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Sample records for volcano solomon islands

  1. The petrogenesis of sodic island arc magmas at Savo volcano, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J.; Petterson, M. G.; Saunders, A. D.; Millar, I. L.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Toba, T.; Naden, J.; Cook, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Savo, Solomon Islands, is a historically active volcano dominated by sodic, alkaline lavas, and pyroclastic rocks with up to 7.5 wt% Na2O, and high Sr, arc-like trace element chemistry. The suite is dominated by mugearites (plagioclase-clinopyroxene-magnetite ± amphibole ± olivine) and trachytes (plagioclase-amphibole-magnetite ± biotite). The presence of hydrous minerals (amphibole, biotite) indicates relatively wet magmas. In such melts, plagioclase is relatively unstable relative to iron oxides and ferromagnesian silicates; it is the latter minerals (particularly hornblende) that dominate cumulate nodules at Savo and drive the chemical differentiation of the suite, with a limited role for plagioclase. This is potentially occurring in a crustal “hot zone”, with major chemical differentiation occurring at depth. Batches of magma ascend periodically, where they are subject to decompression, water saturation and further cooling, resulting in closed-system crystallisation of plagioclase, and ultimately the production of sodic, crystal and feldspar-rich, high-Sr rocks. The sodic and hydrous nature of the parental magmas is interpreted to be the result of partial melting of metasomatised mantle, but radiogenic isotope data (Pb, Sr, Nd) cannot uniquely identify the source of the metasomatic agent.

  2. Oloketa Tingting Fo Apem Education Long Solomon Islands: Issues in Solomon Islands Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcorn, Noeline

    2010-01-01

    This book makes available to a wider audience for the first time material based on fieldwork carried out by the Solomon Island researchers in their own country. The findings will have vital relevance to policy makers, teachers and students. Over the past four years the School of Education, Solomon Islands College of Higher Education and the…

  3. Magnitude 8.1 Earthquake off the Solomon Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 1, 2007, a magnitude 8.1 earthquake rattled the Solomon Islands, 2,145 kilometers (1,330 miles) northeast of Brisbane, Australia. Centered less than ten kilometers beneath the Earth's surface, the earthquake displaced enough water in the ocean above to trigger a small tsunami. Though officials were still assessing damage to remote island communities on April 3, Reuters reported that the earthquake and the tsunami killed an estimated 22 people and left as many as 5,409 homeless. The most serious damage occurred on the island of Gizo, northwest of the earthquake epicenter, where the tsunami damaged the hospital, schools, and hundreds of houses, said Reuters. This image, captured by the Landsat-7 satellite, shows the location of the earthquake epicenter in relation to the nearest islands in the Solomon Island group. Gizo is beyond the left edge of the image, but its triangular fringing coral reefs are shown in the upper left corner. Though dense rain forest hides volcanic features from view, the very shape of the islands testifies to the geologic activity of the region. The circular Kolombangara Island is the tip of a dormant volcano, and other circular volcanic peaks are visible in the image. The image also shows that the Solomon Islands run on a northwest-southeast axis parallel to the edge of the Pacific plate, the section of the Earth's crust that carries the Pacific Ocean and its islands. The earthquake occurred along the plate boundary, where the Australia/Woodlark/Solomon Sea plates slide beneath the denser Pacific plate. Friction between the sinking (subducting) plates and the overriding Pacific plate led to the large earthquake on April 1, said the United States Geological Survey (USGS) summary of the earthquake. Large earthquakes are common in the region, though the section of the plate that produced the April 1 earthquake had not caused any quakes of magnitude 7 or larger since the early 20th century, said the USGS.

  4. Ciguatera fish poisoning in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Oreihaka, E

    1992-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning may have existed in the Solomon Islands long ago though there has never been any ciguatera fish poisoning tests been carried to confirm its presence. Suspected occurrences are infrequent and seasonal. Most cases of ciguatera fish poisoning are undocumented that when cases do occur they depend largely on traditional-knowledge and anecdotal information. Areas suspected to have ciguatoxic poisoning problem in the Solomon Islands includes Santa Cruz, Rennell and Bellona, Indispensable reefs, Ontong Java and Wagina island. Fish species considered ciguatoxic includes red emperor, red snapper, roundfaced batfish, barracuda and blue lined sea-bream. In any way ciguatera fish poisoning is as yet not a big health problem in the Solomon Islands. PMID:1340336

  5. Solomon Islands School Leaders Readiness for Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porakari, James; Sevala, Brenda; Miniti, Patrick; Saemane, George; Sharma, Umesh; Forlin, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities was initiated by the Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development in the Solomon Islands in 2013. This paper investigates the knowledge, skills, and values of school leaders in public and private schools in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands, in regard to providing support for inclusive…

  6. Why don't things fall apart? : a study of the survival of the Solomon Islands state

    E-print Network

    Tucker, Alexis Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    sea of islands”, this claim does not support the legitimacy and logic of the SolomonSolomon Islands, with the bloodiest taking place on Savo Island and on Guadalcanal, having to do with control of the sea

  7. Amendment to the Solomon Islands National Provident Fund Act.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    On 6 June 1988 the Solomon Islands National Provident Fund Act was amended to allow the Solomon Islands National Provident Fund Board to grant loans to members of the Fund. In November 1989 under authority of this amendment the Board implemented a housing scheme for members of the Fund. It instituted loans for the purchase of residential homes from property owners, the construction of residential houses, and the redemption of bank loans obtained for purchase or construction of residential houses. To qualify for the loan the applicant must be a permanent employee, be an active member of the Fund, and less than 50 years old, and the house sought to be purchased or built must be on registered land. PMID:12344585

  8. Remuneration disparities in Oceania: Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marai, Leo; Kewibu, Vincent; Kinkin, Elly; Peter Peniop, John; Salini, Christian; Kofana, Genesis

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the impact of remuneration differences on workers in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. In these countries remunerative differences are linked to government policy (in Papua New Guinea) and job contracts (in the Solomon Islands), and have impacted on industrial relations in both settings (strike action). A total of N = 350 professionals (n = 60 expatriates) from 54 organizations in aid, government, higher education and industry (mean response rate = 36%) responded to an organizational survey form. Remuneration ratios between international and local respondents based on the World Bank's index of purchasing power parity approached 9:1. In both sites staff compared pay and benefits (remuneration) packages: Internationally remunerated staff rated their ability higher than their local counterparts did; locally remunerated groups reported more injustice in remuneration, were more demotivated by the gaps, and were more likely to be thinking about leaving the organization. In-country workshops of N = 40 largely local stakeholders from aid and community organizations plus government ministries considered the survey's findings and recommended: in Solomon Islands, (a) introducing a policy of localization, (b) establishing a remuneration commission (already existent in Papua New Guinea), and (c) reducing the remunerative gap; in Papua New Guinea, (d) reversing the post-Independence "dual pay system" (currently official policy), (e) instituting pay-for-performance, and (f) ensuring the existent localization policy is applied to recruitment, selection, and staff career planning and management. PMID:22044056

  9. Pig production in the Solomon Islands. I. Village pig production.

    PubMed

    de Fredrick, D F

    1977-05-01

    In 181 villages in the Solomon Islands the pig: human ratio was 1:5-8 and the annual per capita pork consumption was 4-2 kg. Some communities did not keep pigs or eat pig meat. Sows weaned an average of 5-5 piglets per year and mean liveweight at 12 months of age was 28-4 kg. Most pigs were kept on the ground but some were housed in pens over the sea and very few lived in their owner's houses. Pigs were important in the social life of the people but proportionally fewer pigs were raised than in neighbouring Pacific countries. PMID:906090

  10. The Education Pacific Islands Children Deserve: The Learn and Play Project in the Solomon Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maebuta, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The Learn and Play Project was initiated by Solomon Islands Football Federation and aimed at educating and providing football skills training for primary school dropouts. The aim of this paper is to report the implementation of the programme in a case study school. Because the project is still being implemented, this paper is not intended to…

  11. He and Sr isotopic constraints on subduction contributions to Woodlark Basin volcanism, Solomon Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Trull, T.W.; Kurz, M.D. ); Perfit, M.R. )

    1990-02-01

    In order to assess the nature and spatial extent of subduction contributions to arc volcanism, Sr and He isotopic compositions are measured for dredged volcanic rocks from the Woodlark Basin in the western Pacific. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios increase geographically, from ocean ridge values (.7025-.7029) at the Woodlark Spreading Center to island arc ratios (.7035-.7039) in the Solomon Islands forearc, with intermediate values near the triple junction where the Woodlark Spreading Center subducts beneath the Solomon Islands. {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are also more radiogenic in the forearc (6.9 {plus minus} .2 R{sub a} at active Kavachi volcano) than along the spreading center, where values typical of major ocean ridges were found (8.2 - 9.3 R{sub a}). Very low {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios occur in many triple junction rocks (.1 to 5 R{sub a}), but consideration of He isotopic differences between crushing and melting analyses suggests that the low ratios were caused by atmospheric (1 R{sub a}) and radiogenic ({approx} 0.2 R{sub a}) helium addition after eruption. Variations in unaltered, magnetic {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He, and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios are best explained by subduction-related fluid or silicate melt contributions to the magma source region, perhaps from ancient Pacific lithosphere. However, mantle volatiles dominate the generation of Woodlark Basin rocks despite extensive subduction in the region.

  12. Slip distribution from the 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands earthquake: A unique image of near-trench rupture

    E-print Network

    Frankel, Kurt L.

    at the transition to the Solomon Sea plate where subduction of the Woodlark rise is ongoing (Figure 1). Here and Woodlark plates, to one in which Solomon Sea plate subduction dominates as Pacific subduction beginsSlip distribution from the 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands earthquake: A unique image of near

  13. Counting the Cost of Diabetes in the Solomon Islands and Nauru

    PubMed Central

    Win Tin, Si Thu; Iro, George; Gadabu, Eva; Colagiuri, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the costs associated with diabetes to governments, people with diabetes and their carers, and its impact on quality of life in two Pacific Island countries—the Solomon Islands and Nauru. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional cost of illness study was conducted on 330 people with type 2 diabetes (197 from the Solomon Islands and 133 from Nauru) using a structured cost of illness survey questionnaire adapted from the Australian DiabCo$t study. Quality of life was measured by the EQ-5D Visual Analogue Scale. Results There were 330 respondents (50% female; mean duration of diabetes 10.9 years; mean age 52.6 years). The estimated annual national cost of diabetes incurred by the Solomon Islands government was AUD12.8 million (AUD281 per person/year) and by Nauru government was AUD1.2 million (AUD747 per person/year). The major contribution to the government costs was inpatient services cost (71% in the Solomon Islands and 83% in Nauru). Annual expenditure for diabetes was approximately 20% of the governments’ annual health care expenditure. Considerable absenteeism and retirement from work due to diabetes was found. Conclusions This study found substantial public and personal costs associated with diabetes. The findings provide objective data on which health policy, funding and planning decisions about the prevention and control of diabetes in the Solomon Islands and Nauru can be reliably based and subsequently evaluated. PMID:26698575

  14. Language, Aid and Literacy: An Outline of Activities in the Solomon Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Lesley

    1994-01-01

    Problems facing the literacy movement in the Solomon Islands are related to communication, economic, and linguistic barriers. The island is linguistically diverse. English is the official language, but a national literacy committee found that only 26% of people could speak English. Improving primary education is a government priority. Training of…

  15. Solomon Islands Pijin: Special Skills Handbook. Peace Corps Language Handbook Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Thom, Comp.

    This handbook is intended to acquaint Peace Corps volunteers with the geography and culture of the Solomon Islands. It is divided into five parts: (1) an atlas of pen-and-ink maps of the islands; (2) custom stories in Pijin, with an English translation of each one; (3) miscellaneous readings in Pijin; (4) posters in Pijin; and (5) a picture…

  16. The Solomon Islands tsunami of 6 February 2013 field survey in the Santa Cruz Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H. M.; Papantoniou, A.; Biukoto, L.; Albert, G.

    2013-12-01

    On February 6, 2013 at 01:12:27 UTC (local time: UTC+11), a magnitude Mw 8.0 earthquake occurred 70 km to the west of Ndendo Island (Santa Cruz Island) in the Solomon Islands. The under-thrusting earthquake near a 90° bend, where the Australian plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate generated a locally focused tsunami in the Coral Sea and the South Pacific Ocean. The tsunami claimed the lives of 10 people and injured 15, destroyed 588 houses and partially damaged 478 houses, affecting 4,509 people in 1,066 households corresponding to an estimated 37% of the population of Santa Cruz Island. A multi-disciplinary international tsunami survey team (ITST) was deployed within days of the event to document flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment and coral boulder depositions, land level changes, damage patterns at various scales, performance of the man-made infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The 19 to 23 February 2013 ITST covered 30 locations on 4 Islands: Ndendo (Santa Cruz), Tomotu Noi (Lord Howe), Nea Tomotu (Trevanion, Malo) and Tinakula. The reconnaissance completely circling Ndendo and Tinakula logged 240 km by small boat and additionally covered 20 km of Ndendo's hard hit western coastline by vehicle. The collected survey data includes more than 80 tsunami runup and flow depth measurements. The tsunami impact peaked at Manoputi on Ndendo's densely populated west coast with maximum tsunami height exceeding 11 m and local flow depths above ground exceeding 7 m. A fast tide-like positive amplitude of 1 m was recorded at Lata wharf inside Graciosa Bay on Ndendo Island and misleadingly reported in the media as representative tsunami height. The stark contrast between the field observations on exposed coastlines and the Lata tide gauge recording highlights the importance of rapid tsunami reconnaissance surveys. Inundation distance and damage more than 500 m inland were recorded at Lata airport on Ndendo Island. Landslides were observed on volcanic Tinakula Island and on Ndendo Island. Observations from the 2013 Santa Cruz tsunami are compared against the 2007 and 2010 Solomon Islands tsunamis. The team also interviewed eyewitnesses and educated residents about the tsunami hazard in numerous ad hoc presentations and discussions. The combination of ancestral knowledge and recent Solomon Islands wide geohazards education programs triggered an immediate spontaneous self-evacuation containing the death toll in the small evacuation window of few minutes between the end of the ground shaking and the onslaught of the tsunami. Fortunately school children were shown a video on the 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami 3 months prior to the Santa Cruz event and the headmaster of the school at Venga evacuated the later flooded school already during a foreshock. On Tomotu Noi Island at Bamoi the residents evacuated inland towards a crocodile infested lake, which was not reached by the tsunami inundation. Community-based education and awareness programs are particularly essential to help save lives in locales at risk from near-source tsunamis.

  17. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in female clinic attendees in Honiara, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kako, H; Butcher, R; Lauri, B; Puiahi, E; Pitakaka, R; Sokana, O; Kilua, G; Roth, A; Solomon, A W; Mabey, D C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the prevalence of common bacterial sexually transmitted infections, including Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, in women attending clinics in the Solomon Islands. Methods We conducted a sexual health survey among women attending three nurse-led community outpatient clinics in August 2014, to establish the prevalence of bacterial sexually transmitted infections in female clinic attenders in Honiara, Solomon Islands. Vaginal swab samples were tested for infection with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae using a commercial strand displacement amplification assay. Serum samples were tested for syphilis. Results We enrolled 296 women, aged 16–49, attending three clinics. Knowledge of safe sexual practices was high but reported condom usage was low. The prevalence of infection with C. trachomatis was 20%. The prevalence of infection with N. gonorrhoeae and syphilis were 5.1% and 4.1%, respectively. Conclusions Bacterial sexually transmitted infections are a major health problem in the Solomon Islands. Interventions are urgently needed. PMID:25922103

  18. Woodlark Island in Solomon Sea as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Woodlark Island in the Solomon Sea, east of New Guinea and northeast of Australia, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 158th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 140 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 251 hours and 21 minutes.

  19. Pijin at School in Solomon Islands: Language Ideologies and the Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourdan, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I analyze the reasons that have excluded Pijin, the lingua franca of Solomon Islands, South West Pacific, from being used as a medium of instruction, and why this may now become possible. Following a short sociolinguistic sketch, I present the colonial and post-colonial linguistic ideologies that shaped sociolinguistic…

  20. "Engendering" environmental projects: the case of eco-timber production in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Scheyvens, R

    1998-11-01

    This article discusses the case of timber production in the Solomon Islands and links between environmental protection and gender. Many environmental projects are undertaken without regard for gender roles and relations. The Solomon Western Islands Fair Trade (SWIFT) initiative included women in only a peripheral way. This article justifies the involvement of women in environmental projects and then evaluates the operations of SWIFT. A role for women in local environmental projects should be recognized because of women's roles, knowledge, and interests. Use of natural resources is gender-based. In the Solomon Islands, women are identified as having the greater interest in the long-term sustainability of the environment and greater reliance on natural resources to fulfill their roles, but forestry is men's work. The price of tropical woods has tempted Micronesian governments to exploit forests to enhance their foreign exchange earnings. Environmental degradation from logging is particularly severe in the Solomon Islands. The population fulfills many basic needs from forests. Forests can provide cash earnings. The author conducted an evaluation of effectiveness of SWIFT in 1996. The SWIFT project allows rural people to earn cash from sustainable timber extraction without signing with logging companies. Women are affected by SWIFT due to their husbands' appropriation of their earnings, their peripheral role, and lack of representation in senior positions and use of women's forestry expertise. The article offers a model for genderizing eco-projects. Men need to be encouraged to work more as partners with women. PMID:12321992

  1. Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Peace Education: Solomon Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maebuta, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Technical and vocational education and training programs as a form of peace education are examined in this paper. It explores the notion of educating for a culture of peace through refocusing technical and vocational education and training programs on sustainable community development in the Solomon Islands. It further highlights the policy and…

  2. Colonization of an island volcano, Long Island, Papua New Guinea, and an emergent island,

    E-print Network

    , in its caldera lake. V. Colonization by ®gs (Ficus spp.), their dispersers and pollinators M. Shanahan1 activity in the early 1950s produced a series of temporary islands in the volcano's caldera lake. One

  3. Molecular analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants in the Solomon Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Hirono, A.; Ishii, A.; Hirono, K.; Miwa, S.; Kere, N.; Fujii, H.

    1995-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders, and >100 million people are considered to have mutant genes. G6PD deficiency is frequent in the area where plasmodium falciparum infection is endemic, probably because the G6PD-deficient subjects are resistant to the parasite. Falciparum and vivax malarias have been highly endemic in the Solomon Islands, and a high frequency of G6PD deficiency has also been expected. A recent investigation showed that the frequency of G6PD deficiency in the Solomon Islands was 8.4%-14.4%. Although >80 G6PD variants from various populations have been molecularly analyzed, little is known about those in Melanesians. G6PD Maewo, which was originally found in Vanuatu, has so far been the only Melanesian variant whose structural abnormality was determined. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) of the Solomon Islands and a new survey of Makira Island

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, Eli M.; Blanchard, Benjamin; Guénard, Benoit; John Fasi;  Evan P. Economo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The intent of this paper is to facilitate future research of the Solomon Islands ant fauna by providing the first comprehensively researched species inventory in over 75 years. The species list presented here includes the names of all ant species recorded from the islands that are available in the literature together with specimen records from several museum collections and new records from our 2008 Makira field expedition. All the names of described species presented are valid in accordance with the most recent Formicidae classification. In total, the checklist is composed of 237 species and subspecies (including 30 morphospecies) in 59 genera representing nine subfamilies. We report that the recent field expedition added 67 new species records to Makira and 28 new species records to the Solomon Islands. Our research recovered species occurrence records for 32 individual islands and five island groups. The five islands with the highest number of recorded species are: Makira (142 spp.), Guadalcanal (107 spp.), Malaita (70 spp.), Santa Isabel (68 spp.), and Rennell (66 spp.). Based on our results, we discuss the taxonomic composition of the archipelago’s ant fauna, which islands are most in need of additional sampling, and the importance of establishing biodiversity baselines before environmental threats such as the invasive ant Wasmannia auropunctata cause irrevocable harm to the native biodiversity. PMID:23653494

  5. In-situ chemical, UPb dating, and Hf isotope investigation of megacrystic zircons, Malaita (Solomon Islands): Evidence for multi-stage alkaline magmatic activity

    E-print Network

    ), the Central Province, and the Volcanic Province. Islands located within the Pacific Province are characterized (Solomon Islands): Evidence for multi-stage alkaline magmatic activity beneath the Ontong Java Plateau (Solomon Islands) have detailed the chemical and isotopic nature of the alnöite and entrained megacrysts

  6. Ancestral heritage saves tribes during 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Kalligeris, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    The 1 April 2007 magnitude Ms 8.1 earthquake off the New Georgia Group in the Solomon Islands generated a tsunami that killed 52 with locally focused run-up heights of 12 m, local flow depths of 5 m as well as tectonic uplift up to 3.6 m and subsidence down to -1.5 m. A reconnaissance team deployed within one week investigated 65 coastal settlements on 13 remote Islands. The ancestral heritage ``run to high ground after an earthquake'' passed on to younger generations by survivors of smaller historic tsunamis triggered an immediate spontaneous self evacuation containing the death toll.

  7. Near-Field Population Response During the 2 April 2007 Solomon Islands Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, B. G.; Moore, A. L.; Baumwoll, J.

    2007-12-01

    When the magnitude 8.1 earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit the Solomon Islands on 2 April 2007 it killed 52 people. On Ghizo Island, home of the capital of the Western Province, Gizo, waves approaching 4 m in height inundated the south coast villages. Eyewitness accounts supported by geologic data from the offshore coral reef and sediment deposited on land suggest a wave that came in as the shaking stopped as a rapidly-rising tide rather than a turbulent bore- vehicles and houses were floated inland with very little damage. Those that survived in villages affected by the tsunami had indigenous knowledge of prior events, whereas immigrant populations died in higher proportions. While buoy-based early warning systems are necessary to mitigate the effects of teletsunamis, they would have done little good in this near-field environment. In Pailongge, a village of 76 indigenous Solomon Islanders on Ghizo's south coast, there were no deaths. Village elders directed the people inland following the shaking and the almost immediate withdrawal of water from the lagoon, and heads of household made sure that children were accounted for and evacuated. Of the 366 Gilbertese living in Titiana, however, 13 people died, 8 of which were children who were exploring the emptied lagoon. A large proportion of the dead were children (24) as they were likely too weak to swim against the non-bore flow. The Gilbertese migrated from Kiribati in the 1950"s, and had not experienced a major earthquake and tsunami, hence had no cultural memory. In the case of the Solomon Islands tsunami, as was the case in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, indigenous knowledge served the people in the near-field well. In the case of the Indian Ocean where there was 10-20 minutes separation between the time the shaking began and the waves arrived, the combination of an in-place plan and a suitable physical geography allowed the population of Simeulue Island and the Moken people of Thailand to escape before the waves hit. In the Solomons, there was less than 3 minutes separation time, and the populations with indigenous knowledge were able to save themselves. Mitigation strategies for those that live adjacent to tsunamigenic subduction zones must include a community-based disaster management plan to educate a variety of populations with different cultural knowledges. This education can be in concert with development of an basin-wide early warning system.

  8. Prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths in remote villages in East Kwaio, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Humpress; Bradbury, Richard; Taeka, James; Asugeni, James; Asugeni, Vunivesi; Igeni, Tony; Gwala, John; Newton, Lawrence; Fa, Chillion Evan; Kilivisi, Fawcett Laurence; Esau, Dorothy; Flores, Angelica; Ribeyro, Elmer; Liku, Daisy; Muse, Alwin; Asugeni, Lyndel; Talana, Jeptha; Shield, Jennifer; MacLaren, David J; Massey, Peter D; Muller, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although soil-transmitted helminths (STH) are endemic in Solomon Islands, there are few recent reports on their prevalence. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of STH in residents of remote communities in Solomon Islands. Methods A cross-sectional convenience-sampled survey of residents of four adjacent villages in Malaita, Solomon Islands was performed in Atoifi and Na’au in April 2011 and in Abitona and Sifilo in April 2012. All residents older than one year were invited to participate, which involved providing a single sample of faeces examined using a modified Kato-Katz technique and completing a questionnaire that asked demographic and STH-related behaviour questions. Results The overall participation rate was 52.8%, with 402 participants comprising 49.8% males. Hookworm was the predominant STH with only a single case of trichuriasis found in Atoifi. The total prevalence of hookworm was 22.6% (95% confidence interval: 18.6–27.1); the prevalence of hookworm in Abitona, Na’au and Sifilo was 20.0%, 29.9% and 27.4%, respectively, whereas in Atoifi it was 2.3% (P < 0.001). Intensity was low in all villages. Although health behaviours differed significantly between Atoifi and the other three villages, the type of toilet used was the only significant association with hookworm. Discussion Residents of Atoifi have a relative freedom from STH compared to the other three villages. Rather than a region-wide morbidity control approach, a “one village at a time” approach aiming to eliminate STH and dealing with each village as a separate autonomous unit empowered to manage its own challenges may be a preferred option. PMID:26668767

  9. Health impacts of climate change in the Solomon Islands: an assessment and adaptation action plan.

    PubMed

    Spickett, Jeffery T; Katscherian, Dianne

    2014-09-01

    The Pacific island countries are particularly vulnerable to the environmental changes wrought by global climate change such as sea level rise, more frequent and intense extreme weather events and increasing temperatures. The potential biophysical changes likely to affect these countries have been identified and it is important that consideration be given to the implications of these changes on the health of their citizens. The potential health impacts of climatic changes on the population of the Solomon Islands were assessed through the use of a Health Impact Assessment framework. The process used a collaborative and consultative approach with local experts to identify the impacts to health that could arise from local environmental changes, considered the risks associated with these and proposed appropriate potential adaptive responses. Participants included knowledgeable representatives from the biophysical, socio-economic, infrastructure, environmental diseases and food sectors. The risk assessments considered both the likelihood and consequences of the health impacts occurring using a qualitative process. To mitigate the adverse effects of the health impacts, an extensive range of potential adaptation strategies were developed. The overall process provided an approach that could be used for further assessments as well as an extensive range of responses which could be used by sectors and to assist future decision making associated with the Solomon Islands' responses to climate change. PMID:25168977

  10. Arc segmentation and seismicity in the Solomon Islands arc, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Chu; Frohlich, Cliff; Taylor, Frederick W.; Burr, George; van Ufford, Andrew Quarles

    2011-07-01

    This paper evaluates neotectonic segmentation in the Solomon Islands forearc, and considers how it relates to regional tectonic evolution and the extent of ruptures of large megathrust earthquakes. We first consider regional geomorphology and Quaternary vertical displacements, especially uplifted coral reef terraces. Then we consider geographic seismicity patterns, aftershock areas and vertical displacements for large earthquakes, focal mechanisms, and along-arc variations in seismic moment release to evaluate the relationship between neotectonically defined segments and seismicity. Notably, one major limitation of using seismicity to evaluate arc segmentation is the matter of accurately defining earthquake rupture zones. For example, shoreline uplifts associated with the 1 April 2007 M w 8.1 Western Solomons earthquake indicate that the along-arc extent of rupture was about 50 km smaller than the aftershock area. Thus if we had relied on aftershocks alone to identify the 2007 rupture zone, as we do for most historical earthquakes, we would have missed the rupture's relationship to a major morphologic feature. In many cases, the imprecision of defining rupture zones without surface deformation data may be largely responsible for the poor mismatches to neotectonic boundaries. However, when a precise paleoseismic vertical deformation history is absent, aftershocks are often the best available tool for inferring rupture geometries. Altogether we identify 16 segments in the Solomon Islands. These comprise three major tectonic regimes or supersegments that correspond respectively to the forearc areas of Guadalcanal-Makira, the New Georgia island group, and Bougainville Islands. Subduction of the young and relatively shallow and buoyant Woodlark Basin and spreading system distinguishes the central New Georgia supersegment from the two neighboring supersegments. The physiographic expression of the San Cristobal trench is largely absent, but bathymetric mapping of the surface trace of the interplate thrust zone defines it adequately. The New Georgia supersegment has smaller arc segments, and more islands due to general late Quaternary forearc uplift very close to the trench where vertical displacement rates tend to be faster; prior to the 2007 earthquake it had much lower rates of seismic activity than the neighboring supersegments. Generally the mean along-arc lateral extent of Solomon arc segments is about 75 km, somewhat smaller than the segments reported in some other island arcs such as Japan (~ 100-260 km), but larger than those of the Tonga (30-80 km) and Central New Hebrides arcs (30-110 km). These differences may be real but it may occur simply because the coral-friendly tropical environment of the South Pacific arcs, numerous emerged forearc islands, and high seismicity rates provide an unusually favorable situation for observing variations in vertical tectonic activity and thus for identifying segment boundaries. Over the past century seismic slip in the Solomons, as indicated by seismic moment release, has corresponded to about half the plate convergence rate; however, there are notable variations along the arc. Even with the 2007 earthquake, the long-term moment release rate in the New Georgia supersegment is relatively low, and this may indicate that large earthquakes are imminent.

  11. Mapping the Epidemiology of Yaws in the Solomon Islands: A Cluster Randomized Survey

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Vahi, Ventis; Sokana, Oliver; Puiahi, Elliot; Pavluck, Alex; Zhang, Zaixing; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Bottomley, Christian; Mabey, David C.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, a non-venereal treponemal disease, is targeted for eradication by 2020 but accurate epidemiological data to guide control programs remain sparse. The Solomon Islands reports the second highest number of cases of yaws worldwide. We conducted a cluster randomized survey of yaws in two provinces of the Solomon Islands. One thousand four hundred and ninety-seven (1,497) children 5–14 years of age were examined. Clinical signs of active yaws were found in 79 children (5.5%), whereas 140 children (9.4%) had evidence of healed yaws lesions. Four hundred and seventy (470) (31.4%) children had a positive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA). Two hundred and eighty-five (285) children (19%) had a positive TPPA and rapid plasma regain assay. Risk of yaws increased with age and was more common in males. The prevalence of yaws at village level was the major risk factor for infection. Our findings suggest the village, not the household, should be the unit of treatment in the World Health Organization (WHO) yaws eradication strategy. PMID:25422395

  12. Geologic Survey of the 2 April 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake and Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiau, W. B.; Jackson, K. L.; Billy, D.; Bonte-Grapentin, M.; Kruger, J.; McAdoo, B. G.; Moore, A. L.; Tiano, B.

    2007-12-01

    The 2 April 2007 magnitude 8.1 Solomon Islands earthquake and tsunami caused extensive damage to coral reefs, coastal erosion, and in some locations, 3 meters of uplift, subsidence, and numerous landslides in the Western and Choiseul Provinces. Extensive damage to the coral reefs ranged from shattered branching corals to 4 meter head corals snapped off their bases and toppled over. The fringing reef on the east coast of Ranongga sustained the greatest degree of damage as it was uplifted 3 m above sea level and remains completely exposed. Sediment samples were collected along transects extended from offshore to onshore environments for larger islands, such as Ghizo, where the tsunami did not pass over the entire island. Smaller islands, such as Nusa Aghana, a transect was conducted from the outer barrier reefs, through the lagoon, across the island, and offshore on the opposing side of the island. Offshore data was collected using a side-scan sonar system that records bathymetry and images coral reef morphology. This data was coupled with snorkeling and SCUBA diving to ground truth the offshore lagoon and reef environments. Sediment samples were collected offshore every 5 m and were documented by underwater photos and GPS coordinates. Offshore to onshore sediment transects reveal that sediment was eroded from seaward facing shorelines, deposited a thin veneer of sediment on islands, and transported the majority of the sediment on coral reefs on the lagoon side of islands, essentially burying coral and lagoonal sediment. Coral reef damaged by the earthquake and tsunami represents a major concern for an already threatened ecosystem. Recovery of the fishing and dive tourism economies rely on the healthy reestablishment of the reef.

  13. The Solomon Islands Tsunami of 6 February 2013 in the Santa Cruz Islands: Field Survey and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Papantoniou, Antonios; Biukoto, Litea; Albert, Gilly; Wei, Yong

    2014-05-01

    On February 6, 2013 at 01:12:27 UTC (local time: UTC+11), a magnitude Mw 8.0 earthquake occurred 70 km to the west of Ndendo Island (Santa Cruz Island) in the Solomon Islands. The under-thrusting earthquake near a 90° bend, where the Australian plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate generated a locally focused tsunami in the Coral Sea and the South Pacific Ocean. The tsunami claimed the lives of 10 people and injured 15, destroyed 588 houses and partially damaged 478 houses, affecting 4,509 people in 1,066 households corresponding to an estimated 37% of the population of Santa Cruz Island. A multi-disciplinary international tsunami survey team (ITST) was deployed within days of the event to document flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment and coral boulder depositions, land level changes, damage patterns at various scales, performance of the man-made infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The 19 to 23 February 2013 ITST covered 30 locations on 4 Islands: Ndendo (Santa Cruz), Tomotu Noi (Lord Howe), Nea Tomotu (Trevanion, Malo) and Tinakula. The reconnaissance completely circling Ndendo and Tinakula logged 240 km by small boat and additionally covered 20 km of Ndendo's hard hit western coastline by vehicle. The collected survey data includes more than 80 tsunami runup and flow depth measurements. The tsunami impact peaked at Manoputi on Ndendo's densely populated west coast with maximum tsunami height exceeding 11 m and local flow depths above ground exceeding 7 m. A fast tide-like positive amplitude of 1 m was recorded at Lata wharf inside Graciosa Bay on Ndendo Island and misleadingly reported in the media as representative tsunami height. The stark contrast between the field observations on exposed coastlines and the Lata tide gauge recording highlights the importance of rapid tsunami reconnaissance surveys. Inundation distance and damage more than 500 m inland were recorded at Lata airport on Ndendo Island. Landslides were observed on volcanic Tinakula Island and on Ndendo Island. Observations from the 2013 Santa Cruz tsunami are compared against the 2007 and 2010 Solomon Islands tsunamis. The field observations in the Santa Cruz Islands present an important dataset to assess tsunami impact in the near-source region. The tsunami was also recorded at deep-ocean tsunameters and tide gauges throughout the Pacific. These observations allow us to further investigate the physics of tsunami generation caused by the seismic process (or other non-seismic mechanisms). We use numerical model MOST to analyze the large runup and complex impact distribution caused by the Santa Cruz tsunami. Source models obtained using seismic data / tsunami data are carried out to initialize the tsunami model. MOST uses two sets of numerical grids to investigate both the near- and far-field aspects of the tsunami. The basin-scale modeling results are computed using a spatial resolution of 4 arc min (approx. 7,200 m) and compared with measurements at deep-ocean tsunameters. The near-field modeling is carried out using a series of telescoped grids up to a grid resolution of tens of meters to compare with the tsunami runup and flooding extent obtained through the field survey in the Solomon Islands. The modeling results emphasize the contrast between the tsunami impact on the exposed coastline and the sheltered Lata Bay stressing the problematic interpretation of a tsunami in progress based solely on near-source tide-gauge measurements. The team also interviewed eyewitnesses and educated residents about the tsunami hazard in numerous ad hoc presentations and discussions. The combination of ancestral knowledge and recent Solomon Islands wide geohazards education programs triggered an immediate spontaneous self-evacuation containing the death toll in the small evacuation window of few minutes between the end of the ground shaking and the onslaught of the tsunami. Fortunately school children were shown a video on the 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami 3 months prior to the Santa Cruz event and the headmaster of the

  14. A review of health leadership and management capacity in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Asante, Augustine; Roberts, Graham; Hall, John

    2012-04-01

    ACCESS AND UTILISATION OF HEALTH CARE: The armed conflict that engulfed the Solomon Islands between 1998 and 2003 significantly disrupted the provision of health care especially in rural and remote areas. There is one doctor for 3,300 people and approximately 13 nurses and midwives for 10,000 people. Despite limitations 87% of people seek health care when sick. FINANCING THE HEALTH SYSTEM: The SIG placed a series of reservations on ministerial goods and services budgets that effectively the budget by 33%, severely impacting provincial budgets and resulting in acquired debts. Shortfalls have been addressed by allocating Health Sector Support Program funds to the provinces to allow services to continue, a strategy that will likely recur, but by which donor support replaces government provision Provincial health accountants have received training in MYOB in 2009 but acquittal systems require higher level accounting skills for reports to be submitted on time to permit the release of subsequent funding tranches. HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH: The shortage of doctors and specialists is a key challenge. As at December 2010, there were a total of 2,728 health workers in the public sector in Solomon Islands. Staff costs consume on average 55% of provincial health grants Filled Public Service Division staff establishments and budgetary reservations have reduced the ability to meet the salary and wage costs of new graduates. Solomon Islands is currently negotiating to assist Vanuatu in filling its nursing staff vacancies with its surplus The return of 75 Cuban trained medical officers from 2013 presents the management challenge of accessing budget provisions for so many new positions and in funding the infrastructure needed to house, equip and maintain them in service. HEALTH MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE: Provincial health managers are operationally responsive to local needs, managerially responsible to provincial governments, while being concerned with adherence to central MHMS policy and to Ministry of Finance and Public Service Division regulations. The delineation of central and provincial health authorities' responsibilities requires guidelines in a changing system, where both population-based and targeted vertical programs are implemented at local levels. NUMBER AND DISTRIBUTION OF MANAGERS: Nine of the 10 positions of Provincial Health Director have experienced high turnover, which reportedly occurs without adequate handover to incoming appointees, most of whom are recent clinical graduates. Health services in the Honiara urban area are provided through the Honiara City Council. Church health services are staffed by government employees. COMPETENCE OF DISTRICT HEALTH MANAGERS: Management skills are reportedly weak at the provincial level. The Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands provides governance training inputs to provincial government staff. Provincial health departments have limited financial and human resource management capacity. They also have clinical backgrounds and no training in public health planning or health services management, other than that provided by donors, the Regional Assistance Mission itself and the MHMS. MANAGEMENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT: Provincial health directors have limited control over health staff. Little supportive supervision in management is provided to new provincial health directors. No performance management systems are in place to ensure that staff are properly assessed and supported to do their best Large numbers of non-government organisations working at the provincial level in youth and women's programs require coordination by Provincial health directors to avoid duplication or implementation of programs that will require ongoing funding, but this is not done. FUNCTIONING OF MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SYSTEMS: Management support systems for budgeting and finance, management information and procurement and supply do not function adequately to support provincial health directors to manage effectively. THE SOCIO-CULTURAL CONTEXT: Socio-cultural issues such as favouritism based on kinship, discrim

  15. Sexual development and reproductive demography of the green humphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum) in the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R. J.; Adams, S.; Choat, J. H.

    2008-03-01

    An investigation of the reproductive biology of the green humphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum) from three areas in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands revealed that B. muricatum exhibits several features that differ from the pattern of reproductive development observed in most parrotfishes. Unlike most parrotfishes, histological evidence suggests that the sexual pattern of B. muricatum is essentially gonochoristic with high incidences of anatomical but non-functional hermaphroditism. B. muricatum also differs from other parrotfishes in that all males pass through an immature female (or bisexual) phase as demonstrated by all adult testis retaining the ex-ovarian lumen and peripheral sperm sinuses in the gonad wall. However, a protogynous diandric reproductive strategy cannot be excluded given that sampling may have missed transitional individuals. Marked variation in the demography of male B. muricatum between the three locations examined is considered to reflect variation in historical fishing effort.

  16. Marine protected areas and resilience to sedimentation in the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, B. S.; Selkoe, K. A.; White, C.; Albert, S.; Aswani, S.; Lauer, M.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of marine protected areas (MPAs) to provide protection from indirect stressors, via increased resilience afforded by decreased impact from direct stressors, remains an important and unresolved question about the role MPAs can play in broader conservation and resource management goals. Over a five-year period, we evaluated coral and fish community responses inside and outside three MPAs within the Roviana Lagoon system in Solomon Islands, where sedimentation pressure from upland logging is substantial. We found little evidence that MPAs decrease impact or improve conditions and instead found some potential declines in fish abundance. We also documented modest to high levels of poaching during this period. Where compliance with management is poor, and indirect stressors play a dominant role in determining ecosystem condition, as appears to be the case in Roviana Lagoon, MPAs may provide little management benefit.

  17. Establishing an early warning alert and response network following the Solomon Islands tsunami in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bilve, Augustine; Nogareda, Francisco; Joshua, Cynthia; Ross, Lester; Betcha, Christopher; Durski, Kara; Fleischl, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem On 6 February 2013, an 8.0 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that struck the Santa Cruz Islands, Solomon Islands, killing 10 people and displacing over 4700. Approach A post-disaster assessment of the risk of epidemic disease transmission recommended the implementation of an early warning alert and response network (EWARN) to rapidly detect, assess and respond to potential outbreaks in the aftermath of the tsunami. Local setting Almost 40% of the Santa Cruz Islands’ population were displaced by the disaster, and living in cramped temporary camps with poor or absent sanitation facilities and insufficient access to clean water. There was no early warning disease surveillance system. Relevant changes By 25 February, an EWARN was operational in five health facilities that served 90% of the displaced population. Eight priority diseases or syndromes were reported weekly; unexpected health events were reported immediately. Between 25 February and 19 May, 1177 target diseases or syndrome cases were reported. Seven alerts were investigated. No sustained transmission or epidemics were identified. Reporting compliance was 85%. The EWARN was then transitioned to the routine four-syndrome early warning disease surveillance system. Lesson learnt It was necessary to conduct a detailed assessment to evaluate the risk and potential impact of serious infectious disease outbreaks, to assess whether and how enhanced early warning disease surveillance should be implemented. Local capacities and available resources should be considered in planning EWARN implementation. An EWARN can be an opportunity to establish or strengthen early warning disease surveillance capabilities. PMID:25378746

  18. A preliminary seismic study of Taal Volcano, Luzon Island Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.-H.; Gung, Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Chang, T.-M.; Chang, E. T. Y.; Solidum, R.

    2013-03-01

    The very active Taal Volcano lies in the southern part of Luzon Island only 60 km from Manila, the capital of the Philippines. In March 2008 we deployed a temporary seismic network around Taal that consisted of 8 three-component short period seismometers. This network recorded during the period from March to November 2008 about 1050 local events. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified for a number of stations. The drifting rates of each problematic station were determined and the errors were corrected before further processing. Initial location of each event was derived by manually picked P-/S-phases arrival times using HYPO71 and a general velocity model based on AK135. Since the velocity structure beneath Taal is essentially unknown, we used travel times of 338 well-located events in order to derive a minimum 1D velocity model using VELEST. The resulting locations show that most events occurred at the shallow depth beneath the Taal Volcano, and two major earthquake groups were noticed, with one lying underneath the western shore of Taal lake and the other one spread around the eastern flank of the Taal Volcano. Since there is no reported volcano activities during the operation period of our seismic array, we are still not confident to interpret these findings in terms of other natures of volcano at the current stage. However, our work represents an important pioneer step towards other more advanced seismic studies in Taal Volcano.

  19. Hospital Visits Due to Domestic Violence from 1994 to 2011 in the Solomon Islands: A Descriptive Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Negin, Joel; Houasia, Patrick; Munamua, Alex B; Leon, David P; Rimon, Mia; Martiniuk, Alexandra LC

    2014-01-01

    The Solomon Islands has one of the highest rates of domestic violence in the world. This paper is a descriptive case series of all cases of domestic violence presenting to the Solomon Islands National Referral Hospital (NRH) over 18 years. Data were routinely collected from a database of all patients who were treated by NRH general surgery and orthopedic clinicians between 1994 and 2011, inclusive. The total number of cases in the injury database as a result of domestic violence was 387. The average number of cases in the database per year from 1994 to 2011 was 20. There were 6% more female patients (205 of 387; 53%) than male (182 of 387; 47%). Of the cases in which the perpetrator of the violence against a female patient was specified (111 of 205 female cases), 74% (82 of 111) were the patient's husband. Only 5% (5 of 111) of cases in females were inflicted by another female. This analysis provides the best available information on domestic violence cases requiring a visit to a tertiary hospital in a Pacific Island in the specified time period and is undoubtedly an under-estimate of the total cases of domestic violence. Preventing and treating domestic violence in the Solomon Islands and in the Pacific is an important challenge and there is a significant role for secondary and tertiary health services in screening for and preventing domestic violence. PMID:25285254

  20. Resumption of traditional drive hunting of dolphins in the Solomon Islands in 2013.

    PubMed

    Oremus, Marc; Leqata, John; Baker, C Scott

    2015-05-01

    The 'drive hunting' of dolphins has a long history in the Solomon Islands, specifically at the island of Malaita. In 2010, the most active village, Fanalei, suspended hunting in exchange for financial compensation from an international non-governmental organization but resumed hunting again in early 2013. Here, we report on a visit to Fanalei in March 2013 to document the species and number of dolphins killed in the renewed hunting. Detailed records for the 2013 hunting, up to the time of our visit, included at least 1500 pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata), 159 spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) and 15 'bottlenose' dolphins, probably Tursiops truncatus. Molecular identification confirmed two of the species, pantropical spotted and spinner dolphins. A summary of all available records from 1976 to 2013 documented a minimum total of 15?454 dolphins killed by the Fanalei villagers alone. We also found the local price of a dolphin tooth had increased from about US$0.14 (SBD$1) in 2004 to about US$0.70 (SBD$5) in 2013. The large number of dolphins killed and the apparent incentive for future hunting offered by the increasing commercial value of teeth, highlight an urgent need to monitor hunts and assess the abundance and trends in local populations. PMID:26064656

  1. Keeping Food on the Table: Human Responses and Changing Coastal Fisheries in Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Globally the majority of commercial fisheries have experienced dramatic declines in stock and catch. Likewise, projections for many subsistence fisheries in the tropics indicate a dramatic decline is looming in the coming decades. In the Pacific Islands coastal fisheries provide basic subsistence needs for millions of people. A decline in fish catch would therefore have profound impacts on the health and livelihoods of these coastal communities. Given the decrease in local catch rates reported for many coastal communities in the Pacific, it is important to understand if fishers have responded to ecological change (either by expanding their fishing range and/or increasing their fishing effort), and if so, to evaluate the costs or benefits of these responses. We compare data from fish catches in 1995 and 2011 from a rural coastal community in Solomon Islands to examine the potentially changing coastal reef fishery at these time points. In particular we found changes in preferred fishing locations, fishing methodology and catch composition between these data sets. The results indicate that despite changes in catch rates (catch per unit effort) between data collected in 2011 and 16 years previously, the study community was able to increase gross catches through visiting fishing sites further away, diversifying fishing methods and targeting pelagic species through trolling. Such insight into local-scale responses to changing resources and/or fisheries development will help scientists and policy makers throughout the Pacific region in managing the region’s fisheries in the future. PMID:26158694

  2. Resumption of traditional drive hunting of dolphins in the Solomon Islands in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Oremus, Marc; Leqata, John; Baker, C. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The ‘drive hunting’ of dolphins has a long history in the Solomon Islands, specifically at the island of Malaita. In 2010, the most active village, Fanalei, suspended hunting in exchange for financial compensation from an international non-governmental organization but resumed hunting again in early 2013. Here, we report on a visit to Fanalei in March 2013 to document the species and number of dolphins killed in the renewed hunting. Detailed records for the 2013 hunting, up to the time of our visit, included at least 1500 pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata), 159 spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) and 15 ‘bottlenose’ dolphins, probably Tursiops truncatus. Molecular identification confirmed two of the species, pantropical spotted and spinner dolphins. A summary of all available records from 1976 to 2013 documented a minimum total of 15?454 dolphins killed by the Fanalei villagers alone. We also found the local price of a dolphin tooth had increased from about US$0.14 (SBD$1) in 2004 to about US$0.70 (SBD$5) in 2013. The large number of dolphins killed and the apparent incentive for future hunting offered by the increasing commercial value of teeth, highlight an urgent need to monitor hunts and assess the abundance and trends in local populations. PMID:26064656

  3. Education and Libraries in the Solomon Islands: A Bibliography of English-Language Books, Documents, Papers, Theses and Dissertations and Journal Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Robert

    The Solomon Islands are a scattered Melanesian archipelago in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. There are 21 large islands and numerous smaller ones with a total population of 285,766 in 1986. About two-thirds of school-age children attend organized schools. The literacy rate of the islands was reported at 17 percent in 1980. Approximately 30…

  4. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  5. Solomon Islands Largest Hawksbill Turtle Rookery Shows Signs of Recovery after 150 Years of Excessive Exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Richard J.; Bird, Tomas; Gereniu, Collin; Pita, John; Ramohia, Peter C.; Walter, Richard; Goerlich, Clara; Limpus, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The largest rookery for hawksbill turtles in the oceanic South Pacific is the Arnavon Islands, which are located in the Manning Strait between Isabel and Choiseul Province, Solomon Islands. The history of this rookery is one of overexploitation, conflict and violence. Throughout the 1800s Roviana headhunters from New Georgia repeatedly raided the Manning Strait to collect hawksbill shell which they traded with European whalers. By the 1970s the Arnavons hawksbill population was in severe decline and the national government intervened, declaring the Arnavons a sanctuary in 1976. But this government led initiative was short lived, with traditional owners burning down the government infrastructure and resuming intensive harvesting in 1982. In 1991 routine beach monitoring and turtle tagging commenced at the Arnavons along with extensive community consultations regarding the islands’ future, and in 1995 the Arnavon Community Marine Conservation Area (ACMCA) was established. Around the same time national legislation banning the sale of all turtle products was passed. This paper represents the first analysis of data from 4536 beach surveys and 845 individual turtle tagging histories obtained from the Arnavons between 1991-2012. Our results and the results of others, reveal that many of the hawksbill turtles that nest at the ACMCA forage in distant Australian waters, and that nesting on the Arnavons occurs throughout the year with peak nesting activity coinciding with the austral winter. Our results also provide the first known evidence of recovery for a western pacific hawksbill rookery, with the number of nests laid at the ACMCA and the remigration rates of turtles doubling since the establishment of the ACMCA in 1995. The Arnavons case study provides an example of how changes in policy, inclusive community-based management and long term commitment can turn the tide for one of the most charismatic and endangered species on our planet. PMID:25853880

  6. Solomon Islands largest hawksbill turtle rookery shows signs of recovery after 150 years of excessive exploitation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Richard J; Bird, Tomas; Gereniu, Collin; Pita, John; Ramohia, Peter C; Walter, Richard; Goerlich, Clara; Limpus, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The largest rookery for hawksbill turtles in the oceanic South Pacific is the Arnavon Islands, which are located in the Manning Strait between Isabel and Choiseul Province, Solomon Islands. The history of this rookery is one of overexploitation, conflict and violence. Throughout the 1800s Roviana headhunters from New Georgia repeatedly raided the Manning Strait to collect hawksbill shell which they traded with European whalers. By the 1970s the Arnavons hawksbill population was in severe decline and the national government intervened, declaring the Arnavons a sanctuary in 1976. But this government led initiative was short lived, with traditional owners burning down the government infrastructure and resuming intensive harvesting in 1982. In 1991 routine beach monitoring and turtle tagging commenced at the Arnavons along with extensive community consultations regarding the islands' future, and in 1995 the Arnavon Community Marine Conservation Area (ACMCA) was established. Around the same time national legislation banning the sale of all turtle products was passed. This paper represents the first analysis of data from 4536 beach surveys and 845 individual turtle tagging histories obtained from the Arnavons between 1991-2012. Our results and the results of others, reveal that many of the hawksbill turtles that nest at the ACMCA forage in distant Australian waters, and that nesting on the Arnavons occurs throughout the year with peak nesting activity coinciding with the austral winter. Our results also provide the first known evidence of recovery for a western pacific hawksbill rookery, with the number of nests laid at the ACMCA and the remigration rates of turtles doubling since the establishment of the ACMCA in 1995. The Arnavons case study provides an example of how changes in policy, inclusive community-based management and long term commitment can turn the tide for one of the most charismatic and endangered species on our planet. PMID:25853880

  7. Observing the Historic Eruption of Northern Mariana Islands Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Douglas A.; Shore, Patrick J.; Sauter, Allan; Hilton, David R.; Fischer, Tobias; Camacho, Juan T.

    2004-01-01

    Anatahan volcano erupted for the first time in recorded history at about 7:30 GMT on 10 May 2003, covering the island of Anatahan, in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), with ash, and providing scientists with important opportunities to study this volcano. The eruption was first reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Volcanic Ash Advisory Center at 12:32 GMT, based on satellite images of the ash cloud. At about the same time, unusual light flares were observed from an approaching small ship, the Super Emerald, which was carrying a group of seismologists from Washington University in St. Louis, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and the CNMI Emergency Management Office. As morning broke, the ship was approximately 10 km from the island, and those on board witnessed billowing ash and gas rise from the volcano's caldera to form a great cloud exceeding 6 km in altitude (Figure 1). The scientists were in the region installing land seismographs for the Mariana Subduction Factory Imaging Experiment, a joint U.S.-Japanese deployment of 20 land broadband seismographs and 58 ocean bottom seismographs funded (on the U.S. side) by the Margins program of the National Science Foundation. The experiment has the goal of imaging the magma production regions and mantle flow patterns within the upper mantle beneath the Mariana arc and backarc (see http://epsc.wustl.edu/seismology/MARIANA).

  8. The Contribution of Nearshore Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) to Food Security and Livelihoods in Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Joelle A.; Beare, Doug; Schwarz, Anne-Maree; Albert, Simon; Warren, Regon; Teri, James; Siota, Faye; Andrew, Neil L.

    2014-01-01

    Fish aggregating devices, or FADs, are used widely in developing countries to concentrate pelagic fish, making them easier to catch. Nearshore FADs anchored close to the coast allow access for rural communities, but despite their popularity among policy makers, there is a dearth of empirical analysis of their contributions to the supply of fish and to fisheries management. In this paper we demonstrate that nearshore FADs increased the supply of fish to four communities in Solomon Islands. Estimated total annual fish catch ranged from 4300 to 12 000 kg across the study villages, with nearshore FADs contributing up to 45% of the catch. While it is clear that FADs increased the supply of fish, FAD catch rates were not consistently higher than other fishing grounds. Villages with limited access to diverse or productive fishing grounds seemingly utilized FADs to better effect. Villagers believed FADs increased household income and nutrition, as well as providing a source of fish for community events. FADs were also perceived to increase intra-household conflict and reduce fishers' participation in community activities. FADs need to be placed within a broader rural development context and treated as another component in the diversified livelihoods of rural people; as with other livelihood options they bring trade-offs and risks. PMID:25513808

  9. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Martín, R.; Cortés, G.; Alguacil, G.; Moreno, J.; Martín, B.; Martos, A.; Serrano, I.; Stich, D.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Deception Island (South Shetland Island, Antarctica) is an active volcano with recent eruptions (e.g. 1967, 1969 and 1970). It is also among the Antarctic sites most visited by tourists. Besides, there are currently two scientific bases operating during the austral summers, usually from late November to early March. For these reasons it is necessary to deploy a volcano monitoring system as complete as possible, designed specifically to endure the extreme conditions of the volcanic environment and the Antarctic climate. The Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR) performs seismic monitoring on Deception Island since 1994 during austral summer surveys. The seismicity basically includes volcano-tectonic earthquakes, long-period events and volcanic tremor, among other signals. The level of seismicity is moderate, except for a seismo-volcanic crisis in 1999. The seismic monitoring system has evolved during these years, following the trends of the technological developments and software improvements. Recent advances have been mainly focused on: (1) the improvement of the seismic network introducing broadband stations and 24-bit data acquisition systems; (2) the development of a short-period seismic array, with a 12-channel, 24-bit data acquisition system; (3) the implementation of wireless data transmission from the network stations and also from the seismic array to a recording center, allowing for real-time monitoring; (4) the efficiency of the power supply systems and the monitoring of the battery levels and power consumption; (5) the optimization of data analysis procedures, including database management, automated event recognition tools for the identification and classification of seismo-volcanic signals, and apparent slowness vector estimates using seismic array data; (6) the deployment of permanent seismic stations and the transmission of data during the winter using a satellite connection. A single permanent station is operating at Deception Island since 2008. In the current survey we collaborate with the Spanish Army to add another permanent station that will be able to send to the IAG-UGR seismic information about the activity of the volcano during the winter, using a communications satellite (SPAINSAT). These advances simplify the field work and the data acquisition procedures, and allow us to obtain high-quality seismic data in real-time. These improvements have a very important significance for a better and faster interpretation of the seismo-volcanic activity and assessment of the volcanic hazards at Deception Island volcano.

  10. American Dissertations on Foreign Education: A Bibliography with Abstracts. Volume XVII. Pacific: American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Micronesia), Tubuai (French Polynesia), Western Samoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin, Ed.; Parker, Betty June, Ed.

    The editors attempt to examine and abstract all locatable doctoral dissertations completed in the United States, Canada, and some European countries that pertain to the Pacific area. Specifically, these dissertations deal with American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific…

  11. Evolution of a Quaternary peralkaline volcano: Mayor Island, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, B.F.; Weaver, S.D.; Wilson, C.J.N.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mayor Island is a Holocene pantelleritic volcano showing a wide range of dispersive power and eruptive intensity despite a very limited range in magma composition of only 2% SiO2. The primary controls on this range appear to have been the magmatic gas content on eruption and a varying involvement of basaltic magma, rather than major-element chemistry of the rhyolites. The ca. 130 ka subaerial history of the volcano contains portions of three geochemical cycles with abrupt changes in trace-element chemistry following episodes of caldera collapse. The uniform major-element chemistry of the magma may relate to a fine balance between rates of eruption and supply and the higher density of the more evolved (Ferich) magmas which could be tapped only after caldera-forming events had removed significant volumes of less evolved but lighter magma. ?? 1992.

  12. Perspective View of Okmok Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This perspective view shows the caldera of the Okmok volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    The shaded relief was generated from and draped over an Airsar-derived digital elevation mosaic.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Perspective View of Okmok Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This perspective view shows the caldera of the Okmok volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    The shaded relief was generated from and draped over an Airsar-derived digital elevation mosaic.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Strengthening capacity for local evidence to inform local responses to HIV in a remote Solomon Islands health service

    PubMed Central

    Redman-MacLaren, Michelle; Timothy-Harrington, Relmah; Asugeni, Rowena; Muse, Elmah; Jimuru, Emmy; Moutoa, Kenny; Speare, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Background Documenting specific knowledge and attitudes about HIV in the culturally diverse nation of Solomon Islands is essential to inform locally targeted public health responses. As part of a large capacity-strengthening project at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in East Kwaio, Solomon Islands, researchers, using a ‘learn-by-doing’ process, worked with participants in public health research methods. Methods Overall, 43 people attended research capacity building workshops in 2011; eight joined the HIV study group. A cross-sectional survey including semi-structured interviews on HIV was conducted by the group. In February 2014, a hospital administrator was interviewed about how the 2011 study informed local HIV responses. Results Of the 53 survey participants, 64% self-assessed as having little or no HIV knowledge, but 90% knew HIV could be transmitted between men and women during sex. Less than 50% knew HIV could be transmitted between two men having sex, 45% thought HIV could be transmitted by mosquitoes and 55% agreed condoms help protect from HIV. Most participants reported negative attitudes towards people with HIV. Three years later the health administrator reported ad hoc responses to HIV because of low HIV prevalence, increasing noncommunicable diseases, staff turnover and resource shortages. Discussion This HIV study was used to strengthen research skills in local health professionals and community members in Solomon Islands. It showed that community members require accurate information about HIV transmission and that entrenched stigma is an issue. Although results provided local evidence for local response, ongoing health system challenges and little local HIV transmission meant HIV services remain rudimentary. PMID:26306218

  15. Landesque capital as an alternative to food storage in Melanesia: irrigated taro terraces in New Georgia, Solomon Islands

    E-print Network

    Bayliss-Smith, Tim; Hviding, Edvard

    2015-01-01

    , breadfruit, vegetables, pigs, fish and shellfish. Most of these foodstuffs need to be consumed within hours or days of being produced and, with few exceptions, they cannot be stored. The climate is hot and humid and lacks significant seasonal variation, so... . In Solomon Islands, for example, taro, bananas and breadfruit all have limited potential for storage as does pork and most seafoods, and only yams can be stored post-harvest for some months. To a large extent the problems posed by the perishability of food...

