tidal mud, sometimes with intervening sand) or subsidence (tidal mud over peat, sometimes with intervening sand). We collected samples of modern tidal foraminifera along three elevational transects for the baseline dataset needed to use fossil assemblages to measure the amount of uplift or subsidence recorded by contacts. Foraminiferal assemblages above and below one contact confirm rapid uplift a few hundred years before the 1788 tsunami, but cores are too few to correlate this contact with any of the sandy beds that we infer were deposited by tsunamis farther inland. These initial results demonstrate the promise of this previously unexplored island and similar sites for using stratigraphic evidence of sudden land-level changes and high tsunamis to map prehistoric ruptures of the Aleutian-Alaskan megathrust.

  4. Role of Subducted Basalt in the Genesis Island Arc Magmas: Evidence from Western Aleutian Seafloor Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Brown, S. T.; Kelemen, P. B.; Vervoort, J. D.; Hoernle, K.; Portnyagin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Western Aleutian seafloor lavas define a highly calc-alkaline series, with Mg numbers (Mg#, Mg/Mg+Fe) greater than 0.65 in dacitic lavas with 2-4% MgO at 63-70% SiO2. These lavas have uniformly radiogenic Hf and Nd and variable, but relatively unradiogenic, Sr and Pb, at the MORB-like end of the spectrum of island-arc lavas. Andesites and dacites have high Sr >1000 ppm, fractionated trace element patterns (Sr/Y=50-350, La/Yb=8-35, Dy/Yb=2-3.5), and low relative abundances of Nb and Ta (La/Ta=100-300), consistent with an enhanced role for residual or cumulate garnet + rutile. MORB-like isotope compositions and high MgO and Mg# relative to silica, rule out an origin for the andesites and dacites by fractional crystallization from basalt, except perhaps, by a process of melt-rock reaction with peridotite. The most fractionated trace element patterns are in western seafloor rhyodacites (69-70% SiO2), which were dredged from volcanic cones built on Bering Sea oceanic lithosphere, where the crust is probably no more than 10 km thick, and so unlikely to produce garnet during crustal melting. We interpret the western seafloor andesites and dacites to have been produced by melting of subducted MORB-like basalt in the eclogite facies, followed by interaction of the resulting high-silica melt with mantle peridotite. This interpretation is consistent with the tectonic setting in the western Aleutians, which is dominated by oblique convergence, capable of producing a relatively hot subducting plate. Western seafloor lavas define an end-member composition with MORB-like isotope compositions and fractionated trace element ratios, which falls at the end of the continuum of compositions for all Aleutian lavas. The end-member character of western seafloor lavas is clearest in plots highlighting their radiogenic Hf, Nd and strong relative depletions in Ta and Yb. The western seafloor lavas also define an end-member composition for Pb isotopes and Ce/Pb (Miller et al., Nature, 1994). Some western seafloor samples have high Nd/Hf, as required by Hf-Nd mixing scenarios, which indicate that a source component with radiogenic Hf and Nd and Nd/Hf greater than ~8, is present in lavas throughout the Aleutian arc (Brown et al., 2005 Fall AGU). Abundances of radiogenic Nd and Hf in the eclogite-melt component are relatively high, and so offset the unradiogenic Hf and Nd from subducted sediment. The result is a source mixture with much higher contributions of both subducted basalt and subducted sediment relative to the mantle end-member, than is produced when these elements are modeled as binary mixtures of mantle and sediment.

  5. Science, policy, and stakeholders: developing a consensus science plan for Amchitka Island, Aleutians, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Kosson, David S; Powers, Charles W; Friedlander, Barry; Eichelberger, John; Barnes, David; Duffy, Lawrence K; Jewett, Stephen C; Volz, Conrad D

    2005-05-01

    With the ending of the Cold War, the US Department of Energy is responsible for the remediation of radioactive waste and disposal of land no longer needed for nuclear material production or related national security missions. The task of characterizing the hazards and risks from radionuclides is necessary for assuring the protection of health of humans and the environment. This is a particularly daunting task for those sites that had underground testing of nuclear weapons, where the radioactive contamination is currently inaccessible. Herein we report on the development of a Science Plan to characterize the physical and biological marine environment around Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain of Alaska, where three underground nuclear tests were conducted (1965-1971). Information on the ecology, geology, and current radionuclide levels in biota, water, and sediment is necessary for evaluating possible current contamination and to serve as a baseline for developing a plan to ensure human and ecosystem health in perpetuity. Other information required includes identifying the location of the salt water/fresh water interface where migration to the ocean might occur in the future and determining groundwater recharge balances, as well as assessing other physical/geological features of Amchitka near the test sites. The Science Plan is needed to address the confusing and conflicting information available to the public about radionuclide risks from underground nuclear blasts in the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as the potential for volcanic or seismic activity to disrupt shot cavities or accelerate migration of radionuclides into the sea. Developing a Science Plan involved agreement among regulators and other stakeholders, assignment of the task to the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, and development of a consensus Science Plan that dealt with contentious scientific issues. Involvement of the regulators (State of Alaska), resource trustees (U S Fish and Wildlife Service), representatives of the Aleut and Pribilof Island communities, and other stakeholders was essential for plan development and approval, although this created tensions because of the different objectives of each group. The complicated process of developing a Science Plan involved iterations and interactions with multiple agencies and organizations, scientists in several disciplines, regulators, and the participation of Aleut people in their home communities, as well as the general public. The importance of including all parties in all phases of the development of the Science Plan was critical to its acceptance by a broad range of regulators, agencies, resource trustees, Aleutian/Pribilof communities, and other stakeholders. PMID:15886955

  6. Diverse lavas from closely spaced volcanoes drawing from a common parent: Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Eastern Aleutian Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Miller, T.; Waythomas, C.; Trusdell, F.; Calvert, A.; Layer, P.

    2009-01-01

    Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) on the lower Alaskan Peninsula is one of the largest and most diverse volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc. Since the Middle Pleistocene, eruption of ~ 350 km3 of basalt through rhyolite has produced a 30 km, arc front chain of nested calderas and overlapping stratovolcanoes. ELVC has experienced as many as five major caldera-forming eruptions, the most recent, at ~ 27 ka, produced ~ 50 km3 of rhyolitic ignimbrite and ash fall. These violent silicic events were interspersed with less energetic, but prodigious, outpourings of basalt through dacite. Holocene eruptions are mostly basaltic andesite to andesite and historically recorded activity includes over 40 eruptions within the last 200 yr, all from Pavlof volcano, the most active site in the Aleutian Arc. Geochemical and geophysical observations suggest that although all ELVC eruptions derive from a common clinopyroxene + spinel + plagioclase fractionating high-aluminum basalt parent in the lower crust, magma follows one of two closely spaced, but distinct paths to the surface. Under the eastern end of the chain, magma moves rapidly and cleanly through a relatively young (~ 28 ka), hydraulically connected dike plexus. Steady supply, short magma residence times, and limited interaction with crustal rocks preserve the geochemistry of deep crustal processes. Below the western part of the chain, magma moves haltingly through a long-lived (~ 500 ka) and complex intrusive column in which many generations of basaltic to andesitic melts have mingled and fractionated. Buoyant, silicic melts periodically separate from the lower parts of the column to feed voluminous eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. Mafic lavas record a complicated passage through cumulate zones and hydrous silicic residues as manifested by disequilibrium phenocryst textures, incompatible element enrichments, and decoupling of REEs and HFSEs ratios. Such features are absent in mafic lavas from the younger part of the chain, highlighting the importance of plumbing architecture and longevity in creating petrologic diversity. Supplemental Data include 156 major element (XRF) and 128 trace element (ICP-MS) whole-rock analyses, 23 new 40Ar/39Ar ages, a generalized geologic map with associated unit descriptions and field photographs, and photomicrographs of key petrographic features.

  7. Organochlorine contaminants in fishes from coastal waters west of Amukta Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA.

    PubMed

    Miles, A Keith; Ricca, Mark A; Anthony, Robert G; Estes, James A

    2009-08-01

    Organochlorines were examined in liver and stable isotopes in muscle of fishes from the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska, in relation to islands or locations affected by military occupation. Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus), Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis), and rock greenling (Hexagrammos lagocephalus) were collected from nearshore waters at contemporary (decommissioned) and historical (World War II) military locations, as well as at reference locations. Total (Sigma) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) dominated the suite of organochlorine groups (SigmaDDTs, Sigmachlordane cyclodienes, Sigmaother cyclodienes, and Sigmachlorinated benzenes and cyclohexanes) detected in fishes at all locations, followed by SigmaDDTs and Sigmachlordanes; dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'DDE) composed 52 to 66% of SigmaDDTs by species. Organochlorine concentrations were higher or similar in cod compared to halibut and lowest in greenling; they were among the highest for fishes in Arctic or near Arctic waters. Organochlorine group concentrations varied among species and locations, but SigmaPCB concentrations in all species were consistently higher at military locations than at reference locations. Moreover, all organochlorine group concentrations were higher in halibut from military locations than those from reference locations. A wide range of molecular weight organochlorines was detected at all locations, which implied regional or long-range transport and deposition, as well as local point-source contamination. Furthermore, a preponderance of higher-chlorinated PCB congeners in fishes from contemporary military islands implied recent exposure. Concentrations in all organochlorine groups increased with delta15N enrichment in fishes, and analyses of residual variation provided further evidence of different sources of SigmaPCBs and p,p'DDE among species and locations. PMID:19374473

  8. Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas are the result of partial melting of this slab where thermal erosion and weakening of the crust occurs along the Pacific plate-Yakutat terrane transition. Additionally, flat slab subduction may be responsible for producing adakitic magmas by equilibration of the hydrous slab with ambient mantle temperatures. In contrast, it is possible that the adakitic signature at Hayes is from underplated mafic lower crust that melted as the result of pooling mantle melt at depth. Two volcanoes within the WVF, Mt. Drum and Mt. Churchill, are adakitic with an abundance of biotite and amphibole similar to Hayes volcano and have been suggested to have slab melt origins. Mt. Drum lavas have less radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr but overlapping 206Pb/204Pb signatures while Mt. Churchill, which approximately overlies the eastern edge of the Yakutat terrane, has similar 87Sr/86Sr compositions, but more radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb than Hayes. Mt. Spurr, the nearest CIV to Hayes volcano (90 km south), does not share its adakitic signature but exhibits overlapping, more heterogeneous isotopic compositions. Thus, understanding the petrogenetic history of Hayes volcano is essential not only to explain the development of an adakitic volcanic system but how this relates to regional, arc-wide volcanism.

  9. Mercury concentrations in breast feathers of three upper trophic level marine predators from the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kaler, Robb S A; Kenney, Leah A; Bond, Alexander L; Eagles-Smith, Collin A

    2014-05-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element distributed globally through atmospheric transport. Agattu Island, located in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska, has no history of point-sources of Hg contamination. We provide baseline levels of total mercury (THg) concentrations in breast feathers of three birds that breed on the island. Geometric mean THg concentrations in feathers of fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma furcata; 6703 ± 1635, ng/g fresh weight [fw]) were higher than all other species, including snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus; 2105 ± 1631, ng/g fw), a raptor with a diet composed largely of storm-petrels at Agattu Island. There were no significant differences in mean THg concentrations of breast feathers among adult Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris; 1658 ± 1276, ng/g fw) and chicks (1475 ± 671, ng/g fw) and snowy owls. The observed THg concentrations in fork-tailed storm-petrel feathers emphasizes the need for further study of Hg pollution in the western Aleutian Islands. PMID:24656750

  10. Mercury concentrations in breast feathers of three upper trophic level marine predators from the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaler, Robb S.A.; Kenney, Leah A.; Bond, Alexander L.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element distributed globally through atmospheric transport. Agattu Island, located in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska, has no history of point-sources of Hg contamination. We provide baseline levels of total mercury (THg) concentrations in breast feathers of three birds that breed on the island. Geometric mean THg concentrations in feathers of fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma furcata; 6703 ± 1635, ng/g fresh weight [fw]) were higher than all other species, including snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus; 2105 ± 1631, ng/g fw), a raptor with a diet composed largely of storm-petrels at Agattu Island. There were no significant differences in mean THg concentrations of breast feathers among adult Kittlitz’s murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris; 1658 ± 1276, ng/g fw) and chicks (1475 ± 671, ng/g fw) and snowy owls. The observed THg concentrations in fork-tailed storm-petrel feathers emphasizes the need for further study of Hg pollution in the western Aleutian Islands.

  11. New species of sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) from the Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Helmut; Stone, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Ten new species of demosponges, assigned to the orders Poecilosclerida, Axinellida and Dictyoceratida, discovered in the Gulf of Alaska and along the Aleutian Island Archipelago are described and compared to relevant congeners. Poecilosclerida include Cornulum globosum n. sp., Megaciella lobata n. sp., M. triangulata n. sp., Artemisina clavata n. sp., A. flabellata n. sp., Coelosphaera (Histodermion) kigushimkada n. sp., Stelodoryx mucosa n. sp. and S. siphofuscus n. sp. Axinellida is represented by Raspailia (Hymeraphiopsis) fruticosa n. sp. and Dictyoceratida is represented by Dysidea kenkriegeri n. sp. The genus Cornulum is modified to allow for smooth tylotes. We report several noteworthy biogeographical observations. We describe only the third species within the subgenus Histodermion and the first from the Indo-Pacific Region. Additionally, the subgenus Hymerhaphiopsis was previously represented by only a single species from Antarctica. We also report the first record of a dictyoceratid species from Alaska. The new collections further highlight the richness of the sponge fauna from the region, particularly for the Poecilosclerida. PMID:26624419

  12. Near-field survey of the 1946 Aleutian tsunami on Unimak and Sanak Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okal, E.A.; Plafker, G.; Synolakis, C.E.; Borrero, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The 1946 Aleutian earthquake stands out among tsunamigenic events because it generated both very high run-up near the earthquake source region and a destructive trans-Pacific tsunami. We obtained new data on the distribution of its tsunami in the near field along south-facing coasts between Unimak Pass on the west and Sanak Island on the east by measuring the height of driftwood and beach materials that were deposited by the tsunami above the extreme storm tide level. Our data indicate that (1) the highest measured run-up, which is at the Scotch Cap lighthouse, was 42 m above tide level or about 37 m above present storm tide elevation; (2) run-up along the rugged coast from Scotch Cap for 12 km northwest to Sennett Point is 12-18 m, and for 30 km east of Scotch Cap to Cape Lutke it is 24-42 m; (3) run-up along the broad lowlands bordering Unimak Bight is 10-20 m, and in-undation is locally more than 2 km; (5) run-up diminishes to 8 m or less at the southeast corner of Unimak Island; (6) no evidence was found for run-up above present storm tides (about 4-5 m above MLLW) on the Ikatan Peninsula or areas along the coast to the west; and (7) run-up above storm tide level in the Sanak Island group is restricted to southwest-facing coasts of Sanak, Long, and Clifford Islands, where it is continuous and locally up to 24 m high. Generation of the tsunami by one or more major earthquake-triggered submarine landslides near the shelf edge south of Unimak Island seems to be the only viable mechanism to account for the data on wave arrival time, run-up heights, and distribution, as well as for unconfirmed anecdotal reports of local postquake increases in water depth and diminished bottom-fisheries productivity. A preliminary hydrodynamic simulation of the local tsunami propagation and run-up using a dipolar model of a possible landslide off Davidson Bank provides an acceptable fit to the characteristics of the distribution of local run-up, with a value at 34 m at the Scotch Cap lighthouse.

  13. A preliminary seismic study of Taal Volcano, Luzon Island Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.-H.; Gung, Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Chang, T.-M.; Chang, E. T. Y.; Solidum, R.

    2013-03-01

    The very active Taal Volcano lies in the southern part of Luzon Island only 60 km from Manila, the capital of the Philippines. In March 2008 we deployed a temporary seismic network around Taal that consisted of 8 three-component short period seismometers. This network recorded during the period from March to November 2008 about 1050 local events. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified for a number of stations. The drifting rates of each problematic station were determined and the errors were corrected before further processing. Initial location of each event was derived by manually picked P-/S-phases arrival times using HYPO71 and a general velocity model based on AK135. Since the velocity structure beneath Taal is essentially unknown, we used travel times of 338 well-located events in order to derive a minimum 1D velocity model using VELEST. The resulting locations show that most events occurred at the shallow depth beneath the Taal Volcano, and two major earthquake groups were noticed, with one lying underneath the western shore of Taal lake and the other one spread around the eastern flank of the Taal Volcano. Since there is no reported volcano activities during the operation period of our seismic array, we are still not confident to interpret these findings in terms of other natures of volcano at the current stage. However, our work represents an important pioneer step towards other more advanced seismic studies in Taal Volcano.

  14. Holocene Geology and Geochemistry, and Ongoing Seismicity of Aniakchak Caldera Volcano, Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Neal, C. A.; Miller, T. P.; McGimsey, R. G.; Nye, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The oldest recognized postglacial eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Aniakchak I, produced distinctly incompatible-element-rich andesitic ignimbrite ca. 9500-7500 14C yr B.P., and may have resulted in collapse of a small caldera. Subsequently, a vent NE of the summit issued dacitic-rhyodacitic magma as lava, plinian Black Nose pumice falls, and intraplinian welded ignimbrite that probably differentiated from an Aniakchak I andesitic parent. Tephra ~40 km SE (7,350×50 14C yr B.P., VanderHoek and Myron, 2004) may be Black Nose pumice. Following Aniakchak I and Black Nose eruptions, at least 20 Holocene tephras fell before the ca. 3430 14C yr B.P. Aniakchak II eruption and collapse of its 10-km-diameter caldera. Aniakchak II produced rhyodacitic plinian fall followed by rhyodacitic and andesitic ignimbrite extending ?50 km to the Bering Sea and Pacific coasts. The rhyodacite (~70% SiO2) is the most evolved and only hornblende-phyric magma erupted from Aniakchak. The recharge Aniakchak II andesite (57.2-60.4% SiO2) has low V and high Na2O, Y, TiO2, and, especially, P2O5. Because Aniakchak I and II andesites have geochemical analogs at Veniaminof volcano ~100 km SW, their compositions reflect common processes and not local anomalies. Postcaldera vents are mainly on the ring-fracture system. The earliest extruded small dacite (64.2-67.5% SiO2) domes into a deep caldera lake and a NW flank lava flow. Three basaltic andesite-andesite tuff cones were constructed on the E caldera floor after catastrophic draining of the lake by ~200 m, including the most primitive postglacial magma (52.3% SiO2). Dacitic-andesitic magmas, from crystallization differentiation of several batches, issued from Vent Mountain and Half Cone starting as much as ~1000 yr ago. Plinian eruption at Half Cone ~400 14C yr B.P. yielded ~1 km3 of widespread dacitic Pink and overlying andesitic Brown pumice fall deposits, as well as intracaldera pyroclastic flows. Strombolian eruption of basaltic andesite (~52.4% SiO2) built Blocky cone after Half Cone and most Vent Mountain activity. The most recent eruption, 1931 C.E., yielded a total of 0.9 km3 of dacite-rhyodacite tephra followed by relatively voluminous andesite tephra, ending with minor basaltic andesite, spanning ~67 to 56% SiO2. Current indications of an active magmatic system include high 3He/4He of CO2-rich gas at intracaldera Surprise Lake, InSAR pattern of caldera floor subsidence, and episodic seismicity. The majority of earthquakes located by Alaska Volcano Observatory are long-period (LP) events. Epicenters for 135 (2009-2012; ML ?2.1) define a bow-tie pattern elongated parallel to plate convergence, centered between Half Cone and Vent Mountain. Hypocenters are in a laterally extensive region with events14-28 km bsl, few events 7-14 km bsl beneath the caldera, and events <10 km bsl concentrated under Vent Mountain. Recent seismicity is consistent with long-lived mush in the quiet zone, from which magma escapes to be stored ephemerally to within ~2.5 km bsl. LP events cluster in time through substantial depth ranges and may reflect ascent of magma from depth, transient pressure increases in the mush column, and fluid pressure pulses in the brittle upper crust.

  15. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  16. Radionuclide concentrations in benthic invertebrates from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutian Chain, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jewett, Stephen C

    2007-05-01

    Concentrations of 13 radionuclides (137Cs, 129I, 60Co, 152Eu, 90Sr, 99Tc, 241Am, 238Pu, 239,249Pu, 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U) were examined in seven species of invertebrates from Amchitka and Kiska Islands, in the Aleutian Chain of Alaska, using gamma spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, and alpha spectroscopy. Amchitka Island was the site of three underground nuclear test (1965-1971), and we tested the null hypotheses that there were no differences in radionuclide concentrations between Amchitka and the reference site (Kiska) and there were no differences among species. The only radionuclides where composite samples were above the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) were 137Cs, 241Am, 239,249Pu, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U. Green sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus polyacanthus), giant chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri), plate limpets (Tectura scutum) and giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) were only tested for 137Cs; octopus was the only species with detectable levels of 137Cs (0.262 +/- 0.029 Bq/kg, wet weight). Only rock jingle (Pododesmus macroschisma), blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus) and horse mussel (Modiolus modiolus) were analyzed for the actinides. There were no interspecific differences in 241Am and 239,240Pu, and almost no samples above the MDA for 238Pu and 236U. Horse mussels had significantly higher concentrations of 234U (0.844 +/- 0.804 Bq/kg) and 238U (0.730 +/- 0.646) than the other species (both isotopes are naturally occurring). There were no differences in actinide concentrations between Amchitka and Kiska. In general, radionuclides in invertebrates from Amchitka were similar to those from uncontaminated sites in the Northern Hemisphere, and below those from the contaminated Irish Sea. There is a clear research need for authors to report the concentrations of radionuclides by species, rather than simply as 'shellfish', for comparative purposes in determining geographical patterns, understanding possible effects, and for estimating risk to humans from consuming different biota. PMID:17057992

  17. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Martín, R.; Cortés, G.; Alguacil, G.; Moreno, J.; Martín, B.; Martos, A.; Serrano, I.; Stich, D.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Deception Island (South Shetland Island, Antarctica) is an active volcano with recent eruptions (e.g. 1967, 1969 and 1970). It is also among the Antarctic sites most visited by tourists. Besides, there are currently two scientific bases operating during the austral summers, usually from late November to early March. For these reasons it is necessary to deploy a volcano monitoring system as complete as possible, designed specifically to endure the extreme conditions of the volcanic environment and the Antarctic climate. The Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR) performs seismic monitoring on Deception Island since 1994 during austral summer surveys. The seismicity basically includes volcano-tectonic earthquakes, long-period events and volcanic tremor, among other signals. The level of seismicity is moderate, except for a seismo-volcanic crisis in 1999. The seismic monitoring system has evolved during these years, following the trends of the technological developments and software improvements. Recent advances have been mainly focused on: (1) the improvement of the seismic network introducing broadband stations and 24-bit data acquisition systems; (2) the development of a short-period seismic array, with a 12-channel, 24-bit data acquisition system; (3) the implementation of wireless data transmission from the network stations and also from the seismic array to a recording center, allowing for real-time monitoring; (4) the efficiency of the power supply systems and the monitoring of the battery levels and power consumption; (5) the optimization of data analysis procedures, including database management, automated event recognition tools for the identification and classification of seismo-volcanic signals, and apparent slowness vector estimates using seismic array data; (6) the deployment of permanent seismic stations and the transmission of data during the winter using a satellite connection. A single permanent station is operating at Deception Island since 2008. In the current survey we collaborate with the Spanish Army to add another permanent station that will be able to send to the IAG-UGR seismic information about the activity of the volcano during the winter, using a communications satellite (SPAINSAT). These advances simplify the field work and the data acquisition procedures, and allow us to obtain high-quality seismic data in real-time. These improvements have a very important significance for a better and faster interpretation of the seismo-volcanic activity and assessment of the volcanic hazards at Deception Island volcano.

  18. Tsunami recurrence in the eastern Alaska-Aleutian arc: A Holocene stratigraphic record from Chirikof Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Alan R.; Briggs, Richard; Dura, Tina; Engelhart, Simon E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Bradley, Lee-Ann; Forman, S.L.; Vane, Christopher H.; Kelley, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the role of the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust as the source of some of the largest earthquakes and tsunamis, the history of its pre–twentieth century tsunamis is largely unknown west of the rupture zone of the great (magnitude, M 9.2) 1964 earthquake. Stratigraphy in core transects at two boggy lowland sites on Chirikof Island’s southwest coast preserves tsunami deposits dating from the postglacial to the twentieth century. In a 500-m-long basin 13–15 m above sea level and 400 m from the sea, 4 of 10 sandy to silty beds in a 3–5-m-thick sequence of freshwater peat were probably deposited by tsunamis. The freshwater peat sequence beneath a gently sloping alluvial fan 2 km to the east, 5–15 m above sea level and 550 m from the sea, contains 20 sandy to silty beds deposited since 3.5 ka; at least 13 were probably deposited by tsunamis. Although most of the sandy beds have consistent thicknesses (over distances of 10–265 m), sharp lower contacts, good sorting, and/or upward fining typical of tsunami deposits, the beds contain abundant freshwater diatoms, very few brackish-water diatoms, and no marine diatoms. Apparently, tsunamis traveling inland over low dunes and boggy lowland entrained largely freshwater diatoms. Abundant fragmented diatoms, and lake species in some sandy beds not found in host peat, were probably transported by tsunamis to elevations of >10 m at the eastern site. Single-aliquot regeneration optically stimulated luminescence dating of the third youngest bed is consistent with its having been deposited by the tsunami recorded at Russian hunting outposts in 1788, and with the second youngest bed being deposited by a tsunami during an upper plate earthquake in 1880. We infer from stratigraphy, 14C-dated peat deposition rates, and unpublished analyses of the island’s history that the 1938 tsunami may locally have reached an elevation of >10 m. As this is the first record of Aleutian tsunamis extending throughout the Holocene, we cannot estimate source earthquake locations or magnitudes for most tsunami-deposited beds. We infer that no more than 3 of the 23 possible tsunamis beds at both sites were deposited following upper plate faulting or submarine landslides independent of megathrust earthquakes. If so, the Semidi segment of the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust near Chirikof Island probably sent high tsunamis southward every 180–270 yr for at least the past 3500 yr.                   

  19. Evolution of a Quaternary peralkaline volcano: Mayor Island, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, B.F.; Weaver, S.D.; Wilson, C.J.N.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mayor Island is a Holocene pantelleritic volcano showing a wide range of dispersive power and eruptive intensity despite a very limited range in magma composition of only 2% SiO2. The primary controls on this range appear to have been the magmatic gas content on eruption and a varying involvement of basaltic magma, rather than major-element chemistry of the rhyolites. The ca. 130 ka subaerial history of the volcano contains portions of three geochemical cycles with abrupt changes in trace-element chemistry following episodes of caldera collapse. The uniform major-element chemistry of the magma may relate to a fine balance between rates of eruption and supply and the higher density of the more evolved (Ferich) magmas which could be tapped only after caldera-forming events had removed significant volumes of less evolved but lighter magma. ?? 1992.

  20. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 Aleutian arc and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This map shows details of the Aleutian arc not visible in an earlier publication. The Aleutian arc extends about 3,000 km from the Gulf of Alaska to the Kamchatka Peninsula. It marks the region where the Pacific plate subducts into the mantle beneath the North America plate. This subduction is responsible for the generation of the Aleutian Islands and the deep offshore Aleutian Trench. Relative to a fixed North America plate, the Pacific plate is moving northwest at a rate that increases from about 55 mm per year at the arc's eastern edge to 75 mm per year near its western terminus. In the east, the convergence of the plates is nearly perpendicular to the plate boundary. However, because of the boundary's curvature, as one travels westward along the arc, the subduction becomes more and more oblique to the boundary until the relative plate motion becomes parallel to the arc at the Near Islands near its western edge. Subduction zones such as the Aleutian arc are geologically complex and produce numerous earthquakes from multiple sources. Deformation of the overriding North America plate generates shallow crustal earthquakes, whereas slip at the interface of the plates generates interplate earthquakes that extend from near the base of the trench to depths of 40 to 60 km. At greater depths, Aleutian arc earthquakes occur within the subducting Pacific plate and can reach depths of 300 km. Since 1900, six great earthquakes have occurred along the Aleutian Trench, Alaska Peninsula, and Gulf of Alaska: M8.4 1906 Rat Islands; M8.6 1938 Shumagin Islands; M8.6 1946 Unimak Island; M8.6 1957 Andreanof Islands; M9.2 1964 Prince William Sound; and M8.7 1965 Rat Islands. Several relevant tectonic elements (plate boundaries and active volcanoes) provide a context for the seismicity presented on the main map panel. The plate boundaries are most accurate along the axis of the Aleutian Trench and more diffuse or speculative in extreme northeastern Russia. The active volcanoes parallel the Aleutian Trench from the Gulf of Alaska to the Rat Islands.

  1. Aleutian terranes from Nd isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Kay, S. M.; Rubenstone, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Nd isotope ratios substantiate the identification of oceanic crustal terranes within the continental crustal basement of the Aleutian island arc. The oceanic terranes are exposed in the westernmost Aleutians, but to the east, they are completely buried by isotopically distinct arc-volcanic rocks. Analogous oceanic terranes may be important components of the terrane collages that comprise the continents.

  2. Hydrochemical fluxes from Baransky volcano, Iturup, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, George; Zharkov, Rafael; Bragin, Ivan; Kharitonova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Sernaya River and its tributary the Kipyashaya River are the only rivers that drain all thermal waters coming down the Baransky volcano (Iturup, the Kuril Islands). Hydrological parameters and a chemical composition relating to these rivers and all inflow streams coming from the volcano were measured from August to October 2013. The main aims of this investigation were to develop a data baseline for the catchment of the Sernaya River in order to monitor the Baransky volcano, to estimate total discharge of solute elements and finally to identify thermal groundwater inflow. Since the Kipyashaya River and the Sernaya River receive all water streams coming along the south-west and south flanks of the Baransky volcano within approximately 10 kilometers we can suggest that the whole thermal discharge runs into the Kipyashaya River. Thus a frequent sampling of the rivers presents the best way to monitor the volcano as they comprise a mix of all thermal waters from the Baransky volcano. The Sernaia River, at the end of its course along the flanks of the Baransky volcano, has a total flux of 12 m³/s ± 1%. Multiplication of the discharge by the concentration in main ions of the river at this point yields an aggregate flux of ~130 tons/day ± 10%. This flux performs the dissolution flux as a result of rocks dissolution beneath the active crater and in the aquifer of the Kipyashaya River. Cl total discharge was estimated at ~33 tons/day ± 10%, SO4 ~67 tons/day ± 10%, and total cation discharge ~28 tons/day ± 10%. The Kipyashaya River brings in to the Sernaya River 15 tons/day ± 10% of Cl, ~30 tons/day ± 10% of SO4, and ~3,5 tons/day ± 10% cations average. Several thermal springs with low water discharge are located on the right waterside of the Sernaya River 100 m up and down from the Kipyashaya River influx. These thermal springs with Cl discharge ~ 5g/s have significant concentrations of Ca due to water-rock interaction with basement rocks. The way of sampling streams at the end of their course, just before confluence with the Sernaia River, provides more representative chemical composition of the Baransky volcano waters than a punctual sampling of springs and indicates the existing thermal groundwater inflow. It is argued that a renewal in the activity of the Baransky volcano is a result of the changes in chemical ratios and Cl discharge. Studying the network of the Sernaya River presents one of the best ways of detection such pre-eruptive periods. The work was supported by RFBR grants 13-05-00544A, 14-05-00243, 14-05-00171 and FEB RAS grant 12-III-A-08-161.

  3. Remote sensing for active volcano monitoring in Barren Island, India

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Reddy, C.S.S.; Srivastav, S.K. )

    1993-08-01

    The Barren Island Volcano, situated in the Andaman Sea of the Bay of Bengal, erupted recently (March, 1991) after a prolonged period of quiescence of about 188 years. This resumed activity coincides with similar outbreaks in the Philippines and Japan, which are located in an identical tectonic environment. This study addresses (1) remote sensing temporal monitoring of the volcanic activity, (2) detecting hot lava and measuring its pixel-integrated and subpixel temperatures, and (3) the importance of SWIR bands for high temperature volcanic feature detection. Seven sets of TM data acquired continuously from 3 March 1991 to 8 July 1991 have been analyzed. It is concluded that detectable pre-eruption warming took place around 25 March 1991 and volcanic activity started on 1 April 1991. It is observed that high temperature features, such as an erupting volcano, can register emitted thermal radiance in SWIR bands. Calculation of pixel-integrated and sub-pixel temperatures related to volcanic vents has been made, using the dual-band method. 6 refs.

  4. The 2014 Submarine Eruption of Ahyi Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Chadwick, W.; Merle, S. G.; Buck, N. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Coombs, M. L.; Evers, L. G.; Heaney, K. D.; Lyons, J. J.; Searcy, C. K.; Walker, S. L.; Young, C.; Embley, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    On April 23, 2014, Ahyi Volcano, a submarine cone in the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI), ended a 13-year-long period of repose with an explosive eruption lasting over 2 weeks. The remoteness of the volcano and the presence of several seamounts in the immediate area posed a challenge for constraining the source location of the eruption. Critical to honing in on the Ahyi area quickly were quantitative error estimates provided by the CTBTO on the backazimuth of hydroacoustic arrivals observed at Wake Island (IMS station H11). T-phases registered across the NMI seismic network at the rate of approximately 10 per hour until May 8 and were observed in hindsight at seismic stations on Guam and Chichijima. After May 8, sporadic T-phases were observed until May 17. Within days of the eruption onset, reports were received from NOAA research divers of hearing explosions underwater and through the hull on the ship while working on the SE coastline of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas), a distance of 20 km NW of Ahyi. In the same area, the NOAA crew reported sighting mats of orange-yellow bubbles on the water surface and extending up to 1 km from the shoreline. Despite these observations, satellite images showed nothing unusual throughout the eruption. During mid-May, a later cruise leg on the NOAA ship Hi'ialakai that was previously scheduled in the Ahyi area was able to collect some additional data in response to the eruption. Preliminary multibeam sonar bathymetry and water-column CTD casts were obtained at Ahyi. Comparison between 2003 and 2014 bathymetry revealed that the minimum depth had changed from 60 m in 2003 to 75 m in 2014, and a new crater ~95 m deep had formed at the summit. Extending SSE from the crater was a new scoured-out landslide chute extending downslope to a depth of at least 2300 m. Up to 125 m of material had been removed from the head of the landslide chute and downslope deposits were up to 40 m thick. Significant particle plumes were detected at all three CTD casts of Ahyi volcano. Plumes with optical anomalies up to 0.4 NTU were found south and west of Ahyi at 100-175 m water depth, corresponding to the depth of the new summit crater. We plan to combine the extensive T-phase, hydroacoustic, CTD, and bathymetry data from Ahyi to characterize submarine volcanic processes and quantify the size and total radiated energy of the eruption.

  5. Volcanic Tsunami Generation in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Watts, P.

    2003-12-01

    Many of the worlds active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines, and during eruptions the transfer of mass from volcano to sea is a potential source mechanism for tsunamis. Flows of granular material off of volcanoes, such as pyroclastic flow, debris avalanche, and lahar, often deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean that have a large potential tsunami hazard. The deposits of both hot and cold volcanic grain flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by granular subaerial volcanic flows using examples from Aniakchak volcano in southwestern Alaska, and Augustine volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Evidence for far-field tsunami inundation coincident with a major caldera-forming eruption of Aniakchak volcano ca. 3.5 ka has been described and is the basis for one of our case studies. We perform a numerical simulation of the tsunami using a large volume pyroclastic flow as the source mechanism and compare our results to field measurements of tsunami deposits preserved along the north shore of Bristol Bay. Several attributes of the tsunami simulation, such as water flux and wave amplitude, are reasonable predictors of tsunami deposit thickness and generally agree with the field evidence for tsunami inundation. At Augustine volcano, geological investigations suggest that as many as 14 large volcanic-rock avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during the 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. By analogy with the 1883 event, previous studies concluded that tsunamis could have been generated many times in the past. If so, geological evidence of tsunamis, such as tsunami deposits on land, should be found in the area around Augustine Island. Paradoxically, unequivocal evidence for tsunami inundation has been found. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region and a future tsunami from the volcano would have devastating consequences to villages, towns, oil-production facilities, and the fishing industry, especially if it occurred at high tide (the tidal range in this area is about 5 m). Numerical simulation experiments of tsunami generation, propagation and inundation using a subaerial debris avalanche source at Augustine volcano indicate only modest wave generation because of the shallow water surrounding the volcano (maximum water depth about 25 m). Lahar flows produced during eruptions at snow and ice clad volcanoes in the Aleutian arc also deliver copious amounts of sediment to the sea. These flows only rarely transform to subaqueous debris flows that may become tsunamigenic. However, the accumulation of loose, unconsolidated sediment on the continental shelf may lead to subaqueous debris flows and landslides if these deposits become mobilized by large earthquakes. Tsunamis produced by this mechanism could potentially reach coastlines all along the Pacific Rim. Finally, recent work in the western Aleutian Islands indicates that many of the island volcanoes in this area have experienced large-scale flank collapse. Because these volcanoes are surrounded by deep water, the tsunami hazard associated with a future sector collapse could be significant.

  6. Toothpaste lava from the Barren Island volcano (Andaman Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Kumar, Alok; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Awasthi, Neeraj

    2011-04-01

    Toothpaste lava is a basaltic lava flow type transitional between pahoehoe and aa and has been described from Paricutin, Kilauea and Etna volcanoes. Here we describe a spectacular example of toothpaste lava, forming part of a recent (possibly 1994-95) aa flow on the active volcano of Barren Island (Andaman Sea). This flow of subalkalic basalt shows abundant squeeze-ups of viscous toothpasate lava near its entry into the sea. The squeeze-ups are sheets and slabs, up to several meters across and tens of centimeters thick, extruded from boccas. They are often prominently curved, have striated upper surfaces with close-spaced, en echelon linear ridges and grooves, broad wave-like undulations perpendicular to the striations, and sometimes, clefts. Textural, geochemical, and Sr-Nd isotopic data on the squeeze-ups and the exposed aa flow core indicate very crystal-rich, viscous, and isotopically very homogeneous lava. We envisage that a greatly reduced speed of this viscous flow at the coastline, possibly aided by a shallowing of the basal slope, led to lateral spreading of the flow, which caused tension in its upper parts. This, with continued (albeit dwindling) lava supply at the back, led to widespread tearing of the flow surface and extrusion of the squeeze-ups. The larger slabs, while extruding in a plastic condition, curved under their own weight, whereas their surfaces experienced brittle deformation, forming the en echelon grooves. The extruded, detached, and rotated sheets and slabs were carried forward for some distance atop the very slowly advancing aa core, before the flow solidified.

  7. Evolution and geochemistry of the Tertiary calc-alkaline plutons in the Adak Island region of the central Aleutian oceanic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Suzanne; Citron, Gary P.; Kay, Robert W.; Jicha, Brian; Tibbetts, Ashley

    2014-05-01

    Calc-alkaline plutons are major crustal building blocks of continental margin mountain belts like the Mesozoic to Tertiary Andes and the Sierra Nevada, but are rare in oceanic island arcs. Some of the most calc-alkaline I-type island arc plutons are in the Central Aleutians with the most extreme signatures, as indicated by FeO/MgO ratios of < ~2 at 48-70% wt. % SiO2, in the ~10 km wide Oligocene Hidden Bay pluton on southern Adak Island and the 10 km wide Miocene Kagalaska pluton to the north on eastern Adak and the adjacent Kagalaska Island. Although small compared to most continental plutons, similarities in intrusive units, mineralogy and chemistry suggest common formation processes. The Aleutian calc-alkaline plutonic rocks mainly differ from continental plutons in having more oceanic like isotopic (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703-0.7033; Epsilon Nd = 9-7.8) and LIL (e.g., higher K/Rb) ratios. The Adak region plutons differ from Tertiary plutons on Unalaska Island further east in being more K-rich and in having a more oxidized and lower-temperature mineralogy. From a regional perspective, the Adak area plutons intrude Eocene/Oligocene Finger Bay Formation mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks and postdate the small ~38 Ma tholeiitic Finger Bay pluton. The chemistry of these older magmatic rocks is basically similar to that of young Central Aleutian magmatic rocks with boninites and arc tholeiitic magmas seemingly being absent. The formation of the calc-alkaline plutons seems to require a sufficient crustal thickness, fluid concentration and contractional stress such that magma chambers can stabilize significant amounts of pargasitic hornblende. Seismic receiver function analyses (Janiszewski et al., 2013) indicate the modern Adak crust is ~ 37 km thick. Existing and new hornblende, plagioclase and biotite Ar/Ar ages from 16 Hidden Bay pluton and Gannet Lake stock gabbro, porphyritic diorite, diorite, granodiorite, leucogranodiorite and aplite samples range from 34.6 to 30.9 Ma and indicate an ~ 4 Ma intrusion history. Biotite Ar/Ar ages for Kagalaska gabbro and granodiorite samples range from 14.7 to 13.9 Ma. The new ages are consistent with the plutons being related to several eruptive centers and forming during the waning stages of volcanism as the magmatic arc front was displaced to the north, possibly in response to accelerated periods of forearc subduction erosion. The gabbroic to leucogranodioritic units evolved in the lower to mid-crust with more silicic magmas rising buoyantly to higher levels where final crystallization and segregation of aplites occurred. Most gabbro and all mafic diorite units are largely crystal cumulates; one gabbro approaches the melt composition of a high Al basalt. The volumetrically dominant silicic diorites and granodiorites (58-63% SiO2) show the most zoning in their mineral phases and approach melt compositions. The leucogranodiorite (67-70% SiO2)unit was the last to crystallize. The silicic units are considered to be deep-crustal differentiates of high-Al basalt magmas, although partial melting of older magmatic rocks may play a role. Mafic dikes in the pluton represent the basic magmas under the dying arc front as the front moved northward.

  8. Preliminary Geologic Map of Mount Pagan Volcano, Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Moore, Richard B.; Sako, Maurice K.

    2006-01-01

    Pagan Island is the subaerial portion of two adjoining Quaternary stratovolcanoes near the middle of the active Mariana Arc, [FAT1]north of Saipan. Pagan and the other volcanic islands that constitute part of the Arc form the northern half of the East Mariana Ridge[FAT2], which extends about 2-4 km above the ocean floor. The > 6-km-deep Mariana Trench adjoins the East Mariana Ridge on the east, and the Mariana Trough, partly filled with young lava flows and volcaniclastic sediment, lies on the west of the Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge. The submarine West Mariana Ridge, Tertiary in age, bounds the western side of the Mariana Trough. The Mariana Trench and Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge) overlie an active subduction zone where the Pacific Plate, moving northwest at about 10.3 cm/year, is passing beneath the Philippine Plate, moving west-northwest at 6.8 cm/year. Beneath the Northern Mariana Islands, earthquake hypocenters at depths of 50-250 km identify the location of the west-dipping subduction zone, which farther west becomes nearly vertical and extends to 700 km depth. During the past century, more than 40 earthquakes of magnitude 6.5-8.1 have shaken the Mariana Trench. The Mariana Islands form two sub-parallel, concentric, concave-west arcs. The southern islands comprise the outer arc and extend north from Guam to Farallon de Medinilla. They consist of Eocene to Miocene volcanic rocks and uplifted Tertiary and Quaternary limestone. The nine northern islands extend from Anatahan to Farallon de Pajaros and form part of the inner arc. The active inner arc extends south from Anatahan, where volcanoes, some of which are active, form seamounts west of the older outer arc. Other volcanic seamounts of the active arc surmount the East Mariana Ridge in the vicinity of Anatahan and Sarigan and north and south of Farallon de Pajaros. Six volcanoes (Farallon de Pajaros, Asuncion, Agrigan, Mount Pagan, Guguan, and Anatahan) in the northern islands have erupted during the past century, and Ruby Seamount erupted in 1996.

  9. Final Report: Weatherization and Energy Conservation Education and Home Energy and Safety Review in the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Wright

    2011-08-30

    Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, Inc. (APIA) hired three part-time local community members that desire to be Energy Technicians. The energy technicians were trained in methods of weatherization assistance, energy conservation and home safety. They developed a listing of homes in the region that required weatherization, and conducted on-site weatherization and energy conservation education and a home energy and safety reviews in the communities of Akutan, False Pass, King Cove and Nelson Lagoon. Priority was given to these smaller communities as they tend to have the residences most in need of weatherization and energy conservation measures. Local residents were trained to provide all three aspects of the project: weatherization, energy conservation education and a home energy and safety review. If the total energy saved by installing these products is a 25% reduction (electrical and heating, both of which are usually produced by combustion of diesel fuel), and the average Alaska home produces 32,000 pounds of CO2 each year, so we have saved about: 66 homes x 16 tons of CO2 each year x .25 = 264 tons of CO2 each year.

  10. Island-arc magmatic processes beneath South Pagan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Trusdell, F. A.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The island-arc volcanoes that make up the Northern Mariana Islands are among the most historically active stratovolcanoes along the Pacific plate, yet they have been poorly studied due to their remote location and difficult accessibility. One of the least studied areas in the Northern Mariana Islands is Pagan Island, located near the center of the Mariana ridge. Pagan Island consists of two Holocene stratovolcanoes, Mount Pagan and South Pagan. Remarkably little is known about South Pagan including its eruptive history, potential volcanic hazards, and geochemical evolution due to a small population of inhabitants, a short and intermittent recorded history, and few geological studies. There is abundant evidence that eruption of South Pagan could pose significant hazards to both residents of the Northern Mariana Islands and to aircraft flying in the western Pacific. For example, following Mount Pagan's most recent explosive eruption (VEI = 4) in 1981, destructive rain-triggered volcanic debris flows buried large tracts of land, including the site of a village that contained a school, dispensary, church, and power generating buildings. Preliminary field studies in May 2006 by the USGS showed that a full spectrum of hazardous phenomena originated from South Pagan in the past, including pyroclastic flows and surges, caldera collapses, and volcanic debris flows. Two previously unrecognized active fumaroles near the summit of South Pagan were discovered suggesting that potential volcanic hazards currently exist in this area. A majority of the new lava samples are vesicular, clinopyroxene-plagioclase basalts with minor plagioclase xenocrysts and gabbroic xenoliths. The purpose of this study is to understand the compositional history of South Pagan and how it relates to the crustal and mantle magmatic processes beneath the central Northern Mariana Islands. Pb, Sr and Nd isotope ratios, major and trace element abundances, and mineral chemistry were determined and will be presented.

  11. Volcanoes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Winter Storms & Extreme Cold Space Weather Main Content Volcanoes A volcano is a mountain that opens downward ... most mountains, which are pushed up from below, volcanoes are vents through which molten rock escapes to ...

  12. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Statistical and Reporting Areas 1 Figure 1 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99.000 b. Coordinates Code Description 300 Russian waters... statistical area is the part of a reporting area contained in the EEZ....

  13. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Statistical and Reporting Areas 1 Figure 1 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99.000 b. Coordinates Code Description 300 Russian waters... statistical area is the part of a reporting area contained in the EEZ....

  14. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Statistical and Reporting Areas 1 Figure 1 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99.000 b. Coordinates Code Description 300 Russian waters... statistical area is the part of a reporting area contained in the EEZ....

  15. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Statistical and Reporting Areas 1 Figure 1 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99.000 b. Coordinates Code Description 300 Russian waters... statistical area is the part of a reporting area contained in the EEZ....

  16. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Statistical and Reporting Areas 1 Figure 1 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99.000 b. Coordinates Code Description 300 Russian waters... statistical area is the part of a reporting area contained in the EEZ....

  17. A model for selecting bioindicators to monitor radionuclide concentrations using Amchitka Island in the Aleutians as a case study.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2007-11-01

    World War II and the Cold War have left the Unites States, and other Nations, with massive cleanup and remediation tasks for radioactive and other legacy hazardous wastes. While some sites can be cleaned up to acceptable residential risk levels, others will continue to hold hazardous wastes, which must be contained and monitored to protect human health and the environment. While media (soil, sediment, groundwater) monitoring is the usual norm at many radiological waste sites, for some situations (both biological and societal), biomonitoring may provide the necessary information to assure greater peace of mind for local and regional residents, and to protect ecologically valuable buffer lands or waters. In most cases, indicators are selected using scientific expertise and a literature review, but not all selected indicators will seem relevant to stakeholders. In this paper, I provide a model for the inclusion of stakeholders in the development of bioindicators for assessing radionuclide levels of biota in the marine environment around Amchitka Island, in the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Amchitka was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. The process was stakeholder-initiated, stakeholder-driven, and included stakeholders during each phase. Phases included conceptualization, initial selection of biota and radionuclides, refinement of biota and radionuclide target lists, collection of biota, selection of biota and radionuclides for analysis, and selection of biota, tissues, and radionuclides for bioindicators. The process produced site-specific information on biota availability and on radionuclide levels that led to selection of site-appropriate bioindicators. I suggest that the lengthy, iterative, stakeholder-driven process described in this paper results in selection of bioindicators that are accepted by biologists, public health personnel, public-policy makers, resource agencies, regulatory agencies, subsistence hunters/fishers, and a wide range of other stakeholders. The process is applicable to other sites with ecologically important buffer lands or waters, or where contamination issues are contentious. PMID:17698056

  18. A model for selecting bioindicators to monitor radionuclide concentrations using Amchitka Island in the Aleutians as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna

    2007-11-15

    World War II and the Cold War have left the Unites States, and other Nations, with massive cleanup and remediation tasks for radioactive and other legacy hazardous wastes. While some sites can be cleaned up to acceptable residential risk levels, others will continue to hold hazardous wastes, which must be contained and monitored to protect human health and the environment. While media (soil, sediment, groundwater) monitoring is the usual norm at many radiological waste sites, for some situations (both biological and societal), biomonitoring may provide the necessary information to assure greater peace of mind for local and regional residents, and to protect ecologically valuable buffer lands or waters. In most cases, indicators are selected using scientific expertise and a literature review, but not all selected indicators will seem relevant to stakeholders. In this paper, I provide a model for the inclusion of stakeholders in the development of bioindicators for assessing radionuclide levels of biota in the marine environment around Amchitka Island, in the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Amchitka was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. The process was stakeholder-initiated, stakeholder-driven, and included stakeholders during each phase. Phases included conceptualization, initial selection of biota and radionuclides, refinement of biota and radionuclide target lists, collection of biota, selection of biota and radionuclides for analysis, and selection of biota, tissues, and radionuclides for bioindicators. The process produced site-specific information on biota availability and on radionuclide levels that led to selection of site-appropriate bioindicators. I suggest that the lengthy, iterative, stakeholder-driven process described in this paper results in selection of bioindicators that are accepted by biologists, public health personnel, public-policy makers, resource agencies, regulatory agencies, subsistence hunters/fishers, and a wide range of other stakeholders. The process is applicable to other sites with ecologically important buffer lands or waters, or where contamination issues are contentious.

  19. Levels of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Three Organochlorine Pesticides in Fish from the Aleutian Islands of Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, Sara; Tilander, Hanna; Welfinger-Smith, Gretchen; Burger, Joanna; Carpenter, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides, have been shown to have many adverse human health effects. These contaminants therefore may pose a risk to Alaska Natives that follow a traditional diet high in marine mammals and fish, in which POPs bioaccumulate. Methods and Findings This study examined the levels of PCBs and three pesticides [p, p′-DDE, mirex, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB)] in muscle tissue from nine fish species from several locations around the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The highest median PCB level was found in rock sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata, 285 ppb, wet weight), while the lowest level was found in rock greenling (Hexagrammos lagocephalus, 104 ppb, wet weight). Lipid adjusted PCB values were also calculated and significant interspecies differences were found. Again, rock sole had the highest level (68,536 ppb, lipid weight). Concerning the PCB congener patterns, the more highly chlorinated congeners were most common as would be expected due to their greater persistence. Among the pesticides, p, p′-DDE generally dominated, and the highest level was found in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka, 6.9 ppb, wet weight). The methodology developed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) was used to calculate risk-based consumption limits for the analyzed fish species. For cancer health endpoints for PCBs, all species would trigger strict advisories of between two and six meals per year, depending upon species. For noncancer effects by PCBs, advisories of between seven and twenty-two meals per year were triggered. None of the pesticides triggered consumption limits. Conclusion The fish analyzed, mainly from Adak, contain significant concentrations of POPs, in particular PCBs, which raises the question whether these fish are safe to eat, particularly for sensitive populations. However when assessing any risk of the traditional diet, one must also consider the many health and cultural benefits from eating fish. PMID:20811633

  20. Modeling the impacts of bottom trawling and the subsequent recovery rates of sponges and corals in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooper, Christopher N.; Wilkins, Mark E.; Rose, Craig S.; Coon, Catherine

    2011-11-01

    The abundance of some marine fish species are correlated to the abundance of habitat-forming benthic organisms such as sponges and corals. A concern for fisheries management agencies is the recovery of these benthic invertebrates from removal or mortality from bottom trawling and other commercial fisheries activities. Using a logistic model, observations of available substrate and data from bottom trawl surveys of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, we estimated recovery rates of sponges and corals following removal. The model predicted the observed sponge and coral catch in bottom trawl surveys relatively accurately ( R2=0.38 and 0.46). For sponges, the results show that intrinsic growth rates were slow ( r=0.107 yr -1). Results show that intrinsic growth rates of corals were also slow ( r=0.062 yr -1). The best models for corals and sponges were models that did not include the impacts of commercial fishing removals. Subsequent recovery times for both taxa were also predicted to be slow. Mortality of 67% of the initial sponge biomass would recover to 80% of the original biomass after 20 years, while mortality of 67% of the coral biomass would recover to 80% of the original biomass after 34 years. The modeled recovery times were consistent with previous studies in estimating that recovery times were of the order of decades, however improved data from directed studies would no doubt improve parameter estimates and reduce the uncertainty in the model results. Given their role as a major ecosystem component and potential habitat for marine fish, damage and removal of sponges and corals must be considered when estimating the impacts of commercial bottom trawling on the seafloor.

