Science.gov

Sample records for wake field suppression

  1. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Wake Field work at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Weilland, T.

    1985-10-01

    At DESY, we are investigating the applicability of the ''Wake Field Transformer'' concept for high gradient acceleration of particles. In this paper we focus on the experiment which is under construction. We have built a 8 MeV high current linac for generation of a hollow driving beam of 1 ..mu..Cou lomb charge. The hollow beam gun came into operation in March 1985 and is laser driven with a tungsten (or tantalum) cathode. This new type of gun does not need extremely high vacuum and is very reliable. The linac will come into operation in May. By the end of 1985, we hope to have first results from the Wake Field Transformer operation. All parts including the gun, linac cavities, solenoid coils and the transformer have already been manufactured.

  3. Wake fields and energy spread for the ERHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Kayran, D.

    2011-10-16

    Wake fields in high-current ERLs can cause significant beam quality degradations. Here we summarize effects of coherent synchrotron radiation, resistive wall, accelerating cavities and wall roughness for ERL parameters of the eRHIC project. A possibility of compensation of such correlated energy spread is also presented. An emphasis in the discussion is made on the suppression of coherent synchrotron radiation due to shielding and a possible reduction of wall roughness effects for realistic surfaces.

  4. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  5. Field Line Bend in the Lunar Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Khurana, Krishan; Kivelson, Margaret; Wan, Weixing; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yiding; Le, Huijun; Shi, Quanqi; Liu, Wenlong

    2015-04-01

    By taking advantage of the magnetic field measurements simultaneously observed by two ARTEMIS satellites in the Moon's upstream solar wind and in the downstream wake, we characterized the magnetic field line bends in the lunar wake. Magnetic flux tube are observed to be squeezed by the pressure gradient force in the Y direction; while in the XZ plane the field line bends can be decomposed to two components, according to the conventional diamagnetic current theory, caused by the pressure gradients in the X and Z directions, respectively. Our calculations show that, however, the pressure gradient in the X direction is not strong enough to make the field line bend as we observed and that additional processes are needed to make the field line bulge towards the Moon. The effect of the finite conductivity inside the Moon body can bend field lines in wake to the Moon, which, however, is eliminated since it seems not consistent with our observations. The interaction (pickup) between the heavy charged lunar dust grains floating above the lunar surface and the solar wind provides a reasonable mechanism both to slow down the solar wind plasma and bulge the magnetic field line towards the Moon. According to our calculations, the current associated with the pickup process is ~3×10-9 A/m2 and the Pedersen conductivity of the lunar dust is ~2×10-6 S/m. Thus, the field line bend in the lunar wake may provide another clue to the existence of the lunar dust other than the 'lunar horizon glow.

  6. Optically guided laser wake-field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Krall, J.; Ting, A.; Joyce, G. )

    1993-07-01

    The laser wake-field acceleration concept is studied using a general axisymmetric formulation based on relativistic fluid equations. This formalism is valid for arbitrary laser intensities and allows the laser--plasma interaction to be simulated over long propagation distances (many Rayleigh lengths). Several methods for optically guiding the laser pulse are examined, including relativistic guiding, preformed plasma density channels and tailored pulse profiles. Self-modulation of the laser, which occurs when the pulse length is long compared to the plasma wavelength and the power exceeds the critical power, is also examined. Simulations of three possible laser wake-field accelerator (LWFA) configurations are performed and discussed: (i) a channel-guided LWFA, (ii) a tailored-pulse LWFA, and (iii) a self-modulated LWFA.

  7. Modeling laser wake field acceleration with QUICKPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis; Huang, Chengkun; Decyk, Viktor; Zhou, Miaomiao; Tzoufras, Michail; Lu, Wei; Tsung, Frank; Mori, Warren; Cooley, James; Antonsen, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    We model laser wake field acceleration with the Quasi Static PIC code QUICKPIC, in both uniform and parabolic plasma channels. Since in LWFA the laser evolution is much slower than the plasma response, QUICKPIC employs the Quasi Static Approximation, where the plasma response is calculated through a quasi-static field solver for each 2d slice. The laser is evolved according to the ponderomotive guiding center approximation, with time steps that correctly resolve distances on the order of the rayleigh length. We focus our research in the current state of the art experimental laser and plasma parameters. Our simulations show computational speed up of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in comparison to full 3D PIC simulations in OSIRIS. We find very good agreement between the codes.

  8. Dreaming and personality: Wake-dream continuity, thought suppression, and the Big Five Inventory.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Josie E

    2015-12-15

    Studies have found relationships between dream content and personality traits, but there are still many traits that have been underexplored or have had questionable conclusions drawn about them. Experimental work has found a 'rebound' effect in dreams when thoughts are suppressed prior to sleep, but the effect of trait thought suppression on dream content has not yet been researched. In the present study participants (N=106) reported their Most Recent Dream, answered questions about the content of the dream, and completed questionnaires measuring trait thought suppression and the 'Big Five' personality traits. Of these, 83 were suitably recent for analyses. A significant positive correlation was found between trait thought suppression and participants' ratings of dreaming of waking-life emotions, and high suppressors reported dreaming more of their waking-life emotions than low suppressors did. The results may lend support to the compensation theory of dreams, and/or the ironic process theory of mental control. PMID:26496477

  9. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  10. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM); Jones, Michael E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  11. Wake fields and energy spread for the eRHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Kayran, D.

    2011-10-16

    Wake fields in high-current ERLs can cause significant beam quality degradations. Here we summarize effects of coherent synchrotron radiation, resistive wall, accelerating cavities and wall roughness for ERL parameters of the eRHIC project. A possibility of compensation of such correlated energy spread is also presented. An emphasis in the discussion is made on the suppression of coherent synchrotron radiation due to shielding and a possible reduction of wall roughness effects for realistic surfaces. In this report we discuss the wake fields with a focus on their effect on the energy spread of the beam. Other effects of wake fields are addressed elsewhere. An energy spread builds up during a pass though a very long beam transport in the eRHIC ERL under design. Such energy spread become important when beam is decelerated to low energy, and needs to be corrected. Several effects, such as Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR), Resistive Wall (RW), accelerating RF cavities (RF) and Wall Roughness (WR) were considered. In this paper, we briefly summarize major contributions to energy spread from the wake fields for eRHIC parameters, and present possible energy spread compensation for decelerated beam. In the rest of the report we discuss effects which we believe are suppressed for the eRHIC parameters.

  12. Wake Vortex Field Measurement Program at Memphis, Tennessee: Data Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, S. D.; Dasey, T. J.; Freehart, R. E.; Heinrichs, R. M.; Mathews, M. P.; Perras, G. H.; Rowe, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Eliminating or reducing current restrictions in the air traffic control system due to wake vortex considerations would yield increased capacity, decreased delays, and cost savings. Current wake vortex separation standards are widely viewed as very conservative under most conditions. However, scientific uncertainty about wake vortex behavior under different atmospheric conditions remains a barrier to development of an adaptive vortex spacing system. The objective of the wake vortex field measurement efforts during December, 1994 and August, 1995 at Memphis, TN were to record wake vortex behavior for varying atmospheric conditions and types of aircraft. This effort is part of a larger effort by the NASA Langley Research Center to develop an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) as an element of the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The TAP program is being performed in concert with the FAA Terminal Air Traffic Control Automation (TATCA) program and ATC Automation. Wake vortex behavior was observed using a mobile continuous-wave (CW) coherent laser Doppler radar (lidar) developed at Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar features a number of improvements over previous systems, including the first-ever demonstration of an automatic wake vortex detection and tracking algorithm.

  13. Mariner 10 magnetic field observations of the Venus wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements made over a 21-hour interval during the Mariner 10 encounter with Venus were used to study the down-stream region of the solar wind-Venus interaction over a distance of approximately 100 R sub v. For most of the day before closest approach the spacecraft was located in a sheath-like region which was apparently bounded by planetary bow shock on the outer side and either a planetary wake boundary or transient boundary-like feature on the inner side. The spacecraft made multiple encounters with the wake-like boundary during the 21-hour interval with an increasing frequency as it approached the planet. Each pass into the wake boundary from the sheath region was consistently characterized by a slight decrease in magnetic field magnitude, a marked increase in the frequency and amplitude of field fluctuations, and a systematic clockwise rotation of the field direction when viewed from above the plane of the planet orbit.

  14. Localized wake-field excitation and relativistic wave-breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, G.; Laedke, E. W.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2007-10-01

    The localized wake-field behavior behind a short laser pulse is analyzed numerically as well as analytically in one space dimension. A laser pulse propagating in an underdense plasma oscillates in amplitude and width. Within a certain parameter regime, the variations may be near the threshold for wake-field generation. During the times when the width becomes small enough, localized electrostatic wave-packets are generated. The latter may have amplitudes in the relativistic regime. The breaking of the wake-field wave packets is investigated. Known criteria for wave-breaking are generalized to the relativistic and inhomogeneous cases. It is found that relativistic, inhomogeneous packets break without threshold; however, not, in general, on the first oscillation. The time for wave-breaking can be estimated. The numerical findings are proven analytically by making use of a Lagrangian coordinate formulation.

  15. Waking.

    PubMed

    Moon, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    An indubitable aspect of laboring in the realm of hospice care is the "everydayness" of human loss or the stark encounter of death in the human experience. This can pose as opportunity to adopt each day in a particular manner. As such, the focus of my reflection is on transposing certain dynamics of a (funeral) wake to broader professional and personal socioexistential processes. PMID:22811212

  16. Suppression of wake-induced vibration of tandem cylinders with free-to-rotate control plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assi, G. R. S.; Bearman, P. W.; Kitney, N.; Tognarelli, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Experiments have been carried out on a pair of circular cylinders to investigate the effectiveness of pivoting parallel plates as wake-induced vibration suppressors. Measurements of amplitude of vibration and average drag are presented for a circular cylinder, free to respond in the cross-flow direction, with mass ratio 2 and a damping level of 0.7% of critical damping. Reduced velocities were up to nearly 30, with associated Reynolds numbers up to 2.3×104 and the results presented are for a centre-to-centre separation of cylinders of 4 diameters. It is shown how vortex-induced vibration and wake-induced vibration of the downstream cylinder of a tandem pair can be practically eliminated by using free to rotate parallel plates. The device achieves vibration suppression with a substantial drag reduction when compared to a pair of fixed tandem cylinders at the same Reynolds number. Results for a single splitter plate and helical strakes are also presented for comparison and were found not to be effective in suppressing wake-induced vibration.

  17. ARTEMIS observations of extreme diamagnetic fields in the lunar wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Fatemi, S.; Halekas, J. S.; Holmström, M.; Delory, G. T.

    2014-06-01

    We present two Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) observations of diamagnetic fields in the lunar wake at strengths exceeding twice the ambient magnetic field during high plasma beta conditions. The first observation was 350 km from the lunar surface while the Moon was located in the terrestrial magnetosheath with elevated particle temperatures. The second observation was in the solar wind ranging from 500 to 2000 km downstream, with a relatively low magnetic field strength of approximately 1.6 nT. In both cases, the plasma beta exceeded 10. We discuss the observations and compare the data to hybrid plasma simulations in order to validate the model under such extreme conditions and to elucidate the global structure of the lunar wake during these observations. The extreme nature of the diamagnetic field in the lunar wake provides an important end-member test case for theoretical and modeling studies of the various plasma processes operating in the lunar wake.

  18. Experimental studies of plasma wake-field acceleration and focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cole, B.; Ho, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Mtingwa, S.; Norem, J.; Rosing, M.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1989-07-18

    More than four years after the initial proposal of the Plasma Wake-field Accelerator (PWFA), it continues to be the object of much investigation, due to the promise of the ultra-high accelerating gradients that can exist in relativistic plasma waves driven in the wake of charged particle beams. These large amplitude plasma wake-fields are of interest in the laboratory, both for the wealth of basic nonlinear plasma wave phenomena which can be studied, as well as for the applications of acceleration of focusing of electrons and positrons in future linear colliders. Plasma wake-field waves are also of importance in nature, due to their possible role in direct cosmic ray acceleration. The purpose of the present work is to review the recent experimental advances made in PWFA research at Argonne National Laboratory, in which many interesting beam and plasma phenomena have been observed. Emphasis is given to discussion of the nonlinear aspects of the PWFA beam-plasma interaction. 29 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Field measurements in the wake of a model wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Suhas; Taylor, Amelia; Bilbao, Argenis; Doostalab, Ali; Novoa, Santiago; Westergaard, Carsten; Hussain, Fazle; Sheng, Jian; Ren, Beibei; Giesselmann, Michael; Glauser, Mark; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    As a first step to study the dynamics of a wind farm' we experimentally explored the flow field behind a single wind turbine of diameter 1.17 m at a hub height of 6.25 m. A 10 m tower upstream of the wind farm characterizes the atmospheric conditions and its influence on the wake evolution. A vertical rake of sonic anemometers is clustered around the hub height on a second tower' 6D downstream of the turbine. We present preliminary observations from a 1- hour block of data recorded in near-neutral atmospheric conditions. The ratio of the standard deviation of power to the inflow velocity is greater than three' revealing adverse effects of inflow turbulence on the power and load fluctuations. Furthermore' the wake defect and Reynolds stress and its gradient are pronounced at 6D. The flux of energy due to Reynolds stresses is similar to that reported in wind tunnel studies. The swirl and mixing produces a constant temperature wake which results in a density jump across the wake interface. Further field measurements will explore the dynamics of a model wind farm' including the effects of atmospheric variability.

  20. Field-aligned Currents in Io's Plasma Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuxin

    2008-09-01

    Since the discovery of Io-controlled decametric radio emissions, the interaction between Io and Jovian magnetosphere has been studied intensively. Two types of interaction have been proposed so far. One is electric circuit model, in which the induced currents flow between Io and the Jovian ionosphere along the magnetic flux tube threading Io. The other is Alfvén wing model. A wing forms in the perturbed magnetic field lines behind Io, the Alfvénic currents develop in the wing rather than along the magnetic flux tubes. More recently, auroral emission associated with Io's footprint and its trailing emission were observed. Such auroral arc may extend longitudinally westward for more than 100 degrees. This trail of aurora is brightest near Io and dims with increasing downstream distance. There is no clear theoretical understanding of the physics that generates this downstream aurora. However it is generally believed that Io's plasma wake is associated with this phenomenon and field-aligned currents lead to downstream emissions. Along with the above two types of the interaction between Io and its surrounding medium, there are also two theoretical frameworks in which these downstream emissions can be interpreted. The first one is corotational lag. When an Io-perturbed (mass loading and/or Io's conductivity) magnetic flux tube moves slowly relative to Jovian magnetosphere, an electric field would be induced at the equatorial plane of the flux tube, which in turn causes a current perpendicular to the field lines that is connected by field-aligned currents. The Lorentz force due to the perpendicular current would play the role of bring the lagged plasma up to corotation. The second is Alfvén wave, in which the Io-perturbed Alfvén wave is reflected between the Jovian ionosphere and the torus edge, driving particles into loss cone. Our present study attempts to use a MHD method to solve the above problem. MHD simulations of Io-Jupiter interaction has been carried out by several groups and yielded some suggestive results, but these studies concentrated primarily on the vicinity of Io and did not treat the Jovian ionospheric effect realistically. To investigate the mechanism for emissions in the trailing tail, a model extending longitudinally more than 100 degrees and latitudinally from the southern Jovian ionosphere to the northern ionosphere is needed. In particular, such a model should reflect both the non-uniform magnetic field and the non-uniform plasma distributions together with realistic boundary conditions. To tackle this problem with available computer resources, we provide instead an equivalent approach "theory of thin filament motion". Our model is indeed a one-dimensional MHD simulation that satisfies all the above requirements and has the advantage of using much less computer resources than the earlier MHD models, which in turn allows us to try various physical conditions within limited computing time. We assume Io's plasma wake can be regarded as a tail of thin magnetic flux tubes perturbed by Io successively. In this assumption, a flux tube is considered as thin if the pressure variations across the flux tube are negligible compared to the total external pressure (gas plus magnetic pressure) representing the effects of the enveloping magnetized plasma (Jovian magnetosphere). Furthermore we assume that in Io's reference frame the variations of the physical quantities along the downstream distance do not change with time. After converting to the corotating frame, the study of Io's plasma wake can be simplified to investigate the evolution of a magnetic flux tube in Io's wake with appropriate initial conditions. Our simulations suggest that the mechanism for producing wake aurora could not be explained by either Alfvén wave or electric circuit alone, rather, the underlying physics possesses the characteristics typical for both Alfvén wave and corotational lag models. An upstream-coming flux tube must be in contact with Io for approximately 500 seconds, until a tilt angle of about 4 degrees has been develo

  1. Two-Channel Rectangular Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, G. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Didenko, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A design is presented for a two-channel 30-GHz rectangular dielectric wake field accelerator structure being built for experimental tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This structure allows for a transformer ratio T much greater than two, and permits continuous coupling of energy from drive bunches to accelerated bunches. It consists of three planar slabs of cordierite ceramic ({epsilon} = 4.7) supported within a rectangular copper block, forming a drive channel 12 mmx6 mm, and an accelerator channel 2 mmx6 mm. When driven by a 50 nC, 14 MeV single bunch available at ANL, theory predicts an acceleration field of 6 MeV/m, and T = 12.6. Inherent transverse wake forces introduce deflections and some distortion of bunch profiles during transit through the structure that are estimated to be tolerable. Additionally, a cylindrical two-channel DWFA is introduced which shares many advantages of the rectangular structure including high T, and the added virtue of axisymmetry that eliminates lowest-order transverse deflecting forces.

  2. Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator Carl B. Schroeder1 structure is the transverse instability of the particle beam. INTRODUCTION Plasma-based accelerators have. The electromagnetic wake field response of a hollow plasma channel to a driver (laser or charged particle beam

  3. A prescribed wake rotor inflow and flow field prediction analysis, user's manual and technical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A user's manual is provided which includes the technical approach for the Prescribed Wake Rotor Inflow and Flow Field Prediction Analysis. The analysis is used to provide the rotor wake induced velocities at the rotor blades for use in blade airloads and response analyses and to provide induced velocities at arbitrary field points such as at a tail surface. This analysis calculates the distribution of rotor wake induced velocities based on a prescribed wake model. Section operating conditions are prescribed from blade motion and controls determined by a separate blade response analysis. The analysis represents each blade by a segmented lifting line, and the rotor wake by discrete segmented trailing vortex filaments. Blade loading and circulation distributions are calculated based on blade element strip theory including the local induced velocity predicted by the numerical integration of the Biot-Savart Law applied to the vortex wake model.

  4. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-04-30

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  5. Nonthermal Lorentzian wake-field effects on collision processes in complex dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-10-15

    The influence of nonthermal Lorentzian wake-field on the electron-dust grain collision is investigated in complex dusty plasmas. The Eikonal method and the effective interaction potential are applied to obtain the Eikonal scattering phase shift, the differential Eikonal collision cross section, and the total Eikonal collision cross section as functions of the collision energy, the impact parameter, the Mach number, and the spectral index of Lorentzian plasma. It is found that the nonthermal effect enhances the Eikonal scattering phase shift and, however, suppresses the Eikonal collision cross section for the electron-dust grain in Lorentzian complex dusty plasmas. It is also found that the Eikonal scattering phase shift decreases with increasing Mach number and spectral index. In addition, the Eikonal collision cross section increases with an increase of the spectral index and Mach number in Lorentzian complex dusty plasmas.

  6. Measurement of velocity and vorticity fields in the wake of an airfoil in periodic pitching motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The velocity field created by the wake of an airfoil undergoing a prescribed pitching motion was sampled using hot wire anemometry. Data analysis methods concerning resolution of velocity components from cross wire data, computation of vorticity from velocity time history data, and calculation of vortex circulation from vorticity field data are discussed. These data analysis methods are applied to a flow field relevant to a two dimensional blade-vortex interaction study. Velocity time history data were differentiated to yield vorticity field data which are used to characterize the wake of the pitching airfoil. Measurement of vortex strength in sinusoidal and nonsinusoidal wakes show vortices in the sinusoidal wake have stronger circulation and more concentrated vorticity distributions than the tailored nonsinusoidal wake.

  7. Clutter suppression and classification using twin inverted pulse sonar in ship wakes.

    PubMed

    Leighton, T G; Finfer, D C; Chua, G H; White, P R; Dix, J K

    2011-11-01

    Twin inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) is here deployed in the wake of a moored rigid inflatable boat (RIB) with propeller turning, and then in the wake of a moving tanker of 4580 dry weight tonnage (the Whitchallenger). This is done first to test its ability to distinguish between scatter from the wake and scatter from the seabed, and second to test its ability to improve detectability of the seabed through the wake, compared to conventional sonar processing techniques. TWIPS does this by distinguishing between linear and nonlinear scatterers and has the further property of distinguishing those nonlinear targets which scatter energy at the even-powered harmonics from those which scatter in the odd-powered harmonics. TWIPS can also, in some manifestations, require no range correction (and therefore does not require the a priori environment knowledge necessary for most remote detection technologies). PMID:22088017

  8. Analysis of photon acceleration using laser wake fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Jong-Uk; Suk, Hyyong

    2002-11-01

    When a laser pulse is located on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave, the frequency of the laser pulse is blue-shifted and the group velocity increases. This phenomenon is called photon acceleration[1]. The interaction length between the laser pulse and the density gradient can be extended significantly by using a wake field generated by a short laser pulse propagating through plasmas. In this study, we present simulation results of the photon acceleration by one- and two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell codes, 1D-XOOPIC and OSIRIS. More than 150 percent of frequency upshift was observed in the one-dimensional simulation, but much less in the two-dimensional simulation because of laser diffraction and transverse plasma motion. The saturation mechanisms and the effects of slippage, dispersion, diffraction, and pump depletion are discussed for parameter optimization. [1] S. C. Wilks, J. M. Dawson, W. B. Mori, T. Katsouleas, and M. E. Jones, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2600 (1989).

  9. Electrons on closed field lines of lunar crustal fields in the solar wind wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, M. N.; Saito, Y.; Tsunakawa, H.; Takahashi, F.; Fujimoto, M.; Yokota, S.; Harada, Y.; Matsushima, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shimizu, H.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma signature around crustal magnetic fields is one of the most important topics of the lunar plasma sciences. Although recent spacecraft measurements are revealing solar-wind interaction with the lunar crustal fields on the dayside, plasma signatures around crustal fields on the night side have not been fully studied yet. Here we show evidence of plasma trapping on the closed field lines of the lunar crustal fields in the solar-wind wake, using SELENE (Kaguya) plasma and magnetic field data obtained at 14-15 km altitude from the lunar surface. In contrast to expectation on plasma cavity formation at the strong crustal fields, electron flux is enhanced over Crisium Antipode (CA) anomaly which is one of the strongest lunar crustal fields. The enhanced electron fluxes over the CA anomaly are characterised by (1) occasional bi-directional field-aligned beams in the lower energy range (< 150 eV) and (2) a medium energy component (150-300 eV) that has a double loss-cone distribution that represents bounce motion between the two footprints of the crustal magnetic fields. The low-energy electrons on the closed field lines may come from the lunar night side surface, while supply mechanism of medium-energy electrons on the closed field line remains to be solved. We also report that a density cavity in the wake is observed not above the strongest magnetic field but in its vicinity.

  10. Electrons on closed field lines of lunar crustal fields in the solar wind wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Saito, Yoshifumi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Harada, Yuki; Yokota, Shoichiro; Matsushima, Masaki; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi

    2015-04-01

    Plasma signature around crustal magnetic fields is one of the most important topics of the lunar plasma sciences. Although recent spacecraft measurements are revealing solar-wind interaction with the lunar crustal fields on the dayside, plasma signatures around crustal fields on the night side have not been fully studied yet. Here we show evidence of plasma trapping on the closed field lines of the lunar crustal fields in the solar-wind wake, using SELENE (Kaguya) plasma and magnetic field data obtained at 14-15 km altitude from the lunar surface. In contrast to expectation on plasma cavity formation at the strong crustal fields, electron flux is enhanced above Crisium Antipode (CA) anomaly which is one of the strongest lunar crustal fields. The enhanced electron fluxes above CA are characterised by (1) occasional bi-directional field-aligned beams in the lower energy range (< 150 eV) and (2) a medium energy component (150-300 eV) that has a double loss-cone distribution representing bounce motion between the two footprints of the crustal magnetic fields. The low-energy electrons on the closed field lines may come from the lunar night side surface, while supply mechanism of medium-energy electrons on the closed field line remains to be solved. We also report that a density cavity in the wake is observed not above the strongest magnetic field but in its vicinity.

  11. Electrons on closed field lines of lunar crustal fields in the solar wind wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Saito, Yoshifumi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Harada, Yuki; Yokota, Shoichiro; Matsushima, Masaki; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi

    2015-04-01

    Plasma signature around crustal magnetic fields is one of the most important topics of the lunar plasma sciences. Although recent spacecraft measurements are revealing solar-wind interaction with the lunar crustal fields on the dayside, plasma signatures around crustal fields on the night side have not been fully studied yet. Here we show evidence of plasma trapping on the closed field lines of the lunar crustal fields in the solar-wind wake, using SELENE (Kaguya) plasma and magnetic field data obtained at 14-15 km altitude from the lunar surface. In contrast to expectation on plasma cavity formation at the strong crustal fields, electron flux is enhanced above Crisium Antipode (CA) anomaly which is one of the strongest lunar crustal fields. The enhanced electron fluxes above CA are characterised by (1) occasional bi-directional field-aligned beams in the lower energy range (<150 eV) and (2) a medium energy component (150-300 eV) that has a double loss-cone distribution representing bounce motion between the two footprints of the crustal magnetic fields. The low-energy electrons on the closed field lines may come from the lunar night side surface, while supply mechanism of medium-energy electrons on the closed field line remains to be solved. We also report that a density cavity in the wake is observed not above the strongest magnetic field but in its vicinity.

  12. Effect of nonlinear chirped Gaussian laser pulse on plasma wake field generation

    SciTech Connect

    Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2014-08-15

    An ultrashort laser pulse propagating in plasma can excite a nonlinear plasma wake field which can accelerate charged particles up to GeV energies within a compact space compared to the conventional accelerator devices. In this paper, the effect of different kinds of nonlinear chirped Gaussian laser pulse on wake field generation is investigated. The numerical analysis of our results depicts that the excitation of plasma wave with large and highly amplitude can be accomplished by nonlinear chirped pulses. The maximum amplitude of excited wake in nonlinear chirped pulse is approximately three times more than that of linear chirped pulse. In order to achieve high wake field generation, chirp parameters and functions should be set to optimal values.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Wake Vortices Measured During the Idaho Falls and Memphis Field Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical large-eddy simulation model is under modification and testing for application to aircraft wake vortices. The model, having a meteorological framework, permits the interaction of wake vortices with environments characterized by crosswind shear, stratification, and humidity. As part of the validation process, model results are compared with measured field data from the 1990 Idaho Falls and the 1994-1995 Memphis field experiments. Cases are selected that represent different aircraft and a cross section of meteorological environments. Also included is one case with wake vortex generation in ground effect. The model simulations are initialized with the appropriate meteorological conditions and a post roll-up vortex system. No ambient turbulence is assumed in our initial set of experiments, although turbulence can be self generated by the interaction of the model wakes with the ground and environment.

  14. Flow-field Survey of an Empennage Wake Interacting with a Pusher Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field between a model empennage and a 591-mm-diameter pusher propeller was studied in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel with directional pressure probes and hot-wire anemometers. The region probed was bounded by the empennage trailing edge and downstream propeller. The wake properties, including effects of propeller operation on the empennage wake, were investigated for two empennage geometries: one, a vertical tail fin, the other, a Y-tail with a 34 deg dihedral. Results showed that the effect of the propeller on the empennage wake upstream of the propeller was not strong. The flow upstream of the propeller was accelerated in the streamwise direction by the propeller, but the empennage wake width and velocity defect were relatively unaffected by the presence of the propeller. The peak turbulence in the wake near the propeller tip station, 0.66 diameter behind the vertical tail fin, was approximately 3 percent of the free-stream velocity. The velocity field data can be used in predictions of the acoustic field due to propeller-wake interaction.

  15. Electric field effects on ion currents in satellite wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, D. E.; Katz, I.

    1985-01-01

    Small currents associated with satellite spin, dielectric conduction, or trace concentrations of H+, can have a substantial effect on the potential of a satellite and the particle currents reaching its surface. The importance of such small currents at altitudes below about 300 km stems from the extremely small 0+ currents impinging on the wake-side of the spacecraft. The particle current on the downstream side of the AE-C satellite is considered. Theoretical estimates based on a newly described constant of the motion of a particle indicate that accounting for small concentrations of H+ remove a major discrepancy between calculated and measured currents.

  16. Comparison of PIC and fluid simulations for pulse propagation in the laser wake field accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacone, R. E.; Cary, J. R.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bruhwiler, D.; Mardahl, P.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2000-10-01

    Numerical simulation results for pulse propagation in the laser wake field accelerator (LWFA) using XOOPIC, a two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic object-oriented particle-in-cell code, are presented. The results of these PIC simulations are compared against fluid simulations for long and short laser pulses, in both the standard and self-modulated LWFA regimes. The effects that boundaries have on the plasma wake are carefully investigated. We also found a range of plasma parameters where the PIC and fluid simulations are in good agreement.

  17. The effect of space-charge and wake fields in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Amundson, James; Spentzouris, Linda; McCarron, Daniel; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the impedance and the wake functions for laminated structures with parallel-planes and circular geometries. We critically examine the approximations used in the literature for the coupling impedance in laminated chambers and find that most of them are not justified because the wall surface impedance is large. A comparison between the flat and the circular geometry impedance is presented. We use the wake fields calculated for the Fermilab Booster laminated magnets in realistic beam simulations using the Synergia code. We find good agreement between our calculation of the coherent tune shift at injection energy and the experimental measurements. In this paper we calculate the impedance and the wake functions for laminated structures with parallel-planes and circular geometries. First the coupling impedance is derived as a function of the wall surface impedance. Then the surface impedance is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations inside the lamination and the crack regions. We find that the commonly used resistive-wall approximations, good for metallic pipes with small surface impedance, are not valid in the laminated structures where the surface impedance is large. Realistic Synergia simulations of the Booster machine with wake fields predict transverse coherent tune shifts in good agreement with the experiment.

  18. Volumetric visualization of the near and far field wake in flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan; Bio-Robotics Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    The flapping wings of flying animals create complex vortex wake structure, understanding its spatial and temporal distribution is fundamental to animal flight theory. In this study, we applied the volumetric 3-component velocimetry to capture both the near- and far-field flow generated by a pair of mechanical flapping wings. For the first time, the complete three-dimensional wake structure and its evolution throughout a wing stroke were quantified and presented. The general vortex wake structure maintains a quite consistent form: vortex rings in the near-field and two shear layers in the far-field. In specific, vortex rings shed periodically from the wings and are linked to each other in successive strokes. In the far-field, the shed vortex rings evolve into two parallel shear layers with dominant vorticity convected from tip and root vortices. The shear layers are nearly stationary in space compared to the periodic vortex rings shed in the near field. In addition, downwash passes through the centers of the vortex rings and extends downward between the two shear layers. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  19. On the Production of Flat Electron Bunches for Laser Wake Field Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kando, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S.V.; Tajima, T.; Chao, A.; Pitthan, R.; Schuler, K.-P.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Nemoto, K.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo

    2006-06-27

    We suggest a novel method for injection of electrons into the acceleration phase of particle accelerators, producing low emittance beams appropriate even for the demanding high energy Linear Collider specifications. In this paper we work out the injection into the acceleration phase of the wake field in a plasma behind a high intensity laser pulse, taking advantage of the laser polarization and focusing. With the aid of catastrophe theory we categorize the injection dynamics. The scheme uses the structurally stable regime of transverse wake wave breaking, when electron trajectory self-intersection leads to the formation of a flat electron bunch. As shown in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of a laser pulse in a line-focus with an underdense plasma, the electrons, injected via the transverse wake wave breaking and accelerated by the wake wave, perform betatron oscillations with different amplitudes and frequencies along the two transverse coordinates. The polarization and focusing geometry lead to a way to produce relativistic electron bunches with asymmetric emittance (flat beam). An approach for generating flat laser accelerated ion beams is briefly discussed.

  20. Generation of vortex rings by nonstationary laser wake field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N.L.; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H.A.

    2006-01-15

    A new concept of generating quasistatic magnetic fields, vortex rings, and electron jets in an isotropic homogeneous plasma is presented. The propagation of plasma waves, generated by a relativistically intense short pulse laser, is investigated by using the kinetic model and a novel nonpotential, time-dependent ponderomotive force is derived by obtaining a hydrodynamic equation of motion. This force can in turn generate quasistatic magnetic fields, vortex rings, and electron jets. It is also shown that the vortex rings can become a means for accelerating electrons, which are initially in equilibrium. The conservation of canonical momentum circulation and the frozen-in condition for the vorticity is discussed. The excitation of the vortex waves by the modulation of the amplitude of the plasma waves is considered. These vortex waves, which generate a lower hybrid mode propagating across the generated magnetic field, are also investigated.

  1. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  2. Teaching Biology Field Courses in the Wake of Environmental Disasters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca, Bart J.