  16. Hydrochemical fluxes from Baransky volcano, Iturup, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, George; Zharkov, Rafael; Bragin, Ivan; Kharitonova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Sernaya River and its tributary the Kipyashaya River are the only rivers that drain all thermal waters coming down the Baransky volcano (Iturup, the Kuril Islands). Hydrological parameters and a chemical composition relating to these rivers and all inflow streams coming from the volcano were measured from August to October 2013. The main aims of this investigation were to develop a data baseline for the catchment of the Sernaya River in order to monitor the Baransky volcano, to estimate total discharge of solute elements and finally to identify thermal groundwater inflow. Since the Kipyashaya River and the Sernaya River receive all water streams coming along the south-west and south flanks of the Baransky volcano within approximately 10 kilometers we can suggest that the whole thermal discharge runs into the Kipyashaya River. Thus a frequent sampling of the rivers presents the best way to monitor the volcano as they comprise a mix of all thermal waters from the Baransky volcano. The Sernaia River, at the end of its course along the flanks of the Baransky volcano, has a total flux of 12 m³/s ± 1%. Multiplication of the discharge by the concentration in main ions of the river at this point yields an aggregate flux of ~130 tons/day ± 10%. This flux performs the dissolution flux as a result of rocks dissolution beneath the active crater and in the aquifer of the Kipyashaya River. Cl total discharge was estimated at ~33 tons/day ± 10%, SO4 ~67 tons/day ± 10%, and total cation discharge ~28 tons/day ± 10%. The Kipyashaya River brings in to the Sernaya River 15 tons/day ± 10% of Cl, ~30 tons/day ± 10% of SO4, and ~3,5 tons/day ± 10% cations average. Several thermal springs with low water discharge are located on the right waterside of the Sernaya River 100 m up and down from the Kipyashaya River influx. These thermal springs with Cl discharge ~ 5g/s have significant concentrations of Ca due to water-rock interaction with basement rocks. The way of sampling streams at the end of their course, just before confluence with the Sernaia River, provides more representative chemical composition of the Baransky volcano waters than a punctual sampling of springs and indicates the existing thermal groundwater inflow. It is argued that a renewal in the activity of the Baransky volcano is a result of the changes in chemical ratios and Cl discharge. Studying the network of the Sernaya River presents one of the best ways of detection such pre-eruptive periods. The work was supported by RFBR grants 13-05-00544A, 14-05-00243, 14-05-00171 and FEB RAS grant 12-III-A-08-161.

  17. Malaria control in central Malaita, Solomon Islands. 1. The use of insecticide-impregnated bed nets.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, K; Dulhunty, J M; Kourleoutov, C; Manuopangai, V T; Polyn, M K; Parks, W J; Williams, G M; Bryan, J H

    2000-03-25

    The present study investigated the use of insecticide-impregnated bed nets by communities in central Malaita, Solomon Islands. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected by: (1) questionnaire administration to 124 care-givers of children aged 0-10 years of age; (2) 20 focus group discussions; (3) two structured observations of bed net re-impregnation, and (4) interviews with key informants. Ninety-four percent of all care-givers had bed nets, but only 62% had sufficient bed nets for all household members. Fifty-two percent used bed nets throughout the year and 70% of care-givers reported that all their children slept under bed nets. Although coastal householders considered malaria and mosquitoes more of a problem than inland householders, overall bed net compliance did not differ. Factors affecting bed net ownership were cost and community expectation of free bed nets. Bed net use was affected by four factors: (1) seasonality (99% used bed nets during the rainy season, 52% used them all year); (2) mosquito nuisance (59% of respondents reported that protection against mosquitoes was the main reason for using a bed net); (3) weather (68% of care-givers would not use a bed net if the weather was hot), and (4) low density of mosquitoes (respondents who used bed nets as protection against mosquito nuisance were more likely not to use bed nets when mosquitoes were few than those who used bed nets for malaria protection (odds ratio (OR), 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-12.0). Protection against malaria was the main reason children slept under bed nets. Children from households where bed nets were used for malaria protection were more likely to sleep under bed nets than children from households where nets were used as protection from mosquitoes only (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.9). Other factors that affected children's bed net use were, age (users were significantly younger than non-users; chi(2)=7.9, degrees of freedom=1, P=0.005) and sufficiency of bed nets (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1. 3-7.0). PMID:10708657

  18. Tropical timber import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Papua New Guinea & the Solomon Islands

    E-print Network

    Tropical timber import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Papua New Guinea & the Solomon/14/2008 12:55:54 PM] #12;Tropical timber import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Volume ('000 m3 import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Papua New Guinea Reports (commissioned

  19. Remote sensing for active volcano monitoring in Barren Island, India

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Reddy, C.S.S.; Srivastav, S.K. )

    1993-08-01

    The Barren Island Volcano, situated in the Andaman Sea of the Bay of Bengal, erupted recently (March, 1991) after a prolonged period of quiescence of about 188 years. This resumed activity coincides with similar outbreaks in the Philippines and Japan, which are located in an identical tectonic environment. This study addresses (1) remote sensing temporal monitoring of the volcanic activity, (2) detecting hot lava and measuring its pixel-integrated and subpixel temperatures, and (3) the importance of SWIR bands for high temperature volcanic feature detection. Seven sets of TM data acquired continuously from 3 March 1991 to 8 July 1991 have been analyzed. It is concluded that detectable pre-eruption warming took place around 25 March 1991 and volcanic activity started on 1 April 1991. It is observed that high temperature features, such as an erupting volcano, can register emitted thermal radiance in SWIR bands. Calculation of pixel-integrated and sub-pixel temperatures related to volcanic vents has been made, using the dual-band method. 6 refs.

  20. Agroforestry In-Service Training. A Training Aid for Asia & the Pacific Islands (Honiara, Solomon Islands, South Pacific, October 23-29, 1983). Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillion, Jacob; Weeks, Julius

    The Forestry/Natural Resources Sector in the Office of Training and Program Support of the Peace Corps conducted an agroforestry inservice training workshop in Honiara, Solomon Islands, in 1983. Participants included Peace Corps volunteers and their host country national counterparts from six countries of the Pacific Islands and Asia (Western…

  1. The 2014 Submarine Eruption of Ahyi Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Chadwick, W.; Merle, S. G.; Buck, N. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Coombs, M. L.; Evers, L. G.; Heaney, K. D.; Lyons, J. J.; Searcy, C. K.; Walker, S. L.; Young, C.; Embley, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    On April 23, 2014, Ahyi Volcano, a submarine cone in the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI), ended a 13-year-long period of repose with an explosive eruption lasting over 2 weeks. The remoteness of the volcano and the presence of several seamounts in the immediate area posed a challenge for constraining the source location of the eruption. Critical to honing in on the Ahyi area quickly were quantitative error estimates provided by the CTBTO on the backazimuth of hydroacoustic arrivals observed at Wake Island (IMS station H11). T-phases registered across the NMI seismic network at the rate of approximately 10 per hour until May 8 and were observed in hindsight at seismic stations on Guam and Chichijima. After May 8, sporadic T-phases were observed until May 17. Within days of the eruption onset, reports were received from NOAA research divers of hearing explosions underwater and through the hull on the ship while working on the SE coastline of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas), a distance of 20 km NW of Ahyi. In the same area, the NOAA crew reported sighting mats of orange-yellow bubbles on the water surface and extending up to 1 km from the shoreline. Despite these observations, satellite images showed nothing unusual throughout the eruption. During mid-May, a later cruise leg on the NOAA ship Hi'ialakai that was previously scheduled in the Ahyi area was able to collect some additional data in response to the eruption. Preliminary multibeam sonar bathymetry and water-column CTD casts were obtained at Ahyi. Comparison between 2003 and 2014 bathymetry revealed that the minimum depth had changed from 60 m in 2003 to 75 m in 2014, and a new crater ~95 m deep had formed at the summit. Extending SSE from the crater was a new scoured-out landslide chute extending downslope to a depth of at least 2300 m. Up to 125 m of material had been removed from the head of the landslide chute and downslope deposits were up to 40 m thick. Significant particle plumes were detected at all three CTD casts of Ahyi volcano. Plumes with optical anomalies up to 0.4 NTU were found south and west of Ahyi at 100-175 m water depth, corresponding to the depth of the new summit crater. We plan to combine the extensive T-phase, hydroacoustic, CTD, and bathymetry data from Ahyi to characterize submarine volcanic processes and quantify the size and total radiated energy of the eruption.

  2. The submarine flanks of Anatahan Volcano, commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    E-print Network

    Chadwick, Bill

    The submarine flanks of Anatahan Volcano, commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands William W of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA Received 9 August 2004; accepted 3 November 2004 Abstract The submarine that 67% of the volcano's submarine flanks are covered with volcaniclastic debris and 26% is lava flows

  3. FREQUENT BASALTIC PLINIAN ERUPTIONS IN THE HISTORY OF CHIKURACHKI VOLCANO, KURILE ISLANDS, RUSSIA

    E-print Network

    Belousov, Alexander

    FREQUENT BASALTIC PLINIAN ERUPTIONS IN THE HISTORY OF CHIKURACHKI VOLCANO, KURILE ISLANDS, RUSSIA, Petropavlovsk- Kamchatsky, Russia; belousov@mail.ru. (2) - GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany. Chikurachki is a young, active

  4. Magnetic structure of Loihi Seamount, an active hotspot volcano in the Hawaiian Island chain 

    E-print Network

    Lamarche, Amy J.

    2004-09-30

    MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF LOIHI SEAMOUNT, AN ACTIVE HOTSPOT VOLCANO IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLAND CHAIN A Thesis by AMY J. LAMARCHE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... VOLCANO IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLAND CHAIN A Thesis by AMY J. LAMARCHE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...

  5. Assessing the effects of changing demographic and consumption patterns on sea tenure regimes in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Shankar

    2002-06-01

    This paper investigates how sea tenure institutions in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands, mediate among population, consumption, and the environment. The focus is on explaining how growth in population and consumption alter sea tenure regimes, and the factors that shape either their institutional robustness or vulnerability. The paper also addresses the regional differences among sea tenure institutional arrangements, the processes that are producing them, and the social and environmental outcomes of these institutions as they engage external forces and internal changes. A major question is how existing forms of sea tenure respond comparatively when faced with parallel demographic and economic transformations? Two villages representing different sea tenure arrangements within the Roviana Lagoon are compared. Results show that inhabitants in these villages perceive their systems of sea tenure governance similarly; yet their managerial responses to changes brought about by growth in population and consumption differ, and the responses produce contrasting environmental effects. PMID:12174597

  6. August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska-resetting an Island Landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.E.; Nye, C.J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Neal, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kasatochi Island, the subaerial portion of a small volcano in the western Aleutian volcanic arc, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. Pyroclastic flows and surges swept the island repeatedly and buried most of it and the near-shore zone in decimeters to tens of meters of deposits. Several key seabird rookeries in taluses were rendered useless. The eruption lasted for about 24 hours and included two initial explosive pulses and pauses over a 6-hr period that produced ash-poor eruption clouds, a 10-hr period of continuous ash-rich emissions initiated by an explosive pulse and punctuated by two others, and a final 8-hr period of waning ash emissions. The deposits of the eruption include a basal muddy tephra that probably reflects initial eruptions through the shallow crater lake, a sequence of pumiceous and lithic-rich pyroclastic deposits produced by flow, surge, and fall processes during a period of energetic explosive eruption, and a fine-grained upper mantle of pyroclastic-fall and -surge deposits that probably reflects the waning eruptive stage as lake and ground water again gained access to the erupting magma. An eruption with similar impact on the island's environment had not occurred for at least several centuries. Since the 2008 eruption, the volcano has remained quiet other than emission of volcanic gases. Erosion and deposition are rapidly altering slopes and beaches. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  7. Preliminary Geologic Map of Mount Pagan Volcano, Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Moore, Richard B.; Sako, Maurice K.

    2006-01-01

    Pagan Island is the subaerial portion of two adjoining Quaternary stratovolcanoes near the middle of the active Mariana Arc, [FAT1]north of Saipan. Pagan and the other volcanic islands that constitute part of the Arc form the northern half of the East Mariana Ridge[FAT2], which extends about 2-4 km above the ocean floor. The > 6-km-deep Mariana Trench adjoins the East Mariana Ridge on the east, and the Mariana Trough, partly filled with young lava flows and volcaniclastic sediment, lies on the west of the Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge. The submarine West Mariana Ridge, Tertiary in age, bounds the western side of the Mariana Trough. The Mariana Trench and Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge) overlie an active subduction zone where the Pacific Plate, moving northwest at about 10.3 cm/year, is passing beneath the Philippine Plate, moving west-northwest at 6.8 cm/year. Beneath the Northern Mariana Islands, earthquake hypocenters at depths of 50-250 km identify the location of the west-dipping subduction zone, which farther west becomes nearly vertical and extends to 700 km depth. During the past century, more than 40 earthquakes of magnitude 6.5-8.1 have shaken the Mariana Trench. The Mariana Islands form two sub-parallel, concentric, concave-west arcs. The southern islands comprise the outer arc and extend north from Guam to Farallon de Medinilla. They consist of Eocene to Miocene volcanic rocks and uplifted Tertiary and Quaternary limestone. The nine northern islands extend from Anatahan to Farallon de Pajaros and form part of the inner arc. The active inner arc extends south from Anatahan, where volcanoes, some of which are active, form seamounts west of the older outer arc. Other volcanic seamounts of the active arc surmount the East Mariana Ridge in the vicinity of Anatahan and Sarigan and north and south of Farallon de Pajaros. Six volcanoes (Farallon de Pajaros, Asuncion, Agrigan, Mount Pagan, Guguan, and Anatahan) in the northern islands have erupted during the past century, and Ruby Seamount erupted in 1996.

  8. Volcanoes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Protection Main Content Volcanoes A volcano is a mountain that opens downward to a reservoir of molten ... below the surface of the earth. Unlike most mountains, which are pushed up from below, volcanoes are ...

  9. The May 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands: Geochemical evolution of a silicic island-arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wade, J.A.; Plank, T.; Stern, R.J.; Tollstrup, D.L.; Gill, J.B.; O'Leary, J. C.; Eiler, J.M.; Moore, R.B.; Woodhead, J.D.; Trusdell, F.; Fischer, T.P.; Hilton, David R.

    2005-01-01

    The first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano began on May 10, 2003. Samples of tephra from early in the eruption were analyzed for major and trace elements, and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, and O isotopic compositions. The compositions of these tephras are compared with those of prehistoric samples of basalt and andesite, also newly reported here. The May 2003 eruptives are medium-K andesites with 59-63 wt.% SiO2, and are otherwise homogeneous (varying less than 3% 2?? about the mean for 45 elements). Small, but systematic, chemical differences exist between dark (scoria) and light (pumice) fragments, which indicate fewer mafic and oxide phenocrysts in, and less degassing for, the pumice than scoria. The May 2003 magmas are nearly identical to other prehistoric eruptives from Anatahan. Nonetheless, Anatahan has erupted a wide range of compositions in the past, from basalt to dacite (49-66 wt.% SiO2). The large proportion of lavas with silicic compositions at Anatahan (> 59 wt.% SiO2) is unique within the active Mariana Islands, which otherwise erupt a narrow range of basalts and basaltic andesites. The silicic compositions raise the question of whether they formed via crystal fractionation or crustal assimilation. The lack of 87Sr/86Sr variation with silica content, the MORB-like ??18O, and the incompatible behavior of Zr rule out assimilation of old crust, altered crust, or zircon-saturated crustal melts, respectively. Instead, the constancy of isotopic and trace element ratios, and the systematic variations in REE patterns are consistent with evolution by crystal fractionation of similar parental magmas. Thus, Anatahan is a type example of an island-arc volcano that erupts comagmatic basalts to dacites, with no evidence for crustal assimilation. The parental magmas to Anatahan lie at the low 143Nd/144Nd, Ba/La, and Sm/La end of the spectrum of magmas erupted in the Marianas arc, consistent with 1-3 wt.% addition of subducted sediment to the mantle source, or roughly one third of the sedimentary column. The high Th/La in Anatahan magmas is consistent with shallow loss of the top 50 m of the sedimentary column during subduction. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Island-arc magmatic processes beneath South Pagan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Trusdell, F. A.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The island-arc volcanoes that make up the Northern Mariana Islands are among the most historically active stratovolcanoes along the Pacific plate, yet they have been poorly studied due to their remote location and difficult accessibility. One of the least studied areas in the Northern Mariana Islands is Pagan Island, located near the center of the Mariana ridge. Pagan Island consists of two Holocene stratovolcanoes, Mount Pagan and South Pagan. Remarkably little is known about South Pagan including its eruptive history, potential volcanic hazards, and geochemical evolution due to a small population of inhabitants, a short and intermittent recorded history, and few geological studies. There is abundant evidence that eruption of South Pagan could pose significant hazards to both residents of the Northern Mariana Islands and to aircraft flying in the western Pacific. For example, following Mount Pagan's most recent explosive eruption (VEI = 4) in 1981, destructive rain-triggered volcanic debris flows buried large tracts of land, including the site of a village that contained a school, dispensary, church, and power generating buildings. Preliminary field studies in May 2006 by the USGS showed that a full spectrum of hazardous phenomena originated from South Pagan in the past, including pyroclastic flows and surges, caldera collapses, and volcanic debris flows. Two previously unrecognized active fumaroles near the summit of South Pagan were discovered suggesting that potential volcanic hazards currently exist in this area. A majority of the new lava samples are vesicular, clinopyroxene-plagioclase basalts with minor plagioclase xenocrysts and gabbroic xenoliths. The purpose of this study is to understand the compositional history of South Pagan and how it relates to the crustal and mantle magmatic processes beneath the central Northern Mariana Islands. Pb, Sr and Nd isotope ratios, major and trace element abundances, and mineral chemistry were determined and will be presented.

  11. The Importance of Long-Term Studies of Ecosystem Reassembly after the Eruption of the Kasatochi Island Volcano

    E-print Network

    del Moral, Roger

    Island Volcano Roger del Moral* *Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle known studies of succession on volcanoes. It is the sole case where pre-eruption conditions are known of the other volcanoes combine a potential for simple, characteristic recovery with monitoring focused on most

  12. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  13. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  14. Malaria elimination in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands: establishing a surveillance-response system to prevent introduction and reintroduction of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Solomon Islands National Malaria Programme is currently focused on intensified control and progressive elimination. Recent control efforts in Isabel Province have reduced their malaria incidence to 2.6/1,000 population in 2009 [1] whereas most neighbouring provinces have much higher incidences. A malaria surveillance-response system that involves testing all travellers entering Isabel Province using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) to prevent cases being imported had been proposed by local health authorities. This study provides information on the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a new approach of surveillance and response in the context of low levels of indigenous malaria transmission in Isabel Province. Methods A total of 13 focus group discussions (FGD) and 22 key informant interviews (KII) were conducted in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. Key topics included: the travel patterns of people to, from and within Isabel Province; the acceptability, community perceptions, attitudes and suggestions towards the proposed surveillance programme; and management of suspected malaria cases. This information was triangulated with data obtained from port authorities, airlines and passenger ships travelling to and from Isabel Province in the preceding two years. Results Travel within Isabel Province and to and from other provinces is common with marked seasonality. The majority of inter-provincial travel is done on scheduled public transport; namely passenger ships and aircrafts. In Isabel Province there is a healthy community spirit as well as high concern regarding malaria and its importation and there is currently effective malaria passive case detection and management. Conducting malaria screening at ports and airports would be acceptable to the community. Conclusion A robust surveillance-response system is essential when moving towards malaria elimination. Many factors contribute positively towards the feasibility of an RDT based malaria surveillance system in Isabel Province. Due to financial and logistical restraints local health authorities have concluded that a system of community-based vigilance to identify new arrivals in villages and direct them to have malaria testing is more feasible than formal screening at ports and airports. A surveillance response system to prevent introduction of malaria into Isabel Province can be integrated into the National Malaria Control Programme provided the operational steps are carefully planned with regards to human and financial resources. PMID:21834995

  15. Supporting Pacific Island Countries to Strengthen Their Resistance to Tobacco Industry Interference in Tobacco Control: A Case Study of Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Judith; McKenzie, Jeanie; Lyman, Annabel; Allen, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is the biggest single preventable cause of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Western Pacific region. Currently, 14 Pacific Island countries have ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and, in having done so, are committed to implementing tobacco control measures aligned with the FCTC. Progressing strong and effective tobacco control legislation is essential to achieving long term gains in public health in small island countries. However, survey evidence suggests that pervasive tobacco industry interference serves to undermine tobacco control and public policy in several Pacific countries. An initiative was developed to provide dedicated, in-country technical support for developing legislation and policy to support implementation of Article 5.3 of the FCTC in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. This paper examines the factors that have assisted the two Pacific countries to make progress in implementing Article 5.3 and what this might mean for supporting progress in other Pacific settings. A document analysis was undertaken to identify the process and outcome of the intervention. Two significant outputs from the project including having identified and documented specific examples of TII and the development of draft legislation for Article 5.3 and other key resources for public servants both within and outside the health sector. Key determinants of progress included a motivated and engaged Ministry of Health, active civil society group or champion and access to media to prepare tobacco industry related material to stimulate public and policy sector debate. PMID:23924884

  16. Monitoring the evolution of Deception Island volcano from magnetic anomaly data (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Martos, Yasmina M.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Funaki, Minoru

    2014-12-01

    Deception Island is a young and active volcano located in the south-western part of Bransfield back-arc basin. During the last twenty years the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy has carried out geophysical surveys in the area. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle flight was conducted in 2011 at 800 m height on the northern half of Deception Island. Analysing and comparing magnetic grids obtained in different periods and tie point readings allow us to detect temporal changes and isolate signals of volcanic origin. Magnetic survey cruises performed in Deception Island's inner bay (1988, 1999 and 2008), and the study of its outer area's magnetic anomaly changes, point to a period of high variations concentrated between December 1989 and December 1999 that may be related to the two main recent periods of seismic activity (1992 and January 1999). From December 1999 to December 2008, there were no significant changes in seismic activity; nevertheless, our data show some magnetic alterations, which might signal the slow progress of a volcanic environment towards equilibrium. Interpreting these magnetic changes called for the construction of several forward models. Additionally, we put forth this kind of study as a suitable, economical and easy method for monitoring an active volcanic system whenever it is possible to measure the magnetic field with accurate positioning, and if the external field components are removed correctly.

  17. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  18. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  19. Colonization of an island volcano, Long Island, Papua New Guinea, and an emergent island,

    E-print Network

    , in its caldera lake. VII. Overview and discussion I. W. B. Thornton1 *, S. Cook2 , J. S. Edwards3 , R. D by volcanic eruption in c. 1645, and Motmot, an emergent island in its caldera lake, was re-created in 1968 species-poor islands. The mid-level caldera plateau, as in 1932, was covered in fairly open forest

  20. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  1. Diet and social status on Taumako, a Polynesian outlier in the Southeastern Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Kinaston, Rebecca L; Buckley, Hallie R; Gray, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    Stable isotopes (?(13)C, ?(15)N, and ?(34)S) are used to characterize the diet of the adult individuals (n = 99) interred in the Namu burial ground located on the Polynesian outlier of Taumako (?300-750 BP). Polynesian outliers are islands on the fringe of Remote Oceania that were inhabited by a back migration of populations from Polynesia during prehistory. As a result of admixture with nearby island communities, little is known about the social structure and social diversity of the prehistoric inhabitants of Taumako. The distribution of prestige grave goods within the Namu cemetery has been used as evidence to support the premise that Taumakoan social structure was stratified like Polynesian societies. Here we test the hypothesis that "wealthy" individuals and males will display isotopic ratios indicative of the consumption of "high status" foods in the Pacific islands such as pork, chicken, sea turtle, and pelagic fish. The isotope results suggest the ?(34) S values were diagenetically altered, possibly an effect of volcanism. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios indicate that the diet of all the individuals included a mixture of C3 terrestrial plant foods (likely starchy staples such as yam, taro, and breadfruit, in addition to nuts) and a variety of marine resources, including reef and pelagic fish. The stable isotope results indicate that wealthy individuals and males were eating more foods from higher trophic levels, interpreted as being high status animal foods. The socially differentiated food consumption patterns are discussed within a Pacific island context. PMID:23868172

  2. Preparedness of Pre-Service Teachers for Inclusive Education in the Solomon Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Simi, Janine; Forlin, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Recent policy changes in the Pacific Islands have seen a strong emphasis on implementing inclusive education. Preparing teachers for this change in education will be essential if they are to have the knowledge, skills and understandings so that they can become inclusive practitioners. Pre-service teacher education will play a critical role in…

  3. Post-eruptive morphological evolution of island volcanoes: Surtsey as a modern case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romagnoli, C.; Jakobsson, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Surtsey is a small volcanic island in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, off the south coast of Iceland. The eruption leading to the island's emersion lasted for 3.5 yr (1963-1967) while destructive forces have been active for over 50 yr (1963-present-day) during which Surtsey has suffered rapid subaerial and submarine erosion and undergone major morphological changes. Surtsey is a well-documented modern example of the post-eruptive degradational stage of island volcanoes, and has provided the unique opportunity to continuously observe and quantify the effects of intense geomorphic processes. In this paper we focus on coastal and marine processes re-shaping the shoreline and shallow-water portions of the Surtsey complex since its formation and on the related geomorphological record. Analogies with the post-eruptive morphological evolution of recently active island volcanoes at the emerging stage, encompassing different climatic conditions, wave regimes and geological contexts, are discussed.

  4. Population screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands, using a modified enzyme assay on filter paper dried bloodspots

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency poses a significant impediment to primaquine use for the elimination of liver stage infection with Plasmodium vivax and for gametocyte clearance, because of the risk of life-threatening haemolytic anaemia that can occur in G6PD deficient patients. Although a range of methods for screening G6PD deficiency have been described, almost all require skilled personnel, expensive laboratory equipment, freshly collected blood, and are time consuming; factors that render them unsuitable for mass-screening purposes. Methods A published WST8/1-methoxy PMS method was adapted to assay G6PD activity in a 96-well format using dried blood spots, and used it to undertake population screening within a malaria survey undertaken in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. The assay results were compared to a biochemical test and a recently marketed rapid diagnostic test. Results Comparative testing with biochemical and rapid diagnostic test indicated that results obtained by filter paper assay were accurate providing that blood spots were assayed within 5 days when stored at ambient temperature and 10 days when stored at 4 degrees. Screening of 8541 people from 41 villages in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands revealed the prevalence of G6PD deficiency as defined by enzyme activity < 30% of normal control was 20.3% and a prevalence of severe deficiency that would predispose to primaquine-induced hemolysis (WHO Class I-II) of 6.9%. Conclusions The assay enabled simple and quick semi-quantitative population screening in a malaria-endemic region. The study indicated a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Isabel Province and highlights the critical need to consider G6PD deficiency in the context of P. vivax malaria elimination strategies in Solomon Islands, particularly in light of the potential role of primaquine mass drug administration. PMID:20684792

  5. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath overthrust, dismembered ophiolite derived from adjacent marginal basin crust. ?? 1989.

  6. Numerical modeling of tsunami waves generated by the flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (La Palma, Canary Islands)

    E-print Network

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    estimated and modeled. [3] Owing to the large volumes involved, debris ava- lanches on volcanic islands have Palma, Canary Islands): Tsunami source and near field effects S. M. Abadie,1 J. C. Harris,2 S. T. Grilli of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV; La Palma, Canary Island, Spain) through numerical simulations performed in two

  7. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  8. Deep intrusions, lateral magma transport and related uplift at ocean island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Andreas; Longpré, Marc-Antoine; García-Cañada, Laura; Stix, John

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic intraplate volcanoes grow by accumulation of erupted material as well as by coeval or discrete magmatic intrusions. Dykes and other intrusive bodies within volcanic edifices are comparatively well studied, but intrusive processes deep beneath the volcanoes remain elusive. Although there is geological evidence for deep magmatic intrusions contributing to volcano growth through uplift, this has rarely been demonstrated by real-time monitoring. Here we use geophysical and petrological data from El Hierro, Canary Islands, to show that intrusions from the mantle and subhorizontal transport of magma within the oceanic crust result in rapid endogenous island growth. Seismicity and ground deformation associated with a submarine eruption in 2011-2012 reveal deep subhorizontal intrusive sheets (sills), which have caused island-scale uplift of tens of centimetres. The pre-eruptive intrusions migrated 15-20 km laterally within the lower oceanic crust, opening pathways that were subsequently used by the erupted magmas to ascend from the mantle to the surface. During six post-eruptive episodes between 2012 and 2014, further sill intrusions into the lower crust and upper mantle have caused magma to migrate up to 20 km laterally, resulting in magma accumulation exceeding that of the pre-eruptive phase. A comparison of geobarometric data for the 2011-2012 El Hierro eruption with data for other Atlantic intraplate volcanoes shows similar bimodal pressure distributions, suggesting that eruptive phases are commonly accompanied by deep intrusions of sills and lateral magma transport. These processes add significant material to the oceanic crust, cause uplift, and are thus fundamentally important for the growth and evolution of volcanic islands. We suggest that the development of such a magma accumulation zone in the lower oceanic crust begins early during volcano evolution, and is a consequence of increasing size and complexity of the mantle reservoir system, and potentially the lithospheric stresses imposed by increasing edifice load.

  9. Geochemistry and solute fluxes of volcano-hydrothermal systems of Shiashkotan, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri; Kotenko, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Shiashkotan Island belongs to the Northern Kuril island arc and consists of two joined volcanoes, Sinarka and Kuntomintar, with about 18 km of distance between the summits. Both volcanoes are active, with historic eruptions, and both emit fumarolic gases. Sinarka volcano is degassing through the extrusive dome with inaccessible strong and hot (> 400 °C) fumaroles. A large fumarolic field of the Kuntomintar volcano situated in a wide eroded caldera-like crater hosts many fumarolic vents with temperatures from boiling point to 480 °C. Both volcanoes are characterized by intense hydrothermal activity discharging acid SO4-Cl waters, which are drained to the Sea of Okhotsk by streams. At least 4 groups of near-neutral Na-Mg-Ca-Cl-SO4 springs with temperatures in the range of 50-80 °C are located at the sea level, within tide zones and discharge slightly altered diluted seawater. Volcanic gas of Kuntomintar as well as all types of hydrothermal manifestations of both volcanoes were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements and water isotopes. Volcanic gases are typical for arc volcanoes with 3He/4He corrected for air contamination up to 6.4 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10- 6, the air ratio) and ?13C (CO2) within - 10‰ to - 8 ‰ VPDB. Using a saturation indices approach it is shown that acid volcanic waters are formed at a shallow level, whereas waters of the coastal springs are partially equilibrated with rocks at ~ 180 °C. Trace element distribution and concentrations and the total REE depend on the water type, acidity and Al + Fe concentration. The REE pattern for acidic waters is unusual but similar to that found in some acidic crater lake waters. The total hydrothermal discharge of Cl and S from the island associated with volcanic activity is estimated at ca. 20 t/d and 40 t/d, respectively, based on the measurements of flow rates of the draining streams and their chemistry. The chemical erosion of the island by surface and thermal waters is estimated at 27 and 140 ton/km2/year, respectively, which is 2-3 times lower than chemical erosion of tropical volcanic islands.

  10. The 2007 eruptions and caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Runion Island) from tilt

    E-print Network

    Barruol, Guilhem

    The 2007 eruptions and caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Tilt estimated from seismic records reveals by a major distal eruption and on 5 April by a summit caldera collapse. Long-term tilt variation suggests

  11. Tree Plantation Systems Influence Nitrogen Retention and the Abundance of Nitrogen Functional Genes in the Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Frédérique; Bai, Shahla H.; Liu, Xian; Blumfield, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Tree mono-plantations are susceptible to soil nutrient impoverishment and mixed species plantations have been proposed as a way of maintaining soil fertility while enhancing biodiversity. In the Solomon Islands, mixed species plantations where teak (Tectona grandis) is inter-planted with a local tree species (Flueggea flexuosa) have been used as an alternative to teak mono-plantations and are expected to increase soil microbial diversity and modify microbial biogeochemical processes. In this study, we quantified the abundance of microbial functional genes involved in the nitrogen (N) cycle from soil samples collected in teak, flueggea, and mixed species plantations. Furthermore, we measured soil properties such as pH, total carbon (C) and total N, stable N isotope composition (?15N), and inorganic N pools. Soil pH and ?15N were higher under teak than under flueggea, which indicates that intercropping teak with flueggea may decrease bacterial activities and potential N losses. Higher C:N ratios were found under mixed species plantations than those under teak, suggesting an enhancement of N immobilization that would help preventing fast N losses. However, inorganic N pools remained unaffected by plant cover. Inter-planting teak with flueggea in mixed species plantations generally increased the relative abundance of denitrification genes and promoted the enrichment of nosZ-harboring denitrifiers. However, it reduced the abundance of bacterial amoA (ammonia monooxygenase) genes compared to teak mono-plantations. The abundance of most denitrification genes correlated with soil total N and C:N ratio, while bacterial and archeal nitrification genes correlated positively with soil NH4+ concentrations. Altogether, these results show that the abundance of bacterial N-cycling functional guilds vary under teak and under mixed species plantations, and that inter-planting teak with flueggea may potentially alleviate N losses associated with nitrification and denitrification and favor N retention. Mixed plantations could also allow an increase in soil C and N stocks without losing the source of income that teak trees represent for local communities.

  12. Stratigraphic framework of Holocene volcaniclastic deposits, Akutan Volcano, east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc, but until recently little was known about its history and eruptive character. Following a brief but sustained period of intense seismic activity in March 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory began investigating the geology of the volcano and evaluating potential volcanic hazards that could affect residents of Akutan Island. During these studies new information was obtained about the Holocene eruptive history of the volcano on the basis of stratigraphic studies of volcaniclastic deposits and radiocarbon dating of associated buried soils and peat. A black, scoria-bearing, lapilli tephra, informally named the 'Akutan tephra,' is up to 2 m thick and is found over most of the island, primarily east of the volcano summit. Six radiocarbon ages on the humic fraction of soil A-horizons beneath the tephra indicate that the Akutan tephra was erupted approximately 1611 years B.P. At several locations the Akutan tephra is within a conformable stratigraphic sequence of pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are all part of the same eruptive sequence. The thickness, widespread distribution, and conformable stratigraphic association with overlying pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits indicate that the Akutan tephra likely records a major eruption of Akutan Volcano that may have formed the present summit caldera. Noncohesive lahar and pyroclastic-flow deposits that predate the Akutan tephra occur in the major valleys that head on the volcano and are evidence for six to eight earlier Holocene eruptions. These eruptions were strombolian to subplinian events that generated limited amounts of tephra and small pyroclastic flows that extended only a few kilometers from the vent. The pyroclastic flows melted snow and ice on the volcano flanks and formed lahars that traveled several kilometers down broad, formerly glaciated valleys, reaching the coast as thin, watery, hyperconcentrated flows or water floods. Slightly cohesive lahars in Hot Springs valley and Long valley could have formed from minor flank collapses of hydrothermally altered volcanic bedrock. These lahars may be unrelated to eruptive activity.

  13. High Rates of Asymptomatic, Sub-microscopic Plasmodium vivax Infection and Disappearing Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in an Area of Low Transmission in Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Waltmann, Andreea; Darcy, Andrew W.; Harris, Ivor; Koepfli, Cristian; Lodo, John; Vahi, Ventis; Piziki, David; Shanks, G. Dennis; Barry, Alyssa E.; Whittaker, Maxine; Kazura, James W.; Mueller, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Solomon Islands is intensifying national efforts to achieve malaria elimination. A long history of indoor spraying with residual insecticides, combined recently with distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets and artemether-lumefantrine therapy, has been implemented in Solomon Islands. The impact of these interventions on local endemicity of Plasmodium spp. is unknown. Methods In 2012, a cross-sectional survey of 3501 residents of all ages was conducted in Ngella, Central Islands Province, Solomon Islands. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale and P. malariae was assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and light microscopy (LM). Presence of gametocytes was determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Results By qPCR, 468 Plasmodium spp. infections were detected (prevalence = 13.4%; 463 P. vivax, five mixed P. falciparum/P. vivax, no P. ovale or P. malariae) versus 130 by LM (prevalence = 3.7%; 126 P. vivax, three P. falciparum and one P. falciparum/P. vivax). The prevalence of P. vivax infection varied significantly among villages (range 3.0–38.5%, p<0.001) and across age groups (5.3–25.9%, p<0.001). Of 468 P. vivax infections, 72.9% were sub-microscopic, 84.5% afebrile and 60.0% were both sub-microscopic and afebrile. Local residency, low education level of the household head and living in a household with at least one other P. vivax infected individual increased the risk of P. vivax infection. Overall, 23.5% of P. vivax infections had concurrent gametocytaemia. Of all P. vivax positive samples, 29.2% were polyclonal by MS16 and msp1F3 genotyping. All five P. falciparum infections were detected in residents of the same village, carried the same msp2 allele and four were positive for P. falciparum gametocytes. Conclusion P. vivax infection remains endemic in Ngella, with the majority of cases afebrile and below the detection limit of LM. P. falciparum has nearly disappeared, but the risk of re-introductions and outbreaks due to travel to nearby islands with higher malaria endemicity remains. PMID:25996619

  14. Estimate of sulfate emitted from Sakurajima volcano to the Japanese Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Tateki; Maeda, Takahisa; Tanaka, Chie; Takeuchi, Kiyohide

    1996-12-31

    Concentration of sulfate increased in a summer night over the wide area of the Kanto plain. Since the effect of long range transport of particulate sulfurs was suggested, Lagrangian dispersion-advection analysis of particles was carried out using global scale weather analytical data. Results show that the concentration observed at the Kanto plain coupled be increased by the effect of the volcanic gas which had been emitted from an active volcano {open_quotes}Sakurajima{close_quotes}, located in the distance of about 1,00 km at south-west of the Kanto area, before 3 days. This phenomenon suggests that sulfate emitted from the active volcano Sakurajima might affect acid deposition of all over the Japanese Islands. This report shows estimated concentration of deposition of sulfate from Sakurajima to the Japan Islands using the same model applied to the Kanto area.

  15. Seismic signature of a phreatic explosion: Hydrofracturing damage at Karthala volcano, Grande Comore Island, Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savin, C.; Grasso, J.-R.; Bachelery, P.

    2005-01-01

    Karthala volcano is a basaltic shield volcano with an active hydrothermal system that forms the southern two-thirds of the Grande Comore Island, off the east coat of Africa, northwest of Madagascar. Since the start of volcano monitoring by the local volcano observatory in 1988, the July 11th, 1991 phreatic eruption was the first volcanic event seismically recorded on this volcano, and a rare example of a monitored basaltic shield. From 1991 to 1995 the VT locations, 0.5volcanoes, during the climax of the 1991 phreatic explosion, are due to the activation of the whole hydrothermal system, as roughly sized by the distribution of VT hypocenters. The seismicity rate in 1995 was still higher than the pre-eruption seismicity rate, and disagrees with the time pattern of thermo-elastic stress readjustment induced by single magma intrusions at basaltic volcanoes. We propose that it corresponds to the still ongoing relaxation of pressure heterogeneity within the hydrothermal system as suggested by the few LP events that still occurred in 1995. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  16. 3-D velocity model beneath Taal Volcano, Luzon Island Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Gung, Y.; Lin, C.

    2011-12-01

    We derive a three dimensional velocity model of seismic waves beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines, from about 2300 local earthquakes recorded by the Taal Volcano seismic network during the time period from March 2008 to March 2010. In the early data processing stage, with the cross-correlation functions of continuous record of station pairs, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified. The drifting rates of each problematic station were determined and the errors were corrected before further processing. With the corrected data, we first determined initial locations by using the program HYPO71 and the reference 1-D global model ak135. 749 well-located events with 3381 P-wave and 2896 S-wave arrivals were used to derive the 'minimum 1-D velocity model' with the program VELEST developed by Kissling to further improve the 1-D velocity model and event locations. With the robust 1-D velocity model and improved event locations, we inverted a high-resolution 3-D velocity model by using the program LOTOS-10 developed by Koulakov. We present the derived 3-D model and discuss its tectonic implications.

  17. The 7-8 August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Scott, William E.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Schneider, David J.; Izbekov, Pavel; Nye, Christopher J.

    2010-12-01

    Kasatochi volcano in the central Aleutian Islands erupted unexpectedly on 7-8 August 2008. Kasatochi has received little study by volcanologists and has had no confirmed historical eruptions. The island is an important nesting area for seabirds and a long-term biological study site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. After a notably energetic preeruptive earthquake swarm, the volcano erupted violently in a series of explosive events beginning in the early afternoon of 7 August. Each event produced ash-gas plumes that reached 14-18 km above sea level. The volcanic plume contained large amounts of SO2 and was tracked around the globe by satellite observations. The cumulative volcanic cloud interfered with air travel across the North Pacific, causing many flight cancelations that affected thousands of travelers. Visits to the volcano in 2008-2009 indicated that the eruption generated pyroclastic flows and surges that swept all flanks of the island, accumulated several tens of meters of pyroclastic debris, and increased the diameter of the island by about 800 m. Pyroclastic flow deposits contain abundant accidental lithic debris derived from the inner walls of the Kasatochi crater. Juvenile material is crystal-rich silicic andesite that ranges from slightly pumiceous to frothy pumice. Fine-grained pyroclastic surge and fall deposits with accretionary lapilli cover the lithic-rich pyroclastic flow deposits and mark a change in eruptive style from episodic explosive activity to more continuous ash emission with smaller intermittent explosions. Pyroclastic deposits completely cover the island, but wave erosion and gully development on the flanks have begun to modify the surface mantle of volcanic deposits.

  18. Whakaari (White Island volcano, New Zealand): Magma-hydrothermal laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Heap, Michael J.; Reuschle, Thierry; Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Gilg, H. Albert; Kennedy, Ben M.; Letham-Brake, Mark; Jolly, Arthur; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Whakaari, active andesitic stratovolcano of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (New Zealand), hosts an open, highly reactive hydrothermal system in the amphitheatre of an earlier sector collapse. Its recent volcanic activity is primarily characterized by sequences of steam-driven (phreatic) and phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions, although a lava dome briefly extruded in 2012. The volcano provides a natural laboratory for the study of aggressive fluids on the permeability of the hydrothermal system, on phreatomagmatic volcanism as well as on the volcano edifice structural stability. Here, we present a holistic experimental dataset on the reservoir rocks properties (mineralogy, permeability, seismic velocity) and their response to changes in stress (strength, deformation mechanisms, fragmentation) and temperature (mineralogical breakdown). We show that the advance degree of alteration in the system, nearly replaced all the original rock-forming minerals. This alteration has produced generally weak rocks, which, when subjected to a differential stress, can undergo transition from a dilatant response (brittle) to a compactant response with a mere confining pressure of about 15-20 MPa (corresponding to depth of about 1 km). Thermal stressing experiments reveal that the alteration phases breakdown at 500 °C (alunite) and 700 °C (dehydrated alum and sulphur), generating much weakened skeletal rocks, deteriorated by a mass loss of 20 wt.%, resulting in an increase in porosity and permeability of about 15 vol.% and an order of magnitude, respectively. Novel thermal stressing tests at high-heating rates (<1000 K/min) suggest that the onset of this mineralogical debilitation is pushed to higher temperatures with heating rates, carrying implication for the stability of the reservoir rocks and explosions during magma movement at variable rates in the upper edifice. Rock strength imposes an important control on the stability of volcanic edifices and of the hydrothermal reservoir rocks, especially when considering the high potential energy stored as fluids in these porous rocks. Recent unrest at Whakaari has resulted in the near sudden generation of phreatomagmatic activity. Here, we complete our experimental description of these rocks by discussing the result of rapid decompression experiments on the rocks stoked with supercritical fluids. The results constrain the violence of these steam-driven events and highlight the predisposition of thermally unstable rocks in hydrothermal system to undergo sudden phreatic eruptions.

  19. Hydrogeochemical, Stable Isotopes and Hydrology of Fogo Volcano Perched Aquifers: São Miguel Island, Azores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, P. C.; Boutt, D. F.; Martini, A. M.; Ferstad, J.; Rodrigues, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    Fogo Volcano is located at central part of São Miguel Island and corresponds to a polygenetic volcano with a caldera made by an intercalated accumulation of volcaniclastic deposits and lava flows. São Miguel Island is one of the nine volcanic islands that form the Azores Archipelago. The volcano is 950 meters high, with a caldera diameter of 3.2 Km, which holds a lake inside. The last eruption occurred in 1563-1564, as one of a group of seven traquitic eruptions occurring within the last 5000 years. The volcanic activity is related to hydrothermal activity in a geothermal field located in the volcanoes North flank. The hydrology of Fogo Volcano is characterized by a series of perched-water bodies drained by a large number of springs grouped at different altitudes on the volcano flanks. It is possible to identify three types of water (1) Fresh water, cold temperature (12 - 17 C) with low dissolved solids contents (average conductivity of 179 ?S/cm), pH range between 6.60 and 7.82, dominated by the major ions Na, K, HCO3, and Cl, and correspond mainly to sodium bicarbonate type water. (2) Mineral water, cold temperature (12.5 - 19.4 C) with low dissolved solids contents (average conductivity of 261 ?S/cm), acid pH range between 4.62 and 6.79, and correspond mainly to sodium bicarbonate type water. (3) Thermal water, with temperature of 32 C, high dissolved solids content (4.62 mS/cm), with a pH around 4.50 and belongs to sodium sulfate type water. South Fogo volcano have only fresh water springs and at high elevation, springs drained from pumice fall deposits near 700 m of altitude. Water dissolved solids contents increased slightly with springs at lower altitude due to water-rock interaction. Springs sampled around 700 m high have a conductivity average of 85 ?S/cm, at 520 m an average of 129 ?S/cm, at 430 m an average of 182 ?S/cm, at 200 m an average of 192 ?S/cm and at 12 m high sea level and average of 472 ?S/cm. This trend is observed at North Fogo volcano flank for fresh water springs. Mineral and thermal waters show an influence of magmatic input, a natural water pollution source in areas with volcanic activity. Rainwater isotopic composition showed elevation effect variation with lighter ?18O and ?D values and recharge appear to be at highest altitudes with influence of sea salt from atmospheric contamination. Evaporation is clearly associated with mineral and thermal waters. Hydrogeochemistry differentiates the low altitude springs at South volcano flank where they are separated by ultramafic intrusions supporting the existence of dike impounded aquifers as Peterson (1972) proposed with the Hawaiian conceptual model for volcanic islands.

  20. Interaction between forest biodiversity and people’s use of forest resources in Roviana, Solomon Islands: implications for biocultural conservation under socioeconomic changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Solomon Islands, forests have provided people with ecological services while being affected by human use and protection. This study used a quantitative ethnobotanical analysis to explore the society–forest interaction and its transformation in Roviana, Solomon Islands. We compared local plant and land uses between a rural village and urbanized village. Special attention was paid to how local people depend on biodiversity and how traditional human modifications of forest contribute to biodiversity conservation. Methods After defining locally recognized land-use classes, vegetation surveys were conducted in seven forest classes. For detailed observations of daily plant uses, 15 and 17 households were randomly selected in the rural and urban villages, respectively. We quantitatively documented the plant species that were used as food, medicine, building materials, and tools. Results The vegetation survey revealed that each local forest class represented a different vegetative community with relatively low similarity between communities. Although commercial logging operations and agriculture were both prohibited in the customary nature reserve, local people were allowed to cut down trees for their personal use and to take several types of non-timber forest products. Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island’s primary forest (68.4%) and the main island’s reserve (68.3%). Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village. In the rural village, customary governance and control over the use of forest resources by the local people still functioned. Conclusions Human modifications of the forest created unique vegetation communities, thus increasing biodiversity overall. Each type of forest had different species that varied in their levels of importance to the local subsistence lifestyle, and the villagers’ behaviors, such as respect for forest reserves and the semidomestication of some species, contributed to conserving diversity. Urbanization threatened this human–forest interaction. Although the status of biodiversity in human-modified landscapes is not fully understood, this study suggested that traditional human modifications can positively affect biodiversity and that conservation programs should incorporate traditional uses of landscapes to be successful. PMID:24468329

  1. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  2. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for the Tanaga Volcanic Cluster, Tanaga Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary of Volcano Hazards at Tanaga Volcanic Cluster The Tanaga volcanic cluster lies on the northwest part of Tanaga Island, about 100 kilometers west of Adak, Alaska, and 2,025 kilometers southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The cluster consists of three volcanoes-from west to east, they are Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha. All three volcanoes have erupted in the last 1,000 years, producing lava flows and tephra (ash) deposits. A much less frequent, but potentially more hazardous phenomenon, is volcanic edifice collapse into the sea, which likely happens only on a timescale of every few thousands of years, at most. Parts of the volcanic bedrock near Takawangha have been altered by hydrothermal activity and are prone to slope failure, but such events only present a local hazard. Given the volcanic cluster's remote location, the primary hazard from the Tanaga volcanoes is airborne ash that could affect aircraft. In this report, we summarize the major volcanic hazards associated with the Tanaga volcanic cluster.

  3. What drives centuries-long polygenetic scoria cone activity at Barren Island volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu

    2014-12-01

    Barren Island in the Andaman Sea is an active mafic stratovolcano, which had explosive and effusive eruptions, followed by caldera formation, in prehistoric time (poorly dated). A scoria cone within the caldera, marking volcanic resurgence, was active periodically from 1787 to 1832 (the historic eruptions). Since 1991, the same scoria cone has produced six eruptions, commonly including lava flows. Links between Barren Island's eruptions and giant earthquakes (such as the 26 December 2004 Great Sumatra megathrust earthquake) have been suggested, though there is no general correlation between them. The ? 227-year-long activity of the scoria cone, named here Shanku ("cone"), is normally driven by purely magmatic processes. I present a "source to surface" model for Barren Island and Shanku, including the source region, deeper and shallow magma chambers, volcanotectonics, dyking from magma chambers, and eruptions and eruptive style as controlled by crustal stresses, composition and volatile content. Calculations show that dykes ~ 0.5 m thick and a few hundred meters long, originating from shallow-level magma chambers (~ 5 km deep), are suitable feeders of the Shanku eruptions. Shanku, a polygenetic scoria cone (at least 13 eruptions since 1787), has three excellent analogues, namely Anak Krakatau (40 eruptions since 1927), Cerro Negro (23 eruptions since 1850), and Yasur (persistent activity for the past hundreds of years). This is an important category of volcanoes, gradational between small "monogenetic" scoria cones and larger "polygenetic" volcanoes.

  4. Dynamics of diffuse carbon dioxide emissions from Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys V.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Sumino, Hirochika; Padilla, Germán; Barrancos, José; Dionis, Samara; Notsu, Kenji; Calvo, David

    2015-04-01

    La Palma Island, the fifth longest (706 km2) and the second in elevation (2,423 m asl) of the Canary Islands, is located at the northwestern extreme of the archipelago. Volcanic activity in the last 123 ka has taken place exclusively at the southern part of the island, where Cumbre Vieja volcano, the most active basaltic volcano in the Canaries, has been constructed. Cumbre Vieja includes a main north-south rift zone 20 km long up to 1,950 m in elevation, and covers 220 km2 with vents located also at the northwest and northeast. Nowadays there are no visible gas emission from fumaroles or hot springs at Cumbre Vieja. For this reason, diffuse CO2 degassing studies may provide important information about subsurface magma movement. Since diffuse CO2 emission rate may increase extraordinarily before a volcanic eruption, it is very important to map surface CO2 efflux anomalies and determine the total output of this gas prior to volcanic activity, in order to have a better understanding during future volcanic events. This study report the results of 13 soil CO2 efflux surveys at Cumbre Vieja volcano. The CO2 efflux measurements were undertaken using the accumulation chamber method between 2001 and 2013 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for Cumbre Vieja. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 2,442 g m-2 d-1, with the highest values observed in the south, where the last volcanic eruption took place (Teneguía, 1971). Isotopic analyses of soil gas carbon dioxide suggest an organic origin as the main contribution to the CO2 efflux, with a very slight magmatic degassing being observed at the southern part of the volcano. Total CO2 emission rates showed a high temporal variability, ranging between 320 and 1,544 t d-1 and averaging 1,147 t d-1 over the 220 km2 region. Two significant increases in the CO2 emission observed in 2011 and 2013, were likely caused by an enhanced magmatic endogenous contribution revealed by significant changes in the 3He/4He ratio in a CO2-rich cold spring. The similarity observed in the estimates rates of diffuse CO2 emission make them an effective surveillance tool for Cumbre Vieja volcano like it has been observed at other volcanic areas.

  5. Eruption of soufriere volcano on st. Vincent island, 1971-1972.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, W P; Sigurdsson, H; Shepherd, J B

    1973-07-13

    The Soufrière volcano in St. Vincent erupted from October 1971 to March 1972, as 80 x 10(6) m(3) of basaltic andesite lava was quietly extruded inside the mile-wide crater. The eruption was largely subaqueous, taking place in the 180-m-deep crater lake, and resulted in the emergence of a steep-sided island. The mild character of the eruption and the absence of seismic activity stand in direct contrast to the highly explosive character of the eruption of 1902 to 1903. PMID:17746610

  6. Man against volcano: The eruption on Heimaey, Vestmann Islands, Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S., Jr.; Moore, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey carries out scientific studies in the geological, hydrological, and cartographic sciences generally within the 50 states, but also in cooperation with scientific organizations in many foreign countries for the investigation of unusual earth science phenomena throughout the world. The following material discusses the impact of the 1973 volcanic eruption of Eldfell on the fishing port of Vestmannaeyjar on the island of Heimaey, Iceland. Before the eruption was over, approximately one-third of the town of Vestmannaeyjar had been obliterated but, more importantly, the potential damage had been reduced markedly by the spraying of seawater onto the advancing lava flows, causing them to be slowed, stopped, or diverted from the undamaged portion of the town. The Survey's interest and involvement in the Heimaey eruption in Iceland was occasioned by the possibility that the procedures used to control the course of the flowing lava and to reduce the damage in a modern town may some day be needed in Hawaii and possibly even in the continental United States. This publication is based on the observations of two USGS geologists, Richard S. Williams, Jr. and James G. Moore, as well as on information from the Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Icelandic scientists' reports through the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena, and other published scientific reports. A number of Icelandic scientists studied the scientific aspects of the eruption and the engineering aspects of the control of lava flows, in particular, Professors Thorbjb'rn Sigurgeirsson and Sigurdur Thorarinsson of the University of Iceland Science Institute. Also, Icelandic governmental officials provided logistical and other support, in particular, Mr. Steingnmur Hermannsson, Director, Icelandic National Research Council and Professor Magnus Magnusson, Director, University of Iceland Science Institute.

  7. Ten years of satellite observations reveal highly variable sulphur dioxide emissions at Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Brendan; Popp, Christoph; Andrews, Benjamin; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Satellite remote sensing enables continuous multiyear observations of volcanic activity in remote settings. Anatahan (Mariana Islands) is a remote volcano in the western North Pacific. Available ground-based measurements of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions at Anatahan place it among thelargest volcanic SO2 sources worldwide. These ground-based measurements, however, are restricted to eruptive intervals. Anatahan's activity since 2003 has been dominated temporally by prolonged periods of quiescence. Using 10 years of satellite observations from OMI, AIRS, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2, we report highly variable SO2 emissions within and between eruptive and quiescent intervals at Anatahan. We find close correspondence between levels of activity reported at the volcano and levels of SO2 emissions detected from space. Eruptive SO2 emission rates have a mean value of ˜6400 t d-1, but frequently are in excess of 20,000 t d-1. Conversely, SO2 emissions during quiescent intervals are below the detection limit of space-based sensors and therefore are not likely to exceed ˜300 t d-1. We show that while Anatahan occupies a quiescent state for 85% of the past 10 years, only ˜15% of total SO2 emissions over this interval occur during quiescence, with the remaining ˜85% released in short duration but intense syn-eruptive degassing. We propose that the integration of multiyear satellite data sets and activity histories are a powerful complement to targeted ground-based campaign measurements in better describing the long-term degassing behavior of remote volcanoes.

  8. Shield volcanoes of Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctic rift: oceanic island similarities, continental signature, and tectonic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMasurier, Wesley

    2013-06-01

    The Marie Byrd Land volcanic province is largely defined by 18 large (up to ~1,800 km3) alkaline shield volcanoes, each surmounted by a summit section of varied felsic rocks dominated by trachytic flows. They are distributed over a 500 × 800-km block-faulted dome within the West Antarctic rift. The basement contact of volcanic sections is ~500 masl at one site and 3,000 mbsl at another, 70 km away, which illustrates the scale of block faulting but complicates an understanding of volcanic structure. Furthermore, the continental ice sheet buries 16 volcanoes to progressively greater heights inland. However, five are sufficiently exposed to allow meaningful comparisons with alkaline oceanic island volcanoes; these comparisons are used as a guide to estimate the structure of Marie Byrd Land volcanoes. The type example for this study is Mt. Murphy, the most completely exposed volcano. It consists of a 1,400-m section of alkaline basalt overlain by trachyte and benmoreite flows that make up ~7-13 % of the volcano volume. In gross structure and composition, Mt. Murphy is similar to Gran Canaria volcano, Canary Islands, but the percent of felsic rock may be three times that of Gran Canaria, if the estimate is approximately correct. Departures from the oceanic island example are believed to represent the imprint of the Marie Byrd Land lithosphere and tectonic environment on volcano evolution. These include a lack of order in the sequence of felsic rock types, lack of progression toward more silica undersaturated compositions with time, absence of a highly undersaturated mafic resurgent stage, and perhaps, a relatively large volume of felsic rock.

