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Sample records for voluntary employee turnover

  1. Voluntary Turnover and Women Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Victoria H.

    2008-01-01

    A salient characteristic about the U.S. workforce is the continual process of voluntary employee turnover, which can be problematic for employers who invest a substantial amount of time and money in recruiting and training employees. This paper discusses the effects of workplace policies and practices on the voluntary turnover of women…

  2. Attitudes toward Money, Intrinsic Job Satisfaction, and Voluntary Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Tang, Theresa Li-Na

    A study was conducted to determine whether employees' attitudes toward money (money ethic endorsement) moderates the relationships between intrinsic job satisfaction on the one hand and thoughts of withdrawal and voluntary turnover on the other. Data were collected from workers in the Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation in a…

  3. Retaining your high performers: moderators of the performance-job satisfaction-voluntary turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Two divergent ideas explain the relationship between performance and voluntary turnover. One suggests that higher performing employees, who are rewarded for their superior work product, will desire to remain with an organization that values their performance and will, consequently, be less likely than lower performing employees to voluntarily leave. An alternative idea suggests that higher performing employees, who are more desirable to external companies as a result of their superior work product, will have more external job opportunities and will, consequently, be more likely than their lower performing colleagues to voluntarily leave. The current study evaluated the behaviors and attitudes of 12,545 insurance employees over a 3-year period to examine how these 2 divergent expectations influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship. Results show that both pay growth and the relevant unemployment rate interact with performance to influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship and that they work independently of employee job satisfaction influences. PMID:20476825

  4. The right friends in the right places: Understanding network structure as a predictor of voluntary turnover.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Gary A; Cross, Rob; Holtom, Brooks C

    2016-04-01

    Research examining the relationship between social networks and employee retention has focused almost exclusively on the number of direct links and generally found that having more ties decreases the likelihood of turnover. The present research moves beyond simple measures of network centrality to investigate the relationship between 2 additional, and theoretically distinct, facets of social capital and voluntary turnover. In 2 organizations, we found consistent evidence of a negative relationship between reputation, as measured by relationships with highly sought-out others (incoming eigenvector centrality) and voluntary turnover. Further, we found that the negative relationship between brokerage (structural holes) and turnover is significant, but only for higher-level employees. The theoretical and practical implications of expanding the suite of social capital measures to understand voluntary turnover are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26595755

  5. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  6. Predicting Employee Turnover from Communication Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas H.; Barnett, George A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates three social network models of employee turnover: a structural equivalence model, a social influence model, and an erosion model. Administers a communication network questionnaire to all 170 employees of an organization. Finds support for all three models of turnover, with the erosion model explaining more of the variance than do the…

  7. Using Absenteeism and Performance To Predict Employee Turnover: Early Detection through Company Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Paula C.; McElroy, James C.; Laczniak, Kathleen S.; Fenton, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Results of a comparison of 113 insurance company employees who left voluntarily with 113 who stayed supported a relationship between absenteeism, performance ratings, and voluntary turnover. There was no significant interaction effect. (SK)

  8. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  9. Employee Turnover: An Empirical and Methodological Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchinsky, Paul M.; Tuttle, Mark L.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews research on the prediction of employee turnover. Groups predictor variables into five general categories: attitudinal (job satisfaction), biodata, work-related, personal, and test-score predictors. Consistent relationships between common predictor variables and turnover were found for four categories. Eight methodological problems/issues…

  10. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  11. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  12. Occupational stress and employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Robert S; Day, Andrea J; Morton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaire data captured in January-March 2007 were examined in relation to turnover in males and females during the next five years. In general, most of the workplace stressors (such as role conflict or peer support) were not antecedents of turnover in any group. Junior personnel with psychological strain in 2007 had an increased risk of turnover in the next five years. Low commitment to the service in 2007 increased the odds of turnover in male and female juniors and in female officers. Female juniors with less effective skills for coping with stress and who exercised less frequently on a weekly basis were more likely to leave. An incidental finding was that the odds of turnover were three times greater in female officers with children than in female officers with no children. Stress management interventions focusing on effective coping and sports and exercise participation which are targeted appropriately may improve retention. PMID:24047248

  13. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  14. Developmental Climate: A Cross-level Analysis of Voluntary Turnover and Job Performance.

    PubMed

    Spell, Hannah B; Eby, Lillian T; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    This research investigates the influence of shared perceptions of developmental climate on individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment, engagement, and perceived competence, and whether these attitudes mediate the relationship between developmental climate and both individual voluntary turnover and supervisor-rated job performance. Survey data were collected from 361 intact employee-supervisory mentoring dyads and matched with employee turnover data collected one year later to test the proposed framework using multilevel modeling techniques. As expected, shared perceptions of developmental climate were significantly and positively related to all three individual work attitudes. In addition, both organizational commitment and perceived competence were significant mediators of the positive relationship between shared perceptions of developmental climate and voluntary turnover, as well as shared perceptions of developmental climate and supervisor-rated job performance. By contrast, no significant mediating effects were found for engagement. Theoretical implications, limitations, and future research are discussed. PMID:24748681

  15. Developmental Climate: A Cross-level Analysis of Voluntary Turnover and Job Performance

    PubMed Central

    Spell, Hannah B.; Eby, Lillian T.; Vandenberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the influence of shared perceptions of developmental climate on individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment, engagement, and perceived competence, and whether these attitudes mediate the relationship between developmental climate and both individual voluntary turnover and supervisor-rated job performance. Survey data were collected from 361 intact employee-supervisory mentoring dyads and matched with employee turnover data collected one year later to test the proposed framework using multilevel modeling techniques. As expected, shared perceptions of developmental climate were significantly and positively related to all three individual work attitudes. In addition, both organizational commitment and perceived competence were significant mediators of the positive relationship between shared perceptions of developmental climate and voluntary turnover, as well as shared perceptions of developmental climate and supervisor-rated job performance. By contrast, no significant mediating effects were found for engagement. Theoretical implications, limitations, and future research are discussed. PMID:24748681

  16. Does a Corresponding Set of Variables for Explaining Voluntary Organizational Turnover Transfer to Explaining Voluntary Occupational Turnover?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed and tested corresponding sets of variables for explaining voluntary organizational versus occupational turnover for a sample of medical technologists. This study is believed to be the first test of the Rhodes and Doering (1983) occupational change model using occupational turnover data. Results showed that corresponding job…

  17. Cusp catastrophe model of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, J E; Abelson, M A

    1983-09-01

    A cusp catastrophe model is developed to explain job turnover of nursing employees. The temporal dynamics of the catastrophe model suggest that leavers experience lower organization commitment than do stayers prior to termination. Leavers' perceptions of job tension and commitment appear to cross the threshold levels prior to the termination dates. PMID:10262614

  18. A Ministudy of employee turnover in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric P; Collins, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    A ministudy was conducted to collect self-reported employee turnover rates in US hospitals. The results indicate many hospitals are struggling with high employee turnover rates. Widespread variances in ratings were observed across hospitals, which may be due to lack of consistency in how they each calculate their employee turnover. This makes benchmarking for the purposes of performance improvement challenging. PMID:25627851

  19. Employee Turnover among Full-time Public Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A study of employee turnover in 31 public libraries in the American Midwest established baseline turnover rates and examined the relationship of gender to turnover behavior. Findings showed that: turnover rates are low compared to other occupations; and turnover rates of males and females are similar. (28 references) (Author/MES)

  20. Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size.

    PubMed

    Hausknecht, John P; Trevor, Charlie O; Howard, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Despite substantial growth in the service industry and emerging work on turnover consequences, little research examines how unit-level turnover rates affect essential customer-related outcomes. The authors propose an operational disruption framework to explain why voluntary turnover impairs customers' service quality perceptions. On the basis of a sample of 75 work units and data from 5,631 employee surveys, 59,602 customer surveys, and organizational records, results indicate that unit-level voluntary turnover rates are negatively related to service quality perceptions. The authors also examine potential boundary conditions related to the disruption framework. Of 3 moderators studied (group cohesiveness, group size, and newcomer concentration), results show that turnover's negative effects on service quality are more pronounced in larger units and in those with a greater concentration of newcomers. PMID:19594245

  1. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line. PMID:21808181

  2. Employee Turnover in the Federal Government. A Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musell, R. Mark

    A study of employee turnover in the Federal government showed that in 1984, about 195,000 full-time, nonpostal Federal workers with permanent appointments left Federal jobs or transferred to other Federal agencies--representing a turnover rate of 11.5 percent. The turnover was about three percentage points higher for white-collar workers than for…

  3. Dynamic aspects of voluntary turnover: an integrated approach to curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Becker, William J; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a downward performance change may increase the likelihood of organizational separation. Drawing on decision theory, we propose and test an integrative framework. This approach incorporates both of these earlier models. Specifically, we argue that individuals are most likely to voluntarily exit when they are below-average performers who are also experiencing a downward performance change. Furthermore, the interaction between this downward change and performance partially accounts for the curvilinear relationship proposed by the push-pull model. Findings from a longitudinal field study supported this integrative theory. PMID:20853945

  4. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  5. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organization. Methods: A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results: Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion: This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover. PMID:24596835

  6. A model of voluntary turnover among hospital CEOs.

    PubMed

    Weil, P A; Kimball, P A

    1995-01-01

    This study examines factors contributing to hospital CEOs' voluntary decisions to leave their positions in 1990. Using a longitudinal design, we contrast 49 leavers with 1,362 stayers. We view turnover as influenced by both "push" factors that promote leaving (dissatisfaction with the position) and "hump" factors that need to be overcome (the cost of job change). Push factors giving rise to dissatisfaction include lower compensation, the predecessor's termination, and value incongruity between the CEO and the hospital. Testing the impact of key variables from Fiedler's contingency theory of leadership, we show that task-oriented leaders are relatively less satisfied when compared with relationship-oriented leaders. CEOs also express less satisfaction in low-situational control settings, a measure heavily influenced by perceived inadequate support from medical staff and subordinates. "Hump" factors that deterred leaving included family-related obstacles such as spouse's work or children's school, features mentioned most often by younger CEOs. The study suggests that boards should structure competitively paid positions with opportunities to generate support from the medical staff and subordinates. Recruiters for CEO positions are apprised of the importance of nonwork features in CEOs' willingness to consider new positions. PMID:10144896

  7. Turnover intentions and voluntary turnover: the moderating roles of self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion.

    PubMed

    Allen, David G; Weeks, Kelly P; Moffitt, Karen R

    2005-09-01

    This article explores moderators of the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover behavior to better explain why some employees translate intentions into behavior and other employees do not. Individual differences in self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion were examined. Results indicate that self-monitoring and risk aversion moderate the intentions-turnover link. Specifically, the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover is stronger for low self-monitors and those lower in risk aversion. Locus of control moderated the relationship in 1 of 2 samples such that the relationship was stronger for those with an internal locus of control. Proactive personality, however, did not directly moderate the relationship between intentions and turnover behaviors. PMID:16162070

  8. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  9. Some Determinants of Employee Turnover in a Psychiatric Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zautra, Alex J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Used research from illness-prevention and job-enrichment approaches to enhancing quality of work environments to create instruments assessing number of job stressors and level of task interest on psychiatric hospital units. Instruments successfully predicted employee turnover during one year. Job stress and interaction between job stress and task…

  10. Employees' views on outsourcing and its impact on employee turnover: A phenomenological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybelinski, Steven A.

    Increasing use of outsourcing gives employees concern about personal job security. Using a modified van Kaam approach, this qualitative phenomenological study examined perceptions and experiences of 12 employees' on the influence outsourcing had on employee turnover. Five themes describing employee perceptions emerged: (a) preparation---education gives job security, (b) plausibility---all believed job loss plausible, (c) emotional influence---feelings of stress, threat, betrayal, and not being valued, (d) environment---value of communication and interaction with leaders, and (e) confidence---gained from increased education, skills, and knowledge protected from outsourcing. Significance of this study to leadership is the identification of employee perceptions of outsourcing and motivating factors influencing employee turnover during times of outsourcing. Findings might present new information and assist leaders with employee retention concerns for future outsourcing activities.

  11. Reviewing Employee Turnover: Focusing on Proximal Withdrawal States and an Expanded Criterion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Peter W.; Mitchell, Terence R.; Lee, Thomas W.; Griffeth, Rodger W.

    2012-01-01

    We reconceptualize employee turnover to promote researchers' understanding and prediction of why employees quit or stay in employing institutions. A literature review identifies shortcomings with prevailing turnover dimensions. In response, we expand the conceptual domain of the turnover criterion to include multiple types of turnover (notably,…

  12. Employee turnover in community mental health organization: a developmental stages study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dror, R

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reasons for employee turnover in community mental-health residential services, and to determine the relationship of workers' developmental stage to those reasons. Three types of variables were collected in the study: 1) Demographics, including tenure and income; 2) Workers' ratings of their effectiveness, satisfaction, desired responsibility, expectancy of leaving the organization, morale, and competence; 3) Workers' ranking of the most important turnover factors for them, at the time of the study. Other personnel data was compiled by the organization for the use of this study. Significant findings were found in all interest areas of this study. The studied organization reached 50% yearly voluntary turnover, and 72% separation rate for the same year. Workers' stages of development found to have significant relationships with the choices workers would make in their selection of turnover factors. Workers in higher stages of development tended to choose "higher order" turnover factors like rewards and organizational factors. Nevertheless, the most significant factor in a decision to leave a CMH organization was low pay. PMID:8045091

  13. The Effects of Autonomy and Empowerment on Employee Turnover: Test of a Multilevel Model in Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Lei; Lee, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Extending research on voluntary turnover in the team setting, this study adopts a multilevel self-determination theoretical approach to examine the unique roles of individual and social-contextual motivational precursors, autonomy orientation and autonomy support, in reducing team member voluntary turnover. Analysis of multilevel time-lagged data…

  14. 19 CFR 200.735-114c - Voluntary submission by employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary submission by employees. 200.735-114c Section 200.735-114c Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES... Voluntary submission by employees. Any employee not required to submit a statement of employment...