  1. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  2. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  3. Shallow seismic imaging of flank collapse structures in oceanic island volcanoes: Application to the Western Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, L.; González, P.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic flank collapse counts among the many hazards associated with volcanic activity. This type of event involves the mobilization of large volumes, producing debris avalanches. It affects mostly oceanic island volcanoes, involving the potential for tsunami occurrence. Geophysical imaging can illuminate subvolcanic features such as volcano-tectonic structures, magmatic plumbing systems or differences in rock type. The most commonly used geophysical methods are gravity, electromagnetics and seismics. In particular, seismic measurements quantify anomalies in seismic waves propagation velocities and can be used to obtain information on the subsurface arrangement of different materials. In the Western Canary Islands, the Cumbre Vieja volcano in La Palma (Canary Islands) has been proposed to be near the collapse stage. Previous geophysical studies that have been carried out on the flank of the volcano comprise gravity and electromagnetic methods. These types of surveys gather information on the deep structures of the volcano (1-2 km). In this project, we complement previous studies by using seismic methods to investigate the near-surface seismic structure of the Cumbre Vieja fault system (La Palma Island) and the structure of the well-developed San Andres fault system (El Hierro Island). We aim to compare the Cumbre Vieja and San Andres fault systems to infer the degree of maturity of collapse structures. We carried out reflection and refraction seismic surveys in order to image approximately the first 10 meters of the subsurface. We used 24 low frequency (4,5 Hz) geophones as receivers and a sledge hammer as the seismic source. The survey lines were located across visible parts of the fault systems at the Cumbre Vieja volcano and the San Andres fault in El Hierro. Here, we present the survey setup and results from the preliminary analysis of the data.

  4. Magma Differentiation in the Plumbing System of an Alkaline Ocean Island Volcano (Fuerteventura, Canary Island).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornare, E.; Bussy, F.; Pilet, S.

    2014-12-01

    Magma differentiation and mixing are generally regarded as taking place in magma chambers, sills or reservoirs, while magma stagnates before continuing to ascent or erupt. Here we consider differentiation to occur during magma rise in vertical dykes, as documented in the PX1 pluton, Fuerteventura, which is part of the root-zone of an eroded ocean island volcano. PX1 is a vertically layered cumulative body composed of meter to decameter-wide bands of clinopyroxenites and gabbros, surrounded by a very high-grade contact aureole (ca. 1000°C, Hobson et al., 1998). Many clinopyroxenites are characterized by a coarse-grained texture and complexly zoned clinopyroxene crystals. Resorption features and reverse zoning observed in rims are evidence for successive pulses. Percolation of high temperature basaltic melts through the accumulating crystal-rich mush would generate the complexly zoned clinopyroxenes and lead to crystal coarsening. We interpret these coarse-grained clinopyroxenites as crystal-rich magma channels, through which sustained magma fluxes travelled to the surface over a long period of time, thus generating the contact aureole. On the other hand, gabbro bands are interpreted as sluggish magma pulses emplaced in a cooler environment during the waning stages of magmatic activity. We thus propose a model of magma differentiation by dynamic fractionation in dykes throughout magma ascent in the plumbing system of basaltic volcanoes. This model assumes fractional crystallization of continuously rising magmas in vertical channels all along their way to the surface through phenocryst accumulation and crystal-melt interaction processes.

  5. Specification of Tectonic Tsunami Sources Along the Eastern Aleutian Island Arc and Alaska Peninsula for Inundation Mapping and Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimani, E.; Nicolsky, D.; Freymueller, J. T.; Koehler, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Alaska Earthquake Information Center conducts tsunami inundation mapping for coastal communities in Alaska along several segments of the Aleutian Megathrust, each having a unique seismic history and tsunami generation potential. Accurate identification and characterization of potential tsunami sources is a critical component of our project. As demonstrated by the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami, correct estimation of the maximum size event for a given segment of the subduction zone is particularly important. In that event, unexpectedly large slip occurred approximately updip of the epicenter of the main shock, based on seafloor GPS and seafloor pressure gage observations, generating a much larger tsunami than anticipated. This emphasizes the importance of the detailed knowledge of the region-specific subduction processes, and using the most up-to-date geophysical data and research models that define the magnitude range of possible future tsunami events. Our study area extends from the eastern half of the 1957 rupture zone to Kodiak Island, covering the 1946 and 1938 rupture areas, the Shumagin gap, and the western part of the 1964 rupture area. We propose a strategy for generating worst-case credible tsunami scenarios for locations that have a short or nonexistent paleoseismic/paleotsunami record, and in some cases lack modern seismic and GPS data. The potential tsunami scenarios are built based on a discretized plate interface model fit to the Slab 1.0 model geometry. We employ estimates of slip deficit along the Aleutian Megathrust from GPS campaign surveys, the Slab 1.0 interface surface, empirical magnitude-slip relationships, and a numerical code that distributes slip among the subfault elements, calculates coseismic deformations and solves the shallow water equations of tsunami propagation and runup. We define hypothetical asperities along the megathrust and in down-dip direction, and perform a set of sensitivity model runs to identify coseismic deformation patterns resulting in highest runup at a given community. Because of the extra fine discretization of the interface, we can prescribe variable slip patterns, using simple parameters to describe slip variations in the along-strike and down-dip directions. Since it was demonstrated by studies of the 1964 tsunami that changes in slip distribution result in significant variations in the local tsunami wave field, we expect that the near-field tsunami runup in target communities will be highly sensitive to variability of slip along the rupture area. We perform simulations for each source scenario using AEIC's numerical model of tsunami propagation and runup, which is validated through a set of analytical benchmarks and tested against laboratory and field data. Results of numerical modeling combined with historical observations are compiled on inundation maps and used for site-specific tsunami hazard assessment by local emergency planners.

  6. Testing the nutritional-limitation, predator-avoidance, and storm-avoidance hypotheses for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Nathan L.; Konar, Brenda; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) inhabiting the Aleutian Islands have stabilized at low abundance levels following a decline and currently exhibit restricted habitat-utilization patterns. Possible explanations for restricted habitat use by sea otters can be classified into two fundamentally different processes, bottom-up and top-down forcing. Bottom-up hypotheses argue that changes in the availability or nutritional quality of prey resources have led to the selective use of habitats that support the highest quality prey. In contrast, top-down hypotheses argue that increases in predation pressure from killer whales have led to the selective use of habitats that provide the most effective refuge from killer whale predation. A third hypothesis suggests that current restricted habitat use is based on a need for protection from storms. We tested all three hypotheses for restricted habitat use by comparing currently used and historically used sea otter foraging locations for: (1) prey availability and quality, (2) structural habitat complexity, and (3) exposure to prevailing storms. Our findings suggest that current use is based on physical habitat complexity and not on prey availability, prey quality, or protection from storms, providing further evidence for killer whale predation as a cause for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands.

  7. Testing the nutritional-limitation, predator-avoidance, and storm-avoidance hypotheses for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Nathan L; Konar, Brenda; Tinker, M Tim

    2015-03-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) inhabiting the Aleutian Islands have stabilized at low abundance levels following a decline and currently exhibit restricted habitat-utilization patterns. Possible explanations for restricted habitat use by sea otters can be classified into two fundamentally different processes, bottom-up and top-down forcing. Bottom-up hypotheses argue that changes in the availability or nutritional quality of prey resources have led to the selective use of habitats that support the highest quality prey. In contrast, top-down hypotheses argue that increases in predation pressure from killer whales have led to the selective use of habitats that provide the most effective refuge from killer whale predation. A third hypothesis suggests that current restricted habitat use is based on a need for protection from storms. We tested all three hypotheses for restricted habitat use by comparing currently used and historically used sea otter foraging locations for: (1) prey availability and quality, (2) structural habitat complexity, and (3) exposure to prevailing storms. Our findings suggest that current use is based on physical habitat complexity and not on prey availability, prey quality, or protection from storms, providing further evidence for killer whale predation as a cause for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands. PMID:25416538

  8. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  9. Post-eruptive morphological evolution of island volcanoes: Surtsey as a modern case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romagnoli, C.; Jakobsson, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Surtsey is a small volcanic island in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, off the south coast of Iceland. The eruption leading to the island's emersion lasted for 3.5 yr (1963-1967) while destructive forces have been active for over 50 yr (1963-present-day) during which Surtsey has suffered rapid subaerial and submarine erosion and undergone major morphological changes. Surtsey is a well-documented modern example of the post-eruptive degradational stage of island volcanoes, and has provided the unique opportunity to continuously observe and quantify the effects of intense geomorphic processes. In this paper we focus on coastal and marine processes re-shaping the shoreline and shallow-water portions of the Surtsey complex since its formation and on the related geomorphological record. Analogies with the post-eruptive morphological evolution of recently active island volcanoes at the emerging stage, encompassing different climatic conditions, wave regimes and geological contexts, are discussed.

  10. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  11. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  12. From birth to death of arc magmatism: The igneous evolution of Komandorsky Islands recorded tectonic changes during 50 Ma of westernmost Aleutian history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfig, T. W.; Portnyagin, M.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F. F.; van den Bogaard, P.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Komandorsky Islands form the westernmost end of the Aleutian Island Arc. Four igneous complexes, spanning almost 50 Ma of magmatism, have previously been identified (Ivaschenko et al., 1984: Far East Scientific Centre, Vladivostok, 192 pp.). The petrogenesis of this protracted magmatic record and accurate absolute ages of events, however, remain poorly constrained. Our study investigates the relationship between magma composition and tectonic setting. The Komandorsky igneous basement formed in subduction zone setting. It hosts some of the oldest igneous rocks of the entire Aleutian Arc with the onset of magmatism occurring at 47 Ma. This early stage was characterized by classic fluid-dominated arc volcanism, which produced two coeval but likely genetically unrelated magmatic series of tholeiitic mafic and tholeiitic to calc-alkaline felsic rocks. To date, no boninites have been found and therefore arc initiation is different at the Aleutians than at Izu-Bonin-Marianas or the oldest rocks in the Aleutians have yet to be discovered. The prolonged production of the contrasting basalt-rhyolite association on Komandorsky Islands had lasted ~25 Ma and ceased around the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Concurrently to this long-lasting activity, a gradual transition to a different mode of arc magmatism took place reflected by newly discovered Sr-enriched, HREE-depleted calc-alkaline basaltic andesitic lavas of mid-upper Eocene age spanning a time of at least ~7 Ma. This so-called Transition Series displays a moderate garnet signature marking the increased contribution of a slab-melt component to the magma sources of the Komandorsky Islands. Slab-melt contribution increased with decreasing age leading to strongly adakitic magmatism as early as ~33 Ma (Lower Oligocene), reflected by eruption of high-Sr (up to 2,500 ppm), highly HREE-depleted Adak-type magnesian basaltic andesites and andesites. These remarkable magmas became predominant during the Lower Miocene. They were followed at ~17 Ma by extremely HREE-depleted calc-alkaline intrusives. Over time there is a clear decrease in Pb isotopic ratios from radiogenic sediment-affected Central Aleutian to unradiogenic Pacific MORB-type compositions similar to Miocene Komandorsky Basin basalt. The geochemical evolution reflects a dramatic change in convergence direction from roughly orthogonal to highly oblique (Duncan and Keller, 2004: G-cubed, v. 5, Q08L03). Increasing oblique subduction led to intense stripping of sediment and enhanced heating of the flat-plunging Pacific lithosphere. This facilitated partial slab melting. However, a significantly increasing amount of slab melt in mid-late Miocene times required an additional heat source, which was probably provided by a slab tear or even slab break-off (Levin et al., 2005: Geology, v. 33, p. 253-256).

  13. Large Scale Failures on Volcanoes of Kurile Islands: the First Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.

    2007-12-01

    Investigations of air and space images of volcanoes of the Kurile arc, supplemented by observations from a vessel as well as by on-land field work on several islands, have allowed us to identify 23 active volcanoes with well-preserved horseshoe-shaped scars formed by large-scale edifice failures. Breaches of most of the scars (14 cases) range from 0.5 to 2 km wide, indicating moderate failure volumes - around 1 km3. The two largest scars were 4 km-across (which were formed by failures with volumes about 5 km3) belong to Milne and Sinarka volcanoes. Most of the failures occurred on andesitic volcanoes which dominate in the region. At least 3 volcanoes (Harimkotan, Sinarka and Mendeleev) experienced multiple (3 or more) failures. Only two failures occurred on dominantly basaltic stratovolcanoes (Alaid and Atsonupuri). Most of the collapsed volcanoes of the Kurile arc exhibit strong hydrothermal alteration of rocks inside their horseshoe-shaped scars, and their debris avalanche deposits contain a large proportion of clayey material. This suggests that weakening of rocks composing volcanic edifices caused by hydrothermal alteration played a leading role in gravitational destabilization of the volcanoes. In 50% of the cases, failures were followed by magmatic activity; the horseshoe- shaped craters are partially filled by younger volcanic cones. This indicates that the failure surfaces intersected upper parts of feeding channels of active volcanoes, and the failures may have been triggered by magma intruding into the volcanic edifices. Apart from failures on active volcanoes there are multiple rather large scale (>0,01 km3) failures along sea cliffs of the islands which involved volcanic rocks. These cases are transitional to non-volcanic failures. Debris avalanches of all of the studied failures traveled far beyond the shore line of Okhotskoye Sea or the Pacific Ocean and thus their exact lengths and drop heights are unknown. The debris avalanches obviously generated tsunamis upon entering the sea. The studied failures have Late Pleistocene-Holocene ages; and one historical case failure of Harimkotan volcano on January 8, 1933 with the volume 0.4 km3. The failure generated a tsunami up to 20 m high with 2 reported victims on nearby Onekotan Island. The failure was followed by a strong, 5-day-long Plinian eruption with deposition of pyroclastic flows and subsequent dome growth over several months.

  14. The petrogenesis of sodic island arc magmas at Savo volcano, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J.; Petterson, M. G.; Saunders, A. D.; Millar, I. L.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Toba, T.; Naden, J.; Cook, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Savo, Solomon Islands, is a historically active volcano dominated by sodic, alkaline lavas, and pyroclastic rocks with up to 7.5 wt% Na2O, and high Sr, arc-like trace element chemistry. The suite is dominated by mugearites (plagioclase-clinopyroxene-magnetite ± amphibole ± olivine) and trachytes (plagioclase-amphibole-magnetite ± biotite). The presence of hydrous minerals (amphibole, biotite) indicates relatively wet magmas. In such melts, plagioclase is relatively unstable relative to iron oxides and ferromagnesian silicates; it is the latter minerals (particularly hornblende) that dominate cumulate nodules at Savo and drive the chemical differentiation of the suite, with a limited role for plagioclase. This is potentially occurring in a crustal “hot zone”, with major chemical differentiation occurring at depth. Batches of magma ascend periodically, where they are subject to decompression, water saturation and further cooling, resulting in closed-system crystallisation of plagioclase, and ultimately the production of sodic, crystal and feldspar-rich, high-Sr rocks. The sodic and hydrous nature of the parental magmas is interpreted to be the result of partial melting of metasomatised mantle, but radiogenic isotope data (Pb, Sr, Nd) cannot uniquely identify the source of the metasomatic agent.

  15. Sheared sheet intrusions as mechanism for lateral flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes: Applications to Réunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayol, V.; Catry, T.; Michon, L.; Chaput, M.; Famin, V.; Bodart, O.; Froger, J.-L.; Romagnoli, C.

    2014-10-01

    Field work carried out on the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island) suggests that the injection of magma along detachments could trigger flank failure by conjugate opening and shear displacement. We use 3-D numerical models to compare the ability of purely opened sheet intrusions, sheared sheet intrusions, and normal faults to induce flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes. We assume that shear stress change on fractures results from stress anisotropy of the host rock under gravity. Exploring a large range of stress anisotropies, fracture dips, and fracture depth over length ratios, we determine that the amount of shear displacement is independent of the proximity to the ground surface. Sheared sheet intrusions are the most efficient slip medium on volcanoes. Consequently, the largest flank displacement is induced by the longest, deepest sheared intrusion dipping closest to 45° in a host rock with the highest stress anisotropy. Using our model in a forward way, we provide shear and normal displacements for buried fractures. Applying the model to a pile of sills at the Piton des Neiges volcano, we determine that the mean shear displacement caused by each intrusion was 3.7 m, leading to a total of a 180-260 m of lateral displacement for the 50 m high pile of sills. Using our model in an inverse way, we formulate a decision tree to determine some fracture characteristics and the host rock stress anisotropy from ratios of maximum surface displacements. This procedure provides a priori models, which can be used to bound the parameter space before it is explored through a formal inversion. Applying the decision tree to the 1.4 m coeruptive flank displacement recorded at Piton de la Fournaise in 2007, we find that it probably originated from a shallow eastward dipping subhorizontal normal fault.

  16. Sheared sheet intrusions as a mechanism for lateral flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes: Applications to Réunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayol, V.; Catry, T.; Michon, L.; Chaput, M.; Famin, V.; Bodart, O.; Froger, J. L.; Romagnoli, C.

    2014-12-01

    Field work carried out on the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island) suggests that the injection of magma along detachments could trigger flank failure by conjugate opening and shear displacement [Famin and Michon, 2010]. We use 3D numerical models to compare the ability of purely opened sheet intrusions, sheared sheet intrusions, and normal faults to induce flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes (Figure). We assume that shear stress change on fractures which are not normal to a principal stress results from stress anisotropy of the host rock under gravity. Exploring a large range of stress anisotropies, fracture dips, and fracture depth over length ratios, we determine that the amount of shear displacement is independent of the proximity to the ground surface. Sheared sheet intrusions are the most efficient slip medium on volcanoes. Using our model in a forward way, we provide shear and normal displacements for buried fractures. Applying the model to a pile of sills at the Piton des Neiges volcano, we determine that the mean shear displacement caused by each intrusion was 3.7 m, leading to a total of a 180-260 m of lateral displacement for the 50 m high pile of sills. Using our model in an inverse way, we formulate a decision tree to determine some fracture characteristics and the host rock stress anisotropy from ratios of maximum surface displacements. This procedure provides a priori models, thus limits to the parameter space which can be further explored through a formal inversion. Applying this procedure to the 1.4 m co-eruptive flank displacement recorded at Piton de la Fournaise in 2007, we find that it probably originated from a shallow eastward-dipping sub-horizontal normal fault.

  17. Deep intrusions, lateral magma transport and related uplift at ocean island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Andreas; Longpré, Marc-Antoine; García-Cañada, Laura; Stix, John

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic intraplate volcanoes grow by accumulation of erupted material as well as by coeval or discrete magmatic intrusions. Dykes and other intrusive bodies within volcanic edifices are comparatively well studied, but intrusive processes deep beneath the volcanoes remain elusive. Although there is geological evidence for deep magmatic intrusions contributing to volcano growth through uplift, this has rarely been demonstrated by real-time monitoring. Here we use geophysical and petrological data from El Hierro, Canary Islands, to show that intrusions from the mantle and subhorizontal transport of magma within the oceanic crust result in rapid endogenous island growth. Seismicity and ground deformation associated with a submarine eruption in 2011-2012 reveal deep subhorizontal intrusive sheets (sills), which have caused island-scale uplift of tens of centimetres. The pre-eruptive intrusions migrated 15-20 km laterally within the lower oceanic crust, opening pathways that were subsequently used by the erupted magmas to ascend from the mantle to the surface. During six post-eruptive episodes between 2012 and 2014, further sill intrusions into the lower crust and upper mantle have caused magma to migrate up to 20 km laterally, resulting in magma accumulation exceeding that of the pre-eruptive phase. A comparison of geobarometric data for the 2011-2012 El Hierro eruption with data for other Atlantic intraplate volcanoes shows similar bimodal pressure distributions, suggesting that eruptive phases are commonly accompanied by deep intrusions of sills and lateral magma transport. These processes add significant material to the oceanic crust, cause uplift, and are thus fundamentally important for the growth and evolution of volcanic islands. We suggest that the development of such a magma accumulation zone in the lower oceanic crust begins early during volcano evolution, and is a consequence of increasing size and complexity of the mantle reservoir system, and potentially the lithospheric stresses imposed by increasing edifice load.

  18. Geochemistry and solute fluxes of volcano-hydrothermal systems of Shiashkotan, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri; Kotenko, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Shiashkotan Island belongs to the Northern Kuril island arc and consists of two joined volcanoes, Sinarka and Kuntomintar, with about 18 km of distance between the summits. Both volcanoes are active, with historic eruptions, and both emit fumarolic gases. Sinarka volcano is degassing through the extrusive dome with inaccessible strong and hot (> 400 °C) fumaroles. A large fumarolic field of the Kuntomintar volcano situated in a wide eroded caldera-like crater hosts many fumarolic vents with temperatures from boiling point to 480 °C. Both volcanoes are characterized by intense hydrothermal activity discharging acid SO4-Cl waters, which are drained to the Sea of Okhotsk by streams. At least 4 groups of near-neutral Na-Mg-Ca-Cl-SO4 springs with temperatures in the range of 50-80 °C are located at the sea level, within tide zones and discharge slightly altered diluted seawater. Volcanic gas of Kuntomintar as well as all types of hydrothermal manifestations of both volcanoes were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements and water isotopes. Volcanic gases are typical for arc volcanoes with 3He/4He corrected for air contamination up to 6.4 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10- 6, the air ratio) and δ13C (CO2) within - 10‰ to - 8 ‰ VPDB. Using a saturation indices approach it is shown that acid volcanic waters are formed at a shallow level, whereas waters of the coastal springs are partially equilibrated with rocks at ~ 180 °C. Trace element distribution and concentrations and the total REE depend on the water type, acidity and Al + Fe concentration. The REE pattern for acidic waters is unusual but similar to that found in some acidic crater lake waters. The total hydrothermal discharge of Cl and S from the island associated with volcanic activity is estimated at ca. 20 t/d and 40 t/d, respectively, based on the measurements of flow rates of the draining streams and their chemistry. The chemical erosion of the island by surface and thermal waters is estimated at 27 and 140 ton/km2/year, respectively, which is 2-3 times lower than chemical erosion of tropical volcanic islands.

  19. The pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures on the volcanoes of Fernandina and Isabela islands, Galapagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Howard, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Maps of the eruptive vents on the active shield volcanoes of Fernandina and Isabela islands, Galapagos, made from aerial photographs, display a distinctive pattern that consists of circumferential eruptive fissures around the summit calderas and radial fissures lower on the flanks. On some volcano flanks either circumferential or radial eruptions have been dominant in recent time. The location of circumferential vents outside the calderas is independent of caldera-related normal faults. The eruptive fissures are the surface expression of dike emplacement, and the dike orientations are interpreted to be controlled by the state of stress in the volcano. Very few subaerial volcanoes display a pattern of fissures similar to that of the Galapagos volcanoes. Some seamounts and shield volcanoes on Mars morphologically resemble the Galapagos volcanoes, but more specific evidence is needed to determine if they also share common structure and eruptive style. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Evolution of the Aleutian arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, B. R.; Kay, S. M.; Schaen, A. J.; Tibbetts, A. K.; Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Recently published and ongoing research at several of the circum-Pacific oceanic arcs (Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Tonga) has led to the development of tectonic models for how these subduction zones have formed and evolved since the Eocene. An outstanding question that has yet to be answered is how the timing of initiation and evolution of the Aleutian arc is linked to these current tectonic models. More than 70 new 40Ar/39Ar ages and over 100 major and trace element analyses of lavas and plutons exposed on numerous central and western Aleutian islands have been determined as part of a reconnaissance effort to address this question. Exposures of > 42 Ma rocks remain elusive, and likely require a concerted sampling campaign in the submarine forearc. The new geochemical and geochronologic data support the suggestion that initial growth of the Aleutian arc was rapid and subsequent growth occurred in three distinct pulses (37-29, 17-11, 6-0 Ma) (e.g., Jicha et al., 2006), a trend also observed in other circum-Pacific arcs. Eocene-Oligocene lavas and gabbroic plutons of the western Aleutians are tholeiitic with island arc-like trace element patterns that can be light rare earth element (LREE) depleted. These compositions are distinctly different from the calc-alkaline, light rare earth element (REE) enriched and variably heavy REE depleted, Pleistocene to Holocene primitive andesites and dacites found atop the thinner, faulted crust of the western Aleutians. Widespread calc-alkaline magmatism does not appear to commence until the Miocene, although some Oligocene calc-alkaline lavas and plutons have been found throughout the arc and along the Bowers Ridge (Wanke et al., 2012). A major transition in post-Pliocene arc chemistry occurs as a sediment melt component, which was not available early in the development of the Aleutian Arc becomes important in the Pleistocene (e.g., Kay and Kay 1994; Schaen, 2014).

  1. 3-D velocity model beneath Taal Volcano, Luzon Island Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Gung, Y.; Lin, C.

    2011-12-01

    We derive a three dimensional velocity model of seismic waves beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines, from about 2300 local earthquakes recorded by the Taal Volcano seismic network during the time period from March 2008 to March 2010. In the early data processing stage, with the cross-correlation functions of continuous record of station pairs, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified. The drifting rates of each problematic station were determined and the errors were corrected before further processing. With the corrected data, we first determined initial locations by using the program HYPO71 and the reference 1-D global model ak135. 749 well-located events with 3381 P-wave and 2896 S-wave arrivals were used to derive the 'minimum 1-D velocity model' with the program VELEST developed by Kissling to further improve the 1-D velocity model and event locations. With the robust 1-D velocity model and improved event locations, we inverted a high-resolution 3-D velocity model by using the program LOTOS-10 developed by Koulakov. We present the derived 3-D model and discuss its tectonic implications.

  2. Petrology of Matthew and Hunter volcanoes, south New Hebrides island arc (southwest Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, Patrick; Monzier, Michel; Lefevre, Christian

    1986-11-01

    Matthew and Hunter, the two southernmost active volcanoes of the New Hebrides island arc (southwest Pacific) differ markedly from the other (mainly tholeiitic Quaternary volcanoes of this arc. Geodynamically related to the New Hebrides subduction zone, they also lie close to the southern limb of the active expanding ridge of the North Fiji Basin. Both volcanoes are made up of acid, medium-K, calcalkaline orogenic andesites, containing a variety of inclusions (pyroxene- and gabbroic cumulates, as well as doleritic cognate inclusions). This paper presents the first systematic petrographic and chemical study of these volcanics and their inclusions. Trace-element geochemistry and rare-earth element modelling suggest that the two volcanoes developed from successive batches of similar parental magmas, originating from limited partial fusion of garnet peridotite in the mantle wedge. Various degrees of fractional crystallization of these batches led to the formation of three volcanic suites: Hunter (little fractionated), West-Matthew (moderately fractionated) and East-Matthew (highly fractionated). Moreover, on Matthew island, no correlation exists between the degree of fractionation and the eruptive chronology, the youngest edifice (West-Matthew) being less evolved than the older one (East-Matthew).

  3. Estimate of sulfate emitted from Sakurajima volcano to the Japanese Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Tateki; Maeda, Takahisa; Tanaka, Chie; Takeuchi, Kiyohide

    1996-12-31

    Concentration of sulfate increased in a summer night over the wide area of the Kanto plain. Since the effect of long range transport of particulate sulfurs was suggested, Lagrangian dispersion-advection analysis of particles was carried out using global scale weather analytical data. Results show that the concentration observed at the Kanto plain coupled be increased by the effect of the volcanic gas which had been emitted from an active volcano {open_quotes}Sakurajima{close_quotes}, located in the distance of about 1,00 km at south-west of the Kanto area, before 3 days. This phenomenon suggests that sulfate emitted from the active volcano Sakurajima might affect acid deposition of all over the Japanese Islands. This report shows estimated concentration of deposition of sulfate from Sakurajima to the Japan Islands using the same model applied to the Kanto area.

  4. Seismic signature of a phreatic explosion: Hydrofracturing damage at Karthala volcano, Grande Comore Island, Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savin, C.; Grasso, J.-R.; Bachelery, P.

    2005-01-01

    Karthala volcano is a basaltic shield volcano with an active hydrothermal system that forms the southern two-thirds of the Grande Comore Island, off the east coat of Africa, northwest of Madagascar. Since the start of volcano monitoring by the local volcano observatory in 1988, the July 11th, 1991 phreatic eruption was the first volcanic event seismically recorded on this volcano, and a rare example of a monitored basaltic shield. From 1991 to 1995 the VT locations, 0.5volcanoes, during the climax of the 1991 phreatic explosion, are due to the activation of the whole hydrothermal system, as roughly sized by the distribution of VT hypocenters. The seismicity rate in 1995 was still higher than the pre-eruption seismicity rate, and disagrees with the time pattern of thermo-elastic stress readjustment induced by single magma intrusions at basaltic volcanoes. We propose that it corresponds to the still ongoing relaxation of pressure heterogeneity within the hydrothermal system as suggested by the few LP events that still occurred in 1995. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  5. Evidence for two shield volcanoes exposed on the island of Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Sawyer, N.-L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The island of Kauai has always been interpreted as a single shield volcano, but lavas of previously correlated reversed-to-normal magnetic-polarity transitions on opposite sides of the island differ significantly in isotopic composition. Samples from west Kauai have 87Sr/86Sr 18.25; samples from east Kauai have 87Sr/86Sr > 0.7037, ??Nd ??? 6.14, and 206Pb/204Pb < 18.25. Available data suggest that a younger eastern shield grew on the collapsed flank of an older western one.

  6. Volcanoes

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  7. Volcanoes

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  8. A Stratigraphic, Granulometric, and Textural Comparison of recent pyroclastic density current deposits exposed at West Island and Burr Point, Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, C. A.; Browne, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is the most active volcano in the eastern Aleutian Islands, with 6 violent eruptions over the past 200 years and at least 12 catastrophic debris-avalanche deposits over the past ~2,000 years. The frequency and destructive nature of these eruptions combined with the proximity of Augustine Volcano to commercial ports and populated areas represents a significant hazard to the Cook Inlet region of Alaska. The focus of this study examines the relationship between debris-avalanche events and the subsequent emplacement of pyroclastic density currents by comparing the stratigraphic, granulometric, and petrographic characteristics of pyroclastic deposits emplaced following the 1883 A.D. Burr Point debris-avalanche and those emplaced following the ~370 14C yr B.P. West Island debris-avalanche. Data from this study combines grain size and componentry analysis of pyroclastic deposits with density, textural, and compositional analysis of juvenile clasts contained in the pyroclastic deposits. The 1883 A.D. Burr Point pyroclastic unit immediately overlies the 1883 debris avalanche deposit and underlies the 1912 Katmai ash. It ranges in thickness from 4 to 48 cm and consists of fine to medium sand-sized particles and coarser fragments of andesite. In places, this unit is normally graded and exhibits cross-bedding. Many of these samples are fines-enriched, with sorting coefficients ranging from -0.1 to 1.9 and median grain size ranging from 0.1 to 2.4 mm. The ~370 14C yr B.P. West Island pyroclastic unit is sandwiched between the underlying West Island debris-avalanche deposit and the overlying 1912 Katmai Ash deposit, and at times a fine-grained gray ash originating from the 1883 eruption. West Island pyroclastic deposit is sand to coarse-sand-sized and either normally graded or massive with sorting coefficients ranging from 0.9 to 2.8 and median grain sizes ranging from 0.4 to 2.6 mm. Some samples display a bimodal distribution of grain sizes, while most display a fines-depleted distribution. Juvenile andesite clasts exist as either subrounded to subangular fragments with abundant vesicles that range in color from white to brown or dense clasts characterized by their porphyritic and glassy texture. Samples from neither eruption correlate in sorting or grain size with distance from the vent. Stratigraphic and granulometric data suggest differences in the manner in which these two pyroclastic density currents traveled and groundmass textures are interpreted as recording differences in how the two magmas ascended and erupted, whereas juvenile Burr Point clasts resemble other lava flows erupted from Augustine Volcano, vesicular and glassy juvenile West Island clasts bear resemblance to clasts derived from so-called "blast-generated" pyroclastic density deposits at Mt. St. Helens in 1980 and Bezymianny in 1956.

  9. Whakaari (White Island volcano, New Zealand): Magma-hydrothermal laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Heap, Michael J.; Reuschle, Thierry; Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Gilg, H. Albert; Kennedy, Ben M.; Letham-Brake, Mark; Jolly, Arthur; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Whakaari, active andesitic stratovolcano of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (New Zealand), hosts an open, highly reactive hydrothermal system in the amphitheatre of an earlier sector collapse. Its recent volcanic activity is primarily characterized by sequences of steam-driven (phreatic) and phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions, although a lava dome briefly extruded in 2012. The volcano provides a natural laboratory for the study of aggressive fluids on the permeability of the hydrothermal system, on phreatomagmatic volcanism as well as on the volcano edifice structural stability. Here, we present a holistic experimental dataset on the reservoir rocks properties (mineralogy, permeability, seismic velocity) and their response to changes in stress (strength, deformation mechanisms, fragmentation) and temperature (mineralogical breakdown). We show that the advance degree of alteration in the system, nearly replaced all the original rock-forming minerals. This alteration has produced generally weak rocks, which, when subjected to a differential stress, can undergo transition from a dilatant response (brittle) to a compactant response with a mere confining pressure of about 15-20 MPa (corresponding to depth of about 1 km). Thermal stressing experiments reveal that the alteration phases breakdown at 500 °C (alunite) and 700 °C (dehydrated alum and sulphur), generating much weakened skeletal rocks, deteriorated by a mass loss of 20 wt.%, resulting in an increase in porosity and permeability of about 15 vol.% and an order of magnitude, respectively. Novel thermal stressing tests at high-heating rates (<1000 K/min) suggest that the onset of this mineralogical debilitation is pushed to higher temperatures with heating rates, carrying implication for the stability of the reservoir rocks and explosions during magma movement at variable rates in the upper edifice. Rock strength imposes an important control on the stability of volcanic edifices and of the hydrothermal reservoir rocks, especially when considering the high potential energy stored as fluids in these porous rocks. Recent unrest at Whakaari has resulted in the near sudden generation of phreatomagmatic activity. Here, we complete our experimental description of these rocks by discussing the result of rapid decompression experiments on the rocks stoked with supercritical fluids. The results constrain the violence of these steam-driven events and highlight the predisposition of thermally unstable rocks in hydrothermal system to undergo sudden phreatic eruptions.

  10. Central Aleutian tundra: ecological manifestations of maritime tundra landscapes in the Central Aleution Islands (Amchitka, Adak) Alaska. Final report, 1 April 1971-15 November 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Amundsen, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Measured and inferred ecological characteristics and holocoenotic factors which affect the dynamics and manifestations of central Aleutian maritime tundra and beach-dune vegetational expressions of Adak and Amchitka Islands are discussed. The known vascular flora is enumerated and predominant taxa are grouped into communities and topoedaphic units. Stability of community composition and structure is elaborated and the absence of ecological succession demonstrated. Perturbations occasioned by human activities which impinge on these remote islands are detailed. The testing and monitoring of subsequent passive and managed recovery of stable vegetation on disturbed areas is described. Selection, preparation and utilization of transplants of Elymus mollis Trin. is documented. Transplants of rhizomes of E. mollis are successful in the reestablishment of vegetative cover in disturbed habitats which are topoedaphically suitable for graminoid success. The responses of plant population stands to environmental processes and habitat insults are reported. The relatively limited but stable biota and the lethargic ecological response as defined by extant vegetational expressions provide field test potentials which mandate further basic and applied research.

  11. Comprehensive study of the seismotectonics of the eastern Aleutian arc and associated volcanic systems. Annual progress report, March 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, K.H.; Davies, J.N.; House, L.

    1981-01-01

    Refined hypocenter locations beneath the Shumagin Islands seismic network of the eastern Aleutian arc, Alaska, provide for the first time conclusive evidence for a double-sheeted dipping seismic (Benioff) zone in this arc. This refined seismicity structure was obtained in the arc section centered on the Shumagin seismic gap. A thorough review of three seismic gaps in the eastern Aleutian arc shows a high potential for great earthquakes within the next one to two decades in the Shumagin and Yakataga seismic gaps, and a less certain potential for a large or great earthquake in the possible Unalaska gap. A tilt reversal was geodetically observed to have occurred in 1978/79 in the forearc region of the Shumagin gap and could indicate the onset of a precursory strain relief episode prior to a great quake. A comparative study of the Pavlof volcano seismicity with that of other recently active volcanoes (i.e., Mt. St. Helens) indicates that island-arc (explosive-type) volcanoes respond to small ambient, periodic stress changes (i.e., tides). Stress drop measurements from earthquakes on the main thrust zone indicate high stress drops within the seismic gap regions of the Aleutian arc and low stress drops outside the gap region.

  12. Evidence for Deep Tectonic Tremor in the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. R.; Prejean, S. G.; Beroza, G. C.; Gomberg, J. S.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    We search for, characterize, and locate tremor not associated with volcanoes along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone using continuous seismic data recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and Alaska Earthquake Information Center from 2005 to the present. Visual inspection of waveform spectra and time series reveal dozens of 10 to 20-minute bursts of tremor throughout the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone (Peterson, 2009). Using autocorrelation methods, we show that these tremor signals are composed of hundreds of repeating low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) as has been found in other circum-Pacific subduction zones. We infer deep sources based on phase arrival move-out times of less than 4 seconds across multiple monitoring networks (max. inter-station distances of 50 km), which are designed to monitor individual volcanoes. We find tremor activity is localized in 7 segments: Cook Inlet, Shelikof Strait, Alaska Peninsula, King Cove, Unalaska-Dutch Harbor, Andreanof Islands, and the Rat Islands. Locations along the Cook Inlet, Shelikof Straight and Alaska Peninsula are well constrained due to adequate station coverage. LFE hypocenters in these regions are located on the plate interface and form a sharp edge near the down-dip limit of the 1964 M 9.2 rupture area. Although the geometry, age, thermal structure, frictional and other relevant properties of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction are poorly known, it is likely these characteristics differ along its entire length, and also differ from other subduction zones where tremor has been found. LFE hypocenters in the remaining areas are also located down-dip of the most recent M 8+ megathrust earthquakes, between 60-75 km depth and almost directly under the volcanic arc. Although these locations are less well constrained, our preliminary results suggest LFE/tremor activity marks the down-dip rupture limit for megathrust earthquakes in this subduction zone. Also, we cannot rule out the possibility that our observations could be related deep magmatic processes.

  13. Spreading Flanks of Ocean-Island Volcanoes: Similarities and Differences at Mauna Loa and Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipman, P. W.; Eakins, B. W.; Yokose, H.

    2003-12-01

    Submarine-flank deposits of Hawaiian volcanoes are widely recognized to have formed largely by gravitationally driven volcano spreading and associated landsliding. Observations from JAMSTEC submersibles (Japan Marine Science and Technology Center) show that prominent benches at mid-depths on flanks of both Mauna Loa and Kilauea consist of volcaniclastic debris derived by landsliding from nearby shallow submarine and subaerial flanks of the same edifice. Both volcanoes have mid-slope benches that record the same general processes of slope failure on varying scales, followed by modest compression during continued volcano spreading, even though they record development during different stages of edifice growth. Massive slide breccias from the mature subaerial tholeiitic shield of Mauna Loa underlie the frontal scarp of its South Kona bench. Outboard of the South Kona bench are large slide blocks, containing mixed subaerial and submarine Mauna Loa rocks, that appear to constitute a distal facies of the same large landslide event(s). The dive results also suggest that volcaniclastic rocks at the north end of the Kona bench, interpreted by others as distal sediments from older volcanoes that were offscraped, uplifted, and accreted to the island by far-traveled thrusts, alternatively are a largely coherent stratigraphic assemblage deposited in a basin behind the South Kona bench. In contrast, the Hilina bench developed as Kilauea volcano has spread seaward, in part riding piggyback on the still active south flank of Mauna Loa. The Hilina bench is underlain by coarse volcaniclastic sediments derived largely from submarine-erupted pre-shield alkalic and transitional basalts of ancestral Kilauea. The south flank of Kilauea is thus far not associated with any massive slide deposits comparable to the distal blocks of the South Kona slide complex.

  14. Contrasting andesitic magmatic systems in adjacent North Island volcanoes, New Zealand: implications for predicting eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. C.; Smith, I. E.; Gamble, J. A.; Moebis, A.; Cronin, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    For active or dormant andesite volcanoes, detailed, stratigraphically controlled, geochemical and petrological information enables an understanding of the magma supply and plumbing system feeding eruptions at the surface. This can establish a basis for predictive eruption models and thus for hazard prediction and management. The potential for petrography to inform volcanic hazard management is demonstrated by comparing two andesitic volcanoes located at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand's North Island. Ngauruhoe has been constructed over the past 3-5 ka and last erupted in 1975. Nearby Ruapehu has a much longer eruptive history extending back beyond 230 ka B.P. Despite their close spatial proximity, the two volcanoes show geochemical contrasts suggesting that each magmatic system has operated separately. The petrology and geochemistry (major and trace element chemistry, U-series isotopes, Sr and Nd isotopes) of eruptives from each volcano reflect magma evolution in a complex magma storage and plumbing system with magma chemistry strongly influenced by fractional crystallisation and crustal assimilation but in the case of Ngauruhoe there is evidence for cyclicity in the evolution of magma batches and this appears to be driven by periodic replenishment of the magmatic system from the mantle. In contrast, the past 2 ka of eruptive history at Ruapehu reflects random tapping of shallow, volume magma reservoirs.

  15. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  16. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for the Tanaga Volcanic Cluster, Tanaga Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary of Volcano Hazards at Tanaga Volcanic Cluster The Tanaga volcanic cluster lies on the northwest part of Tanaga Island, about 100 kilometers west of Adak, Alaska, and 2,025 kilometers southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The cluster consists of three volcanoes-from west to east, they are Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha. All three volcanoes have erupted in the last 1,000 years, producing lava flows and tephra (ash) deposits. A much less frequent, but potentially more hazardous phenomenon, is volcanic edifice collapse into the sea, which likely happens only on a timescale of every few thousands of years, at most. Parts of the volcanic bedrock near Takawangha have been altered by hydrothermal activity and are prone to slope failure, but such events only present a local hazard. Given the volcanic cluster's remote location, the primary hazard from the Tanaga volcanoes is airborne ash that could affect aircraft. In this report, we summarize the major volcanic hazards associated with the Tanaga volcanic cluster.

  17. Ground Water in Kilauea Volcano and Adjacent Areas of Mauna Loa Volcano, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takasaki, Kiyoshi J.

    1993-01-01

    About 1,000 million gallons of water per day moves toward or into ground-water bodies of Kilauea Volcano from the lavas of Mauna Loa Volcano. This movement continues only to the northern boundaries of the east and southwest rift zones of Kilauea, where a substantial quantity of ground water is deflected downslope to other ground-water bodies or to the ocean. In the western part of Kilauea, the kaoiki fault system, which parallels the southwest rift zone, may be the main barrier to ground-water movement. The diversion of the ground water is manifested in the western part of Kilauea by the presence of large springs at the shore end of the Kaoiki fault system, and in the eastern part by the apparently large flow of unheated basal ground water north of the east rift zone. Thus, recharge to ground water in the rift zones of Kilauea and to the areas to the south of the rift zones may be largely by local rainfall. Recharge from rainfall for all of Kilauea is about 1,250 million gallons per day. Beneath the upper slopes of the Kilauea rift zones, ground-water levels are 2,000 feet or more above mean sea level, or more than 1,000 feet below land surface. Ground-water levels are at these high altitudes because numerous and closely spaced dikes at depth in the upper slopes impound the ground water. In the lower slopes, because the number of dikes decreases toward the surface, the presence of a sufficient number of dikes capable of impounding ground water at altitudes substantially above sea level is unlikely. In surrounding basal ground-water reservoirs, fresh basal ground water floats on seawater and, through a transition zone of mixed freshwater and seawater, discharges into the sea. The hydraulic conductivity of the dike-free lavas ranges from about 3,000 to about 7,000 feet per day. The conductivity in the upper slopes of the rift ranges from about 5 to 30 feet per day and that of the lower slopes of the east rift zone was calculated at about 7,000 feet per day. The occurrence of heated basal water south of the lower east rift zone of Kilauea indicates the movement of a large quantity of geothermally heated ground water southward from the rift zone. There is little indication of similar movement of water from the upper slopes of the east rift zone, and there is no obvious movement of heated water from the lower east rift to the north because of the absence of heated ground water north of the rift zone. A broad range in temperature and chemical composition of geothermally modified ground water indicates several different sources. Four possible sources are (1) cold meteoric water, (2) cold seawater, (3) hydrothermal fluids of meteoric origin, and (4) hydrothermally modified seawater. The chloride-ion to magnesium-ion ratio of ground water indicates whether the water has been geothermally modified. A ratio greater than 15 to 1 generally denotes geothermally modified ground water.

  18. Long-distance lateral magma transport from intra-oceanic island arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Geshi, N.; Kawanabe, Y.; Ogitsu, I.; Tuzino, T.; Nakano, S.; Arai, K.; Sakamoto, I.; Taylor, R. N.; Sano, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    2011-12-01

    Long-distance lateral magma transport in oceanic island arc volcanoes is emerging as a common phenomenon where the regional stress regime is favorable. It should also be recognized as an important factor in the construction and growth of island arcs. In this contribution, we report on recent investigations into the magma plumbing of Izu-Oshima volcano: an active basaltic volcano with an extensive fissure system. Geophysical observations in the Izu-Bonin intra-oceanic island arc indicate that magma is transported long distances laterally from the main basaltic composite volcano. When Miyakejima erupted in 2000, seismic activity migrated about 30km northwestward from the volcanic centre (Geshi et al., 2002). This event is interpreted to reflect northwestward dike injection and propagation from Miyakejima, transporting magma at a depth range between 12 and 20km (Kodaira et al., 2002). We demonstrated that long-distance lateral magma transport also occurred at the Nishiyama volcano on Hachijojima Island using petrological, geochemical and structural studies of satellite vents (Ishizuka et al., 2008). Nishiyama provided evidence for two types of magma transport. In the first type, primitive magma moved laterally NNW for at least 20km in the middle to lower crust (10-20km deep). The other type is characterized by magmas that have experienced differentiation in a shallow magma chamber beneath Nishiyama and have been transported short distances (<5km). The long-distance magma transport seems to be controlled by a regional extensional stress regime, while short distance transport may be controlled by local stress regime affected by the load generated by the main volcanic edifice. Izu-Oshima volcano comprises numerous, subparallel NW-SE trending submarine ridges extending up to 22 km to the NW and SE from the summit of Izu-Oshima. A recent diving survey has revealed that: 1) NW-SE trending ridges are fissures which erupted basaltic spatter and lava flows. 2) Basaltic effusives are petrographically similar among each ridge, while there are noticeable differences between ridges. 3) The ridges are petrographically distinct from interspersed seamounts. These seamounts are identical to the Higashi-Izu-Oki monogenetic volcanoes (HIMV) found across this area of the rear-arc. Geochemically there is a close similarity between the submarine ridges and the corresponding subaerial chains, implying that each chain represents an episode of magma transport away from the main Izu-Oshima edifice. This scenario also explains the overlapping distribution of the HIMV and NW-SE chains which have clearly distinct magma sources. HIMV appear to be fed by an "in-situ" source, while the NW-SE chains are fed by lateral magma transport from the Izu-Oshima plumbing system. Unlike the Nishiyama volcano, Izu-Oshima does not show a compositional variation along the length of the volcanic chains, and has no evidence of any primitive magmas. Hence, the magma transport from Izu-Oshima seems to occur from a shallow crustal magma chamber where extensive crystal fractionation and plagioclase accumulation has taken place.

  19. Volcano-hydrothermal system of Ebeko volcano, Paramushir, Kuril Islands: Geochemistry and solute fluxes of magmatic chlorine and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri; Kotenko, Tatiana; Hattori, Keiko; Kotenko, Leonid; Solis-Pichardo, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Ebeko volcano at the northern part of Paramushir Island in the Kuril island arc produces frequent phreatic eruptions and relatively strong fumarolic activity at the summit area ~ 1000 m above sea level (asl). The fumaroles are characterized by low-temperature, HCl- and S-rich gas and numerous hyper-acid pools (pH < 1) without drains. At ~ 550 m asl, in the Yurieva stream canyon, many hot (up to 87 °C) springs discharge ultra-acidic (pH 1-2) SO4-Cl water into the stream and finally into the Sea of Okhotsk. During quiescent stages of degassing, these fumaroles emit 1000-2000 t/d of water vapor, < 20 t/d of SO2 and < 5 t/d of HCl. The measurement of acidic hot Yurieva springs shows that the flux of Cl and S, 60-80 t/d each, is independent on the volcanic activity in the last two decades. Such high flux of Cl is among the highest ever measured in a volcano-hydrothermal system. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of water and Cl concentration for Yurieva springs show an excellent positive correlation, indicating a mixing between meteoric water and magmatic vapor. In contrast, volcanic gas condensates of Ebeko fumaroles do not show a simple mixing trend but rather a complicated data suggesting evaporation of the acidic brine. Temperatures calculated from gas compositions and isotope data are similar, ranging from 150 to 250 °C, which is consistent with the presence of a liquid aquifer below the Ebeko fumarolic fields. Saturation indices of non-silicate minerals suggest temperatures ranging from 150 to 200 °C for Yurieva springs. Trace elements (including REE) and Sr isotope composition suggest congruent dissolution of the Ebeko volcanic rocks by acidic waters. Waters of Yurieva springs and waters of the summit thermal fields (including volcanic gas condensates) are different in Cl/SO4 ratios and isotopic compositions, suggesting complicated boiling-condensation-mixing processes.

  20. Dynamics of diffuse carbon dioxide emissions from Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys V.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Sumino, Hirochika; Padilla, Germán; Barrancos, José; Dionis, Samara; Notsu, Kenji; Calvo, David

    2015-04-01

    La Palma Island, the fifth longest (706 km2) and the second in elevation (2,423 m asl) of the Canary Islands, is located at the northwestern extreme of the archipelago. Volcanic activity in the last 123 ka has taken place exclusively at the southern part of the island, where Cumbre Vieja volcano, the most active basaltic volcano in the Canaries, has been constructed. Cumbre Vieja includes a main north-south rift zone 20 km long up to 1,950 m in elevation, and covers 220 km2 with vents located also at the northwest and northeast. Nowadays there are no visible gas emission from fumaroles or hot springs at Cumbre Vieja. For this reason, diffuse CO2 degassing studies may provide important information about subsurface magma movement. Since diffuse CO2 emission rate may increase extraordinarily before a volcanic eruption, it is very important to map surface CO2 efflux anomalies and determine the total output of this gas prior to volcanic activity, in order to have a better understanding during future volcanic events. This study report the results of 13 soil CO2 efflux surveys at Cumbre Vieja volcano. The CO2 efflux measurements were undertaken using the accumulation chamber method between 2001 and 2013 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for Cumbre Vieja. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 2,442 g m-2 d-1, with the highest values observed in the south, where the last volcanic eruption took place (Teneguía, 1971). Isotopic analyses of soil gas carbon dioxide suggest an organic origin as the main contribution to the CO2 efflux, with a very slight magmatic degassing being observed at the southern part of the volcano. Total CO2 emission rates showed a high temporal variability, ranging between 320 and 1,544 t d-1 and averaging 1,147 t d-1 over the 220 km2 region. Two significant increases in the CO2 emission observed in 2011 and 2013, were likely caused by an enhanced magmatic endogenous contribution revealed by significant changes in the 3He/4He ratio in a CO2-rich cold spring. The similarity observed in the estimates rates of diffuse CO2 emission make them an effective surveillance tool for Cumbre Vieja volcano like it has been observed at other volcanic areas.