  9. Using volcanic tremor for eruption forecasting at White Island volcano (Whakaari), New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardot, Lauriane; Jolly, Arthur D.; M. Kennedy, Ben; Fournier, Nicolas; Sherburn, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Eruption forecasting is a challenging task because of the inherent complexity of volcanic systems. Despite remarkable efforts to develop complex models in order to explain volcanic processes prior to eruptions, the material Failure Forecast Method (FFM) is one of the very few techniques that can provide a forecast time for an eruption. However, the method requires testing and automation before being used as a real-time eruption forecasting tool at a volcano. We developed an automatic algorithm to issue forecasts from volcanic tremor increase episodes recorded by Real-time Seismic Amplitude Measurement (RSAM) at one station and optimised this algorithm for the period August 2011-January 2014 which comprises the recent unrest period at White Island volcano (Whakaari), New Zealand. A detailed residual analysis was paramount to select the most appropriate model explaining the RSAM time evolutions. In a hindsight simulation, four out of the five small eruptions reported during this period occurred within a failure window forecast by our optimised algorithm and the probability of an eruption on a day within a failure window was 0.21, which is 37 times higher than the probability of having an eruption on any day during the same period (0.0057). Moreover, the forecasts were issued prior to the eruptions by a few hours which is important from an emergency management point of view. Whereas the RSAM time evolutions preceding these four eruptions have a similar goodness-of-fit with the FFM, their spectral characteristics are different. The duration-amplitude distributions of the precursory tremor episodes support the hypothesis that several processes were likely occurring prior to these eruptions. We propose that slow rock failure and fluid flow processes are plausible candidates for the tremor source of these episodes. This hindsight exercise can be useful for future real-time implementation of the FFM at White Island. A similar methodology could also be tested at other volcanoes even if only a limited network is available.

  10. Mesoscale Eddies in the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. G.; Kessler, W. S.; McWilliams, J. C.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Water mass transformation in the strong equatorward flows through the Solomon Sea influences the properties of the Equatorial Undercurrent and subsequent cold tongue upwelling. High eddy activity in the interior Solomon Sea seen in altimetric sea surface height (SSH) and in several models may provide a mechanism for these transformations. We investigate these effects using a mesoscale (4-km resolution) sigma-coordinate (ROMS) model of the Solomon Sea nested in a basin solution, forced by a repeating seasonal cycle, and evaluated against observational data. The model generates a vigorous upper layer eddy field; some of these are apparently shed as the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent threads through the complex topography of the region, others are independent of the strong western boundary current. We diagnose the scales and vertical structure of the eddies in different parts of the Solomon Sea to illuminate their generation processes and propagation characteristics, and compare these to observed eddy statistics. Hypotheses tested are that the Solomon Sea mesoscale eddies are generated locally by baroclinic instability, that the eddies are shed as the South Equatorial Current passes around and through the Solomon Island chain, that eddies are generated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent, or that eddies occurring outside of the Solomon Sea propagate into the Solomon Sea. These different mechanisms have different implications for the resulting mixing and property fluxes. They also provide different interpretations for SSH signals observed from satellites (e.g., that will be observed by the upcoming SWOT satellite).

  11. Magma Genesis of Sakurajima, the Quaternary post- Aira caldera volcano, southern Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Suzuki, J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Miki, D.; Takemura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sakurajima volcano is the Quaternary post-caldera volcano of Aira caldera, which was caused by the eruption of huge amount of silicic pyroclastics, situated on Ryukyu arc, southern Kyushu Island, Japan. This volcano is quite active, so it can be considered that the preparation of next caldera-forming eruption with huge amount of silicic magma is proceeding. It is, therefore, expected that the investigation of magma genesis of Sakurajima volcano give us information for the mechanism generating huge amount of silicic magma, which cause the caldera formation. We analyzed major and trace elements with Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of volcanic rocks from Sakurajima volcano. We sampled (ol) - opx - cpx - pl andesite and dacite from almost all the volcanic units defined by Fukuyama and Ono (1981). In addition to Sakurajima samples, we also studied basaltic rocks erupted at pre-caldera stage of the Aira caldera to estimate the primary magma of Sakurajima volcano. Major and trace element variations generally show linear trends on the Harker diagrams, with the exception of P2O5 and TiO2. Based on the trend of P2O5 vs.SiO2, we divided studied samples low-P (P2O5 < 0.15 wt. %) and high-P (P2O5 > 0.15 wt. %) groups and these groups also display two distinct trends on TiO2-SiO2 diagram. The composition of trace elements shows typical island arc character as depletion of Nb and enrichments of Rb, K and Pb, suggesting addition of aqueous fluids to the mantle wedge. The Zr and Nb concentrations make a liner trend (Zr/Nb = 27) and this trend across from tend of MORB (Zr/Nb = 35) to that of crustal materials (Zr/Nb=17). The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions broadly plot to on the mixing curve connecting MORB-type mantle and sediments of the Philippine Sea Plate, indicating that the primary magma was generated by partial melting of MORB-type mantle wedge, which was hydrated with fluids derived from the subducted Philippine Sea sediments. But we found that our data plot apart from the mixing curve to the direction of being more radiogenic when we observe in more detail. This observation supports our conclusion that the crustal materials contribute the magma genesis of Sakurajima volcano emphasized from Zr/Nb ratios. Low-P and high-P groups show different trends of SiO2, P2O5, TiO2 concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to plagioclase modal abundances. The high-P group samples show continuous trends, and their 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase with decreasing plagioclase, representing simple AFC process. The SiO2 content of low-P group rapidly increases from 63 to 66 wt. % at the modal abundance of pl is nearly 20 vol. %. The Sr isotope ratios of low-P group with < 20 vol. % of pl are obviously high (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70556 to 0.70569) compared to those of high-P group (87Sr/86Sr = 0.705136 to 0.705285). From these observations, we conclude that the rapid increase of SiO2 with high 87Sr/87Sr ratio infer involvement of crustal materials to the magma chamber, in which the ACF process is proceeding.

  12. Evolution and facies architecture of Paleogene Surtseyan volcanoes on Chatham Islands, New Zealand, Southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Leonor; Cas, Ray A. F.; Stilwell, Jeffrey D.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports for the first time phreatomagmatic deposits and preserved Surtseyan tuff cones in the Chatham Islands, New Zealand. Fieldwork has located the relicts of at least six, closely-spaced, Paleogene Surtseyan-cones and associated volcaniclastic sediments within the Red Bluff Tuff Formation. The complete stratigraphic section of the cones consists of two parts: 1) the lower part represents volcanic aggradational processes that constructed tuff cones in a short period of time, and is composed of a bedded interval of explosively fragmented, vesicular glassy basaltic pyroclasts (ash and lapilli sizes) as well as feeder-dykes, pillow-lavas and pillow-sills and 2) the upper part represents the rapid denudation of these cones by shallow marine currents or gravity-flows reflecting the instability of the tephra-pile forming the cones, and a much later marine faunal colonization stage (e.g. corals, brachiopods, molluscs, etc.). Erosion could have occurred almost immediately after (or even during) the emplacement of the volcanic pile, similar to what occurred at Surtla vent, a satellite submerged cone of the basaltic island volcano Surtsey, Iceland; the Waiareka-Deborah Volcanics Bridge Point, Aorere Point, and Lookout Bluff Surtseyan-cones (Otago, New Zealand); and Marion and Prince Edward islands (Southwest Indian Ocean), amongst others. By contrast, the complete faunal colonization and stabilization of a diverse marine community could have taken hundreds, or perhaps even thousands of years to reach their acme following the volcanic pulses. The structural, textural and compositional characteristics of the Red Bluff Tuff Formation support a phreatomagmatic mode of fragmentation similar to that at Surtsey Volcano, Iceland. The Red Bluff Tuff sequence represents one of the most complete marine tuff cones described in the geologic record.

  13. The eruption of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands, 15 May 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Norman G.; Koyanagi, Robert Y.; Sinton, John M.; Honma, Kenneth T.

    1984-10-01

    A major explosive eruption occurred 15 May 1981 at Mount Pagan Volcano, the larger of two historic eruptive centers on Pagan Island, Mariana Islands. The eruption was preceded by increased numbers of locally felt earthquakes beginning in late March or early April and by new ground cracks, new sublimates, and increased gas emissions. A swarm of felt earthquakes began at 0745h (local time = UCT+10 hours) 15 May, and at 0915 h, closely following a loud sonic boom, a strong plinian column issued from the volcano. The high-altitude ash cloud (at least 13.5 km) travelled south-southeast, but ash and scoria deposits were thickest (> 2 m) in the NW sector of the island because of the prevailing low-altitude southeasterly winds. The early activity of 15 May probably involved magmatic eruption along a fissure system oriented about N10°E. However, the eruption became hydromagmatic, possibly within minutes, and was largely restricted to three long-lived vents. The northernmost of these built a substantial new scoria-ash cinder cone. Flows and air-fall deposits, consisting almost entirely of juvenile material, exceeded 105 × 10 6 m 3 in volume (75 × 10 6 m 3 of magma) on land and at least 70-100 × 60 6 m 3 at sea. An unknown volume was carried away by stratospheric winds. Lithic blocks and juvenile bombs as large as 1 m in diameter were thrown more than 2 km from the summit, and evidence for base-surge was observed in restricted corridors as low as 200 m elevation on the north and south slopes of the volcano. Neither of these events resulted in serious injuries to the 54 residents of the island, nor did the eruption produce serious chemical hazards in their water supply. Weak eruptions occurred during the ensuing month, and some of these were monitored by ground observations, seismic monitoring, and deformation studies. Precursory seismicity and possibly deformation occurred with some of the observed eruptions. More vigorous eruptions were reported by visiting residents in late 1981 and early 1982, but these were of lesser magnitude than the 15 May 1981 event. The 15 May lava is predominantly aa and ranges from 3 to > 30 m in thickness. In composition, it is a high-alumina basalt with small (< 1 mm long) phenocrysts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene (7%) that is more or less typical of basalt of the northern Marianas volcanoes. It contains slightly more SiO 2 (52%), K 2O, TiO 2, and less Al 2O 3 and CaO than does the basalt of the last eruptive event of Mount Pagan Volcano in 1925. Gas analyses indicate that a large portion of air was introduced into the vent system through the porous volcanic edifice and that the carbon gases were not in equilibrium with the magma or each other.

  14. The eruption of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands, 15 May 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, N.G.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Sinton, J.M.; Honma, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    A major explosive eruption occurred 15 May 1981 at Mount Pagan Volcano, the larger of two historic eruptive centers on Pagan Island, Mariana Islands. The eruption was preceded by increased numbers of locally felt earthquakes beginning in late March or early April and by new ground cracks, new sublimates, and increased gas emissions. A swarm of felt earthquakes began at 0745h (local time = UCT+10 hours) 15 May, and at 0915 h, closely following a loud sonic boom, a strong plinian column issued from the volcano. The high-altitude ash cloud (at least 13.5 km) travelled south-southeast, but ash and scoria deposits were thickest (> 2 m) in the NW sector of the island because of the prevailing low-altitude southeasterly winds. The early activity of 15 May probably involved magmatic eruption along a fissure system oriented about N10??E. However, the eruption became hydromagmatic, possibly within minutes, and was largely restricted to three long-lived vents. The northernmost of these built a substantial new scoria-ash cinder cone. Flows and air-fall deposits, consisting almost entirely of juvenile material, exceeded 105 ?? 106 m3 in volume (75 ?? 106 m3 of magma) on land and at least 70-100 ?? 606 m3 at sea. An unknown volume was carried away by stratospheric winds. Lithic blocks and juvenile bombs as large as 1 m in diameter were thrown more than 2 km from the summit, and evidence for base-surge was observed in restricted corridors as low as 200 m elevation on the north and south slopes of the volcano. Neither of these events resulted in serious injuries to the 54 residents of the island, nor did the eruption produce serious chemical hazards in their water supply. Weak eruptions occurred during the ensuing month, and some of these were monitored by ground observations, seismic monitoring, and deformation studies. Precursory seismicity and possibly deformation occurred with some of the observed eruptions. More vigorous eruptions were reported by visiting residents in late 1981 and early 1982, but these were of lesser magnitude than the 15 May 1981 event. The 15 May lava is predominantly aa and ranges from 3 to > 30 m in thickness. In composition, it is a high-alumina basalt with small (< 1 mm long) phenocrysts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene (7%) that is more or less typical of basalt of the northern Marianas volcanoes. It contains slightly more SiO2 (52%), K2O, TiO2, and less Al2O3 and CaO than does the basalt of the last eruptive event of Mount Pagan Volcano in 1925. Gas analyses indicate that a large portion of air was introduced into the vent system through the porous volcanic edifice and that the carbon gases were not in equilibrium with the magma or each other. ?? 1984.

  15. ASTER-SRTM Perspective of Mount Oyama Volcano, Miyake-Jima Island, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Mount Oyama is a 820-meter-high (2,700 feet) volcano on the island of Miyake-Jima, Japan. In late June 2000, a series of earthquakes alerted scientists to possible volcanic activity. On June 27, authorities evacuated 2,600 people, and on July 8 the volcano began erupting and erupted five times over that week. The dark gray blanket covering green vegetation in the image is the ash deposited by prevailing northeasterly winds between July 8 and 17. This island is about 180 kilometers (110 miles) south of Tokyo and is part of the Izu chain of volcanic islands that runs south from the main Japanese island of Honshu. Miyake-Jima is home to 3,800 people. The previous major eruptions of Mount Oyama occurred in 1983 and 1962, when lava flows destroyed hundreds of houses. An earlier eruption in 1940 killed 11 people.

    This image is a perspective view created by combining image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard NASA's Terra satellite with an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Vertical relief is exaggerated, and the image includes cosmetic adjustments to clouds and image color to enhance clarity of terrain features.

    The ASTER instrument is a cooperative project between NASA, JPL, and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: Island is approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) in diameter Location: 34.1 deg. North lat., 139.5 deg. East lon. Orientation: View toward the west-southwest. Image Data: ASTER visible and near infrared Date Acquired: February 20, 2000 (SRTM), July 17, 2000 (ASTER)

  16. Soil CO2 emissions at Furnas volcano, São Miguel Island, Azores archipelago: Volcano monitoring perspectives, geomorphologic studies, and land use planning application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, FáTima; Cardellini, Carlo; Ferreira, Teresa; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Silva, Catarina

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) diffuse degassing structures (DDS) at Furnas volcano (São Miguel Island, Azores) are mostly associated with the main fumarolic fields, evidence that CO2 soil degassing is the surface expression of rising steam from the hydrothermal system. Locations with anomalous CO2 flux are mainly controlled by tectonic structures oriented WNW-ESE and NW-SE and by the geomorphology of the volcano, as evidenced by several DDS located in depressed areas associated with crater margins. Hydrothermal soil CO2 emissions in Furnas volcano are estimated to be ˜968 t d-1. Discrimination between biogenic and hydrothermal CO2 was determined using a statistical approach and the carbon isotope composition of the CO2 efflux. Different sampling densities were used to evaluate uncertainty in the estimation of the total CO2 flux and showed that a low density of points may not be adequate to quantify soil emanations from a relatively small DDS. Thermal energy release associated with diffuse degassing at Furnas caldera is about 118 MW (from an area of ˜4.8 km2) based on the H2O/CO2 ratio in fumarolic gas. The DDS also affect Furnas and Ribeira Quente villages, which are located inside the caldera and in the south flank of the volcano, respectively. At these sites, 58% and 98% of the houses are built over hydrothermal CO2 emanations, and the populations are at risk due to potential high concentrations of CO2 accumulating inside the dwellings.

  17. Mechanical behaviour and failure modes in the Whakaari (White Island volcano) hydrothermal system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Pernin, Noémie; Jacquemard, Laura; Baud, Patrick; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Gilg, H. Albert; Letham-Brake, Mark; Mayer, Klaus; Jolly, Arthur D.; Reuschlé, Thierry; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-03-01

    Volcanic hydrothermal systems host a prodigious variety of physico-chemical conditions. The physico-chemical state and mechanical behaviour of rocks within is correspondingly complex and often characterised by vast heterogeneity. Here, we present uniaxial and triaxial compression experiments designed to investigate the breadth of mechanical behaviour and failure modes (dilatant or compactant) for hydrothermally-altered lava and ash tuff deposits from Whakaari (White Island volcano) in New Zealand, a volcano with a well-documented and very active hydrothermal system. Our deformation experiments show that the failure mode of low porosity lava remains dilatant over a range of depths (up to pressures corresponding to depths of about 2 km). Upon failure, shear fractures, the result of the coalescence of dilatational microcracks, are universally present. The high porosity ash tuffs switch however from a dilatant to a compactant failure mode (driven by progressive distributed pore collapse) at relatively low pressure (corresponding to a depth of about 250 m). We capture the salient features of the dynamic conditions (e.g., differential stress, effective pressure) in a schematic cross section for the Whakaari hydrothermal system and map, for the different lithologies, areas susceptible to either dilatant vs. compactive modes of failure. The failure mode will impact, for example, the evolution of rock physical properties (e.g., porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity) and the nature of the seismicity accompanying periods of unrest. We outline accordingly the potential implications for the interpretation of seismic signals, outgassing, ground deformation, and the volcanic structural stability for Whakaari and similar hydrothermally-active volcanoes worldwide.

  18. Effect of diel activity patterns and harvesting pressure on the diversity and biomass of sea cucumbers in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Buckius, Christine; Albert, Simon; Tibbetts, Ian; Udy, James

    2010-05-01

    A marked decline in the contribution by Marovo Lagoon to the annual total bêche-de-mer production of the Solomon Islands from 58% in 1989 to 17% in 2003 prompted investigation of their current biomass and diversity. We also assessed changes to critical ecological services and the prospects for population recovery following a fisheries closure. Day time and nocturnal transects revealed a mean abundance of 32.4 (SD = 5.3) low value species per ha (e.g. Holothuria atra, H. edulis, H. coluber and Thelenota anax) and 15.2 (SD = 2.7) high value species per ha (e.g. H. fuscogilva, Actinopyga lecanora, Stichopus hermanni and Thelenota ananas). Following a 17 month closure of the fishery (2005-2007), the abundance of bêche-de-mer was reported by local fisherman to have increased; however, no scientific studies were conducted that can substantiate this community held belief. The current study aimed to document the impact of re-opening the fishery in 2007 and documented a decline in high value species of 9% over a 5 month period following the opening of the fishery, while low value species continued to increase in abundance by 11%, over the same period based on nocturnal surveys. Continued observation of the recovery, post closure, and any subsequent harvest in Marovo will be required to properly understand population dynamics and provide a sustainable harvest plan for bêche-de-mer in the future. PMID:20349313

  19. Youth research. Naked wire and naked truths: a study of reproductive health risks faced by teenage girls in Honiara, Solomon Islands, November 1997.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    A qualitative research project conducted in 1997 in the Solomon Islands used questionnaires, focus groups discussions, and in-depth interviews to gather information on reproductive health risks faced by young, unmarried women in Honiara. In this setting, urbanization and poverty, migration, unemployment, and low levels of education increase the risk for youth of acquiring HIV/AIDS or a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Young women, who must yield to the authority of their male relatives, often have clandestine sexual relationships beginning as early as age 12 and are unable to negotiate safe sex behavior. Commercial sexual exchanges are also on the increase. Sex education is generally confined to secondary schools, although most girls drop-out after primary school. The main source of sex information is the media and friends. While there is concern about adolescent pregnancy rates, contraceptive access is restricted to young, unmarried women. The reaction of a family to an adolescent pregnancy is initial anger and ultimate acceptance. Condom use is low, largely because it is believed that it interferes with sexual pleasure. Because the young women are unable to negotiate safe sex, they are at risk of pregnancy, STDs, and HIV/AIDS. The situation can be improved by creating an enabling environment for young women through policy initiatives, improving knowledge, promoting condom use, providing reproductive health services, and improving communication channels. PMID:12294582

  20. Evidence for Late Eocene emplacement of the Malaita Terrane, Solomon Islands: Implications for an even larger Ontong Java Nui oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrave, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    Most tectonic models for the Solomon Islands Arc invoke a Miocene collision with the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) to halt cessation of Pacific Plate subduction, initiate Australian Plate subduction, and emplace the Malaita Terrane, which shares the characteristic basement age and geochemistry of OJP. Existing paleomagnetic evidence, however, required the Malaita Terrane to have been fixed to the arc from at least the Late Eocene. New sampling has yielded a paleomagnetic pole from Aptian-Albian limestones and mudstones that falls between the apparent polar wander paths for the Australian Plate and OJP, confirming the extended period of residence of the Malaita Terrane on the arc. Arc-derived turbidities within Late Eocene through Miocene limestones on Malaita and Santa Isabel, and related clasts in broadly contemporary sandstones and conglomerates on Santa Isabel, also attest to early emplacement. Modeling the emplacement at 35 Ma satisfies both the paleomagnetic data and the sediment provenance. Continuing the reconstruction to 125 Ma leaves the Malaita Terrane far from OJP at the time of plateau formation. OJP is now understood to have formed as part of a larger Ontong Java Nui, also comprising the Hikurangi and Manihiki plateaus, separated by spreading during the Cretaceous. Restoring the separation of the known elements, and invoking an additional triple junction, unites the (now largely subducted) Malaita Terrane with the rest of Ontong Java Nui. Subduction of substantial areas of the Ontong Java Nui plateau, with little geological signal other than a reduction in arc volcanism, is a corollary.

  1. Effect of Diel Activity Patterns and Harvesting Pressure on the Diversity and Biomass of Sea Cucumbers in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckius, Christine; Albert, Simon; Tibbetts, Ian; Udy, James

    2010-05-01

    A marked decline in the contribution by Marovo Lagoon to the annual total bêche-de-mer production of the Solomon Islands from 58% in 1989 to 17% in 2003 prompted investigation of their current biomass and diversity. We also assessed changes to critical ecological services and the prospects for population recovery following a fisheries closure. Day time and nocturnal transects revealed a mean abundance of 32.4 (SD = 5.3) low value species per ha (e.g. Holothuria atra, H. edulis, H. coluber and Thelenota anax) and 15.2 (SD = 2.7) high value species per ha (e.g. H. fuscogilva, Actinopyga lecanora, Stichopus hermanni and Thelenota ananas). Following a 17 month closure of the fishery (2005-2007), the abundance of bêche-de-mer was reported by local fisherman to have increased; however, no scientific studies were conducted that can substantiate this community held belief. The current study aimed to document the impact of re-opening the fishery in 2007 and documented a decline in high value species of 9% over a 5 month period following the opening of the fishery, while low value species continued to increase in abundance by 11%, over the same period based on nocturnal surveys. Continued observation of the recovery, post closure, and any subsequent harvest in Marovo will be required to properly understand population dynamics and provide a sustainable harvest plan for bêche-de-mer in the future.

  2. Toward a three-century reconstruction of climate variability from a slow-growing coral in the Western Province, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; lin, K.; Shen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate variability in the west Pacific warm pool (WPWP), a major heat and moisture source to the atmosphere, is strongly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Modeling work has suggested that multi-century scale reconstructions of ENSO variability from the tropical west Pacific may be necessary to fully characterize the nature of the ENSO system. Much of the previous coral-based climate studies have used the fast-growing coral genus Porites, although a few studies have used the long-lived, slow-growing coral genus Diploastrea. Here we present an oxygen isotope time series from a three century long D. heliopora coral from near Olasana Island, Western Province, Solomon Islands (WPSI, 8°07.92' S, 156°54.50' E), a location in the WPWP that experiences significant temperature and salinity anomalies during ENSO events. We first used a forward model to generate a pseudoproxy time series for the Olasana region, utilizing available gridded sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) data spanning 1970-2007. There are strong correlations between predicted and measured coral ?18O, between both monthly (r = 0.84) and monthly anomaly (r = 0.69) records. These results demonstrate that the Olasana D. heliopora coral ?18O record is a robust proxy of local surface ocean conditions. There is also a robust relationship between the Olasana ?18O record and NINO3.4 index of ENSO activity during 1938-2007, which provides confidence that the Olasana ?18O record can be used to characterize the ENSO state in this region back in time. Finally, we present results from near the core bottom (~1700 CE), which provide a first window into a gap of coral-based ENSO reconstructions in the immediate preindustrial (~1700-1850 CE).

  3. Three-armed rifts or masked radial pattern of eruptive fissures? The intriguing case of El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, L.; Galindo, I.; Martí, J.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-04-01

    Using new surface structural data as well as subsurface structural data obtained from seventeen water galleries, we provide a comprehensive model of the volcano-tectonic evolution of El Hierro (Canary Islands). We have identified, measured and analysed more than 1700 volcano-structural elements including vents, eruptive fissures, dykes and faults. The new data provide important information on the main structural patterns of the island and on its stress and strain fields, all of which are crucial for reliable hazard assessments. We conducted temporal and spatial analyses of the main structural elements, focusing on their relative age and association with the three main cycles in the construction of the island: the Tiñor Edifice, the El Golfo-Las Playas Edifice, and the Rift Volcanism. A radial strike distribution, which can be related to constructive episodes, is observed in the on-land structures. A similar strike distribution is seen in the submarine eruptive fissures, which are radial with respect to the centre of the island. However, the volcano-structural elements identified onshore and reflecting the entire volcano-tectonic evolution of the island also show a predominant NE-SW strike, which coincides with the main regional trend of the Canary archipelago as a whole. Two other dominant directions of structural elements, N-S and WNW-ESE, are evident from the establishment of the El Golfo-Las Playas edifice, during the second constructive cycle. We suggest that the radial-striking structures reflect comparatively uniform stress fields during the constructive episodes, mainly conditioned by the combination of overburden pressure, gravitational spreading, and magma-induced stresses in each of the volcanic edifices. By contrast, in the shallower parts of the edifice the NE-SW, N-S and WNW-ESE-striking structures reflect local stress fields related to the formation of mega-landslides and masking the general and regional radial patterns.

  4. Construction and destruction rates of volcanoes within tropical environment: Examples from the Basse-Terre Island (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Julia; Lahitte, Pierre; Quidelleur, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In order to better constrain the construction and the erosion rate affecting the volcanic island of Basse-Terre Island (Guadeloupe, F.W.I.), an enlarged K-Ar age dataset has been combined with reconstruction of the paleo-topography. Two different methods of interpolation of the present topography have been cross-checked to better support the erosion rates obtained and their associated uncertainties. The present study focusses on the Monts-Caraïbes volcanoes and on the main geomorphic feature of the Piton de Bouillante volcano, the Beaugendre Valley. The Monts-Caraïbes volcanoes were constructed in 83 kyr at a rate of 0.12 ± 0.04 km3/kyr. During the last 450 kyr, they have experienced an erosion rate of 610 ± 550 t/km2/yr. In the Piton de Bouillante volcano eleven new K-Ar ages have been obtained, constraining the duration of its volcanic activity between 880 ± 14 and 712 ± 12 ka, and involving a construction rate of 0.70 ± 0.20 km3/kyr. For this volcano, an erosion rate of 1220 ± 700 t/km2/yr has been obtained for the last 700 kyr. Our study also shows, based on the contemporaneity of the ages in the entire Beaugendre Valley added to the mean erosion rate of 1350 ± 550 t/km2/yr, that the flank collapse hypothesis cannot explain the formation of this valley. Finally, the similarity of the erosion rates computed for different locations of the Basse-Terre Island shows that the time-integrated erosion appears independent to the trade wind effect and suggests that the barrier effect due to the relief is not present here.

  5. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  6. Electric and magnetic phenomena observed before the volcano-seismic activity in 2000 in the Izu Island Region, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, S.; Hayakawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Molchanov, O.; Hattori, K.; Orihara, Y.; Gotoh, K.; Akinaga, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2002-01-01

    Significant anomalous changes in the ultra low frequency range (?0.01 Hz) were observed in both geoelectric and geomagnetic fields before the major volcano-seismic activity in the Izu Island region, Japan. The spectral intensity of the geoelectric potential difference between some electrodes on Niijima Island and the third principal component of geomagnetic field variations at an array network in Izu Peninsula started to increase from a few months before the onset of the volcano-seismic activity, culminating immediately before nearby magnitude 6 class earthquakes. Appearance of similar changes in two different measurements conducted at two far apart sites seems to provide information supporting the reality of preseismic electromagnetic signals. PMID:12032286

  7. Petrologic observations and multiphase dynamics in highly-crystalline magmatic mushes sourcing Galápagos Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, J.; Bergantz, G. W.; Geist, D.

    2013-12-01

    The inability to directly observe magma chambers makes it difficult to understand their dynamics. Yet conditions within the chamber determines whether an eruption will occur, or if the magma is allowed to cool to complete crystallization. Eruption styles are also conditioned by these dynamics, as the amount of overpressure within the chamber regulates effusive or explosive eruptions. Plutons and volcanoes appear to share similar states: magma reservoirs that are temporally and spatially dominated by crystal-rich states, known as magmatic mushes. To explore the dynamics of mushes, we turn to the relatively simple ocean island end-member of magmatic systems. Ocean island porphyritic basalt flows provide a snapshot of the mush conditions prior to eruption. The Galápagos Islands are a system of ocean islands displaying spatial and temporal variation in their eruption styles and deposits. We have collected porphyritic basalt samples from Rábida Island of the Galápagos Archipelago which contains deposits ranging in ages from 0.7-1.0 Ma. Chemical zoning within phenocrysts indicates intermittent efficient mixing occurs within the mush, despite high viscosities and corresponding low-Reynolds number conditions. To further explore the dynamics of mixing, we present preliminary Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase models using the fluids modeling software MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges). This computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) allows for individual crystal tracking within the system and monitors interactions between the fluid and solid phases. Of special interest is the open-system dynamical response of a mush to a reintrusion event. Unlike high-Reynolds number flows, such as air or water systems, magmatic mushes have high viscosities, indicating that turbulent motion is not the primary mixing mechanism. Instead, mixing appears to be caused by mechanical unlocking from an increase in pore pressure as additional magma is injected. The crystal pile inflates and the injected melt creates crystal-poor fingers through the mush. These regions are unstable and eventually lead to mush collapse. Repetition of this cycle can drive efficient mixing of the magma chamber. We quantify the ability of the mush to mix using the Lacey statistical mixing index. We compare this value for the results of various open-system reintrusion events within the mush as a means to explore the dynamics that occur.

  8. Spatial variation of seismic b-values beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, David L.; Gao, Stephen S.

    2006-05-01

    The frequency-magnitude distribution was spatially mapped beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska using an earthquake catalog of 491 events that occurred between July 2001 and April 2005. An area of high seismic b-values (˜ 2.0) is found ˜ 4 km east of Makushin's main vent at a depth between 4 and 7 km. The anomaly is statistically significant based on Utsu's p-test [T. Utsu, On seismicity, in Report of the Joint Research Institute for Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo (1992) 139-157], and is not data processing method or parameter dependent. Interestingly, a recent InSAR interferometric study [Z. Lu, J.A. Power, V.S. McConnell, C. Wicks Jr., D. Dzurism, Preeruptive inflation and surface interferometric coherence characteristics by satellite radar interferometry at Makushin volcano, Alaska: 1993-2000, J. Geophys. Res. 107 (2002) 2266, doi:10.1029/2001JB000970] inferred a surface uplift of about 7 cm during the two-year period prior to October 1995, centered approximately in the area with the observed anomalous b-values. The uplift was caused by the volume increase of an inferred magma chamber at a depth of about 7 km. The close correspondence of the seismic and InSAR observations suggests that the heterogeneous area associated with the observed high b-values is most likely the result of increased crack density associated with the magma chamber. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of combining InSAR and seismological observations in locating magma chambers and areas of high heterogeneity in the crust.

  9. Petroleum potential of volcanogenic and volcano-sedimentary rocks in ancient and recent island arcs: Caucasus, Komandorskie, and Kuril islands, eastern Kamchatka

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, L.E. )

    1993-09-01

    In the Late Cretaceous-Eocene, subduction of the Tethys oceanic plate under the island arc of the lesser Caucasus contributed to the appearance of the special conditions favorable for petroleum occurrence: (1) tectono-magmatic destruction of the crust of the Transcaucasus median massif and formation of hydrocarbon traps of different types and origins, and (2) high heat flow lasting until the recent epoch. These led flow-intensive generation of hydrocarbons in the shallow-water sediments of the paleoshelf of the Transcaucasus massif and accumulation of hydrocarbons not only in the sedimentary but also in the volcanogenic and volcano-sedimentary reservoirs (Samgori-Patardzeuli, Muradhanly fields, etc.). At the end of the Oligocene, the geodynamic setting in the northwestern margins of the Pacific Ocean was mainly similar to that within the Transcaucasus median massif. At the end of Oligocene-Miocene, such conditions determined the tectono-magmatic destruction of the continental crust and formation of the series of interarc rifts. The main fields of Japan, with accumulations in the volcanogenic and volcano-sedimentary rocks, are concentrated here. Its analog is the rift located in the southern part of a single east Kuril basin, where petroleum occurrence is only inferred. In the separate troughs, the thickness of the volcano-sedimentary cover is 4-6 km. The stratigraphic section of the cover contains the volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sediments of the Neogene-Pleistocene. The studies of the sections of the Komandorskie islands, eastern Kamchatka, Kuril Islands, and western Sakhalin indicate that distribution of reservoirs depends on the stage of evolution of the rifts and adjacent island arcs.

  10. Newly discovered submarine flank eruption at Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagnini, A.; di Roberto, A.; Pompilio, M.; Gamberi, F.; Marani, M.; Rosi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The NW submarine portion of Stromboli volcano has been investigated by deep-towed sidescan sonar, bathymetric surveys, video camera runs and dredging during two research cruises in 2002 and 2004. The surveys resulted in the identification of an extensive pillow lava field (106-107 m3)at about 2300 m of water depth and 9 km from the shoreline of Stromboli Island. Marine geology data coupled with volcanological observation and volatile content in the glass, demonstrate that this lava flow-field is in place and is related to a recent submarine effusive eruption originating from a nearby eruptive fissure. Anyway bulk rock and glass composition of the lava differs significantly from present day summit products and from those erupted during the historical flank eruptions. Pillow lavas compositions show a high K2O content and a general geochemical pattern more similar to the less evolved K-alkaline products erupted between 13 and 6 ka during the Neostromboli period. However, the silica content is outside of the known compositional range of Neostromboli, hence the pillow lava could represent a not yet documented stage of the structural evolution of the volcano. The compositional and volcanological evolution within the subaerial Neostromboli products is relatively well constrained, including the early stages of the period; on the other hand, the passage between Neostromboli period and early stages of development (6-2 ka) of the Recent Stromboli period (after the Neostromboli collapse) are still poorly known. The unique composition of the pillow lavas is interpreted as the result of the interaction between magmas feeding the new cycle and batches of previous Neostromboli magmas, still present after the emptying of the Neostromboli magma chamber. In this perspective, the investigated flank eruption could be the 'missing link' of early Recent Stromboli evolution by representing the beginning of this new intrusive cycle. In addition to its structural and volcanological significance this eruption opens new scenarios in Stromboli volcanic hazard: while flank eruptions on the subaerial part of the volcano could have an obvious direct impact on inhabited areas, submarine eruptions have the potential to trigger slope instability. Processes of flank inflation, opening of the eruptive fissures and gravitational loading due to the lava flows piling-up, are all able to induce sediment destabilization and possible flank failure.

  11. Tetrodotoxin and Its Analogues in the Pufferfish Arothron hispidus and A. nigropunctatus from the Solomon Islands: A Comparison of Their Toxin Profiles with the Same Species from Okinawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Gorapava Puilingi, Clyde; Kudo, Yuta; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Pufferfish poisoning has not been well documented in the South Pacific, although fish and other seafood are sources of protein in these island nations. In this study, tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its analogues in each organ of the pufferfish Arothron hispidus and A. nigropunctatus collected in the Solomon Islands were investigated using high resolution LC-MS. The toxin profiles of the same two species of pufferfish from Okinawa, Japan were also examined for comparison. TTXs concentrations were higher in the skin of both species from both regions, and relatively lower in the liver, ovary, testis, stomach, intestine, and flesh. Due to higher TTX concentrations (51.0 and 28.7 µg/g at highest) detected in the skin of the two species from the Solomon Islands (saxitoxin was <0.02 µg/g), these species should be banned from consumption. Similar results were obtained from fish collected in Okinawa, Japan: TTX in the skin of A. hispidus and A. nigropunctatus were 12.7 and 255 µg/g, respectively, at highest, and saxitoxin was also detected in the skin (2.80 µg/g at highest) and ovary of A. hispidus. TTX, 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX (with its 4-epi form), and its anhydro forms were the most abundant, and 11-oxoTTX was commonly detected in the skin. PMID:26343722

  12. On the time-scales of magmatism at island-arc volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Turner, S P

    2002-12-15

    Precise information on time-scales and rates of change is fundamental to an understanding of natural processes and the development of quantitative physical models in the Earth sciences. U-series isotope studies are revolutionizing this field by providing time information in the range 10(2)-10(4) years, which is similar to that of many modern Earth processes. I review how the application of U-series isotopes has been used to constrain the time-scales of magma formation, ascent and storage beneath island-arc volcanoes. Different elements are distilled-off the subducting plate at different times and in different places. Contributions from subducted sediments to island-arc lava sources appear to occur some 350 kyr to 4 Myr prior to eruption. Fluid release from the subducting oceanic crust into the mantle wedge may be a multi-stage process and occurs over a period ranging from a few hundred kyr to less than one kyr prior to eruption. This implies that dehydration commences prior to the initiation of partial melting within the mantle wedge, which is consistent with recent evidence that the onset of melting is controlled by an isotherm and thus the thermal structure within the wedge. U-Pa disequilibria appear to require a component of decompression melting, possibly due to the development of gravitational instabilities. The preservation of large (226)Ra disequilibria permits only a short period of time between fluid addition and eruption. This requires rapid melt segregation, magma ascent by channelled flow and minimal residence time within the lithosphere. The evolution from basalt to basaltic andesite probably occurs rapidly during ascent or in magma reservoirs inferred from some geophysical data to lie within the lithospheric mantle. The flux across the Moho is broadly andesitic, and some magmas subsequently stall in more shallow crustal-level magma chambers, where they evolve to more differentiated compositions on time-scales of a few thousand years or less. PMID:12626270

  13. Experimental constraints on phreatic eruption processes at Whakaari (White Island volcano)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Gilg, H. Albert; Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Lavallée, Yan; Letham-Brake, Mark; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-09-01

    Vigorous hydrothermal activity interspersed by sequences of phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions occur at Whakaari (White Island volcano), New Zealand. Here, we investigate the influence of sample type (hydrothermally altered cemented ash tuffs and unconsolidated ash/lapilli) and fragmentation mechanism (steam flashing versus gas expansion) on fragmentation and ejection velocities as well as on particle-size and shape. Our rapid decompression experiments show that fragmentation and ejection speeds of two ash tuffs, cemented by alunite and amorphous opal, increase with increasing porosity and that both are significantly enhanced in the presence of steam flashing. Ejection speeds of unconsolidated samples are higher than ejection speeds of cemented tuffs, as less energy is consumed by fragmentation. Fragmentation dominated by steam flashing results in increased fragmentation energy and a higher proportion of fine particles. Particle shape analyses before and after fragmentation reveal that both steam flashing and pure gas expansion produce platy or bladed particles from fracturing parallel to the decompression front. Neither fragmentation mechanisms nor sample type show a significant influence on the shape. Our results emphasize that, under identical pressure and temperature conditions, eruptions accompanied by the process of liquid water flashing to steam are significantly more violent than those driven simply by gas expansion. Therefore, phase changes during decompression and cementation are both important considerations for hazard assessment and modeling of eruptions in hydrothermally active environments.

  14. Relationship between two Solomon Islands Earthquakes in 2007 (M8.1), 2010 (M7.1), and Seismic Gap along the Subduction Zone, Revealed by ALOS/PALSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Y.; Ozawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Solomon Islands are located in the southwest of the Pacific Ocean. The Australian, Woodlark, and Solomon Sea plates subduct toward the northeast beneath the Pacific plate. Interaction among these four plates cause complicated tectonics around the Solomon Islands, and have caused interplate earthquakes in the subduction zone (e.g. Lay and Kanamori, 1980; Xu and Schwarts, 1993). On April 1, 2007 (UTC), an M8.1 interplate earthquake occurred in the subduction zone between the Pacific Plate and the Australian Plate. This earthquake was accompanied by a large tsunami and caused considerable damage in the area. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) carried out emergency observations using the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Rader (PALSAR) installed on Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS), and detected more than 2m of maximum displacement using differential interferometric SAR (DInSAR) technique. Miyagi et al. (2009) estimated a slip distribution of the seismic fault mainly from the PALSAR/DInSAR data and suggested that most of a seismic gap was filled by the 2007 events, but a small seismic gap connecting to an Mw7.0-sized earthquake still remained. On January 3, 2010, an M7.1 earthquake occurred in the vicinity of the remnant seismic gap. ALOS/PALSAR observed epicentral area both before and after the event, and detected crustal deformation associated with the earthquake. We inferred fault model using the PALSAR/DInSAR data and concluded that the 2010 event was the supposed thrust earthquake filling the remnant seismic gap. A distribution of coulomb failure stress change in the epicentral area after the 2007 event suggested the possibility that the 2010 event was triggered by the 2007 earthquake.

  15. Sar interferometry time series analysis of surface deformation for Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Remy, Dominique; Froger, Jean-Luc; Darrozes, José; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, located on the south-eastern side of Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean, is a hotspot oceanic basaltic shield volcano whose activity began more than 500,000 years ago. It is one of the most active volcanoes in the world with a high eruptive frequency on average one eruption every 9 months since 1998. In April 2007, Piton de la Fournaise experienced an exceptional eruption which is considered as the largest historical eruption ever observed during the 20th and 21th centuries, characterized by an effusion of 210 ×106 m3 volume of lava with a 340 m consequent collapse of the Dolomieu crater and the onset of a landslide on the eastern flank. ENVISAT and ALOS data analysis showed that the subsidence of central cone and landslide of eastern flank continued deforming after this eruption at least until June 2008, but no clear ground deformation has been detected after this date from Band-C or Band-L radar images. We so perform a detailed spatio-temporal analysis of ground motions on Piton de la Fournaise using X-band InSAR time series acquired from 2009 to 2014. X-Band was chosen because it provides high spatial resolution (up to 1 m), short revisit period (minimum 11 days) and a highest sensibility to ground deformation. Our large dataset of X-band radar images is composed of 106 COSMO-SkyMed and 96 TerraSAR-X Single-Look Complex images acquired in ascending and descending orbits. The interferograms were generated using DORIS. A high resolution reference Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (5m x 5m Lidar DEM) was used to model and remove the topographic contribution from the interferograms. We employed next StaMPS/MTI (Hooper et al., 2012) to generate the displacement time series and we analyzed the time-dependant behavior of surface displacement using a principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition. This analysis clearly reveals that the large eastward motion affecting the eastern flank of Piton de la Fournaise remained active (LOS velocity of about 25 mm.y-1) at least until July 2012. Another important result is that the displacement maps show evidence of time-dependant processes acting at the central cone.

  16. Ground deformation associated with the eruption of Lumpur Sidoardjo mud volcano, eastern Java island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yosuke; Purnama Sidiq, Teguh

    2013-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that drives the extrusion of materials in the sediment to the surface. While it shares common features with magmatic eruptions; for example, eruption of mud volcanoes often results in elongated calderas and aligned vents. However, the mechanics of mud volcanism is not fully understood because of the rare occurrence. Here we take an advantage of observing ongoing eruption in Lumpur Sidoarjo (LUSI) mud volcano, eastern Java island, to gain insights into the mechanics of mud volcanism. LUSI has been erupting since May 2006 and released more than 12 million cubic meter of mud so far, buried some 20 square kilometers and forced 8000 people to evacuate. We delineated the temporal evolution of ground deformation from Synthetic Aperture Radar images taken from the ALOS satellite. We processed a total of 93 images from two ascending and three descending images between May 2006 and April 2011 using the StaMPS software (Hooper, GRL, 2008) to obtain the displacement time series of persistent scatterers. Although we were not able to obtain the time series in areas near the center of activity due to the lower coherence resulting from the mudflow, we observed an extension of line-of-sight (LOS) distance by a total of up to 200 millimeters within a few kilometers from the activity center from both ascending and descending images. This indicates that the deformation around the center of activity is dominated by subsidence. We also found an area of subsidence with a similar or even larger rate extending to the west of the activity center. This indicates that the depressurization beneath the activity center is not the only mechanism to cause this eruption but we need to consider another source to explain the observed displacement field. We also found a LOS shortening to the north of the activity center only from ascending images. This indicates an uplift and westward displacement in this area. Despite the decreasing rate of gas emission, our time series analysis shows that the deformation is quasi-linear during the time of the analysis. This suggests that the source of deformation has been stationary over time and and also it will a take long time for this eruption to cease.

  17. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): the 2010-2011 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, R.; Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Serrano, I.; Villaseñor, A.; Galeano, J.

    2012-04-01

    As an example of the recent advances introduced in seismic monitoring of Deception Island volcano (Antarctica) during recent years, we describe the instrumental network deployed during the 2010-2011 survey by the Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR). The period of operation extended from December 19, 2010 to March 5, 2011. We deployed a wireless seismic network composed by four three-component seismic stations. These stations are based on 24-bit SL04 SARA dataloggers sampling at 100 sps. They use a PC with embedded linux and SEISLOG data acquisition software. We use two types of three-component seismometers: short-period Mark L4C with natural frequency of 1 Hz and medium-period Lennartz3D/5s with natural frequency of 0.2 Hz. The network was designed for an optimum spatial coverage of the northern half of Deception, where a magma chamber has been reported. Station locations include the vicinity of the Spanish base "Gabriel de Castilla" (GdC), Obsidianas Beach, a zone near the craters from the 1970 eruptions, and the Chilean Shelter located south of Pendulum Cove. Continuous data from the local seismic network are received in real-time in the base by wifi transmission. We used Ubiquiti Networks Nanostation2 antennas with 2.4 GHz, dual-polarity, 10 dBi gain, and 54 Mbps transmission rate. They have shown a great robustness and speed for real-time applications. To prioritize data acquisition when the battery level is low, we have designed a circuit that allows independent power management for the seismic station and wireless transmission system. The reception antenna located at GdC is connected to a computer running SEISCOMP. This software supports several transmission protocols and manages the visualization and recording of seismic data, including the generation of summary plots to show the seismic activity. These twelve data channels are stored in miniseed format and displayed in real time, which allows for a rapid evaluation of the seismic activity and an efficient seismo-volcanic surveillance. The data are processed and analyzed using the SEISAN database management software. In addition to the seismic network, we deployed a small-aperture seismic array south of Fumarole Bay. It is composed by 9 vertical and 1 three-component short-period stations. The 24-bit data acquisition system samples these 12 channels at 100 sps. There is also a permanent seismic station operating since 2008 and located near GdC, that is very useful for the preliminary evaluation of the seismicity at the start of the survey. This station is composed by a 16-s electrolytic seismometer (Eentec SP400) and a 24-bit datalogger (Eentec DR4000) sampling at 100 sps. During the 2010-2011 survey we identified 33 regional earthquakes, 80 volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, and 929 long-period (LP) events. The volcanic alert system has remained green (the lowest level) at all times. The seismic activity has been similar to previous surveys and remained within limits that are normal for the island.

  18. Fluxes of magmatic chlorine and sulfur from volcano-hydrothermal systems. Examples for Northern Kuril Islands Paramushir and Shiashkotan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    The total flux of components degassed from the magma through persistently degassing volcanoes comprises of the volcanic vapor flux from fumaroles to the atmosphere, diffuse flux through volcanic slopes and the hydrothermal flux to the local hydrologic network. The hydrothermal flux may be provided by the discharge of fluids formed at depth over the magma body and/or by acid waters which are formed by the absorption of the ascending volcanic vapor by shallow ground. The anion composition (Cl and SO4) of the discharging thermal waters from a volcano-hydrothermal system originates from the volcanic vapor and should be taken into account in estimations of the magmatic volatile output and volatile recycling in subduction zones. Here we report the chemical (major and trace elements) and isotopic composition of acidic and neutral thermal waters, chemical and isotopic composition of volcanic vapors and solute fluxes from the northern Kurilian islands Paramushir (Ebeko volcanic center) and Shiashkotan (volcanoes Sinarka and Kuntomintar). The total measured outputs of chloride and sulfur from the system in 2006-2014 were estimated on average as 730 g/s and 980 g/s, respectively, which corresponds to the equivalent fluxes of 64 t/d of HCl and 169 t/d of SO2. These values are one order of magnitude higher than the fumarolic output of Cl and S from the low-temperature fumarolic field of Ebeko (<120°C). The estimated discharge rate of hot (85°C) water from the system with ~ 3500 ppm of chloride is about 0.3 m3s-1 which is among the highest hot water natural outputs ever measured for a volcano-hydrothermal system. The total hydrothermal discharge of Cl and S from Shiashkotan island to the Sea of Okhotsk associated with magmatic activity of two volcanoes is estimated as ca. 20 t/d and 40 t/d, respectively, which is close to the fumarolic output from both volcanoes (Sinarka and Kuntomintar) estimated using the chemistry and flow rates of fumaroles those measured temperature is close to 500°C.

  19. The shallow magmatic system of Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos Islands. Evidence of multiple magma reservoirs from Satellite Radar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, M.; Amelung, F.; Baker, S.

    2010-12-01

    In the Galápagos Islands as at other ocean island volcanoes only a fraction of the magma coming from the mantle is erupted; the remaining magma is stored in crustal magma chambers, or trapped near the crust-mantle boundary. The increase of pressure generated by these magma intrusions can inflate the volcanic edifice and trigger eruptions and earthquakes. The geometry of magma reservoirs and their connections with the surface during eruptive phases, therefore, is fundamental to the development of predictive models of volcano deformation and eruption. Among the Galápagos Islands, Fernandina can be considered the most active volcano in the archipelago, having experienced 25 eruptions since 1813 and three eruptions in the last fifteen years (1995 - 2005 - 2009). In order to investigate the deformation associated with changes in pressure in the magma storage system we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data acquired over Fernandina by the European Space Agency satellites ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT between 1992 and July 2010 in four different orbits. The advantage of using different viewing geometries is that the deformation signal can be independently validated and the responsible source beneath can be better constrained. We generate more than 300 interferograms and we apply the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method to investigate the temporal evolution of ground deformation. The analysis of single interferograms and of mean deformation velocity maps shows that the deformation at Fernandina is characterized by an almost continuous displacement of an elliptical area clearly limited by the summit caldera rim, and occasional displacement of a larger portion of the volcano edifice outside the caldera, around the summit. We then infer the presence of multiple sources of deformation below the summit caldera and the southern flank of Fernandina demonstrating that the magmatic system is composed by multiple magma reservoirs at different depths. We also determine an unusual shallow dipping geometry for the dike that fed the eruptive fissure opened on April 10, 2009 on the southwestern flank of the volcano, confirming what inferred by Jónsson et al. (1999) for the 1995 eruption.

  20. SAR-based Estimation of Glacial Extent and Velocity Fields on Isanotski Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, D.; Lee, A.; Parker, O. P.; Pressler, Y.; Guo, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Global studies show that Earth's glaciers are losing mass at increasing rates, creating a challenge for communities that rely on them as natural resources. Field observation of glacial environments is limited by cost and inaccessibility. Optical remote sensing is often precluded by cloud cover and seasonal darkness. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) overcomes these obstacles by using microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation to provide high resolution information on large spatial scales and in remote, atmospherically obscured environments. SAR is capable of penetrating clouds, operating in darkness, and discriminating between targets with ambiguous spectral signatures. This study evaluated the efficacy of two SAR Earth observation methods on small (< 7 km2) glaciers in rugged topography. The glaciers chosen for this study lie on Isanotski Volcano in Unimak Island, Aleutian Archipelago, USA. The local community on the island, the City of False Pass, relies on glacial melt for drinking water and hydropower. Two methods were used: (1) velocity field estimation based on Repeat Image Feature Tracking (RIFT) and (2) glacial boundary delineation based on interferometric coherence mapping. NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) single-polarized power images and JAXA Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band SAR (ALOS PALSAR) single-look complex images were analyzed over the period 2008-2011. UAVSAR image pairs were coregistered to sub-pixel accuracy and processed with the Coregistration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) feature tracking module to derive glacial velocity field estimates. Maximum glacier velocities ranged from 28.9 meters/year to 58.3 meters/year. Glacial boundaries were determined from interferometric coherence of ALOS PALSAR data and subsequently refined with masking operations based on terrain slope and segment size. Accuracy was assessed against hand-digitized outlines from high resolution UAVSAR power images, yielding 83.0% producer's accuracy (errors of omission) and 86.1% user's accuracy (errors of commission). These results represent a refinement of a decades-old entry from the USGS National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The information gained from this study could strengthen management practices by helping decision makers understand the ecological and economic consequences of glacial change. This procedure could be repeated in similar locations worldwide to provide communities with accurate, quantitative information about their changing glacial resources.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of subaerial lava flows of Barren Island volcano and the deep crust beneath the Andaman Island Arc, Burma Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh

    2015-06-01

    Little was known about the nature and origin of the deep crust beneath the Andaman Island Arc in spite of the fact that it formed part of the highly active Indonesian volcanic arc system, one of the important continental crust forming regions in Southeast Asia. This arc, formed as a result of subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Microplate (a sliver of the Eurasian Plate), contains only one active subaerial magmatic center, Barren Island volcano, whose evolutional timeline had remained uncertain. In this work, we present results of the first successful attempt to date crustal xenoliths and their host lava flows from the island, by incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar method, in an attempt to understand the evolutionary histories of the volcano and its basement. Based on concordant plateau and isochron ages, we establish that the oldest subaerial lava flows of the volcano are 1.58 ± 0.04 (2?) Ma, and some of the plagioclase xenocrysts have been derived from crustal rocks of 106 ± 3 (2?) Ma. Mineralogy (anorthite + Cr-rich diopside + minor olivine) and isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr < 0.7040; ?Nd > 7.0) of xenoliths not only indicate their derivation from a lower (oceanic) crustal olivine gabbro but also suggest a genetic relationship between the arc crust and the ophiolitic basement of the Andaman accretionary prism. We speculate that the basements of the forearc and volcanic arc of the Andaman subduction zone belong to a single continuous unit that was once attached to the western margin of the Eurasian Plate.

  2. Evidence for enhanced bioavailability of trace elements in the marine ecosystem of Deception Island, a volcano in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Deheyn, Dimitri D; Gendreau, Philippe; Baldwin, Roberta J; Latz, Michael I

    2005-07-01

    This study assessed whether trace elements present at Deception Island, an active submarine volcano in the Antarctic Peninsula, show enhanced biological availability to the local marine community. Using a weak acid extraction method to dissolve organic material and leach associated but not constitutive trace elements of sediments, fifteen elements were measured from seafloor sediment, seawater particulates, and tissues of benthic (bivalves, brittlestars, sea urchins) and pelagic (demersal and pelagic fishes, krill) organisms collected in the flooded caldera. The highest element concentrations were associated with seafloor sediment, the lowest with seawater particulates and organism tissues. In the case of Ag and Se, concentrations were highest in organism tissue, indicating contamination through the food chain and biomagnification of those elements. The elements Al, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ti, and to a lesser extent Zn, were the most concentrated of the trace elements for all sample types. This indicates that the whole ecosystem of Deception Island is contaminated with trace elements from local geothermal activity, which is also reflected in the pattern of element contamination in organisms. Accordingly, element concentrations were higher in organisms collected at Deception Island compared to those from the neighboring non-active volcanic King George Island, suggesting that volcanic activity enhances bioavailability of trace elements to marine organisms. Trace element concentrations were highest in digestive tissue of organisms, suggesting that elements at Deception Island are incorporated into the marine food web mainly through a dietary route. PMID:15649525

  3. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor

    2014-05-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments.

  4. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    PubMed Central

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; González-Dávila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Arístegui, J.; Alonso-González, I. J.; Hernández-León, S.; Blanco, M. J.; Rodríguez-Santana, A.; Hernández-Guerra, A.; Gelado-Caballero, M. D.; Eugenio, F.; Marcello, J.; de Armas, D.; Domínguez-Yanes, J. F.; Montero, M. F.; Laetsch, D. R.; Vélez-Belchí, P.; Ramos, A.; Ariza, A. V.; Comas-Rodríguez, I.; Benítez-Barrios, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. PMID:22768379

  5. Argon geochronology of late Pleistocene to Holocene Westdahl volcano, Unimak Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of selected lavas from Westdahl Volcano places time constraints on several key prehistoric eruptive phases of this large active volcano. A dike cutting old pyroclastic-flow and associated lahar deposits from a precursor volcano yields an age of 1,654+/-11 k.y., dating this precursor volcano as older than early Pleistocene. A total of 11 geographically distributed lavas with ages ranging from 47+/-14 to 127+/-2 k.y. date construction of the Westdahl volcanic center. Lava flows cut by an apparent caldera-rim structure yielded ages of 81+/-5 and 121+/-8 k.y., placing a maximum date of 81 ka on caldera formation. Late Pleistocene and Holocene lavas fill the caldera, but most of them are obscured by the large summit icecap.

  6. Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods Cyndi Kelly1, Jesse F. Lawrence1, Cindy Ebinger2 1Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 2University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, 227 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA Low-magnitude seismic signals generated by processes that characterize volcanic and hydrothermal systems and their plumbing networks are difficult to observe remotely. Seismic records from these systems tend to be extremely 'noisy', making it difficult to resolve 3D subsurface structures using traditional seismic methods. Easily identifiable high-amplitude bursts within the noise that might be suitable for use with traditional seismic methods (i.e. eruptions) tend to occur relatively infrequently compared to the length of an entire eruptive cycle. Furthermore, while these impulsive events might help constrain the dynamics of a particular eruption, they shed little insight into the mechanisms that occur throughout an entire eruption sequence. It has been shown, however, that the much more abundant low-amplitude seismic 'noise' in these records (i.e. volcanic or geyser 'tremor') actually represents a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements that can be directly linked to magma, fluid, and volatile movement at depth. This 'noisy' data therefore likely contains valuable information about the processes occurring in the volcanic or hydrothermal system before, during and after eruption events. In this study, we present a new method to comprehensively study how the seismic source distribution of all events - including micro-events - evolves during different phases of the eruption sequence of Sierra Negra Volcano in the Galapagos Islands. We apply a back-projection search algorithm to image sources of seismic 'noise' at Sierra Negra Volcano during a proposed intrusion event. By analyzing coherent seismic energy from all possible events to all available receivers, we generate a movie showing how seismic sources change spatially and temporally during the analysis period. This approach utilizes data from the entire seismic record and could ultimately provide a more complete understanding of how seismic sources change throughout the eruptive sequence rather than during a particular eruption event. This information could help to 1) answer fundamental questions about volcano-tectonic processes and 2) make more accurate assessments of volcanic hazards. Preliminary results from application of the methodology to seismic data collected by a dense array of 3-component geophones at El Tatio Geyser Field in northern Chile during October 2012 will also be introduced.