  15. The relationship between South Korean clinical nurses' attitudes toward organizations and voluntary turnover intention: A path analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Kyung; Chang, Sun Ju

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between attitudes toward their organizations and voluntary turnover intention among South Korean clinical nurses. Data from a total of 312 clinical nurses in six hospitals in South Korea were collected for the study. Both hierarchical multiple regression analysis and path analysis were used to analyse the data. The overall fit of the hypothetical model was good. Voluntary turnover intention was found to have significant direct pathways to job embeddedness and organizational commitment. Organizational commitment and satisfaction with organizational rewards had indirect pathways to voluntary turnover intention through job embeddedness. All variances explained 62.3% of the voluntary turnover intention scores. The findings suggest that greater job embeddedness, organizational commitment and satisfaction with organizational rewards lead to lower voluntary turnover intention among clinical nurses in South Korea. PMID:24666586

  16. 5 CFR 576.103 - Offering Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments to employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Offering Voluntary Separation Incentive... CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS VOLUNTARY SEPARATION INCENTIVE PAYMENTS Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments § 576.103 Offering Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments to employees. (a) Agencies may...

  17. 5 CFR 576.103 - Offering Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments to employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Offering Voluntary Separation Incentive... CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS VOLUNTARY SEPARATION INCENTIVE PAYMENTS Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments § 576.103 Offering Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments to employees. (a) Agencies may...

  18. Intraorganizational Career Advancement and Voluntary Turnover in a Multinational Bank in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Xueguang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate how various aspects of intraorganizational career advancement--current career attainments, recent pace of upward mobility, and future prospect of career advancement--affect voluntary turnover, drawing empirical evidence from a multinational corporation (MNC) in Taiwan's cultural and labor market environment.…

  19. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-4 - Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations; inurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations... Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations; inurement. (a) General rule. No part of the net earnings of an employees' association may inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual...

  20. Development of a global measure of job embeddedness and integration into a traditional model of voluntary turnover.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Craig D; Bennett, Rebecca J; Jex, Steve M; Burnfield, Jennifer L

    2007-07-01

    Recent research on job embeddedness has found that both on- and off-the-job forces can act to bind people to their jobs. The present study extended this line of research by examining how job embeddedness may be integrated into a traditional model of voluntary turnover. This study also developed and tested a global, reflective measure of job embeddedness that overcomes important limitations and serves as a companion to the original composite measure. Results of this longitudinal study found that job embeddedness predicted voluntary turnover beyond job attitudes and core variables from traditional models of turnover. Results also found that job embeddedness interacted with job satisfaction to predict voluntary turnover, suggesting that the job embeddedness construct extends beyond the unfolding model of turnover (T. R. Mitchell & T. W. Lee, 2001) it originated from. PMID:17638463

  1. Toward a Theoretical Model of Employee Turnover: A Human Resource Development Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.

    2004-01-01

    This article sets forth the Organizational Model of Employee Persistence, influenced by traditional turnover models and a student attrition model. The model was developed to clarify the impact of organizational practices on employee turnover from a human resource development (HRD) perspective and provide a theoretical foundation for research on…

  2. The effect of the social organization of work on the voluntary turnover rate of hospital nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Nuchols, B A

    1992-06-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, voluntary turnover among hospital nurses in the United States has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that the social organization of work in hospitals is an important determinant of the voluntary turnover rate among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualized at the organizational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 435 hospitals. Results suggest that organizational characteristics and environmental conditions are important contributors to turnover. Organizational characteristics are stronger predictors of turnover than are economic factors. PMID:1529379

  3. Computer-Aided Monitoring: Its Influence on Employee Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalykoff, John; Kochan, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    Developed model for examining impact of computer-aided monitoring on employee-level job satisfaction and turnover propensity. Results from 740 employees showed that, for some employees, negative effects of monitoring were inherent; for others, its negative impact could be mitigated by attention to feedback/performance appraisal processes.…

  4. Constituent attachment and voluntary turnover in low-wage/low-skill service work.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Jill E; Tews, Michael J; Dachner, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on life stage theory, ethnographic research conducted in the service sector, and evidence for secondary segmentation within the low-wage/low-skill labor force to offer evidence that social bond development with coworkers can help reduce the high rate of turnover observed in low-wage/low-skill service work. Contrary to the belief that these employees will leave before social ties can develop, constituent attachment was found to be the only significant predictor of turnover in 2 samples of front-line service workers in a casual dining, national restaurant chain after controlling for other aspects of work that can create a sense of attachment to a job, and other job attitudes, such as satisfaction and commitment. However, the effect was dependent on developmental life stage. Constituent attachment reduced turnover among workers classified as emerging adults, whereas constituent attachment did little to affect turnover among nonemerging adults. Implications of the results are discussed with respect to the value of considering segmentation in future research on turnover in the service sector and the use of life stage theory for understanding the leaving behavior of workers in different stages of adulthood. PMID:26121092

  5. 78 FR 57818 - Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities. 54 FR 6646 (Feb. 14, 1989). In 2006, the Commission amended several provisions of part 1031. 71 FR 38754 (July 10, 2006). Among other things, the 2006... the development of voluntary standards (43 FR 19216 (May 4, 1978)). Acknowledging the...

  6. A Study on the Employee Turnover Antecedents in ITES/BPO Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sree Rekha, K. R.; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at testing a conceptual model connecting variables of the internal and external work environment to ITES/BPO employee turnover. Based on the gaps identified from the literature that no single model explains in a comprehensive way as to why, people choose to leave and the lack of turnover studies on call centers located in India.…

  7. A retrospective analysis of employee turnover in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Bednar, B; McMullen, N

    1998-02-01

    Significant factors implicated in staff turnover include: variables in organizational structure; employee characteristics; needs and values, and the nature of tasks performed. This article will present the causative factors related to turnover and the conceptual models of the motivational theorists Maslow, Herzberg, Adams, and Mobley. No quantitative or qualitative research could be found on the potential causes of turnover in freestanding dialysis clinics. The staff turnover of a for-profit dialysis company for a 12 month period will be reported by job title, tenure, and level of job satisfaction. PMID:9526369

  8. Employee voice and employee retention.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D G

    1986-09-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the extent to which employees have opportunities to voice dissatisfaction and voluntary turnover in 111 short-term, general care hospitals. Results show that, whether or not a union is present, high numbers of mechanisms for employee voice are associated with high retention rates. Implications for theory and research as well as management practice are discussed. PMID:10278801

  9. Comparing the Effects of Determinants of Turnover Intentions between Taiwanese and U.S. Hospital Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Cherng G.; Lin, Chieh-Peng

    2006-01-01

    This research assesses how the direct effects of career satisfaction and job satisfaction on turnover intentions and the indirect effects through organizational commitment differ between Taiwanese and U.S. hospital employees. Using data collected from 179 Taiwanese and 144 U.S. hospital employees, the test results find the following differences:…

  10. The relationship between perceptions of organizational functioning and voluntary counselor turnover: a four-wave longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Eby, Lillian T; Rothrauff-Laschober, Tanja C

    2012-03-01

    Using data from a nationwide study, we annually track a cohort of 598 substance use disorder counselors over a four-wave period to (a) document the cumulative rates of voluntary turnover and (b) examine how counselor perceptions of the organizational environment (procedural justice, distributive justice, perceived organizational support, and job satisfaction) and clinical supervisor leadership effectiveness (relationship quality, in-role performance, extra-role performance) predict voluntary turnover over time. Survey data were collected from counselors in Year 1, and actual turnover data were collected from organizational records in Years 2, 3, and 4. Findings reveal that 25% of the original counselors turned over by Year 2, 39% by Year 3, and 47% by Year 4. Counselors with more favorable perceptions of the organizational environment are between 13.8% and 22.8% less likely to turn over than those with less favorable perceptions. None of the leadership effectiveness variables are significant. PMID:22116013

  11. The relationship between perceptions of organizational functioning and voluntary counselor turnover: A four-wave longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Lillian T.; Rothrauff-Laschober, Tanja C.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from a nationwide study, we annually track a cohort of 598 substance use disorder counselors over a 4-wave period to (1) document the cumulative rates of voluntary turnover and (2) examine how counselor perceptions of the organizational environment (procedural justice, distributive justice, perceived organizational support, job satisfaction) and clinical supervisor leadership effectiveness (relationship quality, in-role performance, extra-role performance) predict voluntary turnover over time. Survey data were collected from counselors in year 1 and actual turnover data were collected from organizational records in year 2, 3, and 4. Findings reveal that 25% of the original counselors turned over by year 2, 39% by year 3, and 47% by year 4. Counselors with more favorable perceptions of the organizational environment are between 13.8% – 22.8% less likely to turn over than those with less favorable perceptions. None of the leadership effectiveness variables are significant. PMID:22116013

  12. A study of the relationship between job satisfaction, organizational commitment and turnover intention among hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad; Ferlie, Ewan; Rosenberg, Duska

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, co-relational and cross-sectional study was to gain a better understanding of the relationships between job satisfaction and organizational commitment of employees, and their impact on turnover intention at Isfahan Hospitals, Isfahan, Iran, in 2005. Data were collected by the distribution of two questionnaires among 629 employees of these hospitals through a stratified random sampling method. The results of the paper indicate that hospital employees are moderately satisfied with their jobs and committed to their organization. Employees' job satisfaction and organizational commitment were closely inter-related and correlated with turnover intention (P < 0.001). The positive correlation between the two was expected, but there was also unexpected correlation with turnover intention. This may be due to external factors, such as job market conditions, which may influence perceived opportunities for career advancement elsewhere. The impact of such external factors is outside the scope of this study, but will have to be investigated in further research. As job satisfaction and organizational commitment have strong correlation with turnover, it is very important to reinforce them by applying the right human resource policies. PMID:18957399

  13. The Impact of Employee Engagement Factors and Job Satisfaction on Turnover Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Mary Lynn; Morris, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The current literature review examined a proposed relationship between the antecedent-employee engagement factors--and the outcome variable turnover intent mediated by job satisfaction. Kahn's Personal Engagement Theory, Equity Theory, and Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory of Job Satisfaction were used as the theoretical underpinnings for the review.…

  14. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Brody; Gilbert, Jessica M.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2016-01-01

    Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional) was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention. PMID:27199817

  15. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees.

    PubMed

    Heritage, Brody; Gilbert, Jessica M; Roberts, Lynne D

    2016-01-01

    Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional) was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention. PMID:27199817

  16. Do Employees Leave Just Because They Can? Examining the Perceived Employability-Turnover Intentions Relationship.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Yalcin; Sumer, H Canan; Sumer, Nebi

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between perceived employability and turnover intentions seems much more complicated than what the common sense would suggest. Based on the reviewed literature, it was expected that job satisfaction, affective commitment, and perceived job security would moderate this relationship. Using a sample of working individuals from different occupations and sectors (N = 721), it was found that employees who perceived themselves as highly employable were more likely to have turnover intentions when their affective commitment was low and perceived job security was high; and the relationship was negative for employees with shorter tenures. Understanding the conditions under which perceived employability is associated with turnover intentions may help organizations design human resource policies that allow them to retain an educated and competent workforce. PMID:27043746

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-2 - Membership in a voluntary employees' beneficiary association; employees; voluntary association of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... agreements (with respect to benefits provided by reason of such agreement(s)), to membership in a labor union, or to membership in one or more locals of a national or international labor union. For example.... Employees of a labor union also will be considered to share an employment-related common bond with...