    1982-01-01

    A biology field course organized to study the effects of the June 1979 Mexican oil spill on the marine biology of the shores of south Texas and Mexico is described, demonstrating how to effectively couple a biology classroom course with a natural or human caused environmental disaster. (Author/DC)

  3. Femtosecond planar electron beam source for micron-scale dielectric wake field accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Wang, Changbiao; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    A new accelerator, LACARA (laser-driven cyclotron autoresonance accelerator), under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is to be powered by a 1 TW CO2 laser beam and a 50 MeV injected electron pulse. LACARA will produce inside a 2 m, 6 T solenoid a 100 MeV gyrating electron bunch, with ~3% energy spread, approximately 1 psec in length with particles advancing in phase at the laser frequency, executing one cycle each 35 fsec. A beamstop with a small off axis channel will transmit a short beam pulse every optical cycle, thereby producing a train of about 30, 3.5 fsec long, 1-3 pC microbunches for each laser pulse. We describe here a novel accelerator, a micron-scale dielectric wake field accelerator driven by a 500 MeV LACARA-type injector that takes the output train of microbunches and transforms them into a near-rectangular cross section having a narrow dimension of ~10 ?m and height of ~150 ?m using a magnetic quadrupole; these bunches may be injected into a planar dielectric-lined waveguide (slightly larger than the bunch) where cumulative buildup of wake fields can lead to an accelerating gradient >1 GV/m. This proposed vacuum-based wake field structure is physically rigid and capable of microfabrication accuracy, factors important in staging a large number of accelerator modules. Furthermore, the accelerating gradients it promises are comparable with those for plasma accelerators. A LACARA unit for preparing suitable bunches at 500 MeV is described. Physics issues are discussed, including bunch spreading and transport, bunch shaping, coherent diffraction radiation from the aperture, dielectric breakdown, and bunch stability in the rectangular wake field structure.

  4. Electro-optic Measurement of the Wake Fields of a Relativistic Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, M. J.; Melissinos, A. C.; Colestock, P. L.; Carneiro, J.-P.; Edwards, H. T.; Hartung, W. H.

    2001-07-16

    When a relativistic electron bunch traverses a structure, strong electromagnetic fields are induced in its wake. For a 12 nC bunch of duration 4.2ps FWHM, the peak field is measured >0.5 MV/m . Time resolution of {approx}5 ps is achieved using electro-optic sampling with a lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) crystal and a short-pulse infrared laser synchronized to the beam. We present measurements for both the longitudinal and radial components of the field and relate them to the wall impedance.

  5. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Turbulent Wake of a Cylinder in MHD Channel Flow

    SciTech Connect

    John Rhoads, Eric Edlund and Hantao Ji

    2013-04-17

    Results from a free-surface MHD flow experiment are presented detailing the modi cation of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder with its axis parallel to the applied magnetic fi eld. Experiments were performed with a Reynolds number near Re ~ 104 as the interaction parameter, N = |j x#2; B| / |? (? ? ?), was increased through unity. By concurrently sampling the downstream fluid velocity at sixteen cross-stream locations in the wake, it was possible to extract an ensemble of azimuthal velocity profi les as a function of radius for vortices shed by the cylinder at varying strengths of magnetic field. Results indicate a signi cant change in vortex radius and rotation as N is increased. The lack of deviations from the vortex velocity pro file at high magnetic fi elds suggests the absence of small-scale turbulent features. By sampling the wake at three locations downstream in subsequent experiments, the decay of the vortices was examined and the effective viscosity was found to decrease as N-049±0.4. This reduction in effective viscosity is due to the modi cation of the small-scale eddies by the magnetic fi eld. The slope of the energy spectrum was observed to change from a k-1.8 power-law at low N to a k-3.5 power-law for N > 1. Together, these results suggest the flow smoothly transitioned to a quasi-two-dimensional state in the range 0 < N < 1.

  6. Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VAWT in a windfarm array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.T.; Buck, J.W.; Germain, A.C.; Hinchee, M.E.; Solt, T.S.; LeRoy, G.M.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m VAWT were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind windfarm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. The field experiment was conducted within a VAWT array consisting of more than nine VAWTs with separations 3D crosswised by 8D downwind (where D is the turbine diameter) in a staggered configuration. The array is the upwind three rows of VAWTS in a total of six rows that are on top of the Cameron Ridge plateau. The terrain features in the vicinity are reasonably regular, with an upslope of 7 deg on the average; however, several local irregularities are present. The annual hourly averaged wind speed exceeds 8 m/s at the site. The wind field and the power-outputs of nine turbines within the array were measured with wind sensors and power transducers. Nine Gill propeller and 18 Maximum cup anemometers and one direction sensor were mounted on portable and stack-up towers installed upwind and within the turbine array. From the field measurements, the velocity and power/energy deficits were derived under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. Recommendations are made for optimizing windfarm design and operations as well as for wind energy management.

  7. Critical suppression of spin Seebeck effect by magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, Takashi; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Daimon, Shunsuke; Qiu, Zhiyong; Shiomi, Yuki; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in Pt /Y3Fe5O12(YIG ) junction systems has been investigated at various magnetic fields and temperatures. We found that the LSSE voltage in a Pt/YIG-slab system is suppressed by applying high magnetic fields and this suppression is critically enhanced at low temperatures. The field-induced suppression of the LSSE in the Pt/YIG-slab system is too large at around room temperature to be explained simply by considering the effect of the Zeeman gap in magnon excitation. This result requires us to introduce a magnon-frequency-dependent mechanism into the scenario of LSSE; low-frequency magnons dominantly contribute to the LSSE. The magnetic field dependence of the LSSE voltage was observed to change by changing the thickness of YIG, suggesting that the thermospin conversion by the low-frequency magnons is suppressed in thin YIG films due to the long characteristic lengths of such magnons.

  8. The velocity and vorticity fields of the turbulent near wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James; Ong, Lawrence; Moin, Parviz

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide a detailed experimental database of velocity and vorticity statistics in the very near wake (x/d less than 10) of a circular cylinder at Reynolds number of 3900. This study has determined that estimations of the streamwise velocity component in flow fields with large nonzero cross-stream components are not accurate. Similarly, X-wire measurements of the u and v velocity components in flows containing large w are also subject to the errors due to binormal cooling. Using the look-up table (LUT) technique, and by calibrating the X-wire probe used here to include the range of expected angles of attack (+/- 40 deg), accurate X-wire measurements of instantaneous u and v velocity components in the very near wake region of a circular cylinder has been accomplished. The approximate two-dimensionality of the present flow field was verified with four-wire probe measurements, and to some extent the spanwise correlation measurements with the multisensor rake. Hence, binormal cooling errors in the present X-wire measurements are small.

  9. Observation of high-resolution wind fields and offshore wind turbine wakes using TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Tobias; Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    1. Introduction Numerous large-scale offshore wind farms have been built in European waters and play an important role in providing renewable energy. Therefore, knowledge of behavior of wakes, induced by large wind turbines and their impact on wind power output is important. The spatial variation of offshore wind turbine wake is very complex, depending on wind speed, wind direction, ambient atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stability. In this study we demonstrate the application of X-band TerraSAR-X (TS-X) data with high spatial resolution for studies on wind turbine wakes in the near and far field of the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus, located in the North Sea. Two cases which different weather conditions and different wake pattern as observed in the TS-X image are presented. 2. Methods The space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a unique sensor that provides two-dimensional information on the ocean surface. Due to their high resolution, daylight and weather independency and global coverage, SARs are particularly suitable for many ocean and coastal applications. SAR images reveal wind variations on small scales and thus represent a valuable means in detailed wind-field analysis. The general principle of imaging turbine wakes is that the reduced wind speed downstream of offshore wind farms modulates the sea surface roughness, which in turn changes the Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS, denoted by ?0) in the SAR image and makes the wake visible. In this study we present two cases at the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus to investigate turbine-induced wakes and the retrieved sea surface wind field. Using the wind streaks, visible in the TS-X image and the shadow behind the offshore wind farm, induced by turbine wake, the sea surface wind direction is derived and subsequently the sea surface wind speed is calculated using the latest generation of wind field algorithm XMOD2. 3. Case study alpha ventus Alpha Ventus is located approximately 45 km from the coast of Borkum, Germany, and consists of twelve 5-Megawatt wind power turbines. The retrieved results are validated by comparing with QuikSCAT measurements, the results of the German Weather Service (DWD) atmospheric model and in-situ measurements of wind speed and wind direction, obtained from the research platform FiNO1, installed 400 m west of Alpha Ventus. 4. Conclusion In the presented case study we quantify the wake characteristics of wake length, wake width, maximum velocity de?cit, wake merging and wake meandering. We show that SAR has the capability to map the sea surface two-dimensionally in high spatial resolution which provides a unique opportunity to observe spatial characteristics of offshore wind turbine wakes. The SAR derived information can support offshore wind farming with respect to optimal siting and design and help to estimate their effects on the environment.

  10. High-quality electron beam from laser wake-field acceleration in laser produced plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Moorti, Anand; Rathore, Ranjana; Ali Chakera, Juzer; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2013-06-10

    Generation of highly collimated ({theta}{sub div}{approx}10 mrad), quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy 12 MeV and charge {approx}50 pC has been experimentally demonstrated from self-guided laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) in a plasma plume produced by laser ablation of solid nylon (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sub n} target. A 7 TW, 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser system was used for LWFA, and the plasma plume forming pulse was derived from the Nd:YAG pump laser of the same system. The results show that a reproducible, high quality electron beam could be produced from this scheme which is simple, low cost and has the capability for high repetition rate operation.

  11. Generating ``Superponderomotive'' Electrons due to a Non-Wake-Field Interaction between a Laser Pulse and a Longitudinal Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Arefiev, A. V.; Neely, D.

    2013-08-01

    It is shown that electrons with momenta exceeding the “free electron” limit of meca02/2 can be produced when a laser pulse and a longitudinal electric field interact with an electron via a non-wake-field mechanism. The mechanism consists of two stages: the reduction of the electron dephasing rate ?-px/mec by an accelerating region of electric field and electron acceleration by the laser via the Lorentz force. This mechanism can, in principle, produce electrons that have longitudinal momenta that is a significant multiple of meca02/2. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of a relatively simple laser-plasma interaction indicate that the generation of superponderomotive electrons is strongly affected by this “antidephasing” mechanism.

  12. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Naughton, Brian Thomas; Herges, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  13. A multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:sapphire laser system for laser wake-field acceleration studies

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    A multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:sapphire laser system for laser wake-field acceleration studies and remotely controlled Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system that provides synchronized (CPA), Ti:sapphire laser system is a Kerr-lens mode-locked, chirped-mirror compensated master

  14. Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Hao, Y.; Lackner, M. A.; Barthelmie, R.; Lundquist, J.; Oxley, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this work is the comparison of the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation with field data from the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind plant composed of 36 3-MW turbines. The field data includes meteorological mast measurements, SCADA information from all turbines, and strain-gauge data from two turbines. The dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation are means of computing unsteady wind plant aerodynamics, including the important unsteady meandering of wakes as they convect downstream and interact with other turbines and wakes. Both of these models are coupled to a turbine model such that power and mechanical loads of each turbine in the wind plant are computed. We are interested in how accurately different types of waking (e.g., direct versus partial waking), can be modeled, and how background turbulence level affects these loads. We show that both the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation appear to underpredict power and overpredict fatigue loads because of wake effects, but it is unclear that they are really in error. This discrepancy may be caused by wind-direction uncertainty in the field data, which tends to make wake effects appear less pronounced.

  15. The Role of Turbulence in Chemical and Dynamical Processes in the Near-Field Wake of Subsonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. Steve

    2002-01-01

    During this grant, covering the period from September 1998 to December 2001, we continued the investigation of the role of turbulent mixing in the wake of subsonic aircraft initiated in 1994 for NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project. The goal of the research has been to provide sufficient understanding and quantitative analytical capability to assess the dynamical, chemical, and microphysical interactions in the near-field wake that have the greatest potential to influence the global atmospheric impact of the projected fleet of subsonic aircraft. Through large-eddy simulations we have shown that turbulence in the early wake dynamics can have a strong effect on both the ice microphysics of contrail evolution and on wake chemistry. The wake vortex dynamics are the primary determinant of the vertical extent of the contrail; this together with the local wind shear largely determines the horizontal extent. The fraction of the initial ice crystals surviving the wake vortex dynamics, their spatial distribution, and the ice mass distribution are all sensitive to the aircraft type, assumed initial ice crystal number, and ambient humidity and turbulence conditions. Our model indicates that there is a significant range of conditions for which a smaller aircraft such as a B737 produces as significant a persistent contrail as a larger aircraft such as a B747, even though the latter consumes almost five times as much fuel. Large-eddy simulations of the near wake of a B757 provided a fine-grained chemical-dynamical representation of simplified NOx - HOx chemistry in wakes of ages from a few seconds to several minutes. By sampling the simulated data in a manner similar to that of in situ aircraft measurements it was possible to provide a likely explanation for a puzzle uncovered in the 1996 SUCCESS flight measurements of OH and HO2 The results illustrate the importance of considering fluid dynamics effects in interpreting chemistry results when mixing rates and species fluctuations are large, and demonstrate the feasibility of using 3D unsteady LES with coupled chemistry to study such phenomena.

  16. Speckle Suppression with the Project 1640 Integral Field Spectrograph

    E-print Network

    Crepp, Justin R; Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R; Zimmerman, Neil; Hinkley, Sasha; Parry, Ian; King, David; Vasisht, Gautam; Beichman, Charles; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Dekany, Richard; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Roberts, Lewis C; Bouchez, Antonin; Roberts, Jenny; Soummer, Remi

    2010-01-01

    Project 1640 is a high-contrast imaging instrument recently commissioned at Palomar observatory. A combination of a coronagraph with an integral field spectrograph (IFS), Project 1640 is designed to detect and characterize extrasolar planets, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar material orbiting nearby stars. In this paper, we present our data processing techniques for improving upon instrument raw sensitivity via the removal of quasi-static speckles. Our approach utilizes the chromatic image diversity provided by the IFS in combination with the locally-optimized combination of images (LOCI) algorithm to suppress the intensity of residual contaminating light in close angular proximity to target stars. We describe the Project 1640 speckle suppression pipeline (PSSP) and demonstrate the ability to detect companions with brightness comparable to and below that of initial speckle intensities using on-sky commissioning data. Our preliminary results indicate that suppression factors of at least one order of magnitude a...

  17. Mean field representation of the natural and actuated cylinder wake Gilead Tadmor,1,a

    E-print Network

    Noack, Bernd R.

    of such representations, are explored along natural and forced transients of the cylinder wake flow. The shift mode cycle, but also over the corresponding at- tractive inertial manifold20 that connects the unstable fixed

  18. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  19. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  20. Electric field suppression of ultracold confined chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2010-06-15

    We consider ultracold collisions of polar molecules confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Using a quantum scattering formalism and a frame transformation method, we calculate elastic and chemical quenching rate constants for fermionic molecules. Taking {sup 40}K{sup 87}Rb molecules as a prototype, we find that the rate of quenching collisions is enhanced at zero electric field as the confinement is increased but that this rate is suppressed when the electric field is turned on. For molecules with 500 nK of collision energy, for realistic molecular densities, and for achievable experimental electric fields and trap confinements, we predict lifetimes for KRb molecules to be 1 s. We find a ratio of elastic to quenching collision rates of about 100, which may be sufficient to achieve efficient evaporative cooling of polar KRb molecules.

  1. The drag-adjoint field of a circular cylinder wake at Reynolds numbers 20, 100 and 500

    E-print Network

    Qiqi Wang; Junhui Gao

    2013-07-06

    This paper analyzes the adjoint solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. We focus on flow across a circular cylinder at three Reynolds numbers, Re_D=20, 100 and 500. The quantity of interest in the adjoint formulation is the drag on the cylinder. We use classical fluid mechanics approaches to analyze the adjoint solution, which is a vector field similar to a flow field. Production and dissipation of kinetic energy of the adjoint field is discussed. We also derive the evolution of circulation of the adjoint field along a closed material contour. These analytical results are used to explain three numerical solutions of the adjoint equations presented in this paper. The adjoint solution at Re_D=20, a viscous steady state flow, exhibits a downstream suction and an upstream jet, opposite of the expected behavior of a flow field. The adjoint solution at Re_D=100, a periodic 2D unsteady flow, exhibits periodic, bean shaped circulation in the near wake region. The adjoint solution at Re_D=500, a turbulent 3D unsteady flow, has complex dynamics created by the shear layer in the near wake. The magnitude of the adjoint solution increases exponentially at the rate of the first Lyapunov exponent. These numerical results correlate well with the theoretical analysis presented in this paper.

  2. Generation and Suppression of E Region Artificial Field Aligned Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Han, S.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and were quantified using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of the experiment was to analyze the X-mode suppression of FAIs generated from O-mode heating and to measure the threshold required to excite thermal parametric instabilities. The irregularities were excited by gradually increasing the power of a zenith pointing O-mode emission transmitted at a frequency of 2.75 MHz. To suppress the irregularities, a second X-mode emission at a higher frequency was added on alternating power cycles. The Homer radar measured the signal-to-noise ratio, Doppler shift, and spectral width of echoes reflected from the irregularities. We will calculate the threshold electric field required to excite the irregularities and compare with similar experiments in order to better understand the thermal parametric instability.

  3. Wake flowfields for Jovian probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.; Hair, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    The wake flow field developed by the Galileo probe as it enters the Jovian atmosphere was modeled. The wake produced by the probe is highly energetic, yielding both convective and radiative heat inputs to the base of the probe. A component mathematical model for the inviscid near and far wake, the viscous near and far wake, and near wake recirculation zone was developed. Equilibrium thermodynamics were used for both the ablation and atmospheric species. Flow fields for three entry conditions were calculated. The near viscous wave was found to exhibit a variable axial pressure distribution with the neck pressure approximately three times the base pressure. Peak wake flow field temperatures were found to be in proportion to forebody post shock temperatures.

  4. HIGH-GRADIENT, HIGH-TRANSFORMER-RATIO, DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12

    The Phase I work reported here responds to DoE'ss stated need "...to develop improved accelerator designs that can provide very high gradient (>200 MV/m for electrons...) acceleration of intense bunches of particles." Omega-P'�s approach to this goal is through use of a ramped train of annular electron bunches to drive a coaxial dielectric wakefield accelerator (CDWA) structure. This approach is a direct extension of the CDWA concept from acceleration in wake fields caused by a single drive bunch, to the more efficient acceleration that we predict can be realized from a tailored (or ramped) train of several drive bunches. This is possible because of a much higher transformer ratio for the latter. The CDWA structure itself has a number of unique features, including: a high accelerating gradient G, potentially with G > 1 GeV/m; continuous energy coupling from drive to test bunches without transfer structures; inherent transverse focusing forces for particles in the accelerated bunch; highly stable motion of high charge annular drive bunches; acceptable alignment tolerances for a multi-section system. What is new in the present approach is that the coaxial dielectric structure is now to be energized by-not one-�but by a short train of ramped annular-shaped drive bunches moving in the outer coaxial channel of the structure. We have shown that this allows acceleration of an electron bunch traveling along the axis in the inner channel with a markedly higher transformer ratio T than for a single drive bunch. As described in this report, the structure will be a GHz-scale prototype with cm-scale transverse dimensions that is expected to confirm principles that can be applied to the design of a future THz-scale high gradient (> 500 MV/m) accelerator with mm-scale transverse dimensions. We show here a new means to significantly increase the transformer ratio T of the device, and thereby to significantly improve its suitability as a flexible and effective component in a future high energy, high gradient accelerator facility. We predict that the T of a high gradient CDWA can be increased by a substantial factor; this enhancement is dramatically greater than what has been demonstrated heretofore. This large enhancement in T that we predict arises from using a train of three or four drive bunches in which the spacing of the bunches and their respective charges are selected according to a simple principle that requires each bunch lose energy to the wakefields at the same rate, so as not to sacrifice drive beam efficiency�¢����as would be the case if one bunch exhausted its available energy while others had not. It is anticipated that results from the study proposed here can have a direct impact on design of the dielectric accelerator in a TeV-scale collider concept, and in the accelerator for an x-ray FEL.

  5. Suppression of probe background signals via B(1) field inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2011-04-01

    A new approach combining a long pulse with the DEPTH sequence (Cory and Ritchey, Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 1988) greatly improves the efficiency for suppressing probe background signals arising from spinning modules. By applying a long initial excitation pulse in the DEPTH sequence, instead of a ?/2 pulse, the inhomogeneous B(1) fields outside the coil can dephase the background coherence in the nutation frame. The initial long pulse and the following two consecutive EXORCYCLE ? pulses function complementarily and prove most effective in removing background signals from both strong and weak B? fields. Experimentally, the length of the long pulse can be optimized around odd multiples of the ?/2 pulse, depending on the individual probe design, to preserve signals inside the coil while minimizing those from probe hardware. This method extends the applicability of the DEPTH sequence to probes with small differences in B? field strength between the inside and outside of the coil, and can readily combine with well-developed double resonance experiments for quantitative measurement. In general, spin systems with weak internal interactions are required to attain efficient and uniform excitation for powder samples, and the principles to determine the applicability are discussed qualitatively in terms of the relative strength of spin interactions, r.f. power and spinning rate. PMID:21349751

  6. A large-domain approach for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, Y.; Stern, F.

    1996-09-01

    A large-domain approach is developed for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and continuity equations are solved with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, exact nonlinear kinematic and approximate dynamic free-surface boundary conditions, and a body/free-surface conforming grid. The results are validated through comparisons with data for the Series 60 C{sub B} = 0.6 ship model at low and high Froude numbers and results of a precursory interactive approach. Both approaches yield satisfactory results; however, the large-domain results indicate improved resolution of the flow close to the hull and wake centerplane and of the Froucle number differences due to near-wall turbulence modeling and non-linear free-surface boundary conditions. Additional evaluation is provided through discussion of the recent CFD Workshop Tokyo 1994, where both methods were among the best. Last, some concluding remarks are made. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Formation and stability of a hollow electron beam in the presence of a plasma wake field driven by an ultra-short electron bunch

    E-print Network

    Tanjia, F; De Nicola, S; Akhter, T; Jovanovic, D

    2015-01-01

    A numerical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of an electron beam, externally injected in a plasma in the presence of a plasma wake field, is carried out. The latter is driven by an ultra-short relativistic axially-symmetric femtosecond electron bunch. We first derive a novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential where the driving term is the ultra-short bunch density, taking suitably into account the interplay between the sharpness and high energy of the bunch. Then, we show that a channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field, within the context of thermal wave model. The formation of the channel seems to be a final stage of the 3D evolution of the beam. This involves the appearance of small filaments and bubbles around the longitudinal axis. The bubbles coalesce forming a relatively stable axially-symmetric hollow beam structure.

  8. Simulation of Time-Dependent Energy Modulation by Wake Fields and its Impact on Gain in the VUV free Electron Laser of the TESLA Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, S.; Schlarb, H.

    2000-05-01

    For shorter bunches and narrower undulator gaps the interaction between the electrons in the bunch and the wake fields becomes so large that the FEL amplification is affected. For a typical vacuum chamber of an X-ray or VUV Free Electron Laser three major sources of wake fields exist: a resistance of the beam pipe, a change in the geometric aperture and the surface roughness of the beam pipe. The generated wake fields, which move along with the electrons, change the electron energy and momentum, depending on the electron longitudinal and transverse position. In particular, the accumulated energy modulation shifts the electrons away from the resonance condition. Based on an analytic model the energy loss by the wake fields has been incorporated into the time-dependent FEL simulation code GENESIS 1.3. For the parameters of the TESLA Test Facility the influence of the bunch length, beam pipe diameter and surface roughness has been studied. The results are presented in this paper.

  9. Electrons and magnetic fields in the lunar plasma wake J. S. Halekas, S. D. Bale, D. L. Mitchell, and R. P. Lin

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    December 2004; revised 30 March 2005; accepted 9 May 2005; published 22 July 2005. [1] Earth's Moon the magnetic field, electron density and temperature, and electrostatic potential. We use these data and Wind key parameter data to characterize the wake near the Moon. At 85­115 km above the Moon we observe

  10. Maleic hydrazide: sprout suppression of potatoes in the field.

    PubMed

    De Blauwer, V; Demeulemeester, K; Demeyere, A; Hofmans, E

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the active substance maleic hydrazide was released on the Belgian market. Maleic hydrazide is authorized in potatoes as foliar treatment for instore sprout suppression and control of volunteers. The mode of action is based on blocking cell division whilst cell elongation is not affected. The product must be applied at once during the growing season, only after at least 80% of the tubers have reached 25 mm diameter and not later than 3 weeks before haulm killing. The first 24 h after application, no meaningful precipitation should occur to insure sufficiently uptake of the product by the crop. Field trials were set up for 4 years (2005-2008) and 4 locations per year with application of maleic hydrazide in four different cultivars (Bintje, Fontane, Asterix and Cilena). After application, the cultivar Asterix showed almost every year a temporarily phytotoxicity (bronze discoloration). On the first place yield was determined. When maleic hydrazide was applied too early (80% tubers % 25mm diameter) yield was negatively affected (3 years on 4) except for the cultivar Cilena (fresh market). Internal quality (dry matter and fry quality) was not influenced by the application of maleic hydrazide. Only Fontane had a slightly lower dry matter content. Maleic hydrazide also influenced appearance of secondary growth. However, the results were very variable depending on cultivar, location and time of application. After harvest, the tubers were kept in storage and assessed monthly on germination. Potatoes treated late in the growing season, showed a shorter dormancy period. A part of the tubers was replanted the following spring to verify volunteer control. Additional trials were set up by the Flemish government for two years (2010-2011). The results of previous trials were confirmed. Additional, the influence of maleic hydrazide on internal germination during storage was examined on the cultivar Innovator. The tests clearly showed a positive effect for this parameter. PMID:23878989

  11. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed at scientists and PhD students working in the field of wake dynamics. The conference covers the following subject areas: Wake and vortex dynamics, instabilities in trailing vortices and wakes, simulation and measurements of wakes, analytical approaches for modeling wakes, wake interaction and other wind farm investigations. Many people have been involved in producing the 2015 Wake Conference proceedings. The work by the more than 60 reviewers ensuring the quality of the papers is greatly appreciated. The timely evaluation and coordination of the reviews would not have been possible without the work of the section editors: Christian Masson, ÉTS, Fernando Porté-Agel, EPFL, Gerard Schepers, ECN Wind Energy, Gijs Van Kuik, Delft University, Gunner Larsen, DTU Wind Energy, Jakob Mann, DTU Wind Energy, Javier Sanz Rodrigo, CENER, Johan Meyers, KU Leuven, Rebecca Barthelmie, Cornell University, Sandrine Aubrun-Sanches, Université d'Orléans and Thomas Leweke, IRPHE-CNRS. We are also immensely indebted to the very responsive support from the editorial team at IOP Publishing, especially Sarah Toms, during the review process of these proceedings. Visby, Sweden, June 2015 Andrew Barney, Jens Nørkær Sørensen and Stefan Ivanell Uppsala University - Campus Gotland

  12. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and low oceanic shell conductivity).

  13. Stratified wake of an accelerating hydrofoil

    E-print Network

    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Gurka, Roi

    2015-01-01

    Wakes of towed and self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids are significantly different from non-stratified wakes. Long time effects of stratification on the development of the wakes of bluff bodies moving at constant speed are well known. In this experimental study we demonstrate how buoyancy affects the initial growth of vortices developing in the wake of a hydrofoil accelerating from rest. Particle image velocimetry measurements were applied to characterize the wake evolution behind a NACA 0015 hydrofoil accelerating in water and for low Reynolds number and relatively strong and stably stratified fluid (Re=5,000, Fr~O(1)). The analysis of velocity and vorticity fields, following vortex identification and an estimate of the circulation, reveal that the vortices in the stratified fluid case are stretched along the streamwise direction in the near wake. The momentum thickness profiles show lower momentum thickness values for the stratified late wake compared to the non-stratified wake, implying that the dra...

  14. A multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:sapphire laser system for laser wake-field acceleration studies

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Tilborg, J. van; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-12-07

    The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (L'OASIS) Lab of LBNL operates a highly automated and remotely controlled Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system that provides synchronized beams of 2x1.0 TW, 12 TW, and 100 TW peak-power, in a unique, radiation shielded facility. The system has been specially designed for studying high field laser-plasma interactions and particularly aimed for the investigations of laser wake-field particle acceleration. It generates and recombines multiple beams having different pulse durations, wavelengths, and pulse energies for various stages of plasma preparation, excitation, and diagnostics. The amplifier system is characterized and continuously monitored via local area network (LAN) from a radiation shielded control room by an array of diagnostics, including beam profile monitoring cameras, remote controlled alignment options, self-correcting beam-pointing stabilization loops, pulse measurement tools, such as single-shot autocorrelator for pulse duration and third-order correlator for contrast measurements, FROG for pulse shape studies.

  15. Effect of wakes from moving upstream rods on boundary layer separation from a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph J.

    2011-11-01

    Highly loaded airfoils in turbines allow power generation using fewer airfoils. High loading, however, can cause boundary layer separation, resulting in reduced lift and increased aerodynamic loss. Separation is affected by the interaction between rotating blades and stationary vanes. Wakes from upstream vanes periodically impinge on downstream blades, and can reduce separation. The wakes include elevated turbulence, which can induce transition, and a velocity deficit, which results in an impinging flow on the blade surface known as a ``negative jet.'' In the present study, flow through a linear cascade of very high lift airfoils is studied experimentally. Wakes are produced with moving rods which cut through the flow upstream of the airfoils, simulating the effect of upstream vanes. Pressure and velocity fields are documented. Wake spacing and velocity are varied. At low Reynolds numbers without wakes, the boundary layer separates and does not reattach. At high wake passing frequencies separation is largely suppressed. At lower frequencies, ensemble averaged velocity results show intermittent separation and reattachment during the wake passing cycle. Supported by NASA.

  16. Control of focusing fields for positron acceleration in nonlinear plasma wakes using multiple laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.-L. Li, F.-Y.; Chen, M.; Weng, S.-M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Sheng, Z.-M.

    2014-12-15

    Control of transverse wakefields in the nonlinear laser-driven bubble regime using a combination of Hermite-Gaussian laser modes is proposed. By controlling the relative intensity ratio of the two laser modes, the focusing force can be controlled, enabling matched beam propagation for emittance preservation. A ring bubble can be generated with a large longitudinal accelerating field and a transverse focusing field suitable for positron beam focusing and acceleration.

  17. MULTIRESOLUTION MARKOV RANDOM FIELD WAVELET SHRINKAGE FOR RIPPLE SUPPRESSION IN SONAR IMAGERY

    E-print Network

    Nelson, James

    MULTIRESOLUTION MARKOV RANDOM FIELD WAVELET SHRINKAGE FOR RIPPLE SUPPRESSION IN SONAR IMAGERY J. D in sonar imagery is extended with a Markov random field framework. Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling positives. Index Terms-- Wavelet transforms, Markov random fields, image denoising, sonar detection 1

  18. Near wakes of advanced turbopropellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.; Patrick, W. P.

    1989-01-01

    The flow in the wake of a model single rotation Prop-Fan rotor operating in a wind tunnel was traversed with a hot-wire anemometer system designed to determine the 3 periodic velocity components. Special data acquisition and data reduction methods were required to deal with the high data frequency, narrow wakes, and large fluctuating air angles in the tip vortex region. The model tip helical Mach number was 1.17, simulating the cruise condition. Although the flow field is complex, flow features such as viscous velocity defects, vortex sheets, tip vortices, and propagating acoustic pulses are clearly identified with the aid of a simple analytical wake theory.

  19. Study of electron trapping by a transversely ellipsoidal bubble in the laser wake-field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup

    2013-09-15

    We present electron trapping in an ellipsoidal bubble which is not well explained by the spherical bubble model by [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 175003 (2009)]. The formation of an ellipsoidal bubble, which is elongated transversely, frequently occurs when the spot size of the laser pulse is large compared to the plasma wavelength. First, we introduce the relation between the bubble size and the field slope inside the bubble in longitudinal and transverse directions. Then, we provide an ellipsoidal model of the bubble potential and investigate the electron trapping condition by numerical integration of the equations of motion. We found that the ellipsoidal model gives a significantly less restrictive trapping condition than that of the spherical bubble model. The trapping condition is compared with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and the electron trajectory in test potential simulations.

  20. Power suppression from disparate mass scales in effective scalar field theories of inflation and quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Jackson, Brendan M. E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    A scalar potential coupled to other fields of large disparate masses will exhibit power suppression of the quantum loop corrections from these massive fields. Quintessence fields in the dark energy regime and inflaton fields during inflation often have a very large background field value. Thus any other field with its mass dependent on the quintessence/inflaton background field value through a moderate coupling will become very massive during the dark energy/inflation phase and its quantum corrections to the scalar effective potential will be suppressed. This concept is developed in this paper using the decoupling theorem. The problem then reduces to a quantitative question of the size of suppression effects within the parameter space of coupling constants, scalar field background value and renormalization scale. Some numerical examples are presented both for inflation and quintessence, but the approach is general and can be applied to any scalar field effective potential. The consequences to dark energy of the decoupling effect developed here is that the quintessence field need not just be an incredibly weakly interacting field, often included as an add-on to generate dark energy and having no other purpose. Instead, this quintessence field could play a central role in the particle physics dynamics at early times and then the other fields simply decouple from it at late times before the onset of the dark energy phase. For inflation a consequence is coupling of the inflaton to other heavy fields can be much larger.