  7. Unravelling the Geometry of Unstable Flanks of Submarine Volcanoes by Magnetic Investigation: the Case of the "sciara del Fuoco" Scar (stromboli Volcano, Aeolian Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccini, F.; Cocchi, L.; Carmisciano, C.; Speranza, F.; Marziani, F.

    2012-12-01

    Stromboli is the easternmost island of the Aeolian Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea) and one of the most active Mediterranean volcanoes. The volcanic edifice rises over 3000 m above the surrounding seafloor, from a depth of about 2000 m b.s.l. to 924 m a.s.l. The north-western flank of volcano is deeply scarred by a destructive collapse event occurred ca. 5000 years ago, and forming a big horseshoe-shaped depression, known as "Sciara del Fuoco" (SdF). This depression, 3 Km long and 2 Km wide, is supposed to extend into the sea down to 700 m b.s.l., while further basinward it turns into a fan-shaped mounted deposit down to about 2600 m b.s.l., where it merges the so-called "Stromboli Canyon". Since its formation, emerged and submerged portions of the SdF have been progressively filled by the volcanic products of the persistent activity of the Stromboli Volcano. In the last 10 years, two paroxysmal eruptions occurred in the Stromboli Volcano, during 2002-2003 and February-April 2007. During both events, the SdF has been partially covered by lava flows and affected by slope failures, also causing (for the 2002-2003 event) a local tsunami. Since the 1990's, and especially after the last two paroxysms, the submerged extension of the SdF has been intensively investigated by using swath bathymetry data. We focused principally on the magnetic anomaly pattern of the submerged SdF since the chaotic depositional system virtually cancels magnetic remanence (which at Stromboli can reach 5-10 A/m values), thus lowering magnetic residual intensity. On July 2012 we acquired new detailed sea-surface magnetic data of the SdF from the shoreline to about 7 km offshore, where the depth is more than 1800 m b.s.l. We collected data thanks to the Italian Navy ship "Nave Aretusa" and by using the Marine Magnetics SeaSPY magnetometer. At the same time, new bathymetric data were acquired in the same area by using a Kongsberg Marine multibeam systems. Although the morphologic features of the submarine prosecution of the SdF system were already studied and unveiled, the complete description of the in-depth extension of the system and the overall volume estimation is still poorly known. This has important implications for the hazard assessment of the landslide structure and most generally of the entire volcanic edifice. The application of a classical geomagnetic prospection to describe a landslide feature is an uncommon procedure yet it can be considered as innovative approach, having the advantages of effectiveness, low cost and expedition typical of the geomagnetic survey. Here we present the interpretation of the newly acquired high-resolution magnetic dataset, thanks to susceptibility and magnetic remanence values gathered from on-land rock samples at Stromboli. A 3D inverse model is here proposed, allowing a full definition of the submerged SdF structure geometry.

  8. A new SO2 emissions budget for Anatahan volcano (Mariana Islands) based on ten years of satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Brendan; Popp, Christoph; Andrews, Benjamin; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing offers great potential for the study of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions from volcanoes worldwide. Anatahan is a remote volcano in the Mariana Islands, SW Pacific. Existing SO2 emissions data from Anatahan, from ground-based UV spectrometer measurements, place the volcano among the largest natural SO2 sources worldwide. However, these measurements are limited in number and only available from intervals of eruptive activity. Activity varies widely at Anatahan: over the past decade, records held in the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program Volcanoes of the World database describe the alternation of intense eruptions with long intervals of quiescence, where much lower intensity activity took place. We present ten years of satellite-based measurements of SO2 in the atmosphere over Anatahan, using data from the UV spectrometers OMI, GOME-2, and SCIAMACHY, and the IR spectrometer AIRS. We find Anatahan's emissions to be highly variable both within and between intervals of eruption and quiescence. We demonstrate a close agreement between trends in SO2 emission evident from our remote sensing data and records of activity compiled from a range of other sources and instruments, across daily to annual temporal scales. Mean eruptive SO2 emissions at Anatahan are ~6400 t/d, and range from <1000 to >18000 t/d. Quiescent emissions are below our instrument detection limits and are therefore unlikely to exceed 150-300 t/d. Overall, accounting for both eruptive and quiescent emissions, we calculate a revised decadal mean SO2 emission rate of 1060-1200 t/d. We further calculate a total decadal SO2 yield from Anatahan of 4-5 Mt, significantly lower than the 17-34 Mt calculated if ground-based campaign data are used in isolation. The use of isolated measurements to extrapolate longer term emissions budgets is subject to clear uncertainty, and we argue that our satellite observations, covering a longer interval of Anatahan's history, are better suited to such calculations, and do not require widespread extrapolation. We propose that the use of multi-year satellite datasets, ideally in conjunction with key ground-based data and longterm records of activity, can make major improvements to existing emissions budgets at Anatahan and other volcanoes worldwide.

  9. The resource and development potential of the Makushin Volcano geothermal reservoir of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, J.W.; Denig-Chakroff, D.N.; Economides, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    Geological, geophysical, geochemical, and well flow-test data suggest a 13+- km/sup 3/ bulk volume, water-dominated, 195/sup 0/C geothermal reservoir that reaches a depth of 4.4+- km beneath the Makushin Volcano caldera. Through numerous fractures, this reservoir is presently discharging gases on the northern, eastern, and southern flanks of the volcano, as indicated by the occurrence of numerous fumaroles. Rising gases are also escaping directly to the surface through the caldera, as reflected by the largest fumarole field on the summit caldera.

  10. Volcano-ice-sea interaction in the Cerro Santa Marta area, northwest James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabozo, Fernando M.; Strelin, Jorge A.; Orihashi, Yuji; Sumino, Hirochika; Keller, Randall A.

    2015-05-01

    We present here the results of detailed mapping, lithofacies analysis and stratigraphy of the Neogene James Ross Island Volcanic Group (Antarctic Peninsula) in the Cerro Santa Marta area (northwest of James Ross Island), in order to give constraints on the evolution of a glaciated volcanic island. Our field results included recognition and interpretation of seventeen volcanic and glacial lithofacies, together with their vertical and lateral arrangements, supported by four new unspiked K-Ar ages. This allowed us to conclude that the construction of the volcanic pile in this area took place during two main eruptive stages (Eruptive Stages 1 and 2), separated from the Cretaceous bedrock and from each other by two major glacial unconformities (U1 and U2). The U1 unconformity is related to Antarctic Peninsula Ice sheet expansion during the late Miocene (before 6.2 Ma) and deposition of glacial lithofacies in a glaciomarine setting. Following this glacial advance, Eruptive Stage 1 (6.2-4.6 Ma) volcanism started with subaerial extrusion of lava flows from an unrecognized vent north of the study area, with eruptions later fed from vent/s centered at Cerro Santa Marta volcano, where cinder cone deposits and a volcanic conduit/lava lake are preserved. These lava flows fed an extensive (> 7 km long) hyaloclastite delta system that was probably emplaced in a shallow marine environment. A second unconformity (U2) was related to expansion of a local ice cap, centered on James Ross Island, which truncated all the eruptive units of Eruptive Stage 1. Concomitant with glacier advance, renewed volcanic activity (Eruptive Stage 2) started after 4.6 Ma and volcanic products were fed again by Cerro Santa Marta vents. We infer that glaciovolcanic eruptions occurred under a moderately thin (~ 300 m) glacier, in good agreement with previous estimates of paleo-ice thickness for the James Ross Island area during the Pliocene.

  11. The 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands: Chronology, volcanology, and deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Moore, R.B.; Sako, M.; White, R.A.; Koyanagi, S.K.; Chong, R.; Camacho, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    The first historical eruption on Anatahan Island occurred on 10 May 2003 from the east crater of the volcano. The eruption was preceded by several hours of seismicity. Two and a half hours before the outbreak, the number of earthquakes surged to more than 100 events per hour. At 0730 UTC, the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center issued an ash advisory. Although the eruption lasted for 3 months, the majority of erupted material was expelled during the first 2 weeks. The opening episode of the eruption resulted in a deposit of juvenile scoria and lithic clasts, the latter derived from geothermally altered colluvial fill from the vent area. The opening episode was followed by crater enlargement and deepening, which produced deposits of coarse, reddish-brown ash containing a mixture of juvenile and lithic clasts. The third episode of the eruption produced coarse ash and lapilli comprised of juvenile scoria and minor amounts of lithics. Plume heights were 4500 to 13,000 m for the initial three phases. The fourth episode, from about May 18 through early August, was characterized by smaller plume heights of 900 to 2400 m, and steam was the dominant component. Minor amounts of coarse ash and accretionary-lapilli ash comprise most of the deposits of the fourth episode, although ballistic blocks and bombs of andesite lava are also locally present. These andesite blocks were emplaced by an explosion on 14 June, which destroyed a small lava dome extruded during the first week of June. Activity waned as the summer progressed, and subsequent ash deposits accumulated in July and early August, by which time the eruption had effectively ended. In September and October, degassing and geothermal activity continued, characterized by small geysers, boiling water, and jetting steam. Noteworthy deviations from this activity were a surge event in late May-early June and the destruction of the lava dome on 14 June. We calculated on-land tephra-fall deposits to have a bulk volume of about 27.5 ?? 106 m3, covering an area of 40.6 km2. We determined the juvenile to lithic content of the deposits and corrected the bulk volume to a juvenile volume of 24.0 ?? 106 m3. We use a volume corrected density of 1.32 g/cm3 to convert the juvenile volume of 24.0 ?? 106 m3 to a magma volume of 13.2 ?? 106 m3. Using the methods of Fierstein and Nathenson (1992) [Fierstein, J., Nathenson, M., 1992. Another look at the calculation of fallout tephra volumes. Bull. Volcanology. 54, 156-167.], we computed the total eruption volume at 45.4 ?? 106 m3. Deformation surveys recorded large changes surrounding the east crater. The modeled volumetric change based on the surveys was 0.82 ?? 106 m3 of magma, which we estimate corresponds to a minimum intrusion of 10 ?? 106 m3 of magma which is in good agreement with our calculated on-land magma volume.

  12. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; Santana-Casiano, J.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.

    2013-12-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. (A) Natural color composite from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument aboard ENVISAT Satellite (European Space Agency), (November 9, 2011 at 14:45 UTC). Remote sensing data have been used to monitor the evolution of the volcanic emissions, playing a fundamental role during field cruises in guiding the Spanish government oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. The inset map shows the position of Canary Islands west of Africa and the study area (solid white box). (B) Location of the stations carried out from November 2011 to February 2012 at El Hierro. Black lines denote transects A-B and C-D.

  13. Use of precipitation and groundwater isotopes to interpret regional hydrology on a tropical volcanic island: Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Janik, C.J.; Kauahikaua, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for groundwater in the Kilauea volcano area of the Island of Hawaii. A network of up to 66 precipitation collectors was emplaced in the study area and sampled twice yearly for a 3-year period. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are correlated with trade wind, rain shadow, and high- elevation climatological patterns. Temporal variations in precipitation isotopes are controlled more by the frequency of storms than by seasonal temperature fluctuations. Results from this study suggest that (1) sampling network design must take into account areal variations in rainfall patterns on islands and in continental coastal areas and (2) isotope/elevation gradients on other tropical islands may be predictable on the basis of similar climatology. Groundwater was sampled yearly in coastal springs, wells, and a few high-elevation springs. Areal contrasts in groundwater stable isotopes and tritium indicate that the volcanic rift zones compartmentalize the regional groundwater system, isolating the groundwater south of Kilauea's summit and rift zones. Part of the Southwest Rift gone appears to act as a conduit for water from higher elevation, but there is no evidence for downrift flow in the springs and shallow wells sampled in the lower East Rift Zone.

  14. Enhancement of sub-daily positioning solutions for surface deformation surveillance at El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, G.; García, A.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Marrero, J. M.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2013-06-01

    El Hierro Island in the Canary Archipelago recently experienced a submerged eruption a few kilometers off its southern shore, detected 2011 October 10 on the island's south-rift alignment. The seismic activity suddenly increased around mid 2011 July, and ground deformation was then detected on the only geodetic benchmark that is continuously observed by global navigation satellite systems techniques and provides public data access. Based on that information, several other global navigation satellite system signal receivers were deployed on the island to provide continuous observation. For data collected by these receivers, a processing strategy was applied to achieve millimeter-level half-hourly positioning solutions. Position updates every 24 h are satisfactory to determine tectonic-plates' velocities. Updates near 1 s or less are required to characterize seismic waves. In between, minute-level updates are well suited for monitoring active volcano's inflation or deflation, providing an optimal time resolution of the local ground deformation. In half-hourly positioning solutions, the heterogeneous satellites' distribution in their orbital planes gives different constraints during satellite-constellation revolution, which can bias the solutions. Also, several geophysical influences can bias the solutions, including those related to gravitational movements. These influences have mostly semi-diurnal periodicities and may be considered Gaussian colored noise on the position's time series. Daily solutions that average out these influences can be applied in active volcanoes, but they can impose some limitations because they average the daily deformation, and the update waiting time is not suitable when near real-time surveillance is mandatory. These semi-diurnal biases do need to be removed or minimized to achieve millimeter-level sub-daily positioning solutions, however, and to do so, a discrete Kalman filter was applied to enhance the half-hourly positioning solutions required during El Hierro's 2011-2012 unrest and eruption. Throughout El Hierro's volcanic activity, there were correlations between ground deformation and seismic activity. Many times the deformation preceded the earthquakes, though at other times the seismic activity was followed by the ground deformation response. This correlation is the outcome of ground deformation taking place as the result of energy accommodation, whereas seismic events correspond to energy release. Hence, those observed correlations indicate that the Kalman filter-enhanced half-hourly positioning solutions measured local ground deformation accurately; they were not a mathematical "trick" producing a spurious precision.

  15. Solomon's Sea and [Pi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a whimsical survey of the various explanations which might account for the biblical passage in I Kings 7:23 that describes a round object--a bronze basin called Solomon's Sea--as having diameter ten cubits and circumference thirty cubits. Can the biblical pi be any number other than 3? We offer seven different perspectives on this…

  16. Petrology and geochemistry of the Banks Peninsula volcanoes, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. C.; Taylor, S. R.

    1980-03-01

    Within the volcanic sequence of the twin volcanoes of Lyttelton and Akaroa, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand a number of different magma series have been distinguished. An early series of hawaiites (McQueens Valley Formation) was erupted about 32 m.y. ago and is of transitional or mildly tholeiitic chemistry. Stratigraphically above the McQueens Valley Formation, but unconformably overlain by the main volcanic dome sequence, is a unit of rhyolite (Gebbies Pass Rhyolites) which is not directly related to the earlier or later basaltic volcanism. The rhyolite was probably formed during intracrustal melting which was related to the rise of basaltic magma into the crust. Between 12 and 9.7 m.y. a large volcanic dome, composed mainly of hawaiite, was built at Lyttelton. Dykes, which intrude the Lyttelton volcanic sequence, range in composition from basalt to trachyte. Late, mildly alkalic, basaltic flank flows (7.5-5.8 m.y.) occur in several areas and they, and the differentiated rocks of the dyke swarm can be related by a crystal fractionation model which has been quantitatively tested. Following construction of the Lyttelton dome a second larger dome was built at Akaroa between 9 and 7.5 m.y. The rocks of the Akaroa Volcano are principally hawaiites but rocks ranging in composition through to trachyte also occur. The differentiated rocks of the Akaroa volcano have derived from the basaltic rocks by a crystal fractionation controlled process, operating during ascent through the crust. None of the Banks Peninsula basalts appear to have derived from primitive (pyrolitic) mantle material, but progressive changes in the chemistry of the basalts with time implies that the mantle source regions were evolving geochemically as partial melting proceeded. Later lavas tend to be more alkalic and to have lower MgO/FeO ratios than earlier lavas. The volcanic rocks of the Banks Peninsula volcanoes were derived by fractional removal of olivine, plagioclase, clinopyroxene, magnetite and apatite from ascending basaltic magma batches. Variations between the suites reflect differences between the parental magma batches.

  17. Characterization of pyroclastic deposits and pre-eruptive soils following the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Island Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Michaelson, G.; Ping, C.-L.; Plumlee, G.; Hageman, P.

    2010-01-01

    The 78 August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Island volcano blanketed the island in newly generated pyroclastic deposits and deposited ash into the ocean and onto nearby islands. Concentrations of water soluble Fe, Cu, and Zn determined from a 1:20 deionized water leachate of the ash were sufficient to provide short-term fertilization of the surface ocean. The 2008 pyroclastic deposits were thicker in concavities at bases of steeper slopes and thinner on steep slopes and ridge crests. By summer 2009, secondary erosion had exposed the pre-eruption soils along gulley walls and in gully bottoms on the southern and eastern slopes, respectively. Topographic and microtopographic position altered the depositional patterns of the pyroclastic flows and resulted in pre-eruption soils being buried by as little as 1 m of ash. The different erosion patterns gave rise to three surfaces on which future ecosystems will likely develop: largely pre-eruptive soils; fresh pyroclastic deposits influenced by shallowly buried, pre-eruptive soil; and thick (>1 m) pyroclastic deposits. As expected, the chemical composition differed between the pyroclastic deposits and the pre-eruptive soils. Pre-eruptive soils hold stocks of C and N important for establishing biota that are lacking in the fresh pyroclastic deposits. The pyroclastic deposits are a source for P and K but have negligible nutrient holding capacity, making these elements vulnerable to leaching loss. Consequently, the pre-eruption soils may also represent an important long-term P and K source. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  18. The Submarine Volcano Eruption off El Hierro Island: Effects on the Scattering Migrant Biota and the Evolution of the Pelagic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  19. The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island: effects on the scattering migrant biota and the evolution of the pelagic communities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  20. Assessment of the exposure of islanders to ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, British West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Searl, A; Nicholl, A; Baxter, P

    2002-01-01

    Background and Aims: The Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, has been erupting since July 1995 and volcanic ash has fallen on the island throughout most of the eruption. The ash contains substantial quantities of respirable particles and unusually large amounts (15–20%) of the crystalline silica mineral, cristobalite. The purpose of the surveys described here, undertaken between December 1996 and April 2000, was to determine levels of personal exposure of islanders to volcanic ash and cristobalite in order to inform advice on the associated risks to health and the measures required to reduce exposure. Methods: Surveys of personal exposure to respirable dust and cristobalite were undertaken using cyclone samplers. In addition, direct reading instruments (DUSTTRAK) were used to monitor ambient air concentrations of PM10 at fixed sites and also to provide information about exposures to airborne particles associated with selected activities. Results: Environmental concentrations of airborne ash have been greatest in the areas where the most ash has been deposited and during dry weather. Individual exposure to airborne ash was related to occupation, with the highest exposures among gardeners, cleaners, roadworkers, and police at roadside checkpoints. During 1997 many of these individuals were exposed to concentrations of cristobalite that exceeded the ACGIH recommended occupational exposure limit. Since the population became confined to the north of the island in October 1997, even those in relatively dusty occupations have received exposures to cristobalite well below this limit. Conclusions: Most of the 4500 people who have remained on island since the eruption began have not been exposed to sufficiently high concentrations of airborne dust for long enough to be at risk of developing silicosis. However, more than a dozen individuals continued to experience frequent high occupational exposures to volcanic ash, some of whom may have had sufficient exposure to crystalline silica to be at risk of developing mild silicosis. If volcanic activity were to deposit further ash over the occupied areas of the island during the coming years, the risks of silicosis will become more substantial. PMID:12151608

  1. Environmental influences on soil CO 2 degassing at Furnas and Fogo volcanoes (São Miguel Island, Azores archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, F.; Ferreira, T.; Cabral Vieira, J.; Silva, C.; Gaspar, J. L.

    2008-11-01

    Since October 2001, four soil CO 2 flux stations were installed in the island of São Miguel (Azores archipelago), at Fogo and Furnas quiescent central volcanoes. These stations perform measurements by the accumulation chamber method and, as the gas flux may be influenced by external variables, the stations are equipped with several meteorological sensors. Multivariate regression analysis applied to the large datasets obtained allowed observing that the meteorological variables may influence the soil CO 2 flux oscillations from 18% to 50.5% at the different monitoring sites. Additionally, it was observed that meteorological variables (mainly soil water content, barometric pressure, wind speed and rainfall) play a different role in the control of the gas flux, depending on the selected monitoring site and may cause significant short-term (spike-like) fluctuations. These divergences may be potentially explained by the porosity and hydraulic conductivity of the soils, topographic effects, drainage area and different exposure of the monitoring sites to the weather conditions. Seasonal effects are responsible for long-term oscillations on the gas flux. Before a reliable application of soil CO 2 flux to seismic and/or volcanic monitoring, it is important to recognize those environmental influences on the gas flux. In addition, understanding the external meteorological influences on the gas flux may be important for the public health risk assessment, since meteorological parameters may cause also significant indoor CO 2 increases. In a house at Furnas Village (in Furnas volcano caldera), the values detected reached percentages as high as 20.8% due to significant decreases in the barometric pressure.

  2. IESID: Automatic system for monitoring ground deformation on the Deception Island volcano (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Páez, Raúl; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; de Gil, Amós

    2012-11-01

    When establishing the relative distance between two GNSS-GPS stations with sub-centimeter accuracy, it is necessary to have auxiliary data, some of which can only be collected some time after the moment of measurement. However, for monitoring highly-active geodynamic areas, such as volcanoes and landslides, data precision is not as essential as rapid availability, processing of data in real-time, and fast interpretation of the results. This paper describes the development of an integrated automatic system for monitoring volcanic deformation in quasi real-time, applied to the Deception volcano (Antarctica). This experimental system integrates two independent modules that enable researchers to monitor and control the status of the GNSS-GPS stations, and to determine a surface deformation parameter. It comprises three permanent stations, one of which serves as the reference for assessing the relative distance in relation to the other two. The availability of GNSS-GPS data in quasi real-time is achieved by means of a WiFi infrastructure and automated data processing. This system provides, in quasi real-time, a time series of varying distances that tells us the extent to which any ground deformation is taking place.

  3. Towards a Proactive Risk Mitigation Strategy at La Fossa Volcano, Vulcano Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biass, S.; Gregg, C. E.; Frischknecht, C.; Falcone, J. L.; Lestuzzi, P.; di Traglia, F.; Rosi, M.; Bonadonna, C.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive risk assessment framework was built to develop proactive risk reduction measures for Vulcano Island, Italy. This framework includes identification of eruption scenarios; probabilistic hazard assessment, quantification of hazard impacts on the built environment, accessibility assessment on the island and risk perception study. Vulcano, a 21 km2 island with two primary communities host to 900 permanent residents and up to 10,000 visitors during summer, shows a strong dependency on the mainland for basic needs (water, energy) and relies on a ~2 month tourism season for its economy. The recent stratigraphy reveals a dominance of vulcanian and subplinian eruptions, producing a range of hazards acting at different time scales. We developed new methods to probabilistically quantify the hazard related to ballistics, lahars and tephra for all eruption styles. We also elaborated field- and GIS- based methods to assess the physical vulnerability of the built environment and created dynamic models of accessibility. Results outline the difference of hazard between short and long-lasting eruptions. A subplinian eruption has a 50% probability of impacting ~30% of the buildings within days after the eruption, but the year-long damage resulting from a long-lasting vulcanian eruption is similar if tephra is not removed from rooftops. Similarly, a subplinian eruption results in a volume of 7x105 m3 of material potentially remobilized into lahars soon after the eruption. Similar volumes are expected for a vulcanian activity over years, increasing the hazard of small lahars. Preferential lahar paths affect critical infrastructures lacking redundancy, such as the road network, communications systems, the island's only gas station, and access to the island's two evacuation ports. Such results from hazard, physical and systemic vulnerability help establish proactive volcanic risk mitigation strategies and may be applicable in other island settings.

  4. Geomorphic evolution of the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island, Indian Ocean): Competition between volcanic construction and erosion since 1.4 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvany, Tiffany; Lahitte, Pierre; Nativel, Pierre; Gillot, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Réunion Island (Indian Ocean) is a volcanic complex whose eruptive history was dominated by the activity of two main edifices: Piton des Neiges (PN) and Piton de la Fournaise (PF) volcanoes. The tropical climate induces erosion processes that permanently compete with volcanic constructional processes. Exposed to the trade winds and associated heavy rainfalls, the northeastern part of the island exhibits the most complex morphological evolution. Geomorphological analysis, performed on a 50 m DEM and associated to new K-Ar ages has clarified the overall history of PN volcano. Each massif is assigned to one of the main building stages of the edifice. In addition, the arrangement of these different massifs reveals that the eruptive phases have led to successive relief inversions and successive excavations of large central depressions in the proximal area. As a result, the younger massifs are always located in more proximal parts of the volcano, the youngest being close to the edifice center. In distal areas, early lava flows were channeled into valleys incised along the massif boundaries, leading to a more complex geochronological organization. Quantitative study of the dissection of PN volcano allows us to propose a minimum eroded volume of 101 ± 44 and 105 ± 41 km 3 for the Mafate and Cilaos "Cirques" (depressions), respectively, during the last 180 kyr and a minimum average long-term erosion rate of 1.2 ± 0.4 km 3/ka. This leads us to estimate the removed volume during the whole history of PN volcano (> 1000 km 3) as equivalent to the volume of the deposits identified on the submarine flanks of Piton des Neiges volcano. Therefore, as regressive erosion appears to be the prevailing geomorphic process during the whole PN history, it questions the presence of major flank collapses younger than 1.4 Ma on this volcano. Erosion processes have largely been neglected in recent models, but our study emphasizes them as a key component of landscape development and a major process in the morphological evolution of Réunion Island that has to be fully integrated in future studies.

  5. GPS monitoring of Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory uses a variety of ground- and satellite-based techniques to monitor Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes.  Here, an HVO scientist sets up a portable GPS receiver to track surface changes during an island-wide survey of Hawai‘i’s volcanoes. &n...

  6. Long- and short-term temporal variations of the diffuse CO2 emission from Timanfaya volcano, Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, P. A.; Padilla, G.; Calvo, D.; Padrón, E.; Melian, G.; Dionis, S.; Nolasco, D.; Barrancos, J.; Rodríguez, F.; Pérez, N.

    2012-04-01

    Lanzarote Island is an emergent part of the East Canary Ridge and it is situated approximately 100 km from the NW coast of Morocco, covering an area of about 795km2. The largest historical eruption of the Canary Islands, Timanfaya, took place during 1730-36 in this island when long-term eruptions from a NE-SW-trending fissure formed the Montañas del Fuego. The last eruption at Lanzarote Island occurred during 1824, Tinguaton volcano, and produced a much smaller lava flow that reached the SW coast. At present, one of the most prominent phenomena at Timanfaya volcanic field is the high maintained superficial temperatures occurring in the area since the 1730 volcanic eruption. The maximum temperatures recorded in this zone are 605°C, taken in a slightly inclined well 13 m deep. Since fumarolic activity is absent at the surface environment of Lanzarote, to study the diffuse CO2 emission becomes an ideal geochemical tool for monitoring its volcanic activity. Soil CO2 efflux surveys were conducted throughout Timanfaya volcanic field and surrounding areas during the summer periods of 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, fall period of 2010 and winter, spring and summer periods of 2011 to investigate long and short-term temporal variations of the diffuse CO2 emission from Timanfaya volcano. Soil CO2 efflux surveys were undertaken at Timanfaya volcanic field always under stable weather conditions to minimize effects of meteorological conditions on the CO2 at the soil atmosphere. Approximately 370-430 sampling sites were selected at the surface environment of Timanfaya to obtain an even distribution of the sampling points over the study area. The accumulation chamber method (Parkinson et al., 1981) was used to perform soil CO2 efflux measurements in-situ by means of a portable non dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO2 analyzer, which was interfaced to a hand size computer that runs data acquisition software. At each sampling site, soil temperature at 15 and 40cm depth was also measured by means of a thermocouple together with soil gas samples collected during the campaign of 2010 to evaluate the chemical and isotopic composition of soil gases. Diffuse CO2 emission values have ranged between non detectable values to 34 g m-2 d-1, and most of the study area have shown relatively low values, around the detection limit of the instrument (~0,5 g m-2 d-1). Higher soil CO2 diffuse emission values were observed where thermal anomalies occur, indicating a convective mechanism transport of gas from depth at these areas. Total CO2 outputs of the study area have been estimated in the range 41-518 t d-1 during the study period. Long-term temporal variation on total CO2 diffuse emission shows a peak recorded on winter 2011, suggesting a seasonal control on the CO2 emission. As part of the volcanic surveillance program and to understand the dynamics of CO2 diffuse emission at Timanfaya volcanic zone, an automatic geochemical station was installed in July 2010 to monitor the CO2 emission and investigate the short-term temporal variation. Time series of soil CO2 efflux shows also a close relationship with seasonal changes mainly due to rainfall.

  7. A Summary of Geothermal Exploration and Data from Stratigraphic Test Well No. 1 Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Don A.; Economides, Michael J.

    1983-12-15

    Geothermal resource investigations have been conducted for the past four years on Unalaska Island in the Aleutian Chain. The focus of the work has been Makushin Volcano, about 12 miles from the cities of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. In the summer of 1982, three widely spaced deep temperature gradient holes were drilled which encountered high temperatures. During the summer of 1983, a three inch diameter "slim hole" well, ST-1, was drilled to 1,949 feet. A shallow, low pressure, steam zone and a relatively productive hot water zone at total depth were encountered. The lower zone produced 47,000 lb/hr, limited by reaching critical mass velocity at the orifice. The static bottomhole pressure and temperature were 478 psig and 379{degrees}F, respectively. Analysis of transient pressure and flow data yielded a productivity inex of 3,470 lb/hr/psi and a permeability-thickness of 50,900 md-ft for the three-foot (at the wellbore) lower zone fracture. A preliminary reservoir/wellbore flow evaluation for a possible power plant indicates two commercial-size wells could fuel a 10 megawatt facility.

  8. Spatio-temporal evolution of a dispersed magmatic system and its implications for volcano growth, Jeju Island Volcanic Field, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Cronin, Shane J.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Sohn, Young Kwan; Maas, Roland

    2012-09-01

    Jeju Island is the emergent portion of a basaltic volcanic field developed over the last c. 1.8 Ma on continental crust. Initial volcanism comprised dispersed, small-volume (< 0.01 km3) alkali basaltic eruptions that incrementally constructed a tuff pile. Lavas and scoria from continuing small-scaled monogenetic volcanism capped this foundation. From c. 0.4 Ma large-volume (> 1 km3) eruptions began, with lavas building a composite shield. Three magma suites can be recognized: Early Pleistocene high-Al alkali (HAA), and Late Pleistocene to Holocene low-Al alkali (LAA) and subalkali (SA). The chemical similarity between small-volume and primitive large-volume eruptions suggests analogous parent magmas and fractionation histories that are independent of erupted volumes. The large-volume magmas evolved to trachyte, which erupted in two distinct episodes: the HAA Sanbangsan suite at c. 750 ka and the LAA Hallasan suite at c. 25 ka. Sr and Nd isotopes indicate that the early trachytes were contaminated by upper crustal material, whereas the later magmas were not. Both suites bear a Nd isotope signature indicative of lower crustal interaction. Sub-suites transitional between HAA and LAA, and between LAA and SA, indicate that melting occurred in discrete, but adjacent, mantle domains. Throughout the evolution of this volcano, each magma batch erupted separately, and a centralized plumbing system was never created. The Island's central peak (Mt. Halla 1950 m a.s.l.) is therefore not a sensu stricto stratovolcano, but marks the point of peak magma output in a distributed magmatic system. Jeju's shape and topography thus represent the spatial variation of fertility of the mantle below it. An increase in melt production in the Late Pleistocene was related to a deepening of the melting zone due to regional tectonic rearrangements. Temporal coincidences between magmatic pulses on Jeju and large-scale caldera eruptive events along the nearest subduction system in Kyushu, Japan, suggest that tectonic extension and changing strain rates may drive volcanism on a regional basis, influencing the intraplate volcanism of Jeju Island.

  9. Extreme Spatial Variability in Microbial Mat Communities from Submarine Hydrothermal Vents Located at Multiple Volcanoes along the Mariana Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanic arc systems are the most active tectonic feature in the world, but are among the least studied. The Western Pacific contains ~20,000 km of volcanic arcs, of which only ~2% have been systematically surveyed. The lack of comprehensive knowledge of volcanic arcs is compounded by the incredible variability found in relatively short distances. The complex source history of hydrothermal fluids and the variable depths of seamounts found in island arc systems result in highly variable vent chemistries and therefore unique microbial habitats within relatively short distances. The Mariana Island Arc was surveyed in 2003 and areas with suspected hydrothermal activities were identified for targeted remote operating vehicle (ROV) exploration and sampling in 2004. Sixteen microbial mat samples from five seamounts ranging from 145-1742 mbsl and from ambient to 222°C were collected and analyzed with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), cluster analysis of terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) community fingerprints, and by clone library analysis of small subunit ribosomal rDNA genes. The microbial mat communities from the Mariana Island Arc exhibit greater spatial variability within their community structure than microbial mats sampled from mid-ocean ridge or hotspot hydrothermal vents from a comparable scale. Microbial communities from the summit of NW Eifuku Volcano are dominated by putative iron-oxidizing phylotypes at the Yellow Top and Yellow Cone Vent sites, but are dominated by sulfur-oxidizing ?-Proteobacteria at the Champagne Vent site. Mats collected at the Mat City Vent site on E Diamante Seamount contained nearly three times as much biomass as any other mat sample collected, and is dominated by a Planctomyces phylotype. Hydrothermal sediments at the Fish Spa site located on Daikoku Seamount contained the second highest biomass detected and supported a large community of flatfish indicating a direct route for biomass being channeled up the food chain. The microbial community at Fish Spa consists of a highly diverse assemblage of Bacteroidetes, ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. While in contrast, the microbial mat at the Iceberg Vent site on NW Rota I is dominated by a single phylotype of ?-Proteobacteria.

  10. Transient volcano deformation sources imaged with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Application to Seguam Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Thirty interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, spanning various intervals during 1992–2000, document coeruptive and posteruptive deformation of the 1992–1993 eruption on Seguam Island, Alaska. A procedure that combines standard damped least squares inverse methods and collective surfaces, identifies three dominant amorphous clusters of deformation point sources. Predictions generated from these three point source clusters account for both the spatial and temporal complexity of the deformation patterns of the InSAR data. Regularized time series of source strength attribute a distinctive transient behavior to each of the three source clusters. A model that combines magma influx, thermoelastic relaxation, poroelastic effects, and petrologic data accounts for the transient, interrelated behavior of the source clusters and the observed deformation. Basaltic magma pulses, which flow into a storage chamber residing in the lower crust, drive this deformational system. A portion of a magma pulse is injected into the upper crust and remains in storage during both coeruption and posteruption intervals. This injected magma degasses and the volatile products accumulate in a shallow poroelastic storage chamber. During the eruption, another portion of the magma pulse is transported directly to the surface via a conduit roughly centered beneath Pyre Peak on the west side of the island. A small amount of this magma remains in storage during the eruption, and posteruption thermoelastic contraction ensues. This model, made possible by the excellent spatial and temporal coverage of the InSAR data, reveals a relatively simple system of interrelated predictable processes driven by magma dynamics.

  11. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  12. Chronic exposure to volcanic air pollution and DNA damage in Furnas Volcano (São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal) inhabitants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhares, Diana; Garcia, Patricia; Silva, Catarina; Ferreira, Teresa; Barroso, Joana; Camarinho, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Armindo

    2015-04-01

    Many studies in volcanic air pollution only have in consideration the acute toxic effects of gas or ash releases however the impact of chronic exposure to ground gas emissions in human health is yet poorly known. In the Azores archipelago (Portugal), São Miguel island has one of the most active and dangerous volcanoes: Furnas Volcano. Highly active fumarolic fields, hot springs and soil diffuse degassing phenomena are the main secondary volcanic phenomena that can be seen at the volcano surroundings. One of the main gases released in these diffuse degassing areas is radon (222Rn), which decay results in solid particles that readily settle within the airways. These decay particles emit alpha radiation that is capable of causing severe DNA damage that cumulatively can eventually cause cancer. Previous studies have established that chronic exposure to chromosome-damaging agents can lead to the formation of nuclear anomalies, such as micronuclei that is used for monitoring DNA damage in human populations. The present study was designed to evaluate whether chronic exposure to volcanic air pollution, associated to 222Rn, might result in DNA damage in human oral epithelial cells. A cross sectional study was performed in a study group of 142 individuals inhabiting an area where volcanic activity is marked by active fumarolic fields and soil degassing (hydrothermal area), and a reference group of 368 individuals inhabiting an area without these secondary manifestations of volcanism (non-hydrothermal area). For each individual, 1000 buccal epithelial cells were analyzed for the frequency of micronucleated cells (MNc) and the frequency of cells with other nuclear anomalies (ONA: pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis), by using the micronucleus assay. Information on lifestyle factors and an informed consent were obtained from each participant. Assessment of indoor radon was performed with the use of radon detectors. Data were analyzed with logistic regression models, adjusted for confounding factors (age, gender, smoking and drinking status, and number of cigarettes smoked per day). Results demonstrated that levels of radon in the environment were significantly different in study and reference groups (115 Bq/m3 vs. 47 Bq/m3, respectively; p<0.001); in winter, radon measurements reached the highest values both in the study and the reference groups (809 Bq/m3 vs. 56 Bq/m3, respectively). The frequency of MNc in the study group was significantly higher than in the reference group (2.93‰ vs. 2.58‰, respectively; p=0.002). The OR for formation of MNc in the hydrothermal area was 1.5 (95% CI 1.07-2.02). A moderate and positive correlation was found between the frequency of MNc and 222Rn (rs = 0.459, p<0.001). To our knowledge this is the first study that clearly associates the exposure of volcanogenic indoor radon in inhabitants of hydrothermal areas and the DNA damage in human oral epithelial cells, evidencing that volcanic air pollution is a risk factor of carcinogenesis. Although the present findings require confirmation in larger studies, bio-monitoring for DNA damage is recommended for inhabitants of localities with active volcanism and mitigation measures such as restriction of building in certain areas should be taken into consideration in these volcanically active areas.

  13. The September 1988 intracaldera avalanche and eruption at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; De Roy, T.; Carrasco, A.

    1991-01-01

    During 14-16 September 1988, a large intracaldera avalanche and an eruption of basaltic tephra and lava at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos, produced the most profound changes within the caldera since its collapse in 1968. A swarm of eight earthquakes (mb 4.7-5.5) occurred in a 14 h period on 24 February 1988 at Fernandina, and two more earthquakes of this size followed on 15 April and 20 May, respectively. On 14 September 1988, another earthquake (mb 4.6) preceded a complex series of events. A debris avalanche was generated by the failure of a fault-bounded segment of the east caldera wall, approximately 2 km long and 300 m wide. The avalanche deposit is up to 250 m thick and has an approximate volume of 0.9 km3. The avalanche rapidly displaced a preexisting lake from the southeast end of the caldera floor to the northwest end, where the water washed up against the lower part of the caldera wall, then gradually seeped into the avalanche deposit and was completely gone by mid-January 1989. An eruption began in the caldera within about 1-2 h of the earthquake, producing a vigorous tephra plume for about 12 h, then lava flows during the next two days. The eruption ended late on 16 September. Most of the eruptive activity was from vents on the caldera floor near the base of the new avalanche scar. Unequivocal relative timing of events is difficult to determine, but seismic records suggest that the avalanche may have occurred 1.6 h after the earthquake, and field relations show that lava was clearly erupted after the avalanche was emplaced. The most likely sequence of events seems to be that the 1988 feeder dike intruded upward into the east caldera wall, dislocated the unstable wall block, and triggered the avalanche. The avalanche immediately exposed the newly emplaced dike and initiated the eruption. The exact cause of the earthquakes is unknown. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  14. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  15. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  16. An investigation of the distribution of eruptive products on the shield volcanoes of the western Galapagos Islands using remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Duncan C.; Rowland, Scott K.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Wilson, Lionel; Oviedo-Perez, Victor-Hugo

    1991-01-01

    Recent volcanic activity in the Galapagos Islands is concentrated on the two westernmost islands, Isla Isabela and Isla Fernandina. Difficult access has thus far prevented comprehensive geological field studies, so we examine the potential of remotely sensed data as a means of studying volcanic processes in the region. Volcan Wolf is used as an example of the analysis of SPOT HRV-1 data undertaken for each volcano. Landsat TM data are analyzed in an attempt to construct a relative age sequence for the recent eruptive activity on Isla Fernandina. No systematic variation in the surface reflectance of lava flows as a function of age could be detected with these data. Thus it was not possible to complete a study of the temporal distribution of volcanic activity.

  17. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  18. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  19. Internal structure of the western flank of the Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands, from land

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alan G.

    wasting is a natural part of the evolution of volcanic islands, where deformation and indications of flank. Introduction [2] Largescale mass wasting is a fundamental process in the evolution of ocean volcanic islands volcanic islands, like the Canary Islands, is dominated by catastrophic debris avalanches, with few

  20. Response of the shallow aquifer of the volcano-hydrothermal system during the recent crises at Vulcano Island (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Giorgio; Federico, Cinzia; Madonia, Paolo; Paonita, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The shallow thermal aquifer at Vulcano Island is strongly affected by deep volcanic fluids. The most significant variations were observed during the 1989-1996 crisis due to a large input of steam and acidic gases from depth. Besides chemical variations related to the input of deep fluids, the record of the water-table elevation at monitored wells has provided remarkable insights into the pressure conditions of the volcano-hydrothermal system. After the pressure drop due to the extensive vaporization of the hydrothermal aquifer, occurred after 1993, the volcano-hydrothermal system has been re-pressurized since 2001, probably because of the contribution of volatiles from the hydrothermal-magmatic source. The increase in fluid pressure may have caused reopening of fractures (which had self-seated during the previous period of cooling) and the onset of a phase of higher vapor output in the fumarole field later in 2004. The fracture opening would have promoted further vapor separation from the deep fluid reservoir (hypothesized at 0.5-1.5 km depth) and finally the drainage of S-rich fluids into the shallow thermal aquifer (found out at few tens of meters of depth). The monitoring of both the water chemistry and the water-table elevation provides insights into the eventual pressurization of the volcano-hydrothermal system that precedes the fracture opening and the extensive drainage of deep fluids. The findings of this study could represent crucial information about the stability of the volcano edifice, and lead to reliable techniques for determining the risk of or even predicting phreatic explosions.

  1. Volcanic Unrest of Fogo Volcano in 2011-2012, S.Miguel Island, Azores, Observed by Continuous and Campaign GPS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Jun; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Ofeigsson, Benedikt; Ferreira, Teresa; Gaspar, Joao; Lorenzo, Maria; Araujo, Joao; Rodriques, Rita

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can occur after long time of dormancy as has been seen from the recent examples: Mount St. Helens 1980, Pinatubo 1991, Unzen 1991, Soufrière Hills volcano 1995, Chaitén 2008, and Eyjafjallajökull 2010. By utilizing space geodesy techniques, namely GNSS and InSAR, it has been reported that the inflation-deflation processes exist at several dormant volcanoes in the world, but the mechanism responsible for this phenomena is still controversial. Fundamental questions such as magma vs. hydrothermal fluids and volcanic vs. tectonic process remain unanswered in many cases. In this study, we analyze both continuous and campaign GPS data from Fogo volcano, S. Miguel Island, Azores. Although no geochemical and hydrothermal evidences for a magmatic intrusion were reported during the past seismic swarm episodes (1989, 2003-2006, and 2011-2012), geophysical data, both seismic and ground deformation, indicate possible volcanic sources. GPS time series spanned 2008-2013 period characterize tectonic plate divergence between Eurasian and Nubian, and reveal two different types of ground deformation associated with the 2011-2012 volcanic unrest of Fogo. One is the permanent edifice-scale inflation centered at NE summit which corresponds to the increase of volcano-tectonic events. Another is the subsequent minor-scale inflation-deflation reversals between Congro, a trachyte maar, east of Fogo and Furnas volcano. Calculated strain rates and GPS campaign results indicate that the 2011-2012 deformation is one order smaller than the previous unrest episode. A strong similarity exists to Matsushiro earthquake swarm (1965-1966) and Campi Flegrei volcanic unrests (1969-1972 and 1982-1984), which is the coexistence of an edifice-scale main inflation associated with intense volcano-tectonic earthquakes with inflation to deflation reversal that coincided with a sharp drop of seismicity. High recovery rate of inflation-deflation may be an indicator for the existence of hydrothermal fluids in the highly heterogeneous/porous media. We propose the following hypothesis for the 2011-2012 volcanic unrest of Fogo - (1) a minor magmatic intrusion beneath Fogo which acts as a heat source encourages lateral diffusion of fluids, (2) the fluids are transported through the existing cracks/fissures which are sustained by regional extension due to plate divergence, (3) influx of fluids increases pressure in cracks/fissures and generates lower-frequency earthquakes, and (4) discharge of fluids causes sudden pressure decrease and dilatancy recovery which leads seismic quiescence. Fogo volcano represents 450 years of dormancy since 1563-1564 when the last eruptions took place at the summit caldera. However, we show that the volcano has been experiencing intermittent magma ascents (i.e. repeating "failed eruptions") even its dormant period. Further researches are needed in order to understand the eruption triggering conditions. Nevertheless, we have a continuous GPS network that can detect small changes in the volcano roots and provide important contribution to evaluate future unrest episodes at Azores.

  2. Isolation, properties and amino acid sequences of a phospholipase A2 and its homologue without activity from the venom of a sea snake, Laticauda colubrina, from the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, C; Kimura, S; Kokubun, Y; Tamiya, N

    1988-08-01

    A phospholipase A2, Laticauda colubrina phospholipase A2 II (LcPLA-II), and a phospholipase A2 homologue, Laticauda colubrina phospholipase A2 homologue I (LcPLH-I), were isolated from the venom of the yellow-lipped sea snake, Laticauda colubrina, from the Solomon Islands. LcPLA-II showed phospholipase A2 activity towards egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine (24 mumol/min per mg at optimal conditions at 37 degrees C) and lethal potency (LD50 45 micrograms/kg body wt. intravenously in mice). Both of the activities were lost by treatment with p-bromophenacyl bromide. LcPLH-I showed neither phospholipase A2 activity nor lethal potency at a dose of 4.5 mg/kg body wt. in mice. It was not modified by the treatment with p-bromophenacyl bromide. LcPLA-II and LcPLH-I bound Ca2+ at a 1:1 molar ratio with KCa values of 105 microM and 44 microM at pH 8.0 respectively. Elucidation of the amino acid sequences of these two proteins showed that each protein consisted of a single chain of 118 amino acid residues, including 14 half-cystine residues. The two sequences are different from each other at 22 residues and highly homologous to those from other sources. The essential histidine residue for the phospholipase A2 activity at position 48 is replaced by an asparagine residue in the homologue LcPLH-I. Details of the separation of the peptides obtained by proteinase digestions of LcPLA-II and LcPLA-I and the determination of their amino acid sequences are given in Supplementary Publication SUP 50145 (14 pages), which has been deposited at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3178739

  3. A large proportion of asymptomatic Plasmodium infections with low and sub-microscopic parasite densities in the low transmission setting of Temotu Province, Solomon Islands: challenges for malaria diagnostics in an elimination setting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many countries are scaling up malaria interventions towards elimination. This transition changes demands on malaria diagnostics from diagnosing ill patients to detecting parasites in all carriers including asymptomatic infections and infections with low parasite densities. Detection methods suitable to local malaria epidemiology must be selected prior to transitioning a malaria control programme to elimination. A baseline malaria survey conducted in Temotu Province, Solomon Islands in late 2008, as the first step in a provincial malaria elimination programme, provided malaria epidemiology data and an opportunity to assess how well different diagnostic methods performed in this setting. Methods During the survey, 9,491 blood samples were collected and examined by microscopy for Plasmodium species and density, with a subset also examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). The performances of these diagnostic methods were compared. Results A total of 256 samples were positive by microscopy, giving a point prevalence of 2.7%. The species distribution was 17.5% Plasmodium falciparum and 82.4% Plasmodium vivax. In this low transmission setting, only 17.8% of the P. falciparum and 2.9% of P. vivax infected subjects were febrile (?38°C) at the time of the survey. A significant proportion of infections detected by microscopy, 40% and 65.6% for P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively, had parasite density below 100/?L. There was an age correlation for the proportion of parasite density below 100/?L for P. vivax infections, but not for P. falciparum infections. PCR detected substantially more infections than microscopy (point prevalence of 8.71%), indicating a large number of subjects had sub-microscopic parasitemia. The concordance between PCR and microscopy in detecting single species was greater for P. vivax (135/162) compared to P. falciparum (36/118). The malaria RDT detected the 12 microscopy and PCR positive P. falciparum, but failed to detect 12/13 microscopy and PCR positive P. vivax infections. Conclusion Asymptomatic malaria infections and infections with low and sub-microscopic parasite densities are highly prevalent in Temotu province where malaria transmission is low. This presents a challenge for elimination since the large proportion of the parasite reservoir will not be detected by standard active and passive case detection. Therefore effective mass screening and treatment campaigns will most likely need more sensitive assays such as a field deployable molecular based assay. PMID:20822506

  4. Influence of an ocean on the propagation of magmas within an oceanic basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; McGovern, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are a common feature on Earth and mostly occur within oceans, forming volcanic islands (e.g. Hawaii (USA), Galapagos (Ecuador), and recently Niijima (Japan)). As the volcano grows it will reach and emerge from the water surface and continue to grow above it. The deformation affecting the volcanic edifice may be influenced by the presence of the water level. We investigate how the presence of an ocean affects the state of stress within a volcanic edifice and thus magma propagation and fault formation. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, axisymmetric elastic models of a volcanic edifice overlying an elastic lithosphere were created. The volcanic edifice (height of ~6000 m and radius of ~ 60 km) was built either instantaneously or iteratively by adding new layers of equivalent volume on top of each other. In the later process, the resulting stress and geometry from the one step is transferred to the next as initial conditions. Thus each new layer overlies a deformed and stressed model. The water load was modeled with a boundary condition at the surface of the model. In the case of an instantaneous volcano different water level were studied, for an iteratively growing volcano the water level was set up to 4000 m. We compared the deformation of the volcanic edifice and lithosphere and the stress orientation and magnitude in half-space and flexural models with the presence or not of an ocean. The preliminary results show 1- major differences in the resulting state of stress between an instantaneous and an iteratively built volcanic edifice, similar to the results of Galgana et al. (2011) and McGovern and Solomon (1993), respectively; 2- the presence of an ocean decreases the amount of flexural response, which decreases the magnitude of differential stress within the models; and 3- stress orientation within the volcano and lithosphere in also influence of an ocean. Those results provide new insights on the state of stress and deformation of oceanic basaltic volcanic edifices. Galgana, G. A., P. J. McGovern, and E. B. Grosfils (2011), Evolution of large Venusian volcanoes: Insights from coupled models of lithospheric flexure and magma reservoir pressurization, J. Geophys. Res., 116(E3), E03009. McGovern, P. J., and S. C. Solomon (1993), State of stress, faulting, and eruption characteristics of large volcanoes on Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 98(E12), 23553-23579.

  5. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  6. Adventive hydrothermal circulation on Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) revealed by geophysical and geochemical approaches: Implications for general fluid flow models on volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finizola, A.; Ricci, T.; Deiana, R.; Cabusson, S. Barde; Rossi, M.; Praticelli, N.; Giocoli, A.; Romano, G.; Delcher, E.; Suski, B.; Revil, A.; Menny, P.; Di Gangi, F.; Letort, J.; Peltier, A.; Villasante-Marcos, V.; Douillet, G.; Avard, G.; Lelli, M.

    2010-09-01

    On March 15th 2007 a paroxysmal explosion occurred at the Stromboli volcano. This event generated a large amount of products, mostly lithic blocks, some of which impacted the ground as far as down to 200 m a.s.l., about 1.5 km far away from the active vents. Two days after the explosion, a new vapour emission was discovered on the north-eastern flank of the volcanic edifice, at 560 m a.s.l., just above the area called "Nel Cannestrà". This new vapour emission was due to a block impact. In order to investigate the block impact area to understand the appearance of the vapour emission, we conducted on May 2008 a multidisciplinary study involving Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Self-Potential (SP), CO 2 soil diffuse degassing and soil temperature surveys. This complementary data set revealed the presence of an anomalous conductive body, probably related to a shallow hydrothermal level, at about 10-15 m depth, more or less parallel to the topography. It is the first time that such a hydrothermal fluid flow, with a temperature close to the water boiling point (76 °C) has been evidenced at Stromboli at this low elevation on the flank of the edifice. The ERT results suggest a possible link between (1) the main central hydrothermal system of Stromboli, located just above the plumbing system feeding the active vents, with a maximum of subsurface soil temperature close to 90 °C and limited by the NeoStromboli summit crater boundary and (2) the investigated area of Nel Cannestrà, at ~ 500 m a.s.l., a buried eruptive fissure active 9 ka ago. In parallel, SP and CO 2 soil diffuse degassing measurements suggest in this sector at slightly lower elevation from the block impact crater a magmatic and hydrothermal fluid rising system along the N41° regional fault. A complementary ERT profile, on May 2009, carried out from the NeoStromboli crater boundary down to the block impact crater displayed a flank fluid flow apparently connected to a deeper system. The concept of shallow hydrothermal level have been compared to similar ERT results recently obtained on Mount Etna and La Fossa cone of Vulcano. This information needs to be taken into account in general fluid flow models on volcanoes. In particular, peripheral thermal waters (as those bordering the north-eastern coast of Stromboli) could be contaminated by hydrothermal and magmatic fluids coming from regional faults but also from the summit.

  7. Coding Basics Reed-Solomon Codes

    E-print Network

    Little, John B.

    Coding Basics Reed-Solomon Codes List Decoding Algorithms Algebraic Codes for Error Control John B B. Little Algebraic Codes for Error Control #12;Coding Basics Reed-Solomon Codes List Decoding Algorithms Outline 1 Coding Basics 2 Reed-Solomon Codes 3 List Decoding Algorithms John B. Little Algebraic

  8. A new model for the growth of basaltic shields based on deformation of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Amelung, Falk; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Space-geodetic measurements of surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina – the most frequently erupting volcano in the Galápagos Archipelago – reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from a shallow magma reservoir. This includes eruptions from fissures that are oriented both radially and circumferentially with respect to the summit caldera. A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image acquired 1–2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galápagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, and this assumption has guided models of the origin of the eruptive fissure geometry and overall development of the volcanoes. Our findings allow us to reinterpret the internal structure and evolution of Galápagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields. Furthermore, we note that stress changes generated by the emplacement of subhorizontal sills feeding one type of eruption may control the geometry of subsequent eruptive fissures. Specifically, circumferential fissures tend to open within areas uplifted by sill intrusions that initiated previous radial fissure eruptions. This mechanism provides a possible explanation for the pattern of eruptive fissures that characterizes all the western Galápagos volcanoes, as well as the alternation between radial and circumferential fissure eruptions at Fernandina. The same model suggests that the next eruption of Fernandina will be from a circumferential fissure in the area uplifted by the 2009 sill intrusion, just southwest of the caldera rim.

  9. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J.W.; Gallina, G.M.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Swanson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes; thereafter, the maximum plume height decreased and during the rest of the eruption usually did not exceed ???5 km (???17,000 ft), which lessened the potential hazard to aircraft at higher cruise altitudes. Drifting ash clouds commonly extended hundreds of kilometers from the volcano, occasionally as far west as the Philippines. Over the course of the eruptive activity in 2003-2004, the VAAC issued 323 advisories (168 with graphical depictions of ash clouds) for Anatahan, serving as a reliable source of ash-cloud information for aviation-related meteorological offices and air carriers. With a record of frequent eruptions in the CNMI, continued satellite and in situ real-time geophysical monitoring is needed at Anatahan and other Marianas volcanoes so that potential hazards to aviation from any future eruptive activity can be quickly and correctly assessed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  11. Don Swanson at Ash Outcrop Near Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Don Swanson (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows scientists in the CSAV International class how layers of ash outside of HVO indicate past explosive eruptions of Kilauea. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Hawaii Island, Hawaii...

  12. How changes in pore pressure affect fluid circulation in volcanoes: three examples from Vulcano Island, Mt. Etna and Mt Vesuvius (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, C.; Madonia, P.; Capasso, G.; D'Alessandro, W.; Bellomo, S.; Brusca, L.; Cusano, P.; Longo, M.; Paonita, A.; Petrosino, S.

    2013-05-01

    Fluids circulating in volcanic edifices are attracting increasing interest from scientists, mostly because their role in triggering flank instability, phreatic explosions, and eruptions has been documented in several cases worldwide [Newhall et al. 2001, Thomas et al. 2004]. Fluid pore pressure can change as an effect of either external (meteoric recharge, variation of the stress field), or endogenous causes (e.g. internal pressurization of magmatic volatiles and hydrothermal systems). The reciprocal roles of tectonics and magmatic/hydrothermal activity are still under investigation [Gottsman et al. 2007, Roeloffs et al. 2003]. We discuss the results of decennial data records collected in the aquifers of Mt Etna, Vulcano Island and Mt Vesuvius, and get insights on the role of tectonics and volcanic activity on the observed variations of water level and chemical composition. In Vulcano Island, the shallow thermal aquifer is deeply concerned by deep volcanic fluids. The most significant variations were observed during the 1988-96 crisis, due to the large input of steam and acidic gases from depth. In addition, the record of the water table elevation provided remarkable insights on the pressure of the volcano-hydrothermal system, which can be envisaged as the cause for the onset of the phase of higher vapor output in the fumarolic field in late 2004. On Mt. Vesuvius, the geochemical behavior of the aquifer appears strictly controlled by the input of volcanic gases and variations in the stress field. These latter, which were responsible for the seismic crisis of 1999, and the almost simultaneous increased input of CO2-rich vapor, significantly affected water chemistry and temperature, until 2006. The recent observations of low salinity, temperature, and dissolved carbon contents in groundwater provide strong evidence for reduced pressure in the volcano-hydrothermal system. The record of water chemistry available on Mt. Etna since 1994 shows coeval changes in almost all monitored sites, ascribed to the variable contribution over time of waters with different temperature and composition. In addition, the dissolved CO2 content is chiefly affected by the input of volcanic CO2. Given the intense dynamics of the volcano, with frequent eruptions and periodic inflation-deflation phases, as well as the uneven deformation of the edifice, changes in water chemistry can be attributed, at least in part, to stress-related changes in pore pressure. Changes of pore pressure and micro-fracturation are controlling fluid movement (water and gases) within the volcano, producing part of the observed geochemical variations. The accurate modeling of the proposed process of fluid pressure increase, fracturing, and drainage of deep fluids will benefit of a multidisciplinary approach, able to clarify the cause-effect relationship and critical conditions. Newhall CG et al. 2001. J. Geol. Soc. Philipp., 56, 69-84. Thomas ME et al. 2004. Terra Nova, 16, 312-317. Gottsmann J. et al. 2007. GRL 34, L07307. Roeloffs E. et al. 2003. JVGR 127, 269-303.