  18. Team climate, intention to leave and turnover among hospital employees: Prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kivimäki, Mika; Vanhala, Anna; Pentti, Jaana; Länsisalmi, Hannakaisa; Virtanen, Marianna; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi

    2007-01-01

    Background In hospitals, the costs of employee turnover are substantial and intentions to leave among staff may manifest as lowered performance. We examined whether team climate, as indicated by clear and shared goals, participation, task orientation and support for innovation, predicts intention to leave the job and actual turnover among hospital employees. Methods Prospective study with baseline and follow-up surveys (2–4 years apart). The participants were 6,441 (785 men, 5,656 women) hospital employees under the age of 55 at the time of follow-up survey. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used as an analysis method to include both individual and work unit level predictors in the models. Results Among stayers with no intention to leave at baseline, lower self-reported team climate predicted higher likelihood of having intentions to leave at follow-up (odds ratio per 1 standard deviation decrease in team climate was 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.4–1.8). Lower co-worker assessed team climate at follow-up was also association with such intentions (odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.4–2.4). Among all participants, the likelihood of actually quitting the job was higher for those with poor self-reported team climate at baseline. This association disappeared after adjustment for intention to leave at baseline suggesting that such intentions may explain the greater turnover rate among employees with low team climate. Conclusion Improving team climate may reduce intentions to leave and turnover among hospital employees. PMID:17956609

  19. A study of relationship between job stress, quality of working life and turnover intention among hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad; Ferlie, Ewan; Rosenberg, Duska

    2011-11-01

    Job stress is a serious threat to the quality of working life (QWL) of health-care employees and can cause hostility, aggression, absenteeism and turnover, as well as reduced productivity. In addition, job stress among employees affects the quality of health-care services. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the relationships between job stress and QWL of employees, and their impact on turnover intention at Isfahan hospitals, Iran. The study employed a cross-sectional research design. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from hospital employees. Overall, 26% of employees graded their job stress high. The major sources of stress were inadequate pay, inequality at work, too much work, staff shortage, lack of recognition and promotion prospects, time pressure, lack of job security and lack of management support. An inverse relationship was found between job stress and QWL among hospital employees. The most important predictor of QWL was disturbance handling, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. Finally, while QWL was negatively associated with turnover intentions, job stress was positively related to employees' intention to quit. Since job stress has a strong correlation with employee QWL and turnover intention, it is very important to apply the right human resources policies to increase employees' QWL and decrease subsequent turnover. This study invites further research to explore, implement and evaluate intervention strategies for prevention of occupational stress and improvement in QWL. PMID:22040944

  20. 41 CFR 301-70.703 - If we grant an exemption, does that prevent the employee from using the card on a voluntary basis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., does that prevent the employee from using the card on a voluntary basis? 301-70.703 Section 301-70.703...-70.703 If we grant an exemption, does that prevent the employee from using the card on a voluntary basis? No, an exemption from use would not prevent the employee from using the Government...

  1. Turnover Intentions of Employees With Informal Eldercare Responsibilities: The Role of Core Self-Evaluations and Supervisor Support.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Claire E; Parker, Stacey L; Zacher, Hannes; Jimmieson, Nerina L

    2015-12-01

    As longevity increases, so does the need for care of older relatives by working family members. This research examined the interactive effect of core self-evaluations and supervisor support on turnover intentions in two samples of employees with informal caregiving responsibilities. Data were obtained from 57 employees from Australia (Study 1) and 66 employees from the United States and India (Study 2). Results of Study 1 revealed a resource compensation effect, that is, an inverse relationship between core self-evaluations and turnover intentions when supervisor care support was low. Results of Study 2 extended these findings by demonstrating resource boosting effects. Specifically, there was an inverse relationship between core self-evaluations and subsequent turnover intentions for those with high supervisor work and care support. In addition, employees' satisfaction and emotional exhaustion from their work mediated the inverse relationship between core self-evaluations and subsequent turnover intentions when supervisor work support and care support were high. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of employee- and supervisor-focused intervention strategies in organizations to support informal caregivers. PMID:26738996

  2. Relations of job characteristics from multiple data sources with employee affect, absence, turnover intentions, and health.

    PubMed

    Spector, P E; Jex, S M

    1991-02-01

    Much of the evidence in support of job characteristics theory is limited to incumbent reports of job characteristics. In this study, job characteristics data from three independent sources--incumbents, ratings from job descriptions, and the Dictionary of Occupational Titles--were used. Convergent validities of incumbent reports with other sources were quite modest. Although incumbent reports of job characteristics correlated significantly with several employee outcomes (job satisfaction, work frustration, anxiety on the job, turnover intentions, and number of doctor visits), the other sources showed few significant correlations, except for number of doctor visits. Caution is urged in the use of incumbent self-reports of job characteristics as indicators of actual work environments. New methods for studying job characteristics are suggested. PMID:2016216

  3. 5 CFR 317.303 - Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conversion to the Senior Executive Service. 317.303 Section 317.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT IN THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.303 Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the...

  4. 5 CFR 317.303 - Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... conversion to the Senior Executive Service. 317.303 Section 317.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT IN THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.303 Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the...

  5. 5 CFR 317.303 - Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conversion to the Senior Executive Service. 317.303 Section 317.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT IN THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.303 Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the...

  6. 5 CFR 317.303 - Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conversion to the Senior Executive Service. 317.303 Section 317.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT IN THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.303 Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the...

  7. 5 CFR 317.303 - Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conversion to the Senior Executive Service. 317.303 Section 317.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT IN THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.303 Status of employees who decline voluntary conversion to the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-3 - Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations; life, sick, accident, or other benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... severance pay plan within the meaning of 29 CFR 2510.3-2(b)) and education or training benefits or courses...; life, sick, accident, or other benefits. 1.501(c)(9)-3 Section 1.501(c)(9)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(9)-3 Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations; life, sick,...

  9. Is a leveraged ESOP (employee stock ownership plan) a possibility for the voluntary hospital?

    PubMed

    Cleverley, W O

    1988-01-01

    One of the biggest news stories to hit the health care industry last year was the leveraged Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) sale of 104 Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) hospitals to a newly formed company, Health Trust, Inc. (HTI). Much skepticism regarding the benefits of this transaction was raised. To many individuals, HCA was the primary, if not exclusive, beneficiary. The management and employees of HTI were viewed by many as being "left out to dry." These initial opinions were almost always based on a total ignorance of the substantial benefits--primarily but not exclusively tax benefits--that are available in an ESOP transaction. My awareness of these benefits comes through my limited involvement as a consultant to the agent bank in the HCA-HTI transaction. This article will acquaint health care executives with the basic features and benefits of an ESOP alternative. EOPSs are a viable alternative for both voluntary and investor-owned health care firms. PMID:10288640

  10. The implications of linking the dynamic performance and turnover literatures.

    PubMed

    Sturman, M C; Trevor, C O

    2001-08-01

    This article examines how the literatures of dynamic performance and the performance-turnover relationship inform each other. The nonrandom performance turnover relationship suggests that dynamic performance studies may be biased by their elimination of participants who do not remain for the entire study period. The authors demonstrated that the performance slopes of those who leave an organization differ from the performance slopes of those who remain. This finding suggests that studies of the performance-turnover relationship need to consider employee performance trends when predicting turnover. Replicating and extending the research of D. A. Harrison, M. Virick, and S. William (1996), the authors found that performance changes from the previous month and performance trends measured over a longer time period explained variance in voluntary turnover beyond current performance. Finally, the authors showed that performance trends interacted with current performance in the prediction of voluntary turnover. PMID:11519652

  11. A concept analysis of turnover intention: implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Takase, Miyuki

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review and concept analysis of turnover intention. The aim was to promote Nurse Managers' understanding of the meanings and mechanisms of turnover intention, which could help them counteract nurse turnover. Sixty-six papers published between January 1998 and August 2007 were collected from CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases, and were subjected to Rogers' concept analysis. The results showed that turnover intention is a multi-stage process involving the voluntary departure of employees from their current position, and is triggered by negative psychological responses to internal/external job context. These psychological responses evolve into withdrawal cognition and behaviours, and lead to actual turnover. To prevent nurse turnover, Nurse Managers should closely observe the internal and external causes of turnover, and the stage of nurses' turnover intention. PMID:20394269

  12. 41 CFR 60-741.46 - Voluntary affirmative action programs for employees with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certain disabilities such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) or developmental disabilities and utilizing... voluntary training and development programs should not result in discrimination against other groups and...

  13. A catastrophe model of employee withdrawal leading to low job performance, high absenteeism, and job turnover during the first year of employment.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, J E

    1985-03-01

    A catastrophe model of employee withdrawal indicates that declining job performance, absenteeism, and turnover are discontinuous behavioral outcomes of the same withdrawal phenomenon arising from varying levels of job tension and group cohesion. The advantages of using catastrophe models to describe the temporal changes in employee withdrawal over a relatively short time period are discussed. PMID:10270900

  14. Investigation of perceived environment, perceived outcome, and person variables in relationship to voluntary development activity by employees.

    PubMed

    Maurer, T J; Tarulli, B A

    1994-02-01

    The authors examined perceived environment, perceived incentive and outcome, and person constructs for relationships with interest and participation in voluntary learning and development activity by nonmanagement employees. All 3 groups of constructs were related to development activity. In relationships with development activity, perceived outcome and environment variables interacted with workers' personal values relevant to aspects of a development setting, illustrating the potentially important role that differences in values may play in a development setting, illustrating the potentially important role that differences in values may play in a development context. Additionally, small relationships were observed between several demographic variables and values within a development setting. Results provide implications for the design and implementation of successful development programs and highlight the need to carefully consider individual differences in this context when targeting many different types of employees for participation. PMID:8200872

  15. Beyond safety outcomes: An investigation of the impact of safety climate on job satisfaction, employee engagement and turnover using social exchange theory as the theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Lee, Jin; McFadden, Anna C; Murphy, Lauren A; Robertson, Michelle M; Cheung, Janelle H; Zohar, Dov

    2016-07-01

    Safety climate, a measure of the degree to which safety is perceived by employees to be a priority in their company, is often implicated as a key factor in the promotion of injury-reducing behavior and safe work environments. Using social exchange theory as a theoretical basis, this study hypothesized that safety climate would be related to employees' job satisfaction, engagement, and turnover rate, highlighting the beneficial effects of safety climate beyond typical safety outcomes. Survey data were collected from 6207 truck drivers from two U.S. trucking companies. The objective turnover rate was collected one year after the survey data collection. Results showed that employees' safety climate perceptions were linked to employees' level of job satisfaction, engagement, and objective turnover rate, thus supporting the application of social exchange theory. Job satisfaction was also a significant mediator between safety climate and the two human resource outcomes (i.e., employee engagement and turnover rate). This study is among the first to assess the impact of safety climate beyond safety outcomes among lone workers (using truck drivers as an exemplar). PMID:26611987

  16. The Recognition and Reward of Employee Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, John

    A study compared different firms' methods of recognizing and rewarding employee performance and examined the impact of such recognition and reward on such factors as involuntary and voluntary labor turnover and worker productivity. Data from a survey of 3,412 employers that was sponsored by the National Institute of Education and the National…

  17. 41 CFR 301-70.703 - If we grant an exemption, does that prevent the employee from using the card on a voluntary basis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false If we grant an exemption, does that prevent the employee from using the card on a voluntary basis? 301-70.703 Section 301-70.703 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  18. Stereotype threat among older employees: relationship with job attitudes and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, Courtney; Kalokerinos, Elise K; Henry, Julie D

    2013-03-01

    Stereotype threat, or the belief that one may be the target of demeaning stereotypes, leads to acute performance decrements and reduced psychological well-being. The current research examined stereotype threat among older employees, a group that is the target of many negative stereotypes. Study 1 surveyed older workers in two different organizations regarding their experiences of stereotype threat, their job attitudes and work mental health, and their intentions to resign or retire. Across both samples, feelings of stereotype threat were related to more negative job attitudes and poorer work mental health. In turn, these negative job attitudes were associated with intentions to resign and (possibly) retire. In Study 2, younger and older employees were surveyed. The results indicated that only for older employees were feelings of stereotype threat negatively related to job attitudes, work mental health, and intentions to resign. The implications of these findings for understanding job attitudes and intentions among older workers are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22924658

  19. Causes and consequences of collective turnover: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Heavey, Angela L; Holwerda, Jacob A; Hausknecht, John P

    2013-05-01

    Given growing interest in collective turnover (i.e., employee turnover at unit and organizational levels), the authors propose an organizing framework for its antecedents and consequences and test it using meta-analysis. Based on analysis of 694 effect sizes drawn from 82 studies, results generally support expected relationships across the 6 categories of collective turnover antecedents, with somewhat stronger and more consistent results for 2 categories: human resource management inducements/investments and job embeddedness signals. Turnover was negatively related to numerous performance outcomes, more strongly so for proximal rather than distal outcomes. Several theoretically grounded moderators help to explain average effect-size heterogeneity for both antecedents and consequences of turnover. Relationships generally did not vary according to turnover type (e.g., total or voluntary), although the relative absence of collective-level involuntary turnover studies is noted and remains an important avenue for future research. PMID:23668597

  20. Modeling Turnover Intentions and Their Antecedents Using the Locus of Control as a Moderator: A Case of Customer Service Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Chou-Kang; Lin, Chieh-Peng; Tsai, Yuan Hui; Hsiao, Ching-Yun

    2005-01-01

    The psychological model of organizational commitment (OC) has been extensively investigated in U.S. workers (Near, 1989), but less frequently applied in cross-personality studies. The investigation proposes a model of turnover intentions (TI) that uses locus of control (LOC) as a moderator. A causal model and a firm-specific sample were used to…

  1. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Gail Paulus; Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    This chapter covers the nearly 250 cases reported in 1987 involving precollegiate public-sector employees. Those cases where purely procedural issues are involved are omitted, and procedural issues in the remaining cases are deemphasized. Although no United States Supreme Court cases in 1987 related to school employees, those from prior years are…

  2. How Fleet Bank fought employee flight.

    PubMed

    Nalbantian, Haig R; Szostak, Anne

    2004-04-01

    In the late 1990s, Fleet Bank was facing high and rising employee turnover, particularly in its retail operations. Overall turnover had reached 25% annually, and among some groups, such as tellers and customer service reps, turnover was as high as 40%. Using a new methodology developed by Mercer Human Resource Consulting, Fleet set out to determine why so many employees were leaving and what could be done to retain them. It began examining data from HR, finance, operations, and sales about employee behavior and the factors that influence it in different locations and labor markets, departments or work groups, in positions with different pay and benefits, and under different supervisors. Fleet's analysis showed that people were leaving not so much for better pay--their personal testimony notwithstanding--but for broader experience, which they thought would enhance their marketability. Additionally, the analysis revealed a link between the turnover problem and the company's busy history of mergers and acquisitions. Fleet's mergers and acquisitions. frequently meant that it had to consolidate operations. That consolidation resulted in layoffs, which provoked higher levels of voluntary turnover, perhaps because remaining employees began worrying about their job security. While the obvious solution to the turnover problem might have been to compensate the remaining employees--say, with higher pay--the more effective and less costly solution, Fleet discovered, was to focus on employees' career opportunities within the company. Those who moved up the hierarchy, or who even made lateral moves, stayed longer. By offering better internal opportunities for career development, the bank was able to stanch much of the hemorrhaging in personnel. Its solutions required only modest investments, which in the end saved the company millions of dollars. PMID:15077372

  3. Plagued by Turnover? Train Your Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with managers is a major cause of employee turnover The Charles Schwab Corporation surveys employees annually and holds employee focus groups and online town meetings. The information is used for the coaching and training of department heads. (JOW)

  4. Turnover Begets Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between turnover of caregivers and turnover of nursing home top management. The top managers examined were administrators and directors of nursing, and the caregivers examined were registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides. Design and Methods: The data came from a survey of 419…

  5. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Thomas S., Jr.