  1. Man against volcano: The eruption on Heimaey, Vestmann Islands, Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S., Jr.; Moore, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey carries out scientific studies in the geological, hydrological, and cartographic sciences generally within the 50 states, but also in cooperation with scientific organizations in many foreign countries for the investigation of unusual earth science phenomena throughout the world. The following material discusses the impact of the 1973 volcanic eruption of Eldfell on the fishing port of Vestmannaeyjar on the island of Heimaey, Iceland. Before the eruption was over, approximately one-third of the town of Vestmannaeyjar had been obliterated but, more importantly, the potential damage had been reduced markedly by the spraying of seawater onto the advancing lava flows, causing them to be slowed, stopped, or diverted from the undamaged portion of the town. The Survey's interest and involvement in the Heimaey eruption in Iceland was occasioned by the possibility that the procedures used to control the course of the flowing lava and to reduce the damage in a modern town may some day be needed in Hawaii and possibly even in the continental United States. This publication is based on the observations of two USGS geologists, Richard S. Williams, Jr. and James G. Moore, as well as on information from the Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Icelandic scientists' reports through the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena, and other published scientific reports. A number of Icelandic scientists studied the scientific aspects of the eruption and the engineering aspects of the control of lava flows, in particular, Professors Thorbjb'rn Sigurgeirsson and Sigurdur Thorarinsson of the University of Iceland Science Institute. Also, Icelandic governmental officials provided logistical and other support, in particular, Mr. Steingnmur Hermannsson, Director, Icelandic National Research Council and Professor Magnus Magnusson, Director, University of Iceland Science Institute.

  2. Investigation of the Influence of the Amlia Fracture Zone on the Islands of Four Mountains Region of the Aleutian Arc, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaysen, K. P.; Myers, J. D.; Weis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Regional isotopic and trace element investigations of the magmatic source characteristics of the Aleutian arc have attributed regional patterns to variations in the contribution of eclogite through slab melting, to increased proportions of sediment melts, and to variation in the amount of fluid derived by progressive metamorphism of the downgoing slab. Currently the Amlia Fracture Zone (AFZ) is located between the islands of Atka and Seguam and marks a prominent boundary between subduction of large quantities of trench sediments to the east versus sediment impoverished subduction to the west of the AFZ. This boundary is not stationary through time. Instead oblique subduction of the Pacific plate moves the AFZ westward along the arc front, causing sequential subduction beneath the islands of Chuginadak, Yunaska and Seguam circa 5, 2.5 and 1 million years ago, respectively. Lavas from Atka Island, which has not yet received the sediment and fluid spike from the AFZ, act as reference compositions. Comparison of bulk rock trace element ratios and Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotopic compositions for lavas from these islands relative to Atka show that contributions from melted subducted sediment are important in the genesis of Holocene and Pleistocene lavas erupted in the Islands of Four Mountains region of the arc. Sr and Pb isotopic compositions for Yunaska and Chuginadak lavas are as high or higher than Seguam values and trend in the direction of sediment values. La/Nb ratios similarly indicate sediment melting is important for all these lavas. Comparison of values for Holocene relative to Pleistocene values indicate that once sediments are introduced to the magma source, they persist in affecting magma compositions. Comparison of higher Mg# lavas (molar Mg#>50) shows that a group of the oldest sampled lavas on Chuginadak have much lower 208Pb/204Pb, 206Pb/204Pb, and 87Sr/86Sr and higher 143Nd/144Nd, Zr/Y and Zn/Mn relative to all sampled Holocene and Pleistocene lavas from Seguam and Yunaska, suggesting that the earliest period of volcanism on Chuginadak occurred prior to the subduction of the AFZ.

  3. Eruption of soufriere volcano on st. Vincent island, 1971-1972.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, W P; Sigurdsson, H; Shepherd, J B

    1973-07-13

    The Soufrière volcano in St. Vincent erupted from October 1971 to March 1972, as 80 x 10(6) m(3) of basaltic andesite lava was quietly extruded inside the mile-wide crater. The eruption was largely subaqueous, taking place in the 180-m-deep crater lake, and resulted in the emergence of a steep-sided island. The mild character of the eruption and the absence of seismic activity stand in direct contrast to the highly explosive character of the eruption of 1902 to 1903. PMID:17746610

  4. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  5. Ten years of satellite observations reveal highly variable sulphur dioxide emissions at Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Brendan; Popp, Christoph; Andrews, Benjamin; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Satellite remote sensing enables continuous multiyear observations of volcanic activity in remote settings. Anatahan (Mariana Islands) is a remote volcano in the western North Pacific. Available ground-based measurements of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions at Anatahan place it among thelargest volcanic SO2 sources worldwide. These ground-based measurements, however, are restricted to eruptive intervals. Anatahan's activity since 2003 has been dominated temporally by prolonged periods of quiescence. Using 10 years of satellite observations from OMI, AIRS, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2, we report highly variable SO2 emissions within and between eruptive and quiescent intervals at Anatahan. We find close correspondence between levels of activity reported at the volcano and levels of SO2 emissions detected from space. Eruptive SO2 emission rates have a mean value of ˜6400 t d-1, but frequently are in excess of 20,000 t d-1. Conversely, SO2 emissions during quiescent intervals are below the detection limit of space-based sensors and therefore are not likely to exceed ˜300 t d-1. We show that while Anatahan occupies a quiescent state for 85% of the past 10 years, only ˜15% of total SO2 emissions over this interval occur during quiescence, with the remaining ˜85% released in short duration but intense syn-eruptive degassing. We propose that the integration of multiyear satellite data sets and activity histories are a powerful complement to targeted ground-based campaign measurements in better describing the long-term degassing behavior of remote volcanoes.

  6. Shield volcanoes of Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctic rift: oceanic island similarities, continental signature, and tectonic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMasurier, Wesley

    2013-06-01

    The Marie Byrd Land volcanic province is largely defined by 18 large (up to ~1,800 km3) alkaline shield volcanoes, each surmounted by a summit section of varied felsic rocks dominated by trachytic flows. They are distributed over a 500 × 800-km block-faulted dome within the West Antarctic rift. The basement contact of volcanic sections is ~500 masl at one site and 3,000 mbsl at another, 70 km away, which illustrates the scale of block faulting but complicates an understanding of volcanic structure. Furthermore, the continental ice sheet buries 16 volcanoes to progressively greater heights inland. However, five are sufficiently exposed to allow meaningful comparisons with alkaline oceanic island volcanoes; these comparisons are used as a guide to estimate the structure of Marie Byrd Land volcanoes. The type example for this study is Mt. Murphy, the most completely exposed volcano. It consists of a 1,400-m section of alkaline basalt overlain by trachyte and benmoreite flows that make up ~7-13 % of the volcano volume. In gross structure and composition, Mt. Murphy is similar to Gran Canaria volcano, Canary Islands, but the percent of felsic rock may be three times that of Gran Canaria, if the estimate is approximately correct. Departures from the oceanic island example are believed to represent the imprint of the Marie Byrd Land lithosphere and tectonic environment on volcano evolution. These include a lack of order in the sequence of felsic rock types, lack of progression toward more silica undersaturated compositions with time, absence of a highly undersaturated mafic resurgent stage, and perhaps, a relatively large volume of felsic rock.

  7. Upper Mantle Magma Storage and Transport Beneath the Miocene Teno Volcano, Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longpré, M.; Troll, V. R.; Hansteen, T. H.

    2007-12-01

    The nature and dynamics of magma plumbing systems are key variables to the understanding of overlying volcanic edifices. With the exception of a few intensely studied localities, these variables are typically unconstrained at volcanoes around the world. Where attempted, studies of magma storage and transport reveal complex plumbing geometries, for a range of geological settings, indicating that assumptions of shallow, spherical-elliptical magma chambers are often oversimplified. At the highly active, basaltic shield-volcanoes, geophysical monitoring is an effective tool to investigate plumbing system geometries. In the Canary Islands, however, the low eruption frequency results in poor deformation and volcano-seismic data sets and, hence, volcanologists have to rely on alternative methods to study the magma plumbing system of Canarian volcanoes. We use clinopyroxene-liquid thermobarometry [Putirka et al. 1996, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol.], aided by petrography and mineral major element chemistry, to reconstruct the magma plumbing system of the late Miocene Teno shield-volcano, Tenerife. Thin section observations show that the numerous clinopyroxene phenocrysts display darker coloured outer rims, which commonly host acicular apatite microcrystals and sometimes form dentritic protrusions. This is coupled with steep normal Fe-Mg zoning and drastic TiO2 enrichment. Supported by similar Fe-Mg zonations in olivine, this suggests that these rims formed due to decompression induced crystallisation upon rapid magma ascent and accompanying degassing and undercooling. This process took place under disequilibrium conditions, implying that clinopyroxene rim compositions may not always be suitable for thermobarometric investigations. On the other hand, clinopyroxene compositions excluding the outer rims generally appear to be in chemical equilibrium with the melt. Thermobarometry indicates that clinopyroxene crystallisation occurred in the uppermost mantle, mostly from 20 to 40 km depth. The interval between the brittle- ductile transition and the crust-mantle boundary thus appears to provide an efficient magma trap, supporting the concept of progressive magmatic underplating in the Canary Archipelago. The combination of careful sampling strategy, petrography, mineral chemistry and clinopyroxene thermobarometry is a promising tool for investigations of magma plumbing systems at basalt-erupting volcanoes.

  8. Environmental monitoring of El Hierro Island submarine volcano, by combining low and high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, F.; Martin, J.; Marcello, J.; Fraile-Nuez, E.

    2014-06-01

    El Hierro Island, located at the Canary Islands Archipelago in the Atlantic coast of North Africa, has been rocked by thousands of tremors and earthquakes since July 2011. Finally, an underwater volcanic eruption started 300 m below sea level on October 10, 2011. Since then, regular multidisciplinary monitoring has been carried out in order to quantify the environmental impacts caused by the submarine eruption. Thanks to this natural tracer release, multisensorial satellite imagery obtained from MODIS and MERIS sensors have been processed to monitor the volcano activity and to provide information on the concentration of biological, chemical and physical marine parameters. Specifically, low resolution satellite estimations of optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration under these abnormal conditions have been assessed. These remote sensing data have played a fundamental role during field campaigns guiding the oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. In addition, to analyze El Hierro submarine volcano area, WorldView-2 high resolution satellite spectral bands were atmospherically and deglinted processed prior to obtain a high-resolution optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient model. This novel algorithm was developed using a matchup data set with MERIS and MODIS data, in situ transmittances measurements and a seawater radiative transfer model. Multisensor and multitemporal imagery processed from satellite remote sensing sensors have demonstrated to be a powerful tool for monitoring the submarine volcanic activities, such as discolored seawater, floating material and volcanic plume, having shown the capabilities to improve the understanding of submarine volcanic processes.

  9. Using volcanic tremor for eruption forecasting at White Island volcano (Whakaari), New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardot, Lauriane; Jolly, Arthur D.; M. Kennedy, Ben; Fournier, Nicolas; Sherburn, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Eruption forecasting is a challenging task because of the inherent complexity of volcanic systems. Despite remarkable efforts to develop complex models in order to explain volcanic processes prior to eruptions, the material Failure Forecast Method (FFM) is one of the very few techniques that can provide a forecast time for an eruption. However, the method requires testing and automation before being used as a real-time eruption forecasting tool at a volcano. We developed an automatic algorithm to issue forecasts from volcanic tremor increase episodes recorded by Real-time Seismic Amplitude Measurement (RSAM) at one station and optimised this algorithm for the period August 2011-January 2014 which comprises the recent unrest period at White Island volcano (Whakaari), New Zealand. A detailed residual analysis was paramount to select the most appropriate model explaining the RSAM time evolutions. In a hindsight simulation, four out of the five small eruptions reported during this period occurred within a failure window forecast by our optimised algorithm and the probability of an eruption on a day within a failure window was 0.21, which is 37 times higher than the probability of having an eruption on any day during the same period (0.0057). Moreover, the forecasts were issued prior to the eruptions by a few hours which is important from an emergency management point of view. Whereas the RSAM time evolutions preceding these four eruptions have a similar goodness-of-fit with the FFM, their spectral characteristics are different. The duration-amplitude distributions of the precursory tremor episodes support the hypothesis that several processes were likely occurring prior to these eruptions. We propose that slow rock failure and fluid flow processes are plausible candidates for the tremor source of these episodes. This hindsight exercise can be useful for future real-time implementation of the FFM at White Island. A similar methodology could also be tested at other volcanoes even if only a limited network is available.

  10. Geothermal resource assessment in the Aleutian Islands and Alaska peninsula: Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L.; Nye, C.J.

    1989-03-30

    In this report the authors have now completed dating work on 20 rock samples. Analytical results for the dated samples are given in the enclosed table. The results are generally in good agreement with observed stratigraphic relationships and provide a well-constrained time framework for the eruptive history of this volcanic area. The argon extraction and potassium analyses are completed and the argon sample is awaiting mass spectrometry. In addition to documenting the eruptive history of Umnak volcanoes, the K-Ar ages will provide a time framework for the chemical evolution of the magmatic system, when combined with the rock chemistry analyses presently in progress at U.C., Santa Cruz. 1 tab.

  11. Magma Genesis of Sakurajima, the Quaternary post- Aira caldera volcano, southern Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Suzuki, J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Miki, D.; Takemura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sakurajima volcano is the Quaternary post-caldera volcano of Aira caldera, which was caused by the eruption of huge amount of silicic pyroclastics, situated on Ryukyu arc, southern Kyushu Island, Japan. This volcano is quite active, so it can be considered that the preparation of next caldera-forming eruption with huge amount of silicic magma is proceeding. It is, therefore, expected that the investigation of magma genesis of Sakurajima volcano give us information for the mechanism generating huge amount of silicic magma, which cause the caldera formation. We analyzed major and trace elements with Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of volcanic rocks from Sakurajima volcano. We sampled (ol) - opx - cpx - pl andesite and dacite from almost all the volcanic units defined by Fukuyama and Ono (1981). In addition to Sakurajima samples, we also studied basaltic rocks erupted at pre-caldera stage of the Aira caldera to estimate the primary magma of Sakurajima volcano. Major and trace element variations generally show linear trends on the Harker diagrams, with the exception of P2O5 and TiO2. Based on the trend of P2O5 vs.SiO2, we divided studied samples low-P (P2O5 < 0.15 wt. %) and high-P (P2O5 > 0.15 wt. %) groups and these groups also display two distinct trends on TiO2-SiO2 diagram. The composition of trace elements shows typical island arc character as depletion of Nb and enrichments of Rb, K and Pb, suggesting addition of aqueous fluids to the mantle wedge. The Zr and Nb concentrations make a liner trend (Zr/Nb = 27) and this trend across from tend of MORB (Zr/Nb = 35) to that of crustal materials (Zr/Nb=17). The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions broadly plot to on the mixing curve connecting MORB-type mantle and sediments of the Philippine Sea Plate, indicating that the primary magma was generated by partial melting of MORB-type mantle wedge, which was hydrated with fluids derived from the subducted Philippine Sea sediments. But we found that our data plot apart from the mixing curve to the direction of being more radiogenic when we observe in more detail. This observation supports our conclusion that the crustal materials contribute the magma genesis of Sakurajima volcano emphasized from Zr/Nb ratios. Low-P and high-P groups show different trends of SiO2, P2O5, TiO2 concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to plagioclase modal abundances. The high-P group samples show continuous trends, and their 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase with decreasing plagioclase, representing simple AFC process. The SiO2 content of low-P group rapidly increases from 63 to 66 wt. % at the modal abundance of pl is nearly 20 vol. %. The Sr isotope ratios of low-P group with < 20 vol. % of pl are obviously high (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70556 to 0.70569) compared to those of high-P group (87Sr/86Sr = 0.705136 to 0.705285). From these observations, we conclude that the rapid increase of SiO2 with high 87Sr/87Sr ratio infer involvement of crustal materials to the magma chamber, in which the ACF process is proceeding.

  12. Seismic vulnerability of dwellings at Sete Cidades Volcano (S. Miguel Island, Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, A.; Gaspar, J. L.; Queiroz, G.

    2006-01-01

    Since the settlement of S. Miguel Island (Azores), in the XV century, several earthquakes caused important human losses and severe damages on the island. Sete Cidades Volcano area, located in the westernmost part of the island, was attained by strong seismic crises of tectonic and volcanic origin and major events reached a maximum historical intensity of IX (European Macroseismic Scale 1998) in this zone. Aiming to evaluate the impact of a future major earthquakes, a field survey was carried out in ten parishes of Ponta Delgada County, located on the flanks of Sete Cidades volcano and inside it is caldera. A total of 7019 buildings were identified, being 4351 recognized as dwellings. The total number of inhabitants in the studied area is 11429. In this work, dwellings were classified according to their vulnerability to earthquakes (Classes A to F), using the structure types table of the EMS-98, adapted to the types of constructions made in the Azores. It was concluded that 76% (3306) of the houses belong to Class A, and 17% (740) to Class B, which are the classes of higher vulnerability. If the area is affected by a seismic event with intensity IX it is estimated, that 57% (2480) to 77% (3350) of the dwellings will partially or totally collapse and 15% (652) to 25% (1088) will need to be rehabilitated. In this scenario, considering the average of inhabitants per house for each parish, 82% (9372) to 92% (10515) of the population will be affected. The number of deaths, injured and dislodged people will pose severe problems to the civil protection authorities and will cause social and economic disruption in the entire archipelago.

  13. The eruption of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands, 15 May 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Norman G.; Koyanagi, Robert Y.; Sinton, John M.; Honma, Kenneth T.

    1984-10-01

    A major explosive eruption occurred 15 May 1981 at Mount Pagan Volcano, the larger of two historic eruptive centers on Pagan Island, Mariana Islands. The eruption was preceded by increased numbers of locally felt earthquakes beginning in late March or early April and by new ground cracks, new sublimates, and increased gas emissions. A swarm of felt earthquakes began at 0745h (local time = UCT+10 hours) 15 May, and at 0915 h, closely following a loud sonic boom, a strong plinian column issued from the volcano. The high-altitude ash cloud (at least 13.5 km) travelled south-southeast, but ash and scoria deposits were thickest (> 2 m) in the NW sector of the island because of the prevailing low-altitude southeasterly winds. The early activity of 15 May probably involved magmatic eruption along a fissure system oriented about N10°E. However, the eruption became hydromagmatic, possibly within minutes, and was largely restricted to three long-lived vents. The northernmost of these built a substantial new scoria-ash cinder cone. Flows and air-fall deposits, consisting almost entirely of juvenile material, exceeded 105 × 10 6 m 3 in volume (75 × 10 6 m 3 of magma) on land and at least 70-100 × 60 6 m 3 at sea. An unknown volume was carried away by stratospheric winds. Lithic blocks and juvenile bombs as large as 1 m in diameter were thrown more than 2 km from the summit, and evidence for base-surge was observed in restricted corridors as low as 200 m elevation on the north and south slopes of the volcano. Neither of these events resulted in serious injuries to the 54 residents of the island, nor did the eruption produce serious chemical hazards in their water supply. Weak eruptions occurred during the ensuing month, and some of these were monitored by ground observations, seismic monitoring, and deformation studies. Precursory seismicity and possibly deformation occurred with some of the observed eruptions. More vigorous eruptions were reported by visiting residents in late 1981 and early 1982, but these were of lesser magnitude than the 15 May 1981 event. The 15 May lava is predominantly aa and ranges from 3 to > 30 m in thickness. In composition, it is a high-alumina basalt with small (< 1 mm long) phenocrysts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene (7%) that is more or less typical of basalt of the northern Marianas volcanoes. It contains slightly more SiO 2 (52%), K 2O, TiO 2, and less Al 2O 3 and CaO than does the basalt of the last eruptive event of Mount Pagan Volcano in 1925. Gas analyses indicate that a large portion of air was introduced into the vent system through the porous volcanic edifice and that the carbon gases were not in equilibrium with the magma or each other.

  14. The eruption of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands, 15 May 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, N.G.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Sinton, J.M.; Honma, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    A major explosive eruption occurred 15 May 1981 at Mount Pagan Volcano, the larger of two historic eruptive centers on Pagan Island, Mariana Islands. The eruption was preceded by increased numbers of locally felt earthquakes beginning in late March or early April and by new ground cracks, new sublimates, and increased gas emissions. A swarm of felt earthquakes began at 0745h (local time = UCT+10 hours) 15 May, and at 0915 h, closely following a loud sonic boom, a strong plinian column issued from the volcano. The high-altitude ash cloud (at least 13.5 km) travelled south-southeast, but ash and scoria deposits were thickest (> 2 m) in the NW sector of the island because of the prevailing low-altitude southeasterly winds. The early activity of 15 May probably involved magmatic eruption along a fissure system oriented about N10??E. However, the eruption became hydromagmatic, possibly within minutes, and was largely restricted to three long-lived vents. The northernmost of these built a substantial new scoria-ash cinder cone. Flows and air-fall deposits, consisting almost entirely of juvenile material, exceeded 105 ?? 106 m3 in volume (75 ?? 106 m3 of magma) on land and at least 70-100 ?? 606 m3 at sea. An unknown volume was carried away by stratospheric winds. Lithic blocks and juvenile bombs as large as 1 m in diameter were thrown more than 2 km from the summit, and evidence for base-surge was observed in restricted corridors as low as 200 m elevation on the north and south slopes of the volcano. Neither of these events resulted in serious injuries to the 54 residents of the island, nor did the eruption produce serious chemical hazards in their water supply. Weak eruptions occurred during the ensuing month, and some of these were monitored by ground observations, seismic monitoring, and deformation studies. Precursory seismicity and possibly deformation occurred with some of the observed eruptions. More vigorous eruptions were reported by visiting residents in late 1981 and early 1982, but these were of lesser magnitude than the 15 May 1981 event. The 15 May lava is predominantly aa and ranges from 3 to > 30 m in thickness. In composition, it is a high-alumina basalt with small (< 1 mm long) phenocrysts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene (7%) that is more or less typical of basalt of the northern Marianas volcanoes. It contains slightly more SiO2 (52%), K2O, TiO2, and less Al2O3 and CaO than does the basalt of the last eruptive event of Mount Pagan Volcano in 1925. Gas analyses indicate that a large portion of air was introduced into the vent system through the porous volcanic edifice and that the carbon gases were not in equilibrium with the magma or each other. ?? 1984.

  15. ASTER-SRTM Perspective of Mount Oyama Volcano, Miyake-Jima Island, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Mount Oyama is a 820-meter-high (2,700 feet) volcano on the island of Miyake-Jima, Japan. In late June 2000, a series of earthquakes alerted scientists to possible volcanic activity. On June 27, authorities evacuated 2,600 people, and on July 8 the volcano began erupting and erupted five times over that week. The dark gray blanket covering green vegetation in the image is the ash deposited by prevailing northeasterly winds between July 8 and 17. This island is about 180 kilometers (110 miles) south of Tokyo and is part of the Izu chain of volcanic islands that runs south from the main Japanese island of Honshu. Miyake-Jima is home to 3,800 people. The previous major eruptions of Mount Oyama occurred in 1983 and 1962, when lava flows destroyed hundreds of houses. An earlier eruption in 1940 killed 11 people.

    This image is a perspective view created by combining image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard NASA's Terra satellite with an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Vertical relief is exaggerated, and the image includes cosmetic adjustments to clouds and image color to enhance clarity of terrain features.

    The ASTER instrument is a cooperative project between NASA, JPL, and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: Island is approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) in diameter Location: 34.1 deg. North lat., 139.5 deg. East lon. Orientation: View toward the west-southwest. Image Data: ASTER visible and near infrared Date Acquired: February 20, 2000 (SRTM), July 17, 2000 (ASTER)

  16. Magma storage and underplating beneath Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Andreas; Hansteen, Thor H.; Galipp, Karsten

    2005-07-01

    We have conducted a barometric study of basaltic lavas and mafic to ultramafic xenoliths from Cumbre Vieja volcano (La Palma) in order to reconstruct magma storage, plumbing and related intrusive island growth. The samples were collected both along the volcano's rift zone and from its subaerial and submarine flanks up to 30 km off the rift axis. Clinopyroxene-melt barometry of lavas yields a well-defined pressure range of 410-770 MPa (average 600 MPa) and shows no systematic variation with sample locality. This pressure range reflects a major fractionation level at ca. 15-26 km depth, within the uppermost mantle, where phenocrysts and melt last equilibrated. In contrast, microthermometry of CO 2-dominated fluid inclusions in phenocrysts and xenoliths gives pressure estimates of 240 to 470 MPa (average 330 MPa), within the lower oceanic crust. These pressures are interpreted to reflect an underplating zone at 7-14 km depth where ascending magmas become ponded prior to eruption and where passing magmas temporarily stagnate during eruption. The underplating zone is inferred to extend to a radius of ca. 30 km at least, and its depth appears to increase slightly with distance to the rift axis. Our data thus show a remarkable pressure bimodality for long-term and short-term storage of magma that appears to be characteristic for Cumbre Vieja. By using a simple model based on the cumulative volume of material added to the crust, we have estimated uplift rates of > 0.5 m/ka due to underplating that occurs on the island scale. On a time-scale of some 10 ka, these uplift rates are of similar magnitude as global changes in sea-level. A second, more local mode of uplift and related faulting is caused by shallow intrusions into the volcanic edifice as is indicated by the highly irregular morphology of the Cumbre Vieja. We stress that intrusion-related uplift should be qualitatively considered when reconstructing the evolution of oceanic island volcanoes. Since most of the underplated material is inferred to consist of cumulate rocks being intimately mixed and juxtaposed with the lower oceanic crust and having similar densities, it is probably impossible to detect such an underplating zone seismically.

  17. Experimental constraints on steam-driven eruptions at White Island volcano (New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, Bettina; Mayer, Klaus; Gilg, H. Albert; Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Lavallée, Yan; Letham-Brake, Mark; Jolly, Arthur; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    The recent activity at White Island volcano is primarily characterized by strong hydrothermal activity interspersed by sequences of phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions, down to micro-eruptions through a mud-rich crater lake. We analyzed the response of various sample types to rapid decompression caused by steam-flashing and/or gas expansion, mimicking steam-driven (phreatic) eruptions. The samples investigated comprise unconsolidated ash/lapilli as well as consolidated ash tuffs with different degree of alteration. All sample sets underwent, where possible, microstructural, geochemical and petrophysical characterization (as porosity, permeability and uniaxial compressive strength (UCS)). This allowed us to assess the role of following factors for phreatic eruptions: (1) PT-conditions leading to either steam-flashing or steam expansion (2) the behavior of loose versus consolidated material, as the influence of fragmentation, ejection velocity, grain size reduction (3) the porosity and its changes, (4) the alteration of the samples, leading to changes in UCS, porosity, and permeability. Besides their role during the short moment of a phreatic eruption itself, the strength and the permeability of rocks of the entire White Island volcanic complex and in detail above the hydrothermal system in the crater area are key factors for the recent activity at White Island. They crucially influence the distribution of fluids and gases; strong and low-permeable layers can act as pressure seals, defining the area and overpressure of a steam-driven eruption.

  18. Mechanical behaviour and failure modes in the Whakaari (White Island volcano) hydrothermal system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Pernin, Noémie; Jacquemard, Laura; Baud, Patrick; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Gilg, H. Albert; Letham-Brake, Mark; Mayer, Klaus; Jolly, Arthur D.; Reuschlé, Thierry; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-03-01

    Volcanic hydrothermal systems host a prodigious variety of physico-chemical conditions. The physico-chemical state and mechanical behaviour of rocks within is correspondingly complex and often characterised by vast heterogeneity. Here, we present uniaxial and triaxial compression experiments designed to investigate the breadth of mechanical behaviour and failure modes (dilatant or compactant) for hydrothermally-altered lava and ash tuff deposits from Whakaari (White Island volcano) in New Zealand, a volcano with a well-documented and very active hydrothermal system. Our deformation experiments show that the failure mode of low porosity lava remains dilatant over a range of depths (up to pressures corresponding to depths of about 2 km). Upon failure, shear fractures, the result of the coalescence of dilatational microcracks, are universally present. The high porosity ash tuffs switch however from a dilatant to a compactant failure mode (driven by progressive distributed pore collapse) at relatively low pressure (corresponding to a depth of about 250 m). We capture the salient features of the dynamic conditions (e.g., differential stress, effective pressure) in a schematic cross section for the Whakaari hydrothermal system and map, for the different lithologies, areas susceptible to either dilatant vs. compactive modes of failure. The failure mode will impact, for example, the evolution of rock physical properties (e.g., porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity) and the nature of the seismicity accompanying periods of unrest. We outline accordingly the potential implications for the interpretation of seismic signals, outgassing, ground deformation, and the volcanic structural stability for Whakaari and similar hydrothermally-active volcanoes worldwide.

  19. Volcanic emissions from soils at the base of La Fossa volcano, Vulcano island, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Parks, J. L.

    2006-12-01

    A top-sealed plastic tube with a diameter of ca. 15 cm had been buried vertically at the base of La Fossa volcano, Volcano island, Italy, next to the front of the obsidian flow. The tube had been filled with quartz wool to condense vapors emanating from the soil. At ca. 75 cm below the surface the sample had been exposed to vapors from Sept. 2005 to April 2006. The leached sample had not been in touch with the ground. Another glass wool cushion (ca. 3 cm thick) had been underneath to minimize capillary effects. Leaching of the quartz wool and ICP-MS analysis documented positive values for: Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Pb. Leaching with nitric acid documented also V and Fe. Acid leaching produced higher values for all elements, except K and Sn, than leaching with deionized water. Negative values had been obtained for As, Se, Mo. Influence from soil breathing can be excluded as the active fumaroles contain As and Se. This experiment documents for the first time an unknown element transport by vapors/gases through a volcanic edifice interacting with hydrothermal and magmatic gases. It remains unknown if elements detected are entering the atmosphere or are getting adsorbed onto the volcanic ash soil particles derived from reworked surge beds. This question is very important as soils might be an unknown filter medium to filter volcanically polluted air in case of major volcanic crises. Data can be obtained from the authors.

  20. Soil CO2 emissions at Furnas volcano, São Miguel Island, Azores archipelago: Volcano monitoring perspectives, geomorphologic studies, and land use planning application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, FáTima; Cardellini, Carlo; Ferreira, Teresa; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Silva, Catarina

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) diffuse degassing structures (DDS) at Furnas volcano (São Miguel Island, Azores) are mostly associated with the main fumarolic fields, evidence that CO2 soil degassing is the surface expression of rising steam from the hydrothermal system. Locations with anomalous CO2 flux are mainly controlled by tectonic structures oriented WNW-ESE and NW-SE and by the geomorphology of the volcano, as evidenced by several DDS located in depressed areas associated with crater margins. Hydrothermal soil CO2 emissions in Furnas volcano are estimated to be ˜968 t d-1. Discrimination between biogenic and hydrothermal CO2 was determined using a statistical approach and the carbon isotope composition of the CO2 efflux. Different sampling densities were used to evaluate uncertainty in the estimation of the total CO2 flux and showed that a low density of points may not be adequate to quantify soil emanations from a relatively small DDS. Thermal energy release associated with diffuse degassing at Furnas caldera is about 118 MW (from an area of ˜4.8 km2) based on the H2O/CO2 ratio in fumarolic gas. The DDS also affect Furnas and Ribeira Quente villages, which are located inside the caldera and in the south flank of the volcano, respectively. At these sites, 58% and 98% of the houses are built over hydrothermal CO2 emanations, and the populations are at risk due to potential high concentrations of CO2 accumulating inside the dwellings.

  1. Chlorine-rich pyrometamorphic magma at White Island volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. Peter; Browne, Patrick R. L.

    1996-07-01

    The 25 January 1987 phreatomagmatic eruption of Congress Vent on White Island volcano ejected paralava bombs derived from pockets of pyrometamorphic magma. The current White Island magmas are calc-alkaline basaltic andesite/andesite, but the paralavas are mostly highly peralkaline with molar(Na2O + K2O)/Al2O3 ratios from 1 to 22 recorded in matrix glasses. The glass compositions are highly variable, though quench crystals of tridymite, wollastonite and green clinopyroxene are ubiquitous, while albite occurs only in the least peralkaline samples. All have high alkali contents (Na2O + K2O > 10%) and chlorine mostly > 1% and up to 1.7%. The paralava glasses represent the most Cl-rich volcanic melts yet discovered. They display a strong positive correlation between Cl and total Fe, but a negative correlation between Cl and normative alkali feldspar content. It is likely that the Fe content of melts was the dominant control over Cl solubility, not their alumina-alkali systematics. Possible parent rocks for the pyrometamorphic magmas include halite-cemented crater-lake sediments and acid-sulfate hydrothermally altered vent breccias and tuffs, as found in the eruption deposits together with the paralava bombs. Fusion probably occurred at temperatures between 830 and 1000 °C and at a pressure below 5 MPa in a regime where silicate melts were buffered by immiscible NaCl-saturated aqueous vapor and hydrosaline melt. The conditions required to form the paralava bombs appear to be uncommon, but it is likely that similar pyrometamorphic melts could be generated at many volcanoes where shallow magma penetrates a hydrothermal system.

  2. CO2 budget from active volcanoes of central Mediterranean: preliminary estimate for Ischia Island (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecoraino, G.; Brusca, L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Giammanco, S.; Inguaggiato, S.; Longo, M.

    2003-12-01

    Ischia Island (46 km2) is an active volcano located a few kilometres northwest of the bay of Naples (Central Italy). It last erupted in 1302 A.D. and its activity is currently characterised only by low-temperature (T° max. = 100° C) gas emissions, such as fumaroles and anomalous soil degassing. A geothermal reservoir (estimated reservoir temperature near 280° C; Inguaggiato et al., 2000) is also present in the island. The emitted gases are mostly water vapour and CO2. Also H2 is present in appreciable amounts (up to 2.5 % v/v of dry gas), together with minor concentrations of CH4 He and CO. Based on helium and carbon isotopic ratios (R/Ra ˜ 3.6; ? 13C(CO2) ˜ -2 \\permil), a magmatic source can be inferred for these gases. The present study was mainly aimed at carrying out a preliminary estimate of the total output of magmatic CO2 from Ischia, considering all types of fluids emitted there. Soil CO2 fluxes (measured with the accumulation chamber) gave a value of about 2.5 Mt a-1, that is much lower than the amount estimated at Mt. Etna (13 to 25 Mt a-1; Allard et al., 1991; D'Alessandro et al., 1997), but more than an order of magnitude higher than that estimated at Pantelleria Island and at Vulcano (Favara et al., 2001). The amount of CO2 dissolved into ground water as carbonatic species is only 0.025 Mt a-1, considering an annual volume of infiltrated water of about 8 x 106 m3. The overall output of CO2 from Ischia indicates that this island is site of active volcanic degassing and deserves a more careful volcanological monitoring.

  3. Coccidia of Aleutian Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greiner, E.C.; Forrester, Donald J.; Carpenter, J.W.; Yparraguirre, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Fecal samples from 122 captive and 130 free-ranging Aleutian Canada geese (Branta canadensis leucopareia) were examined for oocysts of coccidia. Freeranging geese sampled on the spring staging ground near Crescent City, California were infected with Eimeria hermani, E. truncata, E. magnalabia, E. fulva, E. clarkei and Tyzzeria parvula. Except for E. clarkei, the same species of coccidia were found in geese on their breeding grounds in Alaska. Most of the coccidial infections in captive geese from Amchitka Island, Alaska and Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, consisted of Tyzzeria.

  4. Pacific Basin tsunami hazards associated with mass flows in the Aleutian arc of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Watts, Philip; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze mass-flow tsunami generation for selected areas within the Aleutian arc of Alaska using results from numerical simulation of hypothetical but plausible mass-flow sources such as submarine landslides and volcanic debris avalanches. The Aleutian arc consists of a chain of volcanic mountains, volcanic islands, and submarine canyons, surrounded by a low-relief continental shelf above about 1000–2000 m water depth. Parts of the arc are fragmented into a series of fault-bounded blocks, tens to hundreds of kilometers in length, and separated from one another by distinctive fault-controlled canyons that are roughly normal to the arc axis. The canyons are natural regions for the accumulation and conveyance of sediment derived from glacial and volcanic processes. The volcanic islands in the region include a number of historically active volcanoes and some possess geological evidence for large-scale sector collapse into the sea. Large scale mass-flow deposits have not been mapped on the seafloor south of the Aleutian Islands, in part because most of the area has never been examined at the resolution required to identify such features, and in part because of the complex nature of erosional and depositional processes. Extensive submarine landslide deposits and debris flows are known on the north side of the arc and are common in similar settings elsewhere and thus they likely exist on the trench slope south of the Aleutian Islands. Because the Aleutian arc is surrounded by deep, open ocean, mass flows of unconsolidated debris that originate either as submarine landslides or as volcanic debris avalanches entering the sea may be potential tsunami sources. To test this hypothesis we present a series of numerical simulations of submarine mass-flow initiated tsunamis from eight different source areas. We consider four submarine mass flows originating in submarine canyons and four flows that evolve from submarine landslides on the trench slope. The flows have lengths that range from 40 to 80 km, maximum thicknesses of 400–800 m, and maximum widths of 10–40 km. We also evaluate tsunami generation by volcanic debris avalanches associated with flank collapse, at four locations (Makushin, Cleveland, Seguam and Yunaska SW volcanoes), which represent large to moderate sized events in this region. We calculate tsunami sources using the numerical model TOPICS and simulate wave propagation across the Pacific using a spherical Boussinesq model, which is a modified version of the public domain code FUNWAVE. Our numerical simulations indicate that geologically plausible mass flows originating in the North Pacific near the Aleutian Islands can indeed generate large local tsunamis as well as large transoceanic tsunamis. These waves may be several meters in elevation at distal locations, such as Japan, Hawaii, and along the North and South American coastlines where they would constitute significant hazards.

  5. Radionuclides in marine fishes and birds from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutians: establishing a baseline.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Kosson, David; Powers, Charles W; Friedlander, Barry; Stabin, Michael; Favret, Derek; Jewett, Stephen; Snigaroff, Daniel; Snigaroff, Ronald; Stamm, Tim; Weston, James; Jeitner, Christian; Volz, Conrad

    2007-03-01

    Amchitka Island (51degrees N lat, 179 degrees E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965-1971. There have been no substantive studies of radionuclides in marine fishes and birds in the area since the mid-1970's. In this study, levels of 60Co, 52Eu, 90Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 137Cs, and the actinides (241Am, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U) were studied in ten marine fish species (including Pacific Cod Gadus macrocephalus and Pacific Halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis) and five marine bird species (including Glaucous-winged Gulls Larus glaucescens, Tufted Puffins Fratercula cirrhata, and Common Eider Ducks Somateria mollissima) from Amchitka. The same species were collected at a reference site, Kiska Island (52 degrees N lat; 177 degrees E long), about 130 km west of Amchitka. Each sample was a composite of edible muscle from five or more individual fish or birds of similar size (+/-15%) from the same sampling station. The null hypotheses of no differences among species or between Amchitka and Kiska were tested. Most analytic results were below the minimum detectable activity (MDA), even when 1,000 g sizes and 72 h counting times were used. The only radionuclides detected above the MDA were 137Cs, 241Am, 239,240Pu, 234U, 235U, and 238U. There were significant differences in 137Cs as a function of species, but not location, for top predatory fishes. Of the fishes, eight of ten species had 137Cs values above the MDA for some samples; only one bird, Glaucous-winged Gull, had 137Cs values above the MDA. The highest concentrations of 137Cs were in Dolly Varden [Salvelinus malma, 0.780 (Bq kg(-1) wet weight)] and Pacific Cod (0.602 Bq kg(-1)). In aggregate for any actinides, 73 of 234 (31%) composites for fish were above the MDA, compared to only 3 of 98 (3%) for birds. 234U and 238U, radionuclides that are primarily natural in origin, were routinely detected in these biological samples, but there were no significant differences in mean concentrations between Amchitka and Kiska. The concentrations of all radionuclides examined at Amchitka are similar to those of other uncontaminated Northern Hemisphere sites, and are lower than those reported for fishes and birds from the Irish Sea in the vicinity of the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing facility, an area with known contamination. PMID:17293699

  6. Are There Spatial or Temporal Patterns to Holocene Explosive Eruptions in the Aleutian Archipelago? A Work in Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; McConville, K.; Hatfield, V.; West, D.

    2013-12-01

    By examining the existing geological and archeological record of radiocarbon dated Aleutian tephras of the last 12,000 years, this study sought to determine whether there were spatial or temporal patterns of explosive eruptive activity. The Holocene tephra record has important implications because two episodes of migration and colonization by humans of distinct cultures established the Unangan/Aleut peoples of the Aleutian Islands concurrently with the volcanic activity. From Aniakchak Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula to the Andreanof Islands (158 to 178° W longitude), 55 distinct tephras represent significant explosive eruptions of the last 12,000 years. Initial results suggest that the Andreanof and Fox Island regions of the archipelago have had frequent explosive eruptions whereas the Islands of Four Mountains, Rat, and Near Island regions have apparently had little or no eruptive activity. However, one clear result of the investigation is that sampling bias strongly influences the apparent spatial patterns. For example field reconnaissance in the Islands of Four Mountains documents two Holocene calderas and a minimum of 20 undated tephras in addition to the large ignimbrites. Only the lack of significant explosive activity in the Near Islands seems a valid spatial result as archeological excavations and geologic reports failed to document Holocene tephras there. An intriguing preliminary temporal pattern is the apparent absence of large explosive eruptions across the archipelago from ca. 4,800 to 6,000 yBP. To test the validity of apparent patterns, a statistical treatment of the compiled data grappled with the sampling bias by considering three confounding variables: larger island size allows more opportunity for geologic preservation of tephras; larger magnitude eruption promotes tephra preservation by creating thicker and more widespread deposits; the comprehensiveness of the tephra sampling of each volcano and island varies widely because of logistical and financial limitations. This initial statistical investigation proposes variables to mitigate the effects of sampling bias and makes recommendations for sampling strategies to enable statistically valid examination of research questions. Further, though caldera-forming eruptions occurred throughout the Holocene - and several remain undated - four of six dated eruptions occurred throughout the archipelago between 8,000-9,100 yBP, a period coinciding with some of the earliest human occupation (Early Anangula Phase) of the eastern Aleutians.

  7. Satellite and ground observations of the June 2009 eruption of Sarychev Peak volcano, Matua Island, Central Kuriles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Webley, Peter; Steensen, Torge; Izbekov, Pavel; Neal, Christina; Realmuto, Vince

    2011-11-01

    After 33 years of repose, one of the most active volcanoes of the Kurile island arc—Sarychev Peak on Matua Island in the Central Kuriles—erupted violently on June 11, 2009. The eruption lasted 9 days and stands among the largest of recent historical eruptions in the Kurile Island chain. Satellite monitoring of the eruption, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Meteorological Agency Multifunctional Transport Satellite, and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data, indicated at least 23 separate explosions between 11 and 16 June 2009. Eruptive clouds reached altitudes of generally 8-16 km above sea level (ASL) and in some cases up to 21 km asl. Clouds of volcanic ash and gas stretched to the north and northwest up to 1,500 km and to the southeast for more than 3,000 km. For the first time in recorded history, ash fall occurred on Sakhalin Island and in the northeast sector of the Khabarovsky Region, Russia. Based on satellite image analysis and reconnaissance field studies in the summer of 2009, the eruption produced explosive tephra deposits with an estimated bulk volume of 0.4 km3. The eruption is considered to have a Volcanic Explosivity Index of 4. Because the volcano is remote, there was minimal risk to people or infrastructure on the ground. Aviation transport, however, was significantly disrupted because of the proximity of air routes to the volcano.

  8. Three-armed rifts or masked radial pattern of eruptive fissures? The intriguing case of El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, L.; Galindo, I.; Martí, J.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-04-01

    Using new surface structural data as well as subsurface structural data obtained from seventeen water galleries, we provide a comprehensive model of the volcano-tectonic evolution of El Hierro (Canary Islands). We have identified, measured and analysed more than 1700 volcano-structural elements including vents, eruptive fissures, dykes and faults. The new data provide important information on the main structural patterns of the island and on its stress and strain fields, all of which are crucial for reliable hazard assessments. We conducted temporal and spatial analyses of the main structural elements, focusing on their relative age and association with the three main cycles in the construction of the island: the Tiñor Edifice, the El Golfo-Las Playas Edifice, and the Rift Volcanism. A radial strike distribution, which can be related to constructive episodes, is observed in the on-land structures. A similar strike distribution is seen in the submarine eruptive fissures, which are radial with respect to the centre of the island. However, the volcano-structural elements identified onshore and reflecting the entire volcano-tectonic evolution of the island also show a predominant NE-SW strike, which coincides with the main regional trend of the Canary archipelago as a whole. Two other dominant directions of structural elements, N-S and WNW-ESE, are evident from the establishment of the El Golfo-Las Playas edifice, during the second constructive cycle. We suggest that the radial-striking structures reflect comparatively uniform stress fields during the constructive episodes, mainly conditioned by the combination of overburden pressure, gravitational spreading, and magma-induced stresses in each of the volcanic edifices. By contrast, in the shallower parts of the edifice the NE-SW, N-S and WNW-ESE-striking structures reflect local stress fields related to the formation of mega-landslides and masking the general and regional radial patterns.

  9. The 1998-1999 seismic series at Deception Island volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, J. M.; Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Saccorotti, G.; Del Pezzo, E.; Abril, M.; Ortiz, R.

    2003-11-01

    During the 1998-1999 Antarctic summer the pattern of seismic activity at Deception Island volcano changed significantly. The change was characterized by the occurrence of an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes. More than 2000 VT earthquakes with S-P times smaller than 4 s were recorded in the period January-February 1999. Pure volcanic events were also detected; especially long-period (LP) events, volcanic tremor and some hybrid events. Seismic monitoring was performed using two short-period small-aperture arrays, among other instruments. Based on their signal-to-noise ratios we selected 863 VT earthquakes, 350 LP events and tremor episodes, and 9 hybrid events for analysis. We estimated apparent slowness and back-azimuth for all events using the Zero Lag Cross-Correlation array technique. Combining this information with S-P times and other indirect evidence, we identified two different source regions. LP seismicity is located less than 1-1.5 km southwest of the Fumarole array site. These events are likely to have a hydrothermal origin. VT earthquakes and hybrid events are located at depths of 0.3-10 km in an area under the bay of Deception Island. The area extends from the Fumarole array to the northeast with epicentral distances that range from 0.5 to 12 km. Most hypocenters are clustered in a small volume of around 8 km 3. The sources of the LP seismicity and the VT earthquakes are spatially distinct, which indicates that they are not produced by the same mechanisms. Moment magnitude analyses of the VT earthquakes provide an average magnitude of 0.5 and very low average stress drop, around 1 bar. A study of first motion of the P-waves suggests that the events in this small source region should have a variety of source mechanisms. This is supported by the existence of families of events with the same waveforms. The occurrence of repeating fracture processes with low stress drop and small fault dimensions can be explained by the lubrication of pre-existing zones of weakness by pressurized fluids. The most probable hypothesis that explains the generation of this seismic series at Deception Island is: a seismic series caused by the stress generated by the uplift of the source area due to a magmatic injection in depth. We favor this hypothesis since it is compatible with the majority of the characteristics of the seismicity and explains the spatial and temporal behavior of the series.

  10. Anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in caribou and muskoxen in the western Alaskan Arctic and marine fish in the Aleutian Islands in the first half of 2000s.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gi Hoon; Baskaran, Mark; Molaroni, Shannon Marie; Lee, Hyun-Mi; Burger, Joanna

    2011-09-01

    A number of caribou and muskoxen samples from the western Alaskan Arctic and fish samples from the Aleutian Islands were collected between 1998 and 2006 and analyzed for anthropogenic ((90)Sr and (137)Cs) and natural radionculides ((40)K, (210)Pb and (226)Ra), as part of the radiological assessment for the regional subsistence hunting communities in the first half of 2000s. We examined the relationship between the activities of these nuclides with the size of the fish. In caribou samples, concentration of (90)Sr in muscle was below the detection limit of 0.14 Bq kg(-1) and (137)Cs concentration in bones was below the detection limit of 0.15 Bq kg(-1). (137)Cs activity varied over an order of magnitude in caribou muscle samples with an average value of 2.5 Bq/kg wet wt. Average (137)Cs activity in muskoxen muscle was found to be 9.7 Bq/kg wet wt. However, there were a little variation (less than 60%) in (210)Pb, (40)K, and (226)Ra in both muscle and bone of both caribou and muskoxen. The activities of total (210)Pb in caribou and muskox bones were found to be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of parent-supported (210)Pb indicating the potential for dating of bones of terrestrial mammals (time elapsed since the death of the animal) based on the excess (210)Pb method exists. In fish muscle samples, (137)Cs activity varied from below detection limit to 154 mBq/kg wet wt. and its content increased with the size of the fish due to its transfer through the food chain. Among the seven fish species investigated, (210)Pb activities varied almost an order of magnitude; however, (40)K and (226)Ra activities varied less than a factor of two. Total annual effective dose due to (90)Sr and (137)Cs from the ingestion of those terrestrial and marine meats was estimated to be negligible (ca. 9 ?SV/a) compared to the natural radionuclides present thus posing negligible radiological threat to humans. PMID:21774963

  11. Locational differences in heavy metals and metalloids in Pacific Blue Mussels Mytilus [edulis] trossulus from Adak Island in the Aleutian Chain, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2006-09-15

    Increasingly there is a need to implement biomonitoring plans that can be sustained cost-effectively, focusing on single widespread (or closely-related species) in different parts of the world to detect exposure, potential damage to the organisms themselves, and risk to their consumers, including humans. Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis and its relatives) have been widely used for environmental monitoring. One successful program that has achieved great coverage in time and space is "Mussel Watch", and related programs exist in several regions. In this paper we use the Pacific Blue Mussel Mytilus [edulis] trossulus collected from five locations on Adak Island in the Aleutian Chain to examine five heavy metals and two metalloids, to test for locational differences as a function of anthropogenic activities, and to consider potential human health risks. Until the late 1990s Adak hosted a large U.S. military base, with multiple areas of contamination, some of which have been remediated. In June 2004 we identified four presumably human-impacted sites and a presumed unimpacted reference site, the latter on Clam Lagoon Beach, about 3 km from former military activity. No single site had the highest level of more than two metals, and the reference site had the highest levels of chromium and manganese. We subsequently found historic records of a former landfill within 1 km of the reference site. All of the locational differences were less than an order of magnitude, the greatest difference between the highest and lowest values being 4.5 times for lead. The highest correlations were between mercury and arsenic, mercury and lead, arsenic and lead, and chromium and manganese. Shell length was a better indicator of metals' levels than soft body weight, but the relationships were weak. There was no significant correlation between body size or weight with arsenic, lead, or selenium levels. There is substantial comparative data on these metals in mussels. Our results from Adak are generally within the range of mean values reported in the literature, except for the consistently elevated levels of chromium. PMID:16828845

  12. Two Decades of Degassing at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i: Perspectives on Island Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Sutton, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    The ongoing eruption of Kilauea provides an opportunity to examine how volcanic emissions impact the natural and human environment of the island of Hawai`i. Kilauea has released ˜ 13 megatons of SO2 gas into the troposphere since the current eruption began in 1983, more than any single anthropogenic source in the U.S. During prevailing trade wind conditions, measurements of SO2 gas, aerosol mass, and aerosol acidity downwind of Kilauea document the conversion of SO2 to acid aerosol as the plume propagates to the leeward side of the island. Lidar measurements suggest a gas-to-particle conversion rate (t1/2) of 6 hours. When trade winds are disrupted, ambient SO2 and particle measurements in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park have shown episodes of particle concentrations of ˜ 100 μ g/m3 and SO2 concentrations in excess of 4000 ppb. Federal health standards and WHO guidelines for SO2 have been exceeded repeatedly at this near-source location. Documented effects from volcanic emissions on the island of Hawai`i include the rapid corrosion of metal objects, degradation of domestic water quality, agricultural crop damage, and adverse impacts on human respiratory and pulmonary function. Other impacts may include decreases in local rainfall and increased mortality of asthmatics. For the period 1986 to 1993, after the eruption became continuous, deaths from asthma on the island of Hawai`i increased by a factor of ten. Three current health studies seek to investigate the relationship between exposure to volcanic pollution and health effects. In addition to measuring gas and particle exposures, these studies examine lung development in children around the island, disease prevalence in adults residing in communities downwind of volcanic degassing sources, and acute effects in asthmatic children and healthy children and adults. In the absence of conclusive evidence linking exposure and health effects, the USGS, in collaboration with the National Park Service, has developed a real-time advisory for heavily visited park areas known to exceed U.S. Air Quality Standards. This color-coded system informs and advises park visitors and employees when ambient SO2 concentrations exceed predetermined levels.

  13. Petrologic observations and multiphase dynamics in highly-crystalline magmatic mushes sourcing Galápagos Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, J.; Bergantz, G. W.; Geist, D.