  1. Results from SLAC Experiment on Plasma Wake field Acceleration over One Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2000-04-01

    In the E-157 experiment, a 30 GeV electron beam of 2e10 electrons in a 0.65mm long bunch is propagated through a 1.4m long lithium plasma (created by UV ionization) of density ~ 2e14/cm^3. The beam density is greater than the plasma density and the head of the bunch expels the plasma electrons leaving behind an ion channel with transverse focusing fields of up to several thousand Tesla/m. There are three types of ongoing studies: (1) The zeroth order effect is the ``thick plasma lens" where the induced focusing-channel causes the beam to undergo so-called betatron oscillations where the envelope of the beam oscillates radially. (2) Transverse head-tail effects are of higher order: non-axially-symmetric longitudinal charge distributions cause different slices of the beam to oscillate radially with different periods, or may even be unstable, distorting the beam further. (3) For electron bunch lengths on the order of half the plasma wavelength, the ion column immediately behind the head of the electron bunch will cause the main bunch to lose energy. The plasma electrons expelled from the beam will rush back to the axis and produce a strong accelerating force (order GeV/m) for the particles in the tail of the same bunch. The betatron oscillations are studied by scanning the plasma density and observing time-integrated images of optical transition radiation and Cherenkov radiation from foils downstream of the plasma. Energy changes in the beam are observed from time-resolved images of the Cherenkov radiator located in a dispersive section of the downstream beamline. Head-tail effects are seen in these images and can be isolated from energy gain by acquiring time-resolved images from the Cherenkov radiator in the non-dispersive direction. Beam-position monitors and beamline feedback signals also reveal information regarding beam centroid motion induced by the plasma. Progress on the experiment will be reported.

  2. Anisotropic Stark Effect and Electric-Field Noise Suppression for Phosphorus Donor Qubits in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigillito, A. J.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    We report the use of novel, capacitively terminated coplanar waveguide resonators to measure the quadratic Stark shift of phosphorus donor qubits in Si. We confirm that valley repopulation leads to an anisotropic spin-orbit Stark shift depending on electric and magnetic field orientations relative to the Si crystal. By measuring the linear Stark effect, we estimate the effective electric field due to strain in our samples. We show that in the presence of this strain, electric-field sources of decoherence can be non-negligible. Using our measured values for the Stark shift, we predict magnetic fields for which the spin-orbit Stark effect cancels the hyperfine Stark effect, suppressing decoherence from electric-field noise. We discuss the limitations of these noise-suppression points due to random distributions of strain and propose a method for overcoming them.

  3. Anisotropic Stark Effect and Electric-Field Noise Suppression for Phosphorus Donor Qubits in Silicon

    E-print Network

    A. J. Sigillito; A. M. Tyryshkin; S. A. Lyon

    2015-03-08

    We report the use of novel, capacitively terminated coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators to measure the quadratic Stark shift of phosphorus donor qubits in Si. We confirm that valley repopulation leads to an anisotropic spin-orbit Stark shift depending on electric and magnetic field orientations relative to the Si crystal. By measuring the linear Stark effect, we estimate the effective electric field due to strain in our samples. We show that in the presence of this strain, electric-field sources of decoherence can be non-negligible. Using our measured values for the Stark shift, we predict magnetic fields for which the spin-orbit Stark effect cancels the hyperfine Stark effect, suppressing decoherence from electric-field noise. We discuss the limitations of these noise-suppression points due to random distributions of strain and propose a method for overcoming them.

  4. Anisotropic stark effect and electric-field noise suppression for phosphorus donor qubits in silicon.

    PubMed

    Sigillito, A J; Tyryshkin, A M; Lyon, S A

    2015-05-29

    We report the use of novel, capacitively terminated coplanar waveguide resonators to measure the quadratic Stark shift of phosphorus donor qubits in Si. We confirm that valley repopulation leads to an anisotropic spin-orbit Stark shift depending on electric and magnetic field orientations relative to the Si crystal. By measuring the linear Stark effect, we estimate the effective electric field due to strain in our samples. We show that in the presence of this strain, electric-field sources of decoherence can be non-negligible. Using our measured values for the Stark shift, we predict magnetic fields for which the spin-orbit Stark effect cancels the hyperfine Stark effect, suppressing decoherence from electric-field noise. We discuss the limitations of these noise-suppression points due to random distributions of strain and propose a method for overcoming them. PMID:26066457

  5. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Stoyanov, Zhivko V.; Liley, David T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well-described phenomenon that occurs during deep anesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterization as a “global brain state” has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterization. Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex. PMID:25767438

  6. Symmetry-suppressed two-photon transitions induced by hyperfine interactions and magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    Symmetry-suppressed two-photon transitions induced by hyperfine interactions and magnetic fields M Received 23 July 2009; published 9 October 2009 Two-photon transitions between atomic states of total interactions. Two distinct mechanisms responsible for the hyperfine- induced two-photon transitions

  7. Speech-induced suppression of evoked auditory fields in children who stutter Deryk S. Beal a,

    E-print Network

    Speech-induced suppression of evoked auditory fields in children who stutter Deryk S. Beal a Keywords: Stuttering Child development Speech-motor control Auditory processing M50 Magnetic source imaging found that both adults who do and do not stutter demonstrated a reduced amplitude of the auditory M50

  8. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  9. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  10. Effort Reporting at Wake Forest

    E-print Network

    Berenhaut, Kenneth S.

    Effort Reporting at Wake Forest University Effort certification at Wake Forest University ............................................................................................................ 3 The Wake Forest University Effort Certification Report and Sponsored Programs Effort Reporting - 2 Effort certification at Wake Forest University Our commitment How

  11. Suppression of cooling by strong magnetic fields in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Valyavin, G; Shulyak, D; Wade, G A; Antonyuk, K; Zharikov, S V; Galazutdinov, G A; Plachinda, S; Bagnulo, S; Machado, L Fox; Alvarez, M; Clark, D M; Lopez, J M; Hiriart, D; Han, Inwoo; Jeon, Young-Beom; Zurita, C; Mujica, R; Burlakova, T; Szeifert, T; Burenkov, A

    2014-11-01

    Isolated cool white dwarf stars more often have strong magnetic fields than young, hotter white dwarfs, which has been a puzzle because magnetic fields are expected to decay with time but a cool surface suggests that the star is old. In addition, some white dwarfs with strong fields vary in brightness as they rotate, which has been variously attributed to surface brightness inhomogeneities similar to sunspots, chemical inhomogeneities and other magneto-optical effects. Here we describe optical observations of the brightness and magnetic field of the cool white dwarf WD 1953-011 taken over about eight years, and the results of an analysis of its surface temperature and magnetic field distribution. We find that the magnetic field suppresses atmospheric convection, leading to dark spots in the most magnetized areas. We also find that strong fields are sufficient to suppress convection over the entire surface in cool magnetic white dwarfs, which inhibits their cooling evolution relative to weakly magnetic and non-magnetic white dwarfs, making them appear younger than they truly are. This explains the long-standing mystery of why magnetic fields are more common amongst cool white dwarfs, and implies that the currently accepted ages of strongly magnetic white dwarfs are systematically too young. PMID:25327247

  12. Study on the size effect in Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 films thinner than 8 nm before and after wake-up field cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Hyuk; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Young Hwan; Moon, Taehwan; Kim, Keum Do; Hyun, Seung Dam; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-11-01

    The effects of film thickness and wake-up field cycling on the ferroelectricity in Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 films thinner than 8 nm were carefully examined. The Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 films became more antiferroelectric-like with decreasing film thickness in pristine state, whereas all the Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 films showed ferroelectric characteristics after wake-up process. The decrease in the coercive field with decreasing film thickness could be understood based on the depolarization correction. From the temperature-dependent characterization, the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition during wake-up process is believed to be a thermally activated process, and the estimated activation energy was ˜3.42 ± 0.17 kJ/mol.

  13. Experimental evaluation of a flat wake theory for predicting rotor inflow-wake velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The theory for predicting helicopter inflow-wake velocities called flat wake theory was correlated with several sets of experimental data. The theory was developed by V. E. Baskin of the USSR, and a computer code known as DOWN was developed at Princeton University to implement the theory. The theory treats the wake geometry as rigid without interaction between induced velocities and wake structure. The wake structure is assumed to be a flat sheet of vorticity composed of trailing elements whose strength depends on the azimuthal and radial distributions of circulation on a rotor blade. The code predicts the three orthogonal components of flow velocity in the field surrounding the rotor. The predictions can be utilized in rotor performance and helicopter real-time flight-path simulation. The predictive capability of the coded version of flat wake theory provides vertical inflow patterns similar to experimental patterns.

  14. Slow-roll suppression of adiabatic instabilities in coupled scalar field-dark matter models

    SciTech Connect

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    2008-10-15

    We study the evolution of linear density perturbations in the context of interacting scalar field-dark matter cosmologies, where the presence of the coupling acts as a stabilization mechanism for the runaway behavior of the scalar self-interaction potential as in the case of the chameleon model. We show that, in the 'adiabatic' background regime of the system, the rise of unstable growing modes of the perturbations is suppressed by the slow-roll dynamics of the field. Furthermore, the coupled system behaves as an inhomogeneous adiabatic fluid. In contrast, instabilities may develop for large values of the coupling constant, or along nonadiabatic solutions, characterized by a period of high-frequency dumped oscillations of the scalar field. In the latter case, the dynamical instabilities of the field fluctuations, which are typical of oscillatory scalar field regimes, are amplified and transmitted by the coupling to dark matter perturbations.

  15. Near-Field Analysis of Bright and Dark Modes on Plasmonic Metasurfaces Showing Extraordinary Suppressed Transmission

    E-print Network

    Dobmann, Sabine; Ploss, Daniel; Peschel, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic metasurfaces are investigated that consist of a sub wavelength line pattern in an ultrathin (~ 10 nm) silver film, designed for extraordinarily suppressed transmission (EOST) in the visible spectral range. Measurements with a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) demonstrate that far field irradiation creates resonant excitations of antenna like (bright) modes that are localized on the metal ridges. In contrast, bound (dark) surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched from an NSOM tip propagate well across the metasurface, preferentially perpendicular to the grating lines.

  16. Suppressing the excitability of spinal motoneurons by extracellularly applied electrical fields: insights from computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Elbasiouny, Sherif M; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2007-11-01

    The effect of extracellularly applied electrical fields on neuronal excitability and firing behavior is attributed to the interaction between neuronal morphology and the spatial distribution and level of differential polarization induced by the applied field in different elements of the neuron. The presence of voltage-gated ion channels that mediate persistent inward currents (PICs) on the dendrites of spinal motoneurons enhances the influence of electrical fields on the motoneuronal firing behavior. The goal of the present study was to investigate, with a realistic motoneuron computer model, the effects of extracellularly applied electrical fields on the excitability of spinal motoneurons with the aim of reducing the increased motoneuronal excitability after spinal cord injury (SCI). Our results suggest that electrical fields could suppress the excitability of motoneurons and reduce their firing rate significantly by modulating the magnitude of their dendritic PIC. This effect was achieved at different field directions, intensities, and polarities. The reduction in motoneuronal firing rate resulted from the reduction in the magnitude of the dendritic PIC reaching the soma by the effect of the applied electrical field. This reduction in PIC was attributed to the dendritic field-induced differential polarization and the nonlinear current-voltage relationship of the dendritic PIC-mediating channels. Because of the location of the motoneuronal somata and initial segment with respect to the dendrites, these structures were minimally polarized by the applied field compared with the extended dendrites. In conclusion, electrical fields could be used for suppressing the hyperexcitability of spinal motoneurons after SCI and reducing the level of spasticity. PMID:17702836

  17. Comparing satellite SAR and wind farm wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasager, C. B.; Vincent, P.; Husson, R.; Mouche, A.; Badger, M.; Peña, A.; Volker, P.; Badger, J.; Di Bella, A.; Palomares, A.; Cantero, E.; Correia, P. M. F.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to present offshore wind farm wake observed from satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) wind fields from RADARSAT-1/-2 and Envisat and to compare these wakes qualitatively to wind farm wake model results. From some satellite SAR wind maps very long wakes are observed. These extend several tens of kilometres downwind e.g. 70 km. Other SAR wind maps show near-field fine scale details of wake behind rows of turbines. The satellite SAR wind farm wake cases are modelled by different wind farm wake models including the PARK microscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in high resolution and WRF with coupled microscale parametrization.

  18. Population-wide bias of surround suppression in auditory spatial receptive fields of the owl's midbrain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunyan; Shanbhag, Sharad J; Fischer, Brian J; Peña, José L

    2012-08-01

    The physical arrangement of receptive fields (RFs) within neural structures is important for local computations. Nonuniform distribution of tuning within populations of neurons can influence emergent tuning properties, causing bias in local processing. This issue was studied in the auditory system of barn owls. The owl's external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx) contains a map of auditory space in which the frontal region is overrepresented. We measured spatiotemporal RFs of ICx neurons using spatial white noise. We found a population-wide bias in surround suppression such that suppression from frontal space was stronger. This asymmetry increased with laterality in spatial tuning. The bias could be explained by a model of lateral inhibition based on the overrepresentation of frontal space observed in ICx. The model predicted trends in surround suppression across ICx that matched the data. Thus, the uneven distribution of spatial tuning within the map could explain the topography of time-dependent tuning properties. This mechanism may have significant implications for the analysis of natural scenes by sensory systems. PMID:22855796

  19. Suppression of multipactor discharge on a dielectric surface by an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Libing; Zhu Xiangqin; Wang Yue; Xuan Chun; Xia Hongfu; Wang Jianguo

    2011-07-15

    The multipactor discharge on a dielectric surface in an external magnetic field is simulated by using the particle-in-cell method, and the electron number, energy, the velocity of the yield of secondary electrons, and the power deposited on dielectric surface in the process of multipactor discharge are investigated. The effects of the strength of the external magnetic field on multipactor are studied. The results show that when the external magnetic field reaches a certain value, the multipactor is weaker than that in the case of no external magnetic field and becomes much lighter versus the strength of the external magnetic field in the half microwave period in which the ExB drift pulls the electrons back to dielectric surface. And in the other half microwave period in which the ExB drift pushes the electrons away from the dielectric surface, the multipactor is cut off. So the power capability can be increased to the fourfold by the suppression of multipactor by applying an external magnetic field.

  20. Power spectrum oscillations from Planck-suppressed operators in effective field theory motivated monodromy inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Layne C.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a phenomenological model of inflation where the inflaton is the phase of a complex scalar field ? . Planck-suppressed operators of O (f5/Mpl) modify the geometry of the vev ?? ? at first order in the decay constant f , which adds a first-order periodic term to the definition of the canonically normalized inflaton ? . This correction to the inflaton induces a fixed number of extra oscillatory terms in the potential V ˜?p. We derive the same result in a toy scenario where the vacuum ?? ? is an ellipse with an arbitrarily large eccentricity. These extra oscillations change the form of the power spectrum as a function of scale k and provide a possible mechanism for differentiating effective field theory motivated inflation from models where the angular shift symmetry is a gauge symmetry.

  1. Contour detection based on the contextual modulation of non-classical receptive field facilitation and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Guo, Zhaoli; Cai, Chao

    2013-10-01

    Outside the classical receptive field (CRF), there exists a broad non-classical receptive field (NCRF). The response of the central neuron is affected not only by the stimulus inside the CRF, but also modulated by the stimulus surrounding it. The contextual modulation is mediated by horizontal connections across the visual cortex. In this paper, a contour detection method inspired by the visual mechanism in the primary visual cortex (V1) is proposed. The method is divided in three steps. Firstly, the response of every single visual neuron in V1 is computed by local energy. Secondly, the facilitation and suppression (the contextual influence) on a neuron through horizontal interactions are obtained by constructing a two neighbor modulating functions. Finally, the total output response of one neuron to complex visual stimuli is acquired by combing the influence of local visual context on the neuron and energy response by itself. We tested it on natural image and encouraging results were acquired.

  2. Secondary energy growth and turbulence suppression in conducting channel flow with streamwise magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuai; Krasnov, Dmitry; Boeck, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    The effects of a streamwise magnetic field on conducting channel flow are studied by analyzing secondary linear perturbations evolving on streamwise streaks and by direct numerical simulations of relaminarization. By means of an optimal perturbation approach, magnetic damping is found to increase the streamwise wavelength of the most amplified secondary perturbations and to reduce their amplification level. Complete suppression of secondary instability is observed at a critical magnetic interaction parameter that depends on the streak amplitude and on the Reynolds number when the transient evolution of the streaky basic flow is taken into account. Relaminarization in the direct numerical simulation occurs at lower values of the interaction parameter than the critical values from the stability computations for the streak amplitudes considered. The dependence of these threshold values of the interaction parameters on the Reynolds number is fairly similar between simulations and stability analysis. Relaminarization thresholds from the simulations are also in good agreement with experiments on pipe flow with streamwise magnetic field.

  3. Wind tunnel measurements for dispersion modelling of vehicle wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Kumar, Prashant; Robins, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Wind tunnel measurements downwind of reduced scale car models have been made to study the wake regions in detail, test the usefulness of existing vehicle wake models, and draw key information needed for dispersion modelling in vehicle wakes. The experiments simulated a car moving in still air. This is achieved by (i) the experimental characterisation of the flow, turbulence and concentration fields in both the near and far wake regions, (ii) the preliminary assessment of existing wake models using the experimental database, and (iii) the comparison of previous field measurements in the wake of a real diesel car with the wind tunnel measurements. The experiments highlighted very large gradients of velocities and concentrations existing, in particular, in the near-wake. Of course, the measured fields are strongly dependent on the geometry of the modelled vehicle and a generalisation for other vehicles may prove to be difficult. The methodology applied in the present study, although improvable, could constitute a first step towards the development of mathematical parameterisations. Experimental results were also compared with the estimates from two wake models. It was found that they can adequately describe the far-wake of a vehicle in terms of velocities, but a better characterisation in terms of turbulence and pollutant dispersion is needed. Parameterised models able to predict velocity and concentrations with fine enough details at the near-wake scale do not exist.

  4. On the control and suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimpeanu, Radu; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Petropoulos, Peter G.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown theoretically that an electric field can be used to control and suppress the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability found in stratified flows when a heavy fluid lies above lighter fluid. Dielectric fluids of arbitrary viscosities and densities are considered and a theory is presented to show that a horizontal electric field (acting in the plane of the undisturbed liquid-liquid surface), causes growth rates and critical stability wavenumbers to be reduced thus shifting the instability to longer wavelengths. This facilitates complete stabilization in a given finite domain above a critical value of the electric field strength. Direct numerical simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the electrostatic fields are carried out and the linear theory is used to critically evaluate the codes before computing into the fully nonlinear stage. Excellent agreement is found between theory and simulations, both in unstable cases that compare growth rates and in stable cases that compare frequencies of oscillation and damping rates. Computations in the fully nonlinear regime supporting finger formation and roll-up show that a weak electric field slows down finger growth and that there exists a critical value of the field strength, for a given system, above which complete stabilization can take place. The effectiveness of the stabilization is lost if the initial amplitude is large enough or if the field is switched on too late. We also present a numerical experiment that utilizes a simple on-off protocol for the electric field to produce sustained time periodic interfacial oscillations. It is suggested that such phenomena can be useful in inducing mixing. A physical centimeter-sized model consisting of stratified water and olive oil layers is shown to be within the realm of the stabilization mechanism for field strengths that are approximately 2 × 104 V/m.

  5. Cosmic string wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Silk, Joseph; Brandenberger, Robert; Turok, Neil

    1987-01-01

    Accretion of matter onto wakes left behind by horizon-sized pieces of cosmic string is investigated, and the effects of wakes on the large-scale structure of the universe are determined. Accretion of cold matter onto wakes, the effects of a long string on fluids with finite velocity dispersion or sound speeds, the interactions between loops and wakes, and the conditions for wakes to survive disruption by loops are discussed. It is concluded that the most important wakes are those which were formed at the time of equal matter and radiation density. This leads to sheetlike overdense regions of galaxies with a mean separation in agreement with the scale of the bubbles of de Lapparent, Geller, and Huchra (1986). However, for the value of G(mu) favored from galaxy formation considerations in a universe with cold dark matter, a wake accretes matter from a distance of only about 1.5 Mpc, which is much less than the distance between the wakes.

  6. Trailing edge wake flow characteristics of upper surface blown configurations. [noise generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. N.

    1978-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating flow characteristics in the wake of upper surface blown flap configurations are presented. Relative importance of the longitudinal and the transverse components of the wake flow turbulence for noise generation are evaluated using correlation between the near-field noise and the wake turbulence. Effects of the jet velocity, the initial turbulence in the jet, and the flap deflection angle on noise and wake flow characteristics are studied. The far-field noise data is compared with the existing empirical prediction method. The measured wake flow properties are compared with an analytical model used in the existing USB wake flow noise theory. The detailed wake flow profiles, wake flow turbulence space-time correlations, wake flow turbulence cross-power spectra, and near-field noise third octave band spectra are presented in the appendices.

  7. Wind and Wake Sensing with UAV Formation Flight: System Development and Flight Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrabee, Trenton Jameson

    Wind turbulence including atmospheric turbulence and wake turbulence have been widely investigated; however, only recently it become possible to use Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) as a validation tool for research in this area. Wind can be a major contributing factor of adverse weather for aircraft. More importantly, it is an even greater risk towards UAVs because of their small size and weight. Being able to estimate wind fields and gusts can potentially provide substantial benefits for both unmanned and manned aviation. Possible applications include gust suppression for improving handling qualities, a better warning system for high wind encounters, and enhanced control for small UAVs during flight. On the other hand, the existence of wind can be advantageous since it can lead to fuel savings and longer duration flights through dynamic soaring or thermal soaring. Wakes are an effect of the lift distribution across an aircraft's wing or tail. Wakes can cause substantial disturbances when multiple aircraft are moving through the same airspace. In fact, the perils from an aircraft flying through the wake of another aircraft is a leading cause of the delay between takeoff times at airports. Similar to wind, though, wakes can be useful for energy harvesting and increasing an aircraft's endurance when flying in formation which can be a great advantage to UAVs because they are often limited in flight time due to small payload capacity. Formation flight can most often be seen in manned aircraft but can be adopted for use with unmanned systems. Autonomous flight is needed for flying in the "sweet spot" of the generated wakes for energy harvesting as well as for thermal soaring during long duration flights. For the research presented here formation flight was implemented for the study of wake sensing and gust alleviation. The major contributions of this research are in the areas of a novel technique to estimate wind using an Unscented Kalman filter and experimental wake sensing data using UAVs in formation flight. This has been achieved and well documented before in manned aircraft but very little work has been done on UAV wake sensing especially during flight testing. This document describes the development and flight testing of small unmanned aerial system (UAS) for wind and wake sensing purpose including a Ground Control Station (GCS) and UAVs. This research can be stated in four major components. Firstly, formation flight was obtained by integrating a formation flight controller on the WVU Phastball Research UAV aircraft platform from the Flight Control Systems Laboratory (FCSL) at West Virginia University (WVU). Second, a new approach to wind estimation using an Unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is discussed along with results from flight data. Third, wake modeling within a simulator and wake sensing during formation flight is shown. Finally, experimental results are used to discuss the "sweet spot" for energy harvesting in formation flight, a novel approach to cooperative wind estimation, and gust suppression control for a follower aircraft in formation flight.

  8. Cancellation of the ion deflection due to electron-suppression magnetic field in a negative-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Marconato, N.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-15

    A new magnetic configuration is proposed for the suppression of co-extracted electrons in a negative-ion accelerator. This configuration is produced by an arrangement of permanent magnets embedded in one accelerator grid and creates an asymmetric local magnetic field on the upstream and downstream sides of this grid. Thanks to the “concentration” of the magnetic field on the upstream side of the grid, the resulting deflection of the ions due to magnetic field can be “intrinsically” cancelled by calibrating the configuration of permanent magnets. At the same time, the suppression of co-extracted electrons can be improved.

  9. Wake non-uniformity in MHD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a wake-type nonuniformity on the effective plasma electrical conductivity and Hall parameter is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The nonuniformity is produced by a flat copper plate (vane) located in the supersonic nozzle that creates a two-dimensional wake in a plane parallel to the magnetic field vector. The vane removes approximately 1% of the channel thermal input, which results in a stagnation enthalpy defect in its wake of about 6%. Under these conditions, the optical and electrical diagnostics detect no conductivity defect. Its absence is confirmed by the generator performance, which remains the same with and without the vane. An approximate analytical model shows that the conductivity in the wake can, under certain conditions, be larger than that in the free stream.

  10. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    This report examines the complex interactions between atmospheric stability and turbine-induced wakes on downwind turbine wind speed and power production at a West Coast North American multi-MW wind farm. Wakes are generated when the upwind flow field is distorted by the mechanical movement of the wind turbine blades. This has two consequences for downwind turbines: (1) the downwind turbine encounters wind flows with reduced velocity and (2) the downwind turbine encounters increased turbulence across multiple length scales via mechanical turbulence production by the upwind turbine. This increase in turbulence on top of ambient levels may increase aerodynamic fatigue loads on the blades and reduce the lifetime of turbine component parts. Furthermore, ambient atmospheric conditions, including atmospheric stability, i.e., thermal stratification in the lower boundary layer, play an important role in wake dissipation. Higher levels of ambient turbulence (i.e., a convective or unstable boundary layer) lead to higher turbulent mixing in the wake and a faster recovery in the velocity flow field downwind of a turbine. Lower levels of ambient turbulence, as in a stable boundary layer, will lead to more persistent wakes. The wake of a wind turbine can be divided into two regions: the near wake and far wake, as illustrated in Figure 1. The near wake is formed when the turbine structure alters the shape of the flow field and usually persists one rotor diameter (D) downstream. The difference between the air inside and outside of the near wake results in a shear layer. This shear layer thickens as it moves downstream and forms turbulent eddies of multiple length scales. As the wake travels downstream, it expands depending on the level of ambient turbulence and meanders (i.e., travels in non-uniform path). Schepers estimates that the wake is fully expanded at a distance of 2.25 D and the far wake region begins at 2-5 D downstream. The actual distance traveled before the wake recovers to its inflow velocity is dependent on the amount ambient turbulence, the amount of wind shear, and topographical and structural effects. The maximum velocity deficit is estimated to occur at 1-2 D but can be longer under low levels of ambient turbulence. Our understanding of turbine wakes comes from wind tunnel experiments, field experiments, numerical simulations, and from studies utilizing both experimental and modeling methods. It is well documented that downwind turbines in multi-Megawatt wind farms often produce less power than upwind turbine rows. These wake-induced power losses have been estimated from 5% to up to 40% depending on the turbine operating settings (e.g., thrust coefficient), number of turbine rows, turbine size (e.g., rotor diameter and hub-height), wind farm terrain, and atmospheric flow conditions (e.g., ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability). Early work by Elliott and Cadogan suggested that power data for different turbulent conditions be segregated to distinguish the effects of turbulence on wind farm power production. This may be especially important for downwind turbines within wind farms, as chaotic and turbulent wake flows increase stress on downstream turbines. Impacts of stability on turbine wakes and power production have been examined for a flat terrain, moderate size (43 turbines) wind farm in Minnesota and for an offshore, 80 turbine wind farm off the coast of Denmark. Conzemius found it difficult to distinguish wakes (i.e., downwind velocity deficits) when the atmosphere was convective as large amounts of scatter were present in the turbine nacelle wind speed data. This suggested that high levels of turbulence broke-up the wake via large buoyancy effects, which are generally on the order of 1 km in size. On the other hand, they found pronounced wake effects when the atmosphere was very stable and turbulence was either suppressed or the length scale was reduced as turbulence in this case was mechanically produced (i.e., friction forces). This led to larger reductions at downwind turbines and maximum ve

  11. Fast fat-suppressed reduced field-of-view temperature mapping using 2DRF excitation pulses.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Mei, Chang-Sheng; Madore, Bruno; McDannold, Nathan J; Panych, Lawrence P

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a fast and accurate temperature mapping method capable of both fat suppression and reduced field-of-view (rFOV) imaging, using a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF (2DRF) pulse. Temperature measurement errors caused by fat signals were assessed, through simulations. An 11×1140?s echo-planar 2DRF pulse was developed and incorporated into a gradient-echo sequence. Temperature measurements were obtained during focused ultrasound (FUS) heating of a fat-water phantom. Experiments both with and without the use of a 2DRF pulse were performed at 3T, and the accuracy of the resulting temperature measurements were compared over a range of TE values. Significant inconsistencies in terms of measured temperature values were observed when using a regular slice-selective RF excitation pulse. In contrast, the proposed 2DRF excitation pulse suppressed fat signals by more than 90%, allowing good temperature consistency regardless of TE settings. Temporal resolution was also improved, from 12 frames per minute (fpm) with the regular pulse to 28 frames per minute with the rFOV excitation. This technique appears promising toward the MR monitoring of temperature in moving adipose organs, during thermal therapies. PMID:21371923

  12. JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 6, NO. 6, JUNE 2010 229 Color Breakup Suppression in Field-Sequential

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    without en- hancing frame rate. Meanwhile, our design not only widens the color gamut but also increasesJOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 6, NO. 6, JUNE 2010 229 Color Breakup Suppression in Field-Sequential Five-Primary-Color LCDs Hui-Chuan Cheng, Linghui Rao, and Shin-Tson Wu, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Field-sequential-color

  13. An effective field theory during inflation II: stochastic dynamics and power spectrum suppression

    E-print Network

    Boyanovsky, D

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the non-equilibrium effective action of an inflaton like scalar field --the system-- by tracing over sub Hubble degrees of freedom of ``environmental'' light scalar fields. The effective action is stochastic leading to effective Langevin equations of motion for the fluctuations of the inflaton-like field, with self-energy corrections and stochastic noise correlators that obey a de Sitter space-time analog of a fluctuation dissipation relation. We solve the Langevin equation implementing a dynamical renormalization group resummation of the leading secular terms and obtain the corrections to the power spectrum of super Hubble fluctuations of the inflaton field, $\\mathcal{P}(k;\\eta) = \\mathcal{P}_0(k)\\,e^{-\\gamma(k;\\eta)}$ where $\\mathcal{P}_0(k)$ is the nearly scale invariant power spectrum in absence of coupling. $\\gamma(k;\\eta)>0$ describes the suppression of the power spectrum, it features Sudakov-type double logarithms and entails violations of scale invariance. We also obtain the effective action...

  14. Dissipation of Turbulence in the Wake of a Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2015-02-01

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behaviour of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is critical in assessing wind-farm power production. This evolution depends on the rate of turbulence dissipation in the wind-turbine wake, which has not been previously quantified in field-scale measurements. In situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine were collected using a tethered lifting system (TLS) carrying a payload of high-rate turbulence probes. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located near the turbine. Good agreement between the tower measurements and the TLS measurements was established for a case without a wind-turbine wake. When an operating wind turbine is located between the tower and the TLS so that the wake propagates to the TLS, the TLS measures dissipation rates one to two orders of magnitude higher in the wake than outside of the wake. These data, collected between two and three rotor diameters downwind of the turbine, document the significant enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate within the wind-turbine wake. These wake measurements suggest that it may be useful to pursue modelling approaches that account for enhanced dissipation. Comparisons of wake and non-wake dissipation rates to mean wind speed, wind-speed variance, and turbulence intensity are presented to facilitate the inclusion of these measurements in wake modelling schemes.

  15. Development and testing of laser Doppler system components for wake vortex monitoring. Volume 1: Scanner development, laboratory and field testing and system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Krause, M. C.; Coffey, E. W.; Huang, C. C.; Edwards, B. B.; Shrider, K. R.; Jetton, J. L.; Morrison, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    A servo-controlled range/elevation scanner for the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was developed and tested in the field to assess its performance in detecting and monitoring aircraft trailing vortices in an airport environment. The elevation scanner provides a capability to manually point the LDV telescope at operator chosen angles from 3.2 deg. to 89.6 deg within 0.2 deg, or to automatically scan the units between operator chosen limits at operator chosen rates of 0.1 Hz to 0.5 Hz. The range scanner provides a capability to manually adjust the focal point of the system from a range of 32 meters to a range of 896 meters under operator control, or to scan between operator chosen limits and at rates from 0.1 Hz to 6.9 Hz. The scanner controls are designed to allow simulataneous range and elevation scanning so as to provide finger scan patterns, arc scan patterns, and vertical line scan patterns. The development and testing of the unit is discussed, along with a fluid dynamic model of the wake vortex developed in a laser Doppler vortex sensor simulation program.

  16. Laser wake-field acceleration in pre-formed plasma channel created by pre-pulse pedestal of terawatt laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Chakera, Juzer Ali; Naik, Prasad Anant; Kumar, Mukund; Gupta, Parshotam Dass

    2011-09-15

    The role of nanosecond duration pre-pulse pedestal (Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) pre-pulse) in the propagation of 45 fs, 4 TW Ti:Sapphire laser pulse through a helium gas jet target has been investigated. We observed that the pre-pulse pedestal of about 1 ns duration and intensity 3 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} creates pre-formed plasma with optical guiding channel like structure in the gas-jet at density around 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Guiding of the 45 fs laser pulse (I{sub L} = 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) in the pre-formed plasma channel, over a distance much longer than the Rayleigh length was also observed. The guiding of the laser pulse resulted in the generation of high energy electron beam by laser wake-field acceleration of self-injected electrons. The accelerated electron beam was quasi-monoenergetic with peak energy up to 50 MeV, low divergence in the range of 3-6 mrad, and bunch charge up to 100 pC.

  17. Cooperative wake vortex instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Robert Lindsey

    Reported herein are results concerning a class of three-dimensional instabilities occurring between nearly parallel wake vortices. The problem was studied experimentally, theoretically, and numerically. The experimental data were taken of pairs of co-rotating vortices produced behind a wing in a towing tank. Particle imaging velocimetry and flow visualization revealed the growth of a sinuous disturbance along the axis of each of the vortices in a pair, followed soon thereafter by merger of the two. A linear instability analysis explains the basic mechanisms responsible for the initial growth of the disturbance. This theory also explains a related instability for the case of a counter-rotating pair. The analysis reveals that planar disturbances on one vortex tend to grow along the extensional axis of the straining field imposed by the other vortex. However, self- and orbit-induced effects tend to prevent instability by rotating the plane of the perturbation through the straining field. For instability, the rotational effects must act in opposite directions. For displacement perturbations, this condition can only occur for a counter-rotating pair. A co-rotating pair, however, can be de-stabilized by shorter-wavelength "elliptic" modes, in which the core and periphery of the vortex are perturbed in opposite directions. A numerical study of the problem was undertaken using the cylindrical spectral Navier-Stokes solver of Matsushima and Marcus (1997). In addition to confirming the linear analysis for early growth of the instabilities, the code allowed for the computation of their long-term behavior. The growth of the elliptic instability allows the vortices to form bridges between each other, which eventually yields merger of the co-rotating pair. The displacement instability, acting on a counter-rotating pair, yields the ejection of large hoop-like structures, as was first seen experimentally by Ortega (2001). Thus, a picture emerges of a strain-induced instability which leads to merger of a co-rotating pair and the ejection of large-scale structures from a counter-rotating pair. The fact that this behavior occurs both in a simplified numerical geometry and in actual airfoil wakes suggests that it is relatively robust, and may apply to other flows involving nearly parallel vortices.