    In 1979 judicial activity continued to add to the body of law available relative to relationships between universities and colleges and their employees. Cases touched on the nature of the contract when an offer of employment has been made and accepted, benefits and working conditions, and termination and the procedural safeguards involved.…

  6. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Betsy

    This chapter summarizes recent state supreme court and federal court decisions involving school employees. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1975 and reported in the General Digest as of March 1976. In her discussion, the author attempts to integrate related cases and to illuminate any unifying legal principles that…

  7. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    This chapter covers the nearly 220 cases reported in 1989 involving precollegiate, public-sector employees. Those cases where purely procedural issues are involved are omitted, and procedural issues in the remaining cases are deemphasized. As in previous years, the section on dismissal, nonrenewal, demotion, and discipline has the greatest…

  8. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Gail Paulus

    This chapter analyzes more than 200 cases reported in 1986 involving public-sector employees in elementary and secondary education. Also included, where appropriate, are relevant 1986 Supreme Court cases from outside the field of education, as well as leading cases from prior years. Legal issues covered by the review include the following: (1)…

  9. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    This chapter covers over 200 cases reported in 1990 involving precollegiate, public-sector employees. Those cases where procedural issues are involved are omitted, and procedural issues in the remaining cases are deemphasized. Unlike many years in the past, 1990 saw no Supreme Court cases related to school employment. As in previous years, the…

  10. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    This chapter covers the nearly 230 cases reported in 1988 involving precollegiate, public-sector employees. Those cases where purely procedural issues are involved are omitted, and procedural issues in the remaining cases are deemphasized. As in previous years, the section on dismissal, nonrenewal, demotion, and discipline has the greatest…

  11. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph C.

    This chapter examines cases reported during 1981 concerning school employees. In the format used, federal questions are addressed first, then issues associated with state laws. The author deals with cases in the areas of discrimination in employment, substantive constitutional rights of speech and association and privacy, and procedural due…

  12. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph C.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning the employment, dismissal, and tenuring of the employees of public agencies--in particular, public schools--are reported in this chapter. The chapter first addresses discrimination in employment based on race, sex, age, or physical limitations and notes that the shifting burden of…

  13. Job Satisfaction, Commitment, Withdrawal Cognitions and Turnover: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Kenneth W.; Campbell, James P.

    Recent research on organizational turnover has examined the validity of the turnover decision process, in particular, the model of employee turnover proposed by Mobley (1977). This study followed-up on a previous (Kerber and Campbell, 1986) study of new employees of a large computer company in which participants completed a questionnaire that…

  14. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982). PMID:10106673

  15. Organisation turnover among registered nurses: an exploratory model.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Flatt, S

    1988-11-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, turnover among hospital nurses has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that organisation of hospital work is a determinant of voluntary turnover among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualised at the organisational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 310 community hospitals. Results suggest the importance of administrative work structures and the professionalisation of the workforce as contributors to higher turnover. PMID:10296903

  16. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  17. Examining the job search-turnover relationship: the role of embeddedness, job satisfaction, and available alternatives.

    PubMed

    Swider, Brian W; Boswell, Wendy R; Zimmerman, Ryan D

    2011-03-01

    This study examined factors that may help explain under what conditions employee job search effort may most strongly (or weakly) predict subsequent turnover. As predicted, the job search-turnover relationship was stronger when employees had lower levels of job embeddedness and job satisfaction and higher levels of available alternatives. These findings suggest that there may be a number of factors interacting to influence employees' turnover decisions, indicating greater complexity to the process than described in prominent sequential turnover models. PMID:21142342

  18. Turnover of Public School Superintendents in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Joyce Ntsoaki

    2013-01-01

    This study used a descriptive qualitative design utilizing a phenomenological approach to determine and examine the reasons behind the voluntary or involuntary turnover of Arizona school superintendents. Open-ended questions were used to interview five superintendents who had left their districts between 2008 and 2013 about their perceptions on…

  19. A Turnover Model for the Mexican Maquiladoras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P.; Stevens, Michael J.; Campion, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    From interviews with 47 Mexican maquiladora workers, a model of voluntary turnover was created and compared with models from the United States, Canada, England, and Australia. Despite similarities, the cultural and economic environment affected the precise content of antecedents in the Mexican model. (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  20. Expectations, Commitment, and Withdrawal Cognitions among New Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Kenneth W.; Campbell, James P.

    Recent research on organizational turnover has concentrated on testing models of the turnover decision process, in particular, Mobley's (1977) model of employee turnover. The present research was based on Mobley's theoretical work and the subsequent empirical tests of his model. Employees (N=266) at a large computer company completed a…

  1. 49 CFR 219.403 - Voluntary referral policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Identification of Troubled Employees § 219.403... voluntary referral policy that affords more favorable conditions to employees troubled by alcohol or drug...: (1) A covered employee who is affected by an alcohol or drug use problem may maintain an...

  2. 49 CFR 219.403 - Voluntary referral policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Identification of Troubled Employees § 219.403... voluntary referral policy that affords more favorable conditions to employees troubled by alcohol or drug...: (1) A covered employee who is affected by an alcohol or drug use problem may maintain an...

  3. 49 CFR 219.403 - Voluntary referral policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Identification of Troubled Employees § 219.403... voluntary referral policy that affords more favorable conditions to employees troubled by alcohol or drug...: (1) A covered employee who is affected by an alcohol or drug use problem may maintain an...

  4. Causal Attributions for Turnover by Supervisory and Non-supervisory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krausz, Moshe; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined causal attributions for turnover of employees by supervisory (N=107) and non-supervisory (N=155) employees. Subjects rated extent of their agreement with two reasons for employee turnover: job dissatisfaction and external causes/family matters. Causal attributions of both groups were related to job attitudes: less satisfied subjects…

  5. 5 CFR 831.405 - Interest on voluntary contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... annuity and either dies without withdrawing his or her voluntary contributions or uses his or her... earlier of— (1) The date the former employee or Member dies; or (2) The commencing date of the...

  6. The effect of culture on the curvilinear relationship between performance and turnover.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Michael C; Shao, Lian; Katz, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    Although researchers have theorized that there exists a curvilinear relationship between job performance and voluntary turnover, their research has been tested in the United States or culturally similar Switzerland. Through a study of the performance-turnover relationship from a multinational service-oriented organization in 24 countries, we demonstrate that the general relationship between performance and turnover is similar across countries but the details of that relationship change across countries. Using 4 cultural dimensions--in-group collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and performance orientation--we find that cultural factors alter the overall probability of voluntary turnover and influence the degree of curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship. Our findings have implications for research on the performance-turnover relationship, turnover research, and practice. PMID:22023074

  7. 16 CFR 1031.8 - Voluntary Standards Coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Voluntary Standards Coordinator. 1031.8 Section 1031.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies §...

  8. 16 CFR 1031.8 - Voluntary Standards Coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary Standards Coordinator. 1031.8 Section 1031.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies §...

  9. 16 CFR 1031.8 - Voluntary Standards Coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voluntary Standards Coordinator. 1031.8 Section 1031.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies §...

  10. Further Clarifying Proximal Withdrawal States and the Turnover Criterion Space: Comment on Hom, Mitchell, Lee, and Griffeth (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In "Reviewing Employee Turnover: Focusing on Proximal Withdrawal States and an Expanded Criterion," Hom, Mitchell, Lee, and Griffeth (2012) brought together many of the most important content and process factors in the employee turnover literature. In this paper, I attempt to clarify the true contributions of this framework for the turnover area…

  11. Stressful work, psychological job strain, and turnover: a 2-year prospective cohort study of truck drivers.

    PubMed

    de Croon, Einar M; Sluiter, Judith K; Blonk, Roland W B; Broersen, Jake P J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2004-06-01

    Based on a model that combines existing organizational stress theory and job transition theory, this 2-year longitudinal study examined antecedents and consequences of turnover among Dutch truck drivers. For this purpose, self-reported data on stressful work (job demands and control), psychological strain (need for recovery after work and fatigue), and turnover were obtained from 820 drivers in 1998 and 2000. In agreement with the model, the results showed that strain mediates the influence of stressful work on voluntary turnover. Also in conformity with the model, job movement to any job outside the trucking industry (i.e., interoccupational turnover) resulted in a larger strain reduction as compared to job movement within the trucking industry (intraoccupational turnover). Finally, strain was found to stimulate interoccupational turnover more strongly than it stimulated intraoccupational turnover. These findings provide a thorough validation of existing turnover theory and give new insights into the turnover (decision) process. PMID:15161404

  12. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  13. Career Adaptability, Turnover and Loyalty during Organizational Downsizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klehe, Ute-Christine; Zikic, Jelena; Van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; De Pater, Irene E.

    2011-01-01

    During organizational restructuring and downsizing, employees often worry about being redundant, actually are redundant, and/or feel unsatisfied with their jobs. Employees, in turn, often react with poor loyalty to and high voluntary exit from the organization. The current study addresses this process from a careers' perspective, showing that…

  14. A Review of the Literature on Administrator Turnover: Why They Move on or Are Displaced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Bruce A.

    Employee turnover contributes to lost production, disrupts normal business practices, and is expensive. This literature review examines turnover of three administrator positions: the school superintendent, the executive director of nonprofit agencies, and the chief executive officer of for-profit corporations. The most cited reason for turnover of…

  15. Examining the Job Search-Turnover Relationship: The Role of Embeddedness, Job Satisfaction, and Available Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swider, Brian W.; Boswell, Wendy R.; Zimmerman, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined factors that may help explain under what conditions employee job search effort may most strongly (or weakly) predict subsequent turnover. As predicted, the job search-turnover relationship was stronger when employees had lower levels of job embeddedness and job satisfaction and higher levels of available alternatives. These…

  16. Job Dissatisfaction and Turnover among Two Year College Department/Division Chairpersons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John; Murray, Judy

    Research shows that turnover in managerial positions can cost an organization from 5 to 25 times an employee's monthly salary. Although some turnover is inevitable, many times it is caused by employee dissatisfaction with the job or its conditions, and this dissatisfaction is often directly attributable to stress resulting from role conflict or…

  17. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians’ responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  18. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  19. Relationships between Emotional Labor, Job Performance, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Robyn E.; Groth, Markus; Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the emotional labor strategies surface acting and deep acting and organizational outcomes, specifically, employees' overall job performance and turnover. Call center employees from two large financial service organizations completed an online survey about their use of surface and deep acting.…

  20. 16 CFR 1031.13 - Criteria for employee involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for employee involvement. 1031.13 Section 1031.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES Employee Involvement § 1031.13 Criteria for employee involvement....

  1. Enhancing Precision in the Prediction of Voluntary Turnover and Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daryl R.; Holtom, Brooks C.; Mitchell, Terence R.

    2011-01-01

    The present research examines the differential validity of the facets of organizational commitment and job embeddedness to predict who will reenlist or retire from a branch of the armed services. We tested hypotheses with survey data from 1839 enlisted personnel in the U.S. Air Force. For personnel facing the decision to reenlist or separate,…

  2. Economic Literacy among Corporate Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William C.; Doyle, Joanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Reports the results of a telephone survey of employees (n=1001) of large corporations (n=7) conducted for the Business Roundtable. Embeds 20 questions keyed to the Voluntary National Content Standards in Economics to measure economic literacy. Finds that economic literacy was associated with education level, courses in economics, high income, and…

  3. How to Calculate an Employee Relations Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, William B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Proposes using an employee relations index (ERI) to measure factors affecting employee relations and job performance ability. Examines five of ten major ERI factors: attenance, turnover, safety, grievances/complaints, and motor vehicle accidents. Discusses weighing the factors and interpreting the outcome. (CSS)

  4. 41 CFR 105-56.005 - Employee response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee response. 105-56.005 Section 105-56.005 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... General Services Administration Employees § 105-56.005 Employee response. (a) Voluntary...