  13. The growth of Ritter Island volcano, Papua New Guinea, and the lateral collapse landslide and tsunami of 1888: new insights from eyewitness accounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Melanie Jane; Day, Simon; Downes, Hilary

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of the 1888 edifice lateral collapse landslide and tsunami event at Ritter Island volcano, using a more complete set of primary and secondary eyewitness accounts than has been used in previous studies. The collapse, early in the morning of March 13th, 1888, removed most of the island and its western submarine flank down to the base of the edifice some 900 m below sea level. The resulting tsunami is believed to have eradicated entire coastal communities on the surrounding islands and was recorded by German colonists in several locations around the Bismarck Sea and on adjacent coasts. Our analysis, based in particular upon new and complete translation of the German accounts, considers the evolution of the island over the previous two centuries and the events of March 1888, with the aim of clarifying the constraints that exist upon the cause, kinematics and mechanisms of the lateral collapse. Our analysis indicates that the pre-collapse Ritter edifice produced frequent strombolian eruptions and steam emissions, building an approximately 1700 m wide, notably steep-sided edifice with a N-S elongated oval shape in plan, by the late 1800s. Most activity was concentrated at a group of summit craters some 800 m above sea level, possibly also in a north-south line, with lesser flank fissure activity. The accounts of the tsunami indicate that the 1888 collapse involved a single large-scale catastrophic landslide, but descriptions of the island in the following days indicate a period in which there were many small landslides from the newly formed and unstable collapse scar. There is no evidence for a sequence of large landslides during this event and there is no clear evidence for a coincident or causal magmatic explosive eruption. One report suggests that there was activity (perhaps phreatic or phreatomagmatic explosions?) prior to the collapse that lead some of the resident local communities to seek higher ground, but evidence for precursory flank movements or changes in eruptive style have not been found in the historical accounts.

  14. Influence of an ocean on the propagation of magmas within an oceanic basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, N.; McGovern, P. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are a common feature on Earth and mostly occur within oceans, forming volcanic islands (e.g. Hawaii (USA), Galapagos (Ecuador), and recently Niijima (Japan)). As the volcano grows it will reach and emerge from the water surface and continue to grow above it. The deformation affecting the volcanic edifice may be influenced by the presence of the water level. We investigate how the presence of an ocean affects the state of stress within a volcanic edifice and thus magma propagation and fault formation. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, axisymmetric elastic models of a volcanic edifice overlying an elastic lithosphere were created. The volcanic edifice (height of ~6000 m and radius of ~ 60 km) was built either instantaneously or iteratively by adding new layers of equivalent volume on top of each other. In the later process, the resulting stress and geometry from the one step is transferred to the next as initial conditions. Thus each new layer overlies a deformed and stressed model. The water load was modeled with a boundary condition at the surface of the model. In the case of an instantaneous volcano different water level were studied, for an iteratively growing volcano the water level was set up to 4000 m. We compared the deformation of the volcanic edifice and lithosphere and the stress orientation and magnitude in half-space and flexural models with the presence or not of an ocean. The preliminary results show 1- major differences in the resulting state of stress between an instantaneous and an iteratively built volcanic edifice, similar to the results of [Galgana et al., 2011] and [McGovern and Solomon, 1993], respectively; 2- the presence of an ocean decreases the amount of flexural response, which decreases the magnitude of differential stress within the models; and 3- stress orientation within the volcano and lithosphere in also influence of an ocean. Those results provide new insights on the state of stress and deformation of oceanic basaltic volcanic edifices. Galgana, G. A., P. J. McGovern, and E. B. Grosfils (2011), J. Geophys. Res., 116(E3), E03009. McGovern, P. J., and S. C. Solomon (1993), Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 98(E12), 23553-23579.

  15. Pacific Western Boundary Currents Solomon Sea Glider Program

    E-print Network

    Pacific Western Boundary Currents Solomon Sea Glider Program William S The Solomon Sea carries the western boundary transport of the South Pacific. Subsurface currents Zoom in ... Solomon Sea South Equatorial Current East Australian Current Ekman

  16. GG 104 Volcanoes in the Sea How have the specific geological and geophysical environments of Pacific islands affected the societies that developed there? How do

    E-print Network

    GG 104 Volcanoes in the Sea How have the specific geological and geophysical environments 8/27 Tectonics II, Hotspots, Magma, Volcano Evolution Kious & Tilling (1996: 25-27), Hazlett), Williams (2009) 8a 10/13 MIDTERM EXAM 8b 10/15 Volcano deities elsewhere Rogers (1986), Nunn (2003) 10

  17. Phylogeography of the prehensile-tailed skink Corucia zebrata on the Solomon Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ingerid J; Donnellan, Stephen C; Bull, C Michael

    2012-01-01

    The biogeography of islands is often strongly influenced by prior geological events. Corucia zebrata (Squamata: Scincidae) is endemic to the geologically complex Solomon Archipelago in Northern Melanesia. We examined the level of divergence for different island populations of C. zebrata and discussed these patterns in light of Pleistocene land bridges, island isolation, and island age. Corucia zebrata was sampled from 14 locations across the Solomon Archipelago and sequenced at two mitochondrial genes (ND2 and ND4; 1697 bp in total) and four nuclear loci (rhodopsin, an unknown intron, AKAP9, and PTPN12). Measures of genetic divergence, analyses of genetic variation, and Bayesian phylogenetic inference were used and the data assessed in light of geological information. Populations of C. zebrata on separate islands were found to be genetically different from each other, with reciprocal monophyly on mitochondrial DNA. Populations on islands previously connected by Pleistocene land bridges were marginally less divergent from each other than from populations on other nearby but isolated islands. There are indications that C. zebrata has radiated across the eastern islands of the archipelago within the last 1–4 million years. Nuclear loci were not sufficiently informative to yield further information about the phylogeography of C. zebrata on the Solomon Archipelago. Analyses of the mitochondrial data suggest that dispersal between islands has been very limited and that there are barriers to gene flow within the major islands. Islands that have been isolated during the Pleistocene glacial cycles are somewhat divergent in their mitochondrial genotypes, however, isolation by distance (IBD) and recent colonization of isolated but geologically younger islands appear to have had stronger effects on the phylogeography of C. zebrata than the Pleistocene glacial cycles. This contrasts with patterns reported for avian taxa, and highlights the fact that biogeographic regions for island species cannot be directly extrapolated among taxa of differing dispersal ability. PMID:22833796

  18. Case of correlation between Rn anomalies and seismic activity on a volcano (Vulcano Island, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    SciTech Connect

    Del Pezzo, E.; Gasparini, P.; Mantovani, M.S.M.; Martini, M.; Capaldi, G.; Gomes, Y.T.; Pece, R.

    1981-09-01

    A factor of 10 increase in the Rn concentration in a shallow aquifer forefunning a shallow seismic swarm was observed at the island of Vulcano (Aeolian island arc). The peak of Rn anomaly preceded by about one month the seismic swarm, which had a cumulative magnitude of 2.1. The time lag between the two phenomena is much longer than expected, given the small energy released by the swarm. The observed phenomena may not have a direct cause-effect relationship, but they both can be a consequence of volcanic phenomena.

  19. The evolution of ocean island volcanoes in a stationary plate environment and its implications concerning hotspot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, R.

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of oceanic hotspot systems is strongly influenced by plate velocity relative to the melting source, age/thickness of the lithosphere, proximity to a plate boundary, and melting source parameters. In fast-moving plates, volcanic loci move away from the melting source and an obvious mechanism for the waning of volcanism is established. A linear island chain is thus created and a distinct edifice evolutionary pattern is recognizable. This evolutionary pattern is strongly influenced by long-term subsidence created by flexural loading and hotspot swell decay with plate movement, albeit some small uplift when edifices cross the flexural bulge; the transition from island to guyot is essentially dictated by subsidence. Conversely, in stationary or quasi-stationary plate environments, edifices do not or barely move away from the melting source so other mechanisms must be accounted for the long-term decrease in volcanic activity and the different edifice evolution. The Cape Verde Archipelago is the type-example of a hotspot in an old, stiff plate that is stationary with respect to its melting source, making it an ideal place to study ocean island evolution and oceanic hotspot dynamics in a stationary plate environment. Observations in this archipelago suggest that island evolution in such geodynamic environments is generally characterized by long-term vertical stability or even pronounced uplift trends, prolonging the islands lifetime above sea-level; the transition from island to guyot is essentially dictated by marine erosion. Uplift reconstructions for the Cape Verde Archipelago - using dateable relative sea-level tracers such as lava deltas, submarine volcanic units and marine terraces - suggest that two processes have acted to raise the islands during their lifetime. During an initial phase, mantle processes acted to build the swell. Subsequently, magmatic intrusions in the island edifice caused up to 350 m of local uplift at the scale of individual islands and often synchronous with vigorous volcanic stages. Finally, swell-wide uplift contributed a further 100 m of surface rise. This recent swell-wide uplift is well expressed throughout the archipelago by means of Quaternary marine terraces up to ~100 m asl, even in islands without recent volcanism. These observations pose several constraints concerning oceanic hotspot dynamics: first, a seemingly episodic hotspot swell growth implies that the buoyancy source changes that act to raise the swell are probably cumulative, favoring a model that advocates for accumulation and spreading of depleted material leftover from partial melting; secondly, intrusive processes at hotspots in stationary plate environments are probably much more important than previously thought, and are the likely source of significant amounts of uplift; and thirdly, plate velocity relative to the melting source is expected to be a powerful constraint on intrusive vs extrusive processes of island building.

  20. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift lasting a few hundred thousand years as the island migrates over a broad flexural arch related to isostatic compensation of a nearby active volcano. The arch is located about 190±30 km away from the center of volcanic activity and is also related to the rejuvenated volcanic stage on the islands. Reefs on Oahu that are uplifted several tens of m above sea level are the primary evidence for uplift as the islands over-ride the flexural arch. At the other end of the movement spectrum, both in terms of magnitude and length of response, are the rapid uplift and subsidence that occurs as magma is accumulated within or erupted from active submarine volcanoes. These changes are measured in days to years and are of cm to m variation; they are measured using leveling surveys, tiltmeters, EDM and GPS above sea level and pressure gauges and tiltmeters below sea level. Other acoustic techniques to measure such vertical movement are under development. Elsewhere, evidence for subsidence of volcanoes is also widespread, ranging from shallow water carbonates on drowned Cretaceous guyots, to mapped shoreline features, to the presence of subaerially-erupted (degassed) lavas on now submerged volcanoes. Evidence for uplift is more limited, but includes makatea islands with uplifted coral reefs surrounding low volcanic islands. These are formed due to flexural uplift associated with isostatic loading of nearby islands or seamounts. In sum, oceanic volcanoes display a long history of subsidence, rapid at first and then slow, sometimes punctuated by brief periods of uplift due to lithospheric loading by subsequently formed nearby volcanoes.

  1. Microearthquake activity around Kueishantao island, offshore northeastern Taiwan: Insights into the volcano-tectonic interactions at the tip of the southern Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, K. I.; Pan, C.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2013-05-01

    Kueishantao is a volcanic island located offshore the northeastern coast of Taiwan and lies at the tip of the southern Okinawa Trough which is the back-arc basin of the Ryukyu subduction zone. Its last eruption occurred during the Holocene (~ 7 ka), hence Kueishantao can be considered as an active volcano. In an effort to better understand how magmatic processes may interact with the regional tectonics, a seismic network was installed in the area during early January 2008. This network consisted of 16 three-component seismometers located both on Kueishantao and the coast of northeastern Taiwan. One year of data was analyzed yielding 425 earthquakes whose P and S arrival times were manually picked and each event was located using a nonlinear probabilistic location method. In order to improve the location accuracy, the minimum 1-D velocity model for this dataset was derived and all earthquakes were relocated using this model. The results show a tight cluster of events near Kueishantao while the remaining earthquakes are scattered between the island and mainland Taiwan. The majority of hypocentral depths range between 2.5 and 10 km where the former depth coincides with the bottom of the shallow sedimentary layer and the latter with the ductile lower crust. Waveforms of the three largest events were also inverted for the determination of their deviatoric and full moment tensor. No statistically significant isotropic component was found, while two of the events can be explained by a double-couple source. The third event exhibited a low frequency content (< 10 Hz) and a large non-double-couple component suggesting fluid involvement at its source. A stress inversion of all available focal mechanisms in the area shows that fluid circulation in the upper crust generates a local stress field around Kueishantao facilitating the opening of cracks along the NW-SE direction of regional extension.

  2. Groundwater salinity and hydrochemical processes in the volcano-sedimentary aquifer of La Aldea, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Fuentes, Tatiana; Cabrera, María del Carmen; Heredia, Javier; Custodio, Emilio

    2014-06-15

    The origin of the groundwater salinity and hydrochemical conditions of a 44km(2) volcano-sedimentary aquifer in the semi-arid to arid La Aldea Valley (western Gran Canaria, Spain) has been studied, using major physical and chemical components. Current aquifer recharge is mainly the result of irrigation return flows and secondarily that of rainfall infiltration. Graphical, multivariate statistical and modeling tools have been applied in order to improve the hydrogeological conceptual model and identify the natural and anthropogenic factors controlling groundwater salinity. Groundwater ranges from Na-Cl-HCO3 type for moderate salinity water to Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 type for high salinity water. This is mainly the result of atmospheric airborne salt deposition; silicate weathering, and recharge incorporating irrigation return flows. High evapotranspiration produces significant evapo-concentration leading to relative high groundwater salinity in the area. Under average conditions, about 70% of the water used for intensive agricultural exploitation in the valley comes from three low salinity water runoff storage reservoirs upstream, out of the area, while the remaining 30% derives from groundwater. The main alluvial aquifer behaves as a short turnover time reservoir that adds to the surface waters to complement irrigation water supply in dry periods, when it reaches 70% of irrigation water requirements. The high seasonality and intra-annual variability of water demand for irrigation press on decision making on aquifer use by a large number of aquifer users acting on their own. PMID:24698802

  3. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25627249

  4. Investigation of the Volcano-tectonic dynamics of Vulcano Island by long-term (40 years) geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Alparone, Salvatore; Gambino, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Obrizzo, Francesco; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    Vulcano island is a composite volcanic edifice located in the south-central sector of the Aeolian Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy). It is the southernmost tip of the southern branch of the Y-shaped archipelago; in particular, it is part of the bigger Lipari-Vulcano volcanic complex that comprises the two southernmost islands of the archipelago. This branch of the archipelago is NNW-SSE oriented and represent the off-shore prolongation of the Tindari-Letojanni tectonic lineament in the NE Sicily, splitting the Appennine chain on the west, from the Calabrian arc on the East. N-S compression seems to affect the western side of this NNW-SSE lineament, while extension affects the eastern one, with active volcanism and a NW dipping Benioff plane. Historic activity at Vulcano has been characterized by frequent transitions from phereatomagmatic to minor magmatic activity. The last eruption in 1888-90 was characterized by energetic explosive pulses and defines the so-called "vulcanian" type of activity. Since then, volcanic activity has taken the form of fumarolic emanations of variable intensity and temperature, mainly concentrated at "La Fossa" crater, with maximum temperatures ranging between 200° and 300° C; temperature increases and changes in the gas chemistry, were often observed. The most recent episode began in the 80's when fumarole temperature progressively increased to 690°C in May 1993. Vulcano is active and this favoured monitoring and research studies, in particular focussed on the most recent structures. In the frame of DPC-INGV "V3" project, we investigate the dynamics of the island through ca. 40 years of ground deformation and seismicity data collected by the discrete and continuous INGV monitoring networks. We considered levelling, GPS, EDM, seismic and tilt data. EDM and levelling measurements began in the middle 1970s and since the late 1990s the same EDM network has been surveyed by GPS. By combining and comparing geodetic data and seismicity we are able to distinguish three different scales of phenomena: the first one seems to be linked to the regional tectonics, with a general transpressive kinematics; the second one affects the northern half of the island and could be related to the caldera dynamics; the third one affects only the cone of La Fossa. Regional tectonic stress seems to play an important role in the transition of the volcanic system from a phase of stability to a phase of unrest, inducing the heating and the expansion of shallow hydrothermal fluids. Current local ground deformation at Vulcano may be linked to the geothermal system rather than magmatic sources.

  5. Evidence of flank failure deposit reactivation in a shield volcano. A favorable context for deep-seated landslide activation (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Pierre; Aunay, Bertrand; Famin, Vincent; Join, Jean-Lambert

    2014-05-01

    Giant flank failures are recurrent features of shield volcanoes, and their deposits (i.e. breccia), constitute a significant volume in a volcanic edifice. On La Réunion Island, the growth and development of Piton des Neiges volcano has been punctuated by several flank failure episodes. One of these failures is a deep-seated landslide (>200 Mm3) occurring nowadays in Grand Ilet, a plateau inhabited by 1 000 people in the cirque of Salazie, on the northern flank of Piton des Neiges. Here we present the results of a multidisciplinary study (structural geology and field mapping, GNSS monitoring, borehole logging) performed to characterize the geological structure the Grand Ilet landslide, and identify the instability factors that control this category of destabilization. Basic breccia deposits, up to 160 meters thick, constitute the main geological formation of the unstable mass. This breccia are cut by the headwall scar of the landslide, and covered by lava flows, indicating a minimum age of 200 kyr for the destabilization that produced the deposits. The breccia is consolidated out of the landslide area. The NE toe of the landslide is evidenced by an important compressional deformation of the base of the breccia, and striated surfaces in this deformed volume indicate a NE-direction of transport. In this deformed bulge, a clay-rich layer at the base of the breccia has been identified as the main slip plane. Using a video inspection of drill casings on three exploration boreholes, we reconstructed the 3D geometry of the slip plane at the base of the breccia. This reconstruction shows that the landslide plane has an average dip of 6° toward the NE. The displacement monitoring network shows that the unstable mass has a 5.5 km2 extension, with a variable azimuth of movement direction (N140° for the SW sector, and N45° for the NE sector). The planimetric displacements velocities range between 2 cm/year in the inner part of the unstable mass to 52 cm/year at the landslide toe. The dip of displacement vectors vary from 34° ± 9 uphill to 7° ± 2 downhill near the landslide toe. This displacement field, the topography and the drill casings inspection show that secondary shear zones are located inside the landslide mass, characterized by a lower deformation rate than the basal shear zone. However heterogeneous is the deformation, it more important at the base of the breccia (locally in the clay layer). Ultimately, our study suggests that the main slip plane has localized at the base of the breccia despite its induration. Thus we conclude that the Grand Ilet landslide is in fact a present-day reactivation of an old destabilization.

  6. Fumarole-Supported Islands of Biodiversity within a Hyperarid, High-Elevation Landscape on Socompa Volcano, Puna de Atacama, Andes? †

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Elizabeth K.; Halloy, Stephan R. P.; Reed, Sasha C.; Sowell, Preston; Schmidt, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Fumarolic activity supports the growth of mat-like photoautotrophic communities near the summit (at 6,051 m) of Socompa Volcano in the arid core of the Andes mountains. These communities are isolated within a barren, high-elevation landscape where sparse vascular plants extend to only 4,600 m. Here, we combine biogeochemical and molecular-phylogenetic approaches to characterize the bacterial and eucaryotic assemblages associated with fumarolic and nonfumarolic grounds on Socompa. Small-subunit rRNA genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced from two fumarolic soil samples and two reference soil samples, including the volcanic debris that covers most of the mountain. The nonfumarolic, dry, volcanic soil was similar in nutrient status to the most extreme Antarctic Dry Valley or Atacama Desert soils, hosted relatively limited microbial communities dominated by Actinobacteria and Fungi, and contained no photoautotrophs. In contrast, modest fumarolic inputs were associated with elevated soil moisture and nutrient levels, the presence of chlorophyll a, and 13C-rich soil organic carbon. Moreover, this soil hosted diverse photoautotroph-dominated assemblages that contained novel lineages and exhibited structure and composition comparable to those of a wetland near the base of Socompa (3,661-m elevation). Fumarole-associated eucaryotes were particularly diverse, with an abundance of green algal lineages and a novel clade of microarthropods. Our data suggest that volcanic degassing of water and 13C-rich CO2 sustains fumarole-associated primary producers, leading to a complex microbial ecosystem within this otherwise barren landscape. Finally, we found that human activities have likely impacted the fumarolic soils and that fumarole-supported photoautotrophic communities may be exceptionally sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:19074608

  7. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  8. Living with Volcanoes: Year Eleven Teaching Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Heron, Kiri; Andrews, Jill; Hooks, Stacey; Larnder, Michele; Le Heron, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes and experiences with volcanoes that helps students develop geography skills. Focuses on four volcanoes: (1) Rangitoto Island; (2) Lake Pupuke; (3) Mount Smart; and (4) One Tree Hill. Includes an answer sheet and resources to use with the unit. (CMK)

  9. Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea) at La Palma (Canary Islands)

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Carlos; Jaume, Damià; Oromí, Pedro; Juan, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Background The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands) and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea) lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. Results P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. Conclusion The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity. PMID:18234125

  10. Distribution, 14C chronology, and paleomagnetism of latest Pleistocene and Holocene lava flows at Haleakala volcano, Island of Maui, Hawai'i: a revision of lava flow hazard zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; McGeehin, John P.; Champion, Duane E.; Trusdell, Frank A.

    2006-01-01

    New mapping and 60 new radiocarbon ages define the age and distribution of latest Pleistocene and Holocene (past 13,000 years) lava flows at Haleakal? volcano, Island of Maui. Paleomagnetic directions were determined for 118 sites, of which 89 are in lava flows younger than 13,000 years. The paleomagnetic data, in conjunction with a reference paleosecular variation (PSV) curve for the Hawaiian Islands, are combined with our knowledge of age limitations based on stratigraphic control to refine age estimates for some of the undated lava flows. The resulting volumetric rate calculations indicate that within analytical error, the extrusion rate has remained nearly constant during the past 13,000 years, in the range 0.05–0.15 km3/kyr, only about half the long-term rate required to produce the postshield strata emplaced in the past ?1 Myr. Haleakal?'s eruptive frequency is similar to that of Hual?lai volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i, but its lava flows cover substantially less area per unit time. The reduced rates of lava coverage indicate a lower volcanic hazard than in similar zones at Hual?lai.

  11. Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano as viewed to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. The mushroom-shaped plume rose from avalanches of hot debris (pyroclastic flows) that cascaded down the north flank of the volcano. A smaller, white steam plume rises from the summit crater. ...

  12. Small Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-425, 18 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image, acquired 13 July 2003, shows a small, dust-covered volcano on the plains east of Pavonis Mons. The floor of the caldera--the elliptical depression at the summit of the volcano--has a few windblown ripples on it. The ripples and thick dust mantle, together with the small impact craters on its surface, indicate that the volcano erupted some time ago. There has been no activity at this volcano in geologically recent times. This image covers an area 3 km wide by 6.8 km (1.9 mi by 4.2 mi); the aspect ratio is 1 across by 1.5 down. The volcano is located near 1.6oS, 105.7oW; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  13. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is accompanied by deformation.

  14. Caroline Bedwell G190 Volcanoes of the Eastern Sierra Nevada

    E-print Network

    Schieber, Juergen

    and the upwelling of magma from the dissolution of the subducted plate formed arcs of volcanic islands in the ocean. These chains of volcanic islands then collided periodically with the continent, adding their sediment and some the genesis of an inland volcanic chain: the Sierran Arc volcanoes. Sierran Arc volcanoes were active until

  15. 146 Williams Street Solomons, Maryland 20688

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    . Student Seminar, Chesapeake Biological Lab, Solomons, MD. Mar. 2015. Luek, J.L. Fracking in Maryland, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Germany, Dec. 2014. Luek, J.L. Fracking in Maryland: Developing monitoring

  16. Solomon V. Shereshevsky: the great Russian mnemonist.

    PubMed

    Mecacci, Luciano

    2013-09-01

    A biographical sketch is given of Solomon V. Shereshevsky, a man gifted with exceptional memory skills who became famous after the publication of Aleksandr R. Luria's book The Mind of a Mnemonist, in 1968. PMID:23871306

  17. Plant Diversity Changes during the Postglacial in East Asia: Insights from Forest Refugia on Halla Volcano, Jeju Island

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Jiri; Altman, Jan; Kopecky, Martin; Cerny, Tomas; Janecek, Stepan; Bartos, Michael; Petrik, Petr; Srutek, Miroslav; Leps, Jan; Song, Jong-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how past climate changes affected biodiversity is a key issue in contemporary ecology and conservation biology. These diversity changes are, however, difficult to reconstruct from paleoecological sources alone, because macrofossil and pollen records do not provide complete information about species assemblages. Ecologists therefore use information from modern analogues of past communities in order to get a better understanding of past diversity changes. Here we compare plant diversity, species traits and environment between late-glacial Abies, early-Holocene Quercus, and mid-Holocene warm-temperate Carpinus forest refugia on Jeju Island, Korea in order to provide insights into postglacial changes associated with their replacement. Based on detailed study of relict communities, we propose that the late-glacial open-canopy conifer forests in southern part of Korean Peninsula were rich in vascular plants, in particular of heliophilous herbs, whose dramatic decline was caused by the early Holocene invasion of dwarf bamboo into the understory of Quercus forests, followed by mid-Holocene expansion of strongly shading trees such as maple and hornbeam. This diversity loss was partly compensated in the Carpinus forests by an increase in shade-tolerant evergreen trees, shrubs and lianas. However, the pool of these species is much smaller than that of light-demanding herbs, and hence the total species richness is lower, both locally and in the whole area of the Carpinus and Quercus forests. The strongly shading tree species dominating in the hornbeam forests have higher leaf tissue N and P concentrations and smaller leaf dry matter content, which enhances litter decomposition and nutrient cycling and in turn favored the selection of highly competitive species in the shrub layer. This further reduced available light and caused almost complete disappearance of understory herbs, including dwarf bamboo. PMID:22438890

  18. Spacecraft Reed-Solomon downlink module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Huy H. (Inventor); Donaldson, James A. (Inventor); Wood, Steven H. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Apparatus and method for providing downlink frames to be transmitted from a spacecraft to a ground station. Each downlink frame includes a synchronization pattern and a transfer frame. The apparatus may comprise a monolithic Reed-Solomon downlink (RSDL) encoding chip coupled to data buffers for storing transfer frames. The RSKL chip includes a timing device, a bus interface, a timing and control unit, a synchronization pattern unit, and a Reed-Solomon encoding unit, and a bus arbiter.

  19. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  20. Exploring SARAL/Altika data in the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djath, Bughsin; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Gourdeau, Lionel; Verron, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    In the South West Pacific, the Solomon Sea is a key region in the oceanic climate circuit that connects the equator to the subtropics through the LLWBCs (Low Latitude Western Boundary Currents). In their pathway toward the equator, their changes in strength or water masses properties could influence ENSO low-frequence modulation. Besides, it exhibits the highest variability of the southwest Pacific. Recent studies (Gourdeau et al., 2014; Hristina et al., 2014) have highlighted the specific eddy activity in this region: eddy generation/propagation and mechanism at the mesoscales. However, this region is poorly documented because of the lack of observation data. Only space observation and numerical model could give a synoptic monitoring of this region. Indeed, SARAL/Altika is providing improved high resolution data for studying mesoscale processes in the ocean. The goal of this study is to monitor mesoscale variability, the western boundary currents and pathways toward the equator. A dual approach, based both on SARAL/Altika along track data and high resolution modeling has then been chosen for these purpose. In this study, to analyze altimetric data, we use a specific median filter as the bathymetry of the Solomon Sea is complex (due to numerous islands and straits). The reprocessing data permits to eliminate erroneous data and provide a good quality dataset. It shows a high variability in the Solomon Sea. In order to explore SARAL/Altika temporal observability of mesoscale signal, a high resolution numerical model (1/36°) is used. The model is two-way embedded in a 1/12° regional model which is itself one-way embedded in the DRAKKAR 1/12° global model. The NEMO code is used as well as the AGRIF software for model nestings

  1. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  2. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  3. Cascade Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The volcanoes from closest to farthest are Mt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, Mt. Jefferson. This picture is taken from Middle Sister looking north in the Cascade Range, Three Sisters Wilderness Area, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon....

  4. Investigation of Surtsey Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; Norrman, John O.

    The volcanic island of Surtsey, Iceland, was built during the period November 1963 to June 1967 and is one of the few oceanic volcanic islands that has formed and survived in recent times. New stimulus to geologic work on the island was provided in 1979 by completion of a 181-m-deep hole that was drilled to investigate the structure of the volcano and the active hydrothermal system below.During August 1985 an international group of researchers undertook a series of geologic and biologic investigations on the island. This work was facilitated by new aerial photographs taken by the Icelandic Geodetic Survey and a new bathymetric map of the Surtsy region made by the Icelandic Hydrographic Service (both in Reykjavik). Ground surveying of markers appearing in the photographs will permit a major revision of the to pographic map of the island (scale 1:5000). The new bathymetry defines the extent of continuing erosion of three volcanic vents, two of which formed short-lived islands during the Surtsey eruptive episode. Since 1967, when the first bathymetry of these submarine features was made, the summitt errace of Syrtlingur has been reduced from 23 to 32 m below sea level; that of Jolnir, from 15 to 37 m; and that of Surtla, from 32 t o 46 m.

  5. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  6. Species-area relation for birds of the Solomon Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Diamond, J M; Mayr, E

    1976-01-01

    Accurate values of number of breeding bird species have been obtained for 50 islands of the Solomon Archipelago. From information about species altitudinal distributions on each island, the values are apportioned into number of montane species (S(mt)) and of species present at sea-level (S(low)). S(low) increases linearly with the logarithm of island area A over a million-fold range of areas (correlation coefficient 0.99) and with a comparatively low slope, while the log S-log A relation is markedly curved. With increasing isolation of an archipelago, the species-area relation decreases in slope and may shift in form from a power function to an exponential. Comparison of Pacific archipelagoes at different distances from the colonization source of New Guinea shows that the decrease in slope is due to increasing intra-archipelago immigration rates, arising from overrepresentation of the most vagile inter-archipelago immigrants in more distant archipelagoes. When colonists are sorted into sets correlated with their dispersal abilities, the slope of the species-area relation for the most vagile set is close to zero, but for the least vagile set is close to the value predicted by Preston for "isolated universes." PMID:16592301

  7. Chilean Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the border between Chile and the Catamarca province of Argentina lies a vast field of currently dormant volcanoes. Over time, these volcanoes have laid down a crust of magma roughly 2 miles (3.5 km) thick. It is tinged with a patina of various colors that can indicate both the age and mineral content of the original lava flows. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 15, 1999. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and green wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  8. Variability in Solomon Sea circulation derived from altimeter sea level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melet, Angélique; Gourdeau, Lionel; Verron, Jacques

    2010-08-01

    The Solomon Sea is a key region in the Pacific Ocean where equatorial and subtropical circulations are connected. The region exhibits the highest levels in sea level variability in the entire south tropical Pacific Ocean. Altimeter data was utilized to explore sea level and western boundary currents in this poorly understood portion of the ocean. Since the geography of the region is extremely intricate, with numerous islands and complex bathymetry, specifically reprocessed along-track data in addition to standard gridded data were utilized in this study. Sea level anomalies (SLA) in the Solomon Sea principally evolve at seasonal and interannual time scales. The annual cycle is phased by Rossby waves arriving in the Solomon Strait, whereas the interannual signature corresponds to the basin-scale ENSO mode. The highest SLA variability are concentrated in the eastern Solomon Sea, particularly at the mouth of the Solomon Strait, where they are associated with a high eddy kinetic energy signal that was particularly active during the phase transition during the 1997-1998 ENSO event. Track data appear especially helpful for documenting the fine structure of surface coastal currents. The annual variability of the boundary currents that emerged from altimetry compared quite well with the variability seen at the thermocline level, as based on numerical simulations. At interannual time scales, western boundary current transport anomalies counterbalance changes in western equatorial Pacific warm water volume, confirming the phasing of South Pacific western boundary currents to ENSO. Altimetry appears to be a valuable source of information for variability in low latitude western boundary currents and their associated transport in the South Pacific.

  9. Solomon Lee ESC Therapy and Cloning

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Solomon Lee #12;#12;ESC Therapy and Cloning #12;The Benefits of ESC Embryonic stem cells could to the Issues 14) #12;Proposition 71 California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative (California Constitution Article XXXV) Passed November 2, 2004 Stem cell research as a constitutional right $3 billion

  10. Turing'sThesis Solomon Feferman

    E-print Network

    Feferman, Solomon

    break from his life and var- ied career in England, Alan Turing spent the years 1936­1938 doing graduate drew to a considerable extent on Andrew Hodges' superb biography, Alan Turing: The Enigma [16]. #12Turing'sThesis Solomon Feferman 2 NOTICES OF THE AMS VOLUME 53, NUMBER 10 I n the sole extended

  11. Design Primer for Reed-Solomon Encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Design and operation of Reed-Solomon (RS) encoders discussed in document prepared as instruction manual for computer designers and others in dataprocessing field. Conventional and Berlekamp architectures compared. Engineers who equip computer memory chips with burst-error and dropout detection and correction find report especially useful.

  12. Schematic driven layout of Reed Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arave, Kari; Canaris, John; Miles, Lowell; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    Two Reed Solomon error correcting encoders are presented. Schematic driven layout tools were used to create the encoder layouts. Special consideration had to be given to the architecture and logic to provide scalability of the encoder designs. Knowledge gained from these projects was used to create a more flexible schematic driven layout system.

  13. Klyuchevskaya Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Klyuchevskaya Volcano on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula continued its ongoing activity by releasing another plume on May 24, 2007. The same day, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image, at 01:00 UTC. In this image, a hotspot marks the volcano's summit. Outlined in red, the hotspot indicates where MODIS detected unusually warm surface temperatures. Blowing southward from the summit is the plume, which casts its shadow on the clouds below. Near the summit, the plume appears gray, and it lightens toward the south. With an altitude of 4,835 meters (15,863 feet), Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) is both the highest and most active volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula. As part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Klyuchevskaya is estimated to have experienced more than 100 flank eruptions in the past 3,000 years. Since its formation 6,000 years ago, the volcano has seen few periods of inactivity. NASA image courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. The Rapid Response Team provides daily images of this region.

  14. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    ... of which are so thick that they block the penetration of light from CALIPSO's lidar to the surface. The yellow layer near the surface over France is believed to be primarily air pollution, but could also contain ash from the volcano. Highlighting its ...

  15. Volcano-Tectonic Deformation at Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Galgana, G.; Corpuz, E.; Bartel, B.

    2004-12-01

    Taal Volcano, located in southern Luzon, Philippines, is an unusual, tholeiitic volcano situated within a calc-alkaline arc. It is one of the most active volcanic centers in the Philippines, with some 33 historic volcanic eruptions over the past four centuries. Volcanism at Taal is at least partly tectonically controlled, suggested by its location at the intersection of regional fault structures and by the location and shape of both Taal's caldera and Volcano Island. The alignment of modern eruption centers, are controlled by regional and local structures. Here, we review geomorphic and geodetic observations that constrain both tectonic and volcanic deformation in the vicinity of Taal volcano. We use GPS measurements from a 52-station GPS network measured from 1996 - 2001 to investigate overall plate interaction and microplate (intra-arc) deformation. The velocity field indicates that the majority of the Philippine Sea - Eurasia plate convergence is taking place west of Luzon, presumably largely by subduction at the Manila trench. A relatively small fraction of the convergence appears to be taking place within Luzon or across the East Luzon trough. The major intra-arc deformation is accommodated by strike-slip motion along the Philippine Fault, ranging from 25-40 mm/yr left-lateral slip. Detailed measurements in southern Luzon also indicate significant intra-arc deformation west of the Philippine Fault. GPS measurements in southwestern Luzon indicate significant motion within the arc, which could be explained by 11-13 mm/yr of left-lateral shear along the "Macolod Corridor", within which Taal Volcano resides. A dense network of continuous single- and dual-frequency GPS receivers at Taal Volcano, Philippines reveals highly time-variable deformation behavior, similar to that observed at other large calderas. While the caldera has been relatively quiescent for the past 2-3 years, previous deformation includes two major phases of intra-caldera deformation, including two phases of inflation and deflation in 1998-2000. The February-November 2000 period of inflation was characterized by approximately 120 mm of uplift of the center of Volcano Island relative to the northern caldera rim, at average rates up to 216 mm/yr. The source of deflation in 1999 was modeled as a contractional Mogi point source centered at 4.2 km depth beneath Volcano Island; the source of inflation in 2000 was modeled as a dilatational Mogi point source centered at 5.2 km depth beneath Volcano Island. The locations of the two sources are indistinguishable within the 95% confidence estimates. Modeling using a running four-month time window from June 1999-March 2001 reveals little evidence for source migration. We find marginal evidence for an elongate source whose long axis is oriented NW-SE, paralleling the caldera-controlling fault system. We suggest that the two periods of inflation observed at Taal represent episodic intrusions of magma into a shallow reservoir centered beneath Volcano Island whose position is controlled at least in part by regional tectonic structures.

  16. Infrared science of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, William A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, R.C.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs is- suing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  17. TREATY ON FISHERIES BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF CERTAIN PACIFIC ISLAND

    E-print Network

    TREATY ON FISHERIES BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF CERTAIN PACIFIC ISLAND STATES AND THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE PACIFIC ISLAND STATES party to this Treaty Support Officer) Forum Fisheries Agency PO Box 629 Honiara, Solomon Islands FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

  18. Retrieving 65 years of volcano summit deformation from multitemporal structure from motion: The case of Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, Allan; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Peltier, Aline; Beauducel, François

    2015-09-01

    The structure from motion photogrammetry technique enables use of historical airborne photography to achieve high-resolution 3-D terrain models. We apply this method on Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion), which allows a unique opportunity to retrieve high-resolution (1.5-0.11 m) digital elevation models and precise deformation maps of the volcano since 1950. Our results provide evidence that the summit volume increased throughout the study period, at a stable rate of 2.2 Mm3/yr between 1950 and 2015, with an acceleration up to 8.0 Mm3/yr prior to the major 2007 eruption that was accompanied by summit caldera collapse. At the same time, summit deformation was asymmetric, with 9.2 ± 2.5 m of eastward seaward displacement and 1.3 ± 2.5 m to the west during 1950-2015. Our results reveal a temporal evolution in the volcano magma influx rate and deformation. Tracking these fluxes and the long-lived preferential eastern motion is crucial to mitigate risks associated to flank destabilization.

  19. Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands 

    E-print Network

    Hall, Hillary

    2012-10-19

    Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary...

  20. Eruptions of Taal Volcano 1976-1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, John A.

    Sixty kilometers due south of Manila, Philippines, hidden behind an ignimbrite delta, which at its rim is nearly 700-m high, is the active Taal Volcano. There is a lake of 267 km2 in the volcano-tectonic depression and within it an island of 25 km2. The island has been constructed largely by phreatomagmatic activity, added to in historic times. The last major eruption occurred when a channel was opened to the lake by an explosion on September 28, 1965 (see Figure 1).

  1. Space-geodetic evidence for multiple magma reservoirs and subvolcanic lateral intrusions at Fernandina Volcano,

    E-print Network

    Amelung, Falk

    is the site of one of the largest caldera collapses on a basaltic volcano in recorded history (June 1968, $350] The presence of a large caldera is the evidence that each of the seven volcanoes of the western Galápagos at Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos Islands Marco Bagnardi1 and Falk Amelung1 Received 23 May 2012; revised 12

  2. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  3. A unified model of island biogeography sheds light on the zone of radiation

    E-print Network

    of bird species found across archipelagoes and islands #12;Table S1. Status of bird species found across archipelagoes and islands Species TypeArchipelago/Island Probable Cladogenetic Solomon Islands (including Bougainville) Bismarck Archipelago 36874 175 28 149 92 29 19 Hawaii

  4. Plate boundaries in the Woodlark Basin and Solomon Sea Region, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodliffe, A. M.; Cameron, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Solomon Sea and Woodlark Basin region of eastern Papua New Guinea is a tectonically complex region between the obliquely converging Pacific and Australian plates. Despite numerous marine geophysical surveys in the region, the exact nature of the tectonic boundaries between the Solomon Sea and the Woodlark Basin remains controversial. Marine geophysical data collected in the last decade provides additional insight into this region and clearly defines the boundaries of the Solomon Sea, Trobriand, Woodlark, and Australian plates. Multibeam bathymetry data collected in 2004 along the Trobriand Trough, together with seismic profiles across the trough, show a prominent deformation front in the trench that defines the southern boundary of the Solomon Sea plate. Petrologic data from volcanoes to the south of this boundary indicate that they have a subduction affinity. Heat flow profiles to the south of the plate boundary show a clear subduction signature. At the eastern termination of the Trobriand Trough the plate boundary forms a triple junction with the NE-SW trending Nubaru strike-slip fault. To the NE this major fault separates the Solomon Sea plate from the Woodlark plate. The morphology of this fault and a CMT solution indicate that it is right-lateral. To the SW the Nubaru strike-slip fault passes to the south of the Trobriand Trough, forming the southern boundary of the Trobriand plate (with the Trobriand Trough as the northern boundary). Further west the trend of the strike slip fault becomes more ENE-WSW. A significant extension component is evident as the fault passes to the north of Egum Graben and meets the Woodlark Basin spreading system at the current rifting to seafloor spreading transition directly to the east of Moresby Seamount. The revised tectonic model for this region has important implications for tectonic reconstructions that include an active rifting to spreading transition and prominent core complexes. In the past, models have assumed a simple two-plate system. The inclusion of the Trobriand plate at the rifting to spreading transition will change estimates of extension that have assumed that the system can be described by a single Euler pole directly to the WSW.

  5. Systolic VLSI Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Decoder for digital communications provides high-speed, pipelined ReedSolomon (RS) error-correction decoding of data streams. Principal new feature of proposed decoder is modification of Euclid greatest-common-divisor algorithm to avoid need for time-consuming computations of inverse of certain Galois-field quantities. Decoder architecture suitable for implementation on very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) chips with negative-channel metaloxide/silicon circuitry.

  6. Radiocarbon dates for lava flows from northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hilo 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan-Banks, J. M.; Lockwood, J.P.; Rubin, M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight 14C analyses are reported for carbonized roots and other plant material collected from beneath 15 prehistoric lava flows erupted from the northeast rift zone (NERZ) of Mauna Loa Volcano (ML). The new 14C dates establish ages for 13 previously undated lava flows, and correct or add to information previously reported. Limiting ages on other flows that lie either above or below the dated flows are also established. These dates help to unravel the eruptive history of ML's NERZ. -from Authors

  7. The Solomon Sea eddy activity from a 1/36° regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djath, Bughsin; Babonneix, Antoine; Gourdeau, Lionel; Marin, Frédéric; Verron, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    In the South West Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits the highest levels of eddy kinetic energy but relatively little is known about the eddy activity in this region. This Sea is directly influenced by a monsoonal regime and ENSO variability, and occupies a strategical location as the Western Boundary Currents exiting it are known to feed the warm pool and to be the principal sources of the Equatorial UnderCurrent. During their transit in the Solomon Sea, meso-scale eddies are suspected to notably interact and influence these water masses. The goal of this study is to give an exhaustive description of this eddy activity. A dual approach, based both on altimetric data and high resolution modeling, has then been chosen for this purpose. First, an algorithm is applied on nearly 20 years of 1/3° x 1/3° gridded SLA maps (provided by the AVISO project). This allows eddies to be automatically detected and tracked, thus providing some basic eddy properties. The preliminary results show that two main and distinct types of eddies are detected. Eddies in the north-eastern part shows a variability associated with the mean structure, while those in the southern part are associated with generation/propagation processes. However, the resolution of the AVISO dataset is not very well suited to observe fine structures and to match with the numerous islands bordering the Solomon Sea. For this reason, we will confront these observations with the outputs of a 1/36° resolution realistic model of the Solomon Sea. The high resolution numerical model (1/36°) indeed permits to reproduce very fine scale features, such as eddies and filaments. The model is two-way embedded in a 1/12° regional model which is itself one-way embedded in the DRAKKAR 1/12° global model. The NEMO code is used as well as the AGRIF software for model nestings. Validation is realized by comparison with AVISO observations and available in situ data. In preparing the future wide-swath altimetric SWOT mission that is expected to provide observations of small-scale sea level variability, spectral analysis is performed from the 1/36° resolution realistic model in order to characterize the finer scale signals in the Solomon sea region. The preliminary SSH spectral analysis shows a k-4 slope, in good agreement with the suface quasigeostrophic (SQG) turbulence theory. Keywords: Solomon Sea; meso-scale activity; eddy detection, tracking and properties; wavenumber spectrum.

  8. The LLWBCs of the Solomon Sea depicted by altimetry and gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdeau, L.; Melet, A.; Verron, J. A.; Kessler, W. S.; Dussurget, R.; Davis, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Solomon Sea with its intense Low Latitude Western Boundary Currents (LLWBCs) is a key region in the Pacific Ocean where equatorial and subtropical circulations are connected. Since the geography of the region is extremely intricate, with numerous islands and complex bathymetry, specifically reprocessed along-track data were utilized in this study in addition to standard gridded data. Track data appear especially helpful for documenting the fine structure of surface coastal currents. The annual variability of the boundary currents that emerged from altimetry compared quite well with the variability seen at the thermocline level on numerical simulations. At inter-annual time scales, western boundary current transport anomalies tend to counterbalance changes in western Equatorial Pacific warm water volume, confirming the phasing of South Pacific western boundary currents to ENSO. The highest SLA variability is concentrated in the eastern Solomon Sea, particularly at the mouth of Solomon Strait, where it is associated with a high eddy kinetic energy signal. An experimental glider monitoring of the LLWBCs, currently operated since August 2007, shows the huge variability of the transports in relation to ENSO conditions and eddy activity. The glider data are useful to test how the surface information from altimetry is representative of the dynamics at depth, whereas the satellite data are useful to interpret the along track glider data in a synoptic context.

  9. Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This 150 kilometer stretch of the Pacific coastal plain of Nicaragua (12.0N, 86.5W) from the Gulf of Fonseca to Lake Managua. The large crater on the peninsula is Coseguina, which erupted in 1835, forming a 2 km. wide by 500 meter deep caldera and deposited ash as far away as Mexico City, some 1400 km. to the north. A plume of Steam can be seen venting from San Cristobal volcano, in the Marabios Range, the highest mouintain in Nicaragua.

  10. Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

  11. Kilauea volcano eruption seen from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-51 crew had a clear view of the erupting Kilauea volcano during the early morning pass over the Hawaiian islands. Kilauea, on the southwest side of the island of Hawaii, has been erupting almost continuously since January, 1983. Kilauea's summit caldera, with the smaller Halemaumau crater nestled within, is highlighted in the early morning sun (just above the center of the picture). The lava flows which covered roads and subdivisions in 1983-90 can be seen as dark flows to the east (toward the upper right) of the steam plumes on this photo. The summit crater and lava flows of Mauna Loa volcano make up the left side of the photo. Features like the Volcano House and Kilauea Visitor Center on the edge of the caldera, the small subdivisions east of the summit, Ola's Rain Forest north of the summit, and agricultural land along the coast are easily identified.

  12. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

    Size: 40.5 x 40.5 km (25.1 x 25.1 miles) Location: 16.7 deg. North lat., 62.2 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: October 29, 2002

  13. Natural hazards on the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.W.; Mullineaux, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    The island of Hawaii and the other islands of the Hawaiian chain are products of volcanic eruptions. Lava flows from hundreds of thousands of eruptions through countless centuries have built the Hawaiian Islands. Some volcanoes on the island of Hawaii have been very active during historic time, and similar activity is expected to continue throughout the foreseeable future.

  14. Paleogene stratigraphy of the Solomons Island, Maryland corehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson, Thomas G.; Bybell, Laurel M.

    1994-01-01

    Purge and trap capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is a rapid, precise, accurate method for determining volatile organic compounds in samples of surface water and ground water. The method can be used to determine 59 selected compounds, including chlorofluorohydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and halogenated hydrocarbons. The volatile organic compounds are removed from the sample matrix by actively purging the sample with helium. The volatile organic compounds are collected onto a sorbant trap, thermally desorbed, separated by a Megabore gas chromatographic capillary column, ionized by electron impact, and determined by a full-scan quadrupole mass spectrometer. Compound identification is confirmed by the gas chromatographic retention time and by the resultant mass spectrum. Unknown compounds detected in a sample can be tentatively identified by comparing the unknown mass spectrum to reference spectra in the mass-spectra computer-data system library compiled by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Method detection limits for the selected compounds range from 0.05 to 0.2 microgram per liter. Recoveries for the majority of the selected compounds ranged from 80 to 120 percent, with relative standard deviations of less than 10 percent.

  15. New code parameters from ReedSolomon subfield codes

    E-print Network

    Bierbrauer, Juergen

    New code parameters from Reed­Solomon subfield codes J¨urgen Bierbrauer Department of Mathematical determine the dimensions of subfield codes of Reed­Solomon codes and construct certain extensions and lengthenings of these codes. We start from the duals, using the language of orthogonal arrays. As a first

  16. Appreciating Unity in Diversity: An Interview with Andrew Solomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2014-01-01

    The theme of the AMS 2014 Annual Conference is "Unity in Diversity," a concept that also describes the work of conference keynote speaker Andrew Solomon. Solomon is a writer and lecturer on psychology and politics; winner of the National Book Award; and an activist for LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender] rights, mental health,…

  17. Real-Time Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Cameron, Kelly B.; Owsley, Patrick A.

    1994-01-01

    Generic Reed-Solomon decoder fast enough to correct errors in real time in practical applications designed to be implemented in fewer and smaller very-large-scale integrated, VLSI, circuit chips. Configured to operate in pipelined manner. One outstanding aspect of decoder design is that Euclid multiplier and divider modules contain Galoisfield multipliers configured as combinational-logic cells. Operates at speeds greater than older multipliers. Cellular configuration highly regular and requires little interconnection area, making it ideal for implementation in extraordinarily dense VLSI circuitry. Flight electronics single chip version of this technology implemented and available.

  18. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at midlatitude or high-latitude volcanoes; (c) safety factors during unrest, which can limit where new instrumentation can safely be installed (particularly at near-vent sites that can be critical for precursor detection and eruption forecasting); and (d) the remoteness of many U.S. volcanoes (particularly those in the Aleutians and the Marianas Islands), where access is difficult or impossible most of the year. Given these difficulties, it is reasonable to anticipate that ground-based monitoring of eruptions at U.S. volcanoes will likely be performed primarily with instruments installed before unrest begins. 2. Given a growing awareness of previously undetected 2. phenomena that may occur before an eruption begins, at present the types and (or) density of instruments in use at most U.S. volcanoes is insufficient to provide reliable early warning of volcanic eruptions. As shown by the gap analysis of Ewert and others (2005), a number of U.S. volcanoes lack even rudimentary monitoring. At those volcanic systems with monitoring instrumentation in place, only a few types of phenomena can be tracked in near-real time, principally changes in seismicity, deformation, and large-scale changes in thermal flux (through satellite-based remote sensing). Furthermore, researchers employing technologically advanced instrumentation at volcanoes around the world starting in the 1990s have shown that subtle and previously undetectable phenomena can precede or accompany eruptions. Detection of such phenomena would greatly improve the ability of U.S. volcano observatories to provide accurate early warnings of impending eruptions, and is a critical capability particularly at the very high-threat volcanoes identified by Ewert and others (2005). For these two reasons, change from a reactive to a proactive volcano-monitoring strategy is clearly needed at U.S. volcanoes. Monitoring capabilities need to be expanded at virtually every volcanic center, regardless of its current state of

  19. Seismic Structure Beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Gung, Y.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Lin, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very active Taal Volcano is situated 60 km south of Metro Manila in the southern part of Luzon Island. Based on its frequent explosive eruptions and high potential hazards to nearby population of several million, Taal Volcano is chosen as one of the 15 most dangerous "Decade Volcanoes" in the world. We deployed a temporary seismic network consisting of 8 stations since March 2008. The temporal network was operated from late March 2008 to mid March 2010 and recorded over 2270 local earthquakes. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified from ambient noise cross-correlation functions for a number of stations. The drifting rates of all problematic stations were determined as references to correct timing errors prior to further processing. Initial locations of earthquakes were determined from manually picking P- and S-phases arrivals with a general velocity model based on AK135. We used travel times of 305 well-located local events to derive a minimum 1-D model using VELEST. Two major earthquake groups were noticed from refined locations. One was underneath the western shore of Taal Lake with a linear feature, and the other spread at shallower depths showing a less compact feature around the eastern flank of Taal Volcano Island. We performed seismic tomography to image the 3D structure beneath Taal Volcano using a well-established algorithm, LOTOS. Some interesting features are noted in the tomographic results, such as a probable solidified past magma conduit below the northwestern corner of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by high Vp, Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio, and a potential large hydrothermal reservoir beneath the central of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by low Vs and high Vp/Vs ratio. Combining the results of seismicity and tomographic images, we also suggest the potential existence of a magma chamber beneath the southwestern Taal Lake, and a magma conduit or fault extending from there to the northwestern shore of Taal Lake. Such magmatic signatures have never been reported in previous studies, suggesting that new eruption centers might be forming in places away from the historical craters on Taal Volcano Island.

  20. Ilchulbong tuff cone, Jeju Island, Korea, revisited: A compound monogenetic volcano involving multiple magma batches, shifting vents, and discrete eruptive phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Y.; Brenna, M.; Smith, I. E.; Nemeth, K.; White, J. D.; Murtagh, R.; Jeon, Y.; Kwon, C.; Cronin, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Ilchulbong (Sunrise Peak) tuff cone is a UNESCO World Heritage site that owes its scientific importance to the outstanding coastal exposures that surround it. It is also one of the classic sites that provided the sedimentary evidence for the primary pyroclastic processes that occur during phreatomagmatic basaltic eruptions. It has been long considered, based on the cone morphology, that this classic cone was produced via eruption from a single vent site. Reanalysis of the detailed sedimentary sequence has now revealed that two subtle paraconformities occur in this deposition sequence, one representing a significant time break of perhaps days to weeks or months, during which erosion and compaction of the lower cone occurred, the conduit cooled and solidified and a subsequent resumption of eruption took place in a new vent location. Detailed geochemical study of the juvenile clasts through this cone reveals that three separate alkali basaltic magma batches were erupted, the first and third erupted may be genetically related, with the latter showing evidence for longer periods of shallow-level fractionation. The second magma batch erupted was generated in a different mantle source area. Reconstructing the eruption sequence, the lower Ilchulbong cone was formed by eruption of magma 1. Cessation of eruption was accompanied by erosion to generate a volcano-wide unconformity, associated with reworked deposits in the lower cone flanks. The eruption resumed with magma 2 that, due to the cooled earlier conduit, was forced to erupt in a new site to the west of the initial vent. This formed the middle cone sequence over the initially formed structure. The third magma batch erupted with little or no interval after magma 2 from the same vent location, associated with cone instability and slumping, and making up the deposits of the upper cone. These results demonstrate how critical the examination for sedimentary evidence for time breaks in such eruption sequences is for detecting potential shifts in eruption chemistry and vent location. It appears that if eruption breaks are short, successive magma batches follow the same path, whereas if pauses are greater than a critical period, conduit solidification will force vent migration for subsequent magma batches. This has important implications for examining the controls of vent migration at other monogenetic volcanoes and for emergency management planning during future similar types of eruptions.

  1. First cross-correlated measurements of magma dynamics and degassing during a dyke eruption at Piton de la Fournaise hot spot volcano, Reunion island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; La Spina, A.; Tamburelllo, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Coquet, A.; Brenguier, F.; Coppola, D.; Di Muro, A.; Burton, M. R.; Staudacher, T.

    2011-12-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF), in the western Indian Ocean, is a very active hot spot basaltic volcano whose eruptions (1-2 per year on average) are well anticipated by the local seismic-geodetic monitoring network. Here we report on the first cross-correlated measurements of seismic tremor, magmatic gas composition (OP-FTIR absorption spectroscopy and in situ MultiGas analysis plus filter-pack sampling), gas fluxes (DOAS) and magma extrusion rate (space-borne MODIS data) during a 2-weeks long dyke eruption at PDF in October 2010. Precursory seismic signals indicated dyke ascent in a few hours from a reservoir located at ~2.5 km beneath the summit crater. After an initial burst coinciding with eruptive fissure opening, both the tremor amplitude, lava extrusion rate and SO2 flux coherently decreased during the first week of eruption. The co-emitted magmatic gases, whose composition varied slightly over time, were found to have a high water content (95-98 mol %), high SO2/HCl and low CO2/SO2, HCl/HF and Cl/Br ratios, consistent with a hydrous hot spot mantle source. By comparing gas fluxes with the magma co-extrusion rate and available melt inclusion data, we infer an essentially syn-eruptive (closed system) degassing for sulfur, chlorine and fluorine during the first half of the eruption. In contrast, additions of CO2 (previously accumulated or/and bubbling differentially) and H2O (external contribution from the hydrothermal system?) are required to explain the gas composition. Differential CO2 bubbling is supported by high frequency correlations between the CO2/HCl ratio and seismic tremor. The second part of the eruption was marked by a spectacular decoupling between re-increasing seismic tremor and declining lava extrusion, indicating a key control of tremor and eruptive activity by differential (open system) gas bubbling across the feeder dyke. This was associated with an increasing contribution of the low-frequency (1-3 Hz) spectral band to the tremor amplitude. Finally, the end of the eruption was preceded by a new sharp tremor increase, with remarkable anti-correlated variations of the 1-3 Hz and 3-5 Hz spectral signals, which we tentatively attribute to an abrupt geometrical change prior to dyke closure. These results, and future ones, are expected to contribute to better understanding and forecasting of eruption processes at Piton de la Fournaise volcano.

  2. The decoding of Reed-Solomon codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Reed-Solomon (RS) codes form an important part of the high-rate downlink telemetry system for the Magellan mission, and the RS decoding function for this project will be done by DSN. Although the basic idea behind all Reed-Solomon decoding algorithms was developed by Berlekamp in 1968, there are dozens of variants of Berlekamp's algorithm in current use. An attempt to restore order is made by presenting a mathematical theory which explains the working of almost all known RS decoding algorithms. The key innovation that makes this possible is the unified approach to the solution of the key equation, which simultaneously describes the Berlekamp, Berlekamp-Massey, Euclid, and continued fractions approaches. Additionally, a detailed analysis is made of what can happen to a generic RS decoding algorithm when the number of errors and erasures exceeds the code's designed correction capability, and it is shown that while most published algorithms do not detect as many of these error-erasure patterns as possible, by making a small change in the algorithms, this problem can be overcome.

  3. Links between the variability of the WBCs and the meso-scale eddy activity inside the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonneix, A.; Gourdeau, L.; Djath, N.; Chaigneau, A.; Verron, J. A.; Marin, F.