  18. Cavities of Weak Magnetic Field Strength in the Wake of FTEs: Results from Global Magnetospheric MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hesse, M.; Wang, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2009-01-01

    We use the global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code BATS-R-US to model multipoint observations of Flux Transfer Event (FTE) signatures. Simulations with high spatial and temporal resolution predict that cavities of weak magnetic field strength protruding into the magnetosphere trail FTEs. These predictions are consistent with recently reported multi-point Cluster observations of traveling magnetopause erosion regions (TMERs).

  19. Jovian plasma torus interaction with Europa. Plasma wake structure and effect of inductive magnetic field: 3D Hybrid kinetic simulation

    E-print Network

    Lipatov, A S; Paterson, W R; Sittler, E C; Hartle, R E; Simpson, D G

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect a to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream backgr...

  20. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  1. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  2. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases considered here, the wake Reynolds number and the ratio of the turbulent kinetic energy to the square of the wake mean velocity deficit are determined nearly entirely by the total strain. For these measures the order in which the strains are applied does not matter and the changes brought about by the strain are nearly reversible. The wake mean velocity deficit and width, on the other hand, differ by about a factor of three when the total strain returns to one, depending on whether the wake was first "favourably" or "adversely" strained. The strain history is important for predicting the evolution of these quantities.

  3. LOW-MASS PLANETS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS WITH NET VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS: THE PLANETARY WAKE AND GAP OPENING

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-05-10

    Some regions in protoplanetary disks are turbulent, while some regions are quiescent (e.g. the dead zone). In order to study how planets open gaps in both inviscid hydrodynamic disk (e.g. the dead zone) and the disk subject to magnetorotational instability (MRI), we carried out both shearing box two-dimensional inviscid hydrodynamical simulations and three-dimensional unstratified magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations (having net vertical magnetic fields) with a planet at the box center. We found that, due to the nonlinear wave steepening, even a low mass planet can open gaps in both cases, in contradiction to the ''thermal criterion'' for gap opening. In order to understand if we can represent the MRI turbulent stress with the viscous {alpha} prescription for studying gap opening, we compare gap properties in MRI-turbulent disks to those in viscous HD disks having the same stress, and found that the same mass planet opens a significantly deeper and wider gap in net vertical flux MHD disks than in viscous HD disks. This difference arises due to the efficient magnetic field transport into the gap region in MRI disks, leading to a larger effective {alpha} within the gap. Thus, across the gap, the Maxwell stress profile is smoother than the gap density profile, and a deeper gap is needed for the Maxwell stress gradient to balance the planetary torque density. Comparison with previous results from net toroidal flux/zero flux MHD simulations indicates that the magnetic field geometry plays an important role in the gap opening process. We also found that long-lived density features (termed zonal flows) produced by the MRI can affect planet migration. Overall, our results suggest that gaps can be commonly produced by low mass planets in realistic protoplanetary disks, and caution the use of a constant {alpha}-viscosity to model gaps in protoplanetary disks.

  4. Aircraft Wake RCS Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, William H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of multi-frequency radar measurements of aircraft wakes at altitudes of 5,000 to 25,00 ft. were performed at Kwajalein, R.M.I., in May and June of 1990. Two aircraft were tested, a Learjet 35 and a Lockheed C-5A. The cross-section of the wake of the Learjet was too small for detection at Kwajalein. The wake of the C-5A, although also very small, was detected and measured at VHF, UHF, L-, S-, and C-bands, at distances behind the aircraft ranging from about one hundred meters to tens of kilometers. The data suggest that the mechanism by which aircraft wakes have detectable radar signatures is, contrary to previous expectations, unrelated to engine exhaust but instead due to turbulent mixing by the wake vortices of pre-existing index of refraction gradients in the ambient atmosphere. These measurements were of necessity performed with extremely powerful and sensitive instrumentation radars, and the wake cross-section is too small for most practical applications.

  5. Acceleration of nonmonoenergetic electron bunches injected into a wake wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S. V.

    2012-07-15

    The trapping and acceleration of nonmonoenergetic electron bunches in a wake field wave excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel is studied. Electrons are injected into the region of the wake wave potential maximum at a velocity lower than the phase velocity of the wave. The paper analyzes the grouping of bunch electrons in the energy space emerging in the course of acceleration under certain conditions of their injection into the wake wave and minimizing the energy spread for such electrons. The factors determining the minimal energy spread between bunch electrons are analyzed. The possibility of monoenergetic acceleration of electron bunches generated by modern injectors in a wake wave is analyzed.

  6. Engineering models for merging wakes in wind farm optimization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machefaux, E.; Larsen, G. C.; Murcia Leon, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper deals with validation of 4 different engineering wake superposition approaches against detailed CFD simulations and covering different turbine interspacing, ambient turbulence intensities and mean wind speeds. The first engineering model is a simple linear superposition of wake deficits as applied in e.g. Fuga. The second approach is the square root of sums of squares approach, which is applied in the widely used PARK program. The third approach, which is presently used with the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) model, assumes that the wake affected downstream flow field to be determined by a superposition of the ambient flow field and the dominating wake among contributions from all upstream turbines at any spatial position and at any time. The last approach developed by G.C. Larsen is a newly developed model based on a parabolic type of approach, which combines wake deficits successively. The study indicates that wake interaction depends strongly on the relative wake deficit magnitude, i.e. the deficit magnitude normalized with respect to the ambient mean wind speed, and that the dominant wake assumption within the DWM framework is the most accurate.

  7. Local and Far-Field Effects of Commuter Ferry Wake in New York Harbor: Implications for Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, B.

    2002-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of waves in New York Harbor have grown in recent years to the point that they are presently the dominant source of wave energy. Small fast commuter ferries account for the bulk of this growth. Between 1996 and present, fast-ferry traffic across the Hudson has seen an order of magnitude increase in both ferry crossings and ferry routes. Pressure time series recorders were co-located with profiling acoustic Doppler current, turbidity, and conductivity meters, deployed synoptically in strategic harbor locales for seven-day periods in summer and fall of 2002. Analysis of the sea-surface elevation time series revealed a semi-diurnal increase in wave energy coinciding with peak ferry use during morning and evening rush-hours. The measured wave energy levels during rush-hours was well above the wave energy levels measured overnight, when ferries were no longer in use. During rush-hours, the time-series of sea surface elevation appeared as a persistent background of waves with periods between 1.5 and 4.5 seconds containing intermittent, well-defined packets of high amplitude waves which appeared to be coincident with local ferry passage. The temporal pattern of sea-surface elevation throughout the weekday was repeated throughout the workweek. However, during weekends, the magnitude of the background wave energy level was approximately one half the magnitude of the energy level measured during any given workweek day. The amplitude of waves within the intermittent packets remained nearly constant for the entire week. The local, near-field effect of ferry traffic is visible in the sea surface elevation time series as intermittent packets, whereas the far-field effects, integrated harbor-wide, is seen as the background sea-state. The dual nature of the wave energy creates an implication for efforts attempting to mitigate the wave conditions. For conditions when the background sea-state is acceptable, small adjustments to individual ferry tracks and speeds relative to a specific site within the Harbor can be an effective method for reducing the local wave energy at the site. If conditions persist where even the background sea-state is unacceptable, a more global approach (adjustments to the entire ferry system) would need to be implemented to reduce the background sea-state to acceptable levels. Alternatively, the wave energy tolerance for the specific sites would need to be increased.

  8. RF interference suppression in a cardiac synchronization system operating in a high magnetic field NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Damji, A.A.; Snyder, R.E.; Ellinger, D.C.; Witkowski, F.X.; Allen, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    An electrocardiographic (ECG) unit suitable for cardiac-synchronized nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in high magnetic fields is presented. The unit includes lossy transmission lines as ECG leads in order to suppress radio frequency (RF) interference in the electrocardiogram. The unit's immunity to RF interference is demonstrated.

  9. Modeling the Lunar plasma wake

    E-print Network

    Holmstrom, M

    2013-01-01

    Bodies that lack a significant atmosphere and internal magnetic fields, such as the Moon and asteroids, can to a first approximation be considered passive absorbers of the solar wind. The solar wind ions and electrons directly impact the surface of these bodies due to the lack of atmosphere, and the interplanetary magnetic field passes through the obstacle relatively undisturbed because the bodies are assumed to be non-conductive. Since the solar wind is absorbed by the body, a wake is created behind the object. This wake is gradually filled by solar wind plasma downstream of the body, through thermal expansion and the resulting ambipolar electric field, along the magnetic field lines. Here we study this plasma expansion into a vacuum using a hybrid plasma solver. In the hybrid approximation, ions are treated as particles, and electrons as a massless fluid. We also derive corresponding one- and two-dimensional model problems that account for the absorbing obstacle. It is found that the absorbing obstacle crea...

  10. Studies of a flat wake rotor theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed at Princeton University to calculate the velocity components in the flow field near a lifting rotor. The induced velocity components in the rotor flow field predicted by this theory are compared with experiment. It appears that on balance, this relatively simple theory gives a reasonable prediction of the average induced velocities in a rotor flow and is quite suitable for such applications as estimating the influence of the rotor wake on the tail surfaces of rotorcraft. The theory predicts that significant induced velocity components are present in all three flow directions in the wake at a lifting rotor. It should be noted , however, that there are a few experimental measurements of the longitudinal and lateral induced velocity components in the rotor wake. This theory, known as the flat wake theory, is essentially the rotary wing analog of Prandtl's lifting line theory. The theory is described in this report. Calculations based on the theory are presented and compared with a modern free wake theory.

  11. Suppression of Low-Frequency Electronic Noise in Polymer Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lezzi, Francesca; Ferrari, Giorgio; Pennetta, Cecilia; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-11-11

    The authors report on the reduction of low-frequency noise in semiconductor polymer nanowires with respect to thin-films made of the same organic material. Flicker noise is experimentally investigated in polymer nanowires in the range of 10-10(5) Hz by means of field-effect transistor architectures. The noise in the devices is well described by the Hooge empirical model and exhibits an average Hooge constant, which describes the current power spectral density of fluctuations, suppressed by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to thin-film devices. To explain the Hooge constant reduction, a resistor network model is developed, in which the organic semiconducting nanostructures or films are depicted through a two-dimensional network of resistors with a square-lattice structure, accounting for the different anisotropy and degree of structural disorder of the active nanowires and films. Results from modeling agree well with experimental findings. These results support enhanced structural order through size-confinement in organic nanostructures as effective route to improve the noise performance in polymer electronic devices. PMID:26479330

  12. Near wake features of a flying European Starling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhefer, Adam; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2013-11-01

    A great deal of research focusing on flapping wings has been motivated by their high performance capabilities, especially in low Reynolds number configurations where static wing performance typically suffers. The approaches to studying flapping wings have taken different forms. One form has been the systematic investigation of the parameters that influence the relationship between flapping wings and their wake. The other form, and the approach used in the present work, is the investigation of flapping wings in nature. While the earliest work on the flapping wings of animals consists of observations of bird flight by Leonardo DaVinci, advances in technology have allowed for quantitative measurements of the wake. The near wake of a freely flying European starling has been measured using high speed, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry, simultaneously with high speed cameras which imaged the bird. These have been used to measure the near wake two-dimensional velocity field that can be associated with the bird's location and wing configuration in an avian wind tunnel. Time series of the velocities have been expressed as composite wake plots, which depict segments of the wing beat cycle for various spanwise locations in the wake. Measurements indicate that downwash is not produced during the upstroke, suggesting that the upstroke does not generate lift. As well, the wake velocities imply the presence of streamwise vortical structures, in addition to tip vortices. These two characteristics indicate similarities between the wake of a bird and the wake of a bat.

  13. Three Dimensional Lunar Wake Reconstructed by the ARTEMIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Zong, Q.; Pu, Z.; Hsu, T.; Wan, W.; Shi, Q.; Liu, W.

    2012-12-01

    Thanks to large data coverage of the ARTEMIS mission within the lunar wake, we reconstructed the lunar wake in a three dimensional manner by presenting distributions of key plasma and field parameters: the ion density, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, ion thermal pressure, magnetic pressure (field magnitude), total pressure, and field and flow perturbations. Our observations suggest that the wake is confined within a rarefaction front, which propagates at fast mode velocities in the rest frame of solar wind. When solar wind plasma is absorbed by the dayside lunar surface, a diamagnetic current system with thickness of ~2 ri forms on the surface of the Moon and initiates field disturbances there (bend and compression). These disturbances are controlled by the solar wind ion beta. In the wake behind the Moon, due to force unbalance, plasma reenters into the wake through perpendicular and parallel ways. In the perpendicular way, the inward flowing plasma continues to squeeze flux tubes in the wake, and thus enhances field magnitude there. In the parallel way, the refilling process presents more kinetic features, and leads to higher perpendicular temperature inside the wake. The refilling plasma from opposite sides of the wake may mix with each other significantly at ~6 RM downstream from the Moon, and the lunar wake is found to have fine structure within that distance. In addition, our data also shows that plasma may be decelerated by a total pressure gradient force in the direction against the background solar wind. Our observations thus establish a global lunar wake picture to be tested by theories or simulations.

  14. An iterative methodology for the computation of perturbation fields induced by harmonic forcing of the linearised Navier-Stokes equations in complex geometries and application to forced cylinder wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, George; Lu, Liang

    2013-11-01

    An efficient, iterative methodology is developed for the computation of the perturbation fields induced by harmonic forcing of the linearised Navier-Stokes equations in complex geometries. The problem is formulated in the frequency domain and the resulting system of equations is solved iteratively until convergence. This approach offers distinct advantages: convergence is monitored easily, and the solution from one value of frequency can be used as a restart field for another, nearby, frequency. It is also straightforward to implement in any implicit code that solves the steady Navier-Stokes equations iteratively. The method can be extended to solve the optimal forcing problem, i.e. to find the forcing fields that will maximise the energy of the flow perturbations for a particular frequency. In the present study, the method is applied to investigate the wake behind a cylinder with pulsating approaching flow. The perturbation velocity and pressure fields induced by external forcing are computed and the mechanisms that drive the energy growth of the developed structures in the wake are examined. It is shown that perturbations grow by extracting energy from two sources: the underlying base flow field and the externally provided energy that maintains the imposed oscillation. Part of this work was supported by EPSRC EP/I016015/1.

  15. Dissipation of turbulence in the wake of a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2013-12-01

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behavior of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is of great importance in assessing wind farm power production as well as impacts of wind energy deployment on local and regional environments. The rate of turbulence dissipation in the wake quantifies the wake behavior as it propagates. In situ field measurements of turbulence dissipation rate in the wake of wind turbines have not been previously collected although correct modeling of dissipation rate is required for accurate simulations of wake evolution. In Fall 2012, we collected in situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine, using the University of Colorado at Boulder's Tethered Lifting System (TLS). The TLS is a unique state-of-the-art tethersonde, proven in numerous boundary-layer field experiments to be able to measure turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rates. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located upwind of the turbine, from a profiling lidar upwind, and from a scanning lidar measuring both inflow to and wake from the turbine. Measurements collected within the wake indicate that dissipation rates are higher in the turbine wake than in the ambient flow. Profiles of dissipation and turbulence throughout the rotor disk suggest that dissipation peaks near the hub height of the turbine. Suggestions for incorporating this information into wind turbine modeling approaches will be provided.

  16. Pedestal Bifurcation and Resonant Field Penetration at the Threshold of Edge-Localized Mode Suppression in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Callen, J. D.; deGrassie, J. S.; Eldon, D.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Haskey, S. R.; Hegna, C. C.; King, J. D.; Logan, N. C.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Orlov, D. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Park, J.-K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Shafer, M. W.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Wade, M. R.

    2015-03-01

    Rapid bifurcations in the plasma response to slowly varying n =2 magnetic fields are observed as the plasma transitions into and out of edge-localized mode (ELM) suppression. The rapid transition to ELM suppression is characterized by an increase in the toroidal rotation and a reduction in the electron pressure gradient at the top of the pedestal that reduces the perpendicular electron flow there to near zero. These events occur simultaneously with an increase in the inner-wall magnetic response. These observations are consistent with strong resonant field penetration of n =2 fields at the onset of ELM suppression, based on extended MHD simulations using measured plasma profiles. Spontaneous transitions into (and out of) ELM suppression with a static applied n =2 field indicate competing mechanisms of screening and penetration of resonant fields near threshold conditions. Magnetic measurements reveal evidence for the unlocking and rotation of tearinglike structures as the plasma transitions out of ELM suppression.

  17. Characterization of an Actively Controlled Three-Dimensional Turret Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Three-dimensional turrets are commonly used for housing optical systems on airborne platforms. As bluff bodies, these geometries generate highly turbulent wakes that decrease the performance of the optical systems and the aircraft. The current experimental study looked to use dynamic suction in both open and closed-loop control configurations to actively control the turret wake. The flow field was characterized using dynamic pressure and stereoscopic PIV measurements in the wake of the turret. Results showed that the suction system was able to manipulate the wake region of the turret and could alter not only the spatial structure of the wake, but also the temporal behavior of the wake flow field. Closed-loop, feedback control techniques were used to determine a more optimal control input for the flow control. Similar control effects were seen for both the steady open-loop control case and the closed-loop feedback control configuration with a 45% reduction in the suction levels when comparing the closed-loop to the open-loop case. These results provide unique information regarding the development of the baseline three-dimensional wake and the wake with three different active flow control configurations.

  18. Role of the basal ganglia in the control of sleep and wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Michael; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) act as a cohesive functional unit that regulates motor function, habit formation, and reward/addictive behaviors; but the debate has only recently started on how the BG maintain wakefulness and suppress sleep to achieve all these fundamental functions of the BG. Neurotoxic lesioning, pharmacological approaches, and the behavioral analyses of genetically modified animals revealed that the striatum and globus pallidus are important for the control of sleep and wakefulness. Here, we discuss anatomical and molecular mechanisms for sleep-wake regulation in the BG and propose a plausible model in which the nucleus accumbens integrates behavioral processes with wakefulness through adenosine and dopamine receptors. PMID:23465424

  19. Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutishauser, David; Lohr, Gary; Hamilton, David; Powers, Robert; McKissick, Burnell; Adams, Catherine; Norris, Edward

    2003-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of aircraft wake vortex research, with the most recent accomplishment of demonstrating the Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS) at Dallas/Forth Worth International Airport in July 2000. The AVOSS was a concept for an integration of technologies applied to providing dynamic wake-safe reduced spacing for single runway arrivals, as compared to current separation standards applied during instrument approaches. AVOSS included state-of-the-art weather sensors, wake sensors, and a wake behavior prediction algorithm. Using real-time data AVOSS averaged a 6% potential throughput increase over current standards. This report describes a Concept of Operations for applying the technologies demonstrated in the AVOSS to a variety of terminal operations to mitigate wake vortex capacity constraints. A discussion of the technological issues and open research questions that must be addressed to design a Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) is included.

  20. Speech-induced suppression of evoked auditory fields in children who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Quraan, Maher A.; Cheyne, Douglas O.; Taylor, Margot J.; Gracco, Vincent L.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2011-01-01

    Auditory responses to speech sounds that are self-initiated are suppressed compared to responses to the same speech sounds during passive listening. This phenomenon is referred to as speech-induced suppression, a potentially important feedback-mediated speech-motor control process. In an earlier study, we found that both adults who do and do not stutter demonstrated reduced amplitude of the auditory M50 and M100 responses to speech during active production relative to passive listening. It is unknown if auditory responses to self-initiated speech-motor acts are suppressed in children or if the phenomenon differs between children who do and do not stutter. As stuttering is a developmental speech disorder, examining speech-induced suppression in children may identify possible neural differences underlying stuttering close to its time of onset. We used magnetoencephalography to determine the presence of speech-induced suppression in children and to characterize the properties of speech-induced suppression in children who stutter. We examined the auditory M50 as this was the earliest robust response reproducible across our child participants and the most likely to reflect a motor-to-auditory relation. Both children who do and do not stutter demonstrated speech-induced suppression of the auditory M50. However, children who stutter had a delayed auditory M50 peak latency to vowel sounds compared to children who do not stutter indicating a possible deficiency in their ability to efficiently integrate auditory speech information for the purpose of establishing neural representations of speech sounds. PMID:21095231

  1. Suppression of thermopower of NaxCoO2 by an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H. J.; Singh, David J

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the thermopower in Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} using the standard Boltzmann transport theory and first principles electronic structures with spin polarization taken into account. The thermopower is found to be smaller when the system is polarized, which thereby provides an alternative reasonable explanation for the suppression of thermopower in a magnetic field. The role of the spin-orbit coupling on the thermoelectricity is also discussed.

  2. 3D Field-Induced Transport and Plasma Response Leading to ELM Suppression in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Meneghini, O.; Nazikian, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Austin, M. E.; Callen, J. D.; Davis, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.

    2014-10-01

    A clear increase in trapped electron mode (TEM) scale density fluctuation levels ne is seen at the top of the pedestal as the plasma transitions from edge localized mode (ELM)ing to ELM suppression with applied 3D resonant fields. Additional increases in Te fluctuations and line-integrated ne at the top of the pedestal are seen as the 3D field strength is increased. High resolution Te and ne profile measurements near the top of the pedestal show strong transport scaling with the applied field (l /LTe , 1 /Lne ~Ic2) during ELM suppression. These latter results are consistent with the magnetic flutter model regulating transport at the top of the pedestal, possibly driven by kink mode coupling, however the former results support a 3D modification of microturbulence stability as the process by which ELMs are suppressed. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG03-97ER54415, DE-FG02-92ER54139, DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FG02-07ER44917, and DE-FG02-08ER54984.

  3. Speckle suppression via sparse representation for wide-field imaging through turbid media.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hwanchol; Yoon, Changhyeong; Chung, Euiheon; Choi, Wonshik; Lee, Heung-No

    2014-06-30

    Speckle suppression is one of the most important tasks in the image transmission through turbid media. Insufficient speckle suppression requires an additional procedure such as temporal ensemble averaging over multiple exposures. In this paper, we consider the image recovery process based on the so-called transmission matrix (TM) of turbid media for the image transmission through the media. We show that the speckle left unremoved in the TM-based image recovery can be suppressed effectively via sparse representation (SR). SR is a relatively new signal reconstruction framework which works well even for ill-conditioned problems. This is the first study to show the benefit of using the SR as compared to the phase conjugation (PC) a de facto standard method to date for TM-based imaging through turbid media including a live cell through tissue slice. PMID:24977910

  4. Electromagnetic signature of human cortical dynamics during wakefulness and sleep

    E-print Network

    Destexhe, Alain

    Electromagnetic signature of human cortical dynamics during wakefulness and sleep Signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.5 Spatial reach of LFP & Electromagnetic Lead field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 2 Studies 45 4 Overview 47 4.1 Electromagnetic properties of the extracellular medium

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Weakly Stratified Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redford, J. A.; Lund, T. S.; Coleman, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate a time-dependent turbulent wake evolving in a stably stratified background. A large initial Froude number is chosen to allow the wake to become fully turbulent and axisymmetric before stratification affects the spreading rate of the mean defect. The uncertainty introduced by the finite sample size associated with gathering statistics from a simulation of a time-dependent flow is reduced, compared to earlier simulations of this flow. The DNS reveals the buoyancy-induced changes to the turbulence structure, as well as to the mean-defect history and the terms in the mean-momentum and turbulence-kinetic-energy budgets, that characterize the various states of this flow - namely the three-dimensional (essentially unstratified), non-equilibrium (or 'wake-collapse') and quasi-two-dimensional (or 'two-component') regimes observed elsewhere for wakes embedded in both weakly and strongly stratified backgrounds. The wake-collapse regime is not accompanied by transfer (or 'reconversion') of the potential energy of the turbulence to the kinetic energy of the turbulence, implying that this is not an essential feature of stratified-wake dynamics. The dependence upon Reynolds number of the duration of the wake-collapse period is demonstrated, and the effect of the details of the initial/near-field conditions of the wake on its subsequent development is examined.

  6. Energetic Turbulence Structures in the Wake of Model Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian; Mehdi, Faraz; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2013-11-01

    Wind turbine wakes contain complex and energetic flow structures. Characterizing the near-wake field is critical to assess flow-structure interactions and evaluate asymmetric loadings that trigger premature structural failure. Although the turbulence flow structure in the far-wake region is important in the wind farm design, an integrated characterization of the entire wake flow would provide clearer mechanistic view on other phenomena such wake meandering and unsteady interactions with the blades of downwind turbines. High-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is carried out over a model wind turbine in a neutrally stratified boundary layer flow. The measurements are made at consecutive locations ranging from three rotor diameters upstream to twelve rotor diameters downstream of the unit. Vortical structures within the wake including tip, root and hub vortices are identified and followed as they advect downstream. The evolution of these dominant near-wake flow structures are quantified and provide us a better understanding of interactions between turbine wake and boundary layer. The spatial distribution of the mean and fluctuating velocity, as well as energy spectrum and turbulent kinetic budget are also discussed.

  7. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept works by placing shape memory alloy (SMA) control surfaces on the submarine's diving planes and periodically oscillating them. The modulated control vortices generated by these surfaces interact with the tip vortices on the diving planes, causing an instability to rapidly occur. Though several numerical simulations have been presented, experimental verification does not appear to be available in the open literature. The authors address this problem through a concept called passive wake vortex control (PWVC), which has been demonstrated to rapidly break apart a trailing vortex wake and render it incoherent. PWVC functions by introducing unequal strength, counter-rotating control vortices next to the tip vortices. The presence of these control vortices destabilizes the vortex wake and produces a rapidly growing wake instability.

  8. Evidence of Magnetic Breakdown on the Defects With Thermally Suppressed Critical Field in High Gradient SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Palczewski, Ari

    2013-09-01

    At SRF 2011 we presented the study of quenches in high gradient SRF cavities with dual mode excitation technique. The data differed from measurements done in 80's that indicated thermal breakdown nature of quenches in SRF cavities. In this contribution we present analysis of the data that indicates that our recent data for high gradient quenches is consistent with the magnetic breakdown on the defects with thermally suppressed critical field. From the parametric fits derived within the model we estimate the critical breakdown fields.

  9. First lunar wake passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind fluctuations by 3D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-06-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  10. First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  11. Statistical Study of the Lunar Plasma Wake Outer Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, W. F.; Brain, D. A.; Poppe, A.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Moon does not have an intrinsic magnetic field and lacks the conductivity necessary to develop an induced magnetosphere. Therefore, the interaction of the Moon with the solar wind is dominated by impact absorption of solar wind particles on the day side and the generation of a plasma wake on the night side. A plasma density gradient forms between the flowing solar wind and the plasma wake, causing solar wind plasma to gradually refill the wake region. Electrons fill the wake first, pulling ions in after them via ambi-polar diffusion. Despite the existence of comprehensive new plasma measurements of the lunar wake region, relatively little attention has been devoted to the shape and variability in location of its outer boundary. Improved knowledge of this boundary condition for the physical processes associated with wake refilling would provide useful tests for simulations and theoretical models of the lunar plasma interaction. The ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) spacecraft mission is a two-probe lunar mission derived from the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms) mission, repurposed to study the lunar space and planetary environment. Over the course of the mission there have been numerous passes of the ARTEMIS spacecraft through the lunar wake, at distances of up to seven lunar radii from the Moon. They have occurred for a variety of external conditions. We present a statistical study of tens of selected wake-crossing events of the ARTEMIS probes in 2011, using data primarily from the ARTEMIS fluxgate magnetometers (FGMs) and electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) to identify when the spacecraft entered and exited the wake. We study the shape of the outer wake boundary and its response to external conditions using two different techniques: one defines the wake boundary by a sharp decrease in ion density, the other by a decrease in magnetic field magnitude. We investigate how the wake boundary changes in response to solar wind parameters such as plasma beta, ion velocity, ion temperature, and magnetic field cone and clock angles. These results are compared with earlier wake crossing studies and computational modeling.

  12. Evaluation of experimental flow properties in the wake of a Viking '75 entry vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to obtain the flow properties in the wake of a model of the Viking '75 entry vehicle. Data are presented for the model at several angles of attack at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 3.95. The characteristics of the wake flow field are discussed and results are shown to demonstrate the significant variation of wake center-line flow properties in the transonic speed range, the shift in wake profiles with change in angle of attack, and the similarity exhibited by the velocity profiles across the wake.

  13. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  14. Noise generated by a propeller in a wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Propeller performance and noise were measured on two model scale propellers operating in an anechoic flow environment with and without a wake. Wake thickness of one and three propeller chords were generated by an airfoil which spanned the full diameter of the propeller. Noise measurements were made in the relative near field of the propeller at three streamwise and three azimuthal positions. The data show that as much as 10 dB increase in the OASPL results when a wake is introduced into an operating propeller. Performance data are also presented for completeness.

  15. Population-wide bias of surround suppression in auditory spatial receptive fields of the owl’s midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunyan; Shanbhag, Sharad J.; Fischer, Brian J.; Peña, José L

    2012-01-01

    The physical arrangement of receptive fields (RFs) within neural structures is important for local computations. Nonuniform distribution of tuning within populations of neurons can influence emergent tuning properties, causing bias in local processing. This issue was studied in the auditory system of barn owls. The owl’s external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx) contains a map of auditory space where the frontal region is overrepresented. We measured spatiotemporal RFs of ICx neurons using spatial white noise. We found a population-wide bias in surround suppression such that suppression from frontal space was stronger. This asymmetry increased with laterality in spatial tuning. The bias could be explained by a model of lateral inhibition based on the overrepresentation of frontal space observed in ICx. The model predicted trends in surround suppression across ICx that matched the data. Thus, the uneven distribution of spatial tuning within the map could explain the topography of time-dependent tuning properties. This mechanism may have significant implications for the analysis of natural scenes by sensory systems. PMID:22855796

  16. Observation of multipactor suppression in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure using an applied axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Konecny, R.; Antipov, S.; High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ; Chang, C.; Institute of Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 ; Gold, S. H.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.

    2013-11-18

    Efforts by a number of institutions to develop a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure capable of supporting high gradient acceleration when driven by an external radio frequency source have been ongoing over the past decade. Single surface resonant multipactor has been previously identified as one of the major limitations on the practical application of DLA structures in electron accelerators. In this paper, we report the results of an experiment that demonstrated suppression of multipactor growth in an X-band DLA structure through the use of an applied axial magnetic field. This represents an advance toward the practical use of DLA structures in many accelerator applications.

  17. WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    _______________________________________________________________________ WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY of Business at Wake Forest University. We are glad that you have chosen our school for your graduate education Services. The Wake Forest University School of Business reserves the right to make changes in content

  18. Wake Measurements in ECN's Scaled Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. W.; Schepers, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    In ECN's scaled wind farm the wake evolution is studied in two different situations. A single wake is studied at two different locations downstream of a turbine and a single wake is studied in conjunction with a triple wake. Here, the wake is characterized by the relative wind speed, the turbulence intensity, the vertical wind speed and the turbulence (an)isotropy. Per situation all wake measurements are taken simultaneously together with the inflow conditions.

  19. Suppression of a Field Population of Aedes aegypti in Brazil by Sustained Release of Transgenic Male Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Garziera, Luiza; Lacroix, Renaud; Donnelly, Christl A.; Alphey, Luke; Malavasi, Aldo; Capurro, Margareth L.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing burden of dengue, and the relative failure of traditional vector control programs highlight the need to develop new control methods. SIT using self-limiting genetic technology is one such promising method. A self-limiting strain of Aedes aegypti, OX513A, has already reached the stage of field evaluation. Sustained releases of OX513A Ae. aegypti males led to 80% suppression of a target wild Ae. aegypti population in the Cayman Islands in 2010. Here we describe sustained series of field releases of OX513A Ae. aegypti males in a suburb of Juazeiro, Bahia, Brazil. This study spanned over a year and reduced the local Ae. aegypti population by 95% (95% CI: 92.2%-97.5%) based on adult trap data and 81% (95% CI: 74.9-85.2%) based on ovitrap indices compared to the adjacent no-release control area. The mating competitiveness of the released males (0.031; 95% CI: 0.025-0.036) was similar to that estimated in the Cayman trials (0.059; 95% CI: 0.011 – 0.210), indicating that environmental and target-strain differences had little impact on the mating success of the OX513A males. We conclude that sustained release of OX513A males may be an effective and widely useful method for suppression of the key dengue vector Ae. aegypti. The observed level of suppression would likely be sufficient to prevent dengue epidemics in the locality tested and other areas with similar or lower transmission. PMID:26135160

  20. A new methodology for free wake analysis using curved vortex elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Teske, Milton E.; Quackenbush, Todd R.