  5. 16 CFR 1031.13 - Criteria for employee involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...'s meetings policy, 16 CFR part 1012, Commission personnel shall not become involved in meetings... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criteria for employee involvement. 1031.13... AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES Employee Involvement §...

  6. 16 CFR 1031.5 - Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for Commission involvement in... COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.5 Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards...

  7. 16 CFR 1031.5 - Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criteria for Commission involvement in... COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.5 Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards...

  8. 49 CFR 219.403 - Voluntary referral policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voluntary referral policy. 219.403 Section 219.403 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Identification of Troubled Employees §...

  9. 76 FR 61563 - Voluntary Surrender of Certificate of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... when DEA, through any employee, receives notice ] of a voluntary surrender of a DEA registration. 75 FR... such person dies, ceases legal existence, or discontinues business or professional practice * * *.'' 21... action by the Administration, if and when such person dies, ceases legal existence, discontinues...

  10. The interactive effect of job involvement and organizational commitment on job turnover revisited: a note on the mediating role of turnover intention.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, A; Sverke, M

    2000-09-01

    This study extends previous theoretical and empirical research on Blau and Boal's (1987) model of the interactive effect of job involvement and organizational commitment on employee withdrawal. Using longitudinal data from a survey among the nursing staff of a Swedish emergency hospital (N = 535) and register information on actual turnover, the results showed, in contrast to the statement of the original theoretical model, that turnover intention mediates the additive and multiplicative effects of job involvement and organizational commitment on actual turnover. The study suggests that the proposed involvement by commitment interaction is theoretically justified, and underscores the pertinence of investigating intermediate linkages in turnover research. PMID:11041307

  11. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Willging, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress (“low” versus “high”) experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change. PMID:22229021

  12. Quarantine stressing voluntary compliance.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanni, Cleto; Bowen, Nancy; Ginsberg, Michele; Giles, Gregory

    2005-11-01

    A 1-day table-top exercise in San Diego, California, in December 2004 emphasized voluntary compliance with home quarantine to control an emerging infectious disease outbreak. The exercise heightened local civilian-military collaboration in public health emergency management. Addressing concerns about lost income by residents in quarantine was particularly challenging. PMID:16318738

  13. A Qualitative Study of the Effects of Employee Retention on the Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tara Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences and perceptions of 20 customer service agents regarding employee turnover. Building upon the Herzberg 2-factor theory, research was conducted to identify factors contributing to employee turnover. Data were collected through participant interviews and explored using…

  14. Why employees resist change in medical group practice acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, N

    1999-01-01

    Understanding employees' values and considerations is important in undergoing major organizational change. This research provides an insight of the business and financial aspects vs. the human relations aspects of acquiring a medical group practice. The five employees interviewed in this analysis provide insight as to the factors that employees consider in resisting change. Considering how employees feel through communicating will have a significant impact on efficiency, effectiveness and turnover. PMID:10351697

  15. Employee Retention at ABC & Co. Northwest Arkansas. Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy; And Others

    A 7-month research project was conducted by graduate students at a garment manufacturing plant in Fayetteville, Arkansas, to gain information about high employee turnover. Information also was gathered about the employment situation in northwest Arkansas in general, union-labor relationships, and how other companies handled turnover. Data were…

  16. Does Enhancing Work-Time Control and Flexibility Reduce Turnover? A Naturally Occurring Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Hill, Rachelle

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the turnover effects of an organizational innovation (ROWE—Results Only Work Environment) aimed at moving away from standard time practices to focus on results rather than time spent at work. To model rates of turnover, we draw on survey data from a sample of employees at a corporate headquarters (N = 775) and institutional records of turnover over eight months following the ROWE implementation. We find the odds of turnover are indeed lower for employees participating in the ROWE initiative, which offers employees greater work-time control and flexibility, and that this is the case regardless of employees’ gender, age, or family life stage. ROWE also moderates the turnover effects of organizational tenure and negative home-to-work spillover, physical symptoms, and job insecurity, with those in ROWE who report these situations generally less likely to leave the organization. Additionally, ROWE reduces turnover intentions among those remaining with the corporation. This research moves the “opting-out” argument from one of private troubles to an issue of greater employee work-time control and flexibility by showing that an organizational policy initiative can reduce turnover. PMID:21532909

  17. Tethered to work: A family systems approach linking mobile device use to turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Boswell, Wendy; Whitten, Dwayne; Butts, Marcus M; Kacmar, K Michele Micki

    2016-04-01

    We examined the use of a mobile device for work during family time (mWork) to determine the role that it plays in employee turnover intentions. Using a sample of 344 job incumbents and their spouses, we propose a family systems model of turnover and examine 2 paths through which we expect mWork to relate to turnover intentions: the job incumbent and the spouse. From the job incumbent, we found that the job incumbent's mWork associated with greater work-to-family conflict and burnout, and lower organizational commitment. From the spouse, we found that incumbent mWork and greater work-to-family conflict associated with increased resentment by the spouse and lower spousal commitment to the job incumbent's organization. Both of these paths played a role in predicting job incumbent turnover intentions. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research on mWork for integrating work and family into employee turnover intentions. PMID:26653530

  18. Perceived Work Conditions and Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Meaning of Work.

    PubMed

    Arnoux-Nicolas, Caroline; Sovet, Laurent; Lhotellier, Lin; Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Perceived working conditions lead to various negative outcomes for employee behaviors, including turnover intentions. Although potential mediators for these relationships were previously identified, the importance of meaning of work has not yet been investigated. This study examines the role of this psychological resource as a mediator for the relationships between perceived working conditions and turnover intentions in a sample of 336 French workers from different job contexts. Results show that adverse working conditions were positively and significantly associated with turnover intentions. Meaning of work is negatively related to both perceived working conditions and turnover intentions. Mediation analyses for meaning of work demonstrated indirect effects of several adverse working conditions on turnover intentions. The role of meaning of work as a psychological resource for employees facing adverse working conditions is discussed, especially regarding its implications for research and practice within organizational contexts. PMID:27242616

  19. Perceived Work Conditions and Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Meaning of Work

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux-Nicolas, Caroline; Sovet, Laurent; Lhotellier, Lin; Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Perceived working conditions lead to various negative outcomes for employee behaviors, including turnover intentions. Although potential mediators for these relationships were previously identified, the importance of meaning of work has not yet been investigated. This study examines the role of this psychological resource as a mediator for the relationships between perceived working conditions and turnover intentions in a sample of 336 French workers from different job contexts. Results show that adverse working conditions were positively and significantly associated with turnover intentions. Meaning of work is negatively related to both perceived working conditions and turnover intentions. Mediation analyses for meaning of work demonstrated indirect effects of several adverse working conditions on turnover intentions. The role of meaning of work as a psychological resource for employees facing adverse working conditions is discussed, especially regarding its implications for research and practice within organizational contexts. PMID:27242616

  20. Cost of nursing turnover in a Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Paula Buck de Oliveira; Perroca, Marcia Galan; Jericó, Marli de Carvalho

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To map the sub processes related to turnover of nursing staff and to investigate and measure the nursing turnover cost. METHOD This is a descriptive-exploratory study, classified as case study, conducted in a teaching hospital in the southeastern, Brazil, in the period from May to November 2013. The population was composed by the nursing staff, using Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. RESULTS The total cost of turnover was R$314.605,62, and ranged from R$2.221,42 to R$3.073,23 per employee. The costs of pre-hire totaled R$101.004,60 (32,1%), and the hiring process consumed R$92.743,60 (91.8%) The costs of post-hire totaled R$213.601,02 (67,9%), for the sub process decreased productivity, R$199.982,40 (93.6%). CONCLUSION The study identified the importance of managing the cost of staff turnover and the financial impact of the cost of the employee termination, which represented three times the average salary of the nursing staff. PMID:27007427

  1. Voluntary pollution reduction programs

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    Despite claims that the government is reducing the amount of environmental regulation, the sheer amount of regulatory language has actually increased yearly. Yet based on media reports and citizen claims, pollution appears to go unchecked. Citizens condemn a perceived lack of government regulation of industrial pollution, while industries find themselves mired in increasingly complex regulatory programs that are sometimes far removed from real world situations. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decision-makers have responded to these concerns by designing regulatory programs that abandon traditional command-and-control regulatory schemes as ill-suited to today`s pollution problems and the interests of these stakeholders. This paper analyzes the use of voluntary pollution control programs in place of command-and-control regulation. It is proposed that voluntary programs may serve as carrots to entice regulated entities to reduce pollution, but that there are a number of hurdles to their effective implementation that preclude them from being embraced as effective environmental regulatory tools. This paper reviews why agencies have moved from command-and-control regulation and examines current voluntary pollution control programs. This paper also contemplates the future of such programs.

  2. 16 CFR 1031.6 - Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards. 1031.6 Section 1031.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies §...

  3. 16 CFR 1031.6 - Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards. 1031.6 Section 1031.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies §...

  4. 16 CFR 1031.6 - Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards. 1031.6 Section 1031.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies §...

  5. Group disability income: new policies emphasize employee appeal.

    PubMed

    Yokota, C M

    2001-03-01

    Group disability insurance is a voluntary benefit that offers advantages to both employers and employees. Employees who want this kind of coverage realize that their employers have done much of the homework for them in terms of comparing benefits, rates and contract provisions. Employers recognize an opportunity to add a benefit that may help attract and retain valuable employees with little additional cost or administrative burden. PMID:11272514

  6. Strengthening affective organizational commitment: the influence of fairness perceptions of management practices and underlying employee cynicism.

    PubMed

    English, Brian; Chalon, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between cynicism, the perceived fairness of change management and personnel practices, and affective organizational commitment. High levels of affective organizational commitment have been shown to reduce voluntary turnover in the nursing workforce. Previous research suggests that "unfair" management practices and employee cynicism lead to lower commitment. It is not clear, however, whether the perceived fairness of particular practices influences affective commitment beyond that accounted for by underlying employee cynicism. Data were obtained from a study involving 1104 registered nurses that formed part of a larger investigation of the general well-being of nurses in Western Australia. Only nurses who were permanent or employed on fixed term or temporary contracts were included. Findings indicated that although higher levels of cynicism among nurses were associated with lower levels of affective commitment, their perception of the fairness of change management and personnel practices influenced their affective commitment over and above their cynicism. The perceived fairness of management practices is an important influence on nurses' affective commitment beyond that accounted for by cynicism. The implication for managers is that the affective organizational commitment of nurses is likely to be strengthened by addressing the perceived fairness of change management and personnel practices notwithstanding their beliefs about the integrity of the organization. PMID:21248545

  7. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  8. Substance use disorder counselors' job performance and turnover after 1 year: linear or curvilinear relationship?

    PubMed

    Laschober, Tanja C; de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner

    2013-07-01

    The main goals of the current study were to investigate whether there are linear or curvilinear relationships between substance use disorder counselors' job performance and actual turnover after 1 year utilizing four indicators of job performance and three turnover statuses (voluntary, involuntary, and no turnover as the reference group). Using longitudinal data from 440 matched counselor-clinical supervisor dyads, results indicate that overall, counselors with lower job performance are more likely to turn over voluntarily and involuntarily than not to turn over. Further, one of the job performance measures shows a significant curvilinear effect. We conclude that the negative consequences often assumed to be "caused" by counselor turnover may be overstated because those who leave both voluntarily and involuntarily demonstrate generally lower performance than those who remain employed at their treatment program. PMID:22527711

  9. Substance Use Disorder Counselors’ Job Performance and Turnover after 1 Year: Linear or Curvilinear Relationship?1

    PubMed Central

    Laschober, Tanja C.; de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner

    2013-01-01

    The main goals of the current study were to investigate whether there are linear or curvilinear relationships between substance use disorder counselors’ job performance and actual turnover after 1 year utilizing four indicators of job performance and three turnover statuses (voluntary, involuntary, and no turnover as the reference group). Using longitudinal data from 440 matched counselor-clinical supervisor dyads, results indicate that overall, counselors with lower job performance are more likely to turn over voluntarily and involuntarily than not to turn over. Further, one of the job performance measures shows a significant curvilinear effect. We conclude that the negative consequences often assumed to be “caused” by counselor turnover may be overstated because those who leave both voluntarily and involuntarily demonstrate generally lower performance than those who remain employed at their treatment program. PMID:22527711

  10. Strategies for improving employee retention.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Edward G; Evans, Martin R

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a solution to the perennial problem of talent retention in the clinical laboratory. It includes the presentation of 12 strategies that may be used to significantly improve institutional identity formation and establishment of the psychological contract that employees form with laboratory management. Identity formation and psychological contracting are deemed as essential in helping reduce employee turnover and increase retention. The 12 conversational strategies may be used as a set of best practices for all employees, but most importantly for new employees, and should be implemented at the critical moment when employees first join the laboratory. This time is referred to as "retention on-boarding"--the period of induction and laboratory orientation. Retention on-boarding involves a dialogue between employees and management that is focused on the psychological, practical, cultural, and political dimensions of the laboratory. It is placed in the context of the modern clinical laboratory, which is faced with employing and managing Generation X knowledge workers. Specific topics and broad content areas of those conversations are outlined. PMID:17394785

  11. Operant Variability and Voluntary Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuringer, Allen; Jensen, Greg

    2010-01-01

    A behavior-based theory identified 2 characteristics of voluntary acts. The first, extensively explored in operant-conditioning experiments, is that voluntary responses produce the reinforcers that control them. This bidirectional relationship--in which reinforcer depends on response and response on reinforcer--demonstrates the functional nature…