    2013-12-01

    The inability to directly observe magma chambers makes it difficult to understand their dynamics. Yet conditions within the chamber determines whether an eruption will occur, or if the magma is allowed to cool to complete crystallization. Eruption styles are also conditioned by these dynamics, as the amount of overpressure within the chamber regulates effusive or explosive eruptions. Plutons and volcanoes appear to share similar states: magma reservoirs that are temporally and spatially dominated by crystal-rich states, known as magmatic mushes. To explore the dynamics of mushes, we turn to the relatively simple ocean island end-member of magmatic systems. Ocean island porphyritic basalt flows provide a snapshot of the mush conditions prior to eruption. The Galápagos Islands are a system of ocean islands displaying spatial and temporal variation in their eruption styles and deposits. We have collected porphyritic basalt samples from Rábida Island of the Galápagos Archipelago which contains deposits ranging in ages from 0.7-1.0 Ma. Chemical zoning within phenocrysts indicates intermittent efficient mixing occurs within the mush, despite high viscosities and corresponding low-Reynolds number conditions. To further explore the dynamics of mixing, we present preliminary Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase models using the fluids modeling software MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges). This computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) allows for individual crystal tracking within the system and monitors interactions between the fluid and solid phases. Of special interest is the open-system dynamical response of a mush to a reintrusion event. Unlike high-Reynolds number flows, such as air or water systems, magmatic mushes have high viscosities, indicating that turbulent motion is not the primary mixing mechanism. Instead, mixing appears to be caused by mechanical unlocking from an increase in pore pressure as additional magma is injected. The crystal pile inflates and the injected melt creates crystal-poor fingers through the mush. These regions are unstable and eventually lead to mush collapse. Repetition of this cycle can drive efficient mixing of the magma chamber. We quantify the ability of the mush to mix using the Lacey statistical mixing index. We compare this value for the results of various open-system reintrusion events within the mush as a means to explore the dynamics that occur.

  14. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  15. Spatial variation of seismic b-values beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, David L.; Gao, Stephen S.

    2006-05-01

    The frequency-magnitude distribution was spatially mapped beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska using an earthquake catalog of 491 events that occurred between July 2001 and April 2005. An area of high seismic b-values (˜ 2.0) is found ˜ 4 km east of Makushin's main vent at a depth between 4 and 7 km. The anomaly is statistically significant based on Utsu's p-test [T. Utsu, On seismicity, in Report of the Joint Research Institute for Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo (1992) 139-157], and is not data processing method or parameter dependent. Interestingly, a recent InSAR interferometric study [Z. Lu, J.A. Power, V.S. McConnell, C. Wicks Jr., D. Dzurism, Preeruptive inflation and surface interferometric coherence characteristics by satellite radar interferometry at Makushin volcano, Alaska: 1993-2000, J. Geophys. Res. 107 (2002) 2266, doi:10.1029/2001JB000970] inferred a surface uplift of about 7 cm during the two-year period prior to October 1995, centered approximately in the area with the observed anomalous b-values. The uplift was caused by the volume increase of an inferred magma chamber at a depth of about 7 km. The close correspondence of the seismic and InSAR observations suggests that the heterogeneous area associated with the observed high b-values is most likely the result of increased crack density associated with the magma chamber. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of combining InSAR and seismological observations in locating magma chambers and areas of high heterogeneity in the crust.

  16. Electric and magnetic phenomena observed before the volcano-seismic activity in 2000 in the Izu Island Region, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, S.; Hayakawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Molchanov, O.; Hattori, K.; Orihara, Y.; Gotoh, K.; Akinaga, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2002-01-01

    Significant anomalous changes in the ultra low frequency range (?0.01 Hz) were observed in both geoelectric and geomagnetic fields before the major volcano-seismic activity in the Izu Island region, Japan. The spectral intensity of the geoelectric potential difference between some electrodes on Niijima Island and the third principal component of geomagnetic field variations at an array network in Izu Peninsula started to increase from a few months before the onset of the volcano-seismic activity, culminating immediately before nearby magnitude 6 class earthquakes. Appearance of similar changes in two different measurements conducted at two far apart sites seems to provide information supporting the reality of preseismic electromagnetic signals. PMID:12032286

  17. Petroleum potential of volcanogenic and volcano-sedimentary rocks in ancient and recent island arcs: Caucasus, Komandorskie, and Kuril islands, eastern Kamchatka

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, L.E. )

    1993-09-01

    In the Late Cretaceous-Eocene, subduction of the Tethys oceanic plate under the island arc of the lesser Caucasus contributed to the appearance of the special conditions favorable for petroleum occurrence: (1) tectono-magmatic destruction of the crust of the Transcaucasus median massif and formation of hydrocarbon traps of different types and origins, and (2) high heat flow lasting until the recent epoch. These led flow-intensive generation of hydrocarbons in the shallow-water sediments of the paleoshelf of the Transcaucasus massif and accumulation of hydrocarbons not only in the sedimentary but also in the volcanogenic and volcano-sedimentary reservoirs (Samgori-Patardzeuli, Muradhanly fields, etc.). At the end of the Oligocene, the geodynamic setting in the northwestern margins of the Pacific Ocean was mainly similar to that within the Transcaucasus median massif. At the end of Oligocene-Miocene, such conditions determined the tectono-magmatic destruction of the continental crust and formation of the series of interarc rifts. The main fields of Japan, with accumulations in the volcanogenic and volcano-sedimentary rocks, are concentrated here. Its analog is the rift located in the southern part of a single east Kuril basin, where petroleum occurrence is only inferred. In the separate troughs, the thickness of the volcano-sedimentary cover is 4-6 km. The stratigraphic section of the cover contains the volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sediments of the Neogene-Pleistocene. The studies of the sections of the Komandorskie islands, eastern Kamchatka, Kuril Islands, and western Sakhalin indicate that distribution of reservoirs depends on the stage of evolution of the rifts and adjacent island arcs.

  18. 3-D Anisotropic Ambient Noise Tomography of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Rivet, D. N.; Landes, M.; Shapiro, N.

    2014-12-01

    We cross-correlate four years of seismic noise continuously recorded by the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island). The network is composed of 40 stations 27 of which have 3-component sensors. We use Vertical-to-Vertical (ZZ) cross-correlation components from all stations and Radial-to-Radial (RR) and Transverse-to-Transverse (TT) cross-correlations computed from 3-component records. The group velocity dispersion curves for Rayleigh and Love waves are measured using a Frequency-Time Analysis. We average measurements from ZZ and RR components to finally obtain 577 Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves. 395 Love-wave dispersion curves are obtained from the TT cross-correlations. We then regionalize the group velocities measurements to construct 2D dispersion maps at a set of periods between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we construct a 3D shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level by jointly inverting the Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity maps with a Neighborhood Algorithm and with taking into account the radial anisotropy. The distribution of 3-D Voigt averaged S-wave velocities shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The most western high-velocity anomaly is located below the actual "Plaine des Sables" and could be attributed to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body is located below the summit of the volcano and likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly is located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is thought to be an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the ancient dismantled "Les Alizé" volcano. The distribution of the radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: a positive anisotropy (Vsh>Vsv) above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de la Fournaise with an accumulation of mostly horizontal lava flows, and the second one below the sea level with a negative anisotropy (Vsv>Vsh) showing the ancient edifice of the Piton de la Fournaise dominated by intrusions of vertical dykes.

  19. Movement of shallow magmatic sources inferred from volcano-tectonic faults: An example from Shinjima Island nearby Sakurajima volcano, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Y.; Haraguchi, T.; Toda, S.; Miki, D.; Imura, R.

    2006-12-01

    Uplift and subsidence due to magma movement involve complex fault system at the surface of a volcano. Conversely, mapping volcano-tectonic faults and surface deformation allows us to infer the feeding system of magma and eruption process in the past. Here we represent a case study of such deformation and a complex fault system associated with prehistoric and historic volcanic uplifts on and around Shinjima Island that is a small island of ~0.2 square meter located northeast of Sakurajima volcano, Kagoshima Bay, southwest Japan. Combining detail mapping of the faults and dislocation modeling, we reveal geometry, volume, and depth of the magma intrusion during the past eruptions that produced the current Shinjima landform. According to historical records, Shinjima Island was uplifted and emerged from bottom of the sea at the eruption of Sakurajima in 1779. Shinjima Island that is characterized by horst-and-graben structures caused by numerous E-W striking normal faults. The island is mainly composed of pyroclastic deposits, top of which exposes Moejima shell bed that consists of shell fossils yielded a radiocarbon age of 6,000 - 2,300 yr BP. Assuming the shells had been borne horizontally below the water level before the eruption, we applied the shell bed to a piercing point to estimate the fault vertical separation. We measured the height of the shell bed at 75 points along the coastline and then found the faults on both sides of the main graben vertically offset 15.9m, and 23.5m respectively. In addition to the surface mapping, we made E-W and N-S seismic reflection profiles across Shinjima Island. The N-S profile shows a structure that swells up the geologic units (pyroclastic deposits and andestic lava recovered from a deep borehole by Kyoto University) broadly between 200m and 350m in contrast to the narrow surface deformation. The profile suggests the fault displacements do not extend deeper than ~100m below the surface. We also made the 3D submarine topography using bathymetric charts around An'ei Islands which were newly formed during the 1779 eruption. The topography shows An'ei Islands including Shinjima are on the An'ei Plateau which size is about 3 by 5 km. To estimate the magma storage and movement at the 1779 eruption and the predecessors, we performed forward modeling to restore the surface deformation in elastic half-space. A complex model combining a point source inflation and dike intrusions approximately reproduces the current Shinjima landform. The model suggests that the island was uplifted by two-stage volcanic growth. The former is a wide-area bulging formed An'ei Plateau by a deep magma expansion. The latter is the solo uplift of Shinjima Island accompanied with a ridge-trough-ridge structure by a shallow dike intrusion.

  20. On the time-scales of magmatism at island-arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S. P.

    2002-12-01

    Precise information on time-scales and rates of change is fundamental to an understanding of natural processes and the development of quantitative physical models in the Earth sciences. U-series isotope studies are revolutionizing this field by providing time information in the range 102-104 years, which is similar to that of many modern Earth processes. I review how the application of U-series isotopes has been used to constrain the time-scales of magma formation, ascent and storage beneath island-arc volcanoes. Different elements are distilled-off the subducting plate at different times and in different places. Contributions from subducted sediments to island-arc lava sources appear to occur some 350 kyr to 4 Myr prior to eruption. Fluid release from the subducting oceanic crust into the mantle wedge may be a multi-stage process and occurs over a period ranging from a few hundred kyr to less than one kyr prior to eruption. This implies that dehydration commences prior to the initiation of partial melting within the mantle wedge, which is consistent with recent evidence that the onset of melting is controlled by an isotherm and thus the thermal structure within the wedge. U-Pa disequilibria appear to require a component of decompression melting, possibly due to the development of gravitational instabilities. The preservation of large 226Ra disequilibria permits only a short period of time between fluid addition and eruption. This requires rapid melt segregation, magma ascent by channelled flow and minimal residence time within the lithosphere. The evolution from basalt to basaltic andesite probably occurs rapidly during ascent or in magma reservoirs inferred from some geophysical data to lie within the lithospheric mantle. The flux across the Moho is broadly andesitic, and some magmas subsequently stall in more shallow crustal-level magma chambers, where they evolve to more differentiated compositions on time-scales of a few thousand years or less.

  1. On the time-scales of magmatism at island-arc volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Turner, S P

    2002-12-15

    Precise information on time-scales and rates of change is fundamental to an understanding of natural processes and the development of quantitative physical models in the Earth sciences. U-series isotope studies are revolutionizing this field by providing time information in the range 10(2)-10(4) years, which is similar to that of many modern Earth processes. I review how the application of U-series isotopes has been used to constrain the time-scales of magma formation, ascent and storage beneath island-arc volcanoes. Different elements are distilled-off the subducting plate at different times and in different places. Contributions from subducted sediments to island-arc lava sources appear to occur some 350 kyr to 4 Myr prior to eruption. Fluid release from the subducting oceanic crust into the mantle wedge may be a multi-stage process and occurs over a period ranging from a few hundred kyr to less than one kyr prior to eruption. This implies that dehydration commences prior to the initiation of partial melting within the mantle wedge, which is consistent with recent evidence that the onset of melting is controlled by an isotherm and thus the thermal structure within the wedge. U-Pa disequilibria appear to require a component of decompression melting, possibly due to the development of gravitational instabilities. The preservation of large (226)Ra disequilibria permits only a short period of time between fluid addition and eruption. This requires rapid melt segregation, magma ascent by channelled flow and minimal residence time within the lithosphere. The evolution from basalt to basaltic andesite probably occurs rapidly during ascent or in magma reservoirs inferred from some geophysical data to lie within the lithospheric mantle. The flux across the Moho is broadly andesitic, and some magmas subsequently stall in more shallow crustal-level magma chambers, where they evolve to more differentiated compositions on time-scales of a few thousand years or less. PMID:12626270

  2. Application of emulsion imaging system for cosmic-ray muon radiography to explore the internal structure of Teide and Cumbre Vieja volcanoes in the Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Iñigo; Hernández, Pedro; Pérez, Nemesio; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Seygo; Barrancos, José; Padrón, Eleazar

    2013-04-01

    The internal structure of volcanoes, especially in their up per part, is product of past eruptions. Therefore, the knowledge of the internal structure of a volcano is of great importance for understanding its behaviour and to forecast the nature and style of the next eruptions. For these reasons, during past years scientists have made a big effort to investigate the internal structure of the volcanoes with different geophysical techniques, including deep drilling, passive and active seismic tomography, geoelectrics and magnetotellurics and gravimetry. One of the limits of conventional geophysical methods is the spatial resolution, which typically ranges between some tens of meters up to 1 km. In this sense, the radiography of active volcanoes based on natural muons, even if limited to the external part of the volcano, represents an important tool for investigating the internal structure of a volcano at higher spatial resolution (Macedonio and Martini, 2009). Moreover, muon radiography is able to resolve density contrasts of the order of 1-3%, significantly greater than the resolution obtained with conventional methods. As example, the experiment of muon radiography carried out at Mt. Asama volcano by Tanaka et al., 2007, allowed the reconstruction of the density map of the cone and detection of a dense region that corresponds to the position and shape of a lava deposit created during the last eruption in 2004. In the framework of a research project financed by the Canary Agency of Research, Innovation and Information Society, we will implement muon measurements at Teide volcano in Tenerife Island and Cumbre Vieja volcano in La Palma Island, Canary Islands, to radiographically image the subsurface structure of these two volcanic edifices. The data analysis will involve the study both of the shallow structure of both volcanoes and of the requirements for the implementation of the muon detectors. Both Cumbre Vieja and Teide are two active volcanoes that arouse great interest in the scientific community and society due to their volcanic features and specific hazards associated with volcanic activity.

  3. The forensics of sub-surface processes on island volcanoes from integrated geodetic observations: results from Tenerife and Montserrat (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, J.

    2009-12-01

    Spatio-temporal variations in geodetic signals at active volcanoes provide important insight on governing subsurface processes. This contribution explores the phenomenology of volcanic unrest and eruptive activity from the perspective of both ground deformation and gravimetric investigations at an ocean island volcanic complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands) and an active andesitic arc volcano (Soufrière Hills volcano [SHV], Montserrat). Despite their marked differences in volcanic evolution and tectonic settings both volcanic systems show remarkable similarities in their subsurface processes. On Tenerife, during unrest in 2004-5, mass movement at depth was quantified by time-lapse gravimetric observations despite the absence of significant ground deformation. Shallow migration of hydrous fluids is identified as the main cause for the unrest marking the reactivation of the central volcanic complex after a century of quiescence. The combination of static and dynamic gravimetric data reveals a causality between the major structural building blocks of the island and the pattern of mass variations. Low density bodies underlie areas of maximum mass variations at the complex. Gravimetric data also indicate that the shallow plumbing system of the 3700 m tall Pico Teide/Pico Viejo composite volcano remained unaffected by the unrest. On Montserrat, time-lapse gravimetric data invoke the existence of a previously unrecognized fault zone beneath the centre of the island that is influenced by changes in stress distribution associated with volcanic activity at SHV. The fault zone either provides a trace for ground water flow or responds to a changed stress field via volcano-tectonic coupling with an elastic opening/closing of fractures. Continuous gravimetric (CG) data enabled the calibration of a new precision tidal model for the island resulting in a reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio by about one order of magnitude. Detided CG records reveal particular gravity perturbations a few minutes before the onset of Vulcanian eruptions in 2008. The gravity anomalies are inconsistent with mass variations in either a shallow magma reservoir or the active dyke-conduit system. Some waveforms may reflect very low-frequency seismicity (<0.05 Hz) associated with ensuing eruptions dominated by rock ballistics.

  4. Experimental constraints on phreatic eruption processes at Whakaari (White Island volcano)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Gilg, H. Albert; Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Lavallée, Yan; Letham-Brake, Mark; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-09-01

    Vigorous hydrothermal activity interspersed by sequences of phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions occur at Whakaari (White Island volcano), New Zealand. Here, we investigate the influence of sample type (hydrothermally altered cemented ash tuffs and unconsolidated ash/lapilli) and fragmentation mechanism (steam flashing versus gas expansion) on fragmentation and ejection velocities as well as on particle-size and shape. Our rapid decompression experiments show that fragmentation and ejection speeds of two ash tuffs, cemented by alunite and amorphous opal, increase with increasing porosity and that both are significantly enhanced in the presence of steam flashing. Ejection speeds of unconsolidated samples are higher than ejection speeds of cemented tuffs, as less energy is consumed by fragmentation. Fragmentation dominated by steam flashing results in increased fragmentation energy and a higher proportion of fine particles. Particle shape analyses before and after fragmentation reveal that both steam flashing and pure gas expansion produce platy or bladed particles from fracturing parallel to the decompression front. Neither fragmentation mechanisms nor sample type show a significant influence on the shape. Our results emphasize that, under identical pressure and temperature conditions, eruptions accompanied by the process of liquid water flashing to steam are significantly more violent than those driven simply by gas expansion. Therefore, phase changes during decompression and cementation are both important considerations for hazard assessment and modeling of eruptions in hydrothermally active environments.

  5. Hydrogeochemical, Stable Isotopes and Hydrology of Fogo Volcano Perched Aquifers: São Miguel Island, Azores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, P. C.; Boutt, D. F.; Martini, A. M.; Ferstad, J.; Rodrigues, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    Fogo Volcano is located at central part of São Miguel Island and corresponds to a polygenetic volcano with a caldera made by an intercalated accumulation of volcaniclastic deposits and lava flows. São Miguel Island is one of the nine volcanic islands that form the Azores Archipelago. The volcano is 950 meters high, with a caldera diameter of 3.2 Km, which holds a lake inside. The last eruption occurred in 1563-1564, as one of a group of seven traquitic eruptions occurring within the last 5000 years. The volcanic activity is related to hydrothermal activity in a geothermal field located in the volcanoes North flank. The hydrology of Fogo Volcano is characterized by a series of perched-water bodies drained by a large number of springs grouped at different altitudes on the volcano flanks. It is possible to identify three types of water (1) Fresh water, cold temperature (12 - 17 C) with low dissolved solids contents (average conductivity of 179 μS/cm), pH range between 6.60 and 7.82, dominated by the major ions Na, K, HCO3, and Cl, and correspond mainly to sodium bicarbonate type water. (2) Mineral water, cold temperature (12.5 - 19.4 C) with low dissolved solids contents (average conductivity of 261 μS/cm), acid pH range between 4.62 and 6.79, and correspond mainly to sodium bicarbonate type water. (3) Thermal water, with temperature of 32 C, high dissolved solids content (4.62 mS/cm), with a pH around 4.50 and belongs to sodium sulfate type water. South Fogo volcano have only fresh water springs and at high elevation, springs drained from pumice fall deposits near 700 m of altitude. Water dissolved solids contents increased slightly with springs at lower altitude due to water-rock interaction. Springs sampled around 700 m high have a conductivity average of 85 μS/cm, at 520 m an average of 129 μS/cm, at 430 m an average of 182 μS/cm, at 200 m an average of 192 μS/cm and at 12 m high sea level and average of 472 μS/cm. This trend is observed at North Fogo volcano flank for fresh water springs. Mineral and thermal waters show an influence of magmatic input, a natural water pollution source in areas with volcanic activity. Rainwater isotopic composition showed elevation effect variation with lighter δ18O and δD values and recharge appear to be at highest altitudes with influence of sea salt from atmospheric contamination. Evaporation is clearly associated with mineral and thermal waters. Hydrogeochemistry differentiates the low altitude springs at South volcano flank where they are separated by ultramafic intrusions supporting the existence of dike impounded aquifers as Peterson (1972) proposed with the Hawaiian conceptual model for volcanic islands.

  6. Sar interferometry time series analysis of surface deformation for Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Remy, Dominique; Froger, Jean-Luc; Darrozes, José; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, located on the south-eastern side of Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean, is a hotspot oceanic basaltic shield volcano whose activity began more than 500,000 years ago. It is one of the most active volcanoes in the world with a high eruptive frequency on average one eruption every 9 months since 1998. In April 2007, Piton de la Fournaise experienced an exceptional eruption which is considered as the largest historical eruption ever observed during the 20th and 21th centuries, characterized by an effusion of 210 ×106 m3 volume of lava with a 340 m consequent collapse of the Dolomieu crater and the onset of a landslide on the eastern flank. ENVISAT and ALOS data analysis showed that the subsidence of central cone and landslide of eastern flank continued deforming after this eruption at least until June 2008, but no clear ground deformation has been detected after this date from Band-C or Band-L radar images. We so perform a detailed spatio-temporal analysis of ground motions on Piton de la Fournaise using X-band InSAR time series acquired from 2009 to 2014. X-Band was chosen because it provides high spatial resolution (up to 1 m), short revisit period (minimum 11 days) and a highest sensibility to ground deformation. Our large dataset of X-band radar images is composed of 106 COSMO-SkyMed and 96 TerraSAR-X Single-Look Complex images acquired in ascending and descending orbits. The interferograms were generated using DORIS. A high resolution reference Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (5m x 5m Lidar DEM) was used to model and remove the topographic contribution from the interferograms. We employed next StaMPS/MTI (Hooper et al., 2012) to generate the displacement time series and we analyzed the time-dependant behavior of surface displacement using a principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition. This analysis clearly reveals that the large eastward motion affecting the eastern flank of Piton de la Fournaise remained active (LOS velocity of about 25 mm.y-1) at least until July 2012. Another important result is that the displacement maps show evidence of time-dependant processes acting at the central cone.

  7. Zn isotope compositions of the thermal spring waters of La Soufrière volcano, Guadeloupe Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiu-Bin; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dessert, Céline; Villemant, Benoit; Louvat, Pascale; Crispi, Olivier; Birck, Jean-Louis; Wang, Yi-Na

    2014-02-01

    To trace the sources and pathways of Zn in hydrothermal systems, the Zn isotope compositions of seventeen water samples from eight thermal springs and six gas samples from two fumaroles from La Soufrière, an active volcano on Guadeloupe Island (French West Indies, FWI), were analyzed using a method adapted for purifying Zn from Fe- and SO4-enriched thermal solutions. The fumaroles are enriched in Zn 100 to 8000 times compared to the local bedrock and have isotopic compositions (?66Zn values from +0.21‰ to +0.35‰) similar to or slightly higher than fresh andesite (+0.21‰). The enrichment of Zn in the thermal springs compared with the surface waters shows that Zn behaves as a soluble element during hydrothermal alteration but is significantly less mobile than Na. The ?66Zn values of most of the spring waters are relatively constant (approximately 0.70‰), indicating that the thermal springs from La Soufrière are enriched in heavy isotopes (i.e., 66Zn) compared to the host rocks (from -0.14‰ to +0.42‰). Only three thermal springs have lower ?66Zn values (as low as -0.43%). While the Zn in the fumaroles is essentially derived from magma degassing, which is consistent with a previous study on Merapi volcano (Toutain et al., 2008), we show that the Zn in the thermal springs is mainly derived from water-rock interactions. The 66Zn-enriched isotopic signature in most of the spring waters can be explained qualitatively by the precipitation at depth of sulfide minerals that preferentially incorporate the light isotopes. This agrees with the isotopic fractionation that was recently calculated for aqueous complexes of Zn. The few thermal springs with lower ?66Zn values also have low Zn concentrations, indicating the preferential scavenging of heavy Zn isotopes in the hydrothermal conduits. This study shows that unlike chemical weathering under surface conditions, hydrothermal alteration at high temperatures significantly fractionates Zn isotopes and enriches thermal waters in heavy Zn isotopes (e.g., 66Zn). Continental hydrothermal systems therefore constitute a source of heavy Zn isotopes to the oceans; this should be taken into account in the global oceanic budget of Zn.

  8. Ups and downs on spreading flanks of ocean-island volcanoes: evidence from Mauna Loa and K?lauea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.; Eakins, Barry W.; Yokose, Hisayoshi

    2003-01-01

    Submarine-flank deposits of Hawaiian volcanoes are widely recognized to have formed largely by gravitationally driven volcano spreading and associated landsliding. Observations from submersibles show that prominent benches at middepths on flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea consist of volcaniclastic debris derived by landsliding from nearby shallow submarine and subaerial flanks of the same edifice. Massive slide breccias from the mature subaerial tholeiitic shield of Mauna Loa underlie the frontal scarp of its South Kona bench. In contrast, coarse volcaniclastic sediments derived largely from submarine-erupted preshield alkalic and transitional basalts of ancestral Kilauea underlie its Hilina bench. Both midslope benches record the same general processes of slope failure, followed by modest compression during continued volcano spreading, even though they record development during different stages of edifice growth. The dive results suggest that volcaniclastic rocks at the north end of the Kona bench, interpreted by others as distal sediments from older volcanoes that were offscraped, uplifted, and accreted to the island by far-traveled thrusts, alternatively are a largely coherent stratigraphic assemblage deposited in a basin behind the South Kona bench.

  9. Characteristics of Offshore Hawai';i Island Seismicity and Velocity Structure, including Lo';ihi Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, D. K.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Island of Hawai';i is home to the most active volcanoes in the Hawaiian Islands. The island's isolated nature, combined with the lack of permanent offshore seismometers, creates difficulties in recording small magnitude earthquakes with accuracy. This background offshore seismicity is crucial in understanding the structure of the lithosphere around the island chain, the stresses on the lithosphere generated by the weight of the islands, and how the volcanoes interact with each other offshore. This study uses the data collected from a 9-month deployment of a temporary ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) network fully surrounding Lo';ihi volcano. This allowed us to widen the aperture of earthquake detection around the Big Island, lower the magnitude detection threshold, and better constrain the hypocentral depths of offshore seismicity that occurs between the OBS network and the Hawaii Volcano Observatory's land based network. Although this study occurred during a time of volcanic quiescence for Lo';ihi, it establishes a basis for background seismicity of the volcano. More than 480 earthquakes were located using the OBS network, incorporating data from the HVO network where possible. Here we present relocated hypocenters using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), as well as tomographic images for a 30 km square area around the summit of Lo';ihi. Illuminated by using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), offshore seismicity during this study is punctuated by events locating in the mantle fault zone 30-50km deep. These events reflect rupture on preexisting faults in the lower lithosphere caused by stresses induced by volcano loading and flexure of the Pacific Plate (Wolfe et al., 2004; Pritchard et al., 2007). Tomography was performed using the double-difference seismic tomography method TomoDD (Zhang & Thurber, 2003) and showed overall velocities to be slower than the regional velocity model (HG50; Klein, 1989) in the shallow lithosphere above 16 km depth. This is likely a result of thick deposits of volcaniclastic sediments and fractured pillow basalts that blanket the southern submarine flank of Mauna Loa, upon which Lo';ihi is currently superimposing (Morgan et al., 2003). A broad, low-velocity anomaly was observed from 20-40 km deep beneath the area of Pahala, and is indicative of the central plume conduit that supplies magma to the active volcanoes. A localized high-velocity body is observed 4-6 km deep beneath Lo';ihi's summit, extending 10 km to the North and South. Oriented approximately parallel to Lo';ihi's active rift zones, this high-velocity body is suggestive of intrusion in the upper crust, similar to Kilauea's high-velocity rift zones.

  10. Crustal recycling and the aleutian arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, R.W.; Kay, S.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Two types of crustal recycling transfer continental crust back into its mantle source. The first of these, upper crustal recycling, involves elements that have been fractionated by the hydrosphere-sediment system, and are subducted as a part of the oceanic crust. The subduction process (S-process) then fractionates these elements, and those not removed at shallow tectonic levels and as excess components of arc magmas are returned to the mantle. Newly determined trace element composition of Pacific oceanic sedimants are variable and mixing is necessary during the S-process, if sediment is to provide excess element in the ratios observed in Aleutian arc magmas. Only a small fraction of the total sediment subducted at the Aleutian trench is required to furnish the excess elements in Aleutian arc magmas. Ba and {sub 10}Be data indicate that this small fraction includes a contribution from the youngest subducted sediment. The second type of recycling, lower crustal recycling, involves crystal cumulates of both arc and oceanic crustal origin, and residues from crustal melting within arc crust. Unlike the silicic sediments, recycled lower crust is mafic to ultramafic in composition. Trace element analyses of xenoliths representing Aleutian arc lower crust are presented. Recycling by delamination of lower crust and attached mantle lithosphere may occur following basalt eclogite phase transformations that are facilitated by terrane suturing events that weld oceanic island arcs to the continents. The relative importance of upper and lower crustal recycling exerts a primary control on continental crustal composition.

  11. Aseismic inflation of Westdahl volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Freymueller, J.T.; McNutt, S.R.; Mann, Dorte

    2000-01-01

    Westdahl volcano, located at the west end of Unimak Island in the central Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, is a broad shield that produced moderate-sized eruptions in 1964, 1978-79, and 1991-92. Satellite radar interferometry detected about 17 cm of volcano-wide inflation from September 1993 to October 1998. Multiple independent interferograms reveal that the deformation rate has not been steady; more inflation occurred from 1993 to 1995 than from 1995 to 1998. Numerical modeling indicates that a source located about 9 km beneath the center of the volcano inflated by about 0.05 km3 from 1993 to 1998. On the basis of the timing and volume of recent eruptions at Westdahl and the fact that it has been inflating for more than 5 years, the next eruption can be expected within the next several years.

  12. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  13. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at midlatitude or high-latitude volcanoes; (c) safety factors during unrest, which can limit where new instrumentation can safely be installed (particularly at near-vent sites that can be critical for precursor detection and eruption forecasting); and (d) the remoteness of many U.S. volcanoes (particularly those in the Aleutians and the Marianas Islands), where access is difficult or impossible most of the year. Given these difficulties, it is reasonable to anticipate that ground-based monitoring of eruptions at U.S. volcanoes will likely be performed primarily with instruments installed before unrest begins. 2. Given a growing awareness of previously undetected 2. phenomena that may occur before an eruption begins, at present the types and (or) density of instruments in use at most U.S. volcanoes is insufficient to provide reliable early warning of volcanic eruptions. As shown by the gap analysis of Ewert and others (2005), a number of U.S. volcanoes lack even rudimentary monitoring. At those volcanic systems with monitoring instrumentation in place, only a few types of phenomena can be tracked in near-real time, principally changes in seismicity, deformation, and large-scale changes in thermal flux (through satellite-based remote sensing). Furthermore, researchers employing technologically advanced instrumentation at volcanoes around the world starting in the 1990s have shown that subtle and previously undetectable phenomena can precede or accompany eruptions. Detection of such phenomena would greatly improve the ability of U.S. volcano observatories to provide accurate early warnings of impending eruptions, and is a critical capability particularly at the very high-threat volcanoes identified by Ewert and others (2005). For these two reasons, change from a reactive to a proactive volcano-monitoring strategy is clearly needed at U.S. volcanoes. Monitoring capabilities need to be expanded at virtually every volcanic center, regardless of its current state of

  14. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): the 2010-2011 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, R.; Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Serrano, I.; Villaseñor, A.; Galeano, J.

    2012-04-01

    As an example of the recent advances introduced in seismic monitoring of Deception Island volcano (Antarctica) during recent years, we describe the instrumental network deployed during the 2010-2011 survey by the Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR). The period of operation extended from December 19, 2010 to March 5, 2011. We deployed a wireless seismic network composed by four three-component seismic stations. These stations are based on 24-bit SL04 SARA dataloggers sampling at 100 sps. They use a PC with embedded linux and SEISLOG data acquisition software. We use two types of three-component seismometers: short-period Mark L4C with natural frequency of 1 Hz and medium-period Lennartz3D/5s with natural frequency of 0.2 Hz. The network was designed for an optimum spatial coverage of the northern half of Deception, where a magma chamber has been reported. Station locations include the vicinity of the Spanish base "Gabriel de Castilla" (GdC), Obsidianas Beach, a zone near the craters from the 1970 eruptions, and the Chilean Shelter located south of Pendulum Cove. Continuous data from the local seismic network are received in real-time in the base by wifi transmission. We used Ubiquiti Networks Nanostation2 antennas with 2.4 GHz, dual-polarity, 10 dBi gain, and 54 Mbps transmission rate. They have shown a great robustness and speed for real-time applications. To prioritize data acquisition when the battery level is low, we have designed a circuit that allows independent power management for the seismic station and wireless transmission system. The reception antenna located at GdC is connected to a computer running SEISCOMP. This software supports several transmission protocols and manages the visualization and recording of seismic data, including the generation of summary plots to show the seismic activity. These twelve data channels are stored in miniseed format and displayed in real time, which allows for a rapid evaluation of the seismic activity and an efficient seismo-volcanic surveillance. The data are processed and analyzed using the SEISAN database management software. In addition to the seismic network, we deployed a small-aperture seismic array south of Fumarole Bay. It is composed by 9 vertical and 1 three-component short-period stations. The 24-bit data acquisition system samples these 12 channels at 100 sps. There is also a permanent seismic station operating since 2008 and located near GdC, that is very useful for the preliminary evaluation of the seismicity at the start of the survey. This station is composed by a 16-s electrolytic seismometer (Eentec SP400) and a 24-bit datalogger (Eentec DR4000) sampling at 100 sps. During the 2010-2011 survey we identified 33 regional earthquakes, 80 volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, and 929 long-period (LP) events. The volcanic alert system has remained green (the lowest level) at all times. The seismic activity has been similar to previous surveys and remained within limits that are normal for the island.

  15. Seismovolcanic signals at Deception Island volcano, Antarctica: Wave field analysis and source modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IbáñEz, Jesús M.; Pezzo, Edoardo Del; Almendros, Javier; La Rocca, Mario; Alguacil, Gerardo; Ortiz, Ramón; GarcíA, Alicia

    2000-06-01

    The seismovolcanic signals associated with the volcanic activity of Deception Island (Antarctica), recorded during three Antarctic summers (1994-1995, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997), are analyzed using a dense small-aperture (500 m) seismic array. The visual and spectral classification of the seismic events shows the existence of long-period and hybrid isolated seismic events, and of low-frequency, quasi-monochromatic and spasmodic continuous tremors. All spectra have the highest amplitudes in the frequency band between 1 and 4 Hz, while hybrids and spasmodic tremors have also significant amplitudes in the high-frequency band (4-10 Hz). The array analysis indicates that almost all the well-correlated low-frequency signals share similar array parameters (slowness and back azimuth) and have the same source area, close to the array site. The polarization analysis shows that phases at high-frequency are mostly composed of P waves, and those phases dominated by low frequencies can be interpreted as surface waves. No clear shear waves are evidenced. From the energy evaluation, we have found that the reduced displacement values for surface and body waves are confined in a narrow interval. Volcano-tectonic seismicity is located close to the array, at a depth shallower than 1 km. The wave-field properties of the seismovolcanic signals allow us to assume a unique source model, a shallow resonating fluid-filled crack system at a depth of some hundreds of meters. All of the seismic activity is interpreted as the response of a reasonably stable stationary geothermal process. The differences observed in the back azimuth between low and high frequencies are a near-field effect. A few episodes of the degassification process in an open conduit were observed and modeled with a simple organ pipe.

  16. Fluxes of magmatic chlorine and sulfur from volcano-hydrothermal systems. Examples for Northern Kuril Islands Paramushir and Shiashkotan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    The total flux of components degassed from the magma through persistently degassing volcanoes comprises of the volcanic vapor flux from fumaroles to the atmosphere, diffuse flux through volcanic slopes and the hydrothermal flux to the local hydrologic network. The hydrothermal flux may be provided by the discharge of fluids formed at depth over the magma body and/or by acid waters which are formed by the absorption of the ascending volcanic vapor by shallow ground. The anion composition (Cl and SO4) of the discharging thermal waters from a volcano-hydrothermal system originates from the volcanic vapor and should be taken into account in estimations of the magmatic volatile output and volatile recycling in subduction zones. Here we report the chemical (major and trace elements) and isotopic composition of acidic and neutral thermal waters, chemical and isotopic composition of volcanic vapors and solute fluxes from the northern Kurilian islands Paramushir (Ebeko volcanic center) and Shiashkotan (volcanoes Sinarka and Kuntomintar). The total measured outputs of chloride and sulfur from the system in 2006-2014 were estimated on average as 730 g/s and 980 g/s, respectively, which corresponds to the equivalent fluxes of 64 t/d of HCl and 169 t/d of SO2. These values are one order of magnitude higher than the fumarolic output of Cl and S from the low-temperature fumarolic field of Ebeko (<120°C). The estimated discharge rate of hot (85°C) water from the system with ~ 3500 ppm of chloride is about 0.3 m3s-1 which is among the highest hot water natural outputs ever measured for a volcano-hydrothermal system. The total hydrothermal discharge of Cl and S from Shiashkotan island to the Sea of Okhotsk associated with magmatic activity of two volcanoes is estimated as ca. 20 t/d and 40 t/d, respectively, which is close to the fumarolic output from both volcanoes (Sinarka and Kuntomintar) estimated using the chemistry and flow rates of fumaroles those measured temperature is close to 500°C.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of subaerial lava flows of Barren Island volcano and the deep crust beneath the Andaman Island Arc, Burma Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh

    2015-06-01

    Little was known about the nature and origin of the deep crust beneath the Andaman Island Arc in spite of the fact that it formed part of the highly active Indonesian volcanic arc system, one of the important continental crust forming regions in Southeast Asia. This arc, formed as a result of subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Microplate (a sliver of the Eurasian Plate), contains only one active subaerial magmatic center, Barren Island volcano, whose evolutional timeline had remained uncertain. In this work, we present results of the first successful attempt to date crustal xenoliths and their host lava flows from the island, by incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar method, in an attempt to understand the evolutionary histories of the volcano and its basement. Based on concordant plateau and isochron ages, we establish that the oldest subaerial lava flows of the volcano are 1.58 ± 0.04 (2?) Ma, and some of the plagioclase xenocrysts have been derived from crustal rocks of 106 ± 3 (2?) Ma. Mineralogy (anorthite + Cr-rich diopside + minor olivine) and isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr < 0.7040; ?Nd > 7.0) of xenoliths not only indicate their derivation from a lower (oceanic) crustal olivine gabbro but also suggest a genetic relationship between the arc crust and the ophiolitic basement of the Andaman accretionary prism. We speculate that the basements of the forearc and volcanic arc of the Andaman subduction zone belong to a single continuous unit that was once attached to the western margin of the Eurasian Plate.

  18. Enhancement of sub-daily positioning solutions for surface deformation monitoring at Deception volcano (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, G.; Berrocoso, M.; Fernández-Ros, A.; García, A.

    2013-02-01

    Deception Island is one of the most visited places in Antarctica. There are biological, geological, and archeological features that are major attractions within Port Foster, its horse shoe-shaped natural inner bay, and two scientific bases that are occupied during austral summers. Deception Island is an active volcano, however, and needs to be monitored in order to reduce risk to people on the island. Surface deformation in response to fluid pressure is one of the main volcanic activities to observe. Automated data acquisition and processing using the global navigation satellite systems allow measurements of surface deformation in near real time. Nevertheless, the positioning repeatability in sub-daily solutions is affected by geophysical influences such as ocean tidal loading, among others. Such periodic influences must be accurately modeled to achieve similar repeatability as daily solutions that average them. However, a single solution each 24 h will average out the deformation suffered during that period, and the position update waiting time can be a limitation for near real-time purposes. Throughout the last five austral summer campaigns in Deception, using simultaneous wireless communications between benchmarks, a processing strategy was developed to achieve millimeter-level half-hourly positioning solutions that have similar repeatability as those given by 24-h solutions. For these half-hourly solutions, a tidal analysis was performed to assess any mismodeling of ocean tide loading, and a discrete Kalman filter was designed and implemented to enhance the sub-daily positioning repeatability. With these solutions, the volcano-dynamic activity resulting in localized surface deformation for the last five austral summer campaigns is addressed. Although based on only three carefully located benchmarks, it is shown that Deception has been shortening and subsiding during these last 4 years. The method's accuracy in baselines up to a few hundred kilometers assures its applicability to other volcanoes worldwide.

  19. Evidence for enhanced bioavailability of trace elements in the marine ecosystem of Deception Island, a volcano in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Deheyn, Dimitri D; Gendreau, Philippe; Baldwin, Roberta J; Latz, Michael I

    2005-07-01

    This study assessed whether trace elements present at Deception Island, an active submarine volcano in the Antarctic Peninsula, show enhanced biological availability to the local marine community. Using a weak acid extraction method to dissolve organic material and leach associated but not constitutive trace elements of sediments, fifteen elements were measured from seafloor sediment, seawater particulates, and tissues of benthic (bivalves, brittlestars, sea urchins) and pelagic (demersal and pelagic fishes, krill) organisms collected in the flooded caldera. The highest element concentrations were associated with seafloor sediment, the lowest with seawater particulates and organism tissues. In the case of Ag and Se, concentrations were highest in organism tissue, indicating contamination through the food chain and biomagnification of those elements. The elements Al, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ti, and to a lesser extent Zn, were the most concentrated of the trace elements for all sample types. This indicates that the whole ecosystem of Deception Island is contaminated with trace elements from local geothermal activity, which is also reflected in the pattern of element contamination in organisms. Accordingly, element concentrations were higher in organisms collected at Deception Island compared to those from the neighboring non-active volcanic King George Island, suggesting that volcanic activity enhances bioavailability of trace elements to marine organisms. Trace element concentrations were highest in digestive tissue of organisms, suggesting that elements at Deception Island are incorporated into the marine food web mainly through a dietary route. PMID:15649525

  20. The 1998-1999 Seismic Series At Deception Island Volcano, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, J. M.; Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Saccorotti, G.; del Pezzo, E.; Abril, M.; Ortiz, R.; Martínez-Arévalo, C.

    During the 1998-1999 Antarctic summer, the pattern of seismic activity at Deception Island volcano suffered a significant change with respect to the previous years. This change was characterized by the occurrence of an intense swarm of local earthquakes. More than 2000 local earthquakes with S-P time smaller than 4 s were recorded in the period January-February 1999. Pure volcanic events have been also detected, spe- cially long period (LP) events and volcanic tremor, and some hybrid events. Seismic monitoring was performed using two short-period small-aperture arrays, among other instruments. We selected for the analysis 863 local earthquakes, 350 LP events and tremor episodes, and 9 hybrid events, based on their signal-to-noise ratios. Propaga- tion parameters (apparent slowness and back-azimuth) for all events were estimated using the zero lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) array technique. Combining this infor- mation with measures of S-P times and other indirect evidences, two different source regions have been identified. LP seismicity is located southwestward from the Fuma- role array site at distances smaller than 1-1.5 km. In this region we find the presence of glaciers, important fractures, and thermal anomalies, which supports the hypothesis of a hydrothermal origin. Local earthquakes and hybrid events are located in a region beneath Port Foster, the inner Bay of Deception Island. This region extends from the array site to the Northeast, between depths of 0.3 and 10 km. The epicentral distances range between 0.5 and 12 km. Most hypocenters are clustered in a small volume of around 8 km3 centered at 1.5 km depth and 1.5 km Northeast of the Fumarole ar- ray. The sources of the LP seismicity and the local earthquakes are spatially distinct, which indicates that they are not produced by the same mechanisms. Moment mag- nitude analyses of the local earthquakes show an energetic uniformity in the seismic series, with average magnitude of 0.5 and very low average stress drop, around 1 bar. The study of the spatial distribution of the first motion of the P-waves suggests that dif- ferent source mechanisms acted in a very small volume. The complexity of the source region is also evidenced by the identification of distinct families of events with the same waveforms inside the main source region. The occurrence of repeatable fracture processes with low stress drop and small fault dimensions can be explained by the lu- brication of pre-existing zones of weakness by pressurized fluids. Three mechanisms could be invoked to explain the generation of the recorded seismic series at Decep- 1 tion Island: 1) a classical tectonic seismic swarm caused by a regional stress field; 2) a seismic swarm produced directly by the actual movement of magma through the source region; and 3) a seismic series caused by the stress generated by the uplift of the source area due to a magmatic injection in depth. We favor the last hypothesis since it is compatible with the majority of the characteristics of the seismicicty and explains the spatial and temporal behavior of the series. 2

  1. Ground deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1996 an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (???3000 felt by local residents, Mmax = 5.1, cumulative moment of 2.7 ??1018 N m) beneath Akutan Island in the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, produced extensive ground cracks but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Synthetic aperture radar interferograms that span the time of the swarm reveal complex island-wide deformation: the western part of the island including Akutan volcano moved upward, while the eastern part moved downward. The axis of the deformation approximately aligns with new ground cracks on the western part of the island and with Holocene normal faults that were reactivated during the swarm on the eastern part of the island. The axis is also roughly parallel to the direction of greatest compressional stress in the region. No ground movements greater than 2.83 cm were observed outside the volcano's summit caldera for periods of 4 years before or 2 years after the swarm. We modeled the deformation primarily as the emplacement of a shallow, east-west trending, north dipping dike plus inflation of a deep, Mogi-type magma body beneath the volcano. The pattern of subsidence on the eastern part of the island is poorly constrained. It might have been produced by extensional tectonic strain that both reactivated preexisting faults on the eastern part of the island and facilitated magma movement beneath the western part. Alternatively, magma intrusion beneath the volcano might have been the cause of extension and subsidence in the eastern part of the island. We attribute localized subsidence in an area of active fumaroles within the Akutan caldera, by as much as 10 cm during 1992-1993 and 1996-1998, to fluid withdrawal or depressurization of the shallow hydrothermal system. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor

    2014-05-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments.

  3. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response.

    PubMed

    Fraile-Nuez, E; González-Dávila, M; Santana-Casiano, J M; Arístegui, J; Alonso-González, I J; Hernández-León, S; Blanco, M J; Rodríguez-Santana, A; Hernández-Guerra, A; Gelado-Caballero, M D; Eugenio, F; Marcello, J; de Armas, D; Domínguez-Yanes, J F; Montero, M F; Laetsch, D R; Vélez-Belchí, P; Ramos, A; Ariza, A V; Comas-Rodríguez, I; Benítez-Barrios, V M

    2012-01-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. PMID:22768379

  4. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    PubMed Central

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; González-Dávila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Arístegui, J.; Alonso-González, I. J.; Hernández-León, S.; Blanco, M. J.; Rodríguez-Santana, A.; Hernández-Guerra, A.; Gelado-Caballero, M. D.; Eugenio, F.; Marcello, J.; de Armas, D.; Domínguez-Yanes, J. F.; Montero, M. F.; Laetsch, D. R.; Vélez-Belchí, P.; Ramos, A.; Ariza, A. V.; Comas-Rodríguez, I.; Benítez-Barrios, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. PMID:22768379

  5. Argon geochronology of late Pleistocene to Holocene Westdahl volcano, Unimak Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of selected lavas from Westdahl Volcano places time constraints on several key prehistoric eruptive phases of this large active volcano. A dike cutting old pyroclastic-flow and associated lahar deposits from a precursor volcano yields an age of 1,654+/-11 k.y., dating this precursor volcano as older than early Pleistocene. A total of 11 geographically distributed lavas with ages ranging from 47+/-14 to 127+/-2 k.y. date construction of the Westdahl volcanic center. Lava flows cut by an apparent caldera-rim structure yielded ages of 81+/-5 and 121+/-8 k.y., placing a maximum date of 81 ka on caldera formation. Late Pleistocene and Holocene lavas fill the caldera, but most of them are obscured by the large summit icecap.

  6. Debris avalanche triggered by sill intrusions in basaltic volcanoes (Piton des Neiges, La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthod, C.; Famin, V.; Bascou, J.; Michon, L.; Ildefonse, B.

    2014-12-01

    Debris avalanches derived from the flanks of volcanic islands are among the largest on Earth. Debris avalanches are rare, catastrophic destabilizations that still keep geologists debating about the mechanisms that initiate them and make them travel huge runout distances. To shed light on the trigger of such destabilizations, we studied the inland scar of a debris avalanche deposit cropping out at Piton des Neiges, a dormant and eroded basaltic volcano of La Réunion Island. The avalanche deposit rests on a pile of 50-70 sill intrusions with a shallow northward dip, i.e. toward the sea. We measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in a transect across the uppermost sill of the pile in contact with the avalanche deposit. This transect reveals a strongly asymmetric magnetic fabric, consistent with a north-directed shear movement of the upper intrusion wall. This suggests that the upper sill induced a co-intrusive shear displacement of the volcano flank toward the sea. The upper sill margin in contact with the avalanche is striated, showing that this intrusion is older than the avalanche. Striae indicate a northward direction of avalanche runout. The upper sill margin also displays a magmatic lineation consistent with a magma flow in the intrusion toward the north. There is thus a striking kinematic consistency between the directions of intrusion propagation and avalanche runout, both oriented toward the sea. From the above results, we propose that repeated sill intrusions, such as observed on Piton des Neiges, increase the instability of a volcanic edifice. Each injection induces an incremental slip of the overlying rock mass, which may eventually end up into a landslide. Sill intrusions associated with seaward displacements of volcano flank, such as inferred for the April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise (also in La Réunion), should therefore be considered as a potential trigger of debris avalanches.

  7. Potential geologic hazards of North Aleutian shelf, Bristol Bay, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Molnia, B.F.; Schwab, W.C.

    1985-02-01

    Federal OSC lease sale 92, North Aleutian shelf, Alaska, is scheduled for April 1985. The area, located in the southeastern Bering Sea, has 3 basins with sedimentary thicknesses in excess of 4 km. Six geologic conditions that could cause problems during petroleum development are: (1) seismicity, (2) recent faulting, (3) gas-charged sediment, (4) bed forms and active sediment transport, (5) scours, and (6) volcanism. Since 1953, the region has a history of at least 10 shallow earthquakes, including a 1971 back-arc event with a Richter magnitude of 5.2. The largest event impacting the entire region, a Richter magnitude 8.7 earthquake, occurred in 1938. Normal faults are located along the southern edge of the St. George basin, and on the northeastern edge of the Amak basin. Many exhibit increased offset with depth, surficial sags, and small surficial cracks. Surprising was the absence of any evidence of sea-floor sediment instability. Sonar bright spots, and possible, near-surface gas-charged sediment occur west of Amak Island and north of Unimak Island. An area of megaripples and dunes covers more than 1500 km/sup 2/. Bed forms have spacings of 20-50 m and heights of 1-3 m. Observations suggest that coarse sand may be actively transported. Thousands of scours, many linear and parallel, some greater than 800 m long, 250 m wide, and incised up to 5 m, were identified. Pavlof, an Alaskan Peninsula active volcano, located 45 km northeast of Cold Bay, has a continuous history of steam release and occasional eruption. Lahars, nuee ardentes are unknown. None of the geologic conditions identified precludes petroleum development or production. The potential impact of these factors must, however, be included in planning for future petroleum activities.

  8. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and research opportunities for Russian and American students. AVO was a three-way partnership of the federal and state geological surveys and the state university from the start. This was not a flowering of ecumenism but was rather at the insistence of the Alaska congressional delegation. Such shared enterprises are not managerially convenient, but they do bring a diversity of roles, thinking, and expertise that would not otherwise be possible. Through AVO, the USGS performs its federally mandated role in natural hazard mitigation and draws on expertise available from its network of volcano observatories. The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys performs a similar role at the state level and, in the tradition of state surveys, provides important public communications, state data base, and mapping functions. The University of Alaska Fairbanks brought seismological, remote sensing, geodetic, petrological, and physical volcanological expertise, and uniquely within US academia was able to engage students directly in volcano observatory activities. Although this "model" cannot be adopted in total elsewhere, it has served to point the USGS Volcano Hazards Program in a direction of greater openness and inclusiveness.

  9. InSAR observations of the 1995 Fogo, Cape Verde, eruption: Implications for the effects of collapse events upon island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelung, Falk; Day, Simon

    2002-06-01

    Fogo volcano, Cape Verde Islands, erupted in April 1995 after 43 years of dormancy. About 46 106 m3 of lava erupted during 7.5 weeks from vents on the SW flank of Pico do Fogo into Cha das Caldeiras. Interferograms obtained from 1993-1998 ERS SAR data show ground deformation due to the feeder dike but lack evidence for any volcano-wide deformation related to volume changes of a shallow magma reservoir. This suggests that Fogo is fed from a relatively deep, mantle-lithospheric source (>16.5 km depth), consistent with petrological data. This supports the concept that Cha das Caldeiras is the fill of a collapse scar created by a giant landslide, and not a collapse caldera overlying a central, shallow magma chamber. The disturbance of the magmatic system by giant landslides may explain why some oceanic island volcanoes with high magma supply rates currently lack well-developed shallow reservoirs.