    2012-12-01

    In the South West Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits the highest levels of eddy kinetic energy but relatively little is known about the eddy activity in this region. This Sea is directly influenced by a monsoonal regime and ENSO variability, and occupies a strategical location as the Western Boundary Currents exiting it are known to feed the warm pool waters and to be the main sources for the Equatorial UnderCurrent. During their transit in the Solomon Sea, the meso-scale activity is suspected to notably influence these WBCs. The objective of this study is to give an exhaustive description of these eddies based on an eddy detection algorithm and a tracking procedure applied both on altimetric data and model outputs. Nearly 20 years of 1/3° x 1/3° gridded SLA maps (provided by the AVISO project) are indeed currently available. However, the resolution of the AVISO dataset is not very well suited to match with the numerous islands bordering the Solomon Sea. Moreover, the finest structures cannot be observed with this dataset due to its relatively rough resolution. For this reason, we will confront these observations with the outputs of a 1/36° resolution model of the Solomon Sea. This model, after validation with the AVISO observations, will give access to finer scales and will represent smaller structures. The combined results will be used to describe the meso-scale eddy activity in the Solomon Sea. First, the eddy field will be depicted with the use of general properties such the eddy location, amplitude or the total area occupied. Then, the temporal variability of this meso-scale activity will be analyzed by computing its annual cycle and interannual variations, and put in regard with the regional oceanic circulation variability. In each case, the discrepancies between cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies will also be discussed.

  4. Plant growth promoting capability and genetic diversity of bacteria isolated from mud volcano and lime cave of Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

    PubMed

    Venkadesaperumal, Gopu; Amaresan, Natrajan; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Twenty four bacterial strains from four different regions of mud volcano and lime cave were isolated to estimate their diversity, plant growth promoting and biocontrol activities to use them as inoculant strains in the fields. An excellent antagonistic effect against four plant pathogens and plant growth promoting properties such as IAA production, HCN production, phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, starch hydrolysis and hydrolytic enzymes syntheses were identified in OM5 (Pantoea agglomerans) and EM9 (Exiguobacterium sp.) of 24 studied isolates. Seeds (Chili and tomato) inoculation with plant growth promoting strains resulted in increased percentage of seedling emergence, root length and plant weight. Results indicated that co-inoculation gave a more pronounced effects on seedling emergence, secondary root numbers, primary root length and stem length, while inoculation by alone isolate showed a lower effect. Our results suggest that the mixed inocula of OM5 and EM9 strains as biofertilizers could significantly increase the production of food crops in Andaman archipelago by means of sustainable and organic agricultural system. PMID:25763031

  5. Plant growth promoting capability and genetic diversity of bacteria isolated from mud volcano and lime cave of Andaman and Nicobar Islands

    PubMed Central

    Venkadesaperumal, Gopu; Amaresan, Natrajan; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Twenty four bacterial strains from four different regions of mud volcano and lime cave were isolated to estimate their diversity, plant growth promoting and biocontrol activities to use them as inoculant strains in the fields. An excellent antagonistic effect against four plant pathogens and plant growth promoting properties such as IAA production, HCN production, phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, starch hydrolysis and hydrolytic enzymes syntheses were identified in OM5 (Pantoea agglomerans) and EM9 (Exiguobacterium sp.) of 24 studied isolates. Seeds (Chili and tomato) inoculation with plant growth promoting strains resulted in increased percentage of seedling emergence, root length and plant weight. Results indicated that co-inoculation gave a more pronounced effects on seedling emergence, secondary root numbers, primary root length and stem length, while inoculation by alone isolate showed a lower effect. Our results suggest that the mixed inocula of OM5 and EM9 strains as biofertilizers could significantly increase the production of food crops in Andaman archipelago by means of sustainable and organic agricultural system. PMID:25763031

  6. Comparison of the submarine landslide by the sector collapse of Oshima-Oshima island in the northern part of Japan with the debris avalanche of off Kaimon volcano in the southern part of Japan and several landslide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kato, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Oshima-Oshima island is an active volcano located in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea off Hokkaido. Oshima-Oshima consists of Higashi-yama somma, Nishi-yama somma, and the central cone. The latest eruption occurred at the 18th century. In a huge eruption on August 1741 , Nishiyama of western part of Oshima- Oshima collapsed toward the northern submarine slope , and the horseshoe shape caldera was formed. It is proposed by Katsui et al.(1977) , Satake and Kato(2001) that Japan Sea tsunami in 1741 was generated by this collapse. Detailed swath bathymetry surveys have been conducted around Oshima-Oshima by Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan in 1993. As a result, a large area of debris avalanche deposits has been discovered on the northern submarine flanks of Oshima-Oshima island. In addition, sidescan sonar surveys was also conducted by Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan and University of Tokyo in 1995. In 1997, the lower part of the debris avalanche deposit was investigated using submersible 'Shinkai 2000' by JAMSTEC(Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology). It was confirmed that those deposits were Oshima origins (Kato,1997). We compiled and analyzed using these detailed bathymetry data and sidescan data. As a result , we clarified a detailed geographical features of debris avalanche and the limit of their distribution. Scarp of caldera rim continues to approximately 1100m under the sea. Oshima-Oshima has diameter of approximately 16km. Oshima-Oshima has also an estimated total edifice volume (subaerial and submarine) of 127km3 and rises about 2200m from its base in 1500m depth of water. Northern part of Oshima-Oshima, the scarp of caldera rim on the subaerial area consecutively continues up to about 1100m of depth. The scarp has 100m-300m high, and width of landslide valley is about 2km. Hammocky surface starts from 1100m depth of water. Sea mount of like spur is composed of the collapse deposits has almost extended to the whole area in the trough deeper than 1100m. Debris avalanche deposits have been identified up to 2200m depth and 24km from Oshima-Oshima island, H/L is approximately 0.12. Maximum sizes of debris avalanche block is up to 1-2km width and 100m high. We divided the debris avalanche deposits into three areas (Type A-C) by the topography. Type-A is the main sedimentary area in front of the collapse area and the form is like a spur with 100 to 130m height. Type-B has a form like a knoll or block. Type-C shows gradual slope containing a small rise. We compared these feature with debris avalanche of off Kaimon volcano in the southern part of Japan and the other debris avalanche (landslide, submarine landslide).

  7. Observed Circulation in the Solomon Sea from SADCP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravatte, S. E.; Ganachaud, A. S.; Eldin, G.; Kessler, W. S.; Dutrieux, P.

    2010-12-01

    The Solomon Sea, in the western tropical Pacific, is a major oceanic pathway connecting the tropics to the equator via low latitude western boundary currents. Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data from 94 cruises over 20 years are used to describe the Solomon Sea mean circulation and its seasonal variability above 300m depth, providing an unprecedented detailed picture from observations. The circulation in the near-surface (20-100m) and thermocline (100-300m) layers are analyzed separately but found to have many similar features. The New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent enters the Solomon Sea east of the Louisiade Archipelago (15 Sv inflow above 300m), divides against the coast of New Britain forming two branches flowing westward and eastward. The westward branch previously observed flowing through Vitiaz Strait is found to transport 7-8 Sv in the upper 300m. The eastward branch exits the Solomon Sea through St. George’s Channel (1-2 Sv) and Solomon Strait (4-5 Sv) in the thermocline. At the surface, above about 100m, surface flow in Solomon St is southwestward. The seasonal variability can be documented in locations of sufficient data coverage. It is shown that this western boundary current system strengthens in June to August, during the southeasterly monsoon. A summary of transport variability in the straits of the Solomon Sea from individual cruises is also provided. Transports in the straits display some stable features, but also high non-seasonal variability.

  8. The origin of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, John

    2011-05-15

    I first stepped through the doorway of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1976, and I was impressed by what I saw: A dozen people working out of a stone-and-metal building perched at the edge of a high cliff with a spectacular view of a vast volcanic plain. Their primary purpose was to monitor the island's two active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. I joined them, working for six weeks as a volunteer and then, years later, as a staff scientist. That gave me several chances to ask how the observatory had started.

  9. Ol Doinyo Lengai Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists from the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program team and the Geological Survey of Tanzania take a sample of the most recent ashfall from Ol Doinyo Lengai as the volcano looms in the background....

  10. Publications Volcano geodesy

    E-print Network

    ), Analytical modeling of gravity changes and crustal deformation at volcanoes: the Long Valley caldera (CAPublications Volcano geodesy · Johnson D.J. et al (2010). Shallow magma accumulation at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, revealed by microgravity surveys. Geology 38 (12), p. 1139-1142, doi: 10.1130/G31323

  11. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is perched on the rim of Kilauea Volcano's summit caldera (next to the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park), providing a spectacular view of the active vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater....

  12. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  13. Volcano Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 May 2003

    This low-relief shield volcano imaged with the THEMIS visible camera has two large vents which have erupted several individual lava flows. The positions of the origins of many of the flows indicate that it is probable that the vents are secondary structures that formed only after the shield was built up by eruptions from a central caldera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17.6, Longitude 243.6 East (116.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Mapping Between Distinct Reed-Solomon Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Marvin

    1994-01-01

    One-to-one mapping between two Reed-Solomon (RS) codes devised to enable decoder designed for one of codes to operate on other one also. Codes in question must have same N and K parameters (defined below) but otherwise be two distinct RS codes. Mapping intended to enable same ground-based decoder to decode telemetry signals from two spacecraft in two different RS codes of (N,K) = (255,223). Also useful in purely terrestrial data communications and in optical and magnetic recording and playback of digitized audio and video signals. Implemented in interface circuitry and/or software to enable communication between coding systems of different manufacturers using different RS codes within same (N,K) family.

  15. Earth Mover's Distances on Discrete Surfaces Justin Solomon

    E-print Network

    Guibas, Leonidas J.

    Earth Mover's Distances on Discrete Surfaces Justin Solomon Stanford University Raif Rustamov for Informatics Abstract We introduce a novel method for computing the earth mover's dis- tance (EMD) between: Optimal transportation, Wasserstein metric, earth mover's distance, finite elements, geometric median

  16. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  17. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  18. Glaciation of Haleakala volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Mark, R. ); Porter, S.C. . Quaternary Research Center)

    1993-04-01

    Early debates regarding the large (5 [times] 10 km) summit crater'' of Haleakala volcano (3,055 m altitude) on the island of Maui attributed its origin to renting, rifting, caldera collapse, or erosion. It now is commonly assumed to have resulted from headward expansion of giant canyons by stream erosion (Stearns, 1942). Slope maps and shaded relief images based on new USGS digital elevation data point to the apparent overfit of the canyons that drain the summit depression. Studies of drowned coral reefs and terraces on the offshore east rift of Haleakala indicate that this part of the volcano has undergone submergence of about 2 km, as well as tilting, since 850 ka ago. Such subsidence indicates that the summit altitude at the end of the shield-building phase reached ca. 5,000 m, well above both the present and full-glacial snowlines. A comparison with the radiometrically dated glacial record of Mauna Kea and its reconstructed snowline history suggests that Haleakala experienced 10 or more glaciations, the most extensive during marine isotope stages 20, 18, and 16. By isotope stage 10, the summit had subsided below the full-glacial snowline. Diamictons on the south slope of the volcano, previously described as mudflows, contain lava clasts with superchilled margins, identical to margins of subglacially erupted lavas on Mauna Kea. Glacier ice that mantled the upper slopes of the volcano continuously for several hundred thousand years and intermittently thereafter, is inferred to have carved Haleakala crater and the upper reaches of large canyons radiating from it.

  19. Volcano Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B.

    - A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic regimes and determining their physical and chemical properties; and (3) quantitatively understanding multiphase fluid flow behavior under dynamic volcanic conditions. To realize these goals, not only must we learn how to translate seismic observations into quantitative information about fluid dynamics, but we also must determine the underlying physics that governs vesiculation, fragmentation, and the collapse of bubble-rich suspensions to form separate melt and vapor. Refined understanding of such processes-essential for quantitative short-term eruption forecasts-will require multidisciplinary research involving detailed field measurements, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling.

  20. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic regimes and determining their physical and chemical properties; and (3) quantitatively understanding multiphase fluid flow behavior under dynamic volcanic conditions. To realize these goals, not only must we learn how to translate seismic observations into quantitative information about fluid dynamics, but we also must determine the underlying physics that governs vesiculation, fragmentation, and the collapse of bubble-rich suspensions to form separate melt and vapor. Refined understanding of such processes-essential for quantitative short-term eruption forecasts-will require multidisciplinary research involving detailed field measurements, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling.

  1. Sumisu Volcano, Izu-Bonin Arc, Japan: Site of a Rhyolitic Caldera-Forming Eruption From a Small Open-Ocean Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiske, R. S.; Tani, K.; Tamura, Y.; Naka, J.; Shukuno, H.; Kido, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Sumisu submarine caldera, an 8 x 10 km Crater Lake type structure along the front of the Izu-Bonin arc, was the site of a 30-60 ka eruption that introduced 50-70 km3 of rhyolite tephra into open-ocean environment. A manned submersible, two ROVs, a DeepTow camera system, and dredge samples (augmented by newly acquired single-channel seismic profiles and SeaBeam mapping) were used to study the caldera and surrounding areas. Caldera-wall studies show that pre-caldera eruptions built a complex of overlapping submarine dacitic and basaltic cones that formed an edifice 40 x 25 km in diameter; its summit grew above sea level to form an island about 200 m high. The caldera-forming eruption likely began on this island and sent a Plinian column high into the air. We interpret that prodigious rates of tephra fallback overwhelmed the Sumisu area, forming huge rafts of floating pumice and forcing large volumes of hot, proximal fallback debris beneath sea level-- generating gravity flows of quenched pumice that traveled downslope along the sea floor. The caldera rim, currently 100-400 m below sea level, is mantled by thin and discontinuous deposits of syn-caldera pumice showing no evidence of heat retention. Ocean currents apparently eroded most proximal pumice away (especially during periods of late Pleistocene sea-level lowering), and the caldera rim is locally mantled by lag lithics. ODP Leg 126 cores in the Sumisu Rift, atop the Rift's east margin, and on the forearc slope, show the sea floor south and southeast to be underlain by non-welded pumice deposits 10-20 m thick. Geochemical data point to Sumisu as the source of these distal deposits, rather than the nearby arc-front centers of Minami Sumisu or Torishima-indicating that the Sumisu pumice gravity flows traveled for distances of at least 70 km. Post-caldera edifice instability resulted in the collapse of a 15 degree sector of the east caldera rim and the formation of spectacular thin-skin slumps that ring much of the edifice.

  2. The Anatahan volcano-monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marso, J. N.; Lockhart, A. B.; White, R. A.; Koyanagi, S. K.; Trusdell, F. A.; Camacho, J. T.; Chong, R.

    2003-12-01

    A real-time 24/7 Anatahan volcano-monitoring and eruption detection system is now operational. There had been no real-time seismic monitoring on Anatahan during the May 10, 2003 eruption because the single telemetered seismic station on Anatahan Island had failed. On May 25, staff from the Emergency Management Office (EMO) of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a replacement telemetered seismic station on Anatahan whose data were recorded on a drum recorder at the EMO on Saipan, 130 km to the south by June 5. In late June EMO and USGS staff installed a Glowworm seismic data acquisition system (Marso et al, 2003) at EMO and hardened the Anatahan telemetry links. The Glowworm system collects the telemetered seismic data from Anatahan and Saipan, places graphical display products on a webpage, and exports the seismic waveform data in real time to Glowworm systems at Hawaii Volcano Observatory and Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). In early July, a back-up telemetered seismic station was placed on Sarigan Island 40 km north of Anatahan, transmitting directly to the EMO on Saipan. Because there is currently no population on the island, at this time the principal hazard presented by Anatahan volcano would be air traffic disruption caused by possible erupted ash. The aircraft/ash hazard requires a monitoring program that focuses on eruption detection. The USGS currently provides 24/7 monitoring of Anatahan with a rotational seismic duty officer who carries a Pocket PC-cell phone combination that receives SMS text messages from the CVO Glowworm system when it detects large seismic signals. Upon receiving an SMS text message notification from the CVO Glowworm, the seismic duty officer can use the Pocket PC - cell phone to view a graphic of the seismic traces on the EMO Glowworm's webpage to determine if the seismic signal is eruption related. There have been no further eruptions since the monitoring system was installed, but regional tectonic earthquakes have provided frequent tests of the system. Reliance on a Pocket PC - cell phone requires that the seismic duty officer remain in an area with cell phone coverage. With this monitoring method, the USGS is able to provide rapid notice of an Anatahan eruption to the EMO and the Washington Volcano Ash Advisory Center. Reference Marso, J.N., Murray, T.L., Lockhart, A.B., Bryan, C.J., Glowworm: An extended PC-based Earthworm system for volcano monitoring. Abstracts, Cities On Volcanoes III, Hilo Hawaii, July 2003.

  3. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  4. Space Radar Image of Teide Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Teide volcano on the island of Tenerife in the Canary Islands. The Canary Islands, part of Spain, are located in the eastern Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Morocco. Teide has erupted only once in the 20th Century, in 1909, but is considered a potentially threatening volcano due to its proximity to the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, shown in this image as the purple and white area on the lower right edge of the island. The summit crater of Teide, clearly visible in the left center of the image, contains lava flows of various ages and roughnesses that appear in shades of green and brown. Different vegetation zones, both natural and agricultural, are detected by the radar as areas of purple, green and yellow on the volcano's flanks. Scientists are using images such as this to understand the evolution of the structure of Teide, especially the formation of the summit caldera and the potential for collapse of the flanks. The volcano is one of 15 identified by scientists as potentially hazardous to local populations, as part of the international The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 11, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered at 28.3 degrees North latitude and 16.6 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The area shown measures 90 kilometers by 54.5 kilometers (55.8 miles by 33.8 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received.

  5. Observed circulation in the Solomon Sea from SADCP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravatte, Sophie; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Duong, Quoc-Phi; Kessler, William S.; Eldin, Gérard; Dutrieux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The Solomon Sea, in the western tropical Pacific, is part of a major oceanic pathway for waters connecting the tropics to the equator via low latitude western boundary currents. Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler data from 94 various cruises and transits are used to describe the Solomon Sea mean circulation and its seasonal variability above 300 m depth, providing an unprecedently detailed picture from observations. The circulation in the near-surface (20-100 m) and thermocline (100-300 m) layers were analyzed separately but found to have many similar features. They are compared with circulations inferred from hydrological and satellite data. The New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent enters the Solomon Sea east of the Louisiade Archipelago (15 Sv inflow above 300 m), splits and rejoins around the Woodlark Chain, then divides against the coast of New Britain forming two branches flowing westward and eastward. The westward branch has been previously observed flowing through Vitiaz Strait; in the present SADCP data this transport is found to be 7-8 Sv in the upper 300 m. The eastward branch has been suspected and occurs in some models; it exits the Solomon Sea through St. George’s Channel (1-2 Sv) and Solomon Strait (4-5 Sv) in the thermocline. At the surface, waters enter the Solomon Strait from the north. The seasonal variability can be documented in locations of sufficient data coverage. It is shown that this western boundary system strengthens in June-August. A summary of transport variability in the straits of the Solomon Sea from individual cruises is also presented. Transports in the straits display some stable features, but also high non-seasonal variability.

  6. Emissions from volcanoes Christiane Textor, Hans-F. Graf, Claudia Timmreck, Alan Robock

    E-print Network

    Robock, Alan

    large that volcanic islands have been formed along the mid-Atlantic ridge. Their basaltic magmas. GLOBAL VOLCANISM Around 380 volcanoes were active during the last century, with around 50 volcanoes active per year (Andres and Kasgnoc 1998). Volcanic activity is not randomly distributed over the Earth

  7. Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia

    E-print Network

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    . Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online xxx Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano Faulting volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May 2006 on the Java Island

  8. Iceland's Grímsvötn volcano erupts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    About 13 months after Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano began erupting on 14 April 2010, which led to extensive air traffic closures over Europe, Grímsvötn volcano in southeastern took its turn. Iceland's most active volcano, which last erupted in 2004 and lies largely beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, began its eruption activity on 21 May, with the ash plume initially reaching about 20 kilometers in altitude, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office. Volcanic ash from Grímsvötn has cancelled hundreds of airplane flights and prompted U.S. president Barack Obama to cut short his visit to Ireland. As Eos went to press, activity at the volcano was beginning to subside.

  9. Small Tharsis Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano located southwest of the giant volcano, Pavonis Mons, near 2.5oS, 109.4oW. Lava flows can be seen to have emanated from the summit region, which today is an irregularly-shaped collapse pit, or caldera. A blanket of dust mantles this volcano. Dust covers most martian volcanoes, none of which are young or active today. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  10. Island of Hawaii, Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This single photo covers almost all of the big island of Hawaii (19.5N, 155.5E) in the Hawaiian Archipelago. The active Kilauea Volcano and lava flow is under clouds and hardly visible at the lower right edge but the Mauna Loa volcano crater and its older lava flow is at the bottom center. The Kona Coast, that produces the only coffee grown in the United States, is to the left. Mauna Kea is the extinct volcano and lava flow in the right center.

  11. Sea surface temperature and salinity seasonal changes in the western Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    E-print Network

    Sea surface temperature and salinity seasonal changes in the western Solomon and Bismarck Seas Surface Temperature (SST) and Salinity (SSS) in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977­2009 in situ are examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest

  12. High resolution barotropic modellingS16-254 of the Solomon Sea

    E-print Network

    High resolution barotropic modellingS16-254 of the Solomon Sea ( ),Laurent Testut1(laurent The Solomon Sea is a region of complex bathymetry. Solom on Strait, Vitiaz Strait and St. George's Channel) . In this frame a high resolution barotropic tidal model is build. Figure 1: Bathymetry of the Solomon Sea (GEBCO

  13. A review of "Solomonic Iconography in Early Stuart England." by William Tate 

    E-print Network

    Jonathan Nauman

    2003-01-01

    Stuart?s par- amour. Puritan Lucy Hutchinson characterized James?s Solomonic pose as an evasion of his need to pursue theological and moral improvement. Bishop Lancelot Andrewes used Solomon?s obtain- ing of the throne against the will of High Priest...

  14. Obituary: Philip M. Solomon, 1939-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Philip Solomon, one of the pioneers and leading researchers in molecular astrophysics, died on 30 April 2008 at his apartment on the upper west side of Manhattan after a battle with cancer. His pioneering research included both theoretical and very extensive observational studies of stellar atmospheres, interstellar molecules, high redshift galaxies, and the Earth's stratosphere. Phil was Distinguished Professor at The State University of New York [SUNY], Stony Brook, where he had been since 1974. Phil was born on 29 March 1939 in Manhattan, New York City, to Nat and Betty Solomon. Nat Solomon was a labor organizer and a printer. Phil attended the University of Wisconsin, where he received his BS in 1959 and where he met his future wife Sheila who was studying art. His Ph.D., "On the Role of Light Molecules in Astrophysics," was also from the University of Wisconsin under the guidance of Art Code and Bob Bless. After postdoctoral positions at Princeton and lectureships at Columbia and the University of California, San Diego, Phil spent two years as a Professor at the University of Minnesota. After two years at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, he came to SUNY, Stony Brook, as Professor of Astronomy in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences. In 1988 Phil was selected as a Humboldt Senior Distinguished Scientist, and, in 1999, he was honored with the rank of Distinguished Professor at SUNY. Phil took sabbatical and other leaves at Churchill College and the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge; the Institute for Advanced Study; l'Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris; Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris; and the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique [IRAM], France. Phil published more than 160 papers and supervised seven Ph.D. students. He served on numerous review, visiting, and advisory panels. Phil's first theoretical research focused on opacity and abundance of light molecules such as H2, CO, and CN in stellar atmospheres, but then shifted quickly to the formation, excitation, and astrophysics of interstellar molecules, which had just been discovered in the late 1960s. In 1969, Phil and Chandra Wickramasinghe were among the first to suggest that the denser interstellar clouds, which were deficient in atomic hydrogen, were principally molecular hydrogen with the H2 formed on the surface of cold dust grains and protected from dissociating UV by a self-shielding H2 layer at the cloud surface. With L. Lucy, Phil then developed the radiative transfer and mass-loss mechanism operative in hot OB star winds and QSOs--where the radiative momentum is absorbed in resonance lines of ions. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the detection and mapping of interstellar molecules moved rapidly from the early discoveries of maser emission in H2O and OH to the thermal emission lines of simple molecules like CO, CN, CS, and HCN, to more complex species containing up to thirteen atoms. Phil was a major force in pushing these new detections and in using the thermal emission as astrophysical probes. This explosive growth of spectroscopic detections occurred primarily as a result of Phil's collaborations with A. Penzias, K. Jefferts, R. Wilson, and P. Thaddeus, along with other competing groups using the NRAO 36-foot telescope at Kitt Peak. This was a most exciting period with the mm-wave window finally accessible to spectroscopy and each observing run on the telescope typically yielded one or two new detections. Phil was probably the one most responsible for providing the astrophysical motivation to push the technology towards mm-wavelengths. He clearly elucidated the fact that high densities were required for the thermal excitation of the higher dipole moment molecules such CS and HCN--at the same time pointing out, for the first time, the critical role of line photon trapping in the optically thick lines. In collaboration with N. Scoville and D. Sanders, Phil initiated the early surveys of CO emission from the Milky Way molecular gas. They first pointed out that the molecular gas resides largely in self-gravitating clouds (

  15. Investigating the Gao & Solomon Relationship with MALT90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ian; Jackson, James M.; Whitaker, John Scott; Contreras, Yanett; Foster, Jonathan B.; Guzman, Andres; Sanhueza, Patricio; Rathborne, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In an survey of 53 galaxies, Gao & Solomon (2004) found a tight linear relationship between the infrared luminosity (a proxy for the star formation rate) and the HCN(1-0) luminosity, which is known as the Gao & Solomon relationship. Wu et al. (2005, 2010) found that this relationship extends from these extragalactic sources to the much less luminous Galactic clumps (~1 pc scales), and posited that there exists a fundamental unit for the ratio between infrared luminosity and dense gas mass for high-mass star-forming clumps. The luminosities of the Gao & Solomon (2004) galaxies could then be explained as a summation of this fundamental unit in the form of high-mass star-forming clumps. We test this explanation and other possible origins of the Gao-Solomon relationship using high-density tracers (including HCN(1-0), N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), HNC(1-0), HC3N(10-9), and C2H(1-0)) for ~400 Galactic clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey. Along with ancillary data, we find that this fundamental unit is not likely to exist at the clump-scale. Specifically, there are not enough high-mass clumps in the Milky Way to achieve the total expected luminosity of the Galaxy. Extended infrared emission, which often lacks high-mass clumps, adds significant (and probably dominant) emission to the total infrared luminosity of a galaxy. Low-mass clumps appear to add a significant, if not dominant, component to a galaxy's total HCN(1-0) luminosity. We suggest that Gao & Solomon relationship could be a result of a universal large-scale star formation efficiency, initial mass function, clump mass function, and core mass function. The power-law slope of the Gao & Solomon relationship probably depends on the critical density of the tracer and the median density of the galaxy, as suggested in theoretical simulations.

  16. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and research opportunities for Russian and American students. AVO was a three-way partnership of the federal and state geological surveys and the state university from the start. This was not a flowering of ecumenism but was rather at the insistence of the Alaska congressional delegation. Such shared enterprises are not managerially convenient, but they do bring a diversity of roles, thinking, and expertise that would not otherwise be possible. Through AVO, the USGS performs its federally mandated role in natural hazard mitigation and draws on expertise available from its network of volcano observatories. The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys performs a similar role at the state level and, in the tradition of state surveys, provides important public communications, state data base, and mapping functions. The University of Alaska Fairbanks brought seismological, remote sensing, geodetic, petrological, and physical volcanological expertise, and uniquely within US academia was able to engage students directly in volcano observatory activities. Although this "model" cannot be adopted in total elsewhere, it has served to point the USGS Volcano Hazards Program in a direction of greater openness and inclusiveness.

  17. Small Dusty Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    3 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small, dust-covered, volcano in the Jovis Fossae region of Mars. While Mars is known for its extremely large volcanoes, such as Olympus Mons, many small volcanoes also occur on the red planet, particularly in the Tharsis region. This small volcano is a good example of those. It was originally found by members of the MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) team during the MGS primary mission. The volcano is old, and cratered. Its surface is mantled by dust, and its caldera (summit depression) has some dust-covered wind ripples on its floor.

    Location near: 20.7oN, 111.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season Northern Autumn

  18. A Solomon link through an interwoven molecular grid.

    PubMed

    Beves, Jonathon E; Danon, Jonathan J; Leigh, David A; Lemonnier, Jean-François; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J

    2015-06-22

    A molecular Solomon link was synthesized through the assembly of an interwoven molecular grid consisting of four bis(benzimidazolepyridyl)benzthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole ligands and four zinc(II), iron(II), or cobalt(II) cations, followed by ring-closing olefin metathesis. NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography confirmed the doubly interlocked topology, and subsequent demetalation afforded the wholly organic Solomon link. The synthesis, in which each metal ion defines the crossing point of two ligand strands, suggests that interwoven molecular grids should be useful scaffolds for the rational construction of other topologically complex structures. PMID:25960366

  19. A Solomon Link through an Interwoven Molecular Grid**

    PubMed Central

    Beves, Jonathon E; Danon, Jonathan J; Leigh, David A; Lemonnier, Jean-François; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J

    2015-01-01

    A molecular Solomon link was synthesized through the assembly of an interwoven molecular grid consisting of four bis(benzimidazolepyridyl)benzthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole ligands and four zinc(II), iron(II), or cobalt(II) cations, followed by ring-closing olefin metathesis. NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography confirmed the doubly interlocked topology, and subsequent demetalation afforded the wholly organic Solomon link. The synthesis, in which each metal ion defines the crossing point of two ligand strands, suggests that interwoven molecular grids should be useful scaffolds for the rational construction of other topologically complex structures. PMID:25960366

  20. Lifetime of an ocean island volcano feeder zone: constraints from U-Pb dating on coexisting zircon and baddeleyite, and 40/39Ar age determinations, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allibon, James; Ovtcharova, Maria; Bussy, Francois; Cosca, Michael; Schaltegger, Urs; Bussien, Denise; Lewin, Eric

    2011-01-01

    High-precision isotope dilution - thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages from the PX1 vertically layered mafic intrusion Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, indicate initiation of magma crystallization at 22.10 ± 0.07 Ma. The magmatic activity lasted a minimum of 0.52 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar amphibole dating yielded ages from 21.9 ± 0.6 to 21.8 ± 0.3, identical within errors to the U-Pb ages, despite the expected 1% theoretical bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dates. This overlap could result from (i) rapid cooling of the intrusion (i.e., less than the 0.3 to 0.6 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age uncertainties) from closure temperatures (Tc) of zircon (699-988 °C) to amphibole (500-600 °C); (ii) lead loss affecting the youngest zircons; or (iii) excess argon shifting the plateau ages towards older values. The combination of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb datasets implies that the maximum amount of time PX1 intrusion took to cool below amphibole Tc is 0.8 Ma, suggesting PX1 lifetime of 520,000 to 800,000 Ma. Age disparities among coexisting baddeleyite and zircon (22.10 ± 0.07/0.08/0.15 Ma and 21.58 ± 0.15/0.16/0.31 Ma) in a gabbro sample from the pluton margin suggest complex genetic relationships between phases. Baddeleyite is found preserved in plagioclase cores and crystallized early from low silica activity magma. Zircon crystallized later in a higher silica activity environment and is found in secondary scapolite and is found close to calcite veins, in secondary scapolite that recrystallised from plagioclase. close to calcite veins. Oxygen isotope ?18O values of altered plagioclase are high (+7.7), indicating interaction with fluids derived from host-rock carbonatites. The coexistence of baddeleyite and zircon is ascribed to interaction of the PX1 gabbro with CO2-rich carbonatite-derived fluids released during contact metamorphism.

  1. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  2. Mapping tremor at K?lauea volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, A.; Thelen, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the magma pathway geometry beneath active volcanoes is vital to providing an understanding of how each system works, what drives its dynamics and what eventually controls the surface expression of volcanism. Seismicity can provide clues about the subsurface plumbing, but the seismic catalog is often incomplete. The broad spectrum of seismic phenomena at volcanoes, from discrete earthquakes to the continuous hum of tremor, hampers event identification, and there are no standard seismological tools to resolve this problem. Even at K?lauea, one of the best-instrumented and most studied volcanoes in the world, a detailed source geometry remains elusive. Here we present the first map of a volcano's deep plumbing system by taking a new approach to seismic monitoring. Using envelope cross-correlation, we systematically scan through 2.5 years of continuous seismic data to identify and locate thousands of undocumented volcanic sources, which we interpret to map the path of magma ascent from the deep mantle, offshore south of the Big Island, to the lava lake in K?lauea's crater. The results offer a fundamental insight into the source of K?lauea volcanism and generate a baseline understanding that increases our ability to interpret pre- and co-eruptive observations.

  3. VIP: Finding Important People in Images Clint Solomon Mathialagan

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    VIP: Finding Important People in Images Clint Solomon Mathialagan Virginia Tech Andrew C. Gallagher importance and vi- sual saliency. We find that not only can we automatically predict the importance of people://cloudcv.org/vip/ Abstract People preserve memories of events such as birthdays, wed- dings, or vacations by capturing photos

  4. New Perspectives on Ancient Mars Sean C. Solomon,1

    E-print Network

    of the accretion of the terrestrial planets hint that Mars may have formed in as short an interval as severalNew Perspectives on Ancient Mars Sean C. Solomon,1 * Oded Aharonson,2 Jonathan M. Aurnou,3 W. Bruce. Neumann,13 Roger J. Phillips,6 David E. Smith,7 Maria T. Zuber13 Mars was most active during its first

  5. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is a space radar image of the area around the Unzen volcano, on the west coast of Kyushu Island in southwestern Japan. Unzen, which appears in this image as a large triangular peak with a white flank near the center of the peninsula, has been continuously active since a series of powerful eruptions began in 1991. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 93rd orbit on April 15, 1994. The image shows an area 41.5 kilometers by 32.8 kilometers (25.7 miles by 20.3 miles) that is centered at 32.75 degrees north latitude and 130.15 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received); green represents the average of L-band and C-band (vertically transmitted and received); blue represents the C-band (vertically transmitted and received). Unzen is one of 15 'Decade' volcanoes identified by the scientific community as posing significant potential threats to large local populations. The city of Shimabara sits along the coast at the foot of Unzen on its east and northeast sides. At the summit of Unzen a dome of thick lava has been growing continuously since 1991. Collapses of the sides of this dome have generated deadly avalanches of hot gas and rock known as pyroclastic flows. Volcanologists can use radar image data to monitor the growth of lava domes, to better understand and predict potentially hazardous collapses.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

  6. Imaging magma storage reservoirs beneath Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, G.; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Seats, K.; Ruiz, M. C.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean island volcanoes initiate and grow through repeated eruptions and intrusions of primarily basaltic magma that thicken the oceanic crust above melt production zones within the mantle. The movement of oceanic plates over the hot, melt-rich upwellings produces chains of progressively younger basaltic volcanoes, as in the Galapagos Islands. Rates of surface deformation along the chain of 7 active volcanoes in the western Galápagos are some of the most rapid in the world, yet little is known of the subsurface structure of the active volcanic systems. The 16-station SIGNET array deployed between July 2009 and June 2011 provides new insights into the time-averaged structure beneath Sierra Negra, Cerro Azul, and Alcedo volcanoes, and the ocean platform. We use wavespeed tomography to image volcanic island structure, with focus on the magmatic plumbing system beneath Sierra Negra volcano, which has a deep, ~10 km-wide caldera and last erupted in 2005. We compare our results to those of ambient noise tomography. Our 120 x 100 km grid has a variable mesh of 2.5 - 10 km. We have good resolution at depths between 3 and 15 km, with poorer resolution beneath Cerro Azul volcano. Events from Alcedo volcano, which is just outside our array, cause some N-S smearing. Results from wavespeed tomography provide insights into the major island building processes: accretion through extrusive magmatism, magma chamber geometry and depth, radial dike intrusions, and magmatic underplating/sill emplacement. The wide caldera of Sierra Negra is underlain by high velocity (~7 %) material from depths of 5 - 15, and the flanks correspond to low velocity material at all depths. A high velocity zone corresponds to Cerro Azul (~3%). Aligned chains of eruptive centers correlate with elongate high velocity zones, suggesting that radial dikes are the sites of repeated dike intrusions. These chains are preferentially located along ridges linking nearby volcanoes. A comparison of well-resolved zones with ambient noise tomography shows a close correlation between the shapes and depth distributions. An exception is Cerro Azul volcano, where ambient noise tomography images a low velocity zone at frequencies corresponding to shallow depths, whereas wavespeed tomography in the mid to lower crust shows a moderate high velocity zone. We suggest that the differences can be explained by poor resolution from the wavespeed tomography in the location of Cerro Azul and bias toward the shallow depths with slower velocities in the ambient noise tomography. The high-velocity zone beneath Sierra Negra is consistent with a large volume olivine-gabbro cumulate mush zone proposed from petrological studies.

  7. Iceland: Grímsvötn Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... title:  Grímsvötn Volcano Injects Ash into the Stratosphere     View Larger ... which means that the ash has been injected into the stratosphere, the stratified portion of Earth's upper atmosphere. On this date, ...

  8. Vent of Sand Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

  9. Transport of Fine Ash Through the Water Column at Erupting Volcanoes - Monowai Cone, Kermadec-Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; Leybourne, M. I.; de Ronde, C. E.; Greene, R.; Faure, K.; Chadwick, W.; Dziak, R. P.; Lupton, J. E.; Lebon, G.

    2010-12-01

    Monowai cone is a large, active, basaltic stratovolcano, part of the submarine Monowai volcanic center (MVC) located at ~26°S on the Kermadec-Tonga arc. At other actively erupting submarine volcanoes, magma extrusions and hydrothermal vents have been located only near the summit of the edifice, generating plumes enriched with hydrothermal components and magmatic gasses that disperse into the ocean environment at, or shallower than, the summit depth. Plumes found deeper than summit depths are dominated by fresh volcaniclastic ash particles, devoid of hydrothermal tracers, emplaced episodically by down-slope gravity flows, and transport fine ash to 10’s of km from the active eruptions. A water column survey of the MVC in 2004 mapped intensely hydrothermal-magmatic plumes over the shallow (~130 m) summit of Monowai cone and widespread plumes around its flanks. Due to the more complex multiple parasitic cone and caldera structure of MVC, we analyzed the dissolved and particulate components of the flank plumes for evidence of additional sources. Although hydrothermal plumes exist within the adjacent caldera, none of the parasitic cones on Monowai cone or elsewhere within the MVC were hydrothermally or volcanically active. The combination of an intensely enriched summit plume, sulfur particles and bubbles at the sea surface, and ash-dominated flank plumes indicate Monowai cone was actively erupting at the time of the 2004 survey. Monowai cone is thus the fourth erupting submarine volcano we have encountered, and all have had deep ash plumes distributed around their flanks [the others are: Kavachi (Solomon Island arc), NW Rota-1 (Mariana arc) and W Mata (NE Lau basin)]. These deep ash plumes are a syneruptive phenomenon, but it is unknown how they are related to eruptive style and output, or to the cycles of construction and collapse that occur on the slopes of submarine volcanoes. Repeat multibeam bathymetric surveys have documented two large-scale sector collapse events at Monowai and one at NW Rota-1, as well as constructional deposits extending down the flanks of these volcanoes. Acoustic records at Monowai and NW Rota-1 suggest sector collapse events are infrequent while eruptions, and the resulting supply of depositional material, have been nearly continuous. The sector collapse events occurred at times remote from our plume surveys, so, large landslide events are not a prerequisite for the presence of deep ash plumes. Despite a wide range of summit depths (<10 m at Kavachi to 1500 m at W Mata), lava types (basaltic-andesite, boninite, and basalt), and eruptive styles (Surtseyan, Strombolian, and effusive flows with active pillow formation), the deep particle plumes at each of these volcanoes are remarkably similar in their widespread distribution (to 10’s of km from the summit and at multiple depths down the flanks) and composition (dominantly fresh volcanic ash). Moderate eruption rates, lava-seawater interaction and steep slopes below an eruptive vent may be sufficient to initiate the transport of fine ash into the ocean environment and distal sediments via these types of plumes.

  10. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts on surface, often of plane-conical shape, rising for 5 to 400 m and more over the country (for example, mud volcano Toragay, 400 m height). The base diameter is from 100 m to 3-4 km and more. Like the magmatic ones, the mud volcanoes are crowned with crater of convex-plane or deeply-seated shape. In Azerbaijan there are all types of mud volcanoes: active, extinct, buried, submarine, island, abundantly oil seeping. According to their morphology they are defined into cone-shaped, dome-shaped, ridge-shaped, plateau-shaped. The crater shapes are also various: conical, convex-plane, shield-shaped, deeply-seated, caldera-like. The most complete morphological classification was given in "Atlas of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan" (Yakubov et al., 1971). Recently (Aliyev Ad. et al., 2003) it was proposed a quite new morphological classification of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. For the first time the mud volcanic manifestations had been defined. Volcanoes are ranged according to morphological signs, crater shape and type of activity.

  11. Investigation of the Dashigil mud volcano (Azerbaijan) using beryllium-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. J.; Baskaran, M.; Jweda, J.; Feyzullayev, A. A.; Aliyev, C.; Matsuzaki, H.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2013-01-01

    We collected and analyzed five sediments from three mud volcano (MV) vents and six suspended and bottom sediment samples from the adjoining river near the Dashgil mud volcano in Azerbaijan for 10Be. These three MV are found among the 190 onshore and >150 offshore MV in this region which correspond to the western flank of the South Caspian depression. These MVs overlie the faulted and petroleum-bearing anticlines. The 10Be concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are comparable to the values reported for mud volcanoes in Trinidad Island. It appears that the stable Be concentrations in Azerbaijan rivers are not perturbed by anthropogenic effects and are comparable to the much older sediments (mud volcano samples). The 10Be and 9Be concentrations in our river sediments are compared to the global data set and show that the 10Be values found for Kura River are among the lowest of any river for which data exist. We attribute this low 10Be concentration to the nature of surface minerals which are affected by the residual hydrocarbon compounds that occur commonly in the study area in particular and Azerbaijan at large. The concentrations of 40K and U-Th-series radionuclides (234Th, 210Pb, 226Ra, and 228Ra) indicate overall homogeneity of the mud volcano samples from the three different sites. Based on the 10Be concentrations of the mud volcano samples, the age of the mud sediments could be at least as old as 4 myr.

  12. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  13. Tutorial on Reed-Solomon error correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisel, William A.

    1990-01-01

    This tutorial attempts to provide a frank, step-by-step approach to Reed-Solomon (RS) error correction coding. RS encoding and RS decoding both with and without erasing code symbols are emphasized. There is no need to present rigorous proofs and extreme mathematical detail. Rather, the simple concepts of groups and fields, specifically Galois fields, are presented with a minimum of complexity. Before RS codes are presented, other block codes are presented as a technical introduction into coding. A primitive (15, 9) RS coding example is then completely developed from start to finish, demonstrating the encoding and decoding calculations and a derivation of the famous error-locator polynomial. The objective is to present practical information about Reed-Solomon coding in a manner such that it can be easily understood.

  14. VLSI architecture for a Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, In-Shek (inventor); Truong, Trieu-Kie (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A basic single-chip building block for a Reed-Solomon (RS) decoder system is partitioned into a plurality of sections, the first of which consists of a plurality of syndrome subcells each of which contains identical standard-basis finite-field multipliers that are programmable between 10 and 8 bit operation. A desired number of basic building blocks may be assembled to provide a RS decoder of any syndrome subcell size that is programmable between 10 and 8 bit operation.

  15. A VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.; Reed, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    A pipeline structure of a transform decoder similar to a systolic array was developed to decode Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. An important ingredient of this design is a modified Euclidean algorithm for computing the error locator polynomial. The computation of inverse field elements is completely avoided in this modification of Euclid's algorithm. The new decoder is regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  16. Water Mass Modification through Mixing in the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberty, Marion; MacKinnon, Jennifer; Sprintall, Janet

    2015-04-01

    The Solomon Sea is a semi-enclosed sea located in the Equatorial southwest Pacific. With its complex topography and strong channel flow, the Solomon Sea has the potential to strongly mix water masses consisting of Antarctic Intermediate Water and South Pacific Subtropical Mode Water traveling equatorward to join the Equatorial Undercurrent. Observations of temperature and salinity relationships from the primary entry and exit points of the Solomon Sea circulation display erosion of the transported water masses and relaxation of the temperature-salinity gradients. In addition the surface signature in the northeast channels indicate the presence of a different water mass implying recirculation and variability in the surface transport which is consistent with model simulations of the region. The spatial and temporal variations in mixing through out the sea are investigated using CTD and LADCP profiles taken during two cruises in the Solomon Sea. Turbulent diffusivity is estimated by two fine scale parameterization methods. The first method takes advantage of an empirical ratio of Thorpe to Ozmidov length scales below the mixed layer and estimates diffusivity from overturn length and local stratification. This method employs data from the CTD at 1 m resolution. The second method uses shear derived from LADCP data and compares the variance of the spectra to that of the canonical Garrett-Munk model. The same is done with strain variance from CTD estimated buoyancy profiles and the ratio of the shear to strain variance is estimated for the region. Further estimates of mixing are derived from ARGO profiles, utilizing the region's ratio of shear to strain variance derived from the shipboard profiles. The spatial patterns display enhanced mixing near abrupt topographic features and in channels where vertical shear is strongest. Mixing in the thermocline layer is enhanced during the first cruise, which was concurrent with strong regional monsoonal wind forcing.

  17. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  18. Atmospheric composition, irreversible climate change, and mitigation policy#! S. Solomon1,2

    E-print Network

    ! "! "! Atmospheric composition, irreversible climate change, and mitigation policy#! $! S. Solomon in other aspects of climate such as%+! precipitation and sea level rise. Here we briefly survey the range

  19. Tephra hazard assessment at Concepción Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaini, C.; Folch, A.; Navarro, M.

    2012-03-01

    Concepción volcano in Ometepe Island, Nicaragua, is a highly active volcano with a rich historical record of explosive eruptions. Tephra fallout from Concepción jeopardizes the surrounding populations, whereas volcanic ash clouds threat aerial navigation at a regional level. The assessment of these hazards is important for territorial planning and adoption of mitigation measures. Here we compute probabilistic hazard maps for Concepción volcano considering three different eruptive scenarios based on past reference events. Previous geological analysis is used to quantify the eruption parameters of the reference events. We account for uncertainties in the definition of the scenarios trough probability density functions. A representative meteorological dataset is created for each scenario by running the WRF-ARW mesoscale meteorological model over a typical meteorological year, defined in terms of wind speed and direction at a given atmospheric height. Tephra transport and deposition under different eruption and wind conditions is modelled using the FALL3D dispersion model. For each scenario, simulations are combined to build probabilistic hazard maps for critical values of tephra load and for threshold values of airborne ash concentration at relevant flight levels. Results are useful to identify the expected impacts for each eruption type and aim at improving the assessment and management of risk in the region.

  20. How volcano monitoring in New Zealand can contribute to a global volcano dataset: The GeoNet Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, G. E.; Scott, B.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanism plays an important role in New Zealand. Much of the landscape of the central North Island owes its shape to volcanism, with the soils supporting forestry and farming economies, geothermal systems providing renewable electricity production and the spectacular landscape supporting tourism and adventure. However volcanism also has it disadvantages: eruptive activity brings physical damage and economic losses and, sometimes, tragically the loss of life. Historically, in New Zealand, volcanoes represent the largest single source of fatalities from natural disasters. To better mitigate the hazard from New Zealand’s volcanoes, a multidisciplinary approach is applied. In 2001 the NZ Earthquake Commission (EQC) commenced funding the GeoNet project, providing the first totally national modern geological hazard monitoring system in New Zealand. The GeoNet project is responsibly for monitoring and assessing all of the active volcanoes (and other geological hazards) in New Zealand. The volcano monitoring programme is integrated into the national seismograph and geodetic networks. The volcano monitoring covers active volcanic cones, resting calderas, volcanic fields, and submarine volcanoes. Monitoring techniques include volcano seismology, geodesy, gas and water chemistry, remote sensing and other geophysical techniques, producing a wide variety of data sets, with both temporal and spatial distribution. These data sets form the basis for detailed research to achieve in depth understanding of these volcanoes and will contribute to the global knowledge of volcanic processes. However to achieve this the data sets need to be accessible by a range of end users, so that they can be used to underpin fundamental research and applied hazard assessments. This presentation will outline the NZ data sets and the problems of presenting and sharing them globally.

  1. Exploring New Challenges of High-Resolution SWOT Satellite Altimetry with a Regional Model of the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, P.; Verron, J. A.; Djath, B.; Duran, M.; Gaultier, L.; Gourdeau, L.; Melet, A.; Molines, J. M.; Ubelmann, C.

    2014-12-01

    The upcoming high-resolution SWOT altimetry satellite will provide an unprecedented description of the ocean dynamic topography for studying sub- and meso-scale processes in the ocean. But there is still much uncertainty on the signal that will be observed. There are many scientific questions that are unresolved about the observability of altimetry at vhigh resolution and on the dynamical role of the ocean meso- and submesoscales. In addition, SWOT data will raise specific problems due to the size of the data flows. These issues will probably impact the data assimilation approaches for future scientific or operational oceanography applications. In this work, we propose to use a high-resolution numerical model of the Western Pacific Solomon Sea as a regional laboratory to explore such observability and dynamical issues, as well as new data assimilation challenges raised by SWOT. The Solomon Sea connects subtropical water masses to the equatorial ones through the low latitude western boundary currents and could potentially modulate the tropical Pacific climate. In the South Western Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits very intense eddy kinetic energy levels, while relatively little is known about the mesoscale and submesoscale activities in this region. The complex bathymetry of the region, complicated by the presence of narrow straits and numerous islands, raises specific challenges. So far, a Solomon sea model configuration has been set up at 1/36° resolution. Numerical simulations have been performed to explore the meso- and submesoscales dynamics. The numerical solutions which have been validated against available in situ data, show the development of small scale features, eddies, fronts and filaments. Spectral analysis reveals a behavior that is consistent with the SQG theory. There is a clear evidence of energy cascade from the small scales including the submesoscales, although those submesoscales are only partially resolved by the model. In parallel, investigations have been conducted using image assimilation approaches in order to explore the richness of high-resolution altimetry missions. These investigations illustrate the potential benefit of combining tracer fields (SST, SSS and spiciness) with high-resolution SWOT data to estimate the fine-scale circulation.

  2. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island), Stromboli and Volcano (Italy), Hilo (Hawai), Mt. St. Helens (United States), CTM (Coherent Target Monitoring): Cumbre Vieja (La Palma) To generate products either Envisat ASAR, Radarsat 1or ALOS PALSAR data have been used. Surface Thermal Anomalies Volcanic hot-spots detection, radiant flux and effusion rate (where applicable) calculation of high temperature surface thermal anomalies such as active lava flow, strombolian activity, lava dome, pyroclastic flow and lava lake can be performed through MODIS (Terra / Aqua) MIR and TIR channels, or ASTER (Terra), HRVIR/HRGT (SPOT4/5) and Landsat family SWIR channels analysis. ASTER and Landsat TIR channels allow relative radiant flux calculation of low temperature anomalies such as lava and pyroclastic flow cooling, crater lake and low temperature fumarolic fields. MODIS, ASTER and SPOT data are processed to detect and measure the following volcanic surface phenomena: Effusive activity Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island); Mt Etna (Italy). Lava dome growths, collapses and related pyroclastic flows Soufrière Hills (Montserrat); Arenal - (Costa Rica). Permanent crater lake and ephemeral lava lake Karthala (Comores Islands). Strombolian activity Stromboli (Italy). Low temperature fumarolic fields Nisyros (Greece), Vulcano (Italy), Mauna Loa (Hawaii). Volcanic Emission The Volcanic Emission Service is provided to the users by a link to GSE-PROMOTE - Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The aim of the service is to deliver in near-real-time data derived from satellite measurements regarding SO2 emissions (SO2 vertical column density - Dobson Unit [DU]) possibly related to volcanic eruptions and to track the ash injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. SO2 measurements are derived from different satellite instruments, such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The tracking of volcanic ash is accomplished by using SEVIRI-MSG data and, in particular, the following channels VIS 0.6 and IR 3.9, and along with IR8.7, IR 10.8 and IR 12.0. The GlobVolcano information system and its current experimentation represent a

  3. A volcano bursting at the seams: Inflation, faulting, and eruption at Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Geist, Dennis J.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Poland, Michael P.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Meertens, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    The results of geodetic monitoring since 2002 at Sierra Negra volcano in the Galápagos Islands show that the filling and pressurization of an ?2-km-deep sill eventually led to an eruption that began on 22 October 2005. Continuous global positioning system (CGPS) monitoring measured >2 m of accelerating inflation leading up to the eruption and contributed to nearly 5 m of total uplift since 1992, the largest precursory inflation ever recorded at a basaltic caldera. This extraordinary uplift was accommodated in part by repeated trapdoor faulting, and coseismic CGPS data provide strong constraints for improved deformation models. These results highlight the feedbacks between inflation, faulting, and eruption at a basaltic volcano, and demonstrate that faulting above an intruding magma body can relieve accumulated strain and effectively postpone eruption.

  4. A Submarine Perspective on Hawaiian Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Postwar improvements in navigation, sonar-based mapping, and submarine photography enabled the development of bathymetric maps, which revealed submarine morphologic features that could be dredged or explored and sampled with a new generation of manned and unmanned submersibles. The maps revealed debris fields from giant landslides, the great extent of rift zones radiating from volcanic centers, and two previously unknown submarine volcanoes named Mahukona and Loihi, the youngest Hawaiian volcano. About 70 major landslides cover half the flanks of the Hawaiian Ridge out to Midway Island. Some of the landslides attain lengths of 200 km and have volumes exceeding 5,000 km3. More recent higher resolution bathymetry and sidescan data reveal that many submarine eruptions construct circular, flat-topped, monogenetic cones; that large fields of young strongly alkalic lava flows, such as the North Arch and South Arch lava fields, erupt on the seafloor within several hundred km of the islands; and that alkalic lavas erupt during the shield stage on Kilauea and Mauna Loa. The North Arch flow field covers about 24,000 km2, has an estimated volume between about 1000 and 1250 km3, has flows as long as 108 km, and erupted from over 100 vents. The source and melting mechanisms for their production is still debated. The maps also displayed stair-step terraces, mostly constructed of drowned coral reefs, which form during early rapid subsidence of the volcanoes during periods of oscillating sea level. The combination of scuba and underwater photography facilitated the first motion pictures of the mechanism of formation of pillow lava in shallow water offshore Kilauea. The age progression known from the main islands was extended westward along the Hawaiian Ridge past Midway Island, around a bend in the chain and northward along the Emperor Seamounts. Radiometric dating of dredged samples from these submarine volcanoes show that the magma source that built the chain has been active for over 80 Ma and established the remarkable linearity of the age-progression along the chain. Glass rinds on submarine lava quenched at depth contain initial magmatic volatiles and yield data on the juvenile water, sulfur, CO2, and rare gas contents of basaltic magmas, and continue to reveal nuances of the volatile contents of lava. Rock sampling at Loihi Seamount led to the discovery of the pre-shield alkalic phase of Hawaiian volcanism, which mirrors the well-known post-shield alkalic phase. Lava compositions from the Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamounts have clear affinities to present-day Hawaiian lavas, but subtle source differences as well. The progression from small to large and back to small degrees of melting at individual volcanoes and the compositional changes along the chain constrain the melting processes and source compositions of Hawaiian volcanism. Coupling the age of lavas with that of submerged coral reefs has provided data on the growth and subsidence of volcanic centers. This information has meshed nicely with the age, composition, and morphology of lavas from the 3.2-km-deep Hawaiian Scientific Drill Hole. Submarine studies have taught us much about the workings of Hawaiian Volcanoes, and in the process have stimulated new work and concepts on marine volcanism worldwide.

  5. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs. 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.-Author

  6. Shallow S wave attenuation and actively degassing magma beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Lacson, Rudy; Maeda, Yuta; Figueroa, Melquiades S.; Yamashina, Tadashi

    2014-10-01

    Taal Volcano, Philippines, is one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes given its history of explosive eruptions and its close proximity to populated areas. A real-time broadband seismic network was recently deployed and has detected volcano-tectonic events beneath Taal. Our source location analysis of these volcano-tectonic events, using onset arrival times and high-frequency seismic amplitudes, points to the existence of a region of strong attenuation near the ground surface beneath the east flank of Volcano Island in Taal Lake. This region is beneath the active fumarolic area and above sources of pressure contributing inflation and deflation, and it coincides with a region of high electrical conductivity. The high-attenuation region matches that inferred from an active-seismic survey conducted at Taal in 1993. These features strongly suggest that the high-attenuation region represents an actively degassing magma body near the surface that has existed for more than 20 years.

  7. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  8. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, AVO located 6,664 earthquakes of which 5,660 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Monitoring highlights in 2007 include: the eruption of Pavlof Volcano, volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarms at the Augustine, Illiamna, and Little Sitkin volcanic centers, and the cessation of episodes of unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, Mount Veniaminof and the northern Atka Island volcanoes (Mount Kliuchef and Korovin Volcano). This catalog includes descriptions of : (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2007; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2007; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2007.

  9. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by pryoclastic flow at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.

    2003-01-01

    Pyroclastic flows entering the sea are plausible mechanisms for tsunami generation at volcanic island arcs worldwide. We evaluate tsunami generation by pyroclastic flow using an example from Aniakchak volcano in Alaska where evidence for tsunami inundation coincident with a major, caldera-forming eruption of the volcano ca. 3.5 ka has been described. Using a numerical model, we simulate the tsunami and compare the results to field estimates of tsunami run up.

  10. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... of the plume features between camera views. A quantitative computer analysis is necessary to separate out wind and height (see  Volcano ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  11. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  12. Augustine Volcano Sampling

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Students climb out of ravine on north flank of Augustine Volcano during descent from sampling the 2006 lava flow during 2010 summer field campaign. From left: Laurel Morrow (junior geology major at CSUF), Matthew Bidwell (Science teacher at South Junior High School in Anaheim, CA), Ashley Melendez (...

  13. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  14. The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Wise, William S.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1997-01-01

    Mauna Kea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaii, is capped by lavas of alkalic and transitional basalt (Hamakua Volcanics) erupted between approximately 250-200 and 70-65 ka and hawaiite, mugearite, and benmoreite (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) erupted between approximately 65 and 4 ka. These lavas, which form the entire subaerial surface of the volcano, issued from numerous scattered vents and are intercalated on the upper slopes with glacial deposits. The lavas record diminishing magma-supply rate and degree of partial melting from the shield stage through the postshield stage. Much of the compositional variation apparently reflects fractionation of basaltic magma in reservoirs within and beneath the volcano.

  15. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano.