  12. Voluntary Simplicity: A Lifestyle Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestle, Ruth E.

    This guide provides practical ideas for incorporating the concept of voluntary simplicity into home economics classes. Discussed in the first chapter are the need to study voluntary simplicity, its potential contributions to home economics, and techniques and a questionnaire for measuring student attitudes toward the concept. The remaining…

  13. Employee assistance program treats personal problems.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, R J; Featherston, H J

    1984-03-01

    Though the concept of employee assistance programs (EAPs) is widely accepted throughout business and industry, few hospitals have established similar channels for dealing with workers whose personal problems cause work-related problems. Among the reasons for the health care profession's lack of involvement in this area are: lack of information about costs and benefits of EAPs; the hospital's multidisciplinary environment in which standards of employee competence and behavior are set by persons from many disciplines; hospital working hours; and health care workers' attitudes about their vulnerability to illness. St. Benedict's Hospital, Ogden, UT, however, has confronted the question of how to demonstrate Christian concern for its employees. St. Benedict's EAP, the Helping Hand, which was created in 1979, combines progressive disciplinary action with the opportunity for early intervention in and treatment of employees' personal problems. When a worker with personal problems is referred to the EAP coordinator, he or she is matched with the appropriate community or hospital resource for treatment. Supervisors are trained to identify employee problems and to focus on employee job performance rather than on attempting to diagnose the problem. St. Benedict's records during the program's first three years illustrate the human benefits as well as the cost savings of an EAP. Of 92 hospital employees who took part in the EAP, 72 improved their situations or resolved their problems. The hospital's turnover rates declined from 36 percent to 20 percent, and approximately $40,800 in turnover and replacement costs were saved. PMID:10317423

  14. Employee Turnover in Christian College/University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Kevin D.; Andrews, Megan

    2007-01-01

    Few campus offices bear the weight of organizational health and vitality more directly than college and university admissions offices. This is particularly true for Christian colleges and universities where annual operating budgets depend largely on student tuition dollars. The purpose of the research reported in this paper was to explore rates…

  15. Employer-employee based quality circles in Japan: human resource policy implications for American firms.

    PubMed

    Munchus, G

    1983-04-01

    This paper traces the development of the quality circle in Japan with reference to such traditions as permanent employment, nenko (seniority-based compensation), enterprise unionism, and management paternalism. Quality circles are examined as tools for motivating employees, reducing labor turnover, effecting employee "career expansion," and allowing employee participation in job redesign. PMID:10263059

  16. Employee health.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a new guideline looking at improving the health and wellbeing of employees, with a particular focus on organisational culture and context, and the role of line managers. PMID:26309009

  17. Organizational Commitment for Knowledge Workers: The Roles of Perceived Organizational Learning Culture, Leader-Member Exchange Quality, and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Baek-Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of perceived organizational learning culture and leader-member exchange (LMX) quality on organizational commitment and eventually on employee turnover intention. Employees exhibited the highest organizational commitment when they perceived a higher learning culture and when they were supervised in a supportive…

  18. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-2 - Membership in a voluntary employees' beneficiary association; employees; voluntary association of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... administration of objective conditions has the effect of providing disproportionate benefits to officers... high or low options, self only or self and family, coverage through a local prepaid group medical plan. The contributions required of those electing the prepaid group medical plan also vary with the type...

  19. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-2 - Membership in a voluntary employees' beneficiary association; employees; voluntary association of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... administration of objective conditions has the effect of providing disproportionate benefits to officers... high or low options, self only or self and family, coverage through a local prepaid group medical plan. The contributions required of those electing the prepaid group medical plan also vary with the type...

  20. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-2 - Membership in a voluntary employees' beneficiary association; employees; voluntary association of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or to membership in one or more locals of a national or international labor union. For example... the meaning of paragraph (b) of this section), provided that such individuals share an employment... meaning of paragraph (b) of this section). (2) Restrictions—(i) In general. Eligibility for membership...

  1. Voluntary Support of Education 1987-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    The 29th edition of a publication featuring statistics on voluntary support of education is presented. Three sections have the following titles: (1) "Colleges and Universities" (including national estimates of expenditures and voluntary support, and survey results noting voluntary support by type of institution, voluntary support by source,…

  2. 27 CFR 19.691 - Voluntary destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., State, and local environmental laws and regulations. (e) Record of destruction. The proprietor shall... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary destruction. 19... Voluntary Destruction Voluntary Destruction § 19.691 Voluntary destruction. (a) General. Spirits,...

  3. 12 CFR 627.2795 - Voluntary liquidation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary liquidation. 627.2795 Section 627.2795 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM TITLE IV CONSERVATORS, RECEIVERS, AND VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATIONS Voluntary Liquidation § 627.2795 Voluntary liquidation. (a) A Farm...

  4. The Notion of Voluntary Unemployment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standing, Guy

    1981-01-01

    Considers the distinction between voluntary and involuntary unemployment by analyzing six behavioral characteristics attributed to groups of workers suspected of indulging in the former, and the labor market mechanisms supposedly encouraging them. (Author/CT)

  5. Employee Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Madelyn

    2008-09-05

    Welcome to Berkeley Lab. You are joining or are already a part of a laboratory with a sterling tradition of scientific achievement, including eleven Nobel Laureates and thirteen National Medal of Science winners. No matter what job you do, you make Berkeley Lab the outstanding organization that it is. Without your hard work and dedication, we could not achieve all that we have. We value you and thank you for choosing to be part of our community. This Employee Handbook is designed to help you navigate the Lab. With over 3,000 employees, an additional 3,000 guests visiting from countries around the world, a 200-acre campus and many policies and procedures, learning all the ins and outs may seem overwhelming, especially if you're a new employee. However, even if you have been here for a while, this Handbook should be a useful reference tool. It is meant to serve as a guide, highlighting and summarizing what you need to know and informing you where you can go for more detailed information. The general information provided in this Handbook serves only as a brief description of many of the Lab's policies. Policies, procedures and information are found in the Lab's Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM), Summary Plan Descriptions, University of California policies, and provisions of Contract 31 between the Regents of the University and the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, specific terms and conditions for represented employees are found in applicable collective bargaining agreements. Nothing in this Handbook is intended to supplant, change or conflict with the previously mentioned documents. In addition, the information in this Handbook does not constitute a contract or a promise of continued employment and may be changed at any time by the Lab. We believe employees are happier and more productive if they know what they can expect from their organization and what their organization expects from them. The Handbook will familiarize you with the privileges, benefits

  6. The Role of Pay Satisfaction in Instructor Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Voluntary employee turnover is a major factor affecting adventure education (AE) organizations (Garret, 2003). Voluntary turnover often is dysfunctional for both employees and organizations (Birmingham, 1989; Podsakoff, LePine, & LePine, 2007). Turnover can result in increased employee and organizational costs (e.g., McKinney, Bartlett, &…

  7. Overworked RNs, social workers cause high nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    Using benchmarking to stanch the loss of employees. Many nursing homes and long-term care facilities have a burdensome employee turnover rate, in some cases approaching 400% annually. A benchmarking study conducted by Southern University and the Louisiana State Nursing Home Association revealed that the factors widely believed to cause the problem--wages, benefits, and workload--are not to blame. Take a look at the results. PMID:10557961

  8. Employee Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarratt, Alex

    1975-01-01

    The article presents another approach to individual motivation--participative management--which concerns an emotional rather than financial commitment to the job through involvement and job satisfaction. The author favors within this approach: employee participation in decision-making, entitlement to information, and the establishment of…

  9. Voluntary or Mandatory Enrollment in Training and the Motivation to Transfer Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curado, Carla; Henriques, Paulo Lopes; Ribeiro, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the motivation to transfer training in a multidimensional way. It investigates autonomous and controlled motivation and explores the difference in motivation to transfer according to whether the employee is enrolled in training on a voluntary or mandatory basis. This is a cross-sectional hypotheses-testing…

  10. Employee retention: a customer service approach.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Richard F

    2002-01-01

    Employee retention is a huge problem. There are staff shortages in radiology because not enough people are entering the profession; too many people are leaving the profession for retirement, higher-paying jobs or jobs with less stress; and there are not enough opportunities for career advancement. Staff shortages are exacerbated by difficulty in retaining people who enter the profession. While much work has been focused on recruitment and getting more people "in the front door," I suggest that the bulk of future efforts be focused on employee retention and "closing the back door." Employee retention must be an ongoing process, not a program. Approaches to employee retention that focus on external things, i.e., things that the company can do to or for the employee, generally are not successful. The truth is that employee retention processes must focus on what the employee gets out of the job. The process must be a benefits-based approach that helps employees answer the question, "What's in it for me?" The retention processes must be ongoing and integrated into the daily culture of the company. The best way to keep your employees is to treat them like customers. Customer service works for external customers. We treat them nicely. We work to satisfy them. We help them achieve their goals. Why not do the same for our employees? If positive customer service policies and practices can satisfy and keep external customers, why not adapt these policies and practices for employees? And, there is a service/satisfaction link between employee retention and higher levels of customer satisfaction. Customers prefer dealing with the same employees over and over again. Employee turnover destroys a customer's confidence in the company. Just like a customer does not want to have to "train and educate" a new provider, they do not want to do the same for your "revolving door" employees. So, the key is to keep employees so they in turn will help you keep your customers. Because the

  11. Business-unit-level relationship between employee satisfaction, employee engagement, and business outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Harter, James K; Schmidt, Frank L; Hayes, Theodore L

    2002-04-01

    Based on 7,939 business units in 36 companies, this study used meta-analysis to examine the relationship at the business-unit level between employee satisfaction-engagement and the business-unit outcomes of customer satisfaction, productivity, profit, employee turnover, and accidents. Generalizable relationships large enough to have substantial practical value were found between unit-level employee satisfaction-engagement and these business-unit outcomes. One implication is that changes in management practices that increase employee satisfaction may increase business-unit outcomes, including profit. PMID:12002955

  12. Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

  13. Exit and Voice: Turnover and Militancy Intentions in Elementary and Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacharach, Samuel B.; Bamberger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Using Hirschman's conception of exit (turnover) and voice (militancy) as employee responses to objectionable working conditions, this article examines the degree to which teacher job satisfaction and stress symptomology and two hypothesized antecedents (role conflict and ambiguity) are likely to have the same effect on voicing and exiting…

  14. The link between employee attitudes and employee effectiveness: Data matrix of meta-analytic estimates based on 1161 unique correlations.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Michael M

    2016-09-01

    This article offers a correlation matrix of meta-analytic estimates between various employee job attitudes (i.e., Employee engagement, job satisfaction, job involvement, and organizational commitment) and indicators of employee effectiveness (i.e., Focal performance, contextual performance, turnover intention, and absenteeism). The meta-analytic correlations in the matrix are based on over 1100 individual studies representing over 340,000 employees. Data was collected worldwide via employee self-report surveys. Structural path analyses based on the matrix, and the interpretation of the data, can be found in "Investigating the incremental validity of employee engagement in the prediction of employee effectiveness: a meta-analytic path analysis" (Mackay et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27583347

  15. Employee recruitment.

    PubMed

    Breaugh, James A

    2013-01-01

    The way an organization recruits can influence the type of employees it hires, how they perform, and their retention rate. This article provides a selective review of research that has addressed recruitment targeting, recruitment methods, the recruitment message, recruiters, the organizational site visit, the job offer, and the timing of recruitment actions. These and other topics (e.g., the job applicant's perspective) are discussed in terms of their potential influence on prehire (e.g., the quality of job applicants) and posthire (e.g., new employee retention) recruitment outcomes. In reviewing research, attention is given to the current state of scientific knowledge, limitations of previous research, and important issues meriting future investigation. PMID:23121331

  16. Effect of Diet and Cold Exposure on Norepinephrine Turnover in Brown Adipose Tissue of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Young, James B.; Saville, Elizabeth; Rothwell, Nancy J.; Stock, Michael J.; Landsberg, Lewis

    1982-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an important site of adaptive changes in thermogenesis in the rat. The sympathetic nervous system, which richly supplies BAT, is thought to play an important role in the regulation of BAT thermogenesis because catecholamines stimulate and beta adrenergic blocking agents inhibit oxygen consumption in this tissue. The present studies were carried out to assess directly sympathetic activity in BAT in response to cold exposure and to changes in dietary intake, both of which alter heat production in the rat. Sympathetic activity was determined from the rate of norepinephrine (NE) turnover in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) after preliminary experiments validated the use of NE turnover techniques in IBAT. Acute exposure to 4°C increased NE turnover in IBAT 4- to 12-fold compared with ambient temperature controls, depending upon the interval over which the turnover measurement was made, while in the heart NE turnover doubled in response to the same cold stimulus. In animals exposed to cold continuously for 10 d before study, NE turnover measurements in IBAT and in the heart were elevated comparably to those obtained during acute exposure. Alterations in feeding were also associated with changes in NE turnover in IBAT. Fasting for 2 d decreased NE turnover in IBAT (-35% from 29.2±4.2 ng NE/h to 18.9±5.9) and in heart (-52%). In animals fed a “cafeteria” diet, a model of voluntary overfeeding in the rat, NE turnover was increased in both IBAT (+108% from 24.8±4.5 ng NE/h to 51.7±6.8) and heart (+66%). Because ganglionic blockade exerted a greater effect on NE turnover in IBAT in cafeteria-fed rats than in controls, the increase in NE turnover in IBAT with this overfeeding regimen reflects enhanced central sympathetic outflow. Thus NE turnover techniques can be satisfactorily applied to the assessment of sympathetic nervous system activity in IBAT. The experiments reported here demonstrate changes in sympathetic activity in

  17. Employees' Perceptions of Barriers to Participation in Training and Development in Small Engineering Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susomrith, Pattanee; Coetzer, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate barriers to employee participation in voluntary formal training and development opportunities from the perspective of employees in small engineering businesses. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory qualitative methodology involving data collection via site visits and in-depth semi-structured…

  18. 9 CFR 307.1 - Facilities for Program employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facilities for Program employees. 307.1 Section 307.1 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES...