  10. A Summary of the History and Achievements of the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka and the Kurile Islands present a serious threat to aviation on routes from North America to the Far East. On March 27, 1986, an eruption of Augustine Volcano deposited ash over Anchorage and disrupted air traffic in south-central Alaska. The consequences of the colocation of an active volcano and the largest city in Alaska were clearly evident. That event led to a three-way partnership between the US Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute and the Alaska State Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys that now maintains a continuous watch through ground instrumentation and satellite imagery providing data from which warnings of eruptions can be issued to airline operators and pilots. The eruption of Redoubt Volcano in December 1989 was AVO's first big test. It spewed volcanic ash to a height of 14,000 m (45,000 feet) and managed to catch KLM 867, a Boeing 747 aircraft in its plume under dark conditions while approaching Anchorage Airport. Further details of the early days of the Alaska Volcano Observatory will be described, along with its recent successes and challenges.

  11. Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods Cyndi Kelly1, Jesse F. Lawrence1, Cindy Ebinger2 1Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 2University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, 227 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA Low-magnitude seismic signals generated by processes that characterize volcanic and hydrothermal systems and their plumbing networks are difficult to observe remotely. Seismic records from these systems tend to be extremely 'noisy', making it difficult to resolve 3D subsurface structures using traditional seismic methods. Easily identifiable high-amplitude bursts within the noise that might be suitable for use with traditional seismic methods (i.e. eruptions) tend to occur relatively infrequently compared to the length of an entire eruptive cycle. Furthermore, while these impulsive events might help constrain the dynamics of a particular eruption, they shed little insight into the mechanisms that occur throughout an entire eruption sequence. It has been shown, however, that the much more abundant low-amplitude seismic 'noise' in these records (i.e. volcanic or geyser 'tremor') actually represents a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements that can be directly linked to magma, fluid, and volatile movement at depth. This 'noisy' data therefore likely contains valuable information about the processes occurring in the volcanic or hydrothermal system before, during and after eruption events. In this study, we present a new method to comprehensively study how the seismic source distribution of all events - including micro-events - evolves during different phases of the eruption sequence of Sierra Negra Volcano in the Galapagos Islands. We apply a back-projection search algorithm to image sources of seismic 'noise' at Sierra Negra Volcano during a proposed intrusion event. By analyzing coherent seismic energy from all possible events to all available receivers, we generate a movie showing how seismic sources change spatially and temporally during the analysis period. This approach utilizes data from the entire seismic record and could ultimately provide a more complete understanding of how seismic sources change throughout the eruptive sequence rather than during a particular eruption event. This information could help to 1) answer fundamental questions about volcano-tectonic processes and 2) make more accurate assessments of volcanic hazards. Preliminary results from application of the methodology to seismic data collected by a dense array of 3-component geophones at El Tatio Geyser Field in northern Chile during October 2012 will also be introduced.

  12. Unravelling the Geometry of Unstable Flanks of Submarine Volcanoes by Magnetic Investigation: the Case of the "sciara del Fuoco" Scar (stromboli Volcano, Aeolian Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccini, F.; Cocchi, L.; Carmisciano, C.; Speranza, F.; Marziani, F.

    2012-12-01

    Stromboli is the easternmost island of the Aeolian Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea) and one of the most active Mediterranean volcanoes. The volcanic edifice rises over 3000 m above the surrounding seafloor, from a depth of about 2000 m b.s.l. to 924 m a.s.l. The north-western flank of volcano is deeply scarred by a destructive collapse event occurred ca. 5000 years ago, and forming a big horseshoe-shaped depression, known as "Sciara del Fuoco" (SdF). This depression, 3 Km long and 2 Km wide, is supposed to extend into the sea down to 700 m b.s.l., while further basinward it turns into a fan-shaped mounted deposit down to about 2600 m b.s.l., where it merges the so-called "Stromboli Canyon". Since its formation, emerged and submerged portions of the SdF have been progressively filled by the volcanic products of the persistent activity of the Stromboli Volcano. In the last 10 years, two paroxysmal eruptions occurred in the Stromboli Volcano, during 2002-2003 and February-April 2007. During both events, the SdF has been partially covered by lava flows and affected by slope failures, also causing (for the 2002-2003 event) a local tsunami. Since the 1990's, and especially after the last two paroxysms, the submerged extension of the SdF has been intensively investigated by using swath bathymetry data. We focused principally on the magnetic anomaly pattern of the submerged SdF since the chaotic depositional system virtually cancels magnetic remanence (which at Stromboli can reach 5-10 A/m values), thus lowering magnetic residual intensity. On July 2012 we acquired new detailed sea-surface magnetic data of the SdF from the shoreline to about 7 km offshore, where the depth is more than 1800 m b.s.l. We collected data thanks to the Italian Navy ship "Nave Aretusa" and by using the Marine Magnetics SeaSPY magnetometer. At the same time, new bathymetric data were acquired in the same area by using a Kongsberg Marine multibeam systems. Although the morphologic features of the submarine prosecution of the SdF system were already studied and unveiled, the complete description of the in-depth extension of the system and the overall volume estimation is still poorly known. This has important implications for the hazard assessment of the landslide structure and most generally of the entire volcanic edifice. The application of a classical geomagnetic prospection to describe a landslide feature is an uncommon procedure yet it can be considered as innovative approach, having the advantages of effectiveness, low cost and expedition typical of the geomagnetic survey. Here we present the interpretation of the newly acquired high-resolution magnetic dataset, thanks to susceptibility and magnetic remanence values gathered from on-land rock samples at Stromboli. A 3D inverse model is here proposed, allowing a full definition of the submerged SdF structure geometry.

  13. A new SO2 emissions budget for Anatahan volcano (Mariana Islands) based on ten years of satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Brendan; Popp, Christoph; Andrews, Benjamin; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing offers great potential for the study of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions from volcanoes worldwide. Anatahan is a remote volcano in the Mariana Islands, SW Pacific. Existing SO2 emissions data from Anatahan, from ground-based UV spectrometer measurements, place the volcano among the largest natural SO2 sources worldwide. However, these measurements are limited in number and only available from intervals of eruptive activity. Activity varies widely at Anatahan: over the past decade, records held in the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program Volcanoes of the World database describe the alternation of intense eruptions with long intervals of quiescence, where much lower intensity activity took place. We present ten years of satellite-based measurements of SO2 in the atmosphere over Anatahan, using data from the UV spectrometers OMI, GOME-2, and SCIAMACHY, and the IR spectrometer AIRS. We find Anatahan's emissions to be highly variable both within and between intervals of eruption and quiescence. We demonstrate a close agreement between trends in SO2 emission evident from our remote sensing data and records of activity compiled from a range of other sources and instruments, across daily to annual temporal scales. Mean eruptive SO2 emissions at Anatahan are ~6400 t/d, and range from <1000 to >18000 t/d. Quiescent emissions are below our instrument detection limits and are therefore unlikely to exceed 150-300 t/d. Overall, accounting for both eruptive and quiescent emissions, we calculate a revised decadal mean SO2 emission rate of 1060-1200 t/d. We further calculate a total decadal SO2 yield from Anatahan of 4-5 Mt, significantly lower than the 17-34 Mt calculated if ground-based campaign data are used in isolation. The use of isolated measurements to extrapolate longer term emissions budgets is subject to clear uncertainty, and we argue that our satellite observations, covering a longer interval of Anatahan's history, are better suited to such calculations, and do not require widespread extrapolation. We propose that the use of multi-year satellite datasets, ideally in conjunction with key ground-based data and longterm records of activity, can make major improvements to existing emissions budgets at Anatahan and other volcanoes worldwide.

  14. The 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands: Chronology, volcanology, and deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Moore, R.B.; Sako, M.; White, R.A.; Koyanagi, S.K.; Chong, R.; Camacho, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    The first historical eruption on Anatahan Island occurred on 10 May 2003 from the east crater of the volcano. The eruption was preceded by several hours of seismicity. Two and a half hours before the outbreak, the number of earthquakes surged to more than 100 events per hour. At 0730 UTC, the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center issued an ash advisory. Although the eruption lasted for 3 months, the majority of erupted material was expelled during the first 2 weeks. The opening episode of the eruption resulted in a deposit of juvenile scoria and lithic clasts, the latter derived from geothermally altered colluvial fill from the vent area. The opening episode was followed by crater enlargement and deepening, which produced deposits of coarse, reddish-brown ash containing a mixture of juvenile and lithic clasts. The third episode of the eruption produced coarse ash and lapilli comprised of juvenile scoria and minor amounts of lithics. Plume heights were 4500 to 13,000 m for the initial three phases. The fourth episode, from about May 18 through early August, was characterized by smaller plume heights of 900 to 2400 m, and steam was the dominant component. Minor amounts of coarse ash and accretionary-lapilli ash comprise most of the deposits of the fourth episode, although ballistic blocks and bombs of andesite lava are also locally present. These andesite blocks were emplaced by an explosion on 14 June, which destroyed a small lava dome extruded during the first week of June. Activity waned as the summer progressed, and subsequent ash deposits accumulated in July and early August, by which time the eruption had effectively ended. In September and October, degassing and geothermal activity continued, characterized by small geysers, boiling water, and jetting steam. Noteworthy deviations from this activity were a surge event in late May-early June and the destruction of the lava dome on 14 June. We calculated on-land tephra-fall deposits to have a bulk volume of about 27.5 ?? 106 m3, covering an area of 40.6 km2. We determined the juvenile to lithic content of the deposits and corrected the bulk volume to a juvenile volume of 24.0 ?? 106 m3. We use a volume corrected density of 1.32 g/cm3 to convert the juvenile volume of 24.0 ?? 106 m3 to a magma volume of 13.2 ?? 106 m3. Using the methods of Fierstein and Nathenson (1992) [Fierstein, J., Nathenson, M., 1992. Another look at the calculation of fallout tephra volumes. Bull. Volcanology. 54, 156-167.], we computed the total eruption volume at 45.4 ?? 106 m3. Deformation surveys recorded large changes surrounding the east crater. The modeled volumetric change based on the surveys was 0.82 ?? 106 m3 of magma, which we estimate corresponds to a minimum intrusion of 10 ?? 106 m3 of magma which is in good agreement with our calculated on-land magma volume.

  15. Volcano-ice-sea interaction in the Cerro Santa Marta area, northwest James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabozo, Fernando M.; Strelin, Jorge A.; Orihashi, Yuji; Sumino, Hirochika; Keller, Randall A.

    2015-05-01

    We present here the results of detailed mapping, lithofacies analysis and stratigraphy of the Neogene James Ross Island Volcanic Group (Antarctic Peninsula) in the Cerro Santa Marta area (northwest of James Ross Island), in order to give constraints on the evolution of a glaciated volcanic island. Our field results included recognition and interpretation of seventeen volcanic and glacial lithofacies, together with their vertical and lateral arrangements, supported by four new unspiked K-Ar ages. This allowed us to conclude that the construction of the volcanic pile in this area took place during two main eruptive stages (Eruptive Stages 1 and 2), separated from the Cretaceous bedrock and from each other by two major glacial unconformities (U1 and U2). The U1 unconformity is related to Antarctic Peninsula Ice sheet expansion during the late Miocene (before 6.2 Ma) and deposition of glacial lithofacies in a glaciomarine setting. Following this glacial advance, Eruptive Stage 1 (6.2-4.6 Ma) volcanism started with subaerial extrusion of lava flows from an unrecognized vent north of the study area, with eruptions later fed from vent/s centered at Cerro Santa Marta volcano, where cinder cone deposits and a volcanic conduit/lava lake are preserved. These lava flows fed an extensive (> 7 km long) hyaloclastite delta system that was probably emplaced in a shallow marine environment. A second unconformity (U2) was related to expansion of a local ice cap, centered on James Ross Island, which truncated all the eruptive units of Eruptive Stage 1. Concomitant with glacier advance, renewed volcanic activity (Eruptive Stage 2) started after 4.6 Ma and volcanic products were fed again by Cerro Santa Marta vents. We infer that glaciovolcanic eruptions occurred under a moderately thin (~ 300 m) glacier, in good agreement with previous estimates of paleo-ice thickness for the James Ross Island area during the Pliocene.

  16. Imaging rapidly deforming ocean island volcanoes in the western Galápagos archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Ruiz, Mario; Belachew, Manahloh

    2014-01-01

    Using local body wave arrival-time tomography methods to determine 3-D seismic velocity structure, we imaged the plumbing system of Sierra Negra Volcano, Galápagos. This hot spot volcanic chain includes some of the fastest deforming volcanoes in the world, making this an ideal location to study shield volcano plumbing systems. We inverted P and S wave arrivals recorded on a 15-station temporary array between July 2009 and June 2011 using an a priori 1-D velocity model constrained by offshore refraction studies. With local seismicity from nearby volcanoes as well as the ring fault system, the model resolution is good between depths of 3 and 15.5 km. The propagation of S waves throughout this volume argues against any large high-melt accumulations, although a shallow melt sill may exist above 5 km. We image a broad low-velocity region (>25 km laterally) below Sierra Negra at depths ~8-15 km. No large, regional velocity increase is found within the limits of good resolution, suggesting that crust is thicker than 15 km beneath the western Galápagos archipelago. Our results are consistent with crustal accretion of mafic cumulates from a large-volume magma chamber that may span the boundary between preplume and accreted crust. The similarity between our results and those of Hawaii leave open the possibility that the crust has also been thickened by under-plating.

  17. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; Santana-Casiano, J.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.

    2013-12-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. (A) Natural color composite from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument aboard ENVISAT Satellite (European Space Agency), (November 9, 2011 at 14:45 UTC). Remote sensing data have been used to monitor the evolution of the volcanic emissions, playing a fundamental role during field cruises in guiding the Spanish government oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. The inset map shows the position of Canary Islands west of Africa and the study area (solid white box). (B) Location of the stations carried out from November 2011 to February 2012 at El Hierro. Black lines denote transects A-B and C-D.

  18. Use of precipitation and groundwater isotopes to interpret regional hydrology on a tropical volcanic island: Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Janik, C.J.; Kauahikaua, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for groundwater in the Kilauea volcano area of the Island of Hawaii. A network of up to 66 precipitation collectors was emplaced in the study area and sampled twice yearly for a 3-year period. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are correlated with trade wind, rain shadow, and high- elevation climatological patterns. Temporal variations in precipitation isotopes are controlled more by the frequency of storms than by seasonal temperature fluctuations. Results from this study suggest that (1) sampling network design must take into account areal variations in rainfall patterns on islands and in continental coastal areas and (2) isotope/elevation gradients on other tropical islands may be predictable on the basis of similar climatology. Groundwater was sampled yearly in coastal springs, wells, and a few high-elevation springs. Areal contrasts in groundwater stable isotopes and tritium indicate that the volcanic rift zones compartmentalize the regional groundwater system, isolating the groundwater south of Kilauea's summit and rift zones. Part of the Southwest Rift gone appears to act as a conduit for water from higher elevation, but there is no evidence for downrift flow in the springs and shallow wells sampled in the lower East Rift Zone.

  19. Three-dimensional shear velocity anisotropic model of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Landès, Matthieu; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2015-01-01

    We cross correlate 4 years of seismic noise from the seismic network of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) to measure the group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We average measurements from vertical and radial components to obtain 577 Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The transverse components provided 395 Love wave dispersion curves. We regionalize the group velocities measurements into 2-D velocity maps between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we locally inverted these maps for a pseudo 3-D anisotropic shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level using a Neighborhood Algorithm. The 3-D isotropic shear-wave model shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The anomaly located below the present "Plaine des Sables" could be related to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body located below the summit of the volcano likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the dismantled "Les Alizés" Volcano. Radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: positive anisotropy above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de la Fournaise with an accumulation of horizontal lava flows and the second one below the sea level with a negative anisotropy corresponding to the ancient edifice of Piton de la Fournaise dominated by intrusions of vertical dykes.

  20. 75 FR 64957 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... fishery in the Eastern Aleutian District and the Bering Sea subarea on September 1, 2010 (75 FR 53606... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY... remain anonymous). Attachments to electronic comments will be accepted in Microsoft Word, Excel,...

  1. Real-time infrasonic monitoring of the eruption at a remote island volcano using seismoacoustic cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Ichihara, Mie

    2016-02-01

    On 2013 November 20, a submarine eruption started close to Nishinoshima island, which lies ˜1000 km south of Tokyo. Real-time monitoring of the eruption is crucial for understanding the formation processes of the new volcano island and related disaster prevention. In situ monitoring, however, is difficult in practice because the closest inhabited island, Chichijima, is 130 km away from Nishinoshima. This study presents an infrasonic monitoring method that uses cross-correlating records at a pair of online stations on Chichijima. One is the horizontal ground velocity recorded at a permanent seismic station operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The seismic records were corrected for atmospheric pressure using an empirical ground response to infrasound. The other is the air pressure recorded at the JMA Meteorological Observatory. For each station, we divided the whole records into 3600-s segments. To suppress outliers, each segment was normalized by the envelope function. We then calculated cross-correlation functions between the pair of stations using the fast Fourier transform. They present clear successive arrivals of infrasound coming from Nishinoshima. We also conducted an offline tripartite-array observation using three low-frequency microphones with a station spacing of ˜50 m installed in 2013 May. The array analysis supports the results obtained from the online stations. The typical root-mean-squared amplitude is on the order of 0.01 Pa, and the typical duration is several days. The amplitudes were primarily controlled by the effective sound velocity structure from Nishinoshima to Chichijima. The infrasonic observations together with the meteorological observation at Chichijima suggest that infrasonic activity was not present in the first two weeks in 2015 January. With the help of a more quantitative estimation of the meteorological effect, we could infer eruptive activity in real time. Now many online seismic stations are available worldwide. This study shows that installation of another infrasonic sensor close to the existing seismic station (˜1 km) is useful for monitoring a remote island volcano in real time.

  2. Boron isotopic composition of fumarolic condensates from some volcanoes in Japanese island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masao; Kanzaki, Tadao; Ozawa, Takejiro; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1982-11-01

    Boron samples from 40 fumarolic condensates from volcanoes in the Ryukyu arc (Satsuma Iwo-jima and Shiratori Iwo-yama) and the North-east Japan arc (Usu-shinzan, Showa-shinzan, Esan and Issaikyo-yama) all have 11B /10B ratios close to 4.07. Higher values, from 4.09 to 4.13, were only observed in condensates from volcanoes in the southernmost end of the North-east Japan arc (Nasu-dake), the northern part of the Izu-Bonin arc (Hakone), and the North Mariana arc (Ogasawara Iwo-jima). These higher values suggest geological interaction of the magmas with sea-water enriched in 11B.

  3. On the predictability of volcano-tectonic events by low frequency seismic noise analysis at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárraga, M.; Carniel, R.; Ortiz, R.; Marrero, J. M.; García, A.

    2006-05-01

    The island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), is showing possible signs of reawakening after its last basaltic strombolian eruption, dated 1909 at Chinyero. The main concern relates to the central active volcanic complex Teide - Pico Viejo, which poses serious hazards to the properties and population of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), and which has erupted several times during the last 5000 years, including a subplinian phonolitic eruption (Montaña Blanca) about 2000 years ago. In this paper we show the presence of low frequency seismic noise which possibly includes tremor of volcanic origin and we investigate the feasibility of using it to forecast, via the material failure forecast method, the time of occurrence of discrete events that could be called Volcano-Tectonic or simply Tectonic (i.e. non volcanic) on the basis of their relationship to volcanic activity. In order to avoid subjectivity in the forecast procedure, an automatic program has been developed to generate forecasts, validated by Bayes theorem. A parameter called "forecast gain" measures (and for the first time quantitatively) what is gained in probabilistic terms by applying the (automatic) failure forecast method. The clear correlation between the obtained forecasts and the occurrence of (Volcano-)Tectonic seismic events - a clear indication of a relationship between the continuous seismic noise and the discrete seismic events - is the explanation for the high value of this "forecast gain" in both 2004 and 2005 and an indication that the events are Volcano-Tectonic rather than purely Tectonic.

  4. Enhancement of sub-daily positioning solutions for surface deformation surveillance at El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, G.; García, A.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Marrero, J. M.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2013-06-01

    El Hierro Island in the Canary Archipelago recently experienced a submerged eruption a few kilometers off its southern shore, detected 2011 October 10 on the island's south-rift alignment. The seismic activity suddenly increased around mid 2011 July, and ground deformation was then detected on the only geodetic benchmark that is continuously observed by global navigation satellite systems techniques and provides public data access. Based on that information, several other global navigation satellite system signal receivers were deployed on the island to provide continuous observation. For data collected by these receivers, a processing strategy was applied to achieve millimeter-level half-hourly positioning solutions. Position updates every 24 h are satisfactory to determine tectonic-plates' velocities. Updates near 1 s or less are required to characterize seismic waves. In between, minute-level updates are well suited for monitoring active volcano's inflation or deflation, providing an optimal time resolution of the local ground deformation. In half-hourly positioning solutions, the heterogeneous satellites' distribution in their orbital planes gives different constraints during satellite-constellation revolution, which can bias the solutions. Also, several geophysical influences can bias the solutions, including those related to gravitational movements. These influences have mostly semi-diurnal periodicities and may be considered Gaussian colored noise on the position's time series. Daily solutions that average out these influences can be applied in active volcanoes, but they can impose some limitations because they average the daily deformation, and the update waiting time is not suitable when near real-time surveillance is mandatory. These semi-diurnal biases do need to be removed or minimized to achieve millimeter-level sub-daily positioning solutions, however, and to do so, a discrete Kalman filter was applied to enhance the half-hourly positioning solutions required during El Hierro's 2011-2012 unrest and eruption. Throughout El Hierro's volcanic activity, there were correlations between ground deformation and seismic activity. Many times the deformation preceded the earthquakes, though at other times the seismic activity was followed by the ground deformation response. This correlation is the outcome of ground deformation taking place as the result of energy accommodation, whereas seismic events correspond to energy release. Hence, those observed correlations indicate that the Kalman filter-enhanced half-hourly positioning solutions measured local ground deformation accurately; they were not a mathematical "trick" producing a spurious precision.

  5. Identifying potential habitat for the endangered Aleutian shield fern using topographical characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duarte, Adam; Wolcott, Daniel M.; Chow, T. Edwin, Ricca, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The Aleutian shield fern Polystichum aleuticum is endemic to the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska and is listed as endangered pursuant to the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Despite numerous efforts to discover new populations of this species, only four known populations are documented to date, and information is needed to prioritize locations for future surveys. Therefore, we incorporated topographical habitat characteristics (elevation, slope, aspect, distance from coastline, and anthropogenic footprint) found at known Aleutian shield fern locations into a Geographical Information System (GIS) model to create a habitat suitability map for the entirety of the Andreaonof Islands. A total of 18 islands contained 489.26 km2 of highly suitable and moderately suitable habitat when weighting each factor equally. This study reports a habitat suitability map for the endangered Aleutian shield fern using topographical characteristics, which can be used to assist current and future recovery efforts for the species.

  6. Tephra-Producing Eruptions of Holocene Age at Akutan Volcano, Alaska; Frequency, Magnitude, and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.; Schwaiger, H.

    2012-12-01

    Akutan Volcano in the eastern Aleutian Islands of Alaska is one of the most historically active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc (43 eruptions in about the past 250 years). Explosive eruptions pose major hazards to aircraft flying north Pacific air routes and to local infrastructure on Akutan and neighboring Unalaska Island. Air travel, infrastructure, and population in the region have steadily increased during the past several decades, and thus it is important to better understand the frequency, magnitude, and characteristics of tephra-producing eruptions. The most recent eruption was a VEI 2 event on March 8-May 21, 1992 that resulted in minor ash emissions and trace amounts of proximal fallout. Nearly continuous low-level emission of ash and steam is typical of historical eruptions, and most of the historical events have been similar in magnitude to the 1992 event. The most recent major eruption occurred about 1600 yr. B.P. and likely produced the ca. 2-km diameter summit caldera and inundated valleys that head on the volcano with pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are tens of meters thick. The 1600 yr. B.P. eruption covered most of Akutan Island with up to 2.5 m of coarse scoriaceous tephra fall, including deposits 0.5-1 m thick near the City of Akutan. Tephra-fall deposits associated with this eruption exhibit a continuous sequence of black, fine to coarse scoriaceous lapilli overlain by a lithic-rich facies and finally a muddy aggregate-rich facies indicating water involvement during the latter stages of the eruption. Other tephra deposits of Holocene age on Akutan Island include more than a dozen discrete fine to coarse ash beds and 3-6 beds of scoriaceous, coarse lapilli tephra indicating that there have been several additional major eruptions (>VEI 3) of Akutan Volcano during the Holocene. Radiocarbon dates on these events are pending. In addition to tephra falls from Akutan, other fine ash deposits are found on the island that originated from other Aleutian arc volcanoes. Tephra deposits from typical VEI 2 historical eruptions are not well preserved on the island so tephra-fall frequency estimated from stratigraphic studies is underestimated. Akutan Island is home to the largest seafood processing plant in North America and has a workforce of more than one thousand people. Other infrastructure consists of a recently constructed paved airfield on neighboring Akun Island (25 km east of the active vent) and a new boat harbor at the head of Akutan Harbor. Plans to develop greenhouses, tourism, and increased cold storage capacity on Akutan and Akun Islands also are evolving. To support the power demands of the development efforts, The City of Akutan is considering the utilization of geothermal resources on the island that are located in Hot Springs Bay valley northwest of the city. All of the existing and planned infrastructure, water supply, and residential areas are about 12 km downwind (east) of the volcano and are at risk from ash-producing eruptions. The historical eruptive history suggests that VEI 2 eruptions are plausible in the near future and the Holocene tephra-fall record indicates that large eruptions (VEI 4 or larger) occur about every few thousand years. Numerical modeling of tephra fallout based on the record of ash-producing eruptions will be used to improve tephra-fall hazard assessments for the area.

  7. Characterization of pyroclastic deposits and pre-eruptive soils following the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Island Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Michaelson, G.; Ping, C.-L.; Plumlee, G.; Hageman, P.

    2010-01-01

    The 78 August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Island volcano blanketed the island in newly generated pyroclastic deposits and deposited ash into the ocean and onto nearby islands. Concentrations of water soluble Fe, Cu, and Zn determined from a 1:20 deionized water leachate of the ash were sufficient to provide short-term fertilization of the surface ocean. The 2008 pyroclastic deposits were thicker in concavities at bases of steeper slopes and thinner on steep slopes and ridge crests. By summer 2009, secondary erosion had exposed the pre-eruption soils along gulley walls and in gully bottoms on the southern and eastern slopes, respectively. Topographic and microtopographic position altered the depositional patterns of the pyroclastic flows and resulted in pre-eruption soils being buried by as little as 1 m of ash. The different erosion patterns gave rise to three surfaces on which future ecosystems will likely develop: largely pre-eruptive soils; fresh pyroclastic deposits influenced by shallowly buried, pre-eruptive soil; and thick (>1 m) pyroclastic deposits. As expected, the chemical composition differed between the pyroclastic deposits and the pre-eruptive soils. Pre-eruptive soils hold stocks of C and N important for establishing biota that are lacking in the fresh pyroclastic deposits. The pyroclastic deposits are a source for P and K but have negligible nutrient holding capacity, making these elements vulnerable to leaching loss. Consequently, the pre-eruption soils may also represent an important long-term P and K source. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  8. IESID: Automatic system for monitoring ground deformation on the Deception Island volcano (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Páez, Raúl; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; de Gil, Amós

    2012-11-01

    When establishing the relative distance between two GNSS-GPS stations with sub-centimeter accuracy, it is necessary to have auxiliary data, some of which can only be collected some time after the moment of measurement. However, for monitoring highly-active geodynamic areas, such as volcanoes and landslides, data precision is not as essential as rapid availability, processing of data in real-time, and fast interpretation of the results. This paper describes the development of an integrated automatic system for monitoring volcanic deformation in quasi real-time, applied to the Deception volcano (Antarctica). This experimental system integrates two independent modules that enable researchers to monitor and control the status of the GNSS-GPS stations, and to determine a surface deformation parameter. It comprises three permanent stations, one of which serves as the reference for assessing the relative distance in relation to the other two. The availability of GNSS-GPS data in quasi real-time is achieved by means of a WiFi infrastructure and automated data processing. This system provides, in quasi real-time, a time series of varying distances that tells us the extent to which any ground deformation is taking place.

  9. Eruption Forecasting: Success and Surprise at Kasatochi and Okmok Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prejean, S.; Power, J.; Brodsky, E.

    2008-12-01

    In the summer of 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) successfully forecast eruption at an unmonitored volcano, Kasatochi, and was unable to forecast eruption at a well monitored volcano, Okmok. We use these case studies to explore the limitations and opportunities of seismically monitored and unmonitored systems and to evaluate situations when we can expect to succeed and when we must expect to fail in eruption forecasting. Challenges in forecasting eruptions include interpreting seismicity in context of volcanic history, developing a firm understanding of distance scales over which pre- and co-eruptive seismic signals are observed, and improving our ability to discriminate processes causing tremor. Kasatochi Volcano is a 3 km wide island in the central Aleutian Islands with no confirmed historical activity. Little is known about the eruptive history of the volcano. It was not considered an immediate threat until 3 days prior to eruption. A report of ground shaking by a biology field crew on the island on August 4 was the first indication of unrest. On August 6 a vigorous seismic swarm became apparent on the nearest seismic stations 40 km distant. The aviation color code/volcano alert level at Kasatochi was increased to Yellow/Advisory in response to increasing magnitude and frequency of earthquakes. The color code/alert level was increased to Orange/Watch on August 7 when volcanic tremor was observed in the wake of the largest earthquake in the sequence, a M 5.6. Three hours after the onset of volcanic tremor, eruption was confirmed by satellite data and the color code/alert level increased to Red/Warning. Eruption forecasting was possible only due to the exceptionally large moment release of pre-eruptive seismicity. The key challenge in evaluating the situation was distinguishing between tectonic activity and a volcanic swarm. It is likely there were weeks to months of precursory seismicity, however little instrumental record exists due to the lack of a seismic network on Kasatochi Island. Unlike Kasatochi, Okmok volcano, also located in the central Aleutian Islands, hosts 13 telemetered seismic stations and several telemetered GPS stations. The volcano has received considerable study by AVO, and the record of historical eruptions is well known. Despite regular scrutiny of Okmok data, the 2008 eruption was a surprise as there were fewer than 3 hours of clear pre-eruptive seismicity. The color code/alert level at Okmok went directly from Green/Normal to Red/Warning on July 12 after eruptive activity began. Interpretation of co-eruptive seismicity remained a challenge through the course of the eruption as bursts of volcanic tremor often did not correlate immediately with ash output at the vent as observed in satellite data.

  10. The Submarine Volcano Eruption off El Hierro Island: Effects on the Scattering Migrant Biota and the Evolution of the Pelagic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  11. The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island: effects on the scattering migrant biota and the evolution of the pelagic communities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  12. Towards a Proactive Risk Mitigation Strategy at La Fossa Volcano, Vulcano Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biass, S.; Gregg, C. E.; Frischknecht, C.; Falcone, J. L.; Lestuzzi, P.; di Traglia, F.; Rosi, M.; Bonadonna, C.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive risk assessment framework was built to develop proactive risk reduction measures for Vulcano Island, Italy. This framework includes identification of eruption scenarios; probabilistic hazard assessment, quantification of hazard impacts on the built environment, accessibility assessment on the island and risk perception study. Vulcano, a 21 km2 island with two primary communities host to 900 permanent residents and up to 10,000 visitors during summer, shows a strong dependency on the mainland for basic needs (water, energy) and relies on a ~2 month tourism season for its economy. The recent stratigraphy reveals a dominance of vulcanian and subplinian eruptions, producing a range of hazards acting at different time scales. We developed new methods to probabilistically quantify the hazard related to ballistics, lahars and tephra for all eruption styles. We also elaborated field- and GIS- based methods to assess the physical vulnerability of the built environment and created dynamic models of accessibility. Results outline the difference of hazard between short and long-lasting eruptions. A subplinian eruption has a 50% probability of impacting ~30% of the buildings within days after the eruption, but the year-long damage resulting from a long-lasting vulcanian eruption is similar if tephra is not removed from rooftops. Similarly, a subplinian eruption results in a volume of 7x105 m3 of material potentially remobilized into lahars soon after the eruption. Similar volumes are expected for a vulcanian activity over years, increasing the hazard of small lahars. Preferential lahar paths affect critical infrastructures lacking redundancy, such as the road network, communications systems, the island's only gas station, and access to the island's two evacuation ports. Such results from hazard, physical and systemic vulnerability help establish proactive volcanic risk mitigation strategies and may be applicable in other island settings.

  13. Mt. St. Augustine, Alaska: Geochemical evolution of an eastern Aleutian volcanic center

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.E. . Dept. of Geology); Harmon, R.S. . Kingsley Dunham Centre); Moorbath, S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Sigmarsson, O. )

    1993-04-01

    Mt. St. Augustine is a calc-alkaline Quaternary volcano, situated within Cook Inlet, Alaska. The island is composed of low- to medium-K andesite and dacite domes and pyroclastic flows. Major element variations indicate the magmatic evolution is dominantly influenced by fractionation and magma-mixing processes. Incompatible element and isotopic compositions suggest that despite its continental location, crustal assimilation is not significant factor in magmatic evolution. Alkali contents for Augustine are generally lower than elsewhere in the Aleutians (e.g. Augustine Cs/Rb = 0.016--0.024, K/Rb = 372--553; Aleutians Cs/Rb = 0.016--0.17, K/Rb = 231--745). Sr- and Nd-isotope ratios encompass narrow ranges ([sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.70317--0.70343; [sup 143]Nd/[sup 144]Nd = 0.513011--0.513085), characteristic of uncontaminated mantle-derived melts. U-Th disequilibrium isotopic values also indicate little or no assimilation of evolved continental crust. Pb-isotopic ranges are also relatively restricted ([sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 18.62--18.82; [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 15.54--15.57; [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 38.18--38.34) and comparison with north Pacific enriched (OIB) and depleted (MORB) mantle sources suggest the incorporation of only a small percentage of subducted terrigenous sediments. A model for Augustine magma genesis is proposed where parental magmas are generated by 5--20% partial melting of a lherzolite mantle with up to a 5% subducted terrigenous sediment component. The major influence of the thickened continental crust is to prevent the ascent and eruption of basaltic magma. The data exhibit no temporal variations, indicating that the magmatic system which produced the historic eruptions is well established.

  14. Vapor deposition of trace elements from degassed basaltic lava, Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutain, J. P.; Aloupogiannis, P.; Delorme, H.; Person, A.; Blanc, P.; Robaye, G.

    1990-04-01

    Silica-tube sublimates resulting from the cooling of high-temperature volcanic gases from degassed lava in lava tunnels have been sampled at Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Mineral phases deposited in the tube are mainly halides (Na, K and Cu chlorides, Si and K fluorides). The distribution of most of the chemical elements as a function of the temperature is mainly controlled by their volatility. Volatile elements such as Rb, Cs, Se, Pb and Tl are associated with low-temperature deposits, whereas refractory elements such as R.E.E., alkaline earth, Sc, Ta, Hf, Th and Zr are not detected. The mineral assemblages are characterized by the lack of sulfides, sulfates, native sulfur and oxides. In the same way, numerous transition and semi-metallic elements are lacking. This is interpreted as the result of the magma transport in surface lava tunnels, leading to extensive degassing upstream of the collection site.

  15. Tilt recorded by a portable broadband seismograph: The 2003 eruption of Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, D.A.; Pozgay, S.H.; Shore, P.J.; Sauter, A.W.; White, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The horizontal components of broadband seismographs are highly sensitive to tilt, suggesting that commonly deployed portable broadband seismic sensors may record important tilt information associated with volcanic eruptions. We report on a tilt episode that coincides with the first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano on May 10, 2003. The tilt was recorded by a Strekheisen STS-2 seismograph deployed in an underground insulated chamber 7 km west of the active vent. An ultra-long period signal with a dominant period of several hours was recorded on the E-W component beginning at 06:20 GMT on May 10, which coincides with the onset of continuous volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity and is one hour prior to the eruption time estimated by the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. The signal is much smaller on the N-S component and absent on the vertical component, suggesting it results from tilt that is approximately radial with respect to the active vent. An estimate of tilt as a function of time is recovered by deconvolving the record to acceleration and dividing by the acceleration of gravity. The record indicates an initial episode of tilt downward away from the volcanic center from 06:20-09:30 GMT, which we interpret as inflation of the shallow volcanic source. The tilt reverses, recording deflation, from 09:30 until 17:50, after which the tilt signal becomes insignificant. The inflation corresponds to a period of numerous VT events, whereas fewer events were recorded during the deflation episode, and the VT events subsequently resumed after the end of the deflationary tilt. The maximum tilt of 2 microradians can be used to estimate the volume of the source inflation (???2 million in m3), assuming a simple Mogi source model. These calculations are consistent with other estimates of source volume if reasonable source depths are assumed. Examination of broadband records of other eruptions may disclose further previously unrecognized tilt signals. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Geomorphic evolution of the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island, Indian Ocean): Competition between volcanic construction and erosion since 1.4 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvany, Tiffany; Lahitte, Pierre; Nativel, Pierre; Gillot, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Réunion Island (Indian Ocean) is a volcanic complex whose eruptive history was dominated by the activity of two main edifices: Piton des Neiges (PN) and Piton de la Fournaise (PF) volcanoes. The tropical climate induces erosion processes that permanently compete with volcanic constructional processes. Exposed to the trade winds and associated heavy rainfalls, the northeastern part of the island exhibits the most complex morphological evolution. Geomorphological analysis, performed on a 50 m DEM and associated to new K-Ar ages has clarified the overall history of PN volcano. Each massif is assigned to one of the main building stages of the edifice. In addition, the arrangement of these different massifs reveals that the eruptive phases have led to successive relief inversions and successive excavations of large central depressions in the proximal area. As a result, the younger massifs are always located in more proximal parts of the volcano, the youngest being close to the edifice center. In distal areas, early lava flows were channeled into valleys incised along the massif boundaries, leading to a more complex geochronological organization. Quantitative study of the dissection of PN volcano allows us to propose a minimum eroded volume of 101 ± 44 and 105 ± 41 km 3 for the Mafate and Cilaos "Cirques" (depressions), respectively, during the last 180 kyr and a minimum average long-term erosion rate of 1.2 ± 0.4 km 3/ka. This leads us to estimate the removed volume during the whole history of PN volcano (> 1000 km 3) as equivalent to the volume of the deposits identified on the submarine flanks of Piton des Neiges volcano. Therefore, as regressive erosion appears to be the prevailing geomorphic process during the whole PN history, it questions the presence of major flank collapses younger than 1.4 Ma on this volcano. Erosion processes have largely been neglected in recent models, but our study emphasizes them as a key component of landscape development and a major process in the morphological evolution of Réunion Island that has to be fully integrated in future studies.

  17. Long- and short-term temporal variations of the diffuse CO2 emission from Timanfaya volcano, Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, P. A.; Padilla, G.; Calvo, D.; Padrón, E.; Melian, G.; Dionis, S.; Nolasco, D.; Barrancos, J.; Rodríguez, F.; Pérez, N.

    2012-04-01

    Lanzarote Island is an emergent part of the East Canary Ridge and it is situated approximately 100 km from the NW coast of Morocco, covering an area of about 795km2. The largest historical eruption of the Canary Islands, Timanfaya, took place during 1730-36 in this island when long-term eruptions from a NE-SW-trending fissure formed the Montañas del Fuego. The last eruption at Lanzarote Island occurred during 1824, Tinguaton volcano, and produced a much smaller lava flow that reached the SW coast. At present, one of the most prominent phenomena at Timanfaya volcanic field is the high maintained superficial temperatures occurring in the area since the 1730 volcanic eruption. The maximum temperatures recorded in this zone are 605°C, taken in a slightly inclined well 13 m deep. Since fumarolic activity is absent at the surface environment of Lanzarote, to study the diffuse CO2 emission becomes an ideal geochemical tool for monitoring its volcanic activity. Soil CO2 efflux surveys were conducted throughout Timanfaya volcanic field and surrounding areas during the summer periods of 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, fall period of 2010 and winter, spring and summer periods of 2011 to investigate long and short-term temporal variations of the diffuse CO2 emission from Timanfaya volcano. Soil CO2 efflux surveys were undertaken at Timanfaya volcanic field always under stable weather conditions to minimize effects of meteorological conditions on the CO2 at the soil atmosphere. Approximately 370-430 sampling sites were selected at the surface environment of Timanfaya to obtain an even distribution of the sampling points over the study area. The accumulation chamber method (Parkinson et al., 1981) was used to perform soil CO2 efflux measurements in-situ by means of a portable non dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO2 analyzer, which was interfaced to a hand size computer that runs data acquisition software. At each sampling site, soil temperature at 15 and 40cm depth was also measured by means of a thermocouple together with soil gas samples collected during the campaign of 2010 to evaluate the chemical and isotopic composition of soil gases. Diffuse CO2 emission values have ranged between non detectable values to 34 g m-2 d-1, and most of the study area have shown relatively low values, around the detection limit of the instrument (~0,5 g m-2 d-1). Higher soil CO2 diffuse emission values were observed where thermal anomalies occur, indicating a convective mechanism transport of gas from depth at these areas. Total CO2 outputs of the study area have been estimated in the range 41-518 t d-1 during the study period. Long-term temporal variation on total CO2 diffuse emission shows a peak recorded on winter 2011, suggesting a seasonal control on the CO2 emission. As part of the volcanic surveillance program and to understand the dynamics of CO2 diffuse emission at Timanfaya volcanic zone, an automatic geochemical station was installed in July 2010 to monitor the CO2 emission and investigate the short-term temporal variation. Time series of soil CO2 efflux shows also a close relationship with seasonal changes mainly due to rainfall.

  18. Major and rare gases at White Island Volcano, New Zealand: Origin and flux of volatiles

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, B. ); Giggenbach, W.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Analyses of fumarolic gases at White Island, New Zealand, are reported with special emphasis on rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe). Normalization of major species to rare gases have lead to the identification of several sources: air-saturated meteoric (or marine) water, a magma body, the crust and/or sediments. When compared to Mid Ocean Ridge discharges, the White Island gas discharge represents about 3%, 0.7%, 0.1% and 0.05% of the global water, carbon, sulfur and Helium-3 discharges, respectively. This balance shows that, except for {sup 3}He which derives from the mantle, practically all rare gases, water and carbon, and part of sulfur, derive from originally superficial sources.

  19. Infrasonic Influence of Volcanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosman, Ashley

    2014-03-01

    My presentation will consist of a poster on the use of ring laser interferometers to detect infrasound. The research was performed during the summer of 2013 and it focused on the finding infrasound emissions created by volcanic activity. I will explain how a ring laser works and discuss how I analyze the collected data using Fast Fourier Transforms. Due to the extreme distances over which infrasound can travel, I will also stress the need to compare the detected responses to specific volcanic eruptions. Finally, I will purpose practical applications of my research. One of the more promising applications is to use ring lasers to detect volcanic activity in remote areas such as parts of the Aleutian Islands. There is considerable air traffic over the Aleutian Islands. Volcanic plumes are a significant aviation hazard and can damage jet engines to the extent that they will no longer operate. Thank you to the NSF ans NASA foundations for providing funding for this reseach.

  20. Volcano-tectonic implications of 3-D velocity structures derived from joint active and passive source tomography of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a velocity model of the onshore and offshore regions around the southern part of the island of Hawaii, including southern Mauna Kea, southeastern Hualalai, and the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa, and Kilauea, and Loihi seamount. The velocity model was inverted from about 200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and air gun shots recorded at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Reconstructed volcanic structures of the island provide us with an improved understanding of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes and their interactions. The summits and upper rift zones of the active volcanoes are characterized by high-velocity materials, correlated with intrusive magma cumulates. These high-velocity materials often do not extend the full lengths of the rift zones, suggesting that rift zone intrusions may be spatially limited. Seismicity tends to be localized seaward of the most active intrusive bodies. Low-velocity materials beneath parts of the active rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa suggest discontinuous rift zone intrusives, possibly due to the presence of a preexisting volcanic edifice, e.g., along Mauna Loa beneath Kilauea's southwest rift zone, or alternatively, removal of high-velocity materials by large-scale landsliding, e.g., along Mauna Loa's western flank. Both locations also show increased seismicity that may result from edifice interactions or reactivation of buried faults. New high-velocity regions are recognized and suggest the presence of buried, and in some cases, previously unknown rift zones, within the northwest flank of Mauna Loa, and the south flanks of Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Mauna Kea. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Volcano-tectonic implications of 3-D velocity structures derived from joint active and passive source tomography of the island of Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaewoo; Morgan, Julia K.; Zelt, Colin A.; Okubo, Paul G.

    2009-09-01

    We present a velocity model of the onshore and offshore regions around the southern part of the island of Hawaii, including southern Mauna Kea, southeastern Hualalai, and the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa, and Kilauea, and Loihi seamount. The velocity model was inverted from about 200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and air gun shots recorded at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Reconstructed volcanic structures of the island provide us with an improved understanding of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes and their interactions. The summits and upper rift zones of the active volcanoes are characterized by high-velocity materials, correlated with intrusive magma cumulates. These high-velocity materials often do not extend the full lengths of the rift zones, suggesting that rift zone intrusions may be spatially limited. Seismicity tends to be localized seaward of the most active intrusive bodies. Low-velocity materials beneath parts of the active rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa suggest discontinuous rift zone intrusives, possibly due to the presence of a preexisting volcanic edifice, e.g., along Mauna Loa beneath Kilauea's southwest rift zone, or alternatively, removal of high-velocity materials by large-scale landsliding, e.g., along Mauna Loa's western flank. Both locations also show increased seismicity that may result from edifice interactions or reactivation of buried faults. New high-velocity regions are recognized and suggest the presence of buried, and in some cases, previously unknown rift zones, within the northwest flank of Mauna Loa, and the south flanks of Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Mauna Kea.

  2. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  3. Observations on basaltic lava streams in tubes from Kilauea Volcano, island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Cashman, K.V.; Mattox, T.N.; Christina, Heliker C.; Hon, K.A.; Mangan, M.T.; Thornber, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    From 1986 to 1997, the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea produced a vast pahoehoe flow field fed by lava tubes that extended 10-12 km from vents on the volcano's east rift zone to the ocean. Within a kilometer of the vent, tubes were as much as 20 m high and 10-25 m wide. On steep slopes (4-10??) a little farther away from the vent, some tubes formed by roofing over of lava channels. Lava streams were typically 1-2 m deep flowing within a tube that here was typically 5 m high and 3 m wide. On the coastal plain (<1??), tubes within inflated sheet flows were completely filled, typically 1-2 m high, and several tens of meters wide. Tubes develop as a flow's crust grows on the top, bottom, and sides of the tubes, restricting the size of the fluid core. The tubes start out with nearly elliptical cross-sectional shapes, many times wider than high. Broad, flat sheet flows evolve into elongate tumuli with an axial crack as the flanks of the original flow were progressively buried by breakouts. Temperature measurements and the presence of stalactites in active tubes confirmed that the tube walls were above the solidus and subject to melting. Sometimes, the tubes began downcutting. Progressive downcutting was frequently observed through skylights; a rate of 10 cm/d was measured at one skylight for nearly 2 months.

  4. Hafnium in Aleutian lavas: Isotopic and trace element evidence for slab melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Gerseny, M. G.

    2005-12-01

    New isotopic and trace element analyses of 65 Aleutian lavas are used investigate the sources of Hf in arc magmas and the origin of high Nd/Hf and Sm/Hf in island arc lavas compared to global MORB (i.e. HFSE depletion). A well-characterized subducting sediment composition and relatively simple subduction system make the Aleutian arc an ideal natural laboratory to study the nature of source components in island arc lavas. Aleutian basalts are commonly characterized by high Nd/Hf (5-8) and Sm/Hf (1.45-2.25) compared to similarly evolved MORB (Nd/Hf = 4, Sm/Hf=1.35). The Nd/Hf ratios in Aleutian lavas are not correlated with the observed westward (along-arc) increases in both ?Hf and ?Nd, which have been related to the composition and quantity of sediment being subducted beneath the Aleutians. Sample suites from Korovin, Little Sitkin and other volcanic centers show that Nd/Hf evolves to lower values with increasing SiO2. Thus high Nd/Hf appears to be both a primary magma characteristic and, to a first order, unrelated to the Nd and Hf isotopic variation. Two-component mixtures of bulk subducting sediment (Nd/Hf =6) and depleted mantle (Nd/Hf = 3-4) cannot create mixtures with both the isotopic and trace element characteristics of the least evolved Aleutian lavas. Moreover, since high Nd/Hf lavas occur over the whole range of measured ?Hf, there appears to be no two-component mixture that can adequately explain both the trace element and isotopic characteristics of the least evolved Aleutian lavas. We suggest that a third component with high Nd/Hf is required, that contributes Hf to the source of Aleutian lavas. Recent experimental studies (e.g. Green and Adam, 2003, Eur. Journ. of Min.) indicate that MORB-derived fluids probably have low Nd/Hf (<4), and are unlikely mixing end members for Aleutian lavas with Nd/Hf=5-8. In contrast, magnesian andesites from the western Aleutians, inferred to be melts of the subducting oceanic crust (Kay, 1978 JVGR), have Nd/Hf = 9-10, the highest ratios observed in Aleutian lavas. Thus, coupled Nd-Hf isotopic systematics and the presence of high Nd/Hf in the least evolved Aleutian lavas appear to require a 'slab melt' component in magmas throughout the arc.

  5. Extreme Spatial Variability in Microbial Mat Communities from Submarine Hydrothermal Vents Located at Multiple Volcanoes along the Mariana Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanic arc systems are the most active tectonic feature in the world, but are among the least studied. The Western Pacific contains ~20,000 km of volcanic arcs, of which only ~2% have been systematically surveyed. The lack of comprehensive knowledge of volcanic arcs is compounded by the incredible variability found in relatively short distances. The complex source history of hydrothermal fluids and the variable depths of seamounts found in island arc systems result in highly variable vent chemistries and therefore unique microbial habitats within relatively short distances. The Mariana Island Arc was surveyed in 2003 and areas with suspected hydrothermal activities were identified for targeted remote operating vehicle (ROV) exploration and sampling in 2004. Sixteen microbial mat samples from five seamounts ranging from 145-1742 mbsl and from ambient to 222°C were collected and analyzed with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), cluster analysis of terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) community fingerprints, and by clone library analysis of small subunit ribosomal rDNA genes. The microbial mat communities from the Mariana Island Arc exhibit greater spatial variability within their community structure than microbial mats sampled from mid-ocean ridge or hotspot hydrothermal vents from a comparable scale. Microbial communities from the summit of NW Eifuku Volcano are dominated by putative iron-oxidizing phylotypes at the Yellow Top and Yellow Cone Vent sites, but are dominated by sulfur-oxidizing ?-Proteobacteria at the Champagne Vent site. Mats collected at the Mat City Vent site on E Diamante Seamount contained nearly three times as much biomass as any other mat sample collected, and is dominated by a Planctomyces phylotype. Hydrothermal sediments at the Fish Spa site located on Daikoku Seamount contained the second highest biomass detected and supported a large community of flatfish indicating a direct route for biomass being channeled up the food chain. The microbial community at Fish Spa consists of a highly diverse assemblage of Bacteroidetes, ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. While in contrast, the microbial mat at the Iceberg Vent site on NW Rota I is dominated by a single phylotype of ?-Proteobacteria.

  6. Spatio-temporal evolution of a dispersed magmatic system and its implications for volcano growth, Jeju Island Volcanic Field, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Cronin, Shane J.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Sohn, Young Kwan; Maas, Roland

    2012-09-01

    Jeju Island is the emergent portion of a basaltic volcanic field developed over the last c. 1.8 Ma on continental crust. Initial volcanism comprised dispersed, small-volume (< 0.01 km3) alkali basaltic eruptions that incrementally constructed a tuff pile. Lavas and scoria from continuing small-scaled monogenetic volcanism capped this foundation. From c. 0.4 Ma large-volume (> 1 km3) eruptions began, with lavas building a composite shield. Three magma suites can be recognized: Early Pleistocene high-Al alkali (HAA), and Late Pleistocene to Holocene low-Al alkali (LAA) and subalkali (SA). The chemical similarity between small-volume and primitive large-volume eruptions suggests analogous parent magmas and fractionation histories that are independent of erupted volumes. The large-volume magmas evolved to trachyte, which erupted in two distinct episodes: the HAA Sanbangsan suite at c. 750 ka and the LAA Hallasan suite at c. 25 ka. Sr and Nd isotopes indicate that the early trachytes were contaminated by upper crustal material, whereas the later magmas were not. Both suites bear a Nd isotope signature indicative of lower crustal interaction. Sub-suites transitional between HAA and LAA, and between LAA and SA, indicate that melting occurred in discrete, but adjacent, mantle domains. Throughout the evolution of this volcano, each magma batch erupted separately, and a centralized plumbing system was never created. The Island's central peak (Mt. Halla 1950 m a.s.l.) is therefore not a sensu stricto stratovolcano, but marks the point of peak magma output in a distributed magmatic system. Jeju's shape and topography thus represent the spatial variation of fertility of the mantle below it. An increase in melt production in the Late Pleistocene was related to a deepening of the melting zone due to regional tectonic rearrangements. Temporal coincidences between magmatic pulses on Jeju and large-scale caldera eruptive events along the nearest subduction system in Kyushu, Japan, suggest that tectonic extension and changing strain rates may drive volcanism on a regional basis, influencing the intraplate volcanism of Jeju Island.