    1987-01-01

    A method using curved vortex elements was developed for helicopter rotor free wake calculations. The Basic Curve Vortex Element (BCVE) is derived from the approximate Biot-Savart integration for a parabolic arc filament. When used in conjunction with a scheme to fit the elements along a vortex filament contour, this method has a significant advantage in overall accuracy and efficiency when compared to the traditional straight-line element approach. A theoretical and numerical analysis shows that free wake flows involving close interactions between filaments should utilize curved vortex elements in order to guarantee a consistent level of accuracy. The curved element method was implemented into a forward flight free wake analysis, featuring an adaptive far wake model that utilizes free wake information to extend the vortex filaments beyond the free wake regions. The curved vortex element free wake, coupled with this far wake model, exhibited rapid convergence, even in regions where the free wake and far wake turns are interlaced. Sample calculations are presented for tip vortex motion at various advance ratios for single and multiple blade rotors. Cross-flow plots reveal that the overall downstream wake flow resembles a trailing vortex pair. A preliminary assessment shows that the rotor downwash field is insensitive to element size, even for relatively large curved elements.

  1. Imperfect supercritical bifurcation in a three-dimensional turbulent wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadot, Olivier; Evrard, Antoine; Pastur, Luc

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a square-back body exhibits a strong bimodal behavior. The wake randomly undergoes symmetry-breaking reversals between two mirror asymmetric steady modes [reflectional symmetry-breaking (RSB) modes]. The characteristic time for reversals is about 2 or 3 orders of magnitude larger than the natural time for vortex shedding. Studying the effects of the proximity of a ground wall together with the Reynolds number, it is shown that the bimodal behavior is the result of an imperfect pitchfork bifurcation. The RSB modes correspond to the two stable bifurcated branches resulting from an instability of the stable symmetric wake. An attempt to stabilize the unstable symmetric wake is investigated using a passive control technique. Although the controlled wake still exhibits strong fluctuations, the bimodal behavior is suppressed and the drag reduced. This promising experiment indicates the possible existence of an unstable solution branch corresponding to a reflectional symmetry preserved (RSP) mode. This work is encouraging to develop a control strategy based on a stabilization of this RSP mode to reduce mean drag and lateral force fluctuations.

  2. An optically modulated zero-field atomic magnetometer with suppressed spin-exchange broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Martínez, R.; Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 ; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.

    2014-04-15

    We demonstrate an optically pumped {sup 87}Rb magnetometer in a microfabricated vapor cell based on a zero-field dispersive resonance generated by optical modulation of the {sup 87}Rb ground state energy levels. The magnetometer is operated in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime where high magnetic field sensitivities can be achieved. This device can be useful in applications requiring array-based magnetometers where radio frequency magnetic fields can induce cross-talk among adjacent sensors or affect the source of the magnetic field being measured.

  3. An optically modulated zero-field atomic magnetometer with suppressed spin-exchange broadening

    E-print Network

    Jimenez-Martinez, Ricardo; Kitching, John

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an optically pumped $^{87}$Rb magnetometer in a microfabricated vapor cell based on a zero-field dispersive resonance generated by optical modulation of the $^{87}$Rb ground state energy levels. The magnetometer is operated in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime where high magnetic field sensitivities can be achieved. This device can be useful in applications requiring array-based magnetometers where radio frequency magnetic fields can induce cross-talk among adjacent sensors or affect the source of the magnetic field being measured.

  4. WAKE ISLAND AIRFIELD TERMINAL, BUILDING 1502 LOOKING EAST WITH PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WAKE ISLAND AIRFIELD TERMINAL, BUILDING 1502 LOOKING EAST WITH PHOTO SCALE CENTERED ON BUILDING (12/30/2008) - Wake Island Airfield, Terminal Building, West Side of Wake Avenue, Wake Island, Wake Island, UM

  5. Optimal control of circular cylinder wakes using long control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinois, Thibault L. B.; Colonius, Tim

    2015-08-01

    The classical problem of suppressing vortex shedding in the wake of a circular cylinder by using body rotation is revisited in an adjoint-based optimal control framework. The cylinder's unsteady and fully unconstrained rotation rate is optimized at Reynolds numbers between 75 and 200 and over horizons that are longer than in previous studies, where they are typically of the order of a vortex shedding period or shorter. In the best configuration, the drag is reduced by 19%, the vortex shedding is effectively suppressed, and this low drag state is maintained with minimal cylinder rotation after transients. Unlike open-loop control, the optimal control is shown to maintain a specific phase relationship between the actuation and the shedding in order to stabilize the wake. A comparison is also given between the performance of optimizations for different Reynolds numbers, cost functions, and horizon lengths. It is shown that the long horizons used are necessary in order to stabilize the vortex shedding efficiently.

  6. Luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs: Suppression of luminosity by strong magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Bhattacharya, Mukul; Mukerjee, Subroto

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs. We consider white dwarfs with electron-degenerate core and nondegenerate surface layers where cooling occurs by diffusion of photons. We find the temperature and density profiles in the surface layers or envelope of white dwarfs for radially constant and varying magnetic fields by solving the magnetostatic equilibrium and photon diffusion equations in a Newtonian framework. We also obtain the properties of white dwarfs at the core-envelope interface, when the core is assumed to be practically isothermal due to large thermal conductivity. With the increase in magnetic field, the interface temperature and density are found to be increasing. While the interface radius also increases with the increase in magnetic field when the field is hypothesised to be constant throughout the star, the interface radius decreases for varying fields. However, for white dwarfs having fixed interface radius or interface temperature, we find that the lumin...

  7. The transitional wake behind an inclined prolate spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fengjian; Gallardo, José P.; Andersson, Helge I.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-09-01

    The wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence has been studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNSs). The Reynolds number based on the minor axis of the spheroid was 3000 as compared to 1000 in our preceding study [Jiang et al., "The laminar wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence angle," Phys. Fluids 26, 113602 (2014)]. The resulting wake is no longer laminar and the transitional wake is fundamentally unsteady and highly asymmetric from the very beginning. A substantial side force resulted from the asymmetric pressure field. No signs of vortex shedding could be observed. The forces and the flow field around the spheroid exhibited a dominant periodicity with a surprisingly low Strouhal number of 0.0733. One part of the counter-rotating vortex pair which dominated the near-wake broke down into small-scale vortices as soon as the vortex left the shadow behind the spheroid. The other part appeared as a helical vortex inside which the mechanical energy was conserved over a substantial length. The axial flow within this vortex tube experienced a sudden change from having maximum to minimum at the vortex center while maintaining the sign of the circulation. The severe asymmetry of the wake is ascribed to a global instability and may impact on submarine maneuverability.

  8. Mesoscale Simulation Data for Initializing Fast-Time Wake Transport and Decay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Mathew J.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The fast-time wake transport and decay models require vertical profiles of crosswinds, potential temperature and the eddy dissipation rate as initial conditions. These inputs are normally obtained from various field sensors. In case of data-denied scenarios or operational use, these initial conditions can be provided by mesoscale model simulations. In this study, the vertical profiles of potential temperature from a mesoscale model were used as initial conditions for the fast-time wake models. The mesoscale model simulations were compared against available observations and the wake model predictions were compared with the Lidar measurements from three wake vortex field experiments.

  9. Field Balancing and Harmonic Vibration Suppression in Rigid AMB-Rotor Systems with Rotor Imbalances and Sensor Runout

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic vibrations of high-speed rotors in momentum exchange devices are primary disturbances for attitude control of spacecraft. Active magnetic bearings (AMBs), offering the ability to control the AMB-rotor dynamic behaviors, are preferred in high-precision and micro-vibration applications, such as high-solution Earth observation satellites. However, undesirable harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations also occur in the AMB-rotor system owing to the mixed rotor imbalances and sensor runout. To compensate the rotor imbalances and to suppress the harmonic vibrations, two control methods are presented. Firstly, a four degrees-of-freedom AMB-rotor model with the static imbalance, dynamic imbalance, and the sensor runout are described. Next, a synchronous current reduction approach with a variable-phase notch feedback is proposed, so that the rotor imbalances can be identified on-line through the analysis of the synchronous displacement relationships of the geometric, inertial, and rotational axes of the rotor. Then, the identified rotor imbalances, which can be represented at two prescribed balancing planes of the rotor, are compensated by discrete add-on weights whose masses are calculated in the vector form. Finally, a repetitive control algorithm is utilized to suppress the residual harmonic vibrations. The proposed field balancing and harmonic vibration suppression strategies are verified by simulations and experiments performed on a control moment gyro test rig with a rigid AMB-rotor system. Compared with existing methods, the proposed strategies do not require trial weights or an accurate model of the AMB-rotor system. Moreover, the harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations can be well-attenuated simultaneously. PMID:26334281

  10. Field Balancing and Harmonic Vibration Suppression in Rigid AMB-Rotor Systems with Rotor Imbalances and Sensor Runout.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic vibrations of high-speed rotors in momentum exchange devices are primary disturbances for attitude control of spacecraft. Active magnetic bearings (AMBs), offering the ability to control the AMB-rotor dynamic behaviors, are preferred in high-precision and micro-vibration applications, such as high-solution Earth observation satellites. However, undesirable harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations also occur in the AMB-rotor system owing to the mixed rotor imbalances and sensor runout. To compensate the rotor imbalances and to suppress the harmonic vibrations, two control methods are presented. Firstly, a four degrees-of-freedom AMB-rotor model with the static imbalance, dynamic imbalance, and the sensor runout are described. Next, a synchronous current reduction approach with a variable-phase notch feedback is proposed, so that the rotor imbalances can be identified on-line through the analysis of the synchronous displacement relationships of the geometric, inertial, and rotational axes of the rotor. Then, the identified rotor imbalances, which can be represented at two prescribed balancing planes of the rotor, are compensated by discrete add-on weights whose masses are calculated in the vector form. Finally, a repetitive control algorithm is utilized to suppress the residual harmonic vibrations. The proposed field balancing and harmonic vibration suppression strategies are verified by simulations and experiments performed on a control moment gyro test rig with a rigid AMB-rotor system. Compared with existing methods, the proposed strategies do not require trial weights or an accurate model of the AMB-rotor system. Moreover, the harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations can be well-attenuated simultaneously. PMID:26334281

  11. Probing Neutrino Hierarchy and Chirality via Wakes

    E-print Network

    Hong-Ming Zhu; Ue-Li Pen; Xuelei Chen; Derek Inman

    2014-12-04

    The relic neutrinos are expected to acquire a bulk relative velocity with respect to the dark matter at low redshifts, and downstream of dark matter halos neutrino wakes are expected to develop. We propose a method of measuring the neutrino mass based on this mechanism. The neutrino wake will cause a dipole distortion of the galaxy-galaxy lensing pattern. This effect could be detected by combining upcoming lensing surveys, e.g. the LSST and Euclid surveys with a low redshift galaxy survey or a 21cm intensity mapping survey which can map the neutrino flow field. The data obtained with LSST and Euclid should enable us to make positive detection if the three neutrino masses are Quasi-Degenerate, and a future high precision 21cm lensing survey would allow the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy cases to be distinguished, and even the right handed Dirac neutrinos may be detectable.

  12. Wakes in inhomogeneous plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kompaneets, Roman; Ivlev, Alexei V; Nosenko, Vladimir; Morfill, Gregor E

    2014-04-01

    The Debye shielding of a charge immersed in a flowing plasma is an old classic problem. It has been given renewed attention in the last two decades in view of experiments with complex plasmas, where charged dust particles are often levitated in a region with strong ion flow. Efforts to describe the shielding of the dust particles in such conditions have been focused on the homogeneous plasma approximation, which ignores the substantial inhomogeneity of the levitation region. We address the role of the plasma inhomogeneity by rigorously calculating the point charge potential in the collisionless Bohm sheath. We demonstrate that the inhomogeneity can dramatically modify the wake, making it nonoscillatory and weaker. PMID:24827356

  13. Luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs: Suppression of luminosity by strong magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Mukul Bhattacharya; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay; Subroto Mukerjee

    2015-09-03

    We investigate the luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs. We consider white dwarfs with electron-degenerate core and nondegenerate surface layers where cooling occurs by diffusion of photons. We find the temperature and density profiles in the surface layers or envelope of white dwarfs for radially constant and varying magnetic fields by solving the magnetostatic equilibrium and photon diffusion equations in a Newtonian framework. We also obtain the properties of white dwarfs at the core-envelope interface, when the core is assumed to be practically isothermal due to large thermal conductivity. With the increase in magnetic field, the interface temperature and density are found to be increasing. While the interface radius also increases with the increase in magnetic field when the field is hypothesised to be constant throughout the star, the interface radius decreases for varying fields. However, for white dwarfs having fixed interface radius or interface temperature, we find that the luminosity significantly decreases, falling in the range ~ 10^{-6}-10^{-13} solar luminosity, with the increase in magnetic field strength at the interface and hence envelope, in the corresponding range ~ 10^9-10^{11} G, in particular for the varying magnetic fields which are expected to be more realistic. This is remarkable as it argues for magnetised white dwarfs to be dimmer and be practically hidden in the H-R diagram. We also find the cooling rates corresponding to these luminosities. Interestingly, the decrease in temperature with time, for the fields under consideration, is not found to be appreciable --- at most by a factor of two and that is also for the constant field cases.

  14. Suppression of Secondary Emission in a Magnetic Field Using a Sawtooth and Isosceles Triangle Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2006-09-26

    The effect of surface roughness on the secondary electron emission from a sawtooth and isosceles triangle surface in a magnetic field under electron bombardment is investigated using a Monte-Carlo method. Some of the secondary electrons emitted from the surface return to the surface within their first few gyrations, resulting in a low effective secondary electron yield. Both sawtooth and isosceles triangle surface in magnetic field can significantly reduce the secondary emission yield below the multipacting threshold with weak dependence on the size of surface and magnetic field.

  15. Reduced Field of View MRI with Rapid, B1-Robust Outer Volume Suppression

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    for finer resolution, effective OVS is challenging due to the greater inhomogeneities in the RF transmit (Bþ; reduced field of view imaging; spiral imaging; RF pulse design Spatial aliasing will occur in an MR image

  16. Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2008-01-01

    The preliminary Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA) concept of operations is described in this paper. The WTMA concept provides further detail to work initiated by the Wake Vortex Avoidance System Concept Evaluation Team and is an evolution of the Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Departure concept. Anticipated benefits about reducing wake turbulence separation standards in crosswind conditions, and candidate WTMA system considerations are discussed.

  17. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image Sparsity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Vesanen, Panu T.; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T.; Simola, Juha; Ahonen, Antti I.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low-field (ULF) MRI (B0?=?10–100 µT) typically suffers from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While SNR can be improved by pre-polarization and signal detection using highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, we propose to use the inter-dependency of the k-space data from highly parallel detection with up to tens of sensors readily available in the ULF MRI in order to suppress the noise. Furthermore, the prior information that an image can be sparsely represented can be integrated with this data consistency constraint to further improve the SNR. Simulations and experimental data using 47 SQUID sensors demonstrate the effectiveness of this data consistency constraint and sparsity prior in ULF-MRI reconstruction. PMID:23626710

  18. Suppressing the Folding of Flowing Viscous Jets Using an Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhou; Wang, Liqiu; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we study the folding and unfolding of flowing viscous jets by imposing an electric field. We demonstrate that a folded viscous jet can be induced to unfold through jet widening in a sufficiently strong electric field. The folded jets unfold above a critical slenderness, which increases as the jet capillary number increases. Our systematic elucidation of the mechanisms behind the controlled folding has important implications on processes such as nozzle designs for industrial applications that rely on the manipulation of high-speed viscous jets, including liquid dispensing, printing, and food processing.

  19. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

    E-print Network

    -low-field (ULF) MRI (B0 = 10­100 mT) typically suffers from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While SNR can. From the clinical perspective, MRI still faces significant challenges. First, a strong magnet is usually required to generate a sufficient magnetization to be detected by NMR techniques. The price

  20. Wind Turbine Wake Experiment - Wieringermeer (WINTWEX-W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, Valerie; Reuder, Joachim; Svardal, Benny; Eecen, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The Wind Turbine Wake Experiment - Wieringermeer (WINTWEX-W) is a cooperative wake measurement campaign conducted by the Norwegian Centre of Offshore Wind Energy (Norcowe) and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A scanning, four static Windcubes as well as a downstream looking nacelle LiDAR are placed for half a year downstream of one of five research wind turbines in ECNs' wind turbine test farm Wieringermeer. In order to capture wake characteristics under different weather conditions a 60° sector for three different elevations and two vertical cross-sections are scanned every minute with additional wind profile information every second at 2, 5 and 12 rotor diameter distances. Another static Windcube, a forward-looking nacelle LiDAR and three Sonics are placed upstream to measure the undisturbed approaching flow field. During the campaign several scanning algorithms are tested to capture most wake features. The aim of the campaign is a qualitative and quantitative description of single wind turbine wake evolution, propagation and persistency, as well as to improve CFD wake models by delivering a detailed data set of several real atmospheric conditions.

  1. Atmospheric-wake vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, A. J.; Hirsh, J. E.; Teske, M. E.; Hecht, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The interactions of a vortex wake with a turbulent stratified atmosphere are investigated with the computer code WAKE. It is shown that atmospheric shear, turbulence, and stratification can provide the dominant mechanisms by which vortex wakes decay. Computations included the interaction of a vortex wake with a viscous ground plane. The observed phenomenon of vortex bounce is explained in terms of secondary vorticity produced on the ground. This vorticity is swept off the ground and advected about the vortex pair, thereby altering the classic hyperbolic trajectory. The phenomenon of the solitary vortex is explained as an interaction of a vortex with crosswind shear. Here, the vortex having the sign opposite that of the sign of the vorticity in the shear is dispersed by a convective instability. This instability results in the rapid production of turbulence which in turn disperses the smoke marking the vortex.

  2. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Kanuther N, Harrington J, Lee-Chiong T. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Clin Chest Med . 2010;31:319-325. Zee PC, Vitello MV. Circadian rhythm sleep disorder: irregular sleep wake rhythm. Sleep Med ...

  3. WAKE FOREST CLUBS RESOURCE GUIDE

    E-print Network

    Berenhaut, Kenneth S.

    competition, the satisfaction of service to others ­ the Wake Forest Clubs Program reminds all who attend for the market (e.g. Age, Vocations, Locations, Gender, etc.) o Broadcast emails & outreach: If you are planning

  4. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle ? of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/?(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and ?(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, ??U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law ??c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law ???[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law ??c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  5. Suppression of magnetic levitation force in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-x superconductors by a transverse AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnev, I. A.; Ermolaev, Yu S.

    2008-02-01

    We have studied experimentally the influence of transverse ac magnetic fields on the levitation force arising between a permanent NdFeB magnet and a bulk melt-textured HTSC YBCO superconducting sample. The axes of superconducting disc and cylindrical magnet were coinciding while the transverse ac magnetic field generated by resistive coil was directed parallel to surface of a disc i.e., perpendicular to the disc axis. We found that application of both impulse and alternative transverse magnetic fields results in suppression of the value of levitation force and its relaxation rate. Namely, the variable magnetic field with amplitude 12 mT, that approximately in 20 times is less than field of a constant magnet, causes suppression of force more than twice. Monotonous behavior of value of levitation force reduction with the increase in transverse magnetic field amplitude was observed. The possible origin of observed phenomenon is discussed.

  6. Large-Eddy Simulations of Wind Turbine Wakes Subject to Different Atmospheric Stabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01

    As a byproduct of energy extraction, wind turbines create a low-speed, turbulent wake that propagate downwind. When wind turbines are situated in a group, as in a wind plant, the interactions of these wakes with other turbines are important because wake effects decrease the efficiency of the wind plant, and they increase mechanical loads on individual turbines. Wakes propagate downstream differently depending on the inflow conditions, and these conditions are heavily dominated by atmospheric stability. For example, we know that wakes are more persistent in stable conditions than in unstable conditions. Also, stable conditions often have significant wind veer which skews wakes laterally. Different levels of turbulence intensity are associated with different atmospheric stability levels, and turbulence intensity acts to diffuse wakes and to cause wake meandering. Wake physics are complex, and to understand them better, a high-resolution representation of the flow is necessary. Measurements are difficult with current sensing equipment because of the sheer size of wakes and the unsteady atmospheric environment in which they are found. Numerical simulations complement measurements and provide a high-resolution representation of the entire three-dimensional, unsteady flow field. In this work, we use large-eddy simulation (LES), the highest fidelity type of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) feasible for high-Reynolds-number wake flow. LES directly resolves the larger, energy-containing turbulent scales and models the effects of the subgrid scales that the computational mesh cannot resolve. Our solver is based on the OpenFOAM open-source CFD toolbox. Turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines. Here, we present our LES of the wake behind a modern 1.5 MW turbine subject to different inflow atmospheric stability. We will present results of wakes subject to stable (strongly and weakly stable), neutral, and unstable conditions. We are particularly interested in how stability affects wake recovery, wake skewing, and wake meandering. Figure 1 shows horizontal slices of instantaneous contours of vorticity magnitude in the computed wake of a turbine subject to weakly stable atmospheric inflow. A multi-resolution mesh is used with the finest region of 1.25 m resolution surrounding the turbine and the wake.

  7. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  8. Impact of surface roughness on the turbulent wake flow of a turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulleners, Karen

    2013-11-01

    Roughened aero engine blade surfaces lead to increased friction and reduced efficiency of the individual blades. The surface roughness also affects the wake flow of the blade and thus the inflow conditions for the subsequent compressor or turbine stage. To investigate the impact of surface roughness on a turbulent blade wake, we conducted velocity field measurements by means of stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the wake of a roughened turbine blade in a linear cascade wind tunnel. The turbine blade was roughened at different chord-wise locations. We examined the influence of the chord-wise location of the added surface roughness by comparing their impact on the width and depth of the wake, the positions and distribution of vortical structures and the overall circulation in the wake. The associated variations in the wake's turbulence characteristics including Reynolds stresses were also explored.

  9. Wake Nonuniformity in AN MHD Channel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Vladimir J.

    The influence of a wake type nonuniformity on the effective plasma electrical conductivity and Hall parameters ((sigma)(,eff) and (beta)(,eff)) was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental device consisted of a combustion -driven 1 m long linear magnetohydrodynamic generator designated Mk VII and located at the Avco Everett Research Laboratory, Inc. (AERL). The reactants were oxygen-enriched air and No. 2 fuel oil. The combustion gases were seeded with potassium carbonate in a 50 percent water solution. The nominal thermal input was 10 MW, the inlet Mach number was 1.4 and the maximum magnetic field was B = 2.3 T. The channel was resistively Faraday loaded. The nonuniformity was produced by a flat plate (a vane) located in the supersonic nozzle, which created a wake lying in a plane parallel to the magnetic field. The vane removed approximately 1 percent of the channel thermal input, which resulted in a 6 percent stagnation enthalpy defect in its wake. Traversing optical probes at three locations along the channel detected little or no conductivity defect. The absence of conductivity defect was confirmed by the generator performance which remained the same with or without the vane, all other conditions being the same. An approximate analytical model showed that conductivity in the wake can be, under certain conditions, larger than that in the free stream. A traversing stagnation pressure probe however, did detect a velocity wake at the same conditions. A small amount of water (approximately 1 percent of the total mass flow) was then injected into the plasma from the trailing edge of the vane. That resulted in a strong initial conductivity defect which completely diffused and merged with boundary layers within 0.75 m. The conductivity ((TURN) thermal) profile was recorded by means of optical diagnostics. The stagnation pressure probe recorded both thermal and stagnation pressure defects. The generated power was reduced to a fraction of the power generated without the water injection. Electrical data together with the optical data were combined to evaluate the so -called plasma nonuniformity factor (G). The experimental G fell below that predicted by an approximate analytical expression derived by Rosa (G(,R)). Numerical investigation showed that the analytical approximations are not valid for large conductivity defects. A modified analytical expression resulted in better agreement between the theory and data. . . . (Author's abstract exceeds stipulated maximum length. Discontinued here with permission of author.) UMI.

  10. The Computer Code NOVO for the Calculation of Wake Potentials of the Very Short Ultra-relativistic Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2005-12-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interaction of a beam and accelerator elements is very important for linear colliders, electron-positron factories, and free electron lasers. Precise calculation of wake fields is required for beam dynamics study in these machines. We describe a method which allows computation of wake fields of the very short bunches. Computer code NOVO was developed based on this method. This method is free of unphysical solutions like ''self-acceleration'' of a bunch head, which is common to well known wake field codes. Code NOVO was used for the wake fields study for many accelerator projects all over the world.

  11. A Study of Wake Development and Structure in Constant Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, R. C.; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by the application to high-lift aerodynamics for commercial transport aircraft, a systematic investigation into the response of symmetric/asymmetric planar turbulent wake development to constant adverse, zero, and favorable pressure gradients has been conducted. The experiments are performed at a Reynolds number of 2.4 million based on the chord of the wake generator. A unique feature of this wake study is that the pressure gradients imposed on the wake flow field are held constant. The experimental measurements involve both conventional LDV and hot wire flow field surveys of mean and turbulent quantities including the turbulent kinetic energy budget. In addition, similarity analysis and numerical simulation have also been conducted for this wake study. A focus of the research has been to isolate the effects of both pressure gradient and initial wake asymmetry on the wake development. Experimental results reveal that the pressure gradient has a tremendous influence on the wake development, despite the relatively modest pressure gradients imposed. For a given pressure gradient, the development of an initially asymmetric wake is different from the initially symmetric wake. An explicit similarity solution for the shape parameters of the symmetric wake is obtained and agrees with the experimental results. The turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements of the symmetric wake demonstrate that except for the convection term, the imposed pressure gradient does not change the fundamental flow physics of turbulent kinetic energy transport. Based on the turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements, an approach to correct the bias error associated with the notoriously difficult dissipation estimate is proposed and validated through the comparison of the experimental estimate with a direct numerical simulation result.

  12. Distributed control in a mean-field cortical network model: Implications for seizure suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Kramer, Mark A.

    2012-08-01

    Brain electrical stimulation (BES) has long been suggested as a means of controlling pathological brain activity. In epilepsy, control of a spatially localized source, the seizure focus, may normalize neuronal dynamics. Consequently, most BES research has been directed at controlling small, local, neuronal populations. At a higher level, pathological seizure activity can be viewed as a network event that may begin without a clear spatial focus or in multiple sites and spread rapidly through a distributed cortical network. In this paper, we begin to address the implications of local control in a network scenario. To do so, we explore the efficacy of local BES when deployed over a larger-scale neuronal network, for instance, using a grid of stimulating electrodes on the cortex. By introducing a mean-field model of neuronal interactions we are able to identify limitations in network controllability based on physiological constraints that suggest the need for more nuanced network control strategies.

  13. Complex geophysical wake flows. Madeira Archipelago case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Rui Miguel A.; Sangrà, Pablo

    2012-05-01

    Idealized studies of island wakes often use a cylinder-like island to generate the wake, whereas most realistic studies use a close representation of the oceanic bathymetry immersed in a complex representation of the "ambient" geophysical flows. Here, a system of multiple islands was placed into numerical and experimental channels, in order to focus on the complexity of the archipelago wake, including (a) the influence of small neighboring islands and (b) the role of the island-shelf. The numerical geostrophic and stratified channel was built using a three-dimensional primitive equation model, considering a realistic representation of the Madeira archipelago bathymetry, with prescribed initial and boundary conditions. Results from the simulations show that the neighboring islands alter the near-field wake. Small eddies generated by the neighboring islands lead to destabilization of the shear layers of the larger island. Laboratory experiments carried out in the Coriolis rotating tank corroborated this near-field disruptive mechanism. The neighboring island perturbation effect was present whatever the direction of the incoming flow, but under different regimes. North-south wakes produced geostrophic eddies (? R d), whereas west-east wakes produced (exclusively) ageostrophic submesoscale eddies (< < R d) which traveled offshore with wave-like motion. The archipelago shelf contributed to the asymmetric vertical migration of oceanic vorticity. Cyclonic vorticity dominated the surface dynamics, whereas anticyclonic circulation prevailed at the bottom part of the linearly stratified upper layer. This study identifies several likely wake scenarios induced by the Madeira archipelago, and may serve as guide for future multiscale numerical studies and in situ campaigns.

  14. Suppression of Amblyomma americanum (Ixodida: Ixodidae) for short-term field operations utilizing cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Tony H; Richardson, Alec G; Hoel, David F; Mejeoumov, Tracy; Farooq, Mohammad; Stoops, Craig A

    2014-05-01

    Tick-borne diseases pose significant risks to U.S. military personnel who conduct operations, both domestic and abroad. To determine the feasibility of protecting personnel from tick vectors during short-term field deployments, acaricides cypermethrin (Demon WP, Syngenta, Greensboro, NC) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Surrender Pestabs, CSI, Pasadena, TX) were applied to plots within two separate field sites on Camp Blanding Joint Training Center in Starke, FL, from May to June 2011. We analyzed their effectiveness in reducing tick counts for 6 wk after application. In total, 8,193 ticks were identified and counted, of which > 99% were a mix of nymphs and adult-stage Amblyomma americanum (L.). Our results indicate that both cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin were effective in significantly reducing tick numbers and preventing entry into treated plots for 6 wk after application. Thus, these two acaracides can be used to effectively suppress tick populations and provide residual protection in small geographic areas of recreation or public health significance. PMID:24897866

  15. Coherent Pulsed Lidar Sensing of Wake Vortex Position and Strength, Winds and Turbulence in the Terminal Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, Philip; Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Koch, Grady J.; Nguyen, Dung Phu Chi; Britt, Charles L., Jr.; Petros, Mulugeta

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has field tested a 2.0 gm, 100 Hertz, pulsed coherent lidar to detect and characterize wake vortices and to measure atmospheric winds and turbulence. The quantification of aircraft wake-vortex hazards is being addressed by the Wake Vortex Lidar (WVL) Project as part of Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS), which is under the Reduced Spacing Operations Element of the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. These hazards currently set the minimum, fixed separation distance between two aircraft and affect the number of takeoff and landing operations on a single runway under Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The AVOSS concept seeks to safely reduce aircraft separation distances, when weather conditions permit, to increase the operational capacity of major airports. The current NASA wake-vortex research efforts focus on developing and validating wake vortex encounter models, wake decay and advection models, and wake sensing technologies. These technologies will be incorporated into an automated AVOSS that can properly select safe separation distances for different weather conditions, based on the aircraft pair and predicted/measured vortex behavior. The sensor subsystem efforts focus on developing and validating wake sensing technologies. The lidar system has been field-tested to provide real-time wake vortex trajectory and strength data to AVOSS for wake prediction verification. Wake vortices, atmospheric winds, and turbulence products have been generated from processing the lidar data collected during deployments to Norfolk (ORF), John F. Kennedy (JFK), and Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airports.

  16. The computation of induced drag with nonplanar and deformed wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Smith, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The classical calculation of inviscid drag, based on far field flow properties, is reexamined with particular attention to the nonlinear effects of wake roll-up. Based on a detailed look at nonlinear, inviscid flow theory, it is concluded that many of the classical, linear results are more general than might have been expected. Departures from the linear theory are identified and design implications are discussed. Results include the following: Wake deformation has little effect on the induced drag of a single element wing, but introduces first order corrections to the induced drag of a multi-element lifting system. Far field Trefftz-plane analysis may be used to estimate the induced drag of lifting systems, even when wake roll-up is considered, but numerical difficulties arise. The implications of several other approximations made in lifting line theory are evaluated by comparison with more refined analyses.

  17. Kirchhoff's Integral Representation and a Cavity Wake Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    A method is proposed for the calculation of the short-range wake field potentials of an ultra-relativistic bunch passing near some irregularities in a beam pipe. The method is based on the space-time domain integration of Maxwell's equations using Kirchhoff's formulation. We demonstrate this method on two cases where we obtain the wake potentials for the energy loss of a bunch traversing an iris-collimator in a beam pipe and for a cavity. Likewise, formulas are derived for Green's functions that describe the transverse force action of wake fields. Simple formulas for the total energy loss of a bunch with a Gaussian charge density distribution are derived as well. The derived estimates are compared with computer results and predictions of other models.

  18. Suppressing feedback in a distributed video coding system by employing real field codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louw, Daniel J.; Kaneko, Haruhiko

    2013-12-01

    Single-view distributed video coding (DVC) is a video compression method that allows for the computational complexity of the system to be shifted from the encoder to the decoder. The reduced encoding complexity makes DVC attractive for use in systems where processing power or energy use at the encoder is constrained, for example, in wireless devices and surveillance systems. One of the biggest challenges in implementing DVC systems is that the required rate must be known at the encoder. The conventional approach is to use a feedback channel from the decoder to control the rate. Feedback channels introduce their own difficulties such as increased latency and buffering requirements, which makes the resultant system unsuitable for some applications. Alternative approaches, which do not employ feedback, suffer from either increased encoder complexity due to performing motion estimation at the encoder, or an inaccurate rate estimate. Inaccurate rate estimates can result in a reduced average rate-distortion performance, as well as unpleasant visual artifacts. In this paper, the authors propose a single-view DVC system that does not require a feedback channel. The consequences of inaccuracies in the rate estimate are addressed by using codes defined over the real field and a decoder employing successive refinement. The result is a codec with performance that is comparable to that of a feedback-based system at low rates without the use of motion estimation at the encoder or a feedback path. The disadvantage of the approach is a reduction in average rate-distortion performance in the high-rate regime for sequences with significant motion.

  19. A digital photography and analysis system for estimation of root and shoot development in rice weed suppression studies in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice germplasm with an inherent ability to suppress weeds can potentially improve the economics and sustainability of weed control in rice. We devised a simple, rapid, and inexpensive digital imaging system to quantify several shoot and root growth characteristics in field-grown rice plants that ha...

  20. Formulations of the endophytic bacterium Bacillus subtilis Tu-100 suppress Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape and improve plant vigor in field trials conducted at separate locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses in crops in The People’s Republic of China. Two formulations of oilseed rape seed containing the endophytic bacterium Bacillus subtilis Tu-100 were evaluated for suppression of this pathogen in field trials conducted at two independent locations....