    PubMed

    Embley, Robert W; Chadwick, William W; Baker, Edward T; Butterfield, David A; Resing, Joseph A; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lupton, John E; Juniper, S Kim; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stern, Robert J; Lebon, Geoffrey T; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Merle, Susan G; Hein, James R; Wiens, Douglas A; Tamura, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-25

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. PMID:16724063

  16. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Greek Islands, Western Asia Minor as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This north-looking view shows the western margin of Turkey (right) and the Dodecanese Islands of Greece between the Aegean Sea (left) and the Sea of Crete (foreground). The largest island is Crete (foreground) with the semicircular island of Thira beyond. Thira is dominated by the volcanoe Santorini. Two airplane contrails appear between the Turkish mainland and the large island of Rhodes immediately offshore. The narrow straits of the Dardanelles, joining the Black Sea to the Mediterranean, can be detected top left.

  18. 75 FR 57388 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 32866). Additionally, on... Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 41789... establishing special local regulations during the ``Chesapeake Challenge'' power boat races, a marine event...

  19. Dwight E. Bergles, Ph.D. The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience

    E-print Network

    1 Dwight E. Bergles, Ph.D. The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience The Johns Hopkins Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University Professor, Department of Otolaryngology The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience Prior positions: 2005 ­ 2011 Associate Professor, Department

  20. Hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines): Implications to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Alanis, P. B.; Yamaya, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Bornas, M. V.; Cordon, J. M.; Puertollano, J.; Clarito, C. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Mogi, T.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The first recorded eruption was in 1573. Since then it has erupted 33 times resulting in thousands of casualties and large damages to property. In 1995, it was declared as one of the 15 Decade Volcanoes. Beginning in the early 1990s it has experienced several phases of abnormal activity, including seismic swarms, episodes of ground deformation, ground fissuring and hydrothermal activities, which continues up to the present. However, it has been noted that past historical eruptions of Taal Volcano may be divided into 2 distinct cycles, depending on the location of the eruption center, either at Main Crater or at the flanks. Between 1572-1645, eruptions occurred at the Main Crater, in 1707 to 1731, they occurred at the flanks. In 1749, eruptions moved back to the Main Crater until 1911. During the 1965 and until the end of the 1977 eruptions, eruptive activity once again shifted to the flanks. As part of the PHIVOLCS-JICA-SATREPS Project magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric surveys were conducted on Volcano Island in March 2011 and March 2012. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion and 3-D forward modeling reveals a prominent and large zone of relatively high resistivity between 1 to 4 kilometers beneath the volcano almost directly beneath the Main Crater, surrounded by zones of relatively low resistivity. This anomalous zone of high resistivity is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir filled with volcanic fluids. The presence of this large hydrothermal reservoir could be related to past activities of Taal Volcano. In particular we believe that the catastrophic explosion described during the 1911 eruption was the result of the hydrothermal reservoir collapsing. During the cycle of Main Crater eruptions, this hydrothermal reservoir is depleted, while during a cycle of flank eruptions this reservoir is replenished with hydrothermal fluids.

  1. Space Radar Image of Sakura-Jima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The active volcano Sakura-Jima on the island of Kyushu, Japan is shown in the center of this radar image. The volcano occupies the peninsula in the center of Kagoshima Bay, which was formed by the explosion and collapse of an ancient predecessor of today's volcano. The volcano has been in near continuous eruption since 1955. Its explosions of ash and gas are closely monitored by local authorities due to the proximity of the city of Kagoshima across a narrow strait from the volcano's center, shown below and to the left of the central peninsula in this image. City residents have grown accustomed to clearing ash deposits from sidewalks, cars and buildings following Sakura-jima's eruptions. The volcano is one of 15 identified by scientists as potentially hazardous to local populations, as part of the international 'Decade Volcano' program. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 9, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered at 31.6 degrees North latitude and 130.6 degrees East longitude. North is toward the upper left. The area shown measures 37.5 kilometers by 46.5 kilometers (23.3 miles by 28.8 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received and C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received.

  2. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals and current monitoring level; associated hazards; and detailed descriptions of possible eruption scenarios. Where data allows, the likelihood of different eruption scenarios will also be depicted by probabilistic event trees. The chapters are illustrated with a number of figures, interactive maps and photographs.

  3. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sanchez, John J.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Estes, Steve; Paskievitch, John

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of this program are the near real time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2003. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at twenty-seven volcanoes within Alaska in 2003. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Monitoring highlights in 2003 include: continuing elevated seismicity at Mount Veniaminof in January-April (volcanic unrest began in August 2002), volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year, and low-level tremor at Okmok Caldera throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2003 were the installation of subnetworks on Tanaga and Gareloi Islands, the installation of broadband installations on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera, and the establishment of telemetry for the Okmok Caldera subnetwork. AVO located 3911 earthquakes in 2003. This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2003; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2003.

  4. The Alignment and Spacing of Volcanoes on Earth: Are Oceanic and Continental Settings Really That Different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The origin of the alignment and spacing of volcanoes has traditionally been treated from two fundamentally different perspectives: continental and oceanic. With the overwhelming evidence from the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, where a robust plume has generated a simple time-transgressive chain of volcanic islands, many oceanic alignments worldwide have been ascribed to plate motion above a fixed source of melting. Conversely, alignments of volcanoes in continental settings are primarily ascribed to some structural or tectonic pathway that serves to guide rising magmas. This fundamental difference of cause and effect, with respect to these two settings, has led to misinterpretations regarding the age and evolution of some island chains. In the Hawaiian Islands attributes like volcano age, elevation, morphology, and lava composition change systematically in the direction of plate motion away from the most recent activity on the island of Hawaii. However, some other plume-related volcanic archipelagoes have more diffuse volcanic activity and the relative ages among some the islands are not so clear. In the Galapagos Islands, although the maximum measured ages of the lava flows increase systematically eastward from Fernandina to San Cristobal, the large western volcanoes are essentially coeval. Similar ages imply that morphological and geochemical differences among these volcanoes are due to differences in melt generation and magma supply imposed by variations in plume strength and lithospheric structure rather than an evolutionary model like that predicted for Hawaiian systems. Comparisons of other volcanic chains and fields less voluminous than Hawaii indicate that although oceanic and continental magmas are chemically quite different, the controls governing their emplacement are not. The emplacement of smaller volume oceanic systems like the Galapagos, Canaries, Reunion, and many seamounts may share more aspects with continental volcanic fields than they do with large volume systems like Hawaii. Magma transport in small volume systems is strongly influenced by lithospheric/crustal thickness, tectonic stresses, and preexisting weaknesses which ultimately provide the dominant control on the location, alignment, geochemical variation, and eruptive volume of volcanoes.

  5. Submarine volcanoes along the Aegean volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Alexandri, Matina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean volcanic arc has been investigated along its offshore areas and several submarine volcanic outcrops have been discovered in the last 25 years of research. The basic data including swath bathymetric maps, air-gun profiles, underwater photos and samples analysis have been presented along the four main volcanic groups of the arc. The description concerns: (i) Paphsanias submarine volcano in the Methana group, (ii) three volcanic domes to the east of Antimilos Volcano and hydrothermal activity in southeast Milos in the Milos group, (iii) three volcanic domes east of Christiana and a chain of about twenty volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini in the Santorini group and (iv) several volcanic domes and a volcanic caldera together with very deep slopes of several volcanic islands in the Nisyros group. The tectonic structure of the volcanic centers is described and related to the geometry of the arc and the neotectonic graben structures that usually host them. The NE-SW direction is dominant in the Santorini and Nisyros volcanic groups, located at the eastern part of the arc, where strike-slip is also present, whereas NW-SE direction dominates in Milos and Methana at the western part, where co-existence of E-W disrupting normal faults is observed. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from the outcrops of the volcanic centers emerging usually at 400-600 m depth and ending either below sea level or at high altitudes of 600-700 m on the islands. Hydrothermal activity at relatively high temperatures observed in Kolumbo is remarkable whereas low temperature phenomena have been detected in the Santorini caldera around Kameni islands and in the area southeast of Milos. In Methana and Nisyros, hydrothermal activity seems to be limited in the coastal areas without other offshore manifestations.

  6. Volcanoes, Tsunamis and the demise of the Minoans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, J. J.; Bicknell, P. J.; Humble, R. J.

    1994-10-01

    There is considerable evidence from archaeological sites on the Greek Islands of extensive volcanic activity. The most famous example is the eruption of the island volcano of Thera (Santorini) which buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri on Thera and may have played a significant role in the replacement of the Minoan civilization on Crete by the Myceneans. The eruption of Thera is estimated to have produced about four times the ejecta of Krakatau. In this paper we discuss how geophysical phenomena expected from eruptions like those of Thera (pyroclastic flows, Tsunamis and the breaking of non linear waves) can be simulated using the particle method SPH.

  7. Persistent volcanic signature observed around Barren Island, Andaman Sea, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laluraj, C. M.; Balachandran, K. K.; Sabu, P.; Panampunnayil, S. U.

    2006-12-01

    This study delineates the formation of a warm pool (>34°C) of air to the west (downwind) of the active volcano of the Barren Island during October November 2005. Barren Island is located in the Sumatra Andaman region, about 135 km east of Port Blair, and lies within the Burma microplate, the southern tip of which experienced a submarine earthquake ( M w 9.3) causing a tsunami in December 2004. Barren Island is the only volcano, which has shown sustained eruptive activity since shortly after the Great Sumatran Earthquake of December 2004. Our observations require further corroboration to relate how submarine earthquakes activate volcanoes and how far these thermal emissions influence climate changes. Because it links global warming and climate changes to the frequent emissions from a volcano activated by submarine earthquakes, this case study is of special interest to the earth-ocean-atmosphere sciences community.

  8. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  9. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the importance of this more realistic description in gravity calculations. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  10. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  11. Pairing the Volcano

    E-print Network

    Ionica, Sorina

    2011-01-01

    Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

  12. Volcanic Activities of Hakkoda Volcano after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake of 11 March 2011 generated large deformation in and around the Japanese islands, and the large crustal deformation raises fear of further disasters including triggered volcanic activities. In this presentation, as an example of such potential triggered volcanic activities, we report the recent seismic activities of Hakkoda volcano, and discuss the relation to the movement of volcanic fluids. Hakkoda volcano is a group of stratovolcanoes at the northern end of Honshu Island, Japan. There are fumaroles and hot springs around the volcano, and phreatic eruptions from Jigoku-numa on the southwestern flank of Odake volcano, which is the highest peak of the volcanic group, were documented in its history. Since just after the occurrence of the Tohokui Earthquake, the seismicity around the volcano became higher, and the migration of hypocenters of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes was observed.In addition to these VT earthquakes, long-period (LP) events started occurring beneath Odake at a depth of about 2-3 km since February, 2013, and subtle crustal deformation caused by deep inflation source was also detected by the GEONET GNSS network around the same time. The spectra of LP events are common between events irrespective of the magnitude of events, and they have several spectral peaks at 6-7 sec, 2-3 sec, 1 sec, and so on. These LP events sometimes occur like a swarm with an interval of several minutes. The characteristics of observed LP events at Hakkoda volcano are similar to those of LP events at other active volcanoes and hydrothermal area in the world, where abundant fluids exist. Our further analysis using far-field Rayleigh radiation pattern observed by NIED Hi-net stations reveals that the source of LP events is most likely to be a nearly vertical tensile crack whose strike is NE-SW direction. The strike is almost perpendicular to the direction of maximum extensional strain estimated from the geodetic analysis, and is almost parallel to the direction connecting Odake summit crater and Jigoku-numa. These results suggest that the extensional field generated by the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake causes the upward movement of volcanic fluids and heat from the deep, and results in an activation of hydrothermal activities at the pre-existent fracture zone at the Hakkoda volcanic group.

  13. Constructing a reference tephrochronology for Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in Alaska's populous Cook Inlet region. Past on-island work on pre-historic tephra deposits mainly focused on using tephra layers as markers to help distinguish among prevalent debris-avalanche deposits on the island (Waitt and Beget, 2009, USGS Prof Paper 1762), or as source material for petrogenetic studies. No comprehensive reference study of tephra fall from Augustine Volcano previously existed. Numerous workers have identified Holocene-age tephra layers in the region surrounding Augustine Island, but without well-characterized reference deposits, correlation back to the source volcano is difficult. The purpose of this detailed tephra study is to provide a record of eruption frequency and magnitude, as well as to elucidate physical and chemical characteristics for use as reference standards for comparison with regionally distributed Augustine tephra layers. Whole rock major- and trace-element geochemistry, deposit componentry, and field context are used to correlate tephra units on the island where deposits are coarse grained. Major-element glass geochemistry was collected for use in correlating to unknown regional tephra. Due to the small size of the volcanic island (9 by 11 km in diameter) and frequent eruptive activity, on-island exposures of tephra deposits older than a couple thousand years are sparse, and the lettered Tephras B, M, C, H, I, and G of Waitt and Beget (2009) range in age from 370-2200 yrs B.P. There are, however, a few exposures on the south side of the volcano, within about 2 km of the vent, where stratigraphic sections that extend back to the late Pleistocene glaciation include coarse pumice-fall deposits. We have linked the letter-named tephras from the coast to these higher exposures on the south side using physical and chemical characteristics of the deposits. In addition, these exposures preserve at least 5 older major post-glacial eruptions of Augustine. These ultra-proximal sites, along with an off-island section 20 km to the west, provide the first continuous tephrochronology for Augustine that extends from the earliest to latest Holocene. Because examined pumice-fall exposures are limited to a narrow azimuth on the south side of the volcano, the on-island record is likely an incomplete catalog of major eruptions. It is possible however, that the coarse-grained near vent exposures (within 2 km) represent large eruptions that blanketed the entire island in tephra and are representative of the entire Holocene record. The major Holocene tephra units exposed on-island are composed of coarse-grained (cm-scale) pumice ranging in color from white to cream (variably oxidized), and light to medium gray as well as banded varieties. Accidental lithic assembles are highly variable and often unique for individual eruptions. Pumices range from 60-66 wt % SiO2 in whole-rock composition and are distinguishable using trace and minor element abundances and field context. Glass geochemistry is often distinguishable between tephras, but more overlap exists among deposits and presents challenges for correlating to regional tephras.

  14. Ground deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1996 an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (???3000 felt by local residents, Mmax = 5.1, cumulative moment of 2.7 ??1018 N m) beneath Akutan Island in the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, produced extensive ground cracks but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Synthetic aperture radar interferograms that span the time of the swarm reveal complex island-wide deformation: the western part of the island including Akutan volcano moved upward, while the eastern part moved downward. The axis of the deformation approximately aligns with new ground cracks on the western part of the island and with Holocene normal faults that were reactivated during the swarm on the eastern part of the island. The axis is also roughly parallel to the direction of greatest compressional stress in the region. No ground movements greater than 2.83 cm were observed outside the volcano's summit caldera for periods of 4 years before or 2 years after the swarm. We modeled the deformation primarily as the emplacement of a shallow, east-west trending, north dipping dike plus inflation of a deep, Mogi-type magma body beneath the volcano. The pattern of subsidence on the eastern part of the island is poorly constrained. It might have been produced by extensional tectonic strain that both reactivated preexisting faults on the eastern part of the island and facilitated magma movement beneath the western part. Alternatively, magma intrusion beneath the volcano might have been the cause of extension and subsidence in the eastern part of the island. We attribute localized subsidence in an area of active fumaroles within the Akutan caldera, by as much as 10 cm during 1992-1993 and 1996-1998, to fluid withdrawal or depressurization of the shallow hydrothermal system. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  16. Space communication system for compressed data with a concatenated Reed-Solomon-Viterbi coding channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Hilbert, E. E. (inventors)

    1976-01-01

    A space communication system incorporating a concatenated Reed Solomon Viterbi coding channel is discussed for transmitting compressed and uncompressed data from a spacecraft to a data processing center on Earth. Imaging (and other) data are first compressed into source blocks which are then coded by a Reed Solomon coder and interleaver, followed by a convolutional encoder. The received data is first decoded by a Viterbi decoder, followed by a Reed Solomon decoder and deinterleaver. The output of the latter is then decompressed, based on the compression criteria used in compressing the data in the spacecraft. The decompressed data is processed to reconstruct an approximation of the original data-producing condition or images.

  17. New submarine volcanoes in the Okinawa back-arc opening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.

    2008-12-01

    The results of a series of geological and geophysical observations, it is now better known that about 11 new submarine volcanoes are developing in the southern part of the Okinawa back-arc spreading center. These volcanoes, at the water depth from 200 V 1500 meters, were first detected by a 38 kHz single-beam echo- sounding system. The images not only show the shape of volcano, but also the hydrothermal venting, from several tens to several hundred meters above the top of a volcano. The multi-beam echo-sounder images provide the size and 3-D view. The CDT surveys show that the bottom layer has an anomalous high of turbidity ratio. The heat flow values are very high, up to 25 HFU. The ocean bottom seismometer monitoring indicate an average of 250 earthquake events per day from magnitude of 0.9 V 4.0. The tomographic modeling provides the possible route of magma upwelling and migrating. At the southern tip of Okinawa opening system, close to Taiwan, there is an active volcanic island, the Turtle Island. This volcano was erupted about 7,000 years ago. All the above observations indicate that new submarine volcanoes are developing at the vicinity of Okinawa back-arc spreading center with a half rate of 4-6 cm/year and oriented in N-S direction.

  18. Investigating the potential for volcano flank instability triggered by recent dike intrusions at Fogo volcano, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; González, Pablo; Hooper, Andrew; Wright, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational flank-collapses at volcanoes are rare but catastrophic events that have rarely been witnessed by humans (e.g., Mount St. Helens in 1980). It has been proposed that gravitationally unstable volcanic flanks can be classified in two different types based on the flanks slope: volcanoes characterized by gentle slopes (Hawaiian-like) and that have very dynamic flanks exhibiting high rates of deformation and, conversely, steep-sided volcanoes (Macaronesian-like) showing minimal ground deformation. The two types of volcanoes could therefore reach the stable-state through different mechanisms and experience different mass-wasting processes. Numerous giant debris-avalanche deposits have been identified offshore the volcanoes of the Canary Islands and Cape Verde. Given the steep slopes of these volcanoes, the mass-wasting events may have occurred suddenly and with minimal precursory signals. Several mechanisms have been proposed as potential triggers and among these the intrusion of shallow dikes feeding fissure eruptions is one of the best candidates. In this work, we investigate this hypothesis in the light of new and revised results derived from the analysis of geodetic observations at Fogo volcano (Cape Verde). Fogo has erupted twice in the last 20 years (1995 and 2014-2015) and in both occasions the volcano erupted along fissures that seem to be fed by dykes intruding the shallow crust and the volcanic edifice. We re-process radar data from the ERS satellite to obtain state-of-the-art deformation maps spanning the 1995 eruption and revisit previously proposed models of the magmatic system. Our results indicate that both eruptions were fed by sub-vertical dikes, steeply dipping to the SE, and radiating from the Pico do Fogo volcanic cone to the SW. We also study the effect of such magmatic intrusions in terms of the stress regime that they generate and analyze whether the 1995 and 2014 intrusions could potentially destabilize the structures along which a previous volcano flank-collapse has occurred. Finally, we briefly investigate potential mechanisms that could control the propagation of magma along pre-existing fracture systems.

  19. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-print Network

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  20. The Big Island of Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Boasting snow-covered mountain peaks and tropical forest, the Island of Hawaii, the largest of the Hawaiian Islands, is stunning at any altitude. This false-color composite (processed to simulate true color) image of Hawaii was constructed from data gathered between 1999 and 2001 by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument, flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. The Landsat data were processed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to develop a landcover map. This map will be used as a baseline to chart changes in land use on the islands. Types of change include the construction of resorts along the coastal areas, and the conversion of sugar plantations to other crop types. Hawaii was created by a 'hotspot' beneath the ocean floor. Hotspots form in areas where superheated magma in the Earth's mantle breaks through the Earth's crust. Over the course of millions of years, the Pacific Tectonic Plate has slowly moved over this hotspot to form the entire Hawaiian Island archipelago. The black areas on the island (in this scene) that resemble a pair of sun-baked palm fronds are hardened lava flows formed by the active Mauna Loa Volcano. Just to the north of Mauna Loa is the dormant grayish Mauna Kea Volcano, which hasn't erupted in an estimated 3,500 years. A thin greyish plume of smoke is visible near the island's southeastern shore, rising from Kilauea-the most active volcano on Earth. Heavy rainfall and fertile volcanic soil have given rise to Hawaii's lush tropical forests, which appear as solid dark green areas in the image. The light green, patchy areas near the coasts are likely sugar cane plantations, pineapple farms, and human settlements. Courtesy of the NOAA Coastal Services Center Hawaii Land Cover Analysis project

  1. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  2. Space Radar Image of Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Taal volcano, near Manila on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The black area in the center is Taal Lake, which nearly fills the 30-kilometer-diameter (18-mile) caldera. The caldera rim consists of deeply eroded hills and cliffs. The large island in Taal Lake, which itself contains a crater lake, is known as Volcano Island. The bright yellow patch on the southwest side of the island marks the site of an explosion crater that formed during a deadly eruption of Taal in 1965. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 78th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 56 kilometers by 112 kilometers (34 miles by 68 miles) that is centered at 14.0 degrees north latitude and 121.0 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Since 1572, Taal has erupted at least 34 times. Since early 1991, the volcano has been restless, with swarms of earthquakes, new steaming areas, ground fracturing, and increases in water temperature of the lake. Volcanologists and other local authorities are carefully monitoring Taal to understand if the current activity may foretell an eruption. Taal is one of 15 'Decade Volcanoes' that have been identified by the volcanology community as presenting large potential hazards to population centers. The bright area in the upper right of the image is the densely populated city of Manila, only 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of the central crater. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  3. Validation and Analysis of SRTM and VCL Data Over Tropical Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of our investigation was on the application of digital topographic data in conducting first-order volcanological and structural studies of tropical volcanoes, focusing on the Java, the Philippines and the Galapagos Islands. Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, served as our test site for SRTM data validation. Volcanoes in humid tropical environments are frequently cloud covered, typically densely vegetated and erode rapidly, so that it was expected that new insights into the styles of eruption of these volcanoes could be obtained from analysis of topographic data. For instance, in certain parts of the world, such as Indonesia, even the regional structural context of volcanic centers is poorly known, and the distribution of volcanic products (e.g., lava flows, pyroclastic flows, and lahars) are not well mapped. SRTM and Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) data were expected to provide new information on these volcanoes. Due to the cancellation of the VCL mission, we did not conduct any lidar studies during the duration of this project. Digital elevation models (DEMs) such as those collected by SRTM provide quantitative information about the time-integrated typical activity on a volcano and allow an assessment of the spatial and temporal contributions of various constructional and destructional processes to each volcano's present morphology. For basaltic volcanoes, P_c?w!m-d and Garbed (2000) have shown that gradual slopes (less than 5 deg.) occur where lava and tephra pond within calderas or in the saddles between adjacent volcanoes, as well as where lava deltas coalesce to form coastal plains. Vent concentration zones (axes of rift zones) have slopes ranging from 10 deg. to 12 deg. Differential vertical growth rates between vent concentration zones and adjacent mostly-lava flanks produce steep constructional slopes up to 40". The steepest slopes (locally approaching 90 deg.) are produced by fluvial erosion, caldera collapse, faulting, and catastrophic avalanches, all of which are usually identifiable. Due to the delay in the release of the SRTM data following the February 2000 flight, a significant part of our effort was devoted to the analog studies of the SRTM topographic data using topographic data from airborne interferometric radars. As part of the original SRTM Science Team, we proposed four study sites (Kilauea, Hawaii; Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines; Cerro Am1 and Femandina volcanoes, Galapagos Islands; and Tengger caldera, Java) where we could conduct detailed geologic studies to evaluate the uses of SRTM data for the analysis of lava flows, lahars, erosion of ash deposits, and an evaluation of the structural setting of the volcanoes. Only near the end of this project was one of these SRTM Science Team products (Luzon Island, the Philippines) released to the community, and we only had limited time to work on these data.

  4. Stigmaphyllon patricianum-firmenichianum (Malpighiaceae), a new species from Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Butaud, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Stigmaphyllon (Malpighiaceae) is described: Stigmaphyllon patricianum-firmenichianum Butaud. It is restricted to the coral islands of Ouvéa, Lifou and Maré in the Loyalty Islands Province (New Caledonia) and is most similar to Stigmaphyllon discolor (Gand.) C.E.Anderson, known from New Caledonia and Solomon Islands. Previously, plants now known as Stigmaphyllon patricianum-firmenichianum were included in Stigmaphyllon taomense (Baker f.) C.E.Anderson, endemic to the northern part of Grande-Terre and Belep Islands (New Caledonia). A new circumscription of Stigmaphyllon taomense is proposed. The regional key for New Caledonian species of Stigmaphyllon is updated. PMID:26312047

  5. Solomon M. Hsiang Receives 2013 Science for Solutions Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Solomon Hsiang is representative of a new generation in the geosciences community, whose work spans several disciplines, drawing on methods and concepts from far outside the traditional physical science domain in order to make progress on difficult questions at the intersection of natural science, social science, and public policy. Broadly speaking, by examining how humanity has responded to climate variability and change in the distant and recent past, Sol's research elucidates the question of how humanity may respond to a changing climate in the future. Combining large, independent sets of social science, meteorological, and climatological data and analyzing them with tools more common in microeconomics than natural science, Sol, still at an early stage of his career, has made critical contributions to an incipient revolution in our understanding of the sensitivity and adaptability of humans and their social arrangements to climate variability and change. Such insights will greatly improve the information base from which effective public policy is developed.

  6. Aerial View of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists monitor Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth. In this 1985 aerial photo, Mauna Loa looms above K?lauea Volcano’s summit caldera (left center) and nearly obscures Hual?lai in the far distance (upper right)....

  7. Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Bjorn Scheuermann

    E-print Network

    Mannheim, Universität

    Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades Bj¨orn Scheuermann Vortrag im Rahmen des Seminars Datenbanken, WS 03/04 Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades ­ p.1/23 #12;Zielsetzung Entwicklung von ¨angig von konkretem Datenmodell Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades ­ p.2/23 #12;Volcano

  8. Deep magmatic structures of Hawaiian volcanoes, imaged by three-dimensional gravity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Hildenbrand, T.; Webring, M.

    2000-01-01

    A simplified three-dimensional model for the island of Hawai'i, based on 3300 gravity measurements, provides new insights on magma pathways within the basaltic volcanoes. Gravity anomalies define dense cumulates and intrusions beneath the summits and known rift zones of every volcano. Linear gravity anomalies project southeast from Kohala and Mauna Kea summits and south from Huala??lai and Mauna Loa; these presumably express dense cores of previously unrecognized rift zones lacking surface expression. The gravity-modeled dense cores probably define tholeiitic shield-stage structures of the older volcanoes that are now veneered by late alkalic lavas. The three-dimensional gravity method is valuable for characterizing the magmatic systems of basaltic oceanic volcanoes and for defining structures related to landslide and seismic hazards.

  9. Bulk rock composition and geochemistry of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the Grey Porri Tuff and selected lavas of the Monte dei Porri volcano, Salina, Aeolian Islands, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, Angela L.; Bodnar, Robert J.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Bohrson, Wendy A.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Messina, Antonia; Tracy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aeolian Islands are an arcuate chain of submarine seamounts and volcanic islands, lying just north of Sicily in southern Italy. The second largest of the islands, Salina, exhibits a wide range of compositional variation in its erupted products, from basaltic lavas to rhyolitic pumice. The Monte dei Porri eruptions occurred between 60 ka and 30 ka, following a period of approximately 60,000 years of repose. The bulk rock composition of the Monte dei Porri products range from basaltic-andesite scoria to andesitic pumice in the Grey Porri Tuff (GPT), with the Monte dei Porri lavas having basaltic-andesite compositions. The typical mineral assemblage of the GPT is calcic plagioclase, clinopyroxene (augite), olivine (Fo72?84) and orthopyroxene (enstatite) ± amphibole and Ti-Fe oxides. The lava units show a similar mineral assemblage, but contain lower Fo olivines (Fo57?78). The lava units also contain numerous glomerocrysts, including an unusual variety that contains quartz, K-feldspar and mica. Melt inclusions (MI) are ubiquitous in all mineral phases from all units of the Monte dei Porri eruptions; however, only data from olivine-hosted MI in the GPT are reported here. Compositions of MI in the GPT are typically basaltic (average SiO2 of 49.8 wt %) in the pumices and basaltic-andesite (average SiO2 of 55.6 wt %) in the scoriae and show a bimodal distribution in most compositional discrimination plots. The compositions of most of the MI in the scoriae overlap with bulk rock compositions of the lavas. Petrological and geochemical evidence suggest that mixing of one or more magmas and/or crustal assimilation played a role in the evolution of the Monte dei Porri magmatic system, especially the GPT. Analyses of the more evolved mineral phases are required to better constrain the evolution of the magma.

  10. Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 1111

    E-print Network

    Rose, William I.

    Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 11111 Open-File Report 01­431Open-File Report 01

  11. NEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1

    E-print Network

    Yim, Solomon C.

    NEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1 , Harry H. Yeh2 , Daniel T in coastal science and engineering including tsunami phenomena induced by sub-sea earthquakes, spanning

  12. Collaborative Teleoperation via the Internet Ken Goldberg, Billy Chen, Rory Solomon, Steve Bui,

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Ken

    Collaborative Teleoperation via the Internet Ken Goldberg, Billy Chen, Rory Solomon, Steve Bui in inhospitable environments such as radiation sites, under- sea [6] and space exploration [7]. See Sheridan [8

  13. Alfred Tarski and a watershed meeting in logic: Cornell, 1957 Solomon Feferman1

    E-print Network

    Feferman, Solomon

    1 Alfred Tarski and a watershed meeting in logic: Cornell, 1957 Solomon Feferman1 For Jan Wolenski Institute for Symbolic Logic. That meeting turned out to be a watershed event in the development of logic

  14. Elysium Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On July 4, 1998--the first anniversary of the Mars Pathfinder landing--Mars Global Surveyor's latest images were radioed to Earth with little fanfare. The images received on July 4, 1998, however, were very exciting because they included a rare crossing of the summit caldera of a major martian volcano. Elysium Mons is located at 25oN, 213oW, in the martian eastern hemisphere. Elysium Mons is one of three large volcanoes that occur on the Elysium Rise-- the others are Hecates Tholus (northeast of Elysium Mons) and Albor Tholus (southeast of Elysium Mons). The volcano rises about 12.5 kilometers (7.8 miles) above the surrounding plain, or about 16 kilometers (9.9 miles) above the martian datum-- the 'zero' elevation defined by average martian atmospheric pressure and the planet's radius.

    Elysium Mons was discovered by Mariner 9 in 1972. It differs in a number of ways from the familiar Olympus Mons and other large volcanoes in the Tharsis region. In particular, there are no obvious lava flows visible on the volcano's flanks. The lack of lava flows was apparent from the Mariner 9 images, but the new MOC high resolution image--obtained at 5.24 meters (17.2 feet) per pixel--illustrates that this is true even when viewed at higher spatial resolution.

    Elysium Mons has many craters on its surface. Some of these probably formed by meteor impact, but many show no ejecta pattern characteristic of meteor impact. Some of the craters are aligned in linear patterns that are radial to the summit caldera--these most likely formed by collapse as lava was withdrawn from beneath the surface, rather than by meteor impact. Other craters may have formed by explosive volcanism. Evidence for explosive volcanism on Mars has been very difficult to identify from previous Mars spacecraft images. This and other MOC data are being examined closely to better understand the nature and origin of volcanic features on Mars.

    The three MOC images, 40301 (red wide angle), 40302 (blue wide angle), and 40303 (high resolution, narrow angle) were obtained on Mars Global Surveyor's 403rd orbit around the planet around 9:58 - 10:05 p.m. PDT on July 2, 1998. The images were received and processed at Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) around 4:00 p.m. PDT on July 4, 1998.

    This image: MOC image 40303, shown at 25% of its original size. North is approximately up, illumination is from the right. Resolution of picture shown here is 21 meters (69 feet) per pixel. Image was received with bright slopes saturated at DN=255.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  15. Geodetic observations and modeling of time-varying deformation at Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, Gerald A.; Newman, Andrew V.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Solidum, Renato U.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate active crustal deformation patterns associated with magmatic activity at Taal Volcano, an active tholeiitic volcano located in southwestern Luzon, Philippines. We present comparisons of elastic and combined elastic-viscoelastic modeling results with deformation observed by continuous GPS measurements on and near the volcano. Continuous dual-frequency and single-frequency (L1) GPS data between 1998 and 2005 provide evidence for smoothly transitioning periods of inflation and deflation centered under the volcano. Within deformation phases that typically last 3-9 months (with rates exceeding 200 mm yr- 1), prominent inflationary phases were observed in February-November 2000 and June 2004-March 2005. The 2000 period of inflation was characterized by up to 145 mm yr- 1 surface extension and 220 mm yr- 1 of uplift of the center of Volcano Island relative to the northern caldera rim, while the 2005 inflation was characterized by as much as 116 mm yr- 1 horizontal extension of the volcanic edifice and 180 mm yr- 1 uplift. Inversions of observed surface deformation to determine the source location points to a relatively stable spherical source, situated under Volcano Island's central crater, at depths of ~ 5 km (based on the preferred Mogi model). Using this source geometry, we develop axisymmetric finite element models with annuli of concentric shells around the magma reservoir, embedded within a multi-layered elastic lithosphere. Using simply varying pressure histories as input, a variety of forward models are fit to the time history of continuously observed deformation for GPS stations located on Volcano Island. Though the inferred source geometry, volume and near-source rheological properties are non-unique, they represent more physically appropriate material properties than those assumed in simple elastic half-space models. The sources inferred using viscoelastic shell models suggest simpler pressure histories and reduced overall pressure changes, relative to equivalent elastic half-space models.

  16. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  17. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  18. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  19. Solomon Sea circulation and water mass modifications: response at ENSO timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melet, Angélique; Gourdeau, Lionel; Verron, Jacques; Djath, Bughsin

    2013-01-01

    The South Pacific low latitude western boundary currents (LLWBCs) carry waters of subtropical origin through the Solomon Sea before joining the equatorial Pacific. Changes in their properties or transport are assumed to impact El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics. At ENSO timescales, the LLWBCs transport tends to counterbalance the interior geostrophic one. When transiting through the complex geography of the Solomon Sea, the main LLWBC, the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent, cannot follow a unique simple route to the equator. Instead, its routes and water mass properties are influenced by the circulation occurring in the Solomon Sea. In this study, the response of the Solomon Sea circulation to ENSO is investigated based on a numerical simulation. The transport anomalies entering the Solomon Sea from the south are confined to the top 250 m of the water column, where they represent 7.5 Sv (based on ENSO composites) for a mean transport of 10 Sv. The induced circulation anomalies in the Solomon Sea are not symmetric between the two ENSO states because of (1) a bathymetric control at Vitiaz Strait, which plays a stronger role during El Niño, and (2) an additional inflow through Solomon Strait during La Niña events. In terms of temperature and salinity, modifications are particularly notable for the thermocline water during El Niño conditions, with cooler and fresher waters compared to the climatological mean. The surface water at Vitiaz Strait and the upper thermocline water at Solomon Strait, feeding respectively the equatorial Pacific warm pool and the Equatorial Undercurrent, particularly affect the heat and salt fluxes. These fluxes can change by up to a factor of 2 between extreme El Niño and La Niña conditions.

  20. Reed-Solomon error-correction as a software patch mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin D.

    2013-11-01

    This report explores how error-correction data generated by a Reed-Solomon code may be used as a mechanism to apply changes to an existing installed codebase. Using the Reed-Solomon code to generate error-correction data for a changed or updated codebase will allow the error-correction data to be applied to an existing codebase to both validate and introduce changes or updates from some upstream source to the existing installed codebase.

  1. Lava Flow From Fissure Eruption on Kilauea Volcano's East Rift Zone

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A new fissure eruption in September 2011 on the east flank of Pu‘u ‘?‘? on K?lauea Volcano's east rift zone reminds us of the need to be aware of our ever-changing volcanic environment on Hawai‘i Island. The fissure—the source of the lava flow—is sh...

  2. Solomon Sea circulation and water mass modifications: response at ENSO time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verron, J. A.; Melet, A. V.; Gourdeau, L.; Djath, N.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific low latitude western boundary currents (LLWBCs) carry waters of subtropical origin through the Solomon Sea before joining the equatorial Pacific. Changes in their properties or transport are assumed to impact ENSO dynamics. At ENSO time-scales, the LLWBCs transport tends to counterbalance the interior geostrophic one. However, the Solomon Sea is a strong constraint to the propagation of the LLWBCs. In this study, the response of the Solomon Sea circulation to ENSO is investigated based on a numerical simulation. The transport anomalies entering the Solomon Sea from the south are confined to the top 250 m of the water column, and represent 9 Sv (which is half of the mean transport).The induced circulation anomalies are not symmetric between the two ENSO states because of (1) a bathymetric control at Vitiaz Strait, that plays a stronger role during El Niño, and (2) an additional inflow at Solomon Strait during La Niña events. In terms of temperature and salinity, modifications are particularly notable for the thermocline water during El Niño conditions, with cooler and fresher waters compared to a climatological mean. The surface water at Vitiaz Strait and the upper thermocline water at Solomon Strait, feeding respectively the equatorial Pacific warm pool and the Equatorial Undercurrent, particularly affect the heat and salt fluxes. These fluxes can change by up to a factor of 2 between El Niño and La Niña conditions.

  3. Klyuchevskaya, Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, CIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Klyuchevskaya, Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, CIS (56.0N, 160.5E) is one of several active volcanoes in the CIS and is 15,584 ft. in elevation. Fresh ash fall on the south side of the caldera can be seen as a dirty smudge on the fresh snowfall. Just to the north of the Kamchatka River is Shiveluch, a volcano which had been active a short time previously. There are more than 100 volcanic edifices recognized on Kamchatka, 15 of which are still active.

  4. Potential impact of sea level rise on French islands worldwide 1 Potential impact of sea level rise

    E-print Network

    Courchamp, Franck

    (Solomon et al. 2007). Several recent studies strongly suggest that sea level rise will increase by 0Potential impact of sea level rise on French islands worldwide 1 Potential impact of sea level rise | Published @@ @@@@ 2013 Citation: Bellard C, Leclerc C, Courchamp F (2013) Potential impact of sea level rise

  5. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    The historical database of past disasters is a cornerstone of catastrophe risk assessment. Whereas disasters are fortunately comparatively rare, near-misses are quite common for both natural and man-made hazards. The word disaster originally means 'an unfavourable aspect of a star'. Except for astrologists, disasters are no longer perceived fatalistically as pre-determined. Nevertheless, to this day, historical disasters are treated statistically as fixed events, although in reality there is a large luck element involved in converting a near-miss crisis situation into a disaster statistic. It is possible to conceive a stochastic simulation of the past to explore the implications of this chance factor. Counterfactual history is the exercise of hypothesizing alternative paths of history from what actually happened. Exploring history from a counterfactual perspective is instructive for a variety of reasons. First, it is easy to be fooled by randomness and see regularity in event patterns which are illusory. The past is just one realization of a variety of possible evolutions of history, which may be analyzed through a stochastic simulation of an array of counterfactual scenarios. In any hazard context, there is a random component equivalent to dice being rolled to decide whether a near-miss becomes an actual disaster. The fact that there may be no observed disaster over a period of time may belie the occurrence of numerous near-misses. This may be illustrated using the simple dice paradigm. Suppose a dice is rolled every month for a year, and an event is recorded if a six is thrown. There is still an 11% chance of no events occurring during the year. A variety of perils may be used to illustrate the use of near-miss information within a counterfactual disaster analysis. In the domain of natural hazards, near-misses are a notable feature of the threat landscape. Storm surges are an obvious example. Sea defences may protect against most meteorological scenarios. However, if a major storm surge happens to arrive at a high astronomical tide, sea walls may be overtopped and flooding may ensue. In the domain of geological hazards, periods of volcanic unrest may generate precursory signals suggestive of imminent volcanic danger, but without leading to an actual eruption. Near-miss unrest periods provide vital evidence for assessing the dynamics of volcanoes close to eruption. Where the volcano catalogue has been diligently revised to include the maximum amount of information on the phenomenology of unrest periods, dynamic modelling and hazard assessment may be significantly refined. This is illustrated with some topical volcano hazard examples, including Montserrat and Santorini.

  6. Strong S-wave attenuation and actively degassing magma beneath Taal volcano, Philippines, inferred from source location analysis using high-frequency seismic amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Lacson, R. _Jr., Jr.; Maeda, Y.; Figueroa, M. S., II; Yamashina, T.

    2014-12-01

    Taal volcano, Philippines, is one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes given its history of explosive eruptions and its close proximity to populated areas. A key feature of these eruptions is that the eruption vents were not limited to Main Crater but occurred on the flanks of Volcano Island. This complex eruption history and the fact that thousands of people inhabit the island, which has been declared a permanent danger zone, together imply an enormous potential for disasters. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) constantly monitors Taal, and international collaborations have conducted seismic, geodetic, electromagnetic, and geochemical studies to investigate the volcano's magma system. Realtime broadband seismic, GPS, and magnetic networks were deployed in 2010 to improve monitoring capabilities and to better understand the volcano. The seismic network has recorded volcano-tectonic (VT) events beneath Volcano Island. We located these VT events based on high-frequency seismic amplitudes, and found that some events showed considerable discrepancies between the amplitude source locations and hypocenters determined by using onset arrival times. Our analysis of the source location discrepancies points to the existence of a region of strong S-wave attenuation near the ground surface beneath the east flank of Volcano Island. This region is beneath the active fumarolic area and above sources of pressure contributing inflation and deflation, and it coincides with a region of high electrical conductivity. The high-attenuation region matches that inferred from an active-seismic survey conducted at Taal in 1993. Our results, synthesized with previous results, suggest that this region represents actively degassing magma near the surface, and imply a high risk of future eruptions on the east flank of Volcano Island.

  7. K?lauea-an Explosive Volcano in Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.; Fiske, Dick; Rose, Tim; Houghton, Bruce; Mastin, Larry

    2011-01-01

    K?lauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i, though best known for its frequent quiet eruptions of lava flows, has erupted explosively many times in its history - most recently in 2011. At least six such eruptions in the past 1,500 years sent ash into the jet stream, at the cruising altitudes for today's aircraft. The eruption of 1790 remains the most lethal eruption known from a U.S. volcano. However, the tendency of K?lauea's 2 million annual visitors is to forget this dangerous potential. Cooperative research by scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey, Smithsonian Institution, and University of Hawai‘i is improving our understanding of K?lauea's explosive past and its potential for future violent eruptions.

  8. A Diminutive Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 15 October 2003

    The small Tharsis volcano called Biblis Patera is nearly lost amongst its gigantic neighbors. With a height of less than 10,000 feet, it is even dwarfed by many volcanoes on Earth. The gaping caldera of Biblis Patera shows evidence for multiple episodes of collapse, producing the concentric topography seen in the image. Several slope streaks are visible, indicators of a more recent and much smaller form of collapse: avalanches of the dust that thickly mantles the terrain.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.3, Longitude 236.4 East (123.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Nitric acid from volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.; Allen, A. G.; Davison, B. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Oppenheimer, C.; McGonigle, A. J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric cycling of nitric acid and other nitrogen-bearing compounds is an important biogeochemical process, with significant implications for ecosystems and human health. Volcanoes are rarely considered as part of the global nitrogen cycle, but here we show that they release a previously unconsidered flux of HNO 3 vapour to the atmosphere. We report the first measurements of nitric acid vapour in the persistent plumes from four volcanoes: Masaya (Nicaragua); Etna (Italy); and Villarrica and Lascar (Chile). Mean near-source volcanic plume concentrations of HNO 3 range from 1.8 to 5.6 ?mol m -3, an enrichment of one to two orders of magnitude over background (0.1-1.5 ?mol m -3). Using mean molar HNO 3/SO 2 ratios of 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.07 for Villarrica, Masaya, Etna, and Lascar respectively, combined with SO 2 flux measurements, we calculate gaseous HNO 3 fluxes from each of these volcanic systems, and extend this to estimate the global flux from high-temperature, non-explosive volcanism to be ˜0.02-0.06 Tg (N) yr -1. While comparatively small on the global scale, this flux could have important implications for regional fixed N budgets. The precise mechanism for the emission of this HNO 3 remains unclear but we suggest that thermal nitrogen fixation followed by rapid oxidation of the product NO is most likely. In explosive, ash-rich plumes NO may result from, or at least be supplemented by, production from volcanic lightning rather than thermal N fixation. We have calculated NO production via this route to be of the order of 0.02 Tg (N) yr -1.

  10. Strategies for the implementation of a European Volcano Observations Research Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Active volcanic areas in Europe constitute a direct threat to millions of people on both the continent and adjacent islands. Furthermore, eruptions of "European" volcanoes in overseas territories, such as in the West Indies, an in the Indian and Pacific oceans, can have a much broader impacts, outside Europe. Volcano Observatories (VO), which undertake volcano monitoring under governmental mandate and Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; such as university departments, laboratories, etc.) manage networks on European volcanoes consisting of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are either continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), including prototype deployment. VOs and VRIs also operate laboratories for sample analysis (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), near-real time analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing centres; all providing high-quality information on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. This large and high-quality deployment of monitoring systems, focused on a specific geophysical target (volcanoes), together with the wide volcanological phenomena of European volcanoes (which cover all the known volcano types) represent a unique opportunity to fundamentally improve the knowledge base of volcano behaviour. The existing arrangement of national infrastructures (i.e. VO and VRI) appears to be too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure. Therefore, the main effort planned in the framework of the EPOS-PP proposal is focused on the creation of services aimed at providing an improved and more efficient access to the volcanological facilities and observations on active volcanoes. The issue to facilitate the access to this valued source of information is to reshape this fragmented community into a unique infrastructure concerning common technical solutions and data policies. Some of the key actions include the implementation of virtual accesses to geophysical, geochemical, volcanological and environmental raw data and metadata, multidisciplinary volcanic and hazard products, tools for modelling volcanic processes, and transnational access to facilities of volcano observatories. Indeed this implementation will start from the outcomes of the two EC-FP7 projects, Futurevolc and MED-SUV, relevant to three out of four global volcanic Supersites, which are located in Europe and managed by European institutions. This approach will ease the exchange and collaboration among the European volcano community, thus allowing better understanding of the volcanic processes occurring at European volcanoes considered worldwide as natural laboratories.

  11. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  12. Late-stage water eruptions from Ascraeus Mons volcano, Mars: Implications for its structure and history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, John B.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Marquez, Alvaro; Williams, David A.; Byrne, Paul; Muller, Jan-Peter; Kim, Jung-Rack

    2010-06-01

    Ascraeus Mons was one of the first of the Martian volcanoes to be imaged by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) experiment onboard the ESA Mars Express spacecraft. These images show much of the volcano at a higher resolution than previously, and details of its lava flows, sinuous rilles, flank vents and tectonic features indicate an unexpected origin for some of these features. We establish the time-stratigraphic sequence for these features, and use a numerical model on HRSC stereo DTMs of the sinuous rilles, and conclude that they were formed by water erosion. Terrestrial analogues for such features are found at Réunion Island and other volcanoes. We then examine the overall structure of the volcano, which is dissimilar to that of large terrestrial volcanoes in important respects, and perform laboratory analogue experiments of its deformation, concluding that the tectonic features were formed by sinking of the volcano into a substratum that was much weaker than the volcanic edifice. An ice-rich substratum melted by a combination of pressure melting and magmatic heating seems the most likely mechanism. Analogous water-escape structures in a similar volcanic situation have been identified at Mt Haddington in the Antarctic. The possible role of a hydrological cycle and a hydrothermal system within the volcano are discussed. Based on field evidence, we propose that much of the broad aprons of lobate flows issuing from the NE and SSW foot of Ascraeus Mons are composed of mudflows rather than lava flows. These different approaches are linked into a coherent history of this volcano. The similarity of Ascraeus Mons to Pavonis Mons and Arsia Mons (though Ascraeus is younger) suggests that some of our conclusions may apply to these volcanoes too.

  13. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... travelers around the world. The particles contained in volcanic ash clouds can cause significant damage to jet engines and the outside ... and its center is located between the Faeroe and Shetland Islands. Here, north is at the top and east is at the right. Figure 2 shows ...

  14. Flank tectonics of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.; Carr, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the numerous terraces on the flanks of the Olympus Mons volcano on Mars, seen on space images to be arranged in a roughly concentric pattern, is investigated. The images of the volcano show that the base of each terrace is marked by a modest but abrupt change in slope, suggesting that these terraces could be thrust faults caused by a compressional failure of the cone. The mechanism of faulting and the possible effect of the interior structure of Olympus Mons was investigated using a numerical model for elastic stresses within a Martian volcano, constructed for that purpose. Results of the analysis supports the view that the terraces on Olympus Mons, as well as on other three Martian volcanoes, including Ascraeus Mons, Arsia Mons, and Pavonis Mons are indeed thrust faults.

  15. Morphometric evolution of composite volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Statistical relations between geometry, slope, and age for 26 circum-Pacific composite volcanoes (stratovolcanoes) are presented. Topics considered include morphometry, eruption characteristics, growth rates, repose periods, flow lengths, and petrological/chemical trends. Composite and cinder cones are compared, and it is suggested that, if cinder cones do evolve into composite volcanoes, a fundamental change in cone morphometry, eruption style, and petrology occurs at a basal diameter of 2 km.

  16. Mass wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, H.; Sager, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    Oceanic island volcanoes such as those comprising the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable with the passage of time, resulting in failures of the subaerial and submarine portion of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary source of destruction and loss of volume of many oceanic islands, but our knowledge of mass wasting in seamount and island chains is still rudimentary. To better understand mass wasting in the western Galapagos Islands, multi-beam bathymetry, backscatter and sidescan sonar data were used to examine topography characteristic of mass wasting. Observations show that mass wasting plays an important role in the morphological development of Galapagos volcanoes. While volcanic activity continues to modify the submarine terrain, the data show that several types of mass wasting can be found in this archipelago. The steep upper slopes of the north and west flanks of Fernandina Island and the north and southwest flanks of Isabela Island are characterized by slump sheets. The lower slopes on the north and west flank of Fernandina and the southwest tip of Isabela Island are characterized by debris flows. The northwest tip of Isabela Island is characterized by chaotic slumping and detached blocks originating from the sector collapse of Volcan Ecuador. Unlike the giant landslides documented by GLORIA imagery around the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slumps and debris flows. Nevertheless, this study indicates that submarine mass wasting is widespread in the western Galapagos Islands and is an important component of erosion of these volcanic edifices.

  17. Genetic algorithm for TEC seismo-ionospheric anomalies detection around the time of the Solomon (Mw = 8.0) earthquake of 06 February 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2013-08-01

    On 6 February 2013, at 12:12:27 local time (01:12:27 UTC) a seismic event registering Mw 8.0 struck the Solomon Islands, located at the boundaries of the Australian and Pacific tectonic plates. Time series prediction is an important and widely interesting topic in the research of earthquake precursors. This paper describes a new computational intelligence approach to detect the unusual variations of the total electron content (TEC) seismo-ionospheric anomalies induced by the powerful Solomon earthquake using genetic algorithm (GA). The GA detected a considerable number of anomalous occurrences on earthquake day and also 7 and 8 days prior to the earthquake in a period of high geomagnetic activities. In this study, also the detected TEC anomalies using the proposed method are compared to the results dealing with the observed TEC anomalies by applying the mean, median, wavelet, Kalman filter, ARIMA, neural network and support vector machine methods. The accordance in the final results of all eight methods is a convincing indication for the efficiency of the GA method. It indicates that GA can be an appropriate non-parametric tool for anomaly detection in a non linear time series showing the seismo-ionospheric precursors variations.

  18. Geochemical fingerprint of the primary magma composition in the marine tephras originated from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Kim, Seonyoung; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    The intraplate Baegdusan (Changbai) and Ulleung volcanoes located on the border of China, North Korea, and East/Japan Sea, respectively, have been explained by appeals to both hotspots and asthenospheric mantle upwelling (wet plume) caused by the stagnant Pacific plate. To understand the origin of the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanism, we performed geochemical analyses on the tephra deposits in the East/Japan Sea basins originating from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes. The volcanic glass in the tephra from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes ranged from alkaline trachyte to peralkaline rhyolite and from phonolite to trachyte, respectively. The tephra from the two intraplate volcanoes showed highly enriched incompatible elements, such as Tb, Nb, Hf, and Ta, distinct from those of the ordinary arc volcanoes of the Japanese islands. The straddle distribution of the Th/Yb and Ta/Yb ratios of the tephra deposits from the Baegdusan volcano may originate from the alkali basaltic magma resulting from mixing between the wet plume from the stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone and the overlying shallow asthenospheric mantle. In contrast, the deposits from the Ulleung volcano show a minor contribution of the stagnant slab to the basaltic magma, implying either partial melting of a more enriched mantle, smaller degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source, or a combination of both processes as the magma genesis. Our study indicated that the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes have different magma sources and evolutionary histories.

  19. Near-Surface Circulation in the Solomon Sea Derived from Lagrangian Drifter Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. G.; Kessler, W. S.

    2010-12-01

    A low-latitude western boundary current in the Solomon Sea in the southwest Pacific Ocean carries waters from the subtropical gyre toward the tropics. Despite its importance as a major pathway connecting the subtropics to the equator, our knowledge about the Solomon Sea circulation remains incomplete and direct observations are sparse. Here, we use the Global Drifter Program (GDP) dataset to map out the near-surface circulation in the vicinity of the Solomon Sea. The analysis is based on pseudo-eulerian statistics computed from nearly 500 satellite-tracked drifting buoys drogued at 15m depth that have transited through the region during the 16-year period from 1994 to 2009. To the east of the Solomon Sea, the seasonally averaged velocity field outlines the changes in intensity and position of the main regional currents - the South Equatorial Current (SEC) and the South Equatorial CounterCurrent (SECC). Within the Solomon Sea, the drifters suggest a surface flow to the northwest that hugs the Papua New Guinea coast and exits equatorward through Vitiaz Strait. The flow is at its maximum during the austral winter, when the southeast monsoon winds are also at their strongest, while it is much weaker and undefined during the austral summer, reversing direction in the southeastern part of the basin at this time. The surface flow in Solomon Strait, the other major opening toward the equator, is to the southwest (into the sea) year around. Consistent with findings from altimetry data, the drifters single out the interior of the Solomon Sea as a region of enhanced eddy kinetic energy. The drifter-derived velocity field is compared with other observational climatologies, such as the CSIRO Atlas of the Regional Seas (CARS).

  20. Widespread uplift and 'trapdoor' faulting on Galápagos volcanoes observed with radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Amelung, F; Jónsson, S; Zebker, H; Segall, P

    2000-10-26

    Volcanic uplift, caused by the accumulation of magma in subsurface reservoirs, is a common precursor to eruptions. But, for some volcanoes, uplift of metres or more has not yet led to an eruption. Here we present displacement maps of volcanoes in the Galápagos Islands, constructed using satellite radar interferometry, that might help explain this dichotomy. We show that all but one of the seven volcanoes on the islands of Isabela and Fernandina deformed during 1992-99. Cerro Azul and Fernandina erupted during the observation period and show evidence of inflation, co-eruptive deflation and shallow dyke intrusion. In contrast, the largest volcano, Sierra Negra, has not erupted, yet exhibits spatially and temporally variable deformation, with a maximum uplift of 2.7 m between 1992 and 1999, which can be modelled by a shallow inflating sill. Inflation during 1997-98, however, was accompanied by 'trapdoor' faulting on a steeply dipping fracture system within the caldera. Repeated trapdoor faulting over geological time has formed an arcuate intra-caldera ridge within Sierra Negra and may have acted to relax stresses above the magma chamber, inhibiting summit eruptions. Similar processes may help explain large uplift unaccompanied by eruptive activity at other volcanoes. PMID:11069176

  1. A Summary of the History and Achievements of the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka and the Kurile Islands present a serious threat to aviation on routes from North America to the Far East. On March 27, 1986, an eruption of Augustine Volcano deposited ash over Anchorage and disrupted air traffic in south-central Alaska. The consequences of the colocation of an active volcano and the largest city in Alaska were clearly evident. That event led to a three-way partnership between the US Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute and the Alaska State Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys that now maintains a continuous watch through ground instrumentation and satellite imagery providing data from which warnings of eruptions can be issued to airline operators and pilots. The eruption of Redoubt Volcano in December 1989 was AVO's first big test. It spewed volcanic ash to a height of 14,000 m (45,000 feet) and managed to catch KLM 867, a Boeing 747 aircraft in its plume under dark conditions while approaching Anchorage Airport. Further details of the early days of the Alaska Volcano Observatory will be described, along with its recent successes and challenges.

  2. Geothermal activity supports islands of biodiversity in a hyper-arid, high-elevation landscape, Socompa Volcano, Puna de Atacama, Andes: A cultivation-independent molecular-phylogenetic view of soil microbial communities from an extreme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, E.; Reed, S.; Sowell, P.; Halloy, S.; Schmidt, S.

    2006-12-01

    Socompa Volcano is a relatively young, unglaciated, 6051 m (19,852`) elevation stratovolcano that lies at the Chilean-Argentine border (24° 25`S, 68° 15`W) at the eastern edge of the Atacama Basin in the Arid Core of the Andes. A 1984 exploration revealed isolated mats of moss, liverwort, algae and lichen- dominated autotrophic communities associated with geothermal vents or warmspots near Socompa`s summit (Halloy, 1991). If extant, this system would present a unique opportunity to study life`s limits in a hyper-arid, high-elevation Mars-like landscape. Returning to Socompa in 2005, we encountered previously described warmspot "2" (Halloy, 1991) at 5824 m (19,107`) and found it partially disturbed by recent foot traffic. We collected warmspot-associated gas and soil samples, as well as other non-vent associated soils on Socompa. These soils were subjected to a battery of analyses, including cultivation-independent surveys of bacterial and eukaryotic small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. Gas samples contained elevated CO2 and CH4 that, along with water vapor, vent directly from rocky "tubes" and percolate diffusely through the ground at the site. In general, Socompa soils were unvegetated, poorly sorted sands and gravels. Non-vent and vent-associated soils had pH 5.23 and 6.8, respectively. Non-vent and warm (25°C), disturbed (mat destroyed) vent-associated soils had no measurable moisture or nitrogen and 0.03% carbon (with SOM ?13C of -26‰). These soils also contained no measurable photosynthetic or photoprotective pigments and low enzyme activities. Conversely, cold (-5°C), undisturbed (but not overlain with dense mat) vent-associated soil had 10% water, 0.02% nitrogen and 0.25% carbon (C:N=13, SOM ?13C of -23.5‰). These soils had higher enzyme activities, contained chlorophyll a, and harbored a diverse array of algae, moss, liverwort, ascomycete, alveolate, and metazoan 18S rRNA sequences (~30 species). On the other hand, in the warm, disturbed vent-associated soil, 1 of only 4 observed eukaryotic species dominated (a cercomonad), and non-vent soil contained only 6 species and was dominated by fungi such as the basidiomycete yeast Cryptococcus. Bacterial diversity was high and significantly different among the three soils. Cyanobacterial sequences were only observed in the cold, undisturbed vent- associated soils. All soils produced colonies on soil extract agar at 0°C, but 10-100X more originated from the cold, undisturbed vent-associated soil. These results suggest that water vapor and possibly CO2, but not necessarily heat, may infiltrate soil across a wider area than previously thought on Socompa, and that these minimal inputs support a complex community whose parent populations may exist hundreds of kilometers away. However, we also note that non-vent associated soils from this cold, arid site are not completely "lifeless". Finally, we caution travelers to this area that physical disturbance can easily destroy these delicate, cryptic communities.