  7. GPS monitoring of Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory uses a variety of ground- and satellite-based techniques to monitor Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes.  Here, an HVO scientist sets up a portable GPS receiver to track surface changes during an island-wide survey of Hawai‘i’s volcanoes. &n...

  8. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the Santa Maria Island (Azores): Implications for paleostress evolution at the western Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Hildenbrand, A.; Marques, F. O.; Costa, A. C. G.

    2015-01-01

    The growth and decay of oceanic volcanoes developed close to plate boundaries are intrinsically related to a competition between construction and destruction processes, partly controlled by tectonic strain and stresses. From morphologic, stratigraphic, tectonic and new high-precision K-Ar data, we present a comprehensive picture of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Santa Maria, and discuss its significance regarding the stress evolution and regional deformation in the Azores. Our new data show that: (1) the western flat portion of the island is mostly composed of west-dipping volcanic rocks here dated between 5.70 ± 0.08 and 5.33 ± 0.08 Ma, which we consider the remnants of an Older Shield Volcano; (2) more than half of this early volcanic complex has been removed by an east-directed large-scale sector collapse; (3) a second volcano, here coined the Younger Shield Volcano, grew rapidly on the collapse scar between at least 4.32 ± 0.06 and 3.94 ± 0.06 Ma; (4) more than half of this new volcano was removed by a second large-scale sector collapse most probably around 3.6 Ma, based on the ages of Parasitic Scoria Cones sitting unconformably on the Younger Shield Volcano; (5) the latest parasitic volcanic activity is here dated at 2.84 ± 0.04 Ma, extending significantly the known eruptive history of Santa Maria. Morpho-structural data (shape of the island, faults, dikes, and distribution of volcanic cones) show a significant control of construction and destruction along the N045° and N150° directions. The age of the lavas intruded by dikes suggests that the N045° and the N150° trends are ca. 5.3 Ma old and younger than ca. 4.3 Ma, respectively. Based on the new data, we conclude that a change in the regional stress field occurred between 5.3 and 4.3 Ma, most likely associated with a major reconfiguration of the Eurasia/Nubia plate boundary in the Azores.

  9. Seasonal and distributional patterns of seabirds along the Aleutian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renner, M.; Hunt, G.L., Jr.; Piatt, J.F.; Byrd, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    The Aleutian Archipelago is of global importance to seabirds during the northern summer, but little is known about seabird use of these waters during winter. We compare summer and winter abundances of seabirds around 3 islands: Buldir in the western, Kasatochi in the central, and Aiktak in the eastern Aleutians. The density of combined seabird biomass in nearshore marine waters was higher in summer than in winter at Buldir and Kasatochi, but was higher in winter at Aiktak, despite the departure of abundant migratory species. Comparing foraging guilds, we found that only piscivores increased at the western and central sites in winter, whereas at the eastern site several planktivorous species increased as well. The only planktivore remaining in winter at the central and western sites in densities comparable to summer densities was whiskered auklet Aethia pygmaea. Crested auklet Aethia cristatella and thick-billed murre Uria lomvia showed the greatest proportional winter increase at the eastern site. The seasonal patterns of the seabird communities suggest a winter breakdown of the copepod-based food web in the central and western parts of the archipelago, and a system that remains rich in euphausiids in the eastern Aleutians. We suggest that in winter crested auklets take the trophic role that short-tailed shearwaters Puffinus tenuirostris occupy during summer. We hypothesize that advection of euphausiids in the Aleutian North Slope Current is important for supporting the high biomass of planktivores that occupy the Unimak Pass region on a year-round basis. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  10. Transient volcano deformation sources imaged with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Application to Seguam Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Thirty interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, spanning various intervals during 1992–2000, document coeruptive and posteruptive deformation of the 1992–1993 eruption on Seguam Island, Alaska. A procedure that combines standard damped least squares inverse methods and collective surfaces, identifies three dominant amorphous clusters of deformation point sources. Predictions generated from these three point source clusters account for both the spatial and temporal complexity of the deformation patterns of the InSAR data. Regularized time series of source strength attribute a distinctive transient behavior to each of the three source clusters. A model that combines magma influx, thermoelastic relaxation, poroelastic effects, and petrologic data accounts for the transient, interrelated behavior of the source clusters and the observed deformation. Basaltic magma pulses, which flow into a storage chamber residing in the lower crust, drive this deformational system. A portion of a magma pulse is injected into the upper crust and remains in storage during both coeruption and posteruption intervals. This injected magma degasses and the volatile products accumulate in a shallow poroelastic storage chamber. During the eruption, another portion of the magma pulse is transported directly to the surface via a conduit roughly centered beneath Pyre Peak on the west side of the island. A small amount of this magma remains in storage during the eruption, and posteruption thermoelastic contraction ensues. This model, made possible by the excellent spatial and temporal coverage of the InSAR data, reveals a relatively simple system of interrelated predictable processes driven by magma dynamics.

  11. Changes of diffuse CO2 emission from the summit cone of Teide volcano, Tenerife, Canary Islands: a premonitory volcanic unrest signature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, G.; Perez, N.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padron, E.; Melian, G.; Nolasco, D.; Barrancos, J.; Marrero, R.; Calvo, D.; Diaz Requejo, M.; Rodriguez, F.; Chiodini, G.

    2009-12-01

    We report the results of 11 soil CO2 efflux surveys by the accumulation chamber method at the summit cone of Teide volcano (SCT), Tenerife Island, Spain. The surveys were undertaken from 1997 to 2009 to determine the scale of total CO2 emissions at the SCT and to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations of CO2 efflux and their relationships with the volcanic-seismic activity at Tenerife. Our results reveal significant variations from 1997 to 2009 and indicate that CO2 emissions at the SCT fluctuate greatly. Temporal variations in the total CO2 output do not seem to be masked by external variations, showing a temporal correlation with the onsets of seismic activity in 2004. The fluctuations are evident in the intensity of the efflux anomaly. These geochemical observations support unrest of the volcanic system, as is also suggested by anomalous seismic activity recorded in Tenerife Island during April 22-29, 2004 (Spanish National Geographical Institute, IGN). A new increasing trend is observed from 2007, which might precursor new anomalous seismic activity in the next future, suggesting that subsurface magma movement is the cause for the observed changes in the total output of diffuse CO2 emission. Performing frequent soil CO2 efflux surveys appear to be an effective surveillance tool for Teide volcanic system at Tenerife Island. The temporal evolution of the diffuse CO2 emissions from SCT will allow us to determine the typical range of seasonal or other transient departures from its normal or “baseline” behaviour. For this reason, ITER’s Teide Geochemical Monitoring Program has become an important tool since 1997 for reducing volcano risk in Tenerife Island, making a special effort on volcano monitoring to detect precursory phenomena which provide early warnings of possible impending eruptions.

  12. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  13. B-type volcanic earthquakes at White Island volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherburn, Steven; Scott, Bradley J.

    1993-08-01

    B-type volcanic earthquakes at White Island have almost all their energy in the band 0.5-4 Hz, around a dominant spectral peak of about 2 Hz. A high degree of similarity in the waveforms suggests that the earthquakes originate from a volume of about 100 m 3, and that the process that generates them is repetitive. At a distance of 1 km from the active crater the particle motion of B-type events suggests an initial P-wave, followed 0.5 seconds later by a horizontally polarised S-wave and then a wave of unknown type. The exact mechanism for B-type events is unknown, however, the absence of higher harmonics implies they cannot be caused by the resonance of gas or magma within a pipe-like structure, and the P- and S-waves suggest a simple shear-induced rock fracture in a hot ductile medium.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and harlequin ducks (Histronicus histronicus) in the Eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A.K.; Flint, P.L.; Trust, K.A.; Ricca, M.A.; Spring, S.E.; Arrieta, D.E.; Hollmen, T.; Wilson, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    Seaducks may be affected by harmful levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at seaports near the Arctic. As an indicator of exposure to PAHs, we measured hepatic enzyme 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) to determine cytochrome P4501A induction in Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and Harlequin ducks (Histronicus histronicus) from Unalaska, Popof, and Unga Islands (AK, USA) in 2002 and 2003. We measured PAHs and organic contaminants in seaduck prey samples and polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in seaduck blood plasma to determine any relationship to EROD. Using Akaike's information criterion, species and site differences best explained EROD patterns: Activity was higher in Harlequin ducks than in Steller's eiders and higher at industrial than at nonindustrial sites. Site-specific concentrations of PAHs in blue mussels ([Mytilus trossilus] seaduck prey; PAH concentrations higher at Dutch Harbor, Unalaska, than at other sites) also was important in defining EROD patterns. Organochlorine compounds rarely were detected in prey samples. No relationship was found between polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in avian blood and EROD, which further supported inferences derived from Akaike's information criterion. Congeners were highest in seaducks from a nonindustrial or reference site, contrary to PAH patterns. To assist in interpreting the field study, 15 captive Steller's eiders were dosed with a PAH known to induce cytochrome P4501A. Dosed, captive Steller's eiders had definitive induction, but results indicated that wild Steller's eiders were exposed to PAHs or other inducing compounds at levels greater than those used in laboratory studies. Concentrations of PAHs in blue mussels at or near Dutch Harbor (???1,180-5,980 ng/g) approached those found at highly contaminated sites (???4,100-7,500 ng/g). ?? 2007 SETAC.

  15. Chronic exposure to volcanic air pollution and DNA damage in Furnas Volcano (São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal) inhabitants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhares, Diana; Garcia, Patricia; Silva, Catarina; Ferreira, Teresa; Barroso, Joana; Camarinho, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Armindo

    2015-04-01

    Many studies in volcanic air pollution only have in consideration the acute toxic effects of gas or ash releases however the impact of chronic exposure to ground gas emissions in human health is yet poorly known. In the Azores archipelago (Portugal), São Miguel island has one of the most active and dangerous volcanoes: Furnas Volcano. Highly active fumarolic fields, hot springs and soil diffuse degassing phenomena are the main secondary volcanic phenomena that can be seen at the volcano surroundings. One of the main gases released in these diffuse degassing areas is radon (222Rn), which decay results in solid particles that readily settle within the airways. These decay particles emit alpha radiation that is capable of causing severe DNA damage that cumulatively can eventually cause cancer. Previous studies have established that chronic exposure to chromosome-damaging agents can lead to the formation of nuclear anomalies, such as micronuclei that is used for monitoring DNA damage in human populations. The present study was designed to evaluate whether chronic exposure to volcanic air pollution, associated to 222Rn, might result in DNA damage in human oral epithelial cells. A cross sectional study was performed in a study group of 142 individuals inhabiting an area where volcanic activity is marked by active fumarolic fields and soil degassing (hydrothermal area), and a reference group of 368 individuals inhabiting an area without these secondary manifestations of volcanism (non-hydrothermal area). For each individual, 1000 buccal epithelial cells were analyzed for the frequency of micronucleated cells (MNc) and the frequency of cells with other nuclear anomalies (ONA: pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis), by using the micronucleus assay. Information on lifestyle factors and an informed consent were obtained from each participant. Assessment of indoor radon was performed with the use of radon detectors. Data were analyzed with logistic regression models, adjusted for confounding factors (age, gender, smoking and drinking status, and number of cigarettes smoked per day). Results demonstrated that levels of radon in the environment were significantly different in study and reference groups (115 Bq/m3 vs. 47 Bq/m3, respectively; p<0.001); in winter, radon measurements reached the highest values both in the study and the reference groups (809 Bq/m3 vs. 56 Bq/m3, respectively). The frequency of MNc in the study group was significantly higher than in the reference group (2.93‰ vs. 2.58‰, respectively; p=0.002). The OR for formation of MNc in the hydrothermal area was 1.5 (95% CI 1.07-2.02). A moderate and positive correlation was found between the frequency of MNc and 222Rn (rs = 0.459, p<0.001). To our knowledge this is the first study that clearly associates the exposure of volcanogenic indoor radon in inhabitants of hydrothermal areas and the DNA damage in human oral epithelial cells, evidencing that volcanic air pollution is a risk factor of carcinogenesis. Although the present findings require confirmation in larger studies, bio-monitoring for DNA damage is recommended for inhabitants of localities with active volcanism and mitigation measures such as restriction of building in certain areas should be taken into consideration in these volcanically active areas.

  16. Lead isotopes behavior in the fumarolic environment of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastélic, I.; Staudacher, T.; Deniel, C.; Devidal, J. L.; Devouard, B.; Finizola, A.; Télouk, P.

    2013-01-01

    The recent activity of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano offers a rare opportunity to address the issue of Pb isotope behavior in volcanic fumaroles, as the composition of the degassing source is accurately and precisely known. Gas sublimates formed between 2007 and 2011 at temperature ranging from 400 to ca. 100 °C include Na-K sulfate (aphthitalite), Ca-Cu sulfate (e.g., gypsum), Na sulfate (thenardite), Ca-Mg-Al-Fe fluoride (e.g., ralstonite) and native sulfur. The high-temperature deposits show trace element patterns typical of volcanic gas (with Pb concentration up to 836 ppm) while the low-temperature deposits are depleted in most volatile elements (Pb <1 ppm) with the exception of Pd and Tl (in fluorides) and Se (in native sulfur). Only for low-temperature fluoride samples do Pb isotope compositions plot significantly outside the field of lavas. The isotopic shift is ascribed to leaching ubiquitous unradiogenic phases (e.g., sulfides) by acidic gas condensates. The similarity in Pb isotope signature between lavas and sublimate samples more representative of the gas phase (sulfates) indicates that the net fractionation of Pb isotopes resulting from volatilization and condensation processes is smaller than the precision of Pb isotope measurements (better than 60 ppm/a.m.u.). The absence of net fractionation could result from negligible isotope fractionation during Pb volatilization followed by extensive condensation of gaseous Pb, with possibly significant isotopic fractionation at this stage. Although this scenario has to be refined by more direct measurement of the gas phase, and its general applicability tested, it suggests that a small fraction (<10%) of initially volatilized Pb ultimately escapes to the atmosphere, while the remaining dominant fraction is trapped in sublimates. As sublimates are rapidly dissolved and entrained by runoff, the fumarolic environment appears as a factory efficiently transferring isotopically unfractionated Pb from magmas towards the hydrological system and seawater. Resolving very small isotopic differences between magmas and their gaseous products remains an analytical challenge. High-precision Pb isotope measurements rest not only on instrumental performance but also on high-yield chemistry, as Pb isotopes drastically fractionate (800 ppm/a.m.u.) upon elution on anionic resin. For 50% Pb recovery, the estimated isotopic bias is plus or minus 60-80 ppm/a.m.u., depending on which of the early (isotopically light) or late (isotopically heavy) Pb fraction is lost.

  17. The September 1988 intracaldera avalanche and eruption at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; De Roy, T.; Carrasco, A.

    1991-01-01

    During 14-16 September 1988, a large intracaldera avalanche and an eruption of basaltic tephra and lava at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos, produced the most profound changes within the caldera since its collapse in 1968. A swarm of eight earthquakes (mb 4.7-5.5) occurred in a 14 h period on 24 February 1988 at Fernandina, and two more earthquakes of this size followed on 15 April and 20 May, respectively. On 14 September 1988, another earthquake (mb 4.6) preceded a complex series of events. A debris avalanche was generated by the failure of a fault-bounded segment of the east caldera wall, approximately 2 km long and 300 m wide. The avalanche deposit is up to 250 m thick and has an approximate volume of 0.9 km3. The avalanche rapidly displaced a preexisting lake from the southeast end of the caldera floor to the northwest end, where the water washed up against the lower part of the caldera wall, then gradually seeped into the avalanche deposit and was completely gone by mid-January 1989. An eruption began in the caldera within about 1-2 h of the earthquake, producing a vigorous tephra plume for about 12 h, then lava flows during the next two days. The eruption ended late on 16 September. Most of the eruptive activity was from vents on the caldera floor near the base of the new avalanche scar. Unequivocal relative timing of events is difficult to determine, but seismic records suggest that the avalanche may have occurred 1.6 h after the earthquake, and field relations show that lava was clearly erupted after the avalanche was emplaced. The most likely sequence of events seems to be that the 1988 feeder dike intruded upward into the east caldera wall, dislocated the unstable wall block, and triggered the avalanche. The avalanche immediately exposed the newly emplaced dike and initiated the eruption. The exact cause of the earthquakes is unknown. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  18. The 2007 eruptions and caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island) from tilt analysis at a single very broadband seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Roult, Geneviève; Michon, Laurent; Barruol, Guilhem; Muro, Andrea Di

    2014-04-01

    Seismic records from La Réunion Island very broadband Geoscope station are investigated to constrain the link between the 2007 eruptive sequence and the related caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Tilt estimated from seismic records reveals that the three 2007 eruptions belong to a single inflation-deflation cycle. Tilt trend indicates that the small-volume summit eruption of 18 February occurred during a phase of continuous inflation that started in January 2007. Inflation decelerated 24 days before a second short-lived, small-volume eruption on 30 March, almost simultaneous with a sudden, large-scale deflation of the volcano. Deflation rate, which had stabilized at relatively low level, increased anew on 1 April while no magma was erupted, followed on 2 April by a major distal eruption and on 5 April by a summit caldera collapse. Long-term tilt variation suggests that the 2007 eruptive succession was triggered by a deep magma input.

  19. A biomonitoring plan for assessing potential radionuclide exposure using Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain of Alaska as a case study.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Kosson, D S; Powers, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    With the ending of the Cold War, the US and other nations were faced with a legacy of nuclear wastes. For some sites where hazardous nuclear wastes will remain in place, methods must be developed to protect human health and the environment. Biomonitoring is one method of assessing the status and trends of potential radionuclide exposure from nuclear waste sites, and of providing the public with early warning of any potential harmful exposure. Amchitka Island (51 degrees N lat, 179 degrees E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. Following a substantive study of radionuclide levels in biota from the marine environment around Amchitka and a reference site, we developed a suite of bioindicators (with suggested isotopes) that can serve as a model for other sites contaminated with radionuclides. Although the species selection was site-specific, the methods can provide a framework for other sites. We selected bioindicators using five criteria: (1) occurrence at all three test shots (and reference site), (2) receptor groups (subsistence foods, commercial species, and food chain nodes), (3) species groups (plants, invertebrates, fish, and birds), (4) trophic levels, and (5) an accumulator of one or several radionuclides. Our major objective was to identify bioindicators that could serve for both human health and the ecosystem, and were abundant enough to collect adjacent to the three test sites and at the reference site. Site-specific information on both biota availability and isotope levels was essential in the final selection of bioindicators. Actinides bioaccumulated in algae and invertebrates, while radiocesium accumulated in higher trophic level birds and fish. Thus, unlike biomonitoring schemes developed for heavy metals or other contaminants, top-level predators are not sufficient to evaluate potential radionuclide exposure at Amchitka. The process described in this paper resulted in the selection of Fucus, Alaria fistulosa, blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus), dolly varden (Salvelinus malma), black rockfish (Sebastes melanops), Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus), Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis), and glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens) as bioindicators. This combination of species included mainly subsistence foods, commercial fish, and nodes on different food chains. PMID:17683832

  20. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs from the Aleutian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Robert G; Miles, A Keith; Ricca, Mark A; Estes, James A

    2007-09-01

    We collected 136 fresh and unhatched eggs from bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests and assessed productivity on eight islands in the Aleutian archipelago, 2000 to 2002. Egg contents were analyzed for a broad spectrum of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, mercury (Hg), and stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (SigmaPCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and Hg in bald eagle eggs were elevated throughout the archipelago, but the patterns of distribution differed among the various contaminants. Total PCBs were highest in areas of past military activities on Adak and Amchitka Islands, indicating local point sources of these compounds. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were higher on Amchitka Island, which was subjected to much military activity during World War II and the middle of the 20th century. Concentrations of SigmaPCBs also were elevated on islands with little history of military activity (e.g., Amlia, Tanaga, Buldir), suggesting non-point sources of PCBs in addition to point sources. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were highest in eagle eggs from the most western Aleutian Islands (e.g., Buldir, Kiska) and decreased eastward along the Aleutian chain. This east-to-west increase suggested a Eurasian source of contamination, possibly through global transport and atmospheric distillation and/or from migratory seabirds. Eggshell thickness and productivity of bald eagles were normal and indicative of healthy populations because concentrations of most contaminants were below threshold levels for effects on reproduction. Contrary to our predictions, contaminant concentrations were not correlated with stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) or nitrogen (delta15N) in eggs. These latter findings indicate that contaminant concentrations were influenced more by point sources and geographic location than trophic status of eagles among the different islands. PMID:17702538

  1. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs from the Aleutian archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Miles, A.K.; Ricca, M.A.; Estes, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We collected 136 fresh and unhatched eggs from bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests and assessed productivity on eight islands in the Aleutian archipelago, 2000 to 2002. Egg contents were analyzed for a broad spectrum of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, mercury (Hg), and stable isotopes of carbon (??13C) and nitrogen (??15N). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (??PCBs), p,p???- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and Hg in bald eagle eggs were elevated throughout the archipelago, but the patterns of distribution differed among the various contaminants. Total PCBs were highest in areas of past military activities on Adak and Amchitka Islands, indicating local point sources of these compounds. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were higher on Amchitka Island, which was subjected to much military activity during World War II and the middle of the 20th century. Concentrations of ??PCBs also were elevated on islands with little history of military activity (e.g., Amlia, Tanaga, Buldir), suggesting non-point sources of PCBs in addition to point sources. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were highest in eagle eggs from the most western Aleutian Islands (e.g., Buldir, Kiska) and decreased eastward along the Aleutian chain. This east-to-west increase suggested a Eurasian source of contamination, possibly through global transport and atmospheric distillation and/or from migratory seabirds. Eggshell thickness and productivity of bald eagles were normal and indicative of healthy populations because concentrations of most contaminants were below threshold levels for effects on reproduction. Contrary to our predictions, contaminant concentrations were not correlated with stable isotopes of carbon (??13C) or nitrogen (??15N) in eggs. These latter findings indicate that contaminant concentrations were influenced more by point sources and geographic location than trophic status of eagles among the different islands. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  2. Aleutian disease in ferrets.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, H G; Porter, D D; Larsen, A E

    1982-01-01

    When 32 antibody-free ferrets were inoculated with the highly mink-virulent Utah-1 strain of Aleutian disease virus (ADV), most developed ADV antibody starting 15 days after infection, but the antibody titers were much lower than those seen in mink. Relatively small amounts of ADV were demonstrated in CRFK cell culture, using ferret spleen and lymph node homogenates only 4 to 10 days after experimental infection, but low-level viral persistence for 180 days was shown by mink inoculation. The ferrets inoculated with the Utah-1 strain of ADV did not develop elevated gamma globulin levels, but did have mild tissue lesions. Forty-two percent of a group of 214, approximately 1-year-old, recently pregnant, female ferrets were found to have antibody to ADV. An analysis of the serum proteins of the ferrets with ADV antibody showed that they had a significant, but mild, elevation of their serum gamma globulin. Serial ferret-to-ferret transmission of a ferret strain of ADV by inoculation of spleen homogenates was demonstrated, and some of these ferrets developed liver lesions. Mink inoculated with ferret ADV made antibody, but did not develop hypergammaglobulinemia or tissue lesions. Although both ferret and mink strains of ADV replicate and persist in the ferret, they fail to cause severe disease of the type usually seen in the closely related mink. Mink and ferret ADV strains appear to be biologically distinct. Images PMID:6176546

  3. Nd- and Sr-isotopic compositions of lavas from the northern Mariana and southern Volcano arcs: implications for the origin of island arc melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P. N.; Stern, R. J.; Morris, J.; Bloomer, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    Nd- and Sr-isotopic data are reported for lavas from 23 submarine and 3 subaerial volcanoes in the northern Mariana and southern Volcano arcs. Values of ɛNd range from +2.4 to +9.5 whereas 87Sr/86Sr ranges from 0.70319 to 0.70392; these vary systematically between and sometimes within arc segments. The Nd-and Sr-isotopic compositions fall in the field of ocean island basalt (OIB) and extend along the mantle array. Lavas from the Volcano arc, Mariana Central Island Province and the southern part of the Northern Seamount Province have ɛNd to +10 and 87Sr/86Sr=0.7032 to 0.7039. These are often slightly displaced toward higher 87Sr/86Sr at similar ɛNd. In contrast, those lavas from the northern part of the Mariana Northern Seamount Province as far north as Iwo Jima show OIB isotopic characteristics, with ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr=0.7035 to 0.7039. Plots of 87Sr/86Sr and ɛNd versus Ba/La and (La/Yb)n support a model in which melts from the Mariana and Volcano arcs are derived by mixing of OIB-type mantle (or melts therefrom) and a metasomatized MORB-type mantle (or melts therefrom). An alternate interpretation is that anomalous trends on the plots of Nd- and Sr-isotopic composition versus incompatible-element ratios, found in some S-NSP lavas, suggest that the addition of a sedimentary component may be locally superimposed on the two-component mixing of mantle end-members.

  4. Deformation studies at Furnas and Sete Cidades Volcanoes (São Miguel Island, Azores). Velocities and further investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trota, A.; Houlié, N.; Briole, P.; Gaspar, J. L.; Sigmundsson, F.; Feigl, K. L.

    2006-08-01

    The Azores archipelago is located near the triple junction between the Nubian (NU), North America (NA), and Eurasia (EU) plates. It is characterized by a relatively strong seismicity and active volcanism. The best estimate of the current plate velocities in the area over geologic timescales comes from the NUVEL1-NNR model (DeMets et al.) . At the geodetic timescale, plate motion models (Altamimi et al., Sella et al.) including GPS, DORIS, SLR and VLBI data currently do not yet include data from the Azores. In the framework of a research project focused on the seismotectonics and volcanotectonics of São Miguel island, we have analysed GPS data collected there in 1993, 1994, 1997, 2000 and 2002. Our analysis determines both the velocity in the REVEL (Sella et al.) reference frame of São Miguel and its internal deformation. The comparison of the 2000 and 2002 coordinates indicates that São Miguel accommodates moderate WNW-ESE extension at a rate slower than 5 mm yr-1.

  5. High Resolution, Pb Isotope Variability Within Historic Eruptions of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, J. A.; Peterson, B. T.; Nelson, B. K.

    2005-12-01

    The range of time-scales over which ocean island basalt (OIB) magmatism taps different mantle heterogeneities is a fundamental dynamic of mantle plumes. The variability of long-lived radiogenic isotopes in OIB magmas erupted on time scales less than 100 years has been addressed primarily for Hawaiian magmas (e.g., Pietruszka et al., 2001). Similar data are relatively sparse for hot spots with low buoyancy fluxes. The Canary Islands have low eruption rates and have been historically active. The Cumbre Vieja volcano in southern La Palma, Canary Islands, has six, well-mapped, historic eruptions spanning the entire southern rift zone. We have investigated Pb isotope compositional variations expressed in magmas erupted in a series of events spanning 500 years (the 1480, 1585, 1677, 1712, 1949, and 1971 eruptions), and sampled in detail two of these events (the 1677 and 1712 eruptions) to document isotopic variability at the month to year time-scale as well as the 100-year time scale. Previous Pb isotope investigations of Cumbre Vieja did not reveal systematic variations (e.g., Marcantonio et al., 1995 and Ovchinnikova et al., 1995). With denser sampling (40 samples) and higher precision MC-ICP-MS analyses, we observe that radiogenic Pb isotope compositions over the 500 year eruptive history decrease systematically with time (206Pb/204Pb =19.669 -- 19.611, 207Pb/ 204Pb = 15.618 -- 15.602, 208Pb/204Pb = 39.530 -- 39.430). Detailed Pb isotope analyses of the 1677 and 1712 eruptions indicate isotopically homogeneous magmas within a single eruptive episode. However, samples from both the 1677 and 1712 eruptions display mineralogic evidence for magma mixing: 1677 samples include isotopically distinct gabbroic xenoliths, and both magmas have reversely- zoned clinopyroxene phenocrysts with corroded cores of Na-rich salite, and zoned overgrowths of Al-rich salite. With time, an increasing proportion of partial melt from a less radiogenic end-member within a heterogeneous plume explains the 500 year trend. Alternatively, higher level mixing of two magmas would require sequential recharge of a single magma chamber that feeds the entire rift zone. A single chamber is structurally unlikely, and not consistent with geochemical and petrographic trends (Klü gel, 1999). From the decompressing plume, batches of melt with homogeneous Pb isotope ratios are extracted periodically. To generate mineralogic disequilibrium, each batch must segregate into a zoned magma chamber or multiple, isolated pockets and differentiate at multiple levels. Prior to eruption, magma from these pockets may remix, producing reversely-zoned clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Isotopic homogeneity is preserved within a given magma batch. In the Canary Islands, the minimum time period for eruptive basalts to reflect resolvable mantle isotope heterogeneity is on the order of 50 - 100 years. A. Klügel, K. A. Hoernle, H.-U. Schmincke, J. D. L. White, J. Geophys. Res. 105(B3), 5997 (2000). F. Marcantonio, A. Zindler, T. R. Elliot, H. Staudigel, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 133, 397 (1995). G. V., Ovchinnikova, B. V., Belyatskii, I. M., Vasil'eva, L. K., Levsky, A. F., Grachev, V., Arana, I. J., Mitjavila, Petrologiya, 3, 195 (1995). A. J. Pietruszka, K. H. Rubin, M. O. Garcia, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 186, 15 (2001).

  6. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  7. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  8. At-sea observations of marine birds and their habitats before and after the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, G.S.; Dragoo, D.E.; Renner, M.; Piatt, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Kasatochi volcano, an island volcano in the Aleutian chain, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. The resulting ash and pyroclastic flows blanketed the island, covering terrestrial habitats. We surveyed the marine environment surrounding Kasatochi Island in June and July of 2009 to document changes in abundance or distribution of nutrients, fish, and marine birds near the island when compared to patterns observed on earlier surveys conducted in 1996 and 2003. Analysis of SeaWiFS satellite imagery indicated that a large chlorophyll-a anomaly may have been the result of ash fertilization during the eruption. We found no evidence of continuing marine fertilization from terrestrial runoff 10 months after the eruption. At-sea surveys in June 2009 established that the most common species of seabirds at Kasatochi prior to the eruption, namely crested auklets (Aethia cristatella) and least auklets (Aethia pusilla) had returned to Kasatochi in relatively high numbers. Densities from more extensive surveys in July 2009 were compared with pre-eruption densities around Kasatochi and neighboring Ulak and Koniuji islands, but we found no evidence of an eruption effect. Crested and least auklet populations were not significantly reduced by the initial explosion and they returned to attempt breeding in 2009, even though nesting habitat had been rendered unusable. Maps of pre- and post-eruption seabird distribution anomalies indicated considerable variation, but we found no evidence that observed distributions were affected by the 2008 eruption. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  9. Flow-By-Flow Mapping on Fogo, Cape Verde Islands, Reveals Long Term Variations in Eruption Distributions and Volcanic Edifice Structure at a Shield-Stage Oceanic Island Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Most maps of large oceanic island shield volcanoes show the lava flows and scoria cones of individual historic and subhistoric eruptions as individual units but then resort to grouping older rocks into larger stratigraphic units. This grouping makes it difficult to characterize long-term progressive trends in volumes of individual eruptions and distributions of eruptive vents, but is commonly made necessary by poor exposure, limited compositional variation between individual eruptions, and burial of older by younger volcanic rocks. In contrast, work on Fogo, Cape Verde Islands has involved flow-by-flow mapping of rocks erupted over an extended period of tens of thousands of years, as part of the process of mapping the island and producing a 1:25 000 scale geological map for research and hazard management purposes. Around three-quarters of the island is characterized by low rainfall and limited vegetation cover, with erosion restricted to narrow gullies. Only in small areas on the windward side of the island do higher rainfall, thick vegetation and deeper erosion combine to prevent flow-by-flow mapping. The map of the island is accompanied by a rigorous representation of direct and inferred age relationships between lavas and scoria cones of different eruptions using a novel type of age correlation diagram. The time period covered by the flow-by-flow mapping includes both the final stages of growth of an older shield volcano (Monte Amarelo volcano) prior to its collapse and the subsequent growth of a new volcano (Cha das Caldeiras volcano). The latter forms a thick infill and summit cone within the Monte Amarelo collapse scar together with partial covering of the outer flanks of the Monte Amarelo volcano with a veneer of younger lavas and scoria cones. The erupted rocks are compositionally varied (ankaramitic nephelinites, basanites, tephrites) and often highly porphyritic. Petrographic criteria were therefore used to aid field mapping, define lithostratigraphic units and demonstrate systematic changes in compositions of erupted magmas through time. Some of these changes, particularly eruptions of ankaramitic magmas, coincide with similar sequences of volcano-structural changes that have occurred prior to the Monte Amarelo collapse and again during the Holocene (beginning around 11 000 years before present; Foeken et al, 2009). The flow-by-flow mapping approach has allowed reconstruction and comparison of the sequences of these structural changes, and thus provides insights into the inferred progressive destabilization of the eastern flank of Fogo during the Holocene, as well as into wide variations in eruption and resurfacing rates that have occurred on decade to century timescales in more recent times. Foeken, J.P.T., Day, S.J. & Stuart, F.M. (2009) Cosmogenic 3He exposure dating of the Quaternary basalts from Fogo, Cape Verdes: Implications for rift zone and magmatic reorganization. Quaternary Geology 4 (2009) 37 - 49.

  10. Submarine Volcanic Cones in the Central Aleutian Arc: Relationship to Arc Rifting and Oblique Plate Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, J. R.; Greene, G.; Krutikov, L.; Vallier, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    Plate convergence along the 2200km Aleutian Arc varies from orthogonal at the Alaskan Peninsula to fully strike-slip on the west end of the arc. Deformation response of the upper plate to oblique convergence appears to accelerate markedly between Adak (177W) and Amchitka Pass (180W). On a regional scale, this deformation appears to be concentrated at the boundaries of crustal blocks, with clockwise rotation and westward translation [Geist et al., Tectonics 7, 327-341, 1988]. In the block rotation model, extensional rift structures develop between the blocks in arc-normal orientation. Summit basins develop at the northern, trailing edge of the blocks in arc-parallel orientation. These summit basins are located near or within the volcanic front. Thus structures in the upper plate driven by oblique convergence are predicted to interact with arc volcanism. We report on multibeam mapping in 2003-2004 and ROV Jason II dives in 2004. The data reveal locations and patterns of fault structures, volcanic cones, and lithologies in several locations critical to understanding the arc's response to oblique convergence. A large submarine volcano, named Amchixtam Chaxsxii in the Unangan language, was mapped next to Semisopochnoi Island. Additional small cones are identified on the flank of Tanaga Volcano, and near Bobrof Volcano on possible fault structures. The largest extensional `block boundary' is located at Amchitka Pass; in this area the seafloor is offset by a network of faults. Small volcanic cones are clustered at these faults. Some show signs of erosion and mass wasting; others, especially deeper ones, are intact. Surfaces are dominated by `a`a flows and spatter, and have light sediment cover and moderately fresh lavas. Our mapping focused on specific sites that were chosen to be representative, and suggests that (1) small, probably monogenetic cones are common; (2) the cones occur preferentially in areas of extensional faulting in the volcanic front; (3) these cones are present largely because of oblique convergence and arc deformation. Geochemical analyses will test their relationship to nearby subaerial arc volcanoes.

  11. Aleutian basin oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christeson, Gail L.; Barth, Ginger A.

    2015-01-01

    We present two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along two wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer profiles from the Aleutian basin in the Bering Sea. The basement here is commonly considered to be trapped oceanic crust, yet there is a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features within the basin that might reflect later processes. Line 1 extends ∼225 km from southwest to northeast, while Line 2 extends ∼225 km from northwest to southeast and crosses the observed change in magnetic lineation orientation. Velocities of the sediment layer increase from 2.0 km/s at the seafloor to 3.0–3.4 km/s just above basement, crustal velocities increase from 5.1–5.6 km/s at the top of basement to 7.0–7.1 km/s at the base of the crust, and upper mantle velocities are 8.1–8.2 km/s. Average sediment thickness is 3.8–3.9 km for both profiles. Crustal thickness varies from 6.2 to 9.6 km, with average thickness of 7.2 km on Line 1 and 8.8 km on Line 2. There is no clear change in crustal structure associated with a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features. The velocity structure is consistent with that of normal or thickened oceanic crust. The observed increase in crustal thickness from west to east is interpreted as reflecting an increase in melt supply during crustal formation.

  12. Buldir Depression - A Late Tertiary graben on the Aleutian Ridge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marlow, M. S.; Scholl, D. W.; Buffington, E.C.; Boyce, R.E.; Alpha, T.R.; Smith, P.J.; Shipek, C.J.

    1970-01-01

    Buldir Depression is a large, rectilinear basin that lies on the northern edge of the Aleutian Ridge and is aligned with the arcuate chain of active volcanoes on the ridge crest. The depression appears to be a volcanic-tectonic feature, which began to form in Late Tertiary time and which is still forming. It is a graben formed by extensional rifting and accompanied by contemporaneous volcanism on the Aleutian Ridge. Subsidence rates for the depression are estimated at 20-70 cm/1,000 years. Sediments in the depression are 300 m thick and are probably pelagic and turbidite deposits of Pleistocene age. The turbidites were apparently derived from the plateau area of the Aleutian Ridge surrounding the depression. Older sediments on the northern slope of the Aleutian Ridge have a maximum thickness of 550 m and are deformed and slumped toward the Bering Sea. These sediments are postulated to overlie a mid-flank terrace on the northern Aleutian Ridge that titled to the north during the formation of Buldir Depression. ?? 1970.

  13. An investigation of the distribution of eruptive products on the shield volcanoes of the western Galapagos Islands using remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Duncan C.; Rowland, Scott K.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Wilson, Lionel; Oviedo-Perez, Victor-Hugo

    1991-01-01

    Recent volcanic activity in the Galapagos Islands is concentrated on the two westernmost islands, Isla Isabela and Isla Fernandina. Difficult access has thus far prevented comprehensive geological field studies, so we examine the potential of remotely sensed data as a means of studying volcanic processes in the region. Volcan Wolf is used as an example of the analysis of SPOT HRV-1 data undertaken for each volcano. Landsat TM data are analyzed in an attempt to construct a relative age sequence for the recent eruptive activity on Isla Fernandina. No systematic variation in the surface reflectance of lava flows as a function of age could be detected with these data. Thus it was not possible to complete a study of the temporal distribution of volcanic activity.

  14. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  15. Intra- and extra-caldera volcaniclastic facies and geomorphic characteristics of a frequently active mafic island-arc volcano, Ambrym Island, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Stewart, Robert B.; Charley, Douglas

    2009-10-01

    Ambrym is one of the most voluminous active volcanoes in the Melanesian arc. It consists of a 35 by 50 km island elongated east-west, parallel with an active fissure zone. The central part of Ambrym, about 800 m above sea level, contains a 12 kilometre-wide caldera, with two active intra-caldera cone-complexes, Marum and Benbow. These frequently erupting complexes provide large volumes of tephra (lapilli and ash) to fill the surrounding caldera and create an exceptionally large devegetated plateau "ash plain", as well as sediment-choked fluvial systems leading outward from the summit caldera. Deposits from fall, subordinate base surge and small-volume pyroclastic (scoria) flows dominate the volcaniclastic sequences in near vent regions. Frequent and high-intensity rainfall results in rapid erosion of freshly deposited tephra, forming small-scale debris flow- and modified grain flow-dominated deposits. Box-shaped channel systems are initially deep and narrow on the upper flanks of the composite cones and are filled bank-to-bank with lapilli-dominated debris flow deposits. These units spill out into larger channel systems forming debris aprons of thousands of overlapping and anastomosing long, narrow lobes of poorly sorted lapilli-dominated deposits. These deposits are typically remobilised by hyperconcentrated flows, debris-rich stream flows and rare debris flows that pass down increasingly shallower and broader box-shaped valleys. Lenses and lags of fines and primary fall deposits occur interbedded between the dominantly tabular hyperconcentrated flow deposits of these reaches. Aeolian sedimentation forms elongated sand dunes flanking the western rim of the ash-plain. Outside the caldera, initially steep-sided immature box-canyons are formed again, conveying dominantly hyperconcentrated flow deposits. These gradually pass into broad channels on lesser gradients in coastal areas and terminate at the coast in the form of prograding fans of ash-dominated deposits. The extra-caldera deposits are typically better sorted and contain other bedding features characteristic of more dilute fluvial flows and transitional hyperconcentrated flows. These outer flank volcaniclastics fill valleys to modify restricted portions of the dominantly constructional landscape (lava flows, and satellite cones) of Ambrym. Apparent maturity of the volcanic system has resulted in the subsidence of the present summit caldera at a similar rate to its infill by volcaniclastic deposits.

  16. Multiplets and Detection of Seismic Velocity Changes During the 1998-99 Seismic Series at Deception Island Volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, E.; Martini, F.; Ibanez, J. M.; Bean, C. J.

    2007-12-01

    During the 1998-1999 Antarctic summer, the pattern of seismicity at Deception Island Volcano changed significantly with respect to previous years. This was characterized by the occurrence of an intense swarm of local earthquakes. More than 2000 local earthquakes were recorded in the period January-February 1999. The average moment magnitude was around 0.5, with the exception of two earthquakes of magnitude 2.3 and 3.4; array analysis was used to establish the hypocentral distribution of the earthquakes. A regional origin of the seismicity, or direct involvement of magmatic fluids, was demonstrated to be unlikely. Most earthquakes in the series were found to be related to small (<0.4 bar) stress changes on small faults which can be explained by lubrication by pressurized fluids (Ibanez et al. 2003). The presence of fluids in the source area could explain the fracturing process and is supported by the observation of hybrid events in the same source region. The study of the spatial distribution of the first motion of the P waves suggests that different source mechanisms acted in a very small volume, and often at the same time. Many distinct families of events with very similar waveforms were identified. When recorded at the same station, the similarity of repeating earthquakes indicates that source and wavepath are the same, and therefore any observed difference in waveforms is related to a change in the medium. Employing Coda Wave Interferometry (Snieder et al., 2002), the families of events identified in the series show a drop in the velocity over a short time period around the two events with bigger magnitudes. These variations may be related to cracking and/or fluid influx. After the seismic crisis, a change in the composition of the fumarolic gases was observed with the appearance of sulfur deposits around the fumaroles, and a clear uplift and inflation of a few centimeters was detected (Garcia et al., 2001). The seismic characteristics and the spatial and temporal behavior of the series, associated with other geochemical, bathymetric and geodetic observations, favor the hypothesis that the seismic series was caused by the stress generated by uplift of the source area due to magmatic injection in depth (Ibanez et al., 2003). The correlation between the observed velocity variations, and their timing with seismological, geochemical and geodetical evidence, supports the influx hypothesis as a causative mechanism.

  17. The tectonically controlled emplacement of a vertically sheeted gabbro-pyroxenite intrusion: Feeder-zone of an ocean-island volcano (Fuerteventura, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allibon, J.; Bussy, F.; Lewin, É.; Darbellay, B.

    2011-03-01

    The Miocene PX1 gabbro-pyroxenite pluton, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, is a 3.5 × 5.5 km shallow-level intrusion (0.15-0.2 GPa and 1100-1120 °C), interpreted as the feeder-zone to an ocean-island volcano. It displays a vertical magmatic banding expressed in five 50 to 100 metre-wide NNE-SSW trending alkaline gabbro sequences alternating with pyroxenites. This emplacement geometry was controlled by brittle to ductile shear zones, generated by a regional E-W extensional tectonic setting that affected Fuerteventura during the Miocene. At a smaller scale, the PX1 gabbro and pyroxenite bands consist of metre-thick differentiation units, which suggest emplacement by periodic injection of magma pulses as vertical dykes that amalgamated, similarly to a sub-volcanic sheeted dyke complex. Individual dykes underwent internal differentiation following a solidification front parallel to the dyke edges. This solidification front may have been favoured by a significant lateral/horizontal thermal gradient, expressed by the vertical banding in the gabbros, the fractionation asymmetry within individual dykes and the migmatisation of the wall rocks. Pyroxenitic layers result from the fractionation and accumulation of clinopyroxene ± olivine ± plagioclase crystals from a mildly alkaline basaltic liquid. They are interpreted as truncated differentiation sequences, from which residual melts were extracted at various stages of their chemical evolution by subsequent dyke intrusions, either next to or within the crystallising unit. Compaction and squeezing of the crystal mush is ascribed to the incoming and inflating magma pulses. The expelled interstitial liquid was likely collected and erupted along with the magma flowing through the newly injected dykes. Clinopyroxene mineral orientation - as evidenced by EBSD and micro X-ray tomography investigations - displays a marked pure-shear component, supporting the interpretation of the role of compaction in the generation of the pyroxenites. Conversely, gabbro sequences underwent minor melt extraction and are believed to represent crystallised coalesced magma batches emplaced at lower rates at the end of eruptive cycles. Clinopyroxene orientations in gabbros record a simple shear component suggesting syn-magmatic deformation parallel to observed NNE-SSW trending shear zones induced by the regional tensional stress field. This emplacement model implies a crystallisation time of 1 to 5 years for individual dykes, consistent with PX1 emplacement over less than 0.5 My. A minimum amount of approximately 150 km 3 of magma is needed to generate the pluton, part of it having been erupted through the Central Volcanic Centre of Fuerteventura. If the regional extensional tectonic regime controls the PX1 feeder-zone initiation and overall geometry, rates and volumes of magma depend on other, source-related factors. High injection rates are likely to induce intrusion growth rates larger than could be accommodated by the regional extension. In this case, dyke intrusion by propagation of a weak tip, combined with the inability of magma to circulate through previously emplaced and crystallised dykes could result in an increase of non-lithostatic pressure on previously emplaced mushy dyke walls; thus generating strong pure-shear compaction within the pluton feeder-zone and interstitial melt expulsion. These compaction-dominated processes are recorded by the cumulitic pyroxenite bands.

  18. Response of the shallow aquifer of the volcano-hydrothermal system during the recent crises at Vulcano Island (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Giorgio; Federico, Cinzia; Madonia, Paolo; Paonita, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The shallow thermal aquifer at Vulcano Island is strongly affected by deep volcanic fluids. The most significant variations were observed during the 1989-1996 crisis due to a large input of steam and acidic gases from depth. Besides chemical variations related to the input of deep fluids, the record of the water-table elevation at monitored wells has provided remarkable insights into the pressure conditions of the volcano-hydrothermal system. After the pressure drop due to the extensive vaporization of the hydrothermal aquifer, occurred after 1993, the volcano-hydrothermal system has been re-pressurized since 2001, probably because of the contribution of volatiles from the hydrothermal-magmatic source. The increase in fluid pressure may have caused reopening of fractures (which had self-seated during the previous period of cooling) and the onset of a phase of higher vapor output in the fumarole field later in 2004. The fracture opening would have promoted further vapor separation from the deep fluid reservoir (hypothesized at 0.5-1.5 km depth) and finally the drainage of S-rich fluids into the shallow thermal aquifer (found out at few tens of meters of depth). The monitoring of both the water chemistry and the water-table elevation provides insights into the eventual pressurization of the volcano-hydrothermal system that precedes the fracture opening and the extensive drainage of deep fluids. The findings of this study could represent crucial information about the stability of the volcano edifice, and lead to reliable techniques for determining the risk of or even predicting phreatic explosions.

  19. Volcanic Unrest of Fogo Volcano in 2011-2012, S.Miguel Island, Azores, Observed by Continuous and Campaign GPS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Jun; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Ofeigsson, Benedikt; Ferreira, Teresa; Gaspar, Joao; Lorenzo, Maria; Araujo, Joao; Rodriques, Rita

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can occur after long time of dormancy as has been seen from the recent examples: Mount St. Helens 1980, Pinatubo 1991, Unzen 1991, Soufrière Hills volcano 1995, Chaitén 2008, and Eyjafjallajökull 2010. By utilizing space geodesy techniques, namely GNSS and InSAR, it has been reported that the inflation-deflation processes exist at several dormant volcanoes in the world, but the mechanism responsible for this phenomena is still controversial. Fundamental questions such as magma vs. hydrothermal fluids and volcanic vs. tectonic process remain unanswered in many cases. In this study, we analyze both continuous and campaign GPS data from Fogo volcano, S. Miguel Island, Azores. Although no geochemical and hydrothermal evidences for a magmatic intrusion were reported during the past seismic swarm episodes (1989, 2003-2006, and 2011-2012), geophysical data, both seismic and ground deformation, indicate possible volcanic sources. GPS time series spanned 2008-2013 period characterize tectonic plate divergence between Eurasian and Nubian, and reveal two different types of ground deformation associated with the 2011-2012 volcanic unrest of Fogo. One is the permanent edifice-scale inflation centered at NE summit which corresponds to the increase of volcano-tectonic events. Another is the subsequent minor-scale inflation-deflation reversals between Congro, a trachyte maar, east of Fogo and Furnas volcano. Calculated strain rates and GPS campaign results indicate that the 2011-2012 deformation is one order smaller than the previous unrest episode. A strong similarity exists to Matsushiro earthquake swarm (1965-1966) and Campi Flegrei volcanic unrests (1969-1972 and 1982-1984), which is the coexistence of an edifice-scale main inflation associated with intense volcano-tectonic earthquakes with inflation to deflation reversal that coincided with a sharp drop of seismicity. High recovery rate of inflation-deflation may be an indicator for the existence of hydrothermal fluids in the highly heterogeneous/porous media. We propose the following hypothesis for the 2011-2012 volcanic unrest of Fogo - (1) a minor magmatic intrusion beneath Fogo which acts as a heat source encourages lateral diffusion of fluids, (2) the fluids are transported through the existing cracks/fissures which are sustained by regional extension due to plate divergence, (3) influx of fluids increases pressure in cracks/fissures and generates lower-frequency earthquakes, and (4) discharge of fluids causes sudden pressure decrease and dilatancy recovery which leads seismic quiescence. Fogo volcano represents 450 years of dormancy since 1563-1564 when the last eruptions took place at the summit caldera. However, we show that the volcano has been experiencing intermittent magma ascents (i.e. repeating "failed eruptions") even its dormant period. Further researches are needed in order to understand the eruption triggering conditions. Nevertheless, we have a continuous GPS network that can detect small changes in the volcano roots and provide important contribution to evaluate future unrest episodes at Azores.

  20. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  1. Paleotsunami evidence on Kaua`i and numerical modeling of a great Aleutian tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Rhett; Burney, David; Walsh, David

    2014-10-01

    The Hawaiian Islands' location in the middle of the Pacific Ocean is threatened by tsunamis from great earthquakes in nearly all directions. Historical great earthquakes Mw > 8.5 in the last 100 years have produced large inundations and loss of life in the islands but cannot account for a substantial (≤ 600 m3) paleotsunami deposit in the Makauwahi sinkhole on the Island of Kaua`i. Using high-resolution bathymetry and topography we model tsunami inundation of the sinkhole caused by an earthquake with a moment magnitude of Mw ~9.25 located in the eastern Aleutians. A preponderance of evidence indicates that a giant earthquake in the eastern Aleutian Islands circa 1425-1665 A.D.—located between the source regions of the 1946 and 1957 great tsunamigenic earthquakes—created the paleotsunami deposit in Kaua`i. A tsunami deposit in the Aleutians dated circa 1530-1660 A.D. is consistent with this eastern Aleutian source region.