  1. Harmonics suppression of vacuum chamber eddy current induced fields with application to the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy Booster (LEB) Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1991-12-04

    This memo presents the formulation of an expression for eddy currents induced in a thin-walled conductor due to a time-dependent electromagnet field excitation. Then follows an analytical development for prediction of vacuum chamber eddy current induced field harmonics in iron-core electromagnets. A passive technique for harmonics suppression is presented with specific application to the design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy B (LEB) Magnets.

  2. Stark interaction of identical particles with the vacuum electromagnetic field as quantum Poisson process suppressing collective spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Basharov, A. M.

    2011-07-15

    The effective Hamiltonian describing resonant interaction of an ensemble of identical quantum particles with a photon-free vacuum electromagnetic field has been obtained with allowance for terms of second order in the coupling constant (the Stark interaction) by means of the perturbation theory on the basis of the unitary transformation of the system quantum state. It has been shown that in the Markov approximation the effective Hamiltonian terms of first order in the coupling constant are represented by the quantum Wiener process, whereas terms of second order are expressed by the quantum Poisson process. During the course of the investigation, it was established that the Stark interaction played a significant role in the ensemble dynamics, thus influencing the collective spontaneous decay of the ensemble of an appreciably high number of identical particles. Fundamental effects have been discovered, i.e., the excitation conservation in a sufficiently dense ensemble of identical particles and superradiance suppression in the collective decaying process of an excited ensemble with a determined number of particles.

  3. Experimental investigation of a stratified buoyant wake 

    E-print Network

    Kraft, Wayne Neal

    2004-11-15

    layer / wake interactions, and qualitative observations of the behavior have been made. Also, quantitative measurements of velocity fluctuations and density fluctuations in the near wake have been obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a...

  4. Study of a Wake Recovery Mechanism in a High-Speed Axial Compressor Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the significant differences in compressor rotor wake mixing loss which exist in a stage environment relative to a rotor in isolation. The wake decay for a rotor in isolation is due solely to viscous dissipation which is an irreversible process and thus leads to a loss in both total pressure and efficiency. Rotor wake decay in the stage environment is due to both viscous mixing and the inviscid strain imposed on the wake fluid particles by the stator velocity field. This straining process, referred to by Smith (1993) as recovery, is reversible and for a 2D rotor wake leads to an inviscid reduction of the velocity deficit of the wake. A model for the rotor wake decay process is developed and used to quantify the viscous dissipation effects relative to those of inviscid wake stretching. The model is verified using laser anemometer measurements acquired in the wake of a transonic rotor operated in isolation and in a stage configuration at near peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. Additional insight is provided by a time-accurate 3D Navier-Stokes simulation of the compressor stator flow field at the corresponding stage loading levels. Results from the wake decay model exhibit good agreement with the experimental data. Data from the model, laser anemometer measurements, and numerical simulations indicate that for the rotor/stator spacing used in this work, which is typical of core compressors, rotor wake straining (stretching) is the primary decay process in the stator passage with viscous mixing playing only a minor role. The implications of these results on compressor stage design are discussed.

  5. Numerical simulation of supersonic wake flow with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Soetrisno, M.

    1995-07-01

    Simulating a supersonic wake flow field behind a conical body is a computing intensive task. It requires a large number of computational cells to capture the dominant flow physics and a robust numerical algorithm to obtain a reliable solution. High performance parallel computers with unique distributed processing and data storage capability can provide this need. They have larger computational memory and faster computing time than conventional vector computers. We apply the PINCA Navier-Stokes code to simulate a wind-tunnel supersonic wake experiment on Intel Gamma, Intel Paragon, and IBM SP2 parallel computers. These simulations are performed to study the mean flow in the near wake region of a sharp, 7-degree half-angle, adiabatic cone at Mach number 4.3 and freestream Reynolds number of 40,600. Overall the numerical solutions capture the general features of the hypersonic laminar wake flow and compare favorably with the wind tunnel data. With a refined and clustering grid distribution in the recirculation zone, the calculated location of the rear stagnation point is consistent with the 2D axisymmetric and 3D experiments. In this study, we also demonstrate the importance of having a large local memory capacity within a computer node and the effective utilization of the number of computer nodes to achieve good parallel performance when simulating a complex, large-scale wake flow problem.

  6. Analytical model of rotor wake aerodynamics in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saberi, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The model and the computer program developed provides the velocity, location, and circulation of the tip vortices of a two-blade helicopter in and out of the ground effect. Comparison of the theoretical results with some experimental measurements for the location of the wake indicate that there is excellent accuracy in the vicinity of the rotor and fair amount of accuracy far from it. Having the location of the wake at all times enables us to compute the history of the velocity and the location of any point in the flow. The main goal of out study, induced velocity at the rotor, can also be calculated in addition to stream lines and streak lines. Since the wake location close to the rotor is known more accurately than at other places, the calculated induced velocity over the disc should be a good estimate of the real induced velocity, with the exception of the blade location, because each blade was replaced only by a vortex line. Because no experimental measurements of the wake close to the ground were available to us, quantitative evaluation of the theoretical wake was not possible. But qualitatively we have been able to show excellent agreement. Comparison of flow visualization with out results has indicated the location of the ground vortex is estimated excellently. Also the flow field in hover is well represented.

  7. Magnetic Fluctuations and Turbulence in the Venus Magnetosheath and Wake

    E-print Network

    Z. Vörös; T. L. Zhang; M. P. Leubner; M. Volwerk; M. Delva; W. Baumjohann; K. Kudela

    2008-06-11

    Recent research has shown that distinct physical regions in the Venusian induced magnetosphere are recognizable from the variations of strength and of wave/fluctuation activity of the magnetic field. In this paper the statistical properties of magnetic fluctuations are investigated in the Venusian magnetosheath, terminator, and wake regions. The latter two regions were not visited by previous missions. We found 1/f fluctuations in the magnetosheath, large-scale structures near the terminator and more developed turbulence further downstream in the wake. Location independent short-tailed non-Gaussian statistics was observed.

  8. Assimilation Experiment of Lidar Measurements for Wake Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaka, Takashi; Ogasawara, Takeshi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Yamada, Izumi; Okuno, Yoshinori

    Numerical simulation of wake turbulence was performed by integrating the lidar measurements using four-dimensional variational method. A bogus vortex technique was adopted to ensure the existence of wake vortices in the flow field. The validation of the method was performed by an idealized test case using virtual lidar measurement which was produced by the reference simulation of a vortex pair. The results of the validation showed the convergence of a vortex parameter such as a circulation to the parameter of reference simulation case. It was also confirmed that the velocity distribution on a measurement plane agreed with reference one.

  9. Contrail Formation in Aircraft Wakes Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, R.; Helie, J.; Poinsot, T. J.; Ghosal, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we analyze the issue of the formation of condensation trails ("contrails") in the near-field of an aircraft wake. The basic configuration consists in an exhaust engine jet interacting with a wing-tip training vortex. The procedure adopted relies on a mixed Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow approach; a simple micro-physics model for ice growth has been used to couple ice and vapor phases. Large eddy simulations have carried out at a realistic flight Reynolds number to evaluate the effects of turbulent mixing and wake vortex dynamics on ice-growth characteristics and vapor thermodynamic properties.

  10. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    Plasma wave wakes, which are the collective oscillatory response near the plasma frequency to the propagation of particles or electromagnetic waves through a plasma, play a critical role in many plasma processes. New results from backwards stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in which wakes with phase velocities much less than the speed of light are induced by the beating of counter-propagating light waves, and from electron beam stopping, in which the wakes are produced by the motion of relativistically propagating electrons through the dense plasma, are discussed. Both processes play important roles in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In BSRS, laser light is scattered backwards out of the plasma, decreasing the energy available to compress the ICF capsule and affecting the symmetry of where the laser energy hits the hohlraum wall in indirect drive ICF. The plasma wave wake can also generate superthermal electrons that can preheat the core and/or the ablator. Electron beam stopping plays a critical role in the Fast Ignition (FI) ICF concept, in which a beam of relativistic electrons is used to heat the target core to ignition temperatures after the compression stage. The beam stopping power determines the effectiveness of the heating process. This dissertation covers new discoveries on the importance of plasma wave wakes in both BSRS and electron beam stopping. In the SRS studies, 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS are performed, which model a short-duration (˜500/?0 --1FWHM) counter-propagating scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold for plasma waves undergoing Landau damping. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over the amplification of fluctuations due to particle discreteness. The simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled-mode solver when special relativity and the effects of finite size PIC simulation particles are accounted for. Linear gain spectra including both effects are discussed. Extending the PIC simulations past when the seed exits the simulation domain reveals bursts of large-amplitude scattering in many cases, which do not occur in simulations without the seed pulse. These bursts can have amplitudes several times greater than the amplified seed pulse, and an examination of the orbits of particles trapped in the wake illustrates that the bursts are caused by a reduction of Landau damping due to particle trapping. This large-amplitude scattering is caused by the seed inducing a wake earlier in the simulation, thus modifying the distribution function. Performing simulations with longer duration seeds leads to parts of the seeds reaching amplitudes several times more than the steady-state linear theory results, similarly caused by a reduction of Landau damping. Simulations with continuous seeds demonstrate that the onset of inflation depends on the seed wavelength and incident intensity, and oscillations in the reflectivity are observed at a frequency equal to the difference between the seed frequency and the frequency at which the inflationary SRS grows. In the electron beam stopping studies, 3D PIC simulations are performed of relativistic electrons with a momentum of 10mec propagating in a cold FI core plasma. Some of the simulations use one simulation particle per real particle, and particle sizes much smaller than the interparitcle spacing. The wake made by a single electron is compared against that calculated using cold fluid theory assuming the phase velocity of the wake is near the speed of light. The results agree for the first wavelength of the wake. However, the shape of the wake changes for succeeding wavelengths and depends on the background plasma temperature, with the concavity pointing in the direction the electron is moving in cold plasmas and in the opposite direction as the plasma temperature increases. In the warm plasma the curvature is described by electrostatic Vlasov theory (for vparticle >> vth) and is due

  11. Wake characteristics of buildings in disturbed boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Chang, J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements relevant to the effect of buildings on the low level atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Field measurements of velocity and turbulence in the wake of a block building 3.2 m high and 26.8 m long are presented which show an apparent increase in momentum flow above the upwind value. Velocity-deficit and turbulence-excess decay characteristics of the disturbed or nonequilibrium layer are correlated with power law exponents and apparent roughness length at various distances downstream of the disturbance. Model wake profiles from the simulated building are compared at various stations for equilibrium and nonequilibrium upstream profiles. Empirical correlations relating building wake profiles to upstream nonequilibrium parameters are presented. The relationship of the data to the smooth-rough transition is discussed, and a flow model is presented.

  12. Numerical Modeling Studies of Wake Vortices: Real Case Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Shao-Hua; Ding, Feng; Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation model, TASS, is used to simulate the behavior of aircraft wake vortices in a real atmosphere. The purpose for this study is to validate the use of TASS for simulating the decay and transport of wake vortices. Three simulations are performed and the results are compared with the observed data from the 1994-1995 Memphis field experiments. The selected cases have an atmospheric environment of weak turbulence and stable stratification. The model simulations are initialized with appropriate meteorological conditions and a post roll-up vortex system. The behavior of wake vortices as they descend within the atmospheric boundary layer and interact with the ground is discussed.

  13. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  14. Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan

    E-print Network

    Cook, Greg

    Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan June 15, 2009 Rev.1 1 Biohazard Waste and disposal of Biohazardous material generated at the Reynolda campus of Wake Forest University. The Solid to receive waste. TYPES OF BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATED Wake Forest University (WFU) generates sharps waste

  15. Normal Component of Induced Velocity for Entire Field of a Uniformly Loaded Lifting Rotor with Highly Swept Wake as Determined by Electromagnetic Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Walter, Jr.; Durham, Howard L., Jr.; Kevorkian, Jirair

    1959-01-01

    Values of the normal component of induced velocity throughout the entire field of a uniformly loaded r(rotor at high high speed are presented in the form of charts and tables. Many points were found by an electromagnetic analog, details of which are given. Comparisons of computed and analog values for the induced velocity indicate that the latter are sufficiently accurate for engineering purposes.

  16. Cooling Signs in Wake Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    More than a year after dismantling a student-assignment policy based on socioeconomic diversity and setting off a wave of reaction that drew national attention, the Wake County, North Carolina, school board took a step that may turn down the temperature of the intense debate. The board, which has been deeply split on an assignment plan for the…

  17. CONTROL OF SLEEP AND WAKEFULNESS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Basheer, Radhika; McKenna, James T.; Strecker, Robert E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, resulting in large-amplitude, slow EEG oscillations. Local, activity-dependent factors modulate the amplitude and frequency of cortical slow oscillations. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep results in conservation of brain energy and facilitates memory consolidation through the modulation of synaptic weights. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep results from the interaction of brain stem cholinergic, aminergic, and GABAergic neurons which control the activity of glutamatergic reticular formation neurons leading to REM sleep phenomena such as muscle atonia, REMs, dreaming, and cortical activation. Strong activation of limbic regions during REM sleep suggests a role in regulation of emotion. Genetic studies suggest that brain mechanisms controlling waking and NREM sleep are strongly conserved throughout evolution, underscoring their enormous importance for brain function. Sleep disruption interferes with the normal restorative functions of NREM and REM sleep, resulting in disruptions of breathing and cardiovascular function, changes in emotional reactivity, and cognitive impairments in attention, memory, and decision making. PMID:22811426

  18. Effects of atmospheric stability on the evolution of wind turbine wakes: Volumetric LiDAR scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Aerodynamic optimization of wind farm layout is a fundamental task to reduce wake effects on downstream wind turbines, thus to maximize wind power harvesting. However, downstream evolution and recovery of wind turbine wakes are strongly affected by the characteristics of the incoming atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow, like the vertical profiles of the mean wind velocity and the turbulence intensity, which are in turn affected by the ABL stability regime. Therefore, the characterization of the variability of wind turbine wakes under different ABL stability regimes becomes fundamental to better predict wind power harvesting and improve wind farm efficiency. To this aim, wind velocity measurements of the wake produced by a 2 MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed with three scanning Doppler wind Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) instruments. One LiDAR was typically devoted to the characterization of the incoming wind, in particular wind velocity, shear and turbulence intensity at the height of the rotor disc. The other two LiDARs performed scans in order to characterize the wake velocity field produced by the tested wind turbine. The main challenge in performing field measurements of wind turbine wakes is represented by the varying wind conditions, and by the consequent adjustments of the turbine yaw angle needed to maximize power production. Consequently, taking into account possible variations of the relative position between LiDAR measurement volume and wake location, different LiDAR measurement procedures were carried out in order to perform 2-D and 3-D characterizations of the mean wake velocity field. However, larger measurement volumes and higher spatial resolution require longer sampling periods; thus, to investigate wake turbulence tests were also performed by staring the LiDAR laser beam over fixed directions and with the maximum sampling frequency. Furthermore, volumetric scans of the wind turbine wake were performed under different wind conditions via two simultaneous LiDARs. Through the evaluation of the minimum wake velocity deficit as a function of the downstream distance, it is shown that the stability regime of the ABL has a significant effect on the wake evolution; specifically the wake recovers faster under convective conditions. This result suggests that atmospheric inflow conditions, and particularly thermal stability, should be considered for improved wake models and predictions of wind power harvesting.

  19. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  20. Vortex shedding in compressor blade wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Gertz, J. B.; Owen, P. R.; Giles, M. B.

    1987-01-01

    The wakes of highly loaded axial compressor blades were often considered to be turbulent, unstructured flows. Recent work has suggested that the blade wakes are in fact dominated by a vortex street-like structure. The work on the wake structure at MIT is reviewed, the results of a viscous numerical simulation are presented, the blade wake vortices are compared to those shed from a cylinder, and the implications of the wake structure on compressor performance are discussed. In particular, a two-dimensional, time accurate, viscous calculation shows both a periodic wake structure and time variations in the passage shock strength. The numerical calculations are compared to laser anemometer and high frequency response probe data. The effect of the wake structure on the entropy production and apparent adiabatic efficiency of the compressor rotor is discussed.

  1. Brain mechanisms that control sleep and waking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Jerome

    This review paper presents a brief historical survey of the technological and early research that laid the groundwork for recent advances in sleep-waking research. A major advance in this field occurred shortly after the end of World War II with the discovery of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) as the neural source in the brain stem of the waking state. Subsequent research showed that the brain stem activating system produced cortical arousal via two pathways: a dorsal route through the thalamus and a ventral route through the hypothalamus and basal forebrain. The nuclei, pathways, and neurotransmitters that comprise the multiple components of these arousal systems are described. Sleep is now recognized as being composed of two very different states: rapid eye movements (REMs) sleep and non-REM sleep. The major findings on the neural mechanisms that control these two sleep states are presented. This review ends with a discussion of two current views on the function of sleep: to maintain the integrity of the immune system and to enhance memory consolidation.

  2. Dynamics of wake structure in clapping propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daegyoum; Gharib, Morteza

    2009-11-01

    Some animals such as insects and frogs use a pair of symmetric flaps for locomotion. In some cases, these flappers operate in close proximity or even touch each other. In order to understand the underlying physics of these kinds of motion, we have studied the wake structures induced by clapping and their associated thrust performance. A simple mechanical model with two acrylic plates was used to simulate the power stroke of the clapping motion and three-dimensional flow fields were obtained using defocusing digital particle image velocimetry. Our studies show that the process of vortex connection plays a critical role in forming a downstream closed vortex loop. Under some kinematic conditions, this vortex loop changes its shape dynamically, which is analogous to the process of an elliptical vortex ring switching its minor and major axis. As the length of the plate along the rotating shaft decreases to change an aspect ratio, the downstream motion of the vortex is retarded due to the outward motion of side edge vortices and less propulsive force is generated per the surface area of the plate. The impact of compliance and stroke angle of the plate on wake structures and thrust magnitudes are also presented.

  3. Optimal perturbations of non-parallel wakes and their stabilizing effect on the global instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guercio, Gerardo; Cossu, Carlo; Pujals, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    We compute the spatial optimal energy amplification of steady inflow perturbations in a non-parallel wake and analyse their stabilizing action on the global mode instability. The optimal inflow perturbations, which are assumed spanwise periodic and varicose, consist in streamwise vortices that induce the downstream spatial transient growth of streamwise streaks. The maximum energy amplification of the streaks increases with the spanwise wavelength of the perturbations, in accordance with previous results obtained for the temporal energy growth supported by parallel wakes. A family of increasingly streaky wakes is obtained by forcing optimal inflow perturbations of increasing amplitude and then solving the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations. We show that the linear global instability of the wake can be completely suppressed by forcing optimal perturbations of sufficiently large amplitude. The attenuation and suppression of self-sustained oscillations in the wake by optimal 3D perturbations is confirmed by fully nonlinear numerical simulations. We also show that the amplitude of optimal spanwise periodic (3D) perturbations of the basic flow required to stabilize the global instability is much smaller than the one required by spanwise uniform (2D) perturbations despite the fact that the first order sensitivity of the global eigenvalue to basic flow modifications is zero for 3D spanwise periodic modifications and non-zero for 2D modifications. We therefore conclude that first-order sensitivity analyses can be misleading if used far from the instability threshold, where higher order terms are the most relevant.

  4. Ventilation of an hydrofoil wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Roger; Lee, Seung Jae; Monson, Garrett

    2013-11-01

    Ventilation physics plays a role in a variety of important engineering applications. For example, hydroturbine ventilation is used for control of vibration and cavitation erosion and more recently for improving the dissolved oxygen content of the flow through the turbine. The latter technology has been the focus of an ongoing study involving the ventilation of an hydrofoil wake to determine the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). The data are compared with previous studies of ventilated flow. The theoretical results of Hinze suggest that a scaling relationship is possible that can lead to developing appropriate design parameters for a ventilation system. Sponsored by ONR and DOE.

  5. Compressor and fan wake characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, B.; Hah, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Ravindranath, A.

    1978-01-01

    A triaxial probe and a rotating conventional probe, mounted on a traverse gear operated by two step motors were used to measure the mean velocities and turbulence quantities across a rotor wake at various radial locations and downstream stations. The data obtained was used in an analytical model developed to study how rotor flow and blade parameters and turbulence properties such as energy, velocity correlations, and length scale affect the rotor wake characteristics and its diffusion properties. The model, includes three dimensional attributes, can be used in predicting the discrete as well as broadband noise generated in a fan rotor, as well as in evaluating the aerodynamic losses, efficiency and optimum spacing between a rotor and stator in turbomachinery.

  6. Neurons containing orexin or melanin concentrating hormone reciprocally regulate wake and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Konadhode, Roda Rani; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons containing orexin (hypocretin), or melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) are intermingled with each other in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus. Each is a separate and distinct neuronal population, but they project to similar target areas in the brain. Orexin has been implicated in regulating arousal since loss of orexin neurons is associated with the sleep disorder narcolepsy. Microinjections of orexin into the brain or optogenetic stimulation of orexin neurons increase waking. Orexin neurons are active in waking and quiescent in sleep, which is consistent with their role in promoting waking. On the other hand, the MCH neurons are quiet in waking but active in sleep, suggesting that they could initiate sleep. Recently, for the first time the MCH neurons were stimulated optogenetically and it increased sleep. Indeed, optogenetic activation of MCH neurons induced sleep in both mice and rats at a circadian time when they should be awake, indicating the powerful effect that MCH neurons have in suppressing the wake-promoting effect of not only orexin but also of all of the other arousal neurotransmitters. Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is coexpressed with MCH in the MCH neurons, although MCH is also inhibitory. The inhibitory tone of the MCH neurons is opposite to the excitatory tone of the orexin neurons. We hypothesize that strength in activity of each determines wake vs. sleep. PMID:25620917

  7. Visitor Parking Wake Forest Rd.

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    . WingateRd. Wake Forest Rd. WingateRd. Jasper M emory Ln. W ak e Forest Rd. W ake ForestRd. Carroll House University Corporate Center Area Map 1 2 3 24 23 4 5 6 78 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 18 47 16 22 42 25 26 Hall 44, 45, 46 Chiller Plants 47 Greene Hall 48 Tennis Courts 49 Polo Road Gate 50 University Parkway

  8. Wake Characteristics of a Single Turbine During the CWEX-10/11 Crop Wind-Energy EXperiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajewski, D. A.; Takle, E. S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Rhodes, M. E.; Prueger, J. H.; Oncley, S. O.; Horst, T. W.; Pfeiffer, R.; Hatfield, J.; Spoth, K. K.; Doorenbos, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2010 and 2011 for the Crop Wind-energy EXperiment (CWEX), flux stations measured differences in micrometeorology upstream and downstream of a single turbine within a large wind farm in Iowa. Profiling LiDARs were positioned upwind and downwind of a single turbine for two months in 2011 to document the wake profiles of mean wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Nacelle-based measurements of wind speed, wind direction, and power produced verified the likely presence of a wake above the downwind flux station. As described in the CWEX overview paper (Rajewski et al. 2013) the flux stations detected (1) turbine-wake events for wakes overhead but not intersecting the surface, (2) wakes with a direct surface influence, and (3) flow perturbations caused by the static pressure field around a line of turbines. We refine our conceptual model of wind turbine flow by comparing downwind-upwind flux and profile station differences for categories of waked and non-waked flow according to turbine hub-height speed and direction, ambient thermal stratification, and the operating status of the turbines. For nighttime stable conditions (some for which a low level jet is present) we measured both within the rotor depth and at the surface higher turbulence and stronger intermittency of the flow on the wake edges as compared to the wake core. We additionally observe frequent periods with 20-30° of directional shear from the surface to the top of the rotor as evidenced by a downwind flux station in non-waked flow with concurrent LiDAR measurement of a wake in the rotor layer. Momentum power spectra and co-spectra of 20-Hz surface data corroborate with previous wind tunnel and numerical simulations of wake turbulence with higher energy intensity but at reduced scales than for non-waked conditions. The spectra demonstrate a return to ambient flow when the wind farm is brought offline.

  9. Large-Eddy Simulations and Lidar Measurements of Vortex-Pair Breakup in Aircraft Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.; Poole, L. R.; DeCoursey, R. J.; Hansen, G. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Kent, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Results of large-eddy simulations of an aircraft wake are compared with results from ground-based lidar measurements made at NASA Langley Research Center during the Subsonic Assessment Near-Field Interaction Flight Experiment field tests. Brief reviews of the design of the field test for obtaining the evolution of wake dispersion behind a Boeing 737 and of the model developed for simulating such wakes are given. Both the measurements and the simulations concentrate on the period from a few seconds to a few minutes after the wake is generated, during which the essentially two-dimensional vortex pair is broken up into a variety of three-dimensional eddies. The model and experiment show similar distinctive breakup eddies induced by the mutual interactions of the vortices, after perturbation by the atmospheric motions.

  10. Bacillus megaterium A6 suppresses Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape in the field and promotes oilseed rape growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses in crops in The People’s Republic of China and other regions of the world. Two formulations of oilseed rape seed containing the plant-growth promoting bacterium Bacillus megaterium A6 were evaluated for suppression of this pathogen on oilseed rap...

  11. Comparison of application methods for suppressing the pecan weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) with Beauveria bassiana under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecans. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana is pathogenic to C. caryae. Our objective was to compare different application methods for suppression of C. caryae adults. Treatments included direct application of B. bassiana (GHA...

  12. Wind-Tunnel Simulation of the Wake of a Large Wind Turbine in a Stable Boundary Layer: Part 2, the Wake Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Philip E.; Pascheke, Frauke

    2014-04-01

    Measurements have been made in the wake of a model wind turbine in both a neutral and a stable atmospheric boundary layer, in the EnFlo stratified-flow wind tunnel, between 0.5 and 10 rotor diameters from the turbine, as part of an investigation of wakes in offshore winds. In the stable case the velocity deficit decreased more slowly than in the neutral case, partly because the boundary-layer turbulence levels are lower and the consequentially reduced level of mixing, an `indirect' effect of stratification. A correlation for velocity deficit showed the effect of stratification to be the same over the whole of the measured extent, following a polynomial form from about five diameters. After about this distance (for the present stratification) the vertical growth of the wake became almost completely suppressed, though with an increased lateral growth; the wake in effect became `squashed', with peaks of quantities occurring at a lower height, a `direct' effect of stratification. Generally, the Reynolds stresses were lower in magnitude, though the effect of stratification was larger in the streamwise fluctuation than on the vertical fluctuations. The vertical heat flux did not change much from the undisturbed level in the first part of the wake, but became much larger in the later part, from about five diameters onwards, and exceeded the surface level at a point above hub height.

  13. Multiple-LiDAR measurements of wind turbine wakes: effect of the atmospheric stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Aerodynamic design and optimization of a wind farm layout are mainly based on the evaluation of wind turbine wake recovery by moving downstream, and on the characterization of wake interactions within a wind farm. Indeed, the power production of downstream wind turbine rows is strictly affected by the cumulative wake produced by the turbines deployed upstream. Wind turbine wakes are dependent on their aerodynamic features, and being immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), they are also affected by surface heterogeneity, e.g. site topography and surface coverage, and atmospheric stability. The ABL stability is typically classified as neutral, convective or stable. In a neutral ABL the mechanical turbulent production is the dominating phenomenon. Conversely, for a convective ABL the turbulent kinetic energy and vertical transport phenomena are enhanced by positive buoyancy. Finally, for a stable ABL, a lower turbulence level is typically observed with an increased wind shear. For the present campaign convective ABL was typically observed during day-time, and neutral ABL for early morning and sunset periods. The aim of the present work is the evaluation of the influence of the ABL stability on downstream evolution of wind turbine wakes, which is mainly controlled by different ABL turbulence characteristics. Field measurements of the wake produced from a 2 MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed with three scanning Doppler wind LiDARs. The wind and atmospheric conditions were characterized through a sonic anemometer deployed in proximity of the wind turbine. One LiDAR was placed at a distance about 12 rotor diameters upstream of the turbine in order to characterize the incoming wind. Two additional LiDARs were typically used to perform wake measurements. Tests were performed over the wake vertical symmetry plane in order to characterize wake recovery. Measurements were also carried out over conical surfaces in order to investigate the wind turbine wake with varying wind direction, thus different turbine yaw angles. Moreover, a 3D characterization of the wind turbine wake was performed by scanning the LiDAR over a 3D measurement volume. However, the large sampling period required for the 3D scans does not allow the investigation of wake dynamics. The LiDAR measurements show that wake evolution is significantly affected by the stability conditions of the ABL, thus by the different turbulence characteristics of the incoming wind. In particular, a faster wake recovery is observed in the presence of an increased turbulence of the incoming wind and for more convective atmospheric flows.

  14. Wind Turbine Wake Variability in a Large Wind Farm, Observed by Scanning Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Xiaoxia, G.; Aitken, M.; Quelet, P. T.; Rana, J.; Rhodes, M. E.; St Martin, C. M.; Tay, K.; Worsnop, R.; Irvin, S.; Rajewski, D. A.; Takle, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Although wind turbine wake modeling is critical for accurate wind resource assessment, operational forecasting, and wind plant optimization, verification of such simulations is currently constrained by sparse datasets taken in limited atmospheric conditions, often of single turbines in isolation. To address this knowledge gap, our team deployed a WINDCUBE 200S scanning lidar in a 300-MW operating wind farm as part of the CWEX-13 field experiment. The lidar was deployed ~2000 m from a row of four turbines, such that wakes from multiple turbines could be sampled with horizontal scans. Twenty minutes of every hour were devoted to horizontal scans at ½ degree resolution at six different elevation angles. Twenty-five days of data were collected, with wind speeds at hub height ranging from quiescent to 14 m/s, and atmospheric stability varying from unstable to strongly stable. The example scan in Fig. 1a shows wakes from a row of four turbines propagating to the northwest. This extensive wake dataset is analyzed based on the quantitative approach of Aitken et al. (J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 2014), who developed an automated wake detection algorithm to characterize wind turbine wakes from scanning lidar data. We have extended the Aitken et al. (2014) method to consider multiple turbines in a single scan in order to classify the large numbers of wakes observed in the CWEX-13 dataset (Fig. 1b) during southerly flow conditions. The presentation will explore the variability of wake characteristics such as the velocity deficit and the wake width. These characteristics vary with atmospheric stability, atmospheric turbulence, and inflow wind speed. We find that the strongest and most persistent wakes occur at low to moderate wind speeds (region 2 of the turbine power curve) in stable conditions. We also present evidence that, in stable conditions with strong changes of wind direction with height, wakes propagate in different directions at different elevations above the surface. Finally, we compare characteristics of wakes at the outside of the row of turbines to wakes from turbines in the interior of the row, quantifying how wakes from outer turbines erode faster than those from interior.

  15. Flow visualization of vortex interactions in multiple vortex wakes behind aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciffone, D. L.; Lonzo, C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A flow visualization technique was developed which allows the nature of lift-generated wakes behind aircraft models to be investigated. The technique was applied to models being towed underwater in a ship model basin. Seven different configurations of a small-scale model of a 747 transport aircraft were used to allow observation of typical vortex interactions and merging in multiple vortex wakes. It was established that the motion of the wake vortices is often sensitive to small changes in either wing span loading or model attitude. Landing gear deployement was found to cause a far-field reformation of vorticity behind a model configuration which dissipated concentrated vorticity in the near-field wake. Alleviation of wake vorticity is achievable by configuring the wing span loading to cause the wake vortices to move in paths that result in their interactions and merging. The vortices shed from the horizontal stabilizer always moved down rapidly into the wake and merged with the other vortices, primarily the inboard flap vortices.

  16. Aerodynamic interaction between vortical wakes and lifting two-dimensional bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremel, Paul M.

    1989-03-01

    Unsteady rotor wake interactions with the empennage, tail boom, and other aerodynamic surfaces of a helicopter have a significant influence on its aerodynamic performance, the ride quality, and vibration. A numerical method for computing the aerodynamic interaction between an interacting vortex wake and the viscous flow about arbitrary two-dimensional bodies was developed to address this helicopter problem. The method solves for the flow field velocities on a body-fitted computational mesh using finite-difference techniques. The interacting vortex wake is represented by an array of discrete vortices which, in turn, are represented by a finite-core model. The evolution of the interacting vortex wake is calculated by Lagrangian techniques. The viscous flow field of the two-dimensional body is calculated on an Eulerian grid. The flow around circular and elliptic cylinders in the absence of an interacting vortex wake was calculated. These results compare very well with other numerical results and with results obtained from experiment and thereby demonstrate the accuracy of the viscous solution. The interaction of a rotor wake with the flow about a 4 to 1 elliptic cylinder at 45 degree incidence was calculated for a Reynolds number of 3000. The results demonstrate the significant variations in the lift and drag on the elliptic cylinder in the presence of the interacting rotor wake.

  17. Ship wake signatures in radar/optical images of the sea surface: observations and physical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S.; Kapustin, I.; Lazareva, T.

    2014-10-01

    Ship wakes can be clearly seen in satellite radar and optical images of the sea surface, and understanding of physical mechanisms responsible for the wake signatures is very important to develop methods of ship detection/identification. The wake surface signatures at small and intermediate stages are characterized by a smooth centerline area where surface waves are depressed due to the vessel turbulence and by a pair of rough bands at the sides of the centerline wake. At large wake ages two slick bands (a "railroad track" wake) appear instead of the rough bands, while the smooth centerline band is practically absent. In this paper results of field studies of the mean flow structure near the wake are presented. It is shown that two mean circulating currents ("rolls") rotating in the opposite directions are formed at two sides of the median vertical plane of the wake. Near the water surface the rolls result in diverging horizontal flows, decreasing near the wake edges. Wind waves propagating against the diverging currents are amplified due to a wave straining mechanism thus increasing the surface roughness. Film sampling was carried out when crossing the wakes and analysis of films collected within the "railroad" slick bands and outside the bands has revealed enhanced surface wave damping, obviously due to accumulation of surfactants in the slick bands; the surfactant compression is explained by the action of the diverging currents. The diverging currents as part of the rolls and the surfactant transport to the water surface are supposed to be associated with air bubbles generated by ship propellers.