  3. Chiliques volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24,2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen.

    The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    These images were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Size: 7.5 x 7.5 km (4.5 x 4.5 miles) Location: 23.6 deg. South lat., 67.6 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3, and thermal band 12 Original Data Resolution: 15 m and 90 m Date Acquired: January 6, 2002 and November 19, 2000

  4. Anatahan Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... 18242). Anatahan Island is one of the Northern Mariana Islands in the western tropical Pacific. These islands are situated along the ... earthquake swarm that suggested the possibility of impending volcanic activity. The Micronesian Megapode is an endangered species of ...

  5. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form lava tubes. As it is being emplaced, the outer margins of the lava flow cool and harden, but the interior remains hot and continues to flow down-hill. Eventually, the eruption stops and the lava inside the tube cools, contracts, and hardens, leaving behind a tube (basically, a long narrow cave).

    (3) Rough elevated surface. The rough, pitted, and elevated surface across the bottom half of the image is a lava flow. The margins of this feature are somewhat lobate in form, and the entire feature is elevated above its surroundings, indicating that it was the last lava flow to pour through this region.

    Putting it All Together: Aa and Pahoehoe Lava Flows: Shield volcanoes such as Ascraeus Mons form from relatively fluid lavas. Shield volcanoes on Earth include the well-known Islands of Hawai'i. The kind of lava that is fluid enough to make shield volcanoes is called basalt. This is an iron- and magnesium-rich silicate lava that, when cooled, is usually black or very dark brown.

    Basalt lava flows come in two main varieties: Aa and Pahoehoe. These are Hawai'ian names. 'Aa' (pronounced 'ah-ah') lava flows have very rough, jumbly surfaces, and they usually lack lava tubes. 'Aa' lava flow surfaces are very rough to walk on-- thus the term 'aa' probably refers to the sound a person might make when walking on a cooled/solidified aa flow in bare feet!

    'Pahoehoe' (pronounced 'pa-hoy-hoy') is a term that means 'ropey'. The surfaces of pahoehoe lava flows are generally very smooth and billowy. Sometimes they have a ropy texture like melted taffy or caramel. Pahoehoe flows very commonly contain lava tubes.

    The rough-surfaced flow across the lower half of the MOC image is interpreted to be an 'aa' lava flow, and the smoother surface with a sinuous channel running down its center is interpreted to be a 'pahoehoe

  6. Subsidence of Surtsey volcano, 1967 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Jakobsson, Sveinn; Holmjarn, Josef

    1992-12-01

    The Surtsey marine volcano was built on the southern insular shelf of Iceland, along the seaward extension of the east volcanic zone, during episodic explosive and effusive activity from 1963 to 1967. A 1600-m-long, east-west line of 42 bench marks was established across the island shortly after volcanic activity stopped. From 1967 to 1991 a series of leveling surveys measured the relative elevation of the original bench marks, as well as additional bench marks installed in 1979, 1982 and 1985. Concurrent measurements were made of water levels in a pit dug on the north coast, in a drill hole, and along the coastline exposed to the open ocean. These surveys indicate that the dominant vertical movement of Surtsey is a general subsidence of about 1.1±0.3 m during the 24-year period of observations. The rate of subsidence decreased from 15 20 cm/year for 1967 1968 to 1 2 cm/year in 1991. Greatest subsidence is centered about the eastern vent area. Through 1970, subsidence was locally greatest where the lava plain is thinnest, adjacent to the flanks of the eastern tephra cone. From 1982 onward, the region closest to the hydrothermal zone, which is best developed in the vicinity of the eastern vent, began showing less subsidence relative to the rest of the surveyed bench marks. The general subsidence of the island probably results from compaction of the volcanic material comprising Surtsey, compaction of the sea-floor sediments underlying the island, and possibly downwarping of the lithosphere due to the laod of Surtsey. The more localized early downwarping near the eastern tephra cone is apparently due to greater compaction of tephra relative to lava. The later diminished local subsidence near the hydrothermal zone is probably due to a minor volume increase caused by hydrous alteration of glassy tephra. However, this volume increase is concentrated at depth beneath the bottom of the 176-m-deep cased drillhole.

  7. Dynamics of active magmatic and hydrothermal systems at Taal Volcano, Philippines, from continuous GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Beth A.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Meertens, Chuck M.; Lowry, Anthony R.; Corpuz, Ernesto

    2003-10-01

    A dense network of continuous single- and dual-frequency GPS receivers at Taal Volcano, Philippines, reveals four major stages of volcanogenic deformation: deflation, from installation in June 1998 to December 1998; inflation, from January to March 1999; deflation, from April 1999 to February 2000; and inflation, from February to November 2000. The largest displacements occurred during the February-November 2000 period of inflation, which was characterized by ˜120 mm of uplift of the center of Volcano Island relative to the northern caldera rim at average rates up to 216 mm/yr. Deformation sources were modeled using a constrained least squares inversion algorithm. The source of 1999 deflation and inflation in 2000 were modeled as contractional and dilatational Mogi point sources centered at 4.2 and 5.2 km depth, respectively, beneath Volcano Island. The locations of the inflationary and deflationary sources are indistinguishable within the 95% confidence estimates. Modeling using a running 4-month time window from June 1999 to March 2001 reveals little evidence for source migration. We suggest that the two periods of inflation observed at Taal result from episodic intrusions of magma into a shallow reservoir centered beneath Volcano Island. Subsequent deflation may result from exsolution of magmatic fluids and/or gases into an overlying, unconfined hydrothermal system.

  8. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Figure 1). The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents calculated earthquake hypocenters and seismic phase arrival data, and details changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2005. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at thirty-two volcanoes within Alaska in 2005 (Figure 1). The network was augmented by two new subnetworks to monitor the Semisopochnoi Island volcanoes and Little Sitkin Volcano. Seismicity at these volcanoes was still being studied at the end of 2005 and has not yet been added to the list of permanently monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. Following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at the Mount Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Korovin Volcano, formal monitoring of these volcanoes began in 2005. AVO located 9,012 earthquakes in 2005. Monitoring highlights in 2005 include: (1) seismicity at Mount Spurr remaining above background, starting in February 2004, through the end of the year and into 2006; (2) an increase in seismicity at Augustine Volcano starting in May 2005, and continuing through the end of the year into 2006; (3) volcanic tremor and seismicity related to low-level strombolian activity at Mount Veniaminof in January to March and September; and (4) a seismic swarm at Tanaga Volcano in October and November. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field in 2005; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2005; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2005.

  9. A Seismological Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia, and Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    E-print Network

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1 A Seismological Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia, and Mount St. Helens Volcano;4 University of Washington Abstract A Seismologic Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens of Earth and Space Sciences Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens, Washington are examples

  10. Understanding Volcano Hazards and Preventing Volcanic Disasters A Science Strategy for the Volcano Hazards Program,

    E-print Network

    Understanding Volcano Hazards and Preventing Volcanic Disasters A Science Strategy for the Volcano active volcanoes, the United States is among the most volcanically active countries in the world. During and property through exposure to volcano hazards continue to increase. Moreover, rapid globalization makes U

  11. The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano geodesy

    E-print Network

    The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano Volcano Observatory, Crater Rim Drive, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718-0051, United States b Department of Earth's active volcanoes. By their very nature, however, the magmatic reservoirs and conduits

  12. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    E-print Network

    Mazzini, Adriano

    When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan A Available online 18 November 2008 Keywords: Dashgil mud volcano Azerbaijan Dormant Methane Water geochemistry a b s t r a c t The worlds >1500 mud volcanoes are normally in a dormant stage due to the short

  13. Ash and Steam, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Monserrat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station crew members are regularly alerted to dynamic events on the Earth's surface. On request from scientists on the ground, the ISS crew observed and recorded activity from the summit of Soufriere Hills on March 20, 2002. These two images provide a context view of the island (bottom) and a detailed view of the summit plume (top). When the images were taken, the eastern side of the summit region experienced continued lava growth, and reports posted on the Smithsonian Institution's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report indicate that 'large (50-70 m high), fast-growing, spines developed on the dome's summit. These spines periodically collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows down the volcano's east flank that sometimes reached the Tar River fan. Small ash clouds produced from these events reached roughly 1 km above the volcano and drifted westward over Plymouth and Richmond Hill. Ash predominately fell into the sea. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remained high. Theodolite measurements of the dome taken on March 20 yielded a dome height of 1,039 m.' Other photographs by astronauts of Montserrat have been posted on the Earth Observatory: digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001; and a recolored and reprojected version of the same image. Digital photograph numbers ISS004-E-8972 and 8973 were taken 20 March, 2002 from Space Station Alpha and were provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  14. Embedded multiparametric system for volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, David; Torres, Pedro A.; Meletlidis, Stavros; Lopez, Carmen; José Blanco, María

    2014-05-01

    A low cost and low power consumption multiparametric system designed for volcano monitoring is presented. Once tested with various sensors, at present it is installed in two locations in Tenerife, Canary Islands, acquiring and transmitting data in real time. The system is based on a commercial board (Raspberry Pi®, RPi®) that uses an embedded ARMTM processor with a Debian (Wheezy-Raspbian) Linux Operating System. This configuration permits different standard communication systems between devices as USB and ETHERNET, and also communication with integrated circuits is possible. The whole system includes this platform and self-developed hardware and software. Analog signals are acquired at an expansion board with an ADC converter with three 16 bits channels. This board, which is powered directly from the RPi®, provides timing to the sampling data using a Real Time Clock (RTC). Two serial protocols (I2C and SPI) are responsible for communications. Due to the influence of atmospheric phenomena on the volcano monitoring data, the system is complemented by a self-developed meteorological station based on ArduinoCC and low cost commercial sensors (atmospheric pressure, humidity and rainfall). It is powered with the RPi® and it uses a serial protocol for communications. Self-developed software run under Linux OS and handles configuration, signal acquisition, data storage (USB storage or SD card) and data transmission (FTP, web server). Remote configuration, data plotting and downloading is available through a web interface tool. Nowadays, the system is used for gravimetric and oceanic tides data acquisition in Tenerife and soon it will be applied for clinometric data.

  15. Shallow velocity imaging of an active volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Chardot, L.; Jolly, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    We use a linear array of temporary seismometers to derive a shear-wave velocity model of the upper ~1000m of the crater area of White Island, an active volcano in New Zealand. We use noise interferometry to generate dispersion curves and invert these dispersion curves to obtain a layered 1D model. By exploiting the varying interstation distances along the array, we are able to define a strong shallow impedance contrast in the upper 10 meters as well as a depth to 'effective' bedrock at about 100m. We limit the bandwidth of the measured dispersion using a 2-wave cycle approximation and construct a composite dispersion curve. We then invert the dispersion curves with two separate inversion algorithms in an effort to test the validity of using this broadband approach for monitoring active volcanoes. The first method is a non-linear approach and is useful when an a-priori starting model is poorly known or if a velocity inversion is likely. Unfortunately, this type of non-linear inversion is more sensitive to small perturbations in the recovered Green's Functions, which may be due to non-equipartitioning of the wavefield as well as to velocity changes. The second is a linearized and damped LSQR approach which we envision will be more useful for routine monitoring in situations in which the starting model is well defined. In this case, selective regularization can be used to stablize moving time-window inversion. Lastly, our results will be used as input for hydrothermal fluid flow modelling conducted in a concurrent study.

  16. Oceanic transports through the Solomon Sea: The bend of the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparin, Florent; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Maes, Christophe; Marin, Frédéric; Eldin, Gérard

    2012-08-01

    Thermocline waters of the tropical southwest Pacific can be traced back to the center of the South Pacific basin and have a potential influence on equatorial surface conditions and on the characteristics of the El Niño Southern Oscillation on decadal timescales. The Solomon Sea is traversed by this influential flow, and therefore is an optimal place for exploring this oceanic connection to the equator. From a high-resolution hydrographic survey at which we applied an inverse box model, we describe the main pathways at the entrance of the Solomon Sea, and more particularly the extremely sharp bend of the western boundary current around the south-east tip of Papua New Guinea. Of the 30 Sv subtropical waters transported into the Coral Sea from the east, above 1300 m, 29 ± 5 Sv makes its way through the Solomon Sea with a large part transported in a boundary current, at the entrance of the Solomon Sea. Around the south-east tip of Papua New Guinea, the Gulf of Papua Current turns abruptly to the north, in a very sharp bend as it merges into the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent, on its way, toward the equator. The warm currents transport large amounts of internal energy, with a total of 1.0 ± 0.3 1015W entering the Solomon Sea from the south.

  17. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  18. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; Gordon, David W., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  19. Redoubt Volcano Summit Crater During Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Redoubt Volcano summit crater during eruption. This was taken just after explosive activity at redoubt ceased. There were still significant gas and steam emissions occurring. Iliamna Volcano to the south of Redoubt is visible in the background....

  20. Calculated volumes of individual shield volcanoes at the young end of the Hawaiian Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.E.; Eakins, B.W.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and a digital elevation model of the Hawaiian Islands are used to calculate the volumes of individual shield volcanoes and island complexes (Niihau, Kauai, Oahu, the Maui Nui complex, and Hawaii), taking into account subsidence of the Pacific plate under the load of the Hawaiian Ridge. Our calculated volume for the Island of Hawaii and its submarine extent (213 ?? 103 km3) is nearly twice the previous estimate (113 ?? 103 km3), due primarily to crustal subsidence that had not been accounted for in the earlier work. The volcanoes that make up the Island of Hawaii (Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea and Loihi) are generally considered to have been formed within the past million years, and our revised volume for the island indicates that magma supply rates are greater than previously estimated, 0.21 km3/yr as opposed to ???0.1 km3/yr. This result also shows that compared with rates calculated for the Hawaiian Islands (0-6 Ma, 0.095 km3/yr), the Hawaiian Ridge (0-45 Ma, 0.017 km3/yr), and the Emperor Seamounts (45-80 Ma, 0.010 km3/yr), magma supply rates have increased dramatically to build the Island of Hawaii.

  1. DEM-based model for reconstructing volcano's morphology from primary volcanic landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayer, Eric; Lopez, Philippe; Michon, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    Volumes of magma intruded in and emitted by volcanoes through time can be estimated by reconstruction of volcano's morphology and time sequence. Classical approaches for quantifying magma volumes on active volcanoes are based on the difference between pre- and post-eruption digital elevation models (DEM), but this kind of approach needs the pre-eruptive surfaces to be available. For old and eroded volcanoes these surfaces are poorly constrained. However, because the geometrical form of many volcanic edifices exhibits a remarkable symmetry we propose, here, a new approach using primary volcanic landforms in order to estimate the amount of the both erupted and eroded material and to locate eruptive centers. A large fraction of composite volcanoes have near constant slope on their flanks and a form that is concave upwards near their summits. But many phenomena can lead to non-symetrical edifices and complex morphologies can result, for example from parasitic centers of volcanism on the flanks, from alternation of short effusive and explosive construction phases, from flank or caldera collapses, or from glacial and other types of erosion. In this study we propose that, on the first order approximation, complex morphologies can be modeled by piling regular cones. In this model, cones centers and slopes are derived by fitting primary volcanic landform with a linear function :elevation=f(distance from center). Such an approach allows to estimate both errors on location of the eruptive center and on the volume of the resulting cones. This model can then be used for quantifying volume of erupted and eroded material, and for quantifying catastrophic events as giant landslides or flank collapse. This approach is tested on four different active volcanoes : Mount Mayon (Philippines), Mount Fuji (Japan), Mount Etna (Sicily) and Mount Teide (Canary Island) to estimate errors in volume between modeled and actual edifices. It is then used on volcanoes of La Réunion hotspot to reconstruct the Piton des Neiges and Piton de la Fournaise volcanoes at its different stages of growing.

  2. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2004

    E-print Network

    , Geochemical constraints on possible subduction components in lavas of Mayon and Taal volcanoes, southern LuzonPublications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2004 2006 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;2 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is part

  3. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  4. Thomas A. Jaggar, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Thomas A. Jaggar founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and served as its Director until 1940.  Shown here in 1925, Jaggar is at work in HVO's first building, which, at the time, was located on the northeast rim of K?lauea Volcano’s summit caldera, near the present-day Volc...

  5. The Volcano Optimizer Jan. 29 2003

    E-print Network

    Ives, Zachary G.

    The Volcano Optimizer Generator Jan. 29 2003 Presented by Peng Wang in CIS650 Cite: Zhang Da Generator System General "toolkits" for creating customized DBs Exodus (Graefe&DeWitt,87) Volcano (Graefe;4 The Motivation of Volcano High Performance Optimization time Memory consumption for search More Extensibility

  6. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2005

    E-print Network

    Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2005 2007 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;2 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is part are included based on date of publication with no attempt to assign them to Fiscal Year. #12;3 Volcano Hazards

  7. A new VLSI architecture for a single-chip-type Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1989-01-01

    A new very large scale integration (VLSI) architecture for implementing Reed-Solomon (RS) decoders that can correct both errors and erasures is described. This new architecture implements a Reed-Solomon decoder by using replication of a single VLSI chip. It is anticipated that this single chip type RS decoder approach will save substantial development and production costs. It is estimated that reduction in cost by a factor of four is possible with this new architecture. Furthermore, this Reed-Solomon decoder is programmable between 8 bit and 10 bit symbol sizes. Therefore, both an 8 bit Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) RS decoder and a 10 bit decoder are obtained at the same time, and when concatenated with a (15,1/6) Viterbi decoder, provide an additional 2.1-dB coding gain.

  8. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  9. Colonization of an island volcano, Long Island, Papua New Guinea, and an emergent island,

    E-print Network

    's short-lived crater pond. Termites were seen ¯ying on Motmot but they must have originated elsewhere. Apart from the termites, and freshwater insects derived from the lake, the pioneer land arthropods

  10. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946

  11. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at the beginning of each activity. A complete explanation, including the format of the Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations, is available at the beginning of each grade link at http://www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/assessment/GLEHome.html.

  12. Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This easterly looking view shows the seven major volcanic islands of the Canary Island chain (28.0N, 16.5W) and offers a unique view of the islands that have become a frequent vacation spot for Europeans. The northwest coastline of Africa, (Morocco and Western Sahara), is visible in the background. Frequently, these islands create an impact on local weather (cloud formations) and ocean currents (island wakes) as seen in this photo.

  13. Tracking the origins of plastic debris across the Coral Sea: A case study from the Ouvéa Island, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Maes, Christophe; Blanke, Bruno

    2015-08-15

    Contamination of the marine environment by human-made plastic litter is a growing and global problem. Our study attempts to explain the presence of two plastic bottles beached on the Ouvéa Island, in the southwest Pacific Ocean, with trademarks from the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea (PNG). We simulate the oceanic drift tracks and associated transit times with a Lagrangian interpretation of the surface currents of a high-resolution ocean model. Our results show that it takes less than 2-3months for drifting objects to connect these archipelagos (New Caledonia, Solomon Islands and PNG) and highlight the role of the meridional component of the circulation rather than the dominant zonal jets. This study shows that the origin or traceability of trash represent valuable information that can be used to test and, ultimately, improve our understanding of ocean circulation. PMID:26088538

  14. The Western Solomons Forearc: Independent Inner and Outer Forearc Paleo-Uplift Histories and Relationship to Megathrust Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Lavier, L. L.; Papabatu, A. K.; Toba, T.; Shen, C. C.; Cai, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Solomons forearc has undergone repeated uplifts that probably were coseismic and similar to that during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 megathrust rupture that raised the outer forearc as much as 2.5 m. A parallel swath of the inner forearc subsided ~0.5 m during the 2007 event. The Western Solomons is ideal for crustal motion measurements because both the outer forearc above the seismogenic zone and the inner forearc are occupied by reef-fringed islands enabling land-based measurements of vertical displacements. U-series and 14C dating of uplifted corals and microatolls has provided the ages for a number of paleo-uplift events that we infer to have been coseismic. While the outer forearc has uplifted rapidly in late Holocene time at rates from ~1 to 8 mm/yr, the inner forearc has risen at only 0 - 1.1 mm/yr. It is notable that the inner and outer forearcs are separated by an arc-parallel boundary along which there is little or no net uplift. However, although both the inner and outer forearcs have late Quaternary histories of relatively rapid net uplift, they appear to have quite different uplift histories. The outer forearc has uplifted several times over the past 1000 years by as much as several meters in each event. Although the inner forearc subsided during the 2007 event and should subside during all events that ruptured the seismogenic zone beneath the outer forearc, it also has undergone abrupt late Holocene uplifts that do not correspond to those of the outer forearc. But the most surprising difference between the inner and outer forearcs is that 8-9 ka corals in growth position and emerged solution notches were found in a number of inner forearc sites adjacent to corals of the ~6 ka mid-Holocene high sea level that was a little higher than present sea level. Because sea level at 8-9 ka was 10-20 m lower than present in this region, 10-20 m of uplift is required between 8-9 ka and 6 ka during one or more tectonic events. Some of the 9 ka corals have morphologies indicate abrupt emergence that may have been coseismic. Much slower uplift after ~8 ka allowed rising sea level to almost overtake the 8-9 ka corals. Fortunately they remained slightly above subsequent sea level so that we could discover them. Our presentation will show the evidence and propose hypotheses to explain the early Holocene interval of great uplift inferred from the 8-9 ka corals.

  15. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  16. Color composite C-band and L-band image of Kilauea volcanoe on Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This color composite C-band and L-band image of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii was acuired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperature Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The city of Hilo can be seen at the top. The image shows the different types of lava flows around the crater Pu'u O'o. Ash deposits which erupted in 1790 from the summit of Kilauea volcano show up as dark in this image, and fine details associated with lava flows which erupted in 1919 and 1974 can be seen to the south of the summit in an area called the Ka'u Desert. Other historic lava flows can also be seen. Highway 11 is the linear feature running from Hilo to the Kilauea volcano. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43918.

  17. Aseismic inflation of Westdahl volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Freymueller, J.T.; McNutt, S.R.; Mann, Dorte

    2000-01-01

    Westdahl volcano, located at the west end of Unimak Island in the central Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, is a broad shield that produced moderate-sized eruptions in 1964, 1978-79, and 1991-92. Satellite radar interferometry detected about 17 cm of volcano-wide inflation from September 1993 to October 1998. Multiple independent interferograms reveal that the deformation rate has not been steady; more inflation occurred from 1993 to 1995 than from 1995 to 1998. Numerical modeling indicates that a source located about 9 km beneath the center of the volcano inflated by about 0.05 km3 from 1993 to 1998. On the basis of the timing and volume of recent eruptions at Westdahl and the fact that it has been inflating for more than 5 years, the next eruption can be expected within the next several years.

  18. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geodetic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, however, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the modelled conduits only exhibit shapes that are too simplistic; (3) most geodetic models only account for elasticity of the host rock, whereas substantial plastic deformation is known to occur. To overcome these limitations, one needs to use a physical system, in which (1) both surface deformation and the shape of, and pressure in, the underlying conduit are known, and (2) the mechanical properties of the host material are controlled and well known. In this contribution, we present novel quantitative laboratory results of shallow magma emplacement. Fine-grained silica flour represents the brittle crust, and low viscosity vegetable oil is an analogue for the magma. The melting temperature of the oil is 31°C; the oil solidifies in the models after the end of the experiments. At the time of injection the oil temperature is 50°C. The oil is pumped from a reservoir using a volumetric pump into the silica flour through a circular inlet at the bottom of a 40x40 cm square box. The silica flour is cohesive, such that oil intrudes it by fracturing it, and produces typical sheet intrusions (dykes, cone sheets, etc.). During oil intrusion, the model surface deforms, mostly by doming. These movements are measured by an advanced photogrammetry method, which uses 4 synchronized fixed cameras that periodically image the surface of the model from different angles. We apply particle tracking method to compute the 3D ground deformation pattern through time. After solidification of the oil, the intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  19. Mafic Plinian volcanism and ignimbrite emplacement at Tofua volcano, Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, J. T.; Cronin, S. J.; Turner, S. P.; Cooper, L. B.

    2011-11-01

    Tofua Island is the largest emergent mafic volcano within the Tofua arc, Tonga, southwest Pacific. The volcano is dominated by a distinctive caldera averaging 4 km in diameter, containing a freshwater lake in the south and east. The latest paroxysmal (VEI 5-6) explosive volcanism includes two phases of activity, each emplacing a high-grade ignimbrite. The products are basaltic andesites with between 52 wt.% and 57 wt.% SiO2. The first and largest eruption caused the inward collapse of a stratovolcano and produced the `Tofua' ignimbrite and a sub-circular caldera located slightly northwest of the island's centre. This ignimbrite was deposited in a radial fashion over the entire island, with associated Plinian fall deposits up to 0.5 m thick on islands >40 km away. Common sub-rounded and frequently cauliform scoria bombs throughout the ignimbrite attest to a small degree of marginal magma-water interaction. The common intense welding of the coarse-grained eruptive products, however, suggests that the majority of the erupted magma was hot, water-undersaturated and supplied at high rates with moderately low fragmentation efficiency and low levels of interaction with external water. We propose that the development of a water-saturated dacite body at shallow (<6 km) depth resulted in failure of the chamber roof to cause sudden evacuation of material, producing a Plinian eruption column. Following a brief period of quiescence, large-scale faulting in the southeast of the island produced a second explosive phase believed to result from recharge of a chemically distinct magma depleted in incompatible elements. This similar, but smaller eruption, emplaced the `Hokula' Ignimbrite sheet in the northeast of the island. A maximum total volume of 8 km3 of juvenile material was erupted by these events. The main eruption column is estimated to have reached a height of ˜12 km, and to have produced a major atmospheric injection of gas, and tephra recorded in the widespread series of fall deposits found on coral islands 40-80 km to the east (in the direction of regional upper-tropospheric winds). Radiocarbon dating of charcoal below the Tofua ignimbrite and organic material below the related fall units imply this eruption sequence occurred post 1,000 years BP. We estimate an eruption magnitude of 2.24 × 1013 kg, sulphur release of 12 Tg and tentatively assign this eruption to the AD 1030 volcanic sulphate spike recorded in Antarctic ice sheet records.

  20. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand and…

  1. Submarine sliver in North Kona: A window into the early magmatic and growth history of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    E-print Network

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    Submarine sliver in North Kona: A window into the early magmatic and growth history of Hualalai rights reserved. Keywords: ocean islands; basalt; hawaiite; sulfur; submarine landslide; geochemistry 1. Introduction Interest in the processes affecting submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes has grown in recent

  2. Near-and Far-field Tsunami Hazard from the Potential Flank Collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano

    E-print Network

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Near- and Far-field Tsunami Hazard from the Potential Flank Collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano Palma (Canary Islands) could result in a large tsunami hav- ing effects throughout the North Atlantic tsunami waves than originally thought, these would still cause devas- tating effects in the near

  3. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a deformation map of the south flank of Kilauea volcano on the big island of Hawaii, centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.25 degrees west longitude. The map was created by combining interferometric radar data -- that is data acquired on different passes of the space shuttle which are then overlayed to obtain elevation information -- acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar during its first flight in April 1994 and its second flight in October 1994. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 80 kilometers (25 miles by 50 miles). North is toward the upper left of the image. The colors indicate the displacement of the surface in the direction that the radar instrument was pointed (toward the right of the image) in the six months between images. The analysis of ground movement is preliminary, but appears consistent with the motions detected by the Global Positioning System ground receivers that have been used over the past five years. The south flank of the Kilauea volcano is among the most rapidly deforming terrains on Earth. Several regions show motions over the six-month time period. Most obvious is at the base of Hilina Pali, where 10 centimeters (4 inches) or more of crustal deformation can be seen in a concentrated area near the coastline. On a more localized scale, the currently active Pu'u O'o summit also shows about 10 centimeters (4 inches) of change near the vent area. Finally, there are indications of additional movement along the upper southwest rift zone, just below the Kilauea caldera in the image. Deformation of the south flank is believed to be the result of movements along faults deep beneath the surface of the volcano, as well as injections of magma, or molten rock, into the volcano's 'plumbing' system. Detection of ground motions from space has proven to be a unique capability of imaging radar technology. Scientists hope to use deformation data acquired by SIR-C/X-SAR and future imaging radar missions to help in better understanding the processes responsible for volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  4. Deep magma transport at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Klein, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    The shallow part of Kilauea's magma system is conceptually well-understood. Long-period and short-period (brittle-failure) earthquake swarms outline a near-vertical magma transport path beneath Kilauea's summit to 20 km depth. A gravity high centered above the magma transport path demonstrates that Kilauea's shallow magma system, established early in the volcano's history, has remained fixed in place. Low seismicity at 4-7 km outlines a storage region from which magma is supplied for eruptions and intrusions. Brittle-failure earthquake swarms shallower than 5 km beneath the rift zones accompany dike emplacement. Sparse earthquakes extend to a decollement at 10-12 km along which the south flank of Kilauea is sliding seaward. This zone below 5 km can sustain aseismic magma transport, consistent with recent tomographic studies. Long-period earthquake clusters deeper than 40 km occur parallel to and offshore of Kilauea's south coast, defining the deepest seismic response to magma transport from the Hawaiian hot spot. A path connecting the shallow and deep long-period earthquakes is defined by mainshock-aftershock locations of brittle-failure earthquakes unique to Kilauea whose hypocenters are deeper than 25 km with magnitudes from 4.4 to 5.2. Separation of deep and shallow long-period clusters occurs as the shallow plumbing moves with the volcanic edifice, while the deep plumbing is centered over the hotspot. Recent GPS data agrees with the volcano-propagation vector from Kauai to Maui, suggesting that Pacific plate motion, azimuth 293.5?? and rate of 7.4 cm/yr, has been constant over Kilauea's lifetime. However, volcano propagation on the island of Hawaii, azimuth 325??, rate 13 cm/yr, requires southwesterly migration of the locus of melting within the broad hotspot. Deep, long-period earthquakes lie west of the extrapolated position of Kilauea backward in time along a plate-motion vector, requiring southwesterly migration of Kilauea's magma source. Assumed ages of 0.4 my for Kilauea and 0.8 my for Mauna Loa are consistent with this model. Younger ages would apply if Kilauea began its growth south of the locus of maximum melting, as is true for Loihi seamount. We conclude that Kilauea is fed from below the eastern end of the zone of deep long-period earthquakes. Magma transport is vertical below 30 km, then sub-horizontal, following the oceanic mantle boundary separating plagioclase- and spinel-peridotite, then near-vertical beneath Kilauea's summit. The migration of the melting region within the hotspot and Kilauea's sampling of different sources within the melting region can explain (1) the long-term geochemical separation of Kilauea from neighboring volcanoes Mauna Loa and Loihi, and (2) the short-term changes in trace-element and isotope signatures within Kilauea. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rigths reserved.

  5. Developing monitoring capability of a volcano observatory: the example of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.; Jolly, G. E.; Sherburn, S.; Scott, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Fournier, N.; Miller, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Vanuatu lies on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire'. With 6 active subaerial and 3 submarine (identified so far) volcanoes, monitoring and following up their activities is a considerable work for a national observatory. The Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory is a good example of what can be done from ‘scratch’ to develop a volcanic monitoring capability in a short space of time. A fire in June 2007 completely destroyed the old observatory building and many valuable records leaving Vanuatu with no volcano monitoring capacity. This situation forced the Government of Vanuatu to reconsider the structure of the hazards monitoring group and think about the best way to rebuild a complete volcano monitoring system. Taking the opportunity of the re-awakening of Gaua volcano (North of Vanuatu), the Vanuatu Geohazards section in partnership with GNS Science, New Zealand developed a new program including a strategic plan for Geohazards from 2010-2020, the installation of a portable seismic network with real-time data transmission in Gaua, the support of the first permanent monitoring station installation in Ambrym and the design and implementation of volcano monitoring infrastructure and protocol. Moreover the technology improvements of the last decade and the quick extension of enhanced communication systems across the islands of Vanuatu played a very important role for the development of this program. In less than one year, the implementation of this program was beyond expectations and showed considerable improvement of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory volcano monitoring capability. In response to increased volcanic activity (or unrest) in Ambae, the Geohazards section was fully capable of the installation of a portable seismic station in April 2010 and to follow the development of the activity. Ultimately, this increased capability results in better and timelier delivery of information and advice on the threat from volcanic activity to the National Disaster Management Office and to the population of the volcanic islands.

  6. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  7. The structural setting of the Ischia Island Caldera (Italy): first evidence from seismic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Matteis, Raffaella; Russo, Guido

    2015-09-01

    Ischia Island is one of the active volcanoes of the Neapolitan area (Italy). Hazard assessment of active, densely populated volcano is primarily based on knowledge of the volcano's past behaviour and of its present state. As a contribution to the definition of the present structural setting of Ischia Island, we constructed a new model of the shallow crust using geophysical data: seismic wave travel times and Bouguer anomaly data. We analysed these data sets through seismic tomography and gravity data inversion. The main results inferable from the 3D seismic and gravity images are the definition of the caldera rim along the perimeter of the island, as hypothesized by many authors, and the presence of a high velocity and density area inside the caldera consistent with extension of the resurgent block that characterizes the recent deformation of the island.

  8. The Kinetics of Analyte Capture on Nanoscale Sensors J. E. Solomon* and M. R. Pauly

    E-print Network

    Paul, Mark

    The Kinetics of Analyte Capture on Nanoscale Sensors J. E. Solomon* and M. R. Pauly *Condensed a number of kinetic analyses related to binding processes relevant to capture of target analyte species, and a detailed kinetic analysis tells us how rapidly such measurements may be made. We have analyzed the capture

  9. Sea surface salinity and temperature seasonal changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Radenac, Marie-Helene; Cravatte, Sophie; Gourdeau, Lionel; Alory, Gael

    2014-05-01

    Small SST and SSS (an indicator of iron-rich Papua New Guinea river outflows) changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas may be transported to the equatorial Pacific and have strong climatic and biological impacts. We analyze mean and seasonal change of SST and SSS in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977-2009 in situ data collected from Voluntary Observing Ships. Co-variability of these two variables with surface wind, altimeter-derived current anomalies, precipitation, and Sepik river discharge is examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest waters occurring in July/August mainly due to horizontal advection. In contrast, they show large semi-annual oscillations in the Bismarck Sea. There, the coldest and saltiest waters happen in January/February, when the northwest monsoon winds drive coastal upwelling, and in July/August, when the New Guinea Coastal Current advects cold and high-salinity waters from the Solomon Sea through Vitiaz Strait. The low SSS values observed in April/May, stuck between the two SSS maxima, are further enhanced by the Sepik river discharge annual maximum. A high-resolution model strengthens the conclusions we derive from observations. The impacts of ENSO on SST and SSS are also discussed.

  10. 75 FR 41789 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 111). The NPRM stated... Challenge'' power boat races, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Patuxent River, near...

  11. 77 FR 47279 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Patuxent River; Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing special local regulations during the ``Chesapeake Challenge'' power boat races, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Patuxent River, near Solomons, MD on September 15 and 16, 2012. These special local regulations are necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the event. This action is intended to temporarily restrict vessel......

  12. 76 FR 35802 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... races, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Patuxent River, near Solomons, MD on September 24... navigable waters during the event. This action is intended to temporarily restrict vessel traffic in...

  13. 76 FR 52865 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 118). We received no... establishing special local regulations during the ``Chesapeake Challenge'' power boat races, a marine event to... event. This action is intended to temporarily restrict vessel traffic in a portion of the Patuxent...

  14. 75 FR 32866 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... races, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Patuxent River, near Solomons, MD on October 3... waters during the event. This action is intended to temporarily restrict vessel traffic in a portion...

  15. 77 FR 25649 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Patuxent River, Solomons, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to establish special local regulations during the ``Chesapeake Challenge'' power boat races, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Patuxent River, near Solomons, MD on September 15 and 16, 2012. These special local regulations are necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the event. This action is intended to temporarily restrict......

  16. Cryptographic Hardness based on the Decoding of ReedSolomon Codes

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Cryptographic Hardness based on the Decoding of Reed­Solomon Codes Aggelos Kiayias # Moti Yung Reconstruction Problem (PR), from a cryptographic hardness perspec­ tive. Namely, we deal with PR instances the underlying finite field. Moreover, under the same assumption we show that it is hard to extract any partial

  17. Cryptographic Hardness based on the Decoding of Reed-Solomon Codes

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Cryptographic Hardness based on the Decoding of Reed-Solomon Codes Aggelos Kiayias Moti Yung Reconstruction Problem (PR), from a cryptographic hardness perspec- tive. Namely, we deal with PR instances the underlying finite field. Moreover, under the same assumption we show that it is hard to extract any partial

  18. A single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (225, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of the dual basis multiplication algorithm. The same architecture can be applied to design VLSI chips to compute various kinds of number theoretic transforms.

  19. Review of finite fields: Applications to discrete Fourier, transforms and Reed-Solomon coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, J. S. L.; Truong, T. K.; Benjauthrit, B.; Mulhall, B. D. L.; Reed, I. S.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide a step-by-step approach to the subject of finite fields. Rigorous proofs and highly theoretical materials are avoided. The simple concepts of groups, rings, and fields are discussed and developed more or less heuristically. Examples are used liberally to illustrate the meaning of definitions and theories. Applications include discrete Fourier transforms and Reed-Solomon coding.

  20. JOURNAL ARTICLES Solomon, J., Kumar, R. and Alvi, F. S. "High Bandwidth Pulsed Microactuators for

    E-print Network

    in the control of supersonic impinging jets using microjets," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 613, 2008, pp. 55 Characteristics of a Supersonic Impinging Jet," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 392, August 1999, pp. 155JOURNAL ARTICLES Solomon, J., Kumar, R. and Alvi, F. S. "High Bandwidth Pulsed Microactuators

  1. Parallel Subspace Subcodes of Reed-Solomon Codes for Magnetic Recording Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Han

    2010-01-01

    Read channel architectures based on a single low-density parity-check (LDPC) code are being considered for the next generation of hard disk drives. However, LDPC-only solutions suffer from the error floor problem, which may compromise reliability, if not handled properly. Concatenated architectures using an LDPC code plus a Reed-Solomon (RS) code…

  2. Upper mantle magma storage and transport under a Canarian shield-volcano, Teno, Tenerife (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longpré, Marc-Antoine; Troll, Valentin R.; Hansteen, Thor H.

    2008-08-01

    We use clinopyroxene-liquid thermobarometry, aided by petrography and mineral major element chemistry, to reconstruct the magma plumbing system of the late Miocene, largely mafic Teno shield-volcano on the island of Tenerife. Outer rims of clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts show patterns best explained by decompression-induced crystallization upon rapid ascent of magmas from depth. The last equilibrium crystallization of clinopyroxene occurred in the uppermost mantle, from ˜20 to 45 km depth. We propose that flexural stresses or, alternatively, thermomechanical contrasts create a magma trap that largely confines magma storage to an interval roughly coinciding with the Moho at ˜15 km and the base of the long-term elastic lithosphere at ˜40 km below sea level. Evidence for shallow magma storage is restricted to the occurrence of a thick vitric tuff of trachytic composition emplaced before the Teno shield-volcano suffered large-scale flank collapses. The scenario developed in this study may help shed light on some unresolved issues of magma supply to intraplate oceanic volcanoes characterized by relatively low magma fluxes, such as those of the Canary, Madeira and Cape Verde archipelagoes, as well as Hawaiian volcanoes in their postshield stage. The data presented also support the importance of progressive magmatic underplating in the Canary Islands.

  3. What can we learn about the history of oceanic shield volcanoes from deep marine sediments? Example from La Reunion volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelery, Patrick; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jorry, Stephan; Mazuel, Aude

    2014-05-01

    The discovery in 2006, during the oceanographic survey FOREVER, of large volcaniclastic sedimentary systems off La Réunion Island (western Indian ocean) revealed a new image of the evolution of oceanic shield volcanoes and their dismantling. Marine data obtained from 2006 to 2011 during the oceanographic surveys ERODER 1 to ERODER 4 included bathymetry, acoustic imagery, echosounding profiles, dredging and coring. Six major turbidite systems were mapped and described on the submarine flanks of La Reunion volcanic edifice and the surrounding oceanic plate. The interpretation of sediment cores enable us to characterise the processes of gravity-driven sediment transfer from land to deep sea and also to revisit the history of the volcanoes of La Réunion Island. Turbidite systems constitute a major component of the transfer of volcanic materials to the abyssal plain (Saint-Ange et al., 2011; 2013; Sisavath et al., 2011; 2012; Babonneau et al., 2013). These systems are superimposed on other dismantling processes (slow deformation such as gravity sliding or spreading, and huge landslides causing debris avalanches). Turbidite systems mainly develop in connection with the hydrographic network of the island, and especially at the mouths of large rivers. They show varying degrees of maturity, with canyons incising the submarine slope of the island and feeding depositional areas, channels and lobes extending over 150 km from the coast. The cores collected in turbidite systems show successions of thin and thick turbidites alternating with hemipelagic sedimentation. Sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of sediment cores yielded a chronology of submarine gravity events. First-order information was obtained on the explosive activity of these volcanoes by identifying tephra layers in the cores (glass shards and pumice). In addition, major events of the volcanic and tectonic history of the island can be identified and dated. In this contribution, we focus most attention on the southernmost turbidite system (St-Joseph system). Sedimentary records allow us to establish a link between two major landslides affecting the flanks of Piton de la Fournaise volcano and the triggering of major turbidity currents. Thus, the age of these events could be obtained; their chronology being far too difficult to establish otherwise. In short: a beautiful example of the contribution of sedimentology to the study of the structural evolution of the volcanoes. References Babonneau N., Delacourt C., Cancouet R., Sisavath E., Bachelery P., Deschamps A., Mazuel A., Ammann J., Jorry S.J., Villeneuve N., 2013, Marine Geology, 346, 47-57. Saint-Ange F., Bachèlery P., Babonneau N., Michon, L., Jorry S.J., 2013, Marine Geology. 337, 35-52. Saint-Ange, F., Savoye, B., Michon, L., Bachelery, P., Deplus, C., De Voogd, B., Dyment, J., Le Drezen, E., Voisset, M., Le Friant, A., and Boudon, G., 2011. Geology, 39, 271-274, doi: 10.1130/G31478.1. Sisavath, E., Mazuel, A., Jorry, S., Babonneau, N., Bachèlery P., De Voogd, B., Salpin, M., Emmanuel, L., Beaufort, L., Toucanne, S., 2012, Sedimentary Geology, 281, p. 180-193, doi :10.1016/j.sedgeo.2012.09.010. Sisavath, E., Babonneau N., Saint-Ange F., Bachèlery P., Jorry S., Deplus C., De Voogd B., Savoye B., 2011, Marine Geology, v. 288, p. 1-17, doi:10.1016/j.margeo.2011.06.011.

  4. Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface structures beneath active volcanoes have frequently been investigated (e.g., Oikawa et al., 1994: Sudo et al., 1996), and seismic attenuation beneath some active volcanoes are reported to be strong. On the other hand, few local subsurface structures beneath volcanoes whose volcanic activities are low have been investigated in detail, though it is important to study them to understand the potential of volcanic activity of these volcanoes. Then, we analyzed the seismic attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano (Midagahara volcano) located in central Japan, whose volcanic activity is quite low. We used seismograms obtained by Hi-net deployed by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention). Hi-net is one of the densest seismic station networks in the world, and the spatial interval of their seismographs is about 20 km, which is suitable for investigating local structure beneath an individual volcano. We estimated S-wave attenuation using seismograms at five stations near Tateyama volcano for nineteen small, local, shallow earthquakes (M 2.7-4.0) that occurred from January 2012 to December 2013. We divided these earthquakes into six groups according to their hypocenter locations. We used twofold spectral ratios around the first S-arrivals to investigate the S-wave attenuation when S-waves passed through the region beneath Tateyama volcano. We focused on station pairs located on opposite sides of Tateyama volcano to each other, and earthquake pairs whose epicenters were located almost along the line connecting Tateyama volcano and the two stations, so that the spectral ratios reflect a local structure beneath Tateyama volcano. Twofold spectral ratios of all seismograms for S waves having northwestern or southeastern sources show strong attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano. On the other hand, those of seismograms having northeastern or southwestern sources show much weaker attenuation, which suggested that the region of strong attenuation is anisotropic and/or has complicated shape.

  5. Active volcanoes observed through Art: the contribution offered by the social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Neri, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes have always fascinated people for the wild beauty of their landscapes and also for the fear that they arouse with their eruptive actions, sometimes simply spectacular, but other times terrifying and catastrophic for human activities. In the past, volcanoes were sometimes imagined as a metaphysical gateway to the otherworld; they have inspired the creation of myths and legends ever since three thousand years ago, also represented by paintings of great artistic impact. Modern technology today offers very sophisticated and readily accessed digital tools, and volcanoes continue to be frequently photographed and highly appreciated natural phenomena. Moreover, in recent years, the spread of social networks (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, etc.) have made the widespread dissemination of graphic contributions even easier. The result is that very active and densely inhabited volcanoes such as Etna, Vesuvius and Aeolian Islands, in Italy, have become among the most photographed subjects in the world, providing a popular science tool with formidable influence and usefulness. The beauty of these landscapes have inspired both professional artists and photographers, as well as amateurs, who compete in the social networks for the publication of the most spectacular, artistic or simply most informative images. The end result of this often frantic popular scientific activity is at least two-fold: on one hand, it provides geoscientists and science communicators a quantity of documentation that is almost impossible to acquire through the normal systems of volcano monitoring, while on the other it raises awareness and respect for the land among the civil community.

  6. Paleomagnetic Study of Azores Archipelago: Volcano-Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. F.; Henry, B.; Marques, F. O.; Madureira, P.; Miranda, J. M. A.; Lourenco, N. V.; Madeira, J.; Hildenbrand, A.; Nunes, J. C.; Roxerová, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic islands are by nature unstable volcanic buildings generally marked by rapid growth that alternates with destruction due to a variety of mass-wasting processes, including giant sector collapses, vertical caldera subsidence, fault generation/propagation, shallow landslides and coastal erosion. Due to its diverse volcanic and tectonic frameworks, the Azores archipelago represents an excellent case study for geophysical and geological proposes. Main results of a paleomagnetic study, conducted on oriented samples from approximately 60 accessible lava piles of three islands of Azores archipelago central group (Faial, Pico and Terceira islands) and covering as much as possible spatially and temporally these islands are: i) The paleomagnetic polarity is in close agreement with the radiometric results known for these islands; ii) Onshore volcanic activity began during the Matuyama geochron for Faial and during Brunhes for Terceira and Pico; iii) The mean ChRMs from Terceira and Pico islands result in a paleomagnetic pole similar to the ones retrieved from the studies of Johnson et al (1998) and Silva et al (2012), from S. Miguel and S. Jorge islands (other islands of Azores archipelago), respectively; iv) ChRMs from Faial show an elliptical distribution perpendicular to the WNW-ESE grabben that is the major structure of the island, suggesting tilting towards SSW of the southern wall and towards NNE of the northern one. The presence of listric faults plunging towards the middle of the grabben and aligned along the N110º azimuth could explain the elliptical distribution of paleomagnetic directions. This study is a contribution for the research project REGENA (PTDC/GEO-FIQ/3648/2012). References Johnson, C.L., Wijbrans, J.R., Constable, C.G., Gee, J., Staudigel, H., Tauxe, L., Forjaz, V.-H., Salgueiro, M., 1998. 40Ar/39Ar ages and paleomagnetism of S. Miguel lavas,Azores, Earth planet. Sci. Lett., 160, 637-649. Silva, PF; Henry, B; Marques, FO; Hildenbrand, A., Madureira, P., Mériaux, C; Kratinová, Z. Palaeomagnetic study of a sub-aerial volcanic ridge (São Jorge Island, Azores) for the past 1.3 Myr: evidence for the Cobb Mountain Subchron, volcano flank instability and tectono-magmatic implications. Geophysical Journal International, 188, 3, 959-978, 2012

  7. Mount Pinatubo, Philippine Islands as seen from STS-59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    View of Mount Pinatubo, Philippine Islands. Subic Bay is at the lower left corner, with the sea at the left and Clark Air Force Base (abandoned after the eruption) is to the lower right of the volcano. A turquoise lake occupies the caldera just below the center of the photograph. Mount Pinatubo erupted in June, 1991 after several hundred years of quiet.

  8. Analysis of shear-wave splitting from volcano-tectonic events at Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, A. F.; Kendall, J. M.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Baptie, B.

    2014-12-01

    Here we investigate seismic anisotropy of the upper crust in the vicinity of Soufrière Hills volcano using shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis from volcano-tectonic (VT) events. Soufrière Hills, which is located on the Island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles, became active in 1995 and has been erupting ever since with 5 major phases of extrusive activity. We use data recored on a network of seismometers between 1996 and 2007 partially spanning three eruptive phases. Shear-wave splitting in the crust is often assumed to be controlled by either by structural features, or by stress aligned cracks. In such a case the polarisation of the fast shear wave (phi) would align parallel to the strike of the structure, or to the maximum compressive stress direction. Previous studies analysing SWS in the region using regional earthquakes observed temporal variations in phi which were interpreted as being caused by stress perturbations associated with pressurisation of a dyke. Our analysis, which uses much shallower sources and thus only samples the anisotropy of the upper few kilometres of the crust, shows no clear temporal variation. However, temporal effects cannot be ruled out, as large fluctuations in the rate of VT events over the course of the study period as well as changes in the seismic network configuration make it difficult to assess. Average delay times of approximately 0.2 seconds, similar in magnitude to that reported for much deeper slab events, suggest that the bulk of the anisotropy is in the shallow crust. We observe clear spatial variations in anisotropy which we believe are consistent with structurally controlled anisotropy resulting from a left-lateral transtensional array of faults which crosses the volcanic complex.

  9. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    E-print Network

    Svensen, Henrik

    When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan A periodicity and cyclicity of these violent events depend on the overpressure generated at depth), dormant/sleeping

  10. Subsidence of Surtsey volcano, 1967-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Jakobsson, S.; Holmjarn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Surtsey marine volcano was built on the southern insular shelf of Iceland, along the seaward extension of the east volcanic zone, during episodic explosive and effusive activity from 1963 to 1967. A 1600-m-long, east-west line of 42 bench marks was established across the island shortly after volcanic activity stopped. From 1967 to 1991 a series of leveling surveys measured the relative elevation of the original bench marks, as well as additional bench marks installed in 1979, 1982 and 1985. Concurrent measurements were made of water levels in a pit dug on the north coast, in a drill hole, and along the coastline exposed to the open ocean. These surveys indicate that the dominant vertical movement of Surtsey is a general subsidence of about 1.1??0.3 m during the 24-year period of observations. The rate of subsidence decreased from 15-20 cm/year for 1967-1968 to 1-2 cm/year in 1991. Greatest subsidence is centered about the eastern vent area. Through 1970, subsidence was locally greatest where the lava plain is thinnest, adjacent to the flanks of the eastern tephra cone. From 1982 onward, the region closest to the hydrothermal zone, which is best developed in the vicinity of the eastern vent, began showing less subsidence relative to the rest of the surveyed bench marks. The general subsidence of the island probably results from compaction of the volcanic material comprising Surtsey, compaction of the sea-floor sediments underlying the island, and possibly downwarping of the lithosphere due to the laod of Surtsey. The more localized early downwarping near the eastern tephra cone is apparently due to greater compaction of tephra relative to lava. The later diminished local subsidence near the hydrothermal zone is probably due to a minor volume increase caused by hydrous alteration of glassy tephra. However, this volume increase is concentrated at depth beneath the bottom of the 176-m-deep cased drillhole. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Canary Islands

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  The Canary Islands     View Larger Image A multi-angle view of the Canary Islands in a dust storm, February 29, 2000. At left is a true-color ... available at JPL February 29, 2000 - Canary Islands during a dust storm. project:  MISR ...

  12. Seismic and gravity signature of the Ischia Island Caldera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, P.; de Matteis, R.; Russo, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Campania (Italy) coasts are characterized by the presence of several volcanoes. The island of Ischia, located at the northwestern end of the Gulf of Naples, belongs to the Neapolitan Volcanic District together with Phlegrean Fields and Vesuvius, having all these Pleistocene volcanoes erupted in historical times, and it is characterized by diffuse hydrothermal phenomena The island represents the emergent part of a more extensive volcanic area developed mainly westward of the island, with underwater volcanoes aligned along regional fault patterns. The activity of Ischia volcano is testified by the occurrence of eruptions in historical times, the presence of intense hydrothermal phenomena, and by seismic activity (e.g. the 1883 Casamicciola earthquake). Ischia is populated by about 50,000 inhabitants increasing, mainly in the summer, due to thriving tourism business, partially due to its active volcanic state. Hazard assessment at active, densely populated volcanoes is critically based on knowledge of the volcanoes past behavior and the definition of its present state. As a contribution to the definition of the present state of the Ischia island volcano, we obtain a model of the shallow crust using geophysical observables through seismic tomography and 3D gravity inversion. In particular we use travel times collected during the Serapis experiment on the island and its surroundings and free air anomaly. A new 3D gravity inversion procedure has been developed to take better into account the shape and the effects of topography approximating it by a triangular mesh. Below each triangle, a sequence of triangular prisms is built, the uppermost prism having the upper face coincident with the triangle following the topography. The inversion is performed searching for a regularized solution using the minimum norm stabilizer. The main results inferable from the 3D seismic and gravity images are the definition of the caldera rims hypothesize by many authors along the perimeter of the island, with a less evidence on the southern part, and the presence of an high velocity/density area inside the caldera that is consistent with the lateral extension of a resurgent block affecting the most recent dynamic of the island

  13. A Volcano Monitoring Seismo-Acoustic Network in the CNMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. E.; Crippen, S. E.; Hayward, C.; Quick, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    In late spring and early summer of 2011, a seismo-acoustic network was installed in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) for volcano monitoring. The network consists of a seismo-acoustic array on Saipan, an acoustic array on Sarigan with one seismometer, and a seismic network on Anatahan. On Saipan the array consists of a central site and 3 embedded triangular arrays with apertures of 100 m, 300 m and 1000 m. Four 50-foot porous hoses in a clover-leaf arrangement are used for spatial filtering at each acoustic site. Broadband seismometers were installed at the central site and the 1000 m sites. The Sarigan Array consists of a central acoustic site with 5 surrounding sites evenly spaced at 50 m radius, and one broadband seismic station. Two hoses were used for each site on Sarigan. Four broadband seismic stations were also installed on Anatahan which last erupted in 2005. Data from each array is sent by radio telemetry to the Emergency Management Office on Saipan, where it is routed to the USGS and SMU. Data will be used for volcano monitoring which will allow the CNMI to resume economic activity in the uninhabited northern islands. Initial data streams show high seismic noise levels as expected for an island installation. The Sarigan acoustic sites are also noisy as a result of being more exposed to wind than the Saipan sites. Many small events have already been observed in the infrasound data. This network was installed through the collaborative efforts of CNMI, USGS and SMU.

  14. 2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  15. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i?the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008....

  16. The Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) Project: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The EC FP7 MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) EC-FP7 Project, which started on June 2013, aims to improve the capacity of the scientific institutions, end users and SME forming the project consortium to assess the volcanic hazards at Italian Supersites, i.e. Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius. The Project activities will focus on the optimisation and integration of ground and space monitoring systems, the breakthrough in understanding of volcanic processes, and on the increase of the effectiveness of the coordination between the scientific and end-user communities in the hazard management. The overall goal of the project is to apply the rationale of the Supersites GEO initiative to Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius, considered as cluster of Supersites. For the purpose MED-SUV will integrate long-term observations of ground-based multidisciplinary data available for these volcanoes, i.e. geophysical, geochemical, and volcanological datasets, with Earth Observation (EO) data. Merging of different parameters over a long period will provide better understanding of the volcanic processes. In particular, given the variety of styles and intensities of the volcanic activity observed at these volcanoes, and which make them sort of archetypes for 'closed conduit ' and 'open conduit' volcanic systems, the combination of different data will allow discrimination between peculiar volcano behaviours associated with pre-, syn- and post-eruptive phases. Indeed, recognition of specific volcano patterns will allow broadening of the spectrum of knowledge of geo-hazards, as well as better parameterisation and modelling of the eruptive phenomena and of the processes occurring in the volcano supply system; thus improving the capability of carrying out volcano surveillance activities. Important impacts on the European industrial sector, arising from a partnership integrating the scientific community and SMEs to implement together new observation/monitoring sensors/systems, are also expected. MED-SUV proposes the development and implementation of a state-of-the-art e-infrastructure for the data integration and sharing and for volcanic risk management life-cycle, from observation to people preparedness. Experiments and studies will be devoted to better understanding of the internal structures and related dynamics of the case study volcanoes, as well as to recognition of signals associated with to impending unrest or eruptive phases. Hazard quantitative assessment will benefit by the outcomes of these studies and by their integration into the cutting edge monitoring approaches, thus leading to a step-change in hazard awareness and preparedness, and leveraging the close relationship between scientists, SMEs, and end-users. The applicability of the project outcomes will be tested on the cluster of Supersite itself during a Pilot phase, as well as on other volcanic systems with similar behaviours like Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island) and Azores.

  17. The Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) Project: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.

    2013-12-01

    The EC FP7 MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) EC-FP7 Project, which started on June 2013, aims to improve the capacity of the scientific institutions, end users and SME forming the project consortium to assess the volcanic hazards at Italian Supersites, i.e. Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius. The Project activities will focus on the optimisation and integration of ground and space monitoring systems, the breakthrough in understanding of volcanic processes, and on the increase of the effectiveness of the coordination between the scientific and end-user communities in the hazard management. The overall goal of the project is to apply the rationale of the Supersites GEO initiative to Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius, considered as cluster of Supersites. For the purpose MED-SUV will integrate long-term observations of ground-based multidisciplinary data available for these volcanoes, i.e. geophysical, geochemical, and volcanological datasets, with Earth Observation (EO) data. Merging of different parameters over a long period will provide better understanding of the volcanic processes. In particular, given the variety of styles and intensities of the volcanic activity observed at these volcanoes, and which make them sort of archetypes for 'closed conduit '; and ';open conduit' volcanic systems, the combination of different data will allow discrimination between pe