  2. Insights from geophysical monitoring into the volcano structure and magma supply systems at three very different oceanic islands in the Cape Verde archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, B. V.; Day, S.; Fonseca, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Three oceanic volcano islands in the west of the Cape Verde archipelago are considered to have the highest levels of volcanic hazard in the archipelago: Fogo, Brava, and Santo Antao. Fogo has had frequent mainly effusive eruptions in historic time, the most recent in 1995, whilst Brava and Santo Antao have ongoing geothermal activity and felt earthquakes, and have experienced geologically recent violent explosive eruptions. Therefore, these three islands have been the focus of recent efforts to set up seismic networks to monitor their activity. Here we present the first results from these networks, and propose interpretations of the monitored seismic activity in terms of subsurface volcano structures, near-surface intrusive activity and seasonal controls on geothermal activity. In Fogo, most recorded seismic events are hydrothermal events. These show a strong seasonal variation, increasing during the summer rain season and decreasing afterwards. Rare volcano-tectonic (VT) events (0.1island due to the 1995 eruption. Brava experiences frequent swarms of VT events. These are located mostly offshore, with a small proportion of on-shore events. The positions of offshore events are strongly correlated with seamounts and hence are interpreted as due to submarine volcanic processes. Onshore events (0.7island that has been indicated by previous geological studies, and may be due to inflation of a magma reservoir in the edifice. S. Antão is characterized by frequent seismic swarms composed of VT earthquakes (0.1volcanoes on Santo Antao, which are most probably also the sources of the associated MF events and harmonic tremor as well. These onshore swarms likely record dike intrusions into the volcanic rift zones. In conclusion, we note that each island has its own distinctive pattern of seismic activity, perhaps reflecting its different stage of evolution. Full understanding of the seismic activity and how it can be interpreted in mechanistic terms, as a basis for future volcanic hazard models and eruption forecasts, will therefore require more detailed geological and geophysical investigations of each island, with different priorities in each case.

  3. Adventive hydrothermal circulation on Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) revealed by geophysical and geochemical approaches: Implications for general fluid flow models on volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finizola, A.; Ricci, T.; Deiana, R.; Cabusson, S. Barde; Rossi, M.; Praticelli, N.; Giocoli, A.; Romano, G.; Delcher, E.; Suski, B.; Revil, A.; Menny, P.; Di Gangi, F.; Letort, J.; Peltier, A.; Villasante-Marcos, V.; Douillet, G.; Avard, G.; Lelli, M.

    2010-09-01

    On March 15th 2007 a paroxysmal explosion occurred at the Stromboli volcano. This event generated a large amount of products, mostly lithic blocks, some of which impacted the ground as far as down to 200 m a.s.l., about 1.5 km far away from the active vents. Two days after the explosion, a new vapour emission was discovered on the north-eastern flank of the volcanic edifice, at 560 m a.s.l., just above the area called "Nel Cannestrà". This new vapour emission was due to a block impact. In order to investigate the block impact area to understand the appearance of the vapour emission, we conducted on May 2008 a multidisciplinary study involving Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Self-Potential (SP), CO 2 soil diffuse degassing and soil temperature surveys. This complementary data set revealed the presence of an anomalous conductive body, probably related to a shallow hydrothermal level, at about 10-15 m depth, more or less parallel to the topography. It is the first time that such a hydrothermal fluid flow, with a temperature close to the water boiling point (76 °C) has been evidenced at Stromboli at this low elevation on the flank of the edifice. The ERT results suggest a possible link between (1) the main central hydrothermal system of Stromboli, located just above the plumbing system feeding the active vents, with a maximum of subsurface soil temperature close to 90 °C and limited by the NeoStromboli summit crater boundary and (2) the investigated area of Nel Cannestrà, at ~ 500 m a.s.l., a buried eruptive fissure active 9 ka ago. In parallel, SP and CO 2 soil diffuse degassing measurements suggest in this sector at slightly lower elevation from the block impact crater a magmatic and hydrothermal fluid rising system along the N41° regional fault. A complementary ERT profile, on May 2009, carried out from the NeoStromboli crater boundary down to the block impact crater displayed a flank fluid flow apparently connected to a deeper system. The concept of shallow hydrothermal level have been compared to similar ERT results recently obtained on Mount Etna and La Fossa cone of Vulcano. This information needs to be taken into account in general fluid flow models on volcanoes. In particular, peripheral thermal waters (as those bordering the north-eastern coast of Stromboli) could be contaminated by hydrothermal and magmatic fluids coming from regional faults but also from the summit.

  4. The 1996 Earthquake Swarm and Intrusion at Akutan Volcano, Alaska: An Example of a Failed Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. A.; Lu, Z.; Prejean, S. G.; Wicks, C.; Dzurisin, D.

    2008-12-01

    In March 1996, Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian Arc, was the source of a powerful swarm of Volcano- Tectonic (VT) earthquakes composed of more than 200 shocks greater than magnitude 3.5 (Mmax = 5.1) that produced an estimated total cumulative seismic moment of 2.7 X 1018 N m. The swarm consisted of two pulses that began on March 11 and March 14: elevated earthquake activity continued at Akutan Volcano for several months. Extensive ground cracks that striking N70W and extending discontinuously across the island from near Lava Point (the most recently active satellite vent) to the southeast side of the island formed in association with this swarm. The most extensive cracks formed a zone that is 500 m wide and 3 km long on the NW flank of the volcano between the summit and Lava Point. In this area, local graben structures show vertical displacements of 30 to 80 cm, suggesting the cracks formed in response to uplift of this portion of the volcano. Results from both C-band ERS and L-band JERS radar interferometry images that span the time of the swarm reveal a complex island-wide pattern of deformation: The western part of the island moved upward as much as 70 cm, while the eastern part moved downward a similar amount. The most plausible interpretation is that the 1996 seismic swam and associated ground deformation at Akutan resulted from an intrusion of magma beneath the northwest flank of the volcano. Modeling of the observed deformation field suggests the inflation on the northwest side of the volcano results from the intrusion of a dike with a top at 0.4 km depth, while the deflation on the island's eastern side is modeled as several dislocation planes that possibly reflect the depressurization of a known hydrothermal system in this area. Earthquake hypocenters calculated between 1996 and 2008 are consistent with this model and show (a) a prominent cluster of shallow earthquake hypocenters that occurred on the eastern side of the island near the center of subsidence in 1996, (b) a west-northwest trend in hypocenters that aligns with the observed ground cracks and extends across the island, and (c) a small cluster of low- and mixed-frequency events that locate at mid-crustal depths beneath the volcano's southwest flank. In spite of this high level of volcanic unrest in 1996 no subsequent magmatic eruption has occurred at Akutan in association with or since this swarm. The seismic moment and ground deformation observed at Akutan in 1996 greatly exceeds many sequences that precede eruptions at other volcanoes. Remarkably, no observed increases in fumorolic activity or gas emission and no obvious periods of volcanic tremor or long- period seismic events were observed in association with the 1996 seismic swarm. The lack of these key precursors played a strong role in diagnosing the unrest and formulating public warnings and advisories issued by the Alaska Volcano Observatory during the 1996 seismic crisis.

  5. Numerical modeling of tsunami waves generated by the flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (La Palma, Canary Islands): Tsunami source and near field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, S. M.; Harris, J. C.; Grilli, S. T.; Fabre, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we study waves generated by the potential collapse of the west flank of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV; La Palma, Canary Island, Spain) through numerical simulations performed in two stages: (i) the initial slide motion and resulting free surface elevation are first calculated using a 3D Navier-Stokes model; (ii) generated waves are then input into a 2D (horizontal) Boussinesq model to further simulate propagation to the nearby islands. Unlike in earlier work on CVV, besides a similar extreme slide volume scenario of 450 km3, in our simulations: (i) we consider several slide scenarios featuring different volumes (i.e., 20, 40, 80 km3), which partly result from a geotechnical slope stability analysis; (ii) we use a more accurate bathymetry; and (iii) an incompressible version of a multiple-fluid/material Navier-Stokes model. We find wave trains for each scenario share common features in terms of wave directivity, frequency, and time evolution, but maximum elevations near CVV significantly differ, ranging from 600 to 1200 m (for increasing slide volume). Additionally, our computations show that significant energy transfer from slide to waves only lasts for a short duration (order 200 s), which justifies concentrating our best modeling efforts on the early slide motion phase. The anticipated consequences of such wave trains on La Palma and other Canary Islands are assessed in detail in the paper.

  6. Amplitude Comparison of Teleseismic P-Wave Phases from the Japan Subduction Zone and the South Sandwich Islands recorded at Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, A. K.; McNutt, S. R.; West, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Uturuncu volcano (22° 15' S, 67° 12'W) has been shown to be inflating at a rate of 1-1.5 cm per year by a satellite geodetic survey from May 1996-present. This inflation is centered just southwest of the volcano's summit and at a depth of 15-17 km. This may be caused by the injection of magma into the system. Seismic studies performed as part of the multi-university PLUTONS project can help constrain the location and nature of this inflation. By looking at how teleseismic peak-to-peak waveform amplitudes (velocities in nm/s) vary across the network, we can begin to pinpoint the size and location of attenuating zones beneath the edifice. Analysis of 5 P-wave phases from 4 earthquakes with origins in the Japan subduction zone (NW of the network, ~155° distant) shows a consistent 'shadow zone' of decreased amplitudes in a 13.6 by 33.3 km zone to the SE of the summit. Observations from two teleseismic events originating in the South Sandwich Islands (~45° distant) show similar effects although the geometry differs with respect to individual stations. We expect this trend to hold true for events originating to the NE and SW of the volcano, which would indicate a zone of decreased amplitude in the same region SE of the summit. The attenuation of P-waves that would otherwise be of uniform amplitude could be the result of some ray paths traveling through a shallow, low-velocity and highly attenuating zone of either magma/mush, highly fractured rock, or some other cause. This attenuating zone may be located at or near the center of the inflation zone, and physical processes associated with it could well be closely related to the observed inflation.

  7. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  8. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J.W.; Gallina, G.M.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Swanson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes; thereafter, the maximum plume height decreased and during the rest of the eruption usually did not exceed ???5 km (???17,000 ft), which lessened the potential hazard to aircraft at higher cruise altitudes. Drifting ash clouds commonly extended hundreds of kilometers from the volcano, occasionally as far west as the Philippines. Over the course of the eruptive activity in 2003-2004, the VAAC issued 323 advisories (168 with graphical depictions of ash clouds) for Anatahan, serving as a reliable source of ash-cloud information for aviation-related meteorological offices and air carriers. With a record of frequent eruptions in the CNMI, continued satellite and in situ real-time geophysical monitoring is needed at Anatahan and other Marianas volcanoes so that potential hazards to aviation from any future eruptive activity can be quickly and correctly assessed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003 2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Ewert, John W.; Gallina, Gregory M.; Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Swanson, Grace L.

    2005-08-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO 2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes; thereafter, the maximum plume height decreased and during the rest of the eruption usually did not exceed ˜5 km (˜17,000 ft), which lessened the potential hazard to aircraft at higher cruise altitudes. Drifting ash clouds commonly extended hundreds of kilometers from the volcano, occasionally as far west as the Philippines. Over the course of the eruptive activity in 2003-2004, the VAAC issued 323 advisories (168 with graphical depictions of ash clouds) for Anatahan, serving as a reliable source of ash-cloud information for aviation-related meteorological offices and air carriers. With a record of frequent eruptions in the CNMI, continued satellite and in situ real-time geophysical monitoring is needed at Anatahan and other Marianas volcanoes so that potential hazards to aviation from any future eruptive activity can be quickly and correctly assessed.

  10. Relationship between regional changes of soil physical properties and volcanic stratigraphy on the southern slope of Batur volcano in the island of Bali, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Sunarta, N.

    1994-04-01

    The present paper shows the relationship between the regional changes of soil physical properties and the volcanic stratigraphy on the southern slope of Batur volcano in the island of Bali, Indonesia, from the hydrogeological point of view based on the data obtained from field observations and laboratory experiments. The Bali soils data showed marked differences in regional distribution and their characteristics are closely correlated to the distribution of the volcanic stratigraphy derived from the Batur volcanic activities with the eruption about 23,700 years ago. On the basis of these data, the hydrogeological situation of the slope are presented schematically and groundwater flow regimes on the slope, such as recharge and discharge areas, are also classified according to the hydrogeological information. These classifications of groundwater flow regimes are useful to consider the occurrence of hydrological phenomena such as springs and paddy field distributions observed on the slope.

  11. Review of Crustal (Non-Volcanic) Seismicity in the Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, N. A.; Kozyreva, N.; Hansen, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Geologically, Aleutian Islands are mostly known for its volcanic eruptions, great subduction zone earthquakes, and earthquake-induced local and Pacific-wide tsunamis. Within the past decade expansion of seismic networks in the Aleutians allowed researchers to glimpse into another fascinating aspect of the arc tectonics - crustal seismicity within the overriding North American plate, or as some studies have suggested, within the Bering microplate. It has been suggested that the crust of Aleutian arc consists of a number of blocks that are rotating clock-wise and translating westward along the plate boundary. Boundaries between the blocks are delineated by major arc-parallel and transverse shear zones. North and south boundaries are right-lateral shear zones, and east and west boundaries are left-lateral shear zones. Within the past 5 years a number of moderate-sized crustal earthquakes occurred in the Aleutians, such as the 2006 M6.0-6.4 events in the Rat Islands, the 2008 M6.4-6.6 events in the Andreanof Islands, and the most recent M6.6 earthquake of July 18, 2010 in the Fox Islands. We performed detailed analysis of the aftershock locations and faulting parameters of these earthquakes. One of the challenges in studying these events is that despite recent improvements in the region, seismic station distribution is still relatively sparse and data communication and power systems are often unreliable. We also revisited previously published reports on crustal seismicity in the Aleutians. An interesting observation is that east of Atka Island most of the crustal events are characterized by normal faulting, while west of Atka they are predominantly strike-slip events. Some of these events can be associated with the faulting along the crustal block boundaries. However, most have occurred north of the block boundaries within the unrotated Bering massif. We postulate that the crustal strike-slip events in central Aleutians manifest Riedel fracture process. Additional geodetic and seismic instrumentation for the EarthScope project in Alaska could shed additional light onto the crustal tectonics of the Aleutian arc.

  12. A new model for the growth of basaltic shields based on deformation of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Amelung, Falk; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Space-geodetic measurements of surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina – the most frequently erupting volcano in the Galápagos Archipelago – reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from a shallow magma reservoir. This includes eruptions from fissures that are oriented both radially and circumferentially with respect to the summit caldera. A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image acquired 1–2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galápagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, and this assumption has guided models of the origin of the eruptive fissure geometry and overall development of the volcanoes. Our findings allow us to reinterpret the internal structure and evolution of Galápagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields. Furthermore, we note that stress changes generated by the emplacement of subhorizontal sills feeding one type of eruption may control the geometry of subsequent eruptive fissures. Specifically, circumferential fissures tend to open within areas uplifted by sill intrusions that initiated previous radial fissure eruptions. This mechanism provides a possible explanation for the pattern of eruptive fissures that characterizes all the western Galápagos volcanoes, as well as the alternation between radial and circumferential fissure eruptions at Fernandina. The same model suggests that the next eruption of Fernandina will be from a circumferential fissure in the area uplifted by the 2009 sill intrusion, just southwest of the caldera rim.

  13. Post-2008 Inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; QU, F.; Dzurisin, D.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Okmok Volcano, a dominantly basaltic volcanic complex that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is among the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc (Lu and Dzurisin, 2014). Minor ash eruptions were reported a dozen times since the 1930s. Blocky basalt flows were extruded during dominantly effusive eruptions in 1945, 1958, and 1997, together with minor amounts of ash. From the 1930s to 1997, all of Okmok's eruptions originated from Cone A within the summit caldera. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far the largest and most explosive eruption since at least the early 19th century. The eruption issued from a new vent in the northeast part of the caldera near Cone D, about 5 km northeast of Cone A. The eruption was strongly hydrovolcanic in nature and produced a new tuff cone roughly 240 m high, dramatically altering the landscape inside the caldera. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations suggest that a magma reservoir, probably an interconnected network of magma bodies of varying sizes located beneath the caldera and centered ~3 km BSL, was responsible for volcano-wide deformation during 1992-2008, including the 1997 and 2008 eruptions (Lu and Dzurisin, 2014). The reservoir inflated at a variable rate before the 1997 and 2008 eruptions, and withdrawal of magma during both eruptions depressurized the reservoir, causing rapid volcano-wide subsidence. In this study, we report re-inflation of the Okmok reservoir from 2008 to 2014. InSAR imagery from X-band TerraSAR-X, C-band Envisat and L-band ALOS PALSAR satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a rate of 5-10 cm/year, which is confirmed by GPS measurements. Deformation modeling suggests the inflation source is located beneath the center of Okmok caldera at ~3 km BSL, which is essentially the same location responsible for uplift and subsidence during 1992-2008. Lu, Z., and Dzurisin, D., 2014. "InSAR Imaging of Aleutian Volcanoes: Monitoring a Volcanic Arc from Space", Springer Praxis Books, Geophysical Sciences, ISBN 978-3-642-00347-9, 390 pp.

  14. Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina A.; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  15. Reawakening of the Teide volcano (Tenerife island, Spain): Monitoring the activity through the analysis of continuous seismic and GPS data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, R.; Vila, J.; García, A.; Tárraga, M.; Carniel, R.; Marrero, J. M.; Carmona, J.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Berrocoso, M.

    2009-04-01

    The reawakening of the Teide volcano in 2004 caused the installation of several seismic and GPS stations, operating in continuous mode. This allowed the application of different techniques of time sequence data analysis. The results of the analysis of the background seismic noise, deformation model and b parameter of located seismic events show evidences of a magmatic process in course, probably related to the central volcanic system of Tenerife. Other obtained results not only allow the occurrence of tectonic events (volcanotectonic??) forecasting, but also the establishment of a clear influence in the variation of the background noise characteristics.

  16. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  17. The growth of Ritter Island volcano, Papua New Guinea, and the lateral collapse landslide and tsunami of 1888: new insights from eyewitness accounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Melanie Jane; Day, Simon; Downes, Hilary

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of the 1888 edifice lateral collapse landslide and tsunami event at Ritter Island volcano, using a more complete set of primary and secondary eyewitness accounts than has been used in previous studies. The collapse, early in the morning of March 13th, 1888, removed most of the island and its western submarine flank down to the base of the edifice some 900 m below sea level. The resulting tsunami is believed to have eradicated entire coastal communities on the surrounding islands and was recorded by German colonists in several locations around the Bismarck Sea and on adjacent coasts. Our analysis, based in particular upon new and complete translation of the German accounts, considers the evolution of the island over the previous two centuries and the events of March 1888, with the aim of clarifying the constraints that exist upon the cause, kinematics and mechanisms of the lateral collapse. Our analysis indicates that the pre-collapse Ritter edifice produced frequent strombolian eruptions and steam emissions, building an approximately 1700 m wide, notably steep-sided edifice with a N-S elongated oval shape in plan, by the late 1800s. Most activity was concentrated at a group of summit craters some 800 m above sea level, possibly also in a north-south line, with lesser flank fissure activity. The accounts of the tsunami indicate that the 1888 collapse involved a single large-scale catastrophic landslide, but descriptions of the island in the following days indicate a period in which there were many small landslides from the newly formed and unstable collapse scar. There is no evidence for a sequence of large landslides during this event and there is no clear evidence for a coincident or causal magmatic explosive eruption. One report suggests that there was activity (perhaps phreatic or phreatomagmatic explosions?) prior to the collapse that lead some of the resident local communities to seek higher ground, but evidence for precursory flank movements or changes in eruptive style have not been found in the historical accounts.

  18. How changes in pore pressure affect fluid circulation in volcanoes: three examples from Vulcano Island, Mt. Etna and Mt Vesuvius (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, C.; Madonia, P.; Capasso, G.; D'Alessandro, W.; Bellomo, S.; Brusca, L.; Cusano, P.; Longo, M.; Paonita, A.; Petrosino, S.

    2013-05-01

    Fluids circulating in volcanic edifices are attracting increasing interest from scientists, mostly because their role in triggering flank instability, phreatic explosions, and eruptions has been documented in several cases worldwide [Newhall et al. 2001, Thomas et al. 2004]. Fluid pore pressure can change as an effect of either external (meteoric recharge, variation of the stress field), or endogenous causes (e.g. internal pressurization of magmatic volatiles and hydrothermal systems). The reciprocal roles of tectonics and magmatic/hydrothermal activity are still under investigation [Gottsman et al. 2007, Roeloffs et al. 2003]. We discuss the results of decennial data records collected in the aquifers of Mt Etna, Vulcano Island and Mt Vesuvius, and get insights on the role of tectonics and volcanic activity on the observed variations of water level and chemical composition. In Vulcano Island, the shallow thermal aquifer is deeply concerned by deep volcanic fluids. The most significant variations were observed during the 1988-96 crisis, due to the large input of steam and acidic gases from depth. In addition, the record of the water table elevation provided remarkable insights on the pressure of the volcano-hydrothermal system, which can be envisaged as the cause for the onset of the phase of higher vapor output in the fumarolic field in late 2004. On Mt. Vesuvius, the geochemical behavior of the aquifer appears strictly controlled by the input of volcanic gases and variations in the stress field. These latter, which were responsible for the seismic crisis of 1999, and the almost simultaneous increased input of CO2-rich vapor, significantly affected water chemistry and temperature, until 2006. The recent observations of low salinity, temperature, and dissolved carbon contents in groundwater provide strong evidence for reduced pressure in the volcano-hydrothermal system. The record of water chemistry available on Mt. Etna since 1994 shows coeval changes in almost all monitored sites, ascribed to the variable contribution over time of waters with different temperature and composition. In addition, the dissolved CO2 content is chiefly affected by the input of volcanic CO2. Given the intense dynamics of the volcano, with frequent eruptions and periodic inflation-deflation phases, as well as the uneven deformation of the edifice, changes in water chemistry can be attributed, at least in part, to stress-related changes in pore pressure. Changes of pore pressure and micro-fracturation are controlling fluid movement (water and gases) within the volcano, producing part of the observed geochemical variations. The accurate modeling of the proposed process of fluid pressure increase, fracturing, and drainage of deep fluids will benefit of a multidisciplinary approach, able to clarify the cause-effect relationship and critical conditions. Newhall CG et al. 2001. J. Geol. Soc. Philipp., 56, 69-84. Thomas ME et al. 2004. Terra Nova, 16, 312-317. Gottsmann J. et al. 2007. GRL 34, L07307. Roeloffs E. et al. 2003. JVGR 127, 269-303.

  19. Variability of passive gas emissions, seismicity, and deformation during crater lake growth at White Island Volcano, New Zealand, 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.; Hurst, T.; Scott, B.; Sherburn, S.; Christenson, B.W.; Britten, K.; Cole-Baker, J.; Mullan, B.

    2008-01-01

    We report on 4 years of airborne measurements of CO2, SO2, and H2S emission rates during a quiescent period at White Island volcano, New Zealand, beginning in 2003. During this time a significant crater lake emerged, allowing scrubbig processes to be investigated. CO2 emissions varied from a baseline of 250 to >2000 t d-1 and demonstrated clear annual cycling that was consistent with numbers of earthquake detections and annual changes in sea level. The annual variability was found to be most likely related to increases in the strain on the volcano during sea level highs, temporarily causing fractures to reduce in size in the upper conduit. SO2 emissions varied from 0 to >400 t d-1 and were clearly affected by scrubbing processes within the first year of take development. Scrubbing caused increases of SO42- and Cl- in lake waters, and the ratio of carbon to total sulphur suggested that elemental sulphur deposition was also significant in the lake during the first year. Careful measurements of the lake level and chemistry allowed estimates of the rate of H2O(g) and HCl(g) input into the lake and suggested that the molar abundances of major gas species (H2O, CO2, SO2, and HCl) during this quiescent phase were similar to fumarolic ratios observed between earlier eruptive periods. The volume of magma estimated from CO2 emissions (0.0 15-0.04 km3) was validated by Cl- increases in the lake, suggesting that the gas and magma are transported from deep to shallow depths as a closed system and likely become open in the upper conduit region. The absence of surface deformation further leads to a necessity of magma convection to supply and remove magma from the degassing depths. Two models of convection configurations are discussed. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Large-scale deformation related to the collision of the Aleutian Arc with Kamchatka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesit, Eric L.; Scholl, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The far western Aleutian Island Arc is actively colliding with Kamchatka. Westward motion of the Aleutian Arc is brought about by the tangential relative motion of the Pacific plate transferred to major, right-lateral shear zones north and south of the arc. Early geologic mapping of Cape Kamchatka (a promontory of Kamchatka along strike with the Aleutian Arc) revealed many similarities to the geology of the Aleutian Islands. Later studies support the notion that Cape Kamchatka is the farthest west Aleutian “island” and that it has been accreted to Kamchatka by the process of arc-continent collision. Deformation associated with the collision onshore Kamchatka includes gravimetrically determined crustal thickening and formation of a narrow thrust belt of intensely deformed rocks directly west of Cape Kamchatka. The trend of the thrust faults is concave toward the collision zone, indicating a radial distribution of maximum horizontal compressive stress. Offshore, major crustal faults trend either oblique to the Kamchatka margin or parallel to major Aleutian shear zones. These offshore faults are complex, accommodating both strike-slip and thrust displacements as documented by focal mechanisms and seismic reflection data. Earthquake activity is much higher in the offshore region within a zone bounded to the north by the northernmost Aleutian shear zone and to the west by an apparent aseismic front. Analysis of focal mechanisms in the region indicate that the present-day arc-continent “contact zone” is located directly east of Cape Kamchatka. In modeling the dynamics of the collision zone using thin viscous sheet theory, the rheological parameters are only partially constrained to values of n (the effective power law exponent) ? 3 and Ar(the Argand number) ? 30. These values are consistent with a forearc thermal profile of Kamchatka, previously determined from heat flow modeling. The thin viscous sheet modeling also indicates that onshore thrust faulting is a consequence, not only of compressive stresses resulting from the west directed collision, but also of sediment-induced coupling of the subducting Pacific plate.

  1. Recent and Hazardous Volcanic Activity Along the NW Rift Zone of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, G.; Frese, I.; Di Muro, A.; Kueppers, U.; Michon, L.; Metrich, N.

    2014-12-01

    Shield volcanoes are a common feature of basaltic volcanism. Their volcanic activity is often confined to a summit crater area and rift systems, both characterized by constructive (scoria and cinder cones; lava flows) and destructive (pit craters; caldera collapse) phenomena. Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano (La Réunion Island, Indian Ocean) is an ideal place to study these differences in eruptive behaviour. Besides the frequent eruptions in the central Enclos Fouqué caldera, hundreds of eruptive vents opened along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. Two short rift zones are characterized by weak seismicity and lateral magma transport at shallow depth (above sea level). Here we focus on the third and largest rift zone (15km wide, 20 km long), which extends in a north-westerly direction between PdF and nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. It is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, testifying of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large-volume eruptions. We present new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruption products) on one of the youngest (~6kyrs) and largest lava field (Trous Blancs eruption). It extends for 24km from a height of 1800 m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre cities, until reaching the coast. The source area of this huge lava flow has been identified in an alignment of four previously unidentified pit craters. The eruption initiated with intense fountaining activity, producing a m-thick bed of loose black scoria, which becomes densely welded in its upper part; followed by an alternation of volume rich lava effusions and strombolian activity, resulting in the emplacement of meter-thick, massive units of olivine-basalt alternating with coarse scoria beds in the proximal area. Activity ended with the emplacement of a dm-thick bed of glassy, dense scoria and a stratified lithic breccia, marking the pit crater foundering. Interestingly, this final stage compares well with the formation of pit craters on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Reoccurring of similar activity on the NW rift represents a major source of risk, for this now densely populated region (more than 150,000 people living in the affected area).

  2. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Rat Islands and Delarof Islands and Tanaga Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healey, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Gravity observations were made both east and west of the international dateline in the Aleutian Islands during 1970. A total of 280 gravity observations were made in the Rat Islands to the west and the Delarof Islands and Tanaga Island to the east. The principal facts and explanatory information for these data are included herein. These data have not been adjusted to the 1971 International Gravity Standardization Network datum.

  3. Don Swanson at Ash Outcrop Near Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Don Swanson (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows scientists in the CSAV International class how layers of ash outside of HVO indicate past explosive eruptions of Kilauea. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Hawaii Island, Hawaii...

  4. 78 FR 57097 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sharks in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... GOA (78 FR 13813, March 1, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(2), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sharks in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY: National...: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting retention of sharks in the Bering Sea and...

  5. 76 FR 59924 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sharks in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... GOA (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011) and apportionment of non-specified reserves (76 FR 53840, August 30... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sharks in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY: National...: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting retention of sharks in the Bering Sea and...

  6. 76 FR 24404 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... pot gear in the BSAI under Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii) on March 8, 2011 (76 FR 13098, March 10, 2011). NMFS... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY... cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 meters) length overall (LOA) using hook-and-line or...

  7. 78 FR 53369 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... using hook-and-line or pot gear in the BSAI under Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii) on February 7, 2013 (78 FR 9328... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY... cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 meters) length overall (LOA) using hook-and-line or...

  8. 75 FR 792 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    .../processors using hook-and-line in the BSAI under Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii) on November 16, 2009 (74 FR 59918... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; modification of a closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is opening directed fishing for Pacific cod...

  9. 75 FR 19561 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii) on March 25, 2010 (75 FR 15626, March 26, 2010). NMFS has determined that as of... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; modification of a closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is opening directed fishing for Pacific cod...

  10. 77 FR 55735 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... February 17, 2012 (77 FR 10400, February 22, 2012). NMFS has determined that as of September 5, 2012... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY... cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 meters) length overall (LOA) using hook-and-line or...

  11. 75 FR 52478 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii) on May 19, 2010 (75 FR 28502, May 21, 2010). NMFS has determined that as of... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; modification of a closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is opening directed fishing for Pacific cod...

  12. 75 FR 69597 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010). In accordance... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY.... ACTION: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting retention of Pacific cod in the Bering...

  13. 78 FR 42023 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... under Sec. 679.2(d)(1)(iii) on June 11, 2013 (78 FR 35771, June 14, 2013). As of July 8, 2013, NMFS has... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY... Microsoft Word or Excel, WordPerfect, or Adobe PDF file formats only. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  14. 75 FR 8547 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (74 FR 7359, February 17, 2009) the HLA limits of the A... dates of the first and second directed fisheries within the HLA in areas 542 and 543 (75 FR 3873... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area...

  15. 75 FR 4491 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Atka Mackerel in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY... comments will be accepted in Microsoft Word, Excel, WordPerfect, or Adobe portable document file (pdf... manages the groundfish fishery in the BSAI exclusive economic zone according to the Fishery...

  16. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Akutan Alaskan Volcano Tiltmeter Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauk, B. A.; Gallaher, W.; Dittmann, T.; Smith, S.

    2007-12-01

    During August of 2007, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) successfully installed four Applied Geomechanics Lily Self Leveling Borehole Tiltmeters on Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian islands of Alaska. All four stations were collocated with existing PBO Global Positioning Systems (GPS) stations installed on the volcano in 2005. The tiltmeters will aid researchers in detecting and measuring flank deformation associated with future magmatic intrusions of the volcano. All four of the tiltmeters were installed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by JL Aviation and logistical support from the Trident Seafood Corporation, the City of Akutan, and the Akutan Corporation. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all drilling equipment be transported to each site from the village of Akutan by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and with internal loads. Each tiltmeter hole was drilled to a depth of approximately 30 feet with a portable hydraulic/pneumatic drill rig. The hole was then cased with splined 2.75 inch PVC. The PVC casing was cemented in place with grout and the tiltmeters were installed and packed with fine grain sand to stabilize the tiltmeters inside the casing. The existing PBO NetRS GPS receivers were configured to collect the tiltmeter data through a spare receiver serial port at one sample per minute and 1 hour files. Data from the GPS receivers and tiltmeters is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the village of Akutan that transmits the data using satellite based communications to connect to the internet and to the UNAVCO Facility data archive where it is made freely available to the public.

  17. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground-based instruments are supplemented by remote sensing data sets. UNAVCO supports the acquisition of InSAR and LiDAR imaging data, with archiving and distribution of these data provided by UNAVCO and partner institutions. We provide descriptions and access information for geodetic data from the PBO volcano subnetworks and their applications to monitoring for scientific and public safety objectives. We also present notable examples of activity recorded by these instruments, including the 2004-2010 accelerated uplift episode at the Yellowstone caldera and the 2006 Augustine eruption.

  18. Island of Timor, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This almost totally cloud free, photo of the island of Timor, Indonesia (9.0S, 125.0E) illustrates the volcanic origin of the over 1500 islands of Indonesia. Close examination of the photo reveals several eroded volcanoes on the Island of Timor and several of the adjacent islands. The linear alignment of the volcanoes, as seen from space, indicates the edges of the tectonic plates of the Earth's crust where volcanic activity is most common.

  19. Deformation associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, Dorte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Lu, Zhiming

    2002-01-01

    Okmok volcano, located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian chain, Alaska, is the most eruptive caldera system in North America in historic time. Its most recent eruption occurred in 1997. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry shows deflation of the caldera center of up to 140 cm during this time, preceded and followed by inflation of smaller magnitude. The main part of the observed deformation can be modeled using a pressure point source model. The inferred source is located between 2.5 and 5.0 km beneath the approximate center of the caldera and ???5 km from the eruptive vent. We interpret it as a central magma reservoir. The preeruptive period features inflation accompanied by shallow localized subsidence between the caldera center and the vent. We hypothesize that this is caused by hydrothermal activity or that magma moved away from the central chamber and toward the later vent. Since all historic eruptions at Okmok have originated from the same cone, this feature may be a precursor that indicates an upcoming eruption. The erupted magma volume is ???9 times the volume that can be accounted for by the observed preeruptive inflation. This indicates a much longer inflation interval than we were able to observe. The observation that reinflation started shortly after the eruption suggests that inflation spans the whole time interval between eruptions. Extrapolation of the average subsurface volume change rate is in good agreement with the long-term eruption frequency and eruption volumes of Okmok.

  20. Microearthquakes at st. Augustine volcano, alaska, triggered by Earth tides.

    PubMed

    Mauk, F J; Kienle, J

    1973-10-26

    Microearthquake activity at St. Augustine volcano, located at the mouth of Cook Inlet in the Aleutian Islands, has been monitored since August 1970. Both before and after minor eruptive activity on 7 October 1971, numerous shallow-foci microearthquake swarms were recorded. Plots of the hourly frequency of microearthquakes often show a diurnal peaking of activity. A cross correlation of this activity with the calculated magnitudes of tidal acceleration exhibited two prominent phase relationships. The first, and slightly more predominant, phase condition is a phase delay in the microearthquake activity of approximately 1 hour from the time of maximum tidal acceleration. This is thought to be a direct microearthquake-triggering effect caused by tidal stresses. The second is a phase delay in the microearthquake activity of approximately 5 hours, which correlates well with the time of maximum oceanic tidal loading. Correlation of the individual peaks of swarm activity with defined components of the tides suggests that it may be necessary for tidal stressing to have a preferential orientation in order to be an effective trigger of microearthquakes. PMID:17841318

  1. Microearthquake activity around Kueishantao island, offshore northeastern Taiwan: Insights into the volcano-tectonic interactions at the tip of the southern Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, K. I.; Pan, C.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2013-05-01

    Kueishantao is a volcanic island located offshore the northeastern coast of Taiwan and lies at the tip of the southern Okinawa Trough which is the back-arc basin of the Ryukyu subduction zone. Its last eruption occurred during the Holocene (~ 7 ka), hence Kueishantao can be considered as an active volcano. In an effort to better understand how magmatic processes may interact with the regional tectonics, a seismic network was installed in the area during early January 2008. This network consisted of 16 three-component seismometers located both on Kueishantao and the coast of northeastern Taiwan. One year of data was analyzed yielding 425 earthquakes whose P and S arrival times were manually picked and each event was located using a nonlinear probabilistic location method. In order to improve the location accuracy, the minimum 1-D velocity model for this dataset was derived and all earthquakes were relocated using this model. The results show a tight cluster of events near Kueishantao while the remaining earthquakes are scattered between the island and mainland Taiwan. The majority of hypocentral depths range between 2.5 and 10 km where the former depth coincides with the bottom of the shallow sedimentary layer and the latter with the ductile lower crust. Waveforms of the three largest events were also inverted for the determination of their deviatoric and full moment tensor. No statistically significant isotropic component was found, while two of the events can be explained by a double-couple source. The third event exhibited a low frequency content (< 10 Hz) and a large non-double-couple component suggesting fluid involvement at its source. A stress inversion of all available focal mechanisms in the area shows that fluid circulation in the upper crust generates a local stress field around Kueishantao facilitating the opening of cracks along the NW-SE direction of regional extension.

  2. Post-eruptive inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR, 2008–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qu, Feifei; Lu, Zhong; Poland, Michael; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Qin; Jung, Hyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Okmok, a ~10-km wide caldera that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far its largest and most explosive since at least the early 19th century. We investigate post-eruptive magma supply and storage at the volcano during 2008–2014 by analyzing all available synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Okmok acquired during that time period using the multi-temporal InSAR technique. Data from the C-band Envisat and X-band TerraSAR-X satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating very soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a time-variable rate of 48-130 mm/y, consistent with GPS measurements. The “model-assisted” phase unwrapping method is applied to improve the phase unwrapping operation for long temporal baseline pairs. The InSAR time-series is used as input for deformation source modeling, which suggests magma accumulating at variable rates in a shallow storage zone at ~3.9 km below sea level beneath the summit caldera, consistent with previous studies. The modeled volume accumulation in the 6 years following the 2008 eruption is ~75% of the 1997 eruption volume and ~25% of the 2008 eruption volume.

  3. A tectonic earthquake sequence preceding the April-May 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Stihler, S.D.; Power, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    On 4 March 1999, a shallow ML 5.2 earthquake occurred beneath Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc. This earthquake was located 10-15 km west of Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite stratovolcano. A Strombolian eruption began at Shishaldin roughly 1 month after the mainshock, culminating in a large explosive eruption on 19 April. We address the question of whether or not the eruption caused the mainshock by computing the Coulomb stress change caused by an inflating dike on fault planes oriented parallel to the mainshock focal mechanism. We found Coulomb stress increases of ???0.1 MPa in the region of the mainshock, suggesting that magma intrusion prior to the eruption could have caused the mainshock. Satellite and seismic data indicate that magma was moving upwards beneath Shishaldin well before the mainshock. indicating that, in an overall sense, the mainshock cannot be said to have caused the eruption. However, observations of changes at the volcano following the mainshock and several large aftershocks suggest that the earthquakes may, in turn, have influenced the course of the eruption.

  4. Groundwater salinity and hydrochemical processes in the volcano-sedimentary aquifer of La Aldea, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Fuentes, Tatiana; Cabrera, María del Carmen; Heredia, Javier; Custodio, Emilio

    2014-06-15

    The origin of the groundwater salinity and hydrochemical conditions of a 44km(2) volcano-sedimentary aquifer in the semi-arid to arid La Aldea Valley (western Gran Canaria, Spain) has been studied, using major physical and chemical components. Current aquifer recharge is mainly the result of irrigation return flows and secondarily that of rainfall infiltration. Graphical, multivariate statistical and modeling tools have been applied in order to improve the hydrogeological conceptual model and identify the natural and anthropogenic factors controlling groundwater salinity. Groundwater ranges from Na-Cl-HCO3 type for moderate salinity water to Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 type for high salinity water. This is mainly the result of atmospheric airborne salt deposition; silicate weathering, and recharge incorporating irrigation return flows. High evapotranspiration produces significant evapo-concentration leading to relative high groundwater salinity in the area. Under average conditions, about 70% of the water used for intensive agricultural exploitation in the valley comes from three low salinity water runoff storage reservoirs upstream, out of the area, while the remaining 30% derives from groundwater. The main alluvial aquifer behaves as a short turnover time reservoir that adds to the surface waters to complement irrigation water supply in dry periods, when it reaches 70% of irrigation water requirements. The high seasonality and intra-annual variability of water demand for irrigation press on decision making on aquifer use by a large number of aquifer users acting on their own. PMID:24698802

  5. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25627249

  6. Investigation of the Volcano-tectonic dynamics of Vulcano Island by long-term (40 years) geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Alparone, Salvatore; Gambino, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Obrizzo, Francesco; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    Vulcano island is a composite volcanic edifice located in the south-central sector of the Aeolian Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy). It is the southernmost tip of the southern branch of the Y-shaped archipelago; in particular, it is part of the bigger Lipari-Vulcano volcanic complex that comprises the two southernmost islands of the archipelago. This branch of the archipelago is NNW-SSE oriented and represent the off-shore prolongation of the Tindari-Letojanni tectonic lineament in the NE Sicily, splitting the Appennine chain on the west, from the Calabrian arc on the East. N-S compression seems to affect the western side of this NNW-SSE lineament, while extension affects the eastern one, with active volcanism and a NW dipping Benioff plane. Historic activity at Vulcano has been characterized by frequent transitions from phereatomagmatic to minor magmatic activity. The last eruption in 1888-90 was characterized by energetic explosive pulses and defines the so-called "vulcanian" type of activity. Since then, volcanic activity has taken the form of fumarolic emanations of variable intensity and temperature, mainly concentrated at "La Fossa" crater, with maximum temperatures ranging between 200° and 300° C; temperature increases and changes in the gas chemistry, were often observed. The most recent episode began in the 80's when fumarole temperature progressively increased to 690°C in May 1993. Vulcano is active and this favoured monitoring and research studies, in particular focussed on the most recent structures. In the frame of DPC-INGV "V3" project, we investigate the dynamics of the island through ca. 40 years of ground deformation and seismicity data collected by the discrete and continuous INGV monitoring networks. We considered levelling, GPS, EDM, seismic and tilt data. EDM and levelling measurements began in the middle 1970s and since the late 1990s the same EDM network has been surveyed by GPS. By combining and comparing geodetic data and seismicity we are able to distinguish three different scales of phenomena: the first one seems to be linked to the regional tectonics, with a general transpressive kinematics; the second one affects the northern half of the island and could be related to the caldera dynamics; the third one affects only the cone of La Fossa. Regional tectonic stress seems to play an important role in the transition of the volcanic system from a phase of stability to a phase of unrest, inducing the heating and the expansion of shallow hydrothermal fluids. Current local ground deformation at Vulcano may be linked to the geothermal system rather than magmatic sources.

  7. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  8. Origin of anorthite and olivine megacrysts in island-arc tholeiites: petrological study of 1940 and 1962 ejecta from Miyake-jima volcano, Izu-Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amma-Miyasaka, Mizuho; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro

    2002-10-01

    Although aphyric tholeiites were discharged from nearly the same fissures during 1940 and 1962 eruptions of Miyake-jima volcano, some of the 1940 rocks are characterized by the presence of anorthite (to 3 cm) and olivine (to 4 mm) megacrysts. We focus on the assemblage and composition of crystal-clots to discuss magmatic processes, because minerals in the same type of clots must have crystallized at the same time. Three types of clots are identified, megacryst (M), basaltic (B; 1190-1175°C) and andesitic (A; 1150-1080°C). The M-type crystal-clots are characterized by anorthite (An 87-96) and olivine (Fo 78-86) megacrysts. Major mafic minerals of the B-type and A-type crystal-clots are olivine-clinopyroxene without magnetite, and pyroxenes with magnetite, respectively. The 1940 megacryst-bearing rocks contain all the three types of clots, whereas 1940 megacryst-free rocks contain only A-type and B-type. However, megacrysts and M-type clots show petrographic features such as kink-bands of olivine, spherical olivines in anorthite, and wide homogeneous cores of anorthite, suggesting that these minerals may not be comagmatic phenocrysts but xenocrysts. Chemical compositions and crystal size distribution plots of these crystals are identical to those of plutonic xenoliths erupted from one of the 1940 fissure. Thus, we concluded that megacrysts and M-type clots are xenocrysts derived from the same sources as plutonic xenoliths. We consider that the magma plumbing system of the 1940 eruption consists of a deeper basaltic magma storage system and a shallower andesitic one. The plutonic body might be located under the northeastern part of the volcano between two magma storage systems. The basaltic magma captured plutonic xenoliths, and then mixed with the andesitic magma during the 1940 eruption. Whether erupted rocks contain xenocrysts or not must depend on the spatial relationship between ascending basaltic dykes and location of the deep-seated plutonic body. On the other hand, the 1962 ejecta contain only A-type crystal-clots, indicating that only shallower andesitic magma was discharged. Although anorthite megacrysts are often recognized in island-arc tholeiites, calcic plagioclase could crystallize not from nearly dry tholeiites but from H 2O-saturated conditions. This could be achieved by closed system differentiation and/or addition of H 2O from the crust, such as plutonic conditions.

  9. Hawaiian Island Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    In this view of the entire Hawaiian Island Archipelago (21.0N, 157.0W), the islands perturb the prevailing northeastewrly winds producing extensive cloud wakes in the lee of the islands. The atmospheric haze within the wake is a result of the near continuous eruptions of Kilauea volcano on the southeast coast of the big island of Hawaii.

  10. Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea) at La Palma (Canary Islands)

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Carlos; Jaume, Damià; Oromí, Pedro; Juan, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Background The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands) and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea) lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. Results P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. Conclusion The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity. PMID:18234125

  11. Quantitative analysis of seismic wave propagation anomalies in azimuth and apparent slowness at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica) using seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeguas, A. García.; Almendros, J.; Abella, R.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2011-02-01

    We analyse shot data recorded by eight seismic arrays during an active-source seismic experiment carried out at Deception Island (Antarctica) in 2005 January. For each source we estimate the apparent slowness and propagation azimuth of the first wave arrival. Since both source and receiver positions are accurately known, we are able to interpret the results in terms of the effect of the heterogeneities of the medium on wave propagation. The results show the presence of significant propagation anomalies. Nearby shots produce large apparent slowness values above 0.6 s km-1, while distant shots produce small values, down to about 0.15-0.20 s km-1. These values are different for each array, which shows the importance of the local structure under the receiver. The spatial distributions of apparent slowness are not radial as we would expect in a flat-layered medium. And again, these distributions are different for each array. The azimuth anomalies defined as the difference between the empirical estimates and the values expected in a 1-D model (i.e. the source-array directions) suggest ubiquitous wave front distortions. We have detected both positive and negative anomalies. For some shot-array geometries, azimuth anomalies are quite large with values up to 60°. The distribution of the anomalies depends on the position of the array. Some of these features can be interpreted in terms of a shallow magma chamber and shallow rigid bodies imaged by high-resolution seismic tomography. However several details remain unexplained. Further work is required, including modelling of synthetic wavefields on realistic models of Deception Island and/or apparent slowness vector tomography.

  12. Geology and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the medium- to high-K Tanaga volcanic cluster, western Aleutians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jicha, Brian R.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Singer, Brad S.

    2012-01-01

    We used geologic mapping and geochemical data augmented by 40Ar/39Ar dating to establish an eruptive chronology for the Tanaga volcanic cluster in the western Aleutian arc. The Tanaga volcanic cluster is unique in comparison to other central and western Aleutian volcanoes in that it consists of three closely spaced, active, volumetrically significant edifices (Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha), the eruptive products of which have unusually high K2O contents. Thirty-five new 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained in two different laboratories constrain the duration of Pleistocene–Holocene subaerial volcanism to younger than 295 ka. The eruptive activity has been mostly continuous for the last 150 k.y., unlike most other well-characterized arc volcanoes, which tend to grow in discrete pulses. More than half of the analyzed Tanaga volcanic cluster lavas are basalts that have erupted throughout the lifetime of the cluster, although a considerable amount of basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite has also been produced since 200 ka. Major- and trace-element variations suggest that magmas from Sajaka and Tanaga volcanoes are likely to have crystallized pyroxene and/or amphibole at greater depths than the older Takawangha magmas, which experienced a larger percentage of plagioclase-dominated fractionation at shallower depths. Magma output from Takawangha has declined over the last 86 k.y. At ca. 19 ka, the focus of magma flux shifted to the west beneath Tanaga and Sajaka volcanoes, where hotter, more mafic magma erupted.

  13. The Pathogenesis of Aleutian Disease of Mink

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David D.; Larsen, Austen E.; Porter, Helen G.

    1973-01-01

    Mink chronically infected with Aleutian disease virus develop a severe necrotizing arteritis affecting muscular arteries. Acute, subacute and healing lesions may be found. Extracellular deposits of host immunoglobulin and complement and, after acid elution, viral antigen can be shown by immunofluorescence technics in areas of fibrinoid necrosis and between proliferating endothelial cells. No intracellular viral antigen was found, indicating that the virus probably does not replicate in vascular structures. The arteritis of Aleutian disease appears to be the result of immune complex deposits in vessel walls. Imagesp[341]-aFig 4p[343]-aFig 1Fig 2Fig 3 PMID:4576760

  14. Distribution, 14C chronology, and paleomagnetism of latest Pleistocene and Holocene lava flows at Haleakala volcano, Island of Maui, Hawai'i: a revision of lava flow hazard zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; McGeehin, John P.; Champion, Duane E.; Trusdell, Frank A.

    2006-01-01

    New mapping and 60 new radiocarbon ages define the age and distribution of latest Pleistocene and Holocene (past 13,000 years) lava flows at Haleakal? volcano, Island of Maui. Paleomagnetic directions were determined for 118 sites, of which 89 are in lava flows younger than 13,000 years. The paleomagnetic data, in conjunction with a reference paleosecular variation (PSV) curve for the Hawaiian Islands, are combined with our knowledge of age limitations based on stratigraphic control to refine age estimates for some of the undated lava flows. The resulting volumetric rate calculations indicate that within analytical error, the extrusion rate has remained nearly constant during the past 13,000 years, in the range 0.05–0.15 km3/kyr, only about half the long-term rate required to produce the postshield strata emplaced in the past ?1 Myr. Haleakal?'s eruptive frequency is similar to that of Hual?lai volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i, but its lava flows cover substantially less area per unit time. The reduced rates of lava coverage indicate a lower volcanic hazard than in similar zones at Hual?lai.

  15. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  16. Mingling processes at Panarea Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy): results from M73/2 cruise drilled cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Benedetti, A. A.; De Astis, G.; Raffaele, V.; Esposito, A.; Giordano, G.; Petersen, S.; Monecke, T.

    2012-04-01

    The last Meteor 73/2 cruise drilled several lava cores in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, close to Panarea Island and surrounding islets (Aeolian archipelago, Italy), at depths comprised between 50 and 70 m bsl. These rocks - unconformably covered by unconsolidated lapilli tuffs - revealed different lithologies and mineralogical assemblages corresponding to different compositions (hereafter A & B), as then evidenced by ICP-MS analyses (major and trace elements) performed on selected rock-samples. The cores also displayed several, cm-sized, rounded enclaves of the A-type dispersed in the B-type. The petrographic study on textures and microprobe analyses on glass shards and mineral phases finally concurred in identifying two magmas with different history and quite complex interaction. Rock A is a holocrystalline shoshonite (SHO) - showing plagioclase (pl - An%=62-74) and clinopyroxene (cpx) as main phases, plus subordinate amphibole and biotite phenocrysts, rare and small olivines (Fo?89%) - which represents the first magma, usually in form of enclaves. Notably, the SHO shows intersertal vesicularity and scarce glass. Rock B is a porphyritic rhyodacite (RD) characterized by pl (An%=32-52), and biotite phenocrysts, with minor cpx phenocrysts and microphenocrysts. Pl and cpx show both alternate and normal zoning, and the former have frequent K-rich reaction rims. Similar mineral phases and frequent sanidine microlites characterize the alkali-trachyte glassy groundmass of rock B. This rock hosts the SHO and represent the most voluminous magma. Overall, these features indicate a quite complex history of magma interaction(s) as well as a polybaric crystallization, which lead the volatiles abundance and behaviour. From the study of the highly irregular edges observed along their contacts, we argue intrusive and visco-plastic relationships between A and B. Moreover, the presence of irregular vesicles and vugs bounded by pl microlites suggest an emplacement at shallow level where cooling favoured both slow degassing and pervasive crystallization. Textural and compositional data concur in indicating that the two magmas mingled at depth. Noteworthy, enclaves of a third rock type - very limited in volume - is present along some of the collected cores. It is a reddish low-porphyritic lava similar to the RD lava in terms of mineralogical composition, but showing a higher amount of microlites with smaller size if compared to the main RD host-rock. This could indicate that at some extent also mixing occurred. The multiple similarities of our rocks with lavas of the Panarea islets or other acid volcanics containing mafic-intermediate enclaves and outcropping on other Aeolian Islands, suggest that mafic magma uprising "within" resident magma with subsequent mingling is a recurrent process in these volcanic systems and may be the trigger for the eruption of acid melts.