  18. Linear and nonlinear auditory response properties of interneurons in a high-order avian vocal motor nucleus during wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Raksin, Jonathan N.; Glaze, Christopher M.; Smith, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Motor-related forebrain areas in higher vertebrates also show responses to passively presented sensory stimuli. However, sensory tuning properties in these areas, especially during wakefulness, and their relation to perception, are poorly understood. In the avian song system, HVC (proper name) is a vocal-motor structure with auditory responses well defined under anesthesia but poorly characterized during wakefulness. We used a large set of stimuli including the bird's own song (BOS) and many conspecific songs (CON) to characterize auditory tuning properties in putative interneurons (HVCIN) during wakefulness. Our findings suggest that HVC contains a diversity of responses that vary in overall excitability to auditory stimuli, as well as bias in spike rate increases to BOS over CON. We used statistical tests to classify cells in order to further probe auditory responses, yielding one-third of neurons that were either unresponsive or suppressed and two-thirds with excitatory responses to one or more stimuli. A subset of excitatory neurons were tuned exclusively to BOS and showed very low linearity as measured by spectrotemporal receptive field analysis (STRF). The remaining excitatory neurons responded well to CON stimuli, although many cells still expressed a bias toward BOS. These findings suggest the concurrent presence of a nonlinear and a linear component to responses in HVC, even within the same neuron. These characteristics are consistent with perceptual deficits in distinguishing BOS from CON stimuli following lesions of HVC and other song nuclei and suggest mirror neuronlike qualities in which “self” (here BOS) is used as a referent to judge “other” (here CON). PMID:22205651

  19. Evolution of Rotor Wake in Swirling Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Haldidi, Basman; Atassi, Hafiz; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary

    2000-01-01

    A theory is presented for modeling the evolution of rotor wakes as a function of axial distance in swirling mean flows. The theory, which extends an earlier work to include arbitrary radial distributions of mean swirl, indicates that swirl can significantly alter the wake structure of the rotor especially at large downstream distances (i.e., for moderate to large rotor-stator spacings). Using measured wakes of a representative scale model fan stage to define the mean swirl and initial wake perturbations, the theory is used to predict the subsequent evolution of the wakes. The results indicate the sensitivity of the wake evolution to the initial profile and the need to have complete and consistent initial definition of both velocity and pressure perturbations.

  20. Suppression of Divergence of Low Energy Ion Beams by Space Charge Neutralization with Low Energy Electrons Emitted from Field Emitter Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Taguchi, Shuhei; Nicolaescu, Dan; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Sakai, Shigeki

    2011-01-07

    Suppression of divergence of low energy neon ion beam was experimentally demonstrated by neutralizing the space charge of ion beam with low energy electrons emitted from silicon field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). Treatment of the FEAs with trifluoromethane plasma realized surface carbonization which was efficient to elongate the lifetime of the FEA and to improve the electron energy distribution. Together with the improvement of the performance of Si-FEA, we have developed a novel electron deceleration system to produce low energy electrons. A low energy neon ion beam was produced and the beam property was investigated with and without the electron supply from surface carbonized Si-FEA (Si:C-FEA). As a result, the divergence of the neon ion beam was largely suppressed with presence of the electrons.

  1. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Models using Wake Encounter Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Bowles, Roland L.; Limon Duparcmeur, Fanny M.; Gloudesman, Thijs; van Lochem, Sander; Ras, Eelco

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integration and evaluation of fast-time wake models with flight data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted detailed flight tests in 1995 and 1997 under the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Program to characterize wake vortex decay and wake encounter dynamics. In this study, data collected during Flight 705 were used to evaluate NASA's fast-time wake transport and decay models. Deterministic and Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to define wake hazard bounds behind the wake generator. The methodology described in this paper can be used for further validation of fast-time wake models using en-route flight data, and for determining wake turbulence constraints in the design of air traffic management concepts.

  2. Plasma wakefield acceleration studies using the quasi-static code WAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Palastro, John; Antonsen, T. M.; Mori, Warren B.; An, Weiming

    2015-02-15

    The quasi-static code WAKE [P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] is upgraded to model the propagation of an ultra-relativistic charged particle beam through a warm background plasma in plasma wakefield acceleration. The upgraded code is benchmarked against the full particle-in-cell code OSIRIS [Hemker et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 3, 061301 (2000)] and the quasi-static code QuickPIC [Huang et al., J. Comput. Phys. 217, 658 (2006)]. The effect of non-zero plasma temperature on the peak accelerating electric field is studied for a two bunch electron beam driver with parameters corresponding to the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams. It is shown that plasma temperature does not affect the energy gain and spread of the accelerated particles despite suppressing the peak accelerating electric field. The role of plasma temperature in improving the numerical convergence of the electric field with the grid resolution is discussed.

  3. Wind Turbine Wake Experiment - Wieringermeer (WINTWEX-W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, V. M.; Reuder, J.; Svardal, B.; Eecen, P.

    2014-12-01

    WINTWEX-W is a cooperative wake measurement campaign conducted by the Norwegian Centre of Offshore Wind Energy (Norcowe) and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A scanning, four static Windcubes as well as a downstream looking nacelle LiDAR were placed for half a year downstream of one of five research wind turbines in ECNs' wind turbine test farm Wieringermeer. In order to capture wake characteristics under different weather conditions we scanned a 60? sector at three different elevations and two vertical cross-sections every minute. Windcubes v1 measured wind profiles every second at 2, 5 and 12 rotor diameter downstream distances. Another static Windcube, a forward-looking nacelle LiDAR and three Sonics were placed upstream to measure the undisturbed approaching flow field. The aim of the campaign is a qualitative and quantitative description of single wind turbine wake propagation and persistency, as well as to improve CFD wake models by delivering a detailed data set of several real atmospheric conditions.

  4. Verification of the SLC wake potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.; Weiland, T.

    1983-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole wake potentials is essential for SLC. These wake potentials were previously computed by the modal method. The time domain code TBCI allows independent verification of these results. This comparison shows that the two methods agree to within 10% for bunch lengths down to 1 mm. TBCI results also indicate that rounding the irises gives at least a 10% reduction in the wake potentials.

  5. TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-05-30

    Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at {approx}30 GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio ({approx}12:1). Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  6. GPU Based Fast Free-Wake Calculations For Multiple Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkal, M.; Novikov, Y.; Ü?enmez, S.; Sezer-Uzol, N.; Uzol, O.

    2014-06-01

    Unsteady free-wake solutions of wind turbine flow fields involve computationally intensive interaction calculations, which generally limit the total amount of simulation time or the number of turbines that can be simulated by the method. This problem, however, can be addressed easily using high-level of parallelization. Especially when exploited with a GPU, a Graphics Processing Unit, this property can provide a significant computational speed-up, rendering the most intensive engineering problems realizable in hours of computation time. This paper presents the results of the simulation of the flow field for the NREL Phase VI turbine using a GPU-based in-house free-wake panel method code. Computational parallelism involved in the free-wake methodology is exploited using a GPU, allowing thousands of similar operations to be performed simultaneously. The results are compared to experimental data as well as to those obtained by running a corresponding CPU-based code. Results show that the GPU based code is capable of producing wake and load predictions similar to the CPU- based code and in a substantially reduced amount of time. This capability could allow free- wake based analysis to be used in the possible design and optimization studies of wind farms as well as prediction of multiple turbine flow fields and the investigation of the effects of using different vortex core models, core expansion and stretching models on the turbine rotor interaction problems in multiple turbine wake flow fields.

  7. The 3-D wake measurements near a hovering rotor for determining profile and induced drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Schuler, C. A.; Branum, L.; Wu, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Primarily an experimental effort, this study focuses on the velocity and vorticity fields in the near wake of a hovering rotor. Drag terminology is reviewed, and the theory for separately determining the profile-and-induced-drag components from wake quantities is introduced. Instantaneous visualizations of the flow field are used to center the laser velocimeter (LV) measurements on the vortex core and to assess the extent of the positional mandering of the trailing vortex. Velocity profiles obtained at different rotor speeds and distances behind the rotor blade clearly indicate the position, size, and rate of movement of the wake sheet and the core of the trailing vortex. The results also show the distribution of vorticity along the wake sheet and within the trailing vortex.

  8. Feasibility of wake vortex monitoring systems for air terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Lawrence, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    Wake vortex monitoring systems, especially those using laser Doppler sensors, were investigated. The initial phases of the effort involved talking with potential users (air traffic controllers, pilots, etc.) of a wake vortex monitoring system to determine system requirements from the user's viewpoint. These discussions involved the volumes of airspace to be monitored for vortices, and potential methods of using the monitored vortex data once the data are available. A subsequent task led to determining a suitable mathematical model of the vortex phenomena and developing a mathematical model of the laser Doppler sensor for monitoring the vortex flow field. The mathematical models were used in combination to help evaluate the capability of laser Doppler instrumentation in monitoring vortex flow fields both in the near vicinity of the sensor (within 1 kilometer and at long ranges(10 kilometers).

  9. Dynamics of SleepWake Cyclicity Across the Fetal

    E-print Network

    ), from 114 to 148 days gestational age (DGA). Sleep and wake bout durations exhibited exponential for wake bouts toward the end of gestation. Both sleep and wake bouts consolidated in an orderly fashion

  10. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61 National... TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial...

  11. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61 National... TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial...

  12. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61 National... TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial...

  13. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61 National... TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial...

  14. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61 National... TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial...

  15. Effects of Solar Wind Conditions on the Plasma Wake Within a Polar Crater: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    As the solar wind sweeps horizontally past a shadowed lunar crater it simultaneously diffuses toward the surface through an ambipolar process, forming a plasma wake (e.g., Figure 1). Importantly, the resulting electric field structure diverts solar wind protons toward the cold crater floor where they may represent a source of surficial hydrogen. We present a handful of two-dimensional kinetic simulations exploring the range of wake structures and surface particle fluxes possible under various background plasma conditions.

  16. Kinetic energy entrainment in wind turbine and actuator disc wakes: an experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lignarolo, L. E. M.; Ragni, D.; Simão Ferreira, C. J.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2014-06-01

    The present experimental study focuses on the comparison between the wake of a two-bladed wind turbine and the one of an actuator disk. The flow field at the middle plane of the wake is measured with a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, in the low-speed Open Jet Facility wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology. The wind turbine wake is characterized by the complex dynamics of the tip vortex development and breakdown. Analysis of the flow statistics show anisotropic turbulent fluctuations in the turbine wake, with stronger components in the radial direction. The wake of the actuator disc is instead characterized by isotropic random fluctuations. The mixing process in the shear layer is further analysed in terms of flux of mean flow kinetic energy, to show the main differences between the kinetic energy entrainment in the actuator and the turbine wake. This project is intended to provide the basis for understanding the origin of the limitations of the current wake models based on the actuator disc assumption.

  17. On the statistics of wind turbine wake meandering: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kevin B.; Singh, Arvind; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Guala, Michele

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the instantaneous wake flow from a model wind turbine placed in a turbulent boundary layer were obtained by wall-parallel oriented particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory wind tunnel. PIV velocity vector fields were used to investigate mean (expansion angle, wavelength, and wake velocity) and higher order statistics (local slope, curvature, and correlation) describing meandering motions in the turbine wake. These statistics were used to compare the wakes produced by four different wind turbine operating configurations, which include a single turbine operating at two different tip-speed ratios and two turbines aligned with the mean flow. The origin of meandering motions was identified for all cases in the hub vortex signature, which evolved into a stretched or compressed low speed meander in the wall parallel plane, depending on the turbine operating conditions and on the interaction with the wake shear layer. Finally, both autocorrelation and scale-dependent statistics on the velocity minima fluctuations about the meander signature suggest that small scale vortices, found in the hub shear layer and in the wake shear layer, interact with the hub vortex and govern its spatial evolution into large scale wake meandering.

  18. Physiologically-based modeling of sleep-wake regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Booth, Victoria; Diniz Behn, Cecilia G

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical modeling has played a significant role in building our understanding of sleep-wake and circadian behavior. Over the past 40 years, phenomenological models, including the two-process model and oscillator models, helped frame experimental results and guide progress in understanding the interaction of homeostatic and circadian influences on sleep and understanding the generation of rapid eye movement sleep cycling. Recent advances in the clarification of the neural anatomy and physiology involved in the regulation of sleep and circadian rhythms have motivated the development of more detailed and physiologically-based mathematical models that extend the approach introduced by the classical reciprocal-interaction model. Using mathematical formalisms developed in the field of computational neuroscience to model neuronal population activity, these models investigate the dynamics of proposed conceptual models of sleep-wake regulatory networks with a focus on generating appropriate sleep and wake state transition patterns as well as simulating disease states and experimental protocols. In this review, we discuss several recent physiologically-based mathematical models of sleep-wake regulatory networks. We identify common features among these models in their network structures, model dynamics and approaches for model validation. We describe how the model analysis technique of fast-slow decomposition, which exploits the naturally occurring multiple timescales of sleep-wake behavior, can be applied to understand model dynamics in these networks. Our purpose in identifying commonalities among these models is to propel understanding of both the mathematical models and their underlying conceptual models, and focus directions for future experimental and theoretical work. PMID:24530893

  19. The Effect of Wake Passing on Turbine Blade Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James David

    1996-01-01

    The effect of upstream blade row wake passing on the showerhead film cooling performance of a downstream turbine blade has been investigated through a combination of experimental and computational studies. The experiments were performed in a steady-flow annular turbine cascade facility equipped with an upstream rotating row of cylindrical rods to produce a periodic wake field similar to that found in an actual turbine. Spanwise, chordwise, and temporal resolution of the blade surface temperature were achieved through the use of an array of nickel thin-film surface gauges covering one unit cell of showerhead film hole pattern. Film effectiveness and Nusselt number values were determined for a test matrix of various injectants, injectant blowing ratios, and wake Strouhal numbers. Results indicated a demonstratable reduction in film effectiveness with increasing Strouhal number, as well as the expected increase in film effectiveness with blowing ratio. An equation was developed to correlate the span-average film effectiveness data. The primary effect of wake unsteadiness was found to be correlated well by a chordwise-constant decrement of 0.094-St. Measurable spanwise film effectiveness variations were found near the showerhead region, but meaningful unsteady variations and downstream spanwise variations were not found. Nusselt numbers were less sensitive to wake and injection changes. Computations were performed using a three-dimensional turbulent Navier-Stokes code which was modified to model wake passing and film cooling. Unsteady computations were found to agree well with steady computations provided the proper time-average blowing ratio and pressure/suction surface flow split are matched. The remaining differences were isolated to be due to the enhanced mixing in the unsteady solution caused by the wake sweeping normally on the pressure surface. Steady computations were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental Nusselt numbers, but to overpredict experimental film effectiveness values. This is likely due to the inability to match actual hole exit velocity profiles and the absence of a credible turbulence model for film cooling.

  20. Wake Vortex Detection: Phased Microphone vs. Linear Infrasonic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Sullivan, Nicholas T.; Knight, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Sensor technologies can make a significant impact on the detection of aircraft-generated vortices in an air space of interest, typically in the approach or departure corridor. Current state-of-the art sensor technologies do not provide three-dimensional measurements needed for an operational system or even for wake vortex modeling to advance the understanding of vortex behavior. Most wake vortex sensor systems used today have been developed only for research applications and lack the reliability needed for continuous operation. The main challenges for the development of an operational sensor system are reliability, all-weather operation, and spatial coverage. Such a sensor has been sought for a period of last forty years. Acoustic sensors were first proposed and tested by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) early in 1970s for tracking wake vortices but these acoustic sensors suffered from high levels of ambient noise. Over a period of the last fifteen years, there has been renewed interest in studying noise generated by aircraft wake vortices, both numerically and experimentally. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) was the first to propose the application of a phased microphone array for the investigation of the noise sources of wake vortices. The concept was first demonstrated at Berlins Airport Schoenefeld in 2000. A second test was conducted in Tarbes, France, in 2002, where phased microphone arrays were applied to study the wake vortex noise of an Airbus 340. Similarly, microphone phased arrays and other opto-acoustic microphones were evaluated in a field test at the Denver International Airport in 2003. For the Tarbes and Denver tests, the wake trajectories of phased microphone arrays and lidar were compared as these were installed side by side. Due to a built-in pressure equalization vent these microphones were not suitable for capturing acoustic noise below 20 Hz. Our group at NASA Langley Research Center developed and installed an infrasonic array at the Newport News-Williamsburg International Airport early in the year 2013. A pattern of pressure burst, high-coherence intervals, and diminishing-coherence intervals was observed for all takeoff and landing events without exception. The results of a phased microphone vs. linear infrasonic array comparison will be presented.

  1. Thrust Production and Wake Structure of an Actuated Lamprey Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, James; Smits, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    Thrust generation is studied for a flexible lamprey model which is actuated periodically to produce a streamwise traveling wave. Shape memory alloy actuators are used to achieve this deformation. The flow field is investigated using DPIV and flow visualization for a range of Strouhal numbers based on peak-to-peak amplitude of the trailing edge. The vortex kinematics in the spanwise and streamwise planes are examined, and a three-dimensional unsteady vortex model of the wake will be discussed.

  2. Fear in the Wake of Terror

    E-print Network

    Fear in the Wake of Terror PSYCHOLOGY Fear in the Wake of Terror Only the Big Bang Was More Powerful ASTROPHYSICS Only the Big Bang Was More Powerful The Economics of Resort Holidays ECONOMICS happens in the brain as languages are spoken and understood. And our Art History Institutes in Florence

  3. Site Suitability Assessment with Dynamic Wake Meandering Model. A Certification Point of View.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas Bayo, Ricard; Parro, Gema

    2015-04-01

    Establishment of large wind farms requires enormous investments putting steadily greater emphasis on optimal topology design and control of these. This requires not only an optimization of the power output, but also the development of strategies to cope with the higher loading expected. The cornerstone of such strategies is a realistic characterization and modelling of the wake flow field inside the wind farm, beyond Frandsen's equivalent turbulence method. Whereas Frandsen model has been mostly considered in the industry so far, it has not proved completely satisfactory when facing current problems such as wake effects on turbines placed at short distances or consequences of half wake for turbine loading. The objective of the present work is to address these questions from a certification point of view within the framework of Risoe's Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) model. The DWM model is based on the combination of three parts: modeling of quasi-steady wake deficits, a stochastic model of the downwind wake meandering and an added or self-generated wake turbulence. The analysis carried out is two-fold: First, a comparative study of the wake effects generated in Frandsen model as well as in various realizations of the DWM model is performed. For this purpose wake-induced loads are calculated using two different aeroelastic codes: HAWC2 and Bladed. Second, the applicability of DWM for the assessment of wind turbines under site-specific conditions is discussed and the conclusions summarized in a Recommended Practice. Clear prescriptions are thereby provided for the use of DWMM for site suitability assessments, including the aforementioned extreme situations, along with the interpretation of the future version of the IEC 61400-1 standards.

  4. Monitoring Wake Vortices for More Efficient Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wake vortices are generated by all aircraft during flight. The larger the aircraft, the stronger the wake, so the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) separates aircraft to ensure wake turbulence has no effect on approaching aircraft. Currently, though, the time between planes is often larger than it needs to be for the wake to dissipate. This unnecessary gap translates into arrival and departure delays, but since the wakes are invisible, the delays are nearly inevitable. If, however, the separation between aircraft can be reduced safely, then airport capacity can be increased without the high cost of additional runways. Scientists are currently studying these patterns to identify and introduce new procedures and technologies that safely increase airport capacity. NASA, always on the cutting edge of aerospace research, has been contributing knowledge and testing to these endeavors.

  5. The Neurobiology of Sleep and Wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael D; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2015-12-01

    Cortical electroencephalographic activity arises from corticothalamocortical interactions, modulated by wake-promoting monoaminergic and cholinergic input. These wake-promoting systems are regulated by hypothalamic hypocretin/orexins, while GABAergic sleep-promoting nuclei are found in the preoptic area, brainstem and lateral hypothalamus. Although pontine acetylcholine is critical for REM sleep, hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone/GABAergic cells may "gate" REM sleep. Daily sleep-wake rhythms arise from interactions between a hypothalamic circadian pacemaker and a sleep homeostat whose anatomical locus has yet to be conclusively defined. Control of sleep and wakefulness involves multiple systems, each of which presents vulnerability to sleep/wake dysfunction that may predispose to physical and/or neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26600100

  6. Formulations of the endophytic bacterium Bacillus subtilis Tu-100 suppress Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape and improve plant vigor in field trials conducted at separate locations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Roberts, Daniel P; Maul, Jude E; Emche, Sarah E; Liao, Xing; Guo, Xuelan; Liu, Yeying; McKenna, Laurie F; Buyer, Jeffrey S; Liu, Shengyi

    2011-07-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses in crops in the People's Republic of China. Two formulations of oilseed rape seed containing the bacterium Bacillus subtilis Tu-100 were evaluated for suppression of this pathogen in field trials conducted at two independent locations. The pellet formulation significantly reduced disease (incidence and disease index) and increased plant dry mass, while the wrap formulation significantly reduced disease incidence and significantly increased plant dry mass at both field locations. Mean seed yield per 120 plants with both formulations of isolate Tu-100 was significantly greater than the appropriate controls, but at only one of the locations. Both formulations provided stable B. subtilis Tu-100 biomass (?10(5) CFU·g(-1)) and seed germination (?85%) over a 6 month period at room temperature. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analysis identified ituC and ituD, and bacAB and bacD in the genome of isolate Tu-100. These genes are involved in the biosynthesis of iturin and bacilysin. Iturin was detected in culture filtrates from isolate Tu-100, with thin layer chromatography. Detection of bacilysin was not attempted. Experiments reported here indicate the commercial viability of B. subtilis Tu-100 for suppression of S. sclerotiorum on oilseed rape. PMID:21767217

  7. Study for prediction of rotor/wake/fuselage interference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. R.; Maskew, B.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed which allows the fully coupled calculation of fuselage and rotor airloads for typical helicopter configurations in forward flight. To do this, an iterative solution is carried out based on a conventional panel representation of the fuselage and a blade element representation of the rotor where fuselage and rotor singularity strengths are determined simultaneously at each step and the rotor wake is allowed to relax (deform) in response to changes in rotor wake loading and fuselage presence. On completion of the iteration, rotor loading and inflow, fuselage singularity strength (and, hence, pressure and velocity distributions) and rotor wake are all consistent. The results of a fully coupled calculation of the flow around representative helicopter configurations are presented. The effect of fuselage components on the rotor flow field and the overall wake structure is detailed and the aerodynamic interference between the different parts of the aircraft is discussed.

  8. Are the wake angles of a duck and a ship really the same?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaud, Marc; Moisy, Frederic

    2012-11-01

    The wake of a disturbance moving at the water surface, like a ship or a duck, owes its shape to the dispersive property of surface gravity waves. According to Kelvin's theory, it is widely accepted, and sometimes observed, that the wake angle is independent of the disturbance velocity, and given by sin-1 (1 / 3) = 19 . 4 degrees. However, field observations often show much smaller angles for fast ships, down to 5 - 10 degrees. The angle of these narrow wakes is actually found to decrease as the inverse of the disturbance velocity, similarly to the Mach cone of a supersonic disturbance in a non-dispersive medium. We propose here a simple model for this transition from a Kelvin regime (at low Froude number) to a Mach regime (at large Froude number) -- where the Froude number is based on the disturbance length. This model is confirmed by numerical simulations, reproducing the variety of wake patterns observed for disturbances of various size and velocity.

  9. A Critical Review of the Transport and Decay of Wake Vortices in Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarpkaya, T.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the transport and decay of wake vortices in ground effect and cites a need for a physics-based parametric model. The encounter of a vortex with a solid body is always a complex event involving turbulence enhancement, unsteadiness, and very large gradients of velocity and pressure. Wake counter in ground effect is the most dangerous of them all. The interaction of diverging, area-varying, and decaying aircraft wake vortices with the ground is very complex because both the vortices and the flow field generated by them are altered to accommodate the presence of the ground (where there is very little room to maneuver) and the background turbulent flow. Previous research regarding vortex models, wake vortex decay mechanisms, time evolution within in ground effect of a wake vortex pair, laminar flow in ground effect, and the interaction of the existing boundary layer with a convected vortex are reviewed. Additionally, numerical simulations, 3-dimensional large-eddy simulations, a probabilistic 2-phase wake vortex decay and transport model and a vortex element method are discussed. The devising of physics-based, parametric models for the prediction of (operational) real-time response, mindful of the highly three-dimensional and unsteady structure of vortices, boundary layers, atmospheric thermodynamics, and weather convective phenomena is required. In creating a model, LES and field data will be the most powerful tools.

  10. Wake interaction and power production of variable height model wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vested, M. H.; Hamilton, N.; Sørensen, J. N.; Cal, R. B.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding wake dynamics is an ongoing research topic in wind energy, since wakes have considerable effects on the power production when wind turbines are placed in a wind farm. Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted to study the wake to wake interaction in a model wind farm in tandem with measurements of the extracted power. The aim is to investigate how alternating mast height influences the interaction of the wakes and the power production. Via the use of stereo-particle image velocimetry, the flow field was obtained in the first and last rows of the wind turbine array as a basis of comparison. It was found that downstream of the exit row wind turbine, the power was increased by 25% in the case of a staggered height configuration. This is partly due to the fact that the taller turbines reach into a flow area with a softened velocity gradient. Another aspect is that the wake downstream of a tall wind turbine to some extent passes above the standard height wind turbine. Overall the experiments show that the velocity field downstream of the exit row changes considerably when the mast height is alternating.

  11. Non-linear plasma wake growth of electron holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Haakonsen, C. B.; Zhou, C.

    2015-03-15

    An object's wake in a plasma with small Debye length that drifts across the magnetic field is subject to electrostatic electron instabilities. Such situations include, for example, the moon in the solar wind and probes in magnetized laboratory plasmas. The instability drive mechanism can equivalently be considered drift down the potential-energy gradient or drift up the density-gradient. The gradients arise because the plasma wake has a region of depressed density and electrostatic potential into which ions are attracted along the field. The non-linear consequences of the instability are analysed in this paper. At physical ratios of electron to ion mass, neither linear nor quasilinear treatment can explain the observation of large-amplitude perturbations that disrupt the ion streams well before they become ion-ion unstable. We show here, however, that electron holes, once formed, continue to grow, driven by the drift mechanism, and if they remain in the wake may reach a maximum non-linearly stable size, beyond which their uncontrolled growth disrupts the ions. The hole growth calculations provide a quantitative prediction of hole profile and size evolution. Hole growth appears to explain the observations of recent particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Transitions in the vortex wake behind the plunging profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz?owski, Tomasz; Kudela, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate numerically the vortex wake formation behind the profile performing simple harmonic motion known in the literature as plunging. This research was inspired by the flapping motion which is appropriate for birds, insects and fishes. We assume the two dimensional model of flow. Depending on the parameters such as plunging amplitude, frequency and the Reynolds number, we demonstrate many different types of vortex street behind the profile. It is well known that the type of vortex wake determines the hydrodynamic forces acting on the profile. Dependences of the plunging amplitude, the Strouhal number and various topology vortices are established by constructing the phase transition diagram. The areas in the diagram related to the drag, thrust, and lift force generation are captured. We notice also the areas where the vorticity field is disordered. The disordered vorticity field does not allow maintenance of the periodic forces on the profile. An increase in the Reynolds number leads to the transition of the vortex wake behind the profile. The transition is caused by the phenomenon of boundary layer eruption. Further increase of the Reynolds number causes the vortex street related to the generation of the lift force to vanish.

  13. Dynamic Hybrid Simulation of the Lunar Wake During ARTEMIS Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, H.; Glassmeier, K.; Kriegel, H.; Motschmann, U. M.; Mueller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of the highly dynamic solar wind with the Moon is simulated with the A.I.K.E.F. (Adaptive Ion Kinetic Electron Fluid) code for the ARTEMIS P1 flyby on February 13, 2010. The A.I.K.E.F. hybrid plasma simulation code is the improved version of the Braunschweig code. It is able to automatically increase simulation grid resolution in areas of interest during runtime, which greatly increases resolution as well as performance. As the Moon has no intrinsic magnetic field and no ionosphere, the solar wind particles are absorbed at its surface, resulting in the formation of the lunar wake at the nightside. The solar wind magnetic field is basically convected through the Moon and the wake is slowly filled up with solar wind particles. However, this interaction is strongly influenced by the highly dynamic solar wind during the flyby. This is considered by a dynamic variation of the upstream conditions in the simulation using OMNI solar wind measurement data. By this method, a very good agreement between simulation and observations is achieved. The simulations show that the stationary structure of the lunar wake constitutes a tableau vivant in space representing the well-known Friedrichs diagram for MHD waves.

  14. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Suppression of Vortex Shedding from a Circular Cylinder by

    E-print Network

    Hu, Hui

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Suppression of Vortex Shedding from a Circular, Heilongjiang, 150090, China An experimental study was conduct to suppress the vortex shedding from a circular to quantify the transient shedding behavior of the unsteady vortex and turbulent flow structures in the wake

  15. Enhancement of high-energy electron generation through suppression of Raman backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Trines, R.M.G.M.; Kamp, L.P.J.; Schep, T.J.; Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.H.; Sluijter, F.W.

    2004-05-27

    The effect of Raman backscattering (RBS) on high-energy electron generation in laser-plasma interaction has been investigated for laser intensities well above the wave breaking and electron trapping threshold. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that suppression of RBS increases the high-energy electron yield in this regime. RBS-induced heating causes heavy beam loading and damping of the laser wake. Its suppression leads to higher wake amplitudes and higher particle energies. RBS suppression through direct stimulation of Raman forward scatter is demonstrated. The implications for high-energy electron production through laser-plasma interaction are discussed.

  16. Field-induced suppression of the ?-band superconductivity and magnetic hysteresis in the microwave surface resistance of MgB2 at temperatures near Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonura, M.; Agliolo Gallitto, A.; Li Vigni, M.; Ummarino, G. A.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the magnetic-field-induced variations of the microwave surface resistance, Rs, in a polycrystalline MgB2 sample, at different values of temperature. We have detected a magnetic hysteresis in Rs, which exhibits an unexpected plateau on decreasing the DC magnetic field below a certain value. In particular, at temperatures near Tc the hysteresis manifests itself only through the presence of the plateau. Although we do not quantitatively justify the anomalous shape of the magnetic hysteresis, we show that the results obtained in the reversible region of the Rs(H) curve can be quite well accounted for by supposing that, in this range of magnetic field, the ? gap is almost suppressed by the applied field and, consequently, all the ?-band charge carriers are quasiparticles. On this hypothesis, we have calculated Rs(H) supposing that fluxons assume a conventional (single core) structure and the flux dynamics can be described in the framework of conventional models. From the fitting of the experimental results, we determine the values of Hc2?(T) at temperatures near Tc. In our opinion, the most important result of our investigation is that, at least at temperatures near Tc, the value of the applied field that separates the reversible and irreversible regions of the Rs(H) curves is just Hc2?(T) a qualitative discussion of the possible reasons for this finding is given.

  17. Large HAWT wake measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. H.; Wegley, H. L.; Buck, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    From the theoretical fluid dynamics point of view, the wake region of a large horizontal-axis wind turbine has been defined and described, and numerical models of wake behavior have been developed. Wind tunnel studies of single turbine wakes and turbine array wakes have been used to verify the theory and further refine the numerical models. However, the effects of scaling, rotor solidity, and topography on wake behavior are questions that remain unanswered. In the wind tunnel studies, turbines were represented by anything from scaled models to tea strainers or wire mesh disks whose solidity was equivalent to that of a typical wind turbine. The scale factor compensation for the difference in Reynolds number between the scale model and an actual turbine is complex, and not typically accounted for. Though it is wise to study the simpler case of wakes in flat topography, which can be easily duplicated in the wind tunnel, current indications are that wind turbine farm development is actually occurring in somewhat more complex terrain. Empirical wake studies using large horizontal-axis wind turbines have not been thoroughly composited, and, therefore, the results have not been applied to the well-developed theory of wake structure. The measurement programs have made use of both in situ sensor systems, such as instrumented towers, and remote sensors, such as kites and tethered, balloonborne anemometers. We present a concise overview of the work that has been performed, including our own, which is based on the philosophy that the MOD-2 turbines are probably their own best detector of both the momentum deficit and the induced turbulence effect downwind. Only the momentum deficit aspects of the wake/machine interactions have been addressed. Both turbine power output deficits and wind energy deficits as measured by the onsite meteorological towers have been analyzed from a composite data set. The analysis has also evidenced certain topographic influences on the operation of spatially diverse wind turbines.

  18. Large HAWT wake measurement and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.H.; Wegley, H.L.; Buck, J.W.

    1984-05-01

    From the theoretical fluid dynamics point of view, the wake region of a large horizontal-axis wind turbine has been defined and described, and numerical models of wake behavior have been developed. Wind tunnel studies of single turbine wakes and turbine array wakes have been used to verify the theory and further refine the numerical models. The effects of scaling, rotor solidity, and topography on wake behavior are questions that remain unanswered. In the wind tunnel studies, turbines were represented by anything from scaled models to tea strainers or wire mesh disks whose solidity was equivalent to that of a typical wind turbine. The scale factor compensation for the difference in Reynolds number between the scale model and an actual turbine is complex, and not typically accounted for. Though it is wise to study the simpler case of wakes in flat topography, current indications are that wind turbine farm development is actually occurring in somewhat more complex terrain. Empirical wake studies using large horizontal-axis wind turbines have not been thoroughly composited, and, therefore, the results have not been applied to the well-developed theory of wake structure. The measurement programs have made use of both in situ sensor systems, such as instrumented towers, and remote sensors, such as kites and tethered, balloon-borne anemometers. A concise overview of the work performed was based on the philosophy that the MOD-2 turbines were probably the best detector of both the momentum deficit and the induced turbulence effect downwind. Only the momentum deficit aspects of the wake-machine interactions have been addressed. Both turbine power output deficits and wind energy deficits as measured by the onsite meteorological towers have been analyzed from a composite data set. The analysis has also evidenced certain topographic influences on the operation of spatially diverse wind turbines.

  19. Large HAWT wake measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. H.; Wegley, H. L.; Buck, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    From the theoretical fluid dynamics point of view, the wake region of a large horizontal-axis wind turbine has been defined and described, and numerical models of wake behavior have been developed. Wind tunnel studies of single turbine wakes and turbine array wakes have been used to verify the theory and further refine the numerical models. However, the effects of scaling, rotor solidity, and topography on wake behavior are questions that remain unanswered. In the wind tunnel studies, turbines were represented by anything from scaled models to tea strainers or wire mesh disks whose solidity was equivalent to that of a typical wind turbine. The scale factor compensation for the difference in Reynolds number between the scale model and an actual turbine is complex, and not typically accounted for. Though it is wise to study the simpler case of wakes in flat topography, which can be easily duplicated in the wind tunnel, current indications are that wind turbine farm development is actually occurring in somewhat more complex terrain. Empirical wake studies using large horizontal-axis wind turbines have not been thoroughly composited, and, therefore, the results have not been applied to the well-developed theory of wake structure. The measurement programs have made use of both in situ sensor systems, such as instrumented towers, and remote sensors, such as kites and tethered, balloonborne anemometers. We present a concise overview of the work that has been performed, including our own, which is based on the philosophy that the MOD-2 turbines are probably their own best detector of both the momentum deficit and the induced turbulence effect downwind. Only the momentum deficit aspects of the wake/machine interactions have been addressed. Both turbine power output deficits and wind energy deficits as measured by the onsite meteorological towers have been analyzed from a composite data set. The analysis has also evidenced certain topographic influences on the operation of spatially diverse wind turbines.

  20. Characterization of a Three-Dimensional Turret Wake for Active Flow Control Part II: Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Ruscher, Christopher; Wallace, Ryan; Glauser, Mark; Dannenhoffer, John, III

    2010-11-01

    Experimental measurements have been performed to characterize the wake of a three-dimensional, non-conformal turret. Experiments were performed in a low-speed wind tunnel at Syracuse University using particle image velocimetry, hotwire anemometry and dynamic and static pressure measurements. The objective of the study was to characterize the spatial and temporal nature of the wake region as well as to investigate the importance of the incoming flow field. Computational studies have been performed in conjunction with this work to help guide the experimental study and offer insight into the complex three-dimensional flow field. With a better understanding of the wake and three-dimensional characteristics of the turret flow field, closed-loop, active flow control systems will be developed to help reduce fluctuating loading and aero-optical distortions associated with the turbulent flow field.

  1. Suppression of quantum decoherence via infrared-driven coherent exciton-plasmon coupling: Undamped field and Rabi oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, S. M.; Patty, K. D.

    2014-02-24

    We show that when a semiconductor quantum dot is in the vicinity of a metallic nanoparticle and driven by a mid-infrared laser field, its coherent dynamics caused by interaction with a visible laser field can become free of quantum decoherence. We demonstrate that this process, which can offer undamped Rabi and field oscillations, is the result of coherent normalization of the “effective” polarization dephasing time of the quantum dot (T{sub 2}{sup *}). This process indicates formation of infrared-induced coherently forced oscillations, which allows us to control the value of T{sub 2}{sup *} using the infrared laser. The results offer decay-free ultrafast modulation of the effective field experienced by the quantum dot when neither the visible laser field nor the infrared laser changes with time.

  2. Results from the first lunar-wake flyby of ARTEMIS on wake potential, electron beams, and electrostatic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J. W.; Newman, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Halekas, J. S.; Cully, C. M.; Glassmeier, K.; Roux, A.; Lecontel, O.; Larson, D. E.; Baumjohann, W.; Goldman, M. V.; Auster, H.

    2010-12-01

    The ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun) mission is a new two-probe lunar mission derived from the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms) mission. On Feb 13, 2010, one of the two probes, ARTEMIS P1 (formerly THEMIS-B), made the first lunar-wake flyby of the mission. Halekas et al. [2010] reported observations of electron beams and derived the wake potential along this flyby. They suggested that the electron beams result from the net potential across the wake. In this presentation, we will show that the net potential is a result of the asymmetric electron distribution function of the solar wind and the quasi-neutrality condition. The electric field waveforms of both low-frequency and high-frequency electrostatic waves associated with the electron beams from the on-board Electric Field Instrument (EFI) will be reported. The low-frequency waves around ion cyclotron frequency showed oblique propagation, and seemed to be associated with the deceleration of the electron beams. The high-frequency electrostatic waves had a broadband spectrogram that is consistent with beam mode. We derived the wave number of the high-frequency waves using high time-resolution EFI data, and performed 1D Vlasov simulations to study the generation mechanism of the high-frequency waves. The results of the simulations are consistent with the observations of the electron beams and the derived potential structure by Halekas, et al. [2010]. Reference: Halekas, et al., 2010. First results from ARTEMIS, a new two-spacecraft lunar mission: Counter-streaming plasma populations in the lunar plasma wake. Space Sci. Rev., submitted.

  3. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  4. Multi-Point Velocity Correlations in the Wake of a Three-Dimensional Bluff Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Three-dimensional bluff-bodies known as turrets are commonly used for housing optical systems on airborne platforms. These geometries generate highly turbulent wakes that decrease the performance of the optical systems and the aircraft. The current experimental study used dynamic suction in both open and closed-loop control configurations to actively control the wake turret. The experiments were carried out at a Reynolds number of 5 × 105, and the flow field was characterized using stereoscopic PIV measurements acquired in the wake of the turret. These data were processed using traditional single-point statistics which showed that the active control system was able to significantly alter the wake of the turret. Using multi-point correlations, turbulent characteristics such as the integral length scale can be calculated. For the turret wake, estimates of the integral length scales were found to be highly dependent upon the region of the flow that was evaluated, especially when comparing the shear layers to the center of the wake. With the application of the active control, the integral length scales were generally found to increase.

  5. First lunar wake passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind fluctuations by 3D hybrid simulations

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    First lunar wake passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind fluctuations 17 January 2011 Accepted 20 January 2011 Available online 31 January 2011 Keywords: Moon Lunar wake, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake

  6. On the wake of a Darrieus turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Base, T. E.; Phillips, P.; Robertson, G.; Nowak, E. S.

    1981-05-01

    The theory and experimental measurements on the aerodynamic decay of a wake from high performance vertical axis wind turbine are discussed. In the initial experimental study, the wake downstream of a model Darrieus rotor, 28 cm diameter and a height of 45.5 cm, was measured in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel. The wind turbine was run at the design tip speed ratio of 5.5. It was found that the wake decayed at a slower rate with distance downstream of the turbine, than a wake from a screen with similar troposkein shape and drag force characteristics as the Darrieus rotor. The initial wind tunnel results indicated that the vertical axis wind turbines should be spaced at least forty diameters apart to avoid mutual power depreciation greater than ten per cent.

  7. A wake detector for wind farm control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottasso, C. L.; Cacciola, S.; Schreiber, J.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes an observer capable of detecting the impingement on a wind turbine rotor of the wake of an upstream machine. The observer estimates the local wind speed and turbulence intensity on the left and right parts of the rotor disk. The estimation is performed based on blade loads measured by strain gages or optical fibers, sensors which are becoming standard equipment on many modern machines. A lower wind speed and higher turbulence intensity on one part of the rotor, possibly in conjunction with other information, can then be used to infer the presence of a wake impinging on the disk. The wake state information is useful for wind plant control strategies, as for example wake deflection by active yawing. In addition, the local wind speed estimates may be used for a rough evaluation of the vertical wind shear.

  8. On the wake of a Darrieus turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Base, T. E.; Phillips, P.; Robertson, G.; Nowak, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and experimental measurements on the aerodynamic decay of a wake from high performance vertical axis wind turbine are discussed. In the initial experimental study, the wake downstream of a model Darrieus rotor, 28 cm diameter and a height of 45.5 cm, was measured in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel. The wind turbine was run at the design tip speed ratio of 5.5. It was found that the wake decayed at a slower rate with distance downstream of the turbine, than a wake from a screen with similar troposkein shape and drag force characteristics as the Darrieus rotor. The initial wind tunnel results indicated that the vertical axis wind turbines should be spaced at least forty diameters apart to avoid mutual power depreciation greater than ten per cent.

  9. Characterizing Wake Turbulence with Staring Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastine, D.; Wächter, M.; Peinke, J.; Trabucchi, D.; Kühn, M.

    2015-06-01

    Lidar measurements in the German offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus were performed to investigate the turbulence characteristics of wind turbine wakes. In particular, we compare measurements of the free flow in the surroundings of the wind turbines with measurements in the inner region of a wake flow behind one turbine. Our results indicate that wind turbines modulate the turbulent structures of the flow on a wide range of scales. For the data of the wake flow, the power spectrum as well as the multifractal intermittency coefficient reveal features of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Thus, we conjecture that on scales of the rotor a new turbulent cascade is initiated, which determines the features of the turbulent wake flow quite independently from the more complex wind flow in the surroundings of the turbine.

  10. NASA Wake Vortex Research for Aircraft Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, R. Brad; Hinton, David A.; Stuever, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several inter-related areas to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These areas include current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors, and operationally acceptable aircraft/wake interaction criteria. In today's ATC system, the AVOSS could inform ATC controllers when a fixed reduced separation becomes safe to apply to large and heavy aircraft categories. With appropriate integration into the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS), AVOSS dynamic spacing could be tailored to actual generator/follower aircraft pairs rather than a few broad aircraft categories.

  11. Investigation of aircraft vortex wake structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, N. A.; Turchak, L. I.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we analyze the mechanisms of formation of the vortex wake structure of aircraft with different wing shape in the plan flying close to or away from the underlying surface cleaned or released mechanization wing.

  12. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  13. Visualization of airflow in the wake of a ship superstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, C. J.; Stillman, W. P.; Golden, J. H.; Simpson, S. A.; Luznik, L.; Miklosovic, D. S.; White, G.; Burks, J. S.; Snyder, M. R.

    2009-11-01

    Helicopter landings on naval surface ships, such as cruisers and destroyers, must take place in the presence of an air wake created by flow over the ship superstructure. Wake turbulence over the flight deck makes piloted landings dangerous and difficult, and poses significant problems for the use of unmanned rotorcraft. To address this problem, a comprehensive set of experimental and simulation data are being collected via concurrent field tests, wind tunnel measurements, and CFD simulations. These data will facilitate an understanding of the wake turbulence produced under a variety of weather conditions, and will allow assessment of the fidelity of lower order flowfield estimates. A U.S. Navy Auxiliary Patrol (YP) Craft is used as a representative ship platform. The YP is over 100 ft long, has a similar shape to a modern destroyer, and has been modified to include a flight deck and hangar-like superstructure. Presented here are preliminary CFD results along with results from a large-scale flow visualization experiment. Qualitative information gleaned from the flow visualization is being used in the experimental design of upcoming quantitative air velocity measurements.

  14. Wake-Vortex Hazards During Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; James, Kevin D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Even though the hazard posed by lift-generated wakes of subsonic transport aircraft has been studied extensively for approach and departure at airports, only a small amount of effort has gone into the potential hazard at cruise altitude. This paper reports on a studio of the wake-vortex hazard during cruise because encounters may become more prevalent when free-flight becomes available and each aircraft, is free to choose its own route between destinations. In order to address the problem, the various fluid-dynamic stages that vortex wakes usually go through as they age will be described along with estimates of the potential hazard that each stage poses. It appears that a rolling-moment hazard can be just as severe at cruise as for approach at airports, but it only persists for several minutes. However, the hazard posed by the downwash in the wake due to the lift on the generator aircraft persists for tens of minutes in a long narrow region behind the generating aircraft. The hazard consists of severe vertical loads when an encountering aircraft crosses the wake. A technique for avoiding vortex wakes at cruise altitude will be described. To date the hazard posed by lift-generated vortex wakes and their persistence at cruise altitudes has been identified and subdivided into several tasks. Analyses of the loads to be encounter and are underway and should be completed shortly. A review of published literature on the subject has been nearly completed (see text) and photographs of vortex wakes at cruise altitudes have been taken and the various stages of decay have been identified. It remains to study and sort the photographs for those that best illustrate the various stages of decay after they are shed by subsonic transport aircraft at cruise altitudes. The present status of the analysis and the paper are described.

  15. Model tests on unsteady rotor wake effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Crews, S. T.

    1973-01-01

    A qualitative model of unsteady asymmetric wake effects is considered, taking into account a progressing blade flapping mode in which each blade flaps in a rotating frame of reference. The rotor model used for the tests is two bladed. The experimental data are compared with an analytical flapping response. It is found that the steady wake effects are largest at zero advance ratio and low collective pitch. The effects remain significant at higher advance ratios and collective pitch settings.

  16. Mesoscale wake clouds in Skylab pictures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.; Tecson, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of cloud patterns formed in the wake of orographic obstacles was investigated using pictures from Skylab, for the purpose of estimating atmospheric motions. The existence of ship-wake-type wave clouds in contrast to vortex sheets were revealed during examination of the pictures, and an attempt was made to characterize the pattern of waves as well as the transition between waves and vortices. Examples of mesoscale cloud patterns which were analyzed photogrammetrically and meteorologically are presented.

  17. Wake-up effects in Si-doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dayu; Key Laboratory for Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024; State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 ; Xu, Jin; Li, Qing; Guan, Yan; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Müller, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Schröder, Uwe

    2013-11-04

    Hafnium oxide based ferroelectric thin films have shown potential as a promising alternative material for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports the switching stability of a Si-doped HfO{sub 2} film under bipolar pulsed-field operation. High field cycling causes a “wake-up” in virgin “pinched” polarization hysteresis loops, demonstrated by an enhancement in remanent polarization and a shift of negative coercive voltage. The rate of wake-up is accelerated by either reducing the frequency or increasing the amplitude of the cycling field. We suggest de-pinning of domains due to reduction of the defect concentration at bottom electrode interface as origin of the wake-up.

  18. Coupling of a free wake vortex ring near-wake model with the Jensen and Larsen far-wake deficit models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heemst, J. W.; Baldacchino, D.; Mehta, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a simple physical model to improve the currently used far-wake deficit models in the wind industry. The main improvement is deemed on the determination of the wake deficit in the near-wake. A Vortex Ring Model (VRM) is used to calculate the induced velocities in the near-wake, which are then coupled to the Jensen far-wake model and the Larsen far-wake model based on the concept of Eddy Viscosity (EV). The inviscid near-wake VRM is based on the shedding of discrete tip vortex rings released from a uniformly loaded actuator disc. The model is validated against wind tunnel measurements from experiments with a two- bladed turbine and a circular metal mesh with a uniform porosity to represent an actuator disc. The VRM shows a good agreement with the experimental data with respect to the wake deficit evolution. The VRM is coupled with two well-known engineering type far-wake models: the Jensen and Larsen wake deficit models. The results of the coupling of the VRM and the more elaborated Larsen far-wake model are compared against a 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) CFD model. This comparison shows the effect of different near-wake models on the development of centreline velocities in the far-wake. The centreline velocity deficit predicted by the VRM-Larsen model more closely matches LES calculations in comparison with the reference Larsen model.

  19. Waking dreams and other metachoric experiences.

    PubMed

    Green, C

    1990-06-01

    This paper summarizes the development of the concept of metachoric experiences from 1961 onwards. The name of metachoric experience was given to one in which the whole of the environment was replaced by a hallucinatory one, although this may provide a precise replica of the physical world and appear to be completely continuous with normal experience. Prior to 1968 three types of metachoric experiences had been recognized; lucid dreams, out-of-the-body experiences (OBEs) and false awakenings, all of which showed interrelationships. The Institute's 1968 appeal for apparitional experiences led to a recognition that many of these were probably metachoric. This was suggested among other things by certain cases in which the lighting of the whole field of view changes, thus indicating that the experience was completely hallucinatory. The study of apparitions led also to the concept of waking dreams, i.e. completely hallucinatory experiences which may be initiated and terminated without any awareness of discontinuity on the part of the subject. These experiences seem to be capable of considerable apparent extension in time, thus providing a possible explanation of some reports of UFO sightings and of some of the more anomalous experiences of psychical research. In this connection the paper discusses the well-known Versailles experience of Miss Moberly and Miss Jourdain, and a published case of C.G. Jung. In conclusion some of the most obvious similarities and differences between the different types of metachoric experiences are discussed. PMID:2374788

  20. Accelerated Destruction of Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennich, Steven C.; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    1996-11-01

    footnotetext [1] Supported by Boeing and NSF under PYI award. We investigate how disturbances to aircraft vortex wakes, applied at the wing, survive the roll-up process and eventually lead to the destruction of the wake. The problem is studied using temporal slices of a vortex wake in a domain that is large enough in the axial direction to contain the most unstable wavelength (as predicted by Crow) and is unbounded in the cross stream directions. A new numerical method solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in vorticity form treating the unbounded character analytically, using spectral methods in space and RK4 time advancement. Studies of the growth of perturbations on a counter-rotating columnar vortex pair reproduced Crow's linear, inviscid, vortex filament results well for high Reynolds number. The 3-D roll-up of perturbed plane wakes were studied at Re = ?/? = 10,000 using a 1/2% oscillation in the spanwise location of the semi-span centroid of vorticity as the perturbation. Perturbed wakes due to elliptically loaded wings show a short period of rapid growth before evolving into the Crow instability which then grows at the predicted rate. Perturbed wakes due to idealized flapped wings, formed by the superposition of two elliptical lift distributions, perturbed in a similar manner, display more complex initial behavior before evolving into the Crow instability.

  1. EVALUATION OF FIELD PENNYCRESS AS AN OVERWINTER GREEN MANURE CROP IN CORN FOR SUPPRESSION OF WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field pennycress (FP; Thlaspi arvense L.) is a winter annual species of the Brassicaceae which is a native of Europe but has a wide distribution throughout temperate North America. FP tissues contain the glucosinolate sinigrin, and release a mixture of the biocides allyl thiocyanate and allyl isoth...

  2. Detection of Suppressiveness against Rotylenchulus reniformis in Soil from Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fields in Texas and Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rotylenchulus reniformis is a major problem confronting cotton production in the central part of the cotton belt of the United States of America. In this study, the hypothesis that natural antagonists in some cases are responsible for unusually low densities of the nematode in certain fields was te...

  3. Comparison of an ARTEMIS lunar wake fly-by with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Farrell, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    On February 13, 2010, the ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft flew through the lunar wake at approximately 3.5 lunar radii downstream from the Moon. Detailed measurements were made of the plasma and electromagnetic field environment, including a density depletion in the wake, counter-streaming ion beams, and electrostatic wave activity. Additionally, the combination of a tilted interplanetary magnetic field orientation and an asymmetric solar wind electron distribution caused a resulting spatial asymmetry in the generation of electron beams and electrostatic waves [Halekas et al, SSR, 2011]. Here, we simulate the ARTEMIS P1 wake crossing with a one-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code in order to (1) reproduce the general characteristics of the lunar wake fly-by, (2) include the effect of the asymmetric nature of the interplanetary magnetic field and electron distribution, and (3) study the effect of these asymmetries on the generation of electron beams and electrostatic waves.

  4. Analysis of the Radar Reflectivity of Aircraft Vortex Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Wray, Alan; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radar has been proposed as a way to track wake vortices to reduce aircraft spacing and tests have revealed radar echoes from aircraft wakes in clear air. The results are always interpreted qualitatively using Tatarski's theory of weak scattering by isotropic atmospheric turbulence. The goal of the present work was to predict the value of the radar cross-section (RCS) using simpler models. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the refractive index is obtained. Since the structure of the aircraft wakes is different from atmospheric turbulence, three simple mechanisms specific to vortex wakes are considered: (1) Radial density gradient in a two-dimensional vortex, (2) three-dimensional fluctuations in the vortex cores, and (3) Adiabatic transport of the atmospheric fluid in a two-dimensional oval surrounding the pair of vortices. The index of refraction is obtained more precisely for the two-dimensional mechanisms than for the three-dimensional ones. In the second step, knowing the index of refraction, a scattering analysis is performed. Tatarski's weak scattering approximation is kept but the usual assumptions of a far-field and a uniform incident wave are dropped. Neither assumption is generally valid for a wake that is coherent across the radar beam. For analytical insight, a simpler approximation that invokes, in addition to weak scattering, the far-field and wide cylindrical beam assumptions, is also developed and compared with the more general analysis. The predicted RCS values for the oval surround the vortices (mechanism C) agree with the experiments of Bilson conducted over a wide range of frequencies. However, the predictions have a cut-off away from normal incidence which is not present in the measurements. Estimates suggest that this is due to turbulence in the baroclinic vorticity generated at the boundary of the oval. The reflectivity of a vortex itself (mechanism A) is comparable to that of the oval (mechanism C) but cuts-off at frequencies lower than those considered in all the experiments to date. The RCS of a vortex happens to peak at the frequency (about 49 MHz) where atmospheric radars (known as ST radars) operate and so the present prediction could be verified in the future. Finally , we suggest that hot engine exhaust could increase RCE by 40 db and reveal vortex circulation, provided its mixing with the surroundings is prevented in the laminarising flow of the vortices.

  5. Force estimation and turbulence in the wake of a freely flying European Starling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2011-11-01

    Flapping wings are one of the most complex yet widespread propulsion method found in nature. Although aeronautical technology has advanced rapidly over the past 100 years, natural flyers, which have evolved over millions of years, still feature higher efficiency and represent one of nature's finest locomotion methods. One of the key questions is the role of the unsteady motion in the flow due to the wing flapping and its contribution to the forces acting on a bird during downstroke and upstroke. The wake of a freely flying European Starling is investigated as a case study of unsteady wing aerodynamics. Measurements of the near wake have been taken using long duration high-speed PIV in the wake behind a freely flying bird in a specially designed avian wind tunnel. The wake has been characterized by means of velocity and vorticity fields. The measured flow field is decomposed based on the wing position phases. Drag and lift have been estimated using the mean velocity deficit and the circulation at the wake region. In addition, kinematic analysis of the wing motion and the body has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV. Correlations between the wing kinematics and the flow field characteristics are presented as well as the time evolution of the velocity, vorticity and additional turbulence parameters.

  6. Do trout swim better than eels? Challenges for estimating performance based on the wake of self-propelled bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric D.

    2007-11-01

    Engineers and biologists have long desired to compare propulsive performance for fishes and underwater vehicles of different sizes, shapes, and modes of propulsion. Ideally, such a comparison would be made on the basis of either propulsive efficiency, total power output or both. However, estimating the efficiency and power output of self-propelled bodies, and particularly fishes, is methodologically challenging because it requires an estimate of thrust. For such systems traveling at a constant velocity, thrust and drag are equal, and can rarely be separated on the basis of flow measured in the wake. This problem is demonstrated using flow fields from swimming American eels, Anguilla rostrata, measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed video. Eels balance thrust and drag quite evenly, resulting in virtually no wake momentum in the swimming (axial) direction. On average, their wakes resemble those of self-propelled jet propulsors, which have been studied extensively. Theoretical studies of such wakes may provide methods for the estimation of thrust separately from drag. These flow fields are compared with those measured in the wakes of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In contrast to eels, these fishes produce wakes with axial momentum. Although the net momentum flux must be zero on average, it is neither spatially nor temporally homogeneous; the heterogeneity may provide an alternative route for estimating thrust. This review shows examples of wakes and velocity profiles from the three fishes, indicating challenges in estimating efficiency and power output and suggesting several routes for further experiments. Because these estimates will be complicated, a much simpler method for comparing performance is outlined, using as a point of comparison the power lost producing the wake. This wake power, a component of the efficiency and total power, can be estimated in a straightforward way from the flow fields. Although it does not provide complete information about the performance, it can be used to place constraints on the relative efficiency and cost of transport for the fishes.

  7. Do trout swim better than eels? Challenges for estimating performance based on the wake of self-propelled bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric D.

    Engineers and biologists have long desired to compare propulsive performance for fishes and underwater vehicles of different sizes, shapes, and modes of propulsion. Ideally, such a comparison would be made on the basis of either propulsive efficiency, total power output or both. However, estimating the efficiency and power output of self-propelled bodies, and particularly fishes, is methodologically challenging because it requires an estimate of thrust. For such systems traveling at a constant velocity, thrust and drag are equal, and can rarely be separated on the basis of flow measured in the wake. This problem is demonstrated using flow fields from swimming American eels, Anguilla rostrata, measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed video. Eels balance thrust and drag quite evenly, resulting in virtually no wake momentum in the swimming (axial) direction. On average, their wakes resemble those of self-propelled jet propulsors, which have been studied extensively. Theoretical studies of such wakes may provide methods for the estimation of thrust separately from drag. These flow fields are compared with those measured in the wakes of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In contrast to eels, these fishes produce wakes with axial momentum. Although the net momentum flux must be zero on average, it is neither spatially nor temporally homogeneous; the heterogeneity may provide an alternative route for estimating thrust. This review shows examples of wakes and velocity profiles from the three fishes, indicating challenges in estimating efficiency and power output and suggesting several routes for further experiments. Because these estimates will be complicated, a much simpler method for comparing performance is outlined, using as a point of comparison the power lost producing the wake. This wake power, a component of the efficiency and total power, can be estimated in a straightforward way from the flow fields. Although it does not provide complete information about the performance, it can be used to place constraints on the relative efficiency and cost of transport for the fishes.

  8. Wake deficit measurements on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenburg, R. )

    1990-04-01

    This report is ninth in a series of documents presenting the findings of field test under DOE's Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) with the wind industry. This report provides results of a project conducted by Altamont Energy Corp. (AEC) to measure wake deficits on the Jess and Sousa Ranches in Altamont Pass, CA. This research enhances and complements other DOE-funded projects to refine estimates of wind turbine array effects. This project will help explain turbine performance variability caused by wake effects. 4 refs., 28 figs., 106 tabs.

  9. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  10. Dynamic wake prediction and visualization with uncertainty analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holforty, Wendy L. (Inventor); Powell, J. David (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic wake avoidance system utilizes aircraft and atmospheric parameters readily available in flight to model and predict airborne wake vortices in real time. A novel combination of algorithms allows for a relatively simple yet robust wake model to be constructed based on information extracted from a broadcast. The system predicts the location and movement of the wake based on the nominal wake model and correspondingly performs an uncertainty analysis on the wake model to determine a wake hazard zone (no fly zone), which comprises a plurality of wake planes, each moving independently from another. The system selectively adjusts dimensions of each wake plane to minimize spatial and temporal uncertainty, thereby ensuring that the actual wake is within the wake hazard zone. The predicted wake hazard zone is communicated in real time directly to a user via a realistic visual representation. In an example, the wake hazard zone is visualized on a 3-D flight deck display to enable a pilot to visualize or see a neighboring aircraft as well as its wake. The system substantially enhances the pilot's situational awareness and allows for a further safe decrease in spacing, which could alleviate airport and airspace congestion.

  11. A Mechanistic Neural Field Theory of How Anesthesia Suppresses Consciousness: Synaptic Drive Dynamics, Bifurcations, Attractors, and Partial State Equipartitioning.

    PubMed

    Hou, Saing Paul; Haddad, Wassim M; Meskin, Nader; Bailey, James M

    2015-12-01

    With the advances in biochemistry, molecular biology, and neurochemistry there has been impressive progress in understanding the molecular properties of anesthetic agents. However, there has been little focus on how the molecular properties of anesthetic agents lead to the observed macroscopic property that defines the anesthetic state, that is, lack of responsiveness to noxious stimuli. In this paper, we use dynamical system theory to develop a mechanistic mean field model for neural activity to study the abrupt transition from consciousness to unconsciousness as the concentration of the anesthetic agent increases. The proposed synaptic drive firing-rate model predicts the conscious-unconscious transition as the applied anesthetic concentration increases, where excitatory neural activity is characterized by a Poincaré-Andronov-Hopf bifurcation with the awake state transitioning to a stable limit cycle and then subsequently to an asymptotically stable unconscious equilibrium state. Furthermore, we address the more general question of synchronization and partial state equipartitioning of neural activity without mean field assumptions. This is done by focusing on a postulated subset of inhibitory neurons that are not themselves connected to other inhibitory neurons. Finally, several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the different aspects of the proposed theory. PMID:26438186

  12. Wind tunnel simulation of a wind turbine wake in neutral, stable and unstable wind flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. E.; Zhang, S.; Pascheke, F.; Hayden, P.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, temperature and heat flux have been made in the wake of a model wind turbine in the EnFlo meteorology wind tunnel, for three atmospheric boundary layer states: the base-line neutral case, stable and unstable. The full-to-model scale is approximately 300:1. Primary instrumentation is two-component LDA combine with cold-wire thermometry to measure heat flux. In terms of surface conditions, the stratified cases are weak, but there is a strong 'imposed' condition in the stable case. The measurements were made between 0.5D and 10D, where D is the turbine disk diameter. In the stable case the velocity deficit decreases more slowly; more quickly in the unstable case. Heights at which quantities are maximum or minimum are greater in the unstable case and smaller in the stable case. In the stable case the wake height is suppressed but the width is increased, while in the unstable case the height is increased and the width (at hub height) reaches a maximum and then decreases. The turbulence in the wake behaves in a complex way. Further work needs to be done, to cover stronger levels of surface condition, requiring more extensive measurements to properly capture the wake development.

  13. Infrared imaging simulation and detection of ship wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Chen, Xuan; Chang, Shizheng; Xu, Enchi; Wang, Xingyu; Wang, Ye; Zhao, Xiaolong; Du, Yongchen; Kou, Wei; Fan, Chunli

    2015-10-01

    The thermal wake would be formed owing to the cooling water or exhaust heat discharged by ship, and the cold wake could be formed by the cool water in the lower part of sea stirred up by the ship propeller or vortexes. Owing to the difference of surface temperature and emissivity between the ship wake and the surrounding ocean the ship wake will be easily detected by the infrared detecting system. The wave of wake also could be detected by the difference of reflected radiance between the background and the Kelvin wake of ship. In this paper the simulating models of infrared imaging of ship wake are developed based on the selfradiation of wake, the reflected radiance of the sky and sun and the transmitted radiance of atmosphere, and the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are investigated. The results show that the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake can be really simulated by the models proposed in this paper. The effects of the detecting height, the angle of view, the NETD of detector and the temperature of wake on the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are studied. The temperature difference between the ship wake and surrounding ocean is a main fact which effects on the detecting distance. The infrared imaging signatures of ship wake in 8-14?m wave band is stronger than that in 2-5?m wave band whenever the temperature of ship wake is warmer or cooler than the surrounding ocean. Further, the infrared imaging of thermal wake is investigated in the homogenous water and temperature stratified water at different speed of a ship and different flow rate and depth of the discharged water in a water tank. The spreading and decaying laws of infrared signature of ship wake are obtained experimentally. The results obtained in this paper have an important application in the infrared remote sensing of ship wake.

  14. Auditory evoked fields measured noninvasively with small-animal MEG reveal rapid repetition suppression in the guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, G. Björn; Chait, Maria; de Cheveigné, Alain

    2014-01-01

    In animal models, single-neuron response properties such as stimulus-specific adaptation have been described as possible precursors to mismatch negativity, a human brain response to stimulus change. In the present study, we attempted to bridge the gap between human and animal studies by characterising responses to changes in the frequency of repeated tone series in the anesthetised guinea pig using small-animal magnetoencephalography (MEG). We showed that 1) auditory evoked fields (AEFs) qualitatively similar to those observed in human MEG studies can be detected noninvasively in rodents using small-animal MEG; 2) guinea pig AEF amplitudes reduce rapidly with tone repetition, and this AEF reduction is largely complete by the second tone in a repeated series; and 3) differences between responses to the first (deviant) and later (standard) tones after a frequency transition resemble those previously observed in awake humans using a similar stimulus paradigm. PMID:25231619

  15. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávní?ek, Zden?k

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U?=?14.7?cm?1, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, Utheor.?=?20.2?cm?1, based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D?=??10.1?cm?1 fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  16. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávní?ek, Zden?k

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm(-1), which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, U(theor).?= 20.2 cm(-1), based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D =?-10.1 cm(-1) fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  17. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    DOEpatents

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  18. The wake of hovering flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Jonas; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-08-01

    Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this has until now never been studied. Here we trained nectar-feeding bats, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, to hover at a feeder and using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in conjunction with high-speed kinematic analysis we show that hovering nectar-feeding bats produce a series of bilateral stacked vortex loops. Vortex visualizations suggest that the downstroke produces the majority of the weight support, but that the upstroke contributes positively to the lift production. However, the relative contributions from downstroke and upstroke could not be determined on the basis of the wake, because wake elements from down- and upstroke mix and interact. We also use a modified actuator disc model to estimate lift force, power and flap efficiency. Based on our quantitative wake-induced velocities, the model accounts for weight support well (108%). Estimates of aerodynamic efficiency suggest hovering flight is less efficient than forward flapping flight, while the overall energy conversion efficiency (mechanical power output/metabolic power) was estimated at 13%. PMID:26179990

  19. Meteorological Controls on Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthelmie, RJ; Hansen, KS