  19. How Dutch Employees Experience Freedom of Learning for Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dellen, Theo; Heidekamp, Ina

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the perceived freedom of Dutch employees to embark on workplace learning in terms of whether they feel it is "voluntary" or "compulsory". The paper is based on the findings of a large international explorative survey carried out by the Workplace Learning (WPL) Research Network (RN2) of the Asia-Europe…

  20. Turnover in the Advancement Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarrobino, Jon D.

    2006-01-01

    Recruitment and retention is an area with which most organizations are concerned. Excessive turnover has exorbitant costs and wastes valuable time. Institutions of higher education are no exception. One of the most vital operations in nonprofit colleges and universities is its Office of Institutional Advancement. More and more, an institution of…

  1. Social Cohesion and Voluntary Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuser, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary organizations exert great influence over how social norms and ethical codes are guided into action. As such, they have a significant impact on societal levels of social cohesion. Although social capital involves generalized trust becoming manifest as spontaneous sociability, social cohesion is determined by how that sociability is…

  2. Voluntary euthanasia: a utilitarian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singer, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Belgium legalised voluntary euthanasia in 2002, thus ending the long isolation of the Netherlands as the only country in which doctors could openly give lethal injections to patients who have requested help in dying. Meanwhile in Oregon, in the United States, doctors may prescribe drugs for terminally ill patients, who can use them to end their life--if they are able to swallow and digest them. But despite President Bush's oft-repeated statements that his philosophy is to 'trust individuals to make the right decisions' and his opposition to 'distant bureaucracies', his administration is doing its best to prevent Oregonians acting in accordance with a law that its voters have twice ratified. The situation regarding voluntary euthanasia around the world is therefore very much in flux. This essay reviews ethical arguments regarding voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide from a utilitarian perspective. I shall begin by asking why it is normally wrong to kill an innocent person, and whether these reasons apply to aiding a person who, when rational and competent, asks to be killed or given the means to commit suicide. Then I shall consider more specific utilitarian arguments for and against permitting voluntary euthanasia. PMID:14959723

  3. Voluntary Associations and Community Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillman, Don A.; And Others

    This study examined overlapping membership of voluntary associations as the basis of a statistical technique for analyzing community structure. An underlying assumption was that organizations select certain membership linkages in preference to others within a community. Thus one would expect to find points of integration and cleavage among…

  4. Informal Learning and the Voluntary Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Robin

    2011-01-01

    While people might not be familiar with the term "voluntary arts", they are probably either involved with some voluntary arts activity themselves or they know someone who is. They use "voluntary arts" to mean any situation in which someone is voluntarily participating in an art form for pleasure, social reasons, skills development, and so on, but…

  5. The Commitment and Job Tenure of New Employees: Some Evidence of Postdecisional Justification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Charles A., III; Caldwell, David F.

    1981-01-01

    A two-year longitudinal study of 108 MBA's from a state university program found that job commitment and job satisfaction were higher after six months and job turnover was lower after two years, when the MBA's perceived the original job choice as both voluntary and irrevocable. (RW)

  6. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  7. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  8. Chronic Teacher Turnover in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guin, Kacey

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of elementary schools that experience chronic teacher turnover and the impacts of turnover on a school's working climate and ability to effectively function. Based on evidence from staff climate surveys and case studies, it is clear that high turnover schools face significant organizational challenges.…

  9. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  10. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  11. Perceived importance of employees' traits in the service industry.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rense; Houran, James

    2009-04-01

    Selection assessments are common practice to help reduce employee turnover in the service industry, but as too little is known about employees' characteristics, which are valued most highly by human resources professionals, a sample of 108 managers and human resources professionals rated the perceived importance of 31 performance traits for Line, Middle, and Senior employees. Rasch scaling analyses indicated strong consensus among the respondents. Nonsocial skills, abilities, and traits such as Ethical Awareness, Self-motivation, Writing Skills, Verbal Ability, Creativity, and Problem Solving were rated as more important for higher level employees. By contrast, traits which directly affect the interaction with customers and coworkers (Service Orientation, Communication Style, Agreeableness, Sense of Humor, Sensitivity to Diversity, Group Process, and Team Building) were rated as more important for lower level employees. Respondents' age and sex did not substantially alter these findings. Results are discussed in terms of improving industry professionals' perceived ecological and external validities of generic and customized assessments of employee. PMID:19610487

  12. Benchmarking of homogeneous electrocatalysts: overpotential, turnover frequency, limiting turnover number.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Passard, Guillaume; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-29

    In relation to contemporary energy challenges, a number of molecular catalysts for the activation of small molecules, mainly based on transition metal complexes, have been developed. The time has thus come to develop tools allowing the benchmarking of these numerous catalysts. Two main factors of merit are addressed. One involves their intrinsic catalytic performances through the comparison of "catalytic Tafel plots" relating the turnover frequency to the overpotential independently of the characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The other examines the effect of deactivation of the catalyst during the course of electrolysis. It introduces the notion of the limiting turnover number as a second key element of catalyst benchmarking. How these two factors combine with one another to control the course of electrolysis is analyzed in detail, leading to procedures that allow their separate estimation from measurements of the current, the charge passed, and the decay of the catalyst concentration. Illustrative examples from literature data are discussed. PMID:25757058

  13. Propensity to Leave versus Probability of Leaving: The Relationship between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Satisfaction in the Voluntary Leaving Behavior of IT Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents a quantitative analysis of the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction and the voluntary leaving behavior of IT professionals. In addition, the study adds to the validity and reliability of the Udechukwu and Mujtaba Mathematical Turnover Model. Surveyed within the study for their intrinsic and…

  14. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  15. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  16. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  17. Perceived supervisor support: contributions to perceived organizational support and employee retention.

    PubMed

    Eisenberger, Robert; Stinglhamber, Florence; Vandenberghe, Christian; Sucharski, Ivan L; Rhoades, Linda

    2002-06-01

    Three studies investigated the relationships among employees' perception of supervisor support (PSS), perceived organizational support (POS), and employee turnover. Study 1 found, with 314 employees drawn from a variety of organizations, that PSS was positively related to temporal change in POS, suggesting that PSS leads to POS. Study 2 established, with 300 retail sales employees, that the PSS-POS relationship increased with perceived supervisor status in the organization. Study 3 found, with 493 retail sales employees, evidence consistent with the view that POS completely mediated a negative relationship between PSS and employee turnover. These studies suggest that supervisors, to the extent that they are identified with the organization, contribute to POS and, ultimately, to job retention. PMID:12090614

  18. The impact of sexual harassment on job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and absenteeism: findings from Pakistan compared to the United States.

    PubMed

    Merkin, Rebecca S; Shah, Muhammad Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast how differences in perceptions of sexual harassment impact productive work environments for employees in Pakistan as compared to the US; in particular, how it affects job satisfaction, turnover, and/or absenteeism. This study analyzed employee responses in Pakistan (n = 146) and the United States (n = 102, 76) using questionnaire data. Significant results indicated that employees who were sexually harassed reported (a) a decrease in job satisfaction (b) greater turnover intentions and (c) a higher rate of absenteeism. Cross-cultural comparisons indicated that (a) Pakistani employees who were sexually harassed had greater job dissatisfaction and higher overall absenteeism than did their US counterparts and (b) Pakistani women were more likely to use indirect strategies to manage sexual harassment than were US targets. PMID:24851198

  19. 16 CFR 1031.6 - Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY... standard development committee or group and take an active part in the discussions of the committee and in... to do so. (e) In the event of duplication of effort by two or more groups (either inside or...

  20. 16 CFR 1031.6 - Extent and form of Commission involvement in the development of voluntary standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Extent and form of Commission involvement in... SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.6 Extent and form of Commission involvement in the...

  1. Lived Experiences of Information Technology Middle Managers Regarding Voluntary Turnover: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Felecia Ann

    2011-01-01

    Leaving information technology (IT) management positions voluntarily can have adverse effects on productivity and knowledge retention among ethnic minorities. Despite organizational efforts to leverage diversity across leadership positions and to comply with governmental laws that protect ethnic minorities from discriminatory practices, ethnic…

  2. Examining the effects of turnover intentions on organizational citizenship behaviors and deviance behaviors: A psychological contract approach.

    PubMed

    Mai, Ke Michael; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Christian, Jessica Siegel; Porter, Christopher O L H

    2016-08-01

    Although turnover intentions are considered the most proximal antecedent of organizational exit, there is often temporal separation between thinking about leaving and actual exit. Using field data from 2 diverse samples of working adults, we explore a causal model of the effects of turnover intentions on employee behavior while they remain with the organization, focusing specifically on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) and deviance behaviors (DBs). Utilizing expectancy theory as an explanatory framework, we argue that turnover intentions result in high levels of transactional contract orientation and low levels of relational contract orientation, which in turn lead to a decrease in the incidence of OCBs and an increase in the incidence of DBs. We first used a pilot study to investigate the direction of causality between turnover intentions and psychological contract orientations. Then, in Study 1, we tested our mediated model using a sample of employees from a large drug retailing chain. In Study 2, we expanded our model by arguing that the mediated effects are much stronger when the organization is deemed responsible for potential exit. We then tested our full model using a sample of employees from a large state-owned telecommunications corporation in China. Across both studies, results were generally consistent and supportive of our hypotheses. We discuss the implications of our findings for future theory, research, and practice regarding the management of both the turnover process and discretionary behaviors at work. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27077526

  3. Revisiting nurse turnover costs: adjusting for inflation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2008-01-01

    Organizational knowledge of nurse turnover costs is important, but gathering these data frequently may not always be feasible in today's fast-paced and complex healthcare environment. The author presents a method to inflation adjust baseline nurse turnover costs using the Consumer Price Index. This approach allows nurse executives to gain current knowledge of organizational nurse turnover costs when primary data collection is not practical and to determine costs and potential savings if nurse retention investments are made. PMID:18157000

  4. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  5. Voluntary wheel running is beneficial to the amino acid profile of lysine-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kenji; Bannai, Makoto; Seki, Shinobu; Kawai, Nobuhiro; Mori, Masato; Takahashi, Michio

    2010-06-01

    Rats voluntarily run up to a dozen kilometers per night when their cages are equipped with a running wheel. Daily voluntary running is generally thought to enhance protein turnover. Thus, we sought to determine whether running worsens or improves protein degradation caused by a lysine-deficient diet and whether it changes the utilization of free amino acids released by proteolysis. Rats were fed a lysine-deficient diet and were given free access to a running wheel or remained sedentary (control) for 4 wk. Amino acid levels in plasma, muscle, and liver were measured together with plasma insulin levels and tissue weight. The lysine-deficient diet induced anorexia, skeletal muscle loss, and serine and threonine aminoacidemia, and it depleted plasma insulin and essential amino acids in skeletal muscle. Allowing rats to run voluntarily improved these symptoms; thus, voluntary wheel running made the rats less susceptible to dietary lysine deficiency. Amelioration of the declines in muscular leucine and plasma insulin observed in running rats could contribute to protein synthesis together with the enhanced availability of lysine and other essential amino acids in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that voluntary wheel running under lysine-deficient conditions does not enhance protein catabolism; on the contrary, it accelerates protein synthesis and contributes to the maintenance of muscle mass. The intense nocturnal voluntary running that characterizes rodents might be an adaptation of lysine-deficient grain eaters that allows them to maximize opportunities for food acquisition. PMID:20233939

  6. The importance of work conditions and health for voluntary job mobility: a two-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changing jobs is part of modern working life. Within occupational health, job mobility has mainly been studied in terms of employees’ intentions to leave their jobs. In contrast to actual turnover, turnover intentions are not definite and only reflect the probability that an individual will change job. The aim of this study was to determine what work conditions predict voluntary job mobility and to examine if good health or burnout predicts voluntary job mobility. Methods The study was based on questionnaire data from 792 civil servants. The data were analysed using logistic regressions. Results Low variety and high autonomy were associated with increased voluntary job mobility. However, the associations between health and voluntary job mobility did not reach significance. Possible explanations for the null results may be that the population was homogeneous, and that the instruments for measuring global health are too coarse for a healthy, working population. Conclusions Voluntary job mobility may be predicted by high autonomy and low variety. The former may reflect that individuals with high autonomy have stronger career development motives; the latter may reflect the fact that low variety leads to job dissatisfaction. In contrast to our results on job content, global health measurements are not strong predictors of voluntary job mobility. This may be because good health affects job mobility through several offsetting channels, involving the resources and ability to seek a new job. Future work should use more detailed measurements of health or examine other work settings so that we may learn more about which of the offsetting effects of health dominate in different contexts. PMID:22909352

  7. Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ⋆

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

  8. Promotion and resignation in employee networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jia; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Linyan; Wan, Xue-Song; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Enterprises have put more and more emphasis on data analysis so as to obtain effective management advices. Managers and researchers are trying to dig out the major factors that lead to employees' promotion and resignation. Most previous analyses are based on questionnaire survey, which usually consists of a small fraction of samples and contains biases caused by psychological defense. In this paper, we successfully collect a data set consisting of all the employees' work-related interactions (action network, AN for short) and online social connections (social network, SN for short) of a company, which inspires us to reveal the correlations between structural features and employees' career development, namely promotion and resignation. Through statistical analysis, we show that the structural features of both AN and SN are correlated and predictive to employees' promotion and resignation, and the AN has higher correlation and predictability. More specifically, the in-degree in AN is the most relevant indicator for promotion, while the k-shell index in AN and in-degree in SN are both very predictive to resignation. Our results provide a novel and actionable understanding of enterprise management and suggest that to enhance the interplays among employees, no matter work-related or social interplays, can be helpful to reduce staffs' turnover risk.

  9. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  10. Determinants of employee punctuality.

    PubMed

    Dishon-Berkovits, Miriam; Koslowsky, Meni

    2002-12-01

    Although researchers have studied employee lateness empirically (e.g., S. Adler & J. Golan, 1981; C. W. Clegg, 1983), few have attempted to describe the punctual employee. In the present study, results of a discriminant analysis on employees in Israel indicated that a personality characteristic, time urgency, a subcomponent of Type A behavioral pattern, distinguished between punctual and late employees. Organizational commitment and age of employee's youngest child also distinguished between the groups. PMID:12450347

  11. Eight ways for employees to stay.

    PubMed

    Dutschke, Gerry

    2002-09-01

    According to the US Department of Labor, company costs for replacing an employee equal one-third of a new hire's annual salary. Normal turnover costs' effect on a home care agency's bottom line is currently compounded by the fact that beyond the media hype, the nursing shortage is very real. Home Health Services of Dallas has a successful strategy for staff retention that has assisted in retaining many of the home health aides and other staff since the agency opened in 1974. PMID:12244806

  12. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This presentation, presented at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in December 2014, outlines the voluntary market in 2013, including community choice aggregation and community solar.

  13. 75 FR 47504 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... America. TTT helps relieve teacher shortages, especially in math, science, special education, and other...) Support the off-duty, voluntary education programs of DoD and conduct special projects and developmental... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 68 RIN 0790-AI50 Voluntary Education Programs AGENCY: Office of...

  14. 22 CFR 127.12 - Voluntary disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary disclosures. 127.12 Section 127.12 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.12 Voluntary disclosures. (a) General policy. The Department strongly encourages the disclosure of information to the Directorate of...

  15. 78 FR 51678 - Voluntary Education Programs; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... 14, 2013 (78 FR 49382-49400), the Department of Defense published a proposed rule titled Voluntary Education Programs. Subsequent to the publication of the proposed rule in the Federal Register, DoD... Part 68 RIN 0790-AJ06 Voluntary Education Programs; Correction AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary...

  16. 78 FR 6208 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ...: On Friday, December 7, 2012 (77 FR 72941-72956), the Department of Defense published a final rule in the Federal Register titled Voluntary Education Programs. Subsequent to the publication of that rule... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 68 RIN 0790-AI50 Voluntary Education Programs AGENCY: Office of...

  17. Ohio's Resource Guide for Voluntary Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springfield-Clark Joint Vocational School, Springfield, OH.

    Voluntary skill standards are industry-based, industry-verified performance specifications that identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities individuals need for success in an industry. This resource guide is designed to raise awareness of voluntary skill standards, identify their benefits, and encourage stakeholder involvement in implementation…

  18. Extending experiences of voluntary action by association.

    PubMed

    Khalighinejad, Nima; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    "Sense of agency" refers to the experience that links one's voluntary actions to their external outcomes. It remains unclear whether this ubiquitous experience is hardwired, arising from specific signals within the brain's motor systems, or rather depends on associative learning, through repeated cooccurrence of voluntary movements and their outcomes. To distinguish these two models, we asked participants to trigger a tone by a voluntary keypress action. The voluntary action was always associated with an involuntary movement of the other hand. We then tested whether the combination of the involuntary movement and tone alone might now suffice to produce a sense of agency, even when the voluntary action was omitted. Sense of agency was measured using an implicit marker based on time perception, namely a shift in the perceived time of the outcome toward the action that caused it. Across two experiments, repeatedly pairing an involuntary movement with a voluntary action induced key temporal features of agency, with the outcome now perceived as shifted toward the involuntary movement. This shift required involuntary movements to have been previously associated with voluntary actions. We show that some key aspects of agency may be transferred from voluntary actions to involuntary movements. An internal volitional signal is required for the primary acquisition of agency but, with repeated association, the involuntary movement in itself comes to produce some key temporal features of agency over the subsequent outcome. This finding may explain how humans can develop an enduring sense of agency in nonnatural cases, like brain-machine interfaces. PMID:27436902

  19. 12 CFR 650.10 - Voluntary liquidation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary liquidation. 650.10 Section 650.10 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION GENERAL PROVISIONS § 650.10 Voluntary liquidation. (a) The Corporation may voluntarily...

  20. 14 CFR 234.7 - Voluntary reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voluntary reporting. 234.7 Section 234.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.7 Voluntary reporting. (a) In addition to...

  1. 14 CFR 234.7 - Voluntary reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary reporting. 234.7 Section 234.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.7 Voluntary reporting. (a) In addition to...

  2. Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

  3. Voluntary Task Switching: Chasing the Elusive Homunculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Catherine M.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2005-01-01

    In the voluntary task switching procedure, subjects choose the task to perform on a series of bivalent stimuli, requiring top-down control of task switching. Experiments 1-3 contrasted voluntary task switching and explicit task cuing. Choice behavior showed small, inconsistent effects of external stimulus characteristics, supporting the assumption…

  4. Voluntary Support of Education, 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the 1982-1983 Survey of Voluntary Support of Education are presented, including a narrative summary and detailed statistical tables. Reports of voluntary support are presented for 1,137 institutions, and support patterns over the past decade are examined, along with patterns for a core group participating in two successive surveys.…

  5. Voluntary Support of Education, 1980-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the 1980-1981 Survey of Voluntary Support of Education are presented, including a narrative summary and detailed statistical tables. Reports of voluntary support are presented for 928 institutions, and support patterns over the last decade are examined, along with patterns for a core group participating in two successive surveys.…

  6. Contextual Factors Related to Elementary Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partlow, Michelle C.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of school leadership instability and how it affects schools and student achievement has been studied. The question of how to predict turnover of the principal remains an unknown. The purpose of this research was to search for possible relationships between certain contextual variables and principal turnover and to test the independent…

  7. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  8. Mitochondrial Turnover in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial quality control is increasingly recognized as an essential element in maintaining optimally functioning tissues. Mitochondrial quality control depends upon a balance between biogenesis and autophagic destruction. Mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission) allows for the redistribution of mitochondrial components. We speculate that this permits sorting of highly functional components into one end of a mitochondrion, while damaged components are segregated at the other end, to be jettisoned by asymmetric fission followed by selective mitophagy. Ischemic preconditioning requires autophagy/mitophagy, resulting in selective elimination of damaged mitochondria, leaving behind a population of robust mitochondria with a higher threshold for opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. In this review we will consider the factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and destruction, the machinery involved in both processes, and the biomedical consequences associated with altered mitochondrial turnover. PMID:21147177

  9. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  10. Family planning and voluntary workers.

    PubMed

    Bhende, A

    1968-01-01

    The Family Planning Communication Action Research Projects at the Demographic Training and Research Centre, DTRC, Bombay, and the Planning Research and Action Institute (PRAI) Lucknow, provide guidelines for implementation of a program in which voluntary workers play an important role. DTRC has concentrated on urban areas and PRAI on rural areas. In selecting the volunteers, emphasis is on involving those who are already active in community affairs, or those who wield some degree of influence. In rural areas, the literacy level of the leaders is an important factor, as well as those who have a wide circle of acquaintances. The training programs conducted by the DTRC are for 3-5 days, covering 6-10 hours, and the involvement of some local association is always sought. It is found that an informal, permissive atmosphere, the use of visual aids, the distribution of reference material, and the lecture and group discussion methods are effective in orienting the participants to family planning educational activities. The PRAI trains the workers 1st through individual visits, and then when a good number have participated for 3 or 4 months, a training camp is organized. When high officials attend and address these camps, and when certificates and badges are distributed, it serves to keep up the enthusiasm. The main problem in both urban and rural area are sustaining the interest of the volunteer and involving men as volunteers. Where cash incentives are not feasible, newspaper and radio publicity is effective, and words of recognition and appreciation also help. Where male volunteers are involved, it is found that they can work well in their places of employment rather than in residential communities. In highly cosmopolitan areas, various linquestic groups live side by side, and it is necessary to enroll voluntary workers from the individual groups. PMID:12338667

  11. Factors influencing the rate of job turnover among hospital pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Smith, S N; Stewart, J E; Grussing, P G

    1986-08-01

    Factors influencing the rate of job turnover among hospital pharmacists were studied. In June 1982, pharmacists and pharmacy directors in acute-care hospitals in the Chicago area with more than 100 beds were asked both open-ended and multiple-choice questions pertaining to reasons for accepting and staying at current jobs, reasons for leaving previous and possibly current jobs, career goals, and demographic data. From the sample of 529 pharmacists, 217 (41%) usable responses were received. Pharmacy directors' responses indicated that the turnover rate for pharmacists was 14.4% and that relocation and layoffs or job termination were the most common reasons for job turnover. Overall, pharmacists' pay and benefits and opportunity for promotion or advancement were the reasons pharmacists cited most frequently both for leaving a job and for staying at a job. Men ranked pay and benefits as the most important reason for taking and staying at a position and for leaving, whereas women cited hospital location as the most important reason for taking, staying at, or leaving a job. Other factors cited as important were working hours, professional challenge, job duties, and continuation of education. Pharmacists who had been in the current job for more than two years were less likely to leave. Pregnancy of the employee or spouse was not a strong reason for leaving, and relocation was a more important reason for women than for men. Approximately half the respondents indicated they had a career goal; promotion to management and continuation of education were the goals most frequently mentioned. Regional or national studies should be conducted to gain further understanding of why pharmacists accept, remain in, and change jobs. PMID:3752133

  12. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. PMID:26686529

  13. Documenting Employee Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Jason

    2009-01-01

    One of the best ways for a child care program to lose an employment-related lawsuit is failure to document the performance of its employees. Documentation of an employee's performance can provide evidence of an employment-related decision such as discipline, promotion, or discharge. When properly implemented, documentation of employee performance…

  14. Improvements to Kramers turnover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    The Kramers turnover problem, that is, obtaining a uniform expression for the rate of escape of a particle over a barrier for any value of the external friction was solved in the 1980s. Two formulations were given, one by Mel'nikov and Meshkov (MM) [V. I. Mel'nikov and S. V. Meshkov, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 1018 (1986), 10.1063/1.451844], which was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion of the particle in the presence of friction. The other, by Pollak, Grabert, and Hänggi (PGH) [E. Pollak, H. Grabert, and P. Hänggi, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4073 (1989), 10.1063/1.456837], valid also for memory friction, was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion along the collective unstable normal mode of the particle. Both theories did not take into account the temperature dependence of the average energy loss to the bath. Increasing the bath temperature will reduce the average energy loss. In this paper, we analyse this effect, using a novel perturbation theory. We find that within the MM approach, the thermal energy gained from the bath diverges, the average energy gain becomes infinite implying an essential failure of the theory. Within the PGH approach increasing the bath temperature reduces the average energy loss but only by a finite small amount of the order of the inverse of the reduced barrier height. Then, this does not seriously affect the theory. Analysis and application for a cubic potential and Ohmic friction are presented.

  15. 5 CFR 831.405 - Interest on voluntary contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest on voluntary contributions. 831.405 Section 831.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Voluntary Contributions § 831.405 Interest on voluntary contributions. (a) Interest on voluntary contributions...

  16. 5 CFR 831.405 - Interest on voluntary contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interest on voluntary contributions. 831.405 Section 831.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Voluntary Contributions § 831.405 Interest on voluntary contributions. (a) Interest on voluntary contributions...

  17. 24 CFR 972.212 - Timing of voluntary conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Timing of voluntary conversion. 972... URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Voluntary Conversion of Public Housing Developments Voluntary Conversion Procedure § 972.212 Timing of voluntary conversion. (a) A...

  18. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804...-Related Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall...

  19. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904... Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to initiating a voluntary emission recall program, must submit to the EPA the following...

  20. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804...-Related Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall...

  1. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting... Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving an engine,...

  2. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting... Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any manufacturer or remanufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall...

  3. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904... Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to initiating a voluntary emission recall program, must submit to the EPA the following...

  4. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall reporting... Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving an engine,...

  5. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Voluntary emission recall. 91.904... Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to initiating a voluntary emission recall program, must submit to the EPA the following...

  6. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting... Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving an engine,...

  7. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804...-Related Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall...

  8. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting... Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving an engine,...

  9. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall reporting... Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any manufacturer or remanufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall...

  10. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904... Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to initiating a voluntary emission recall program, must submit to the EPA the following...