  17. Plant Diversity Changes during the Postglacial in East Asia: Insights from Forest Refugia on Halla Volcano, Jeju Island

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Jiri; Altman, Jan; Kopecky, Martin; Cerny, Tomas; Janecek, Stepan; Bartos, Michael; Petrik, Petr; Srutek, Miroslav; Leps, Jan; Song, Jong-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how past climate changes affected biodiversity is a key issue in contemporary ecology and conservation biology. These diversity changes are, however, difficult to reconstruct from paleoecological sources alone, because macrofossil and pollen records do not provide complete information about species assemblages. Ecologists therefore use information from modern analogues of past communities in order to get a better understanding of past diversity changes. Here we compare plant diversity, species traits and environment between late-glacial Abies, early-Holocene Quercus, and mid-Holocene warm-temperate Carpinus forest refugia on Jeju Island, Korea in order to provide insights into postglacial changes associated with their replacement. Based on detailed study of relict communities, we propose that the late-glacial open-canopy conifer forests in southern part of Korean Peninsula were rich in vascular plants, in particular of heliophilous herbs, whose dramatic decline was caused by the early Holocene invasion of dwarf bamboo into the understory of Quercus forests, followed by mid-Holocene expansion of strongly shading trees such as maple and hornbeam. This diversity loss was partly compensated in the Carpinus forests by an increase in shade-tolerant evergreen trees, shrubs and lianas. However, the pool of these species is much smaller than that of light-demanding herbs, and hence the total species richness is lower, both locally and in the whole area of the Carpinus and Quercus forests. The strongly shading tree species dominating in the hornbeam forests have higher leaf tissue N and P concentrations and smaller leaf dry matter content, which enhances litter decomposition and nutrient cycling and in turn favored the selection of highly competitive species in the shrub layer. This further reduced available light and caused almost complete disappearance of understory herbs, including dwarf bamboo. PMID:22438890

  18. Plant diversity changes during the postglacial in East Asia: insights from Forest Refugia on Halla Volcano, Jeju Island.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Jiri; Altman, Jan; Kopecky, Martin; Cerny, Tomas; Janecek, Stepan; Bartos, Michael; Petrik, Petr; Srutek, Miroslav; Leps, Jan; Song, Jong-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how past climate changes affected biodiversity is a key issue in contemporary ecology and conservation biology. These diversity changes are, however, difficult to reconstruct from paleoecological sources alone, because macrofossil and pollen records do not provide complete information about species assemblages. Ecologists therefore use information from modern analogues of past communities in order to get a better understanding of past diversity changes. Here we compare plant diversity, species traits and environment between late-glacial Abies, early-Holocene Quercus, and mid-Holocene warm-temperate Carpinus forest refugia on Jeju Island, Korea in order to provide insights into postglacial changes associated with their replacement. Based on detailed study of relict communities, we propose that the late-glacial open-canopy conifer forests in southern part of Korean Peninsula were rich in vascular plants, in particular of heliophilous herbs, whose dramatic decline was caused by the early Holocene invasion of dwarf bamboo into the understory of Quercus forests, followed by mid-Holocene expansion of strongly shading trees such as maple and hornbeam. This diversity loss was partly compensated in the Carpinus forests by an increase in shade-tolerant evergreen trees, shrubs and lianas. However, the pool of these species is much smaller than that of light-demanding herbs, and hence the total species richness is lower, both locally and in the whole area of the Carpinus and Quercus forests. The strongly shading tree species dominating in the hornbeam forests have higher leaf tissue N and P concentrations and smaller leaf dry matter content, which enhances litter decomposition and nutrient cycling and in turn favored the selection of highly competitive species in the shrub layer. This further reduced available light and caused almost complete disappearance of understory herbs, including dwarf bamboo. PMID:22438890

  19. Unusually large tsunamis frequent a currently creeping part of the Aleutian megathrust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witter, Robert C.; Carver, G.A.; Briggs, Richard; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Koehler, R.D.; La selle, Seanpaul M.; Bender, Adrian M.; Engelhart, S.E.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Hill, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    Current models used to assess earthquake and tsunami hazards are inadequate where creep dominates a subduction megathrust. Here we report geological evidence for large tsunamis, occurring on average every 300–340 years, near the source areas of the 1946 and 1957 Aleutian tsunamis. These areas bookend a postulated seismic gap over 200 km long where modern geodetic measurements indicate that the megathrust is currently creeping. At Sedanka Island, evidence for large tsunamis includes six sand sheets that blanket a lowland facing the Pacific Ocean, rise to 15 m above mean sea level, contain marine diatoms, cap terraces, adjoin evidence for scour, and date from the past 1700 years. The youngest sheet, and modern drift logs found as far as 800 m inland and >18 m elevation, likely record the 1957 tsunami. Modern creep on the megathrust coexists with previously unrecognized tsunami sources along this part of the Aleutian Subduction Zone.

  20. Unusually large tsunamis frequent a currently creeping part of the Aleutian megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witter, Robert C.; Carver, Gary A.; Briggs, Richard W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Koehler, Richard D.; La Selle, SeanPaul; Bender, Adrian M.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Hemphill-Haley, Eileen; Hill, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    Current models used to assess earthquake and tsunami hazards are inadequate where creep dominates a subduction megathrust. Here we report geological evidence for large tsunamis, occurring on average every 300-340 years, near the source areas of the 1946 and 1957 Aleutian tsunamis. These areas bookend a postulated seismic gap over 200 km long where modern geodetic measurements indicate that the megathrust is currently creeping. At Sedanka Island, evidence for large tsunamis includes six sand sheets that blanket a lowland facing the Pacific Ocean, rise to 15 m above mean sea level, contain marine diatoms, cap terraces, adjoin evidence for scour, and date from the past 1700 years. The youngest sheet and modern drift logs found as far as 800 m inland and >18 m elevation likely record the 1957 tsunami. Previously unrecognized tsunami sources coexist with a presently creeping megathrust along this part of the Aleutian Subduction Zone.

  1. Living with Volcanoes: Year Eleven Teaching Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Heron, Kiri; Andrews, Jill; Hooks, Stacey; Larnder, Michele; Le Heron, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes and experiences with volcanoes that helps students develop geography skills. Focuses on four volcanoes: (1) Rangitoto Island; (2) Lake Pupuke; (3) Mount Smart; and (4) One Tree Hill. Includes an answer sheet and resources to use with the unit. (CMK)

  2. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Neal, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analyzed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analyzed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the U. S. Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  3. Volcanic Eruptions, Landscape Disturbance, and Potential Impacts to Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems in Alaska: An Example from the August 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Drew, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    The magnitude, style, and sometimes-prolonged nature of volcanic activity in Alaska has had significant impact on ecological habitat. The accumulation of volcaniclastic deposits during eruptions have destroyed or altered areas important to the success of various species and it may take years to decades for landforms and surfaces to recover and become habitable again. Kasatochi volcano, in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, erupted explosively on August 7-8, 2008 and the rich nesting habitat for several species of seabirds on the island was completely destroyed. The eruption produced thick pyroclastic fall and flow deposits and several SO2 rich ash-gas plumes that reached 14 to 18 km above sea level. Pyroclastic deposits are several tens of meters thick, blanket the entire island, and initially extended seaward to increase the diameter of the island by about 800 m. Wave and gully erosion have modified these deposits and have exhumed some pre-eruption surfaces. Analysis of surface erosional features observed in satellite and time-lapse camera images and field studies have shown that by September 2009, gully erosion removed 300,000-600,000 m3 of mostly fine-grained volcanic sediment from the volcano flanks and much of this has reached the ocean. Sediment yield estimates from two representative drainage basins are about 104 m3km-2yr-1 and are comparable to sediment yields at other active volcanoes outside of Alaska. Coastal erosion rates at Kasatochi are as high as 80-140 myr-1 and parts of the northern coastline have already been eroded back to pre-eruption positions. As of March, 2011 about 72% of the material emplaced beyond the pre-eruption coastline on the northern sector of the island has been removed by wave erosion. Parts of the southern coastline have prograded beyond the post-eruption shoreline as a result of long-shore transport of sediment from north to south. As of March 2011, the total volume of material eroded by wave action was about 107 m3. The preferred nesting habitat for the estimated 500,000 seabirds (Crested and Least Auklets) are rocky crevices in boulder or talus fields. As long-lived species, Auklets are adapted to annual reproductive failure; however, given that less than 25 percent of preexisting nesting areas have been exhumed in the three years since the eruption the lack of suitable nesting habitat should lead to declines in Auklet populations. Ultimately, the exhumation rate of pre-existing nesting habitat or generation of new talus fields, will dictate Auklet population changes on and around Kasatochi Island. Volcanic eruptions as large or larger than the 2008 Kasatochi eruption are common in the geologic history of the Aleutian arc. Within the past several thousand years there have been many eruptions that produced >10 km3 of volcanic material that covered extensive areas of the Alaska Peninsula and some Aleutian Islands resulting in unknown ecological impacts. Study of the 2008 Kasatochi eruption is providing a much-needed opportunity to evaluate the biological and geological linkages that control habitat recovery following a severe natural disturbance.

  4. Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano as viewed to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. The mushroom-shaped plume rose from avalanches of hot debris (pyroclastic flows) that cascaded down the north flank of the volcano. A smaller, white steam plume rises from the summit crater. ...

  5. Geodetic Measurements and Numerical Modeling of the Deformation Cycle for Okmok Volcano, Alaska: 1993-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, S. J.; Feigl, K.; Thurber, C. H.; Lu, Z.; Masterlark, T.

    2011-12-01

    Okmok Volcano is an active caldera located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Island arc. Okmok, having recently erupted in 1997 and 2008, is well suited for multidisciplinary studies of magma migration and storage because it hosts a good seismic network and has been the subject of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images that span the recent eruption cycle. Interferometric SAR can characterize surface deformation in space and time, while data from the seismic network provides important information about the interior processes and structure of the volcano. We conduct a complete time series analysis of deformation of Okmok with images collected by the ERS and Envisat satellites on more than 100 distinct epochs between 1993 and 2008. We look for changes in inter-eruption inflation rates, which may indicate inelastic rheologic effects. For the time series analysis, we analyze the gradient of phase directly, without unwrapping, using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT) [Feigl and Thurber, 2009]. This approach accounts for orbital and atmospheric effects and provides realistic estimates of the uncertainties of the model parameters. We consider several models for the source, including the prolate spheroid model and the Mogi model, to explain the observed deformation. Using a medium that is a homogeneous half space, we estimate the source depth to be centered at about 4 km below sea level, consistent with the findings of Masterlark et al. [2010]. As in several other geodetic studies, we find the source to be approximately centered beneath the caldera. To account for rheologic complexity, we next apply the Finite Element Method to simulate a pressurized cavity embedded in a medium with material properties derived from body wave seismic tomography. This approach allows us to address the problem of unreasonably large pressure values implied by a Mogi source with a radius of about 1 km by experimenting with larger sources. We also compare the time dependence of the source to published results that used GPS data.

  6. Evidence of flank failure deposit reactivation in a shield volcano. A favorable context for deep-seated landslide activation (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Pierre; Aunay, Bertrand; Famin, Vincent; Join, Jean-Lambert

    2014-05-01

    Giant flank failures are recurrent features of shield volcanoes, and their deposits (i.e. breccia), constitute a significant volume in a volcanic edifice. On La Réunion Island, the growth and development of Piton des Neiges volcano has been punctuated by several flank failure episodes. One of these failures is a deep-seated landslide (>200 Mm3) occurring nowadays in Grand Ilet, a plateau inhabited by 1 000 people in the cirque of Salazie, on the northern flank of Piton des Neiges. Here we present the results of a multidisciplinary study (structural geology and field mapping, GNSS monitoring, borehole logging) performed to characterize the geological structure the Grand Ilet landslide, and identify the instability factors that control this category of destabilization. Basic breccia deposits, up to 160 meters thick, constitute the main geological formation of the unstable mass. This breccia are cut by the headwall scar of the landslide, and covered by lava flows, indicating a minimum age of 200 kyr for the destabilization that produced the deposits. The breccia is consolidated out of the landslide area. The NE toe of the landslide is evidenced by an important compressional deformation of the base of the breccia, and striated surfaces in this deformed volume indicate a NE-direction of transport. In this deformed bulge, a clay-rich layer at the base of the breccia has been identified as the main slip plane. Using a video inspection of drill casings on three exploration boreholes, we reconstructed the 3D geometry of the slip plane at the base of the breccia. This reconstruction shows that the landslide plane has an average dip of 6° toward the NE. The displacement monitoring network shows that the unstable mass has a 5.5 km2 extension, with a variable azimuth of movement direction (N140° for the SW sector, and N45° for the NE sector). The planimetric displacements velocities range between 2 cm/year in the inner part of the unstable mass to 52 cm/year at the landslide toe. The dip of displacement vectors vary from 34° ± 9 uphill to 7° ± 2 downhill near the landslide toe. This displacement field, the topography and the drill casings inspection show that secondary shear zones are located inside the landslide mass, characterized by a lower deformation rate than the basal shear zone. However heterogeneous is the deformation, it more important at the base of the breccia (locally in the clay layer). Ultimately, our study suggests that the main slip plane has localized at the base of the breccia despite its induration. Thus we conclude that the Grand Ilet landslide is in fact a present-day reactivation of an old destabilization.

  7. Seismic potential of the Queen Charlotte-Alaska-Aleutian seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Nishenko, S.P. ); Jacob, K.H. )

    1990-03-10

    The 5,000 km long Queen Charlotte-Alaska-Aleutian seismic zone is subdivided into 17 unequally sized segments. The 17 segments are chosen to represent areas likely to be ruptured by characteristic earthquakes. This term usually implies repeated breakage of a plate boundary segment by either a large or great earthquake, whose source dimensions remain consistent from cycle to cycle. Formal computations of the conditional probabilities for future large and great earthquakes in the 17 segments of the Queen Charlotte-Alaska-Aleutian seismic zone are based on the following data sets and findings: (1) recurrence intervals from historic and geologic data; (2) direct recurrence time estimates based on rates of relative plate motion and the size or displacement of the most recent characteristic event in each segment; and (3) the application of a lognormal distribution of recurrence times for large and great earthquakes. Results of these computations indicate seven areas that have high (i.e., {ge} 60%) conditional probabilities for the recurrence of either large or great earthquakes within the next 20 years (1988-2008). These areas include Cape St. James, Yakataga, the Shumagin Islands, Unimak Island, and the Fox, Delarof, and Near Islands segments of the Aleutian arc. When a shorter time interval is considered (1988-1998), those segments more likely to rupture in large (M{sub S} 7-7.7) rather than great earthquakes have a high conditional probability. These areas include the Unimak, Fox, and Delarof Islands segments. The largest uncertainties in these forecasts stem from the short historic record (providing a single recurrence time estimate for some segments, or widely varying estimates for others); from the unknown importance of aseismic slip; and from a vague definition of characteristic earthquake size. In fact, characteristic earthquake size may not be a time-invariant quantity.

  8. Lithium Isotopic Composition of Aleutian Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Park, Y.; Liu, X.; Kay, S. M.; Kay, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The lithium isotopic compositions of inputs to subduction zones can be highly variable. For example, altered oceanic crust is isotopically heavy (?7Li = 4 to 22, Chan et al., 1996; Bouman et al., 2004) due to uptake of seawater Li (32). Sea floor sediments can have highly variable compositions, ranging from isotopically heavy pelagic sediments (6 to 14) to isotopically light terrigneous clays (-1.5 to 5), derived from highly weathered continental crust (Chan et al., 2006). Despite this variability in inputs, arc outputs (magmatic rocks) typically have mantle-like ?7Li (e.g., 2 to 6; Tomascak et al., 2002; Walker et al., 2009). To explore the behavior of lithium and its isotopes in arcs, we have analyzed [Li] and ?7Li in 48 lavas and plutons from the Aleutian island arc, which span the temporal (0 to 38 Ma), geographical (165-184oW) and compositional variations (SiO2 = 46-70 wt.%) seen in this arc. Previous studies have indicated a systematic geographic change in lava chemistry related to changing sediment composition along the arc (terrigneous in the east, pelagic in the west, e.g., Kay and Kay, 1994; Yogodinski et al., 2010), as well as temporal changes that may also reflect changes in sedimentary input (Kay and Kay, 1994), and we wished to determine if Li isotopes also reflect such changes. Lithium concentration [Li] shows a generally positive correlation with SiO2, consistent with the expected incompatible behavior of Li during magmatic differentiation. Intrusive rocks (all from the Adak region) show more scatter than lavas on this plot, suggesting the influence of cumulate processes. The ?7Li of the rocks span an immense range from -1 to +29, well outside the values considered typical for the MORB-source mantle (e.g., 2-6). However, the majority of the samples (28 out of 48) have ?7Li falling within the range of typical mantle values. There is a general tendency for the lavas (all but one are <2 Ma) to have slightly lower ?7Li than intrusions (which range from 15 to 37 Ma). Given the age differences, this may reflect a slight change to lighter Li with time in the arc. The type adakite (~11 Ma, Kay, 1978) has a ?7Li of 3.7. There is no strong correlation between ?7Li and a sedimentary component (monitored by Th/La), or with geographic position, except that samples from the middle portion of the arc at ~176oW (Adak, Great Sitkin and Kangalaska Islands) show the greatest variation, including the heaviest and lightest ?7Li values observed. The reasons for this variability are, as yet, undetermined. Nevertheless, as found in previous global studies of arcs (e.g., Tomascak et al., 2002), there is no obvious "slab signature" in these lavas, suggesting that transfer of Li from the slab to the surface is greatly attenuated within the mantle wedge, or that the slab signature fortuitously matches that of the mantle.

  9. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is accompanied by deformation.

  10. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  11. Soil microbial structure and function post-volcanic eruption on Kasatochi Island and regional controls on microbial heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeglin, L. H.; Rainey, F.; Wang, B.; Waythomas, C.; Talbot, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms are abundant and diverse in soil and their integrated activity drives nutrient cycling on the ecosystem scale. Organic matter (OM) inputs from plant production support microbial heterotrophic life, and soil geochemistry constrains microbial activity and diversity. As vegetation and soil develops over time, these factors change, modifying the controls on microbial heterogeneity. Following a volcanic eruption, ash deposition creates new surfaces where both organismal growth and weathering processes are effectively reset. The trajectory of microbial community development following this disturbance depends on both organic matter accumulation and geochemical constraints. Also, dispersal of microbial cells to the sterile ash surface may determine microbial community succession. The Aleutian Islands (Alaska, USA) are a dynamic volcanic region, with active and dormant volcanoes distributed across the volcanic arc. One of these volcanoes, Kasatochi, erupted violently in August 2008, burying a small lush island in pryoclastic flows and fine ash. Since, plants and birds are beginning to re-establish on developing surfaces, including legacy soils exposed by rapid erosion of pyroclastic deposits, suggesting that recovery of microbial life is also proceeding. However, soil microbial diversity and function has not been examined on Kasatochi Island or across the greater Aleutian region. The project goal is to address these questions: How is soil microbial community structure and function developing following the Kasatochi eruption? What is the relative importance of dispersal, soil OM and geochemistry to microbial community heterogeneity across the Aleutians? Surface mineral soil (20-cm depth) samples were collected from Kasatochi Island in summer 2013, five years after the 2008 eruption, and from eight additional Aleutian islands. On Kasatochi, pryoclastic deposits, exposed legacy soils supporting regrowth of remnant dune wild-rye (Leymus mollis) and mesic meadow plant communities, and soils impacted by recovering seabird rookeries were sampled. On the other islands, soils supporting both Leymus and mesic meadow communities (representative of dominant vegetation types on Kasatochi pre-eruption) were sampled. For each soil category and island combination, three transects of soil cores at 10-cm, 50-cm, 1-m, 5-m and 10-m distance were collected; with distances between sites and islands included (up to >700 km), the range of geographic distance examined covers over 7 orders of magnitude. For all samples, data on fundamental geochemical and OM factors, bacterial and fungal biomass, activity and diversity (via QPCR, extracellular enzyme potential assays and T-RFLP) are being collected. Covariance analysis is being used to evaluate the scale of maximum spatial heterogeneity in microbial structure and function, and ordination and matrix correlation analyses are being used to identify the key environmental covariates with heterogeneity. We hypothesize that heterogeneity at small (cm) scales will reflect predominant geochemical controls, at medium (m) scales will reflect predominant OM (vegetation) controls and at large (km) scales will reflect dispersal-related controls on microbial community structure and function.

  12. A spatial-seasonal analysis of the oiling risk from shipping traffic to seabirds in the Aleutian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Renner, Martin; Kuletz, Kathy J

    2015-12-15

    Some of the largest seabird concentrations in the northern hemisphere are intersected by major shipping routes in the Aleutian Archipelago. Risk is the product of the probability and the severity incidents in an area. We build a seasonally explicit model of seabird distribution and combine the densities of seabirds with an oil vulnerability index. We use shipping density, as a proxy for the probability of oil spills from shipping accident (or the intensity chronic oil pollution). We find high-risk (above-average seabird and vessel density) areas around Unimak Pass, south of the Alaska Peninsula, near Buldir Island, and north of Attu Island. Risk to seabirds is greater during summer than during winter, but the month of peak risk (May/July) varies depending on how data is analyzed. The area around Unimak Pass stands out for being at high-risk year-round, whereas passes in the western Aleutians are at high risk mostly during summer. PMID:26602441

  13. New Field Surveys of The Great 1946 Aleutian Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, E. A.; Synolakis, C. E.; Plafker, G.

    We seek to reopen the case of the 1946 Aleutian tsunami, which was the most destruc- tive transpacific event in the past century, despite the relatively moderate size of its parent earthquake. As a result, the exact nature of its source, and in particular whether it requires a submarine landslide, remains controversial. In 1999, we started a system- atic effort to build a modern database of runup and inundation values for the 1946 event throughout the Pacific Basin. At teleseismic distances, we rely on interviews from elderly witnesses whose testimony is then quantified using standard surveying techniques. As of early 2002, we were able to gather about 60 such measurements in the Marquesas, Society and Austral Islands, French Polynesia; and at Easter and Juan Fernandez Islands. They point out to the concentration of high runup values (8 m or more) in a narrow band of epicentral azimuths including Hawaii, the Marque- sas and Easter, but excluding Juan Fernandez. In the near field, we surveyed in 2001 the islands of Unimak and Sanak, based on available Coast Guard reports at Scotch Cap, and on subsisting watermarks such as large logs of driftwood deposited on these unforrested islands. We obtain a maximum runup height of 42 m on the Southern coast of Unimak and of 22 m at Sanak. These preliminary results suggest the combi- nation of a slow earthquake dislocation responsible for the strong far-field directivity of the tsunami, and of a co-seismic underwater landslide necessary to account for the exceptional near-field amplitudes, which are many times larger than the seismic dis- placement at the source for any acceptable seismological model of the dislocation. The existence of a large landslide is also suggested by anectodal reports of post-quake changes in local bathymetry and diminished fisheries productivity, and a preliminary confirmation is found on post-1946 bathymetric charts of the continental slope around 53.75 deg.N and 163.75 deg.W.

  14. GLORIA imagery links sedimentation in Aleutian Trench to Yakutat margin via surveyor channel

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, P.R.; Bruns, T.R.; Mann, D.M.; Stevenson, A.J. ); Huggett, Q.J. )

    1990-06-01

    GLORIA side-scan sonar imagery shows that the continental slope developing along the active margin of the Gulf of Alaska is devoid of large submarine canyons, in spite of the presence of large glacially formed sea valleys that cross the continental shelf. In the western and northern Gulf, discontinuous, actively growing deformation structures disrupt or divert the downslope transport of sediment into the Aleutian Trench. To the east of Middleton Island, the slope is intensively gullied and incised only by relatively small canyons. At the base of the gullied slope between Pamplona Spur and Alsek Valley, numerous small slope gullies coalesce into three turbidity current channels that merge to form the Surveyor deep-sea channel. About 350 km from the margin, the channel crosses the structural barrier formed by the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount chain and heads south for another 150 km where it bends northerly, perhaps influenced by the oceanic basement relief of the Patton Seamounts. The channel, now up to 5 km wide and deeply entrenched to 450 m, continues northerly for 200 km where it intercepts the Aleutian Trench, some 700 km from the Yakutat margin. South of Surveyor Channel, GLORIA imagery revealed evidence of another older channel. The older channel meanders through a gap in the seamount chain and eventually bends northwesterly. This now inactive, largely buried channel may have carried turbidity currents to the Aleutian Trench concurrent with the active Surveyor Channel.

  15. Seismicity, topography, and free-air gravity of the Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.; Blakely, R. J.; Scholl, D. W.; Ryan, H. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone, extending 3400 km from the Queen Charlotte Fault to Kamchatka, has been the source of six great megathrust earthquakes in the 20th Century. Four earthquakes have ruptured the 2000-km-long Aleutian segment, where the Cenozoic Aleutian arc overlies the subducting Pacific plate. These include the 1946 M 8.6 earthquake off Unimak Is., the 1957 M 8.6 and 1986 M 8.0 earthquakes off the Andreanoff Is., and the 1965 M 8.7 Rat Is. earthquake. The source regions of these earthquakes inferred from waveform inversions underlie the well-defined Aleutian deep-sea terrace. The deep-sea terrace is about 4 km deep and is underlain by Eocene arc framework rocks, which extend nearly to the trench. It is bounded on its seaward and landward margins by strong topographic and fee-air gravity gradients. The main asperities (areas of largest slip) for the great earthquakes and nearly all of the Aleutian thrust CMT solutions lie beneath the Aleutian terrace, between the maximum gradients. Similar deep-sea terraces are characteristic of non-accretionary convergent margins globally (75% of subduction zones), and, where sampled by drilling (e.g., Japan, Peru, Tonga, Central America), are undergoing sustained subsidence. Sustained subsidence requires removal of arc crust beneath the terrace by basal subduction erosion (BSE). BSE is in part linked to the seismic cycle, as it occurs in the same location as the megathrust earthquakes. Along the eastern 1400 km of the Alaskan subduction zone, the Pacific plate subducts beneath the North American continent. The boundary between the Aleutian segment and the continent is well defined in free-air gravity, and the distinctive deep-sea terrace observed along the Aleutian segment is absent. Instead, the Alaskan margin consists of exhumed, underplated accretionary complexes forming outer arc gravity highs. Superimposed on them are broad topographic highs and lows forming forearc basins (Shumagin, Stevenson) and islands (Kodiak, Shumagin). Two great earthquakes ruptured much of this segment: the 1938 M 8.3 earthquake SW of Kodiak and the 1964 M 9.2 earthquake, which ruptured 800 km of the margin between Prince William Sound and Kodiak Island. Large slip during the 1938 event occurred under the Shumagin and Tugidak basins, but slip in 1964 is thought to have occurred on asperities under Prince William Sound and the outer arc highs off Kodiak. Seismic profiling and industry drilling indicates sustained subsidence has also occurred along the Alaska margin. BSE is probably occurring there, but the terrace structure is buried by the high sedimentation rate. At present, the inherited accretionary structures, the ongoing collision of the Yakutat terrane, and uncertainties in finite fault modeling obscure correlation of slip with topographic and gravity signatures in the 1964 source region.

  16. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  17. Cascade Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The volcanoes from closest to farthest are Mt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, Mt. Jefferson. This picture is taken from Middle Sister looking north in the Cascade Range, Three Sisters Wilderness Area, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon....

  18. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  19. On the absence of InSAR-detected volcano deformation spanning the 1995-1996 and 1999 eruptions of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Kwoun, O.; Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhiming

    2006-01-01

    Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite volcano located on Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska, had a minor eruption in 1995-1996 and a VEI 3 sub-Plinian basaltic eruption in 1999. We used 21 synthetic aperture radar images acquired by ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, and RADARSAT-1 satellites to construct 12 coherent interferograms that span most of the 1993-2003 time interval. All interferograms lack coherence within ???5 km of the summit, primarily due to persistent snow and ice cover on the edifice. Remarkably, in the 5-15 km distance range where interferograms are coherent, the InSAR images show no intrusion- or withdrawal-related deformation at Shishaldin during this entire time period. However, several InSAR images do show deformation associated with a shallow ML 5.2 earthquake located ???14 km west of Shishaldin that occurred 6 weeks before the 1999 eruption. We use a theoretical model to predict deformation magnitudes due to a volumetric expansion source having a volume equivalent to the 1999 erupted volume, and find that deformation magnitudes for sources shallower than 10 km are within the expected detection capabilities for interferograms generated from C-band ERS 1/2 and RADARSAT-1 synthetic aperture radar images. We also find that InSAR images cannot resolve relatively shallow deformation sources (1-2 km below sea level) due to spatial gaps in the InSAR images caused by lost coherence. The lack of any deformation, particularly for the 1999 eruption, leads us to speculate that magma feeding eruptions at the summit moves rapidly (at least 80m/day) from >10 km depth, and that the intrusion-eruption cycle at Shishaldin does not produce significant permanent deformation at the surface.

  20. Use of MODIS for volcanic eruption cloud detection, tracking, and measurement: Examples from the 2001 eruption of Cleveland volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Prata, F. J.; Gu, Y.; Watson, M.; Rose, W. I.

    2001-12-01

    The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra satellite, has new capabilities that will improve the detection, tracking, and measurement of volcanic clouds. Volcanic clouds containing silicate ash, volcanic gases, aerosols, and water are potentially hazardous to aircraft. More than 100 aircraft have sustained documented damage over the past 20 years as a result of encountering volcanic clouds. This paper reports analytical results and interpretations of data from the MODIS instrument obtained for volcanic clouds generated during the 2001 eruption of Cleveland volcano. Cleveland volcano, located in the east-central Aleutian Islands 1500 km southwest of Anchorage, had explosive ash-producing eruptions on February 19, March 11, and March 19, 2001 that erupted material to altitudes of 4.5 to 10.6 km above sea level. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) does not seismically monitor Cleveland volcano; however, the eruptions were detected and the volcanic clouds were tracked by AVO using near real-time AVHRR and GOES satellite data. Contemporaneous MODIS, AVHRR, and GOES data of the eruption clouds from all three events were analyzed retrospectively and preliminary results demonstrate: 1) Improved sensitivity for ash detection using MODIS versus AVHRR and GOES. The magnitude of the brightness temperature differences utilizing MODIS bands centered at 8.5 and 12.0 microns is 2-3 times greater than the magnitude of the brightness temperature differences calculated using AVHRR and GOES bands centered at 10.7 and 12.0 microns; 2) The ability to detect the sulfur dioxide component of volcanic clouds using the brightness temperature difference between MODIS bands centered at 7.3 and 12.0 microns. Separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide was observed in the volcanic cloud generated by the February 19 eruption using this technique; 3) Volcanic ash mass retrievals from GOES and MODIS data (utilizing similar wavelengths) are generally in agreement with each other, especially during early stages (tens of hours) of cloud transport. Near real-time access to MODIS data is possible through its direct broadcast capabilities, and can provide volcano observatories and meteorological agencies with greatly improved capabilities for operational volcanic cloud analysis. The AVO plans to utilize near real-time MODIS data of Alaskan volcanoes through a new receiving station currently being installed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute.

  1. Atmospheric distribution and removal of volcanic ash after the eruption of Kasatochi volcano: A regional model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, Baerbel; ZakšEk, Klemen; Hort, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Kasatochi volcano on the Aleutian Islands erupted without much advance warning. Volcanic ash released during this eruption quickly settled out of the atmosphere, mainly into the NE Pacific Ocean. The amount of volcanic ash, as well as the ash fall area and volume into the NE Pacific Ocean, remains speculative, as only a limited number of measurements is available. We used a three-dimensional atmosphere/chemistry-aerosol model to determine the atmospheric distribution of SO2 and volcanic ash and its fallout after the eruption of Kasatochi volcano. In a first step, modeled atmospheric SO2 distributions are compared with satellite data, thereby evaluating the model capabilities to reasonably reproduce atmospheric transport patterns. For modeled volcanic ash mass a considerable reduction of the atmospheric content already occurred by 10 August, the second day after the eruption in accordance with satellite observations. Gravitational settling is the most efficient removal process for volcanic ash mass, exceeding dry and wet deposition by far. Assuming an ash volume of 0.3 km3 released during the eruption of Kasatochi volcano and a median ash particle diameter of 4 ?m, the mass of volcanic ash removed at ground within the 0.1 mm isopach covers an area of 7.6 × 105 km2 over the NE Pacific Ocean and makes up 49% of the removed material out of the atmosphere. The amount of ash and that of iron attached to it is sufficient to explain measured seawater CO2 decrease at the ocean station Papa in August 2008 induced by iron fertilization and subsequent phytoplankton production.

  2. Evolution of elastic properties and acoustic emission, during uniaxial loading of rocks, from the Fogo Volcano in the island of Sao Miguel, Azores; Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, M.; Wallenstein, N.

    2012-04-01

    A Computerized Uniaxial Press working up to 250 kN was installed in the middle 2011 in the Laboratory of Microseismic Monitoring of ISEL. The system is able to record continuous time, pressure and axial strain (1 µm resolution) at 1s sampling rate. The loading platens were designed to integrate acoustic emission (AE) transducers. Signals are acquired and processed through an 8-channel ESG Hyperion Ultrasonic Monitoring System (10 MSPS, 14/16-bit ADC). The first experiments, presented here, were applied to a set of rock samples from the Fogo, an active central volcano in the island of Sao Miguel. Two different volcanic rock types were studied: a fine grained alkali basaltic rock with a porphyritic texture, a porosity of 4.5% and bulk density of 2700 kg m-3 (sample #3); and a benmoreitic rock with a trachytic texture, a porosity of 8.1 %, and bulk density of 2400 kg m-3 (sample #4). Cores from sample #3 were subjected to continuous increasing pressure, until failure. They show a uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) spanning from 60 to 85 MPa and a stress-strain curve with two phases: a first one with relative low Young's Module (YM) followed by a second phase were the YM increases roughly 3 times. The stress transition value occurs broadly in a stress level 50% of the UCS. The AE produced in the process is almost negligible until the YM transition stress level and increases after that. Important pulses of high AE rate occur, (> 100 s-1), associated with the occurrence and propagation of fractures, which are always parallel to the principal stress, showing an evident pattern of tensile fractures. About 20s before the failure, very important deformation rate is observed, the YM strongly decrease, and continuous AE events, with low rate, usually <50 s-1. The failure is accompanied with a sudden rise of AE events with rate > 200 s-1. Cycling stress experiences were also performed showing reversible stress-strain relation for axial pressure below the YM transition level, and important hysteresis for axial pressure above that level. The associated AE events show a characteristic Kaiser effect pattern. Cores from sample #4 undergo the same continuous increasing stress process, but failure is attained at a considerable lower pressure of 20-25 MPa. The stress-strain curves show an almost linear relation, but approaching the stress level of failure, the YM decreases. The AE events are constant but with a reduced rate until the decrease of the YM, when a significant rise in the AE occurs, achieving emission rates greater that 200 s-1. The fracture shows a characteristic shear pattern. Differences in stress-strain behavior, fracture mode and AE rates are associated with the very different structure of the rocks, once the basaltic sample is very fine grained with some very scattered and almost spherical vesicles or voids, while the benmoreitic core shows high values of porosity in a structure with vesicles and voids with very irregular shapes. Work supported by FCT, Portugal, projet FreeRock, PTDC/CTE-GIX/100687/2008

  3. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  4. Twenty years of Alaska Volcano Observatory's contributions to seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. P.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.; West, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys observed its 20th anniversary in 2008. The AVO seismic network, inherited from AVO partners in 1988, consisted of three small-aperture subnetworks on Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano and Augustine Volcano and regional stations for a total of 23 short-period instruments (two with three-components). Twenty years later, the AVO network has expanded to 192 stations (23 three-component short-period, and 15 broadband) on 33 volcanoes spanning 2500 km across the Aleutian arc in one of the most remote and challenging environments in the world. The AVO seismic network provides for a unique data set. Within the seismically active Aleutian Arc, there are instrumented volcanoes which exhibit a variety of chemical compositions and eruptive styles. With each individual volcanic center similarly instrumented and all data analyzed in a consistent manner AVO has produced a data set suitable for making seismic comparisons across a wide suite of volcanoes. In twenty years, the AVO has captured data sets for eruptions at Augustine, Kasatochi, Okmok, Pavlof, Redoubt, Shishaldin, Spurr, and Venianinof. AVO data set also includes several volcanic-tectonic swarms, most notably at Akutan, Iliamna, Mageik, Martin, Shishaldin, and Tanaga. This broad approach to volcano seismology has led to a better understanding of precursory earthquake swarms, variations in background rates, triggered seismicity, the structure of volcanoes, volcanic tremor and deep long period earthquakes, among numerous other topics. The AVO also incorporates data from seismic stations operated by both the Alaska Earthquake Information Center and West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center to help locate some of the 70,000 earthquakes in the AVO catalog. In exchange AVO provides dense seismic data from the Aleutians which are routinely used to locate earthquakes throughout the north Pacific. In addition to seismic data, AVO also collects data from campaign and continuous GPS, web cameras, and pressure sensors.

  5. Back-arc Seamount Distribution Along the Western Aleutian Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Wyatt, C.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Scholl, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    Seamounts and seafloor volcanoes provide important insights into magma production, fluid flow in the crust, and habitat oases for marine life. In 2005, we obtained the first modern multibeam bathymetric maps, using the 30 kHz Simrad EM300 on the RV Thompson, for large areas of the Aleutian back-arc from west of Attu to Unalaska. Hundreds of previously unknown small seamounts were discovered, and many of the larger previously known seamounts were bathymetrically mapped completely for the first time. Equally important, the high-resolution bathymetry was able to confidently establish areas where no seamounts exist. Our mapping concentrated on several rhombochasms and the general back-arc region. Individual seamounts were identified and characterized using a GIS-based method for detecting local peaks in digital elevation models. Our results indicate that seamounts become progressively smaller but more abundant westward along the arc. Seamounts tend to be organized in linear chains that are subparallel to the local direction of maximum compressive stress indicated by scarps bounding their rhombochasm. Finally, no seamount was found in the Kresta Trough west of Attu, suggesting that this marks the westward limit of (normal?) volcanic production along the Aleutian Arc. These results are correlated to the obliquity of subduction of Pacific Plate beneath the arc.

  6. Deciphering Okmok Volcano's restless years (2002-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Celso Guillermo

    Okmok Volcano is an active island-arc shield volcano located in the central Aleutian islands of Alaska. It is defined by a 10-km-diameter caldera that formed in two cataclysmic eruptions, the most recent being ˜2050 years ago. Subsequent eruptions created several cinder cones within the caldera. The youngest of these, Cone A, was the active vent from 1815 through its 1997 eruption. On July 12 2008 Okmok erupted from new vents located northwest of Cone D. Between 2001 and 2004, geodetic measurements showed caldera inflation. These studies suggested that new magma might be entering the system. In 2002, a newly installed seismic network recorded quasi-periodic ("banded") seismic tremor signals occurring at the rate of two or more episodes per hour. This tremor was a near-continuous signal from the day the seismic network was installed. Although the volcano was not erupting, it was clearly in a state of unrest. This unrest garnered considerable attention because the volcano had erupted just six years prior. The seismic tremor potentially held insight as to whether the unrest was a remnant of the 1997 eruption, or whether it signaled a possible rejuvenation of activity and the potential for eruption. To determine the root cause and implications of this remarkable seismic tremor sequence, I created a catalog of over ˜17,000 tremor events recorded between 2003 and mid-2005. Tremor patterns evolved on the scale of days, but remained the dominant seismic signal. In order to facilitate the analysis of several years of data I created a MATLAB toolbox, known as "The Waveform Suite". This toolbox made it feasible for me to work with several years of digital data and forego my introductory analyses that were based on paper "helicorder" records. I first attempted to locate the tremor using the relative amplitudes of the seismograms to determine where the tremor was being created. Candidate tremor locations were constrained to a few locations along a corridor between Cone A and the caldera center. I then determined theoretical ratios between a reference station and stations nearby the candidate sources. Results suggested that the signal originated in the shallow portion of the corridor connecting the surface of Cone A to the top of the central magma chamber. This study also suggested that the source migrated along this corridor. I integrated the tremor patterns with other studies and proposed that heat and pressure from continued injections of magma were responsible for maintaining an open venting system at Cone A. The tremor resulted from the boiling of a shallow hydrothermal system in the vicinity of Cone A and volatiles potentially coming from the magma itself. The tremor catalog demonstrates that the seismic signal waned during the study period suggesting that fewer fresh volatiles entered the system, which may have allowed the pathways connecting the magma and volatiles to the surface to close up. By the time new magma entered the system in 2006, this network of pathways was closed, forcing the volatiles to seek a new exit. In hindsight, the 2003--2005 period of varied and waning seismic tremor, and the inferred end of massive open venting, may have been a pivotal era at Okmok that eventually led to the 2008 eruption.

  7. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  8. Dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Aleutian Arc, quantified by time series TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Teng; Poland, Michael P.; Lu, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar imagery is widely used to study surface deformation induced by volcanic activity; however, it is rarely applied to quantify the evolution of lava domes, which is important for understanding hazards and magmatic system characteristics. We studied dome formation associated with eruptive activity at Mount Cleveland, Aleutian Volcanic Arc, in 2011-2012 using TerraSAR-X imagery. Interferometry and offset tracking show no consistent deformation and only motion of the crater rim, suggesting that ascending magma may pass through a preexisting conduit system without causing appreciable surface deformation. Amplitude imagery has proven useful for quantifying rates of vertical and areal growth of the lava dome within the crater from formation to removal by explosive activity to rebirth. We expect that this approach can be applied at other volcanoes that host growing lava domes and where hazards are highly dependent on dome geometry and growth rates.

  9. Oxygen isotope constraints on the petrogenesis of Aleutian arc magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, B.S.; O'Neil, J.R. ); Brophy, J.G. )

    1992-04-01

    The first measurement of {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratios of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and titanomagnetite phenocrysts from modern Aleutian island-arc lavas provides new insight and independent constraints on magma sources and intracrustal processes. Basalts are heterogeneous on the scale of the entire arc and individual volcanic centers. Combined with Sr isotope and trace element data {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values suggest a variable magma source characterized by differences in the mantle wedge or the subducted sediment component along the volcanic front. Seven tholeiitic basalt to rhyodacite lavas from the Seguam volcanic center have nearly identical {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values of 6.0{per thousand} {plus minus} 0.2{per thousand}, reflecting extensive closed-system plagioclase-dominated crystal fractionation. Oxygen isotope thermometry and pyroxene and oxide equilibria indicate that differentiation occurred between 1,150 {plus minus} 100C (basalt) and 950 {plus minus} 100C (rhyodacite). In contrast, {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values of 12 calc-alkalic basaltic andesites and andesites from the smaller Kanaga volcanic center span a broader range of 5.9{per thousand}-6.6{per thousand}, and consist of mostly higher values. Isotopic disequilibrium in the Kanaga system is manifest in two ways: two types of basaltic inclusions with contrasting {delta}{sup 18}O values occur in one andesite, and in two other andesites plagioclase-titanomagnetite and clinopyroxene-titanomagnetite oxygen isotope temperatures are inconsistent.

  10. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    ... of which are so thick that they block the penetration of light from CALIPSO's lidar to the surface. The yellow layer near the surface over France is believed to be primarily air pollution, but could also contain ash from the volcano. Highlighting its ...

  11. Retrieving 65 years of volcano summit deformation from multitemporal structure from motion: The case of Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, Allan; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Peltier, Aline; Beauducel, François

    2015-09-01

    The structure from motion photogrammetry technique enables use of historical airborne photography to achieve high-resolution 3-D terrain models. We apply this method on Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion), which allows a unique opportunity to retrieve high-resolution (1.5-0.11 m) digital elevation models and precise deformation maps of the volcano since 1950. Our results provide evidence that the summit volume increased throughout the study period, at a stable rate of 2.2 Mm3/yr between 1950 and 2015, with an acceleration up to 8.0 Mm3/yr prior to the major 2007 eruption that was accompanied by summit caldera collapse. At the same time, summit deformation was asymmetric, with 9.2 ± 2.5 m of eastward seaward displacement and 1.3 ± 2.5 m to the west during 1950-2015. Our results reveal a temporal evolution in the volcano magma influx rate and deformation. Tracking these fluxes and the long-lived preferential eastern motion is crucial to mitigate risks associated to flank destabilization.

  12. Volcano-Tectonic Deformation at Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Galgana, G.; Corpuz, E.; Bartel, B.

    2004-12-01

    Taal Volcano, located in southern Luzon, Philippines, is an unusual, tholeiitic volcano situated within a calc-alkaline arc. It is one of the most active volcanic centers in the Philippines, with some 33 historic volcanic eruptions over the past four centuries. Volcanism at Taal is at least partly tectonically controlled, suggested by its location at the intersection of regional fault structures and by the location and shape of both Taal's caldera and Volcano Island. The alignment of modern eruption centers, are controlled by regional and local structures. Here, we review geomorphic and geodetic observations that constrain both tectonic and volcanic deformation in the vicinity of Taal volcano. We use GPS measurements from a 52-station GPS network measured from 1996 - 2001 to investigate overall plate interaction and microplate (intra-arc) deformation. The velocity field indicates that the majority of the Philippine Sea - Eurasia plate convergence is taking place west of Luzon, presumably largely by subduction at the Manila trench. A relatively small fraction of the convergence appears to be taking place within Luzon or across the East Luzon trough. The major intra-arc deformation is accommodated by strike-slip motion along the Philippine Fault, ranging from 25-40 mm/yr left-lateral slip. Detailed measurements in southern Luzon also indicate significant intra-arc deformation west of the Philippine Fault. GPS measurements in southwestern Luzon indicate significant motion within the arc, which could be explained by 11-13 mm/yr of left-lateral shear along the "Macolod Corridor", within which Taal Volcano resides. A dense network of continuous single- and dual-frequency GPS receivers at Taal Volcano, Philippines reveals highly time-variable deformation behavior, similar to that observed at other large calderas. While the caldera has been relatively quiescent for the past 2-3 years, previous deformation includes two major phases of intra-caldera deformation, including two phases of inflation and deflation in 1998-2000. The February-November 2000 period of inflation was characterized by approximately 120 mm of uplift of the center of Volcano Island relative to the northern caldera rim, at average rates up to 216 mm/yr. The source of deflation in 1999 was modeled as a contractional Mogi point source centered at 4.2 km depth beneath Volcano Island; the source of inflation in 2000 was modeled as a dilatational Mogi point source centered at 5.2 km depth beneath Volcano Island. The locations of the two sources are indistinguishable within the 95% confidence estimates. Modeling using a running four-month time window from June 1999-March 2001 reveals little evidence for source migration. We find marginal evidence for an elongate source whose long axis is oriented NW-SE, paralleling the caldera-controlling fault system. We suggest that the two periods of inflation observed at Taal represent episodic intrusions of magma into a shallow reservoir centered beneath Volcano Island whose position is controlled at least in part by regional tectonic structures.

  13. Infrared science of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, William A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, R.C.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs is- suing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  14. Alaska Volcano Observatory Seismic Network Data Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. P.; Haney, M. M.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Searcy, C. K.; Stihler, S. D.; West, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) established in 1988 as a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, monitors active volcanoes in Alaska. Thirty-three volcanoes are currently monitored by a seismograph network consisting of 193 stations, of which 40 are three-component stations. The current state of AVO’s seismic network, and data processing and availability are summarized in the annual AVO seismological bulletin, Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaska Volcanoes, published as a USGS Data Series (most recent at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/467). Despite a rich seismic data set for 12 VEI 2 or greater eruptions, and over 80,000 located earthquakes in the last 21 years, the volcanic seismicity in the Aleutian Arc remains understudied. Initially, AVO seismic data were only provided via a data supplement as part of the annual bulletin, or upon request. Over the last few years, AVO has made seismic data more available with the objective of increasing volcano seismic research on the Aleutian Arc. The complete AVO earthquake catalog data are now available through the annual AVO bulletin and have been submitted monthly to the on-line Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) composite catalog since 2008. Segmented waveform data for all catalog earthquakes are available upon request and efforts are underway to make this archive web accessible as well. Continuous data were first archived using a tape backup, but the availability of low cost digital storage media made a waveform backup of continuous data a reality. Currently the continuous AVO waveform data can be found in several forms. Since late 2002, AVO has burned all continuous waveform data to DVDs, as well as storing these data in Antelope databases at the Geophysical Institute. Beginning in 2005, data have been available through a Winston Wave Server housed at the USGS in Anchorage. AVO waveform data were added to the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Data Management Center (IRIS-DMC) beginning in 2008 and now includes continuous waveform data from all available AVO seismograph stations in real time. Data coverage is available through the DMC’s Metadata Aggregator.

  15. Roles of magmatic oxygen fugacity and water content in generating signatures of continental crust in the Alaska-Aleutian arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Brounce, M. N.; Gentes, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Early depletion of Fe during magmatic differentiation is a characteristic of many arc magmas, and this may drive them towards the bulk composition of continental crust. In the Alaska-Aleutian arc, magmas are strongly Fe-depleted both in the east, where the arc sits atop pre-existing continental crust, and in the west, where the system is oceanic but convergence is highly oblique. Primary basaltic arc magmas may achieve early Fe depletion through a combination of high magmatic H2O, which delays silicate saturation, and high oxygen fugacity (fO2), which promotes early onset of Fe-oxide crystallization. Alternatively, low-Fe, high Mg# magmas may emerge directly from the arc mantle, possibly due to slab melting, driving mixing with Fe-rich basaltic magmas. Yet, the relative importance of H2O, fO2, and magmatic bulk composition in generating Fe-depletion is not clearly resolved. Here, we present new measurements of the oxidation state of Fe (Fe3+/?Fe ratio; a proxy for magmatic fO2), in combination with major element and volatile data, of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from four Alaska-Aleutian arc volcanoes (Okmok, Seguam, Korovin, Augustine), acquired using XANES spectroscopy. We use the Tholeiitic Index (THI) of Zimmer et al., 2010 to quantify the behavior of Fe in each volcano magma series (<1 is Fe-depleted, >1 is Fe-enriched). These volcanoes span a range of THI, from 0.9-0.65. The Fe3+/?Fe ratios of Aleutian basalts, corrected for fractional crystallization to 6 wt.% MgO (i.e., Fe3+/?Fe6.0) range from 0.22-0.31 and correlate strongly with THI (r2>0.99), such that more Fe-depleted magmas contain a greater proportion of oxidized Fe. The maximum dissolved H2O contents of basaltic melt inclusions from these volcanoes also strongly correlate with THI (r2>0.96), and with measured Fe3+/?Fe ratios (although H2O is not the direct cause of oxidation). These links point to a slab-derived origin of both H2O and oxidation and thus relate slab fluxes to the Fe-depletion trends of arc magmas. These correlations also illustrate the difficulty of separating the effects of H2O and fO2 on arc magmatic differentiation, as the two are challenging to isolate in nature. Analysis of experimental data, however, suggest that fO2 exhibits stronger control than H2O on the relative appearance of spinel and silicates on the liquidus.

  16. Radiocarbon dates for lava flows from northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hilo 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan-Banks, J. M.; Lockwood, J.P.; Rubin, M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight 14C analyses are reported for carbonized roots and other plant material collected from beneath 15 prehistoric lava flows erupted from the northeast rift zone (NERZ) of Mauna Loa Volcano (ML). The new 14C dates establish ages for 13 previously undated lava flows, and correct or add to information previously reported. Limiting ages on other flows that lie either above or below the dated flows are also established. These dates help to unravel the eruptive history of ML's NERZ. -from Authors

  17. Eruptions of Taal Volcano 1976-1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, John A.

    Sixty kilometers due south of Manila, Philippines, hidden behind an ignimbrite delta, which at its rim is nearly 700-m high, is the active Taal Volcano. There is a lake of 267 km2 in the volcano-tectonic depression and within it an island of 25 km2. The island has been constructed largely by phreatomagmatic activity, added to in historic times. The last major eruption occurred when a channel was opened to the lake by an explosion on September 28, 1965 (see Figure 1).

  18. Re-colonization by common eiders Somateria mollissima in the Aleutian Archipelago following removal of introduced arctic foxes Vulpes lagopus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Margaret R.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sexson, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Islands provide refuges for populations of many species where they find safety from predators, but the introduction of predators frequently results in elimination or dramatic reductions in island-dwelling organisms. When predators are removed, re-colonization for some species occurs naturally, and inter-island phylogeographic relationships and current movement patterns can illuminate processes of colonization. We studied a case of re-colonization of common eiders Somateria mollissima following removal of introduced arctic foxes Vulpes lagopus in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. We expected common eiders to resume nesting on islands cleared of foxes and to re-colonize from nearby islets, islands, and island groups. We thus expected common eiders to show limited genetic structure indicative of extensive mixing among island populations. Satellite telemetry was used to record current movement patterns of female common eiders from six islands across three island groups. We collected genetic data from these and other nesting common eiders at 14 microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial DNA control region to examine population genetic structure, historical fluctuations in population demography, and gene flow. Our results suggest recent interchange among islands. Analysis of microsatellite data supports satellite telemetry data of increased dispersal of common eiders to nearby areas and little between island groups. Although evidence from mtDNA is suggestive of female dispersal among island groups, gene flow is insufficient to account for recolonization and rapid population growth. Instead, near-by remnant populations of common eiders contributed substantially to population expansion, without which re-colonization would have likely occurred at a much lower rate. Genetic and morphometric data of common eiders within one island group two and three decades after re-colonization suggests reduced movement of eiders among islands and little movement between island groups after populations were re-established. We predict that re-colonization of an island group where all common eiders are extirpated could take decades.

  19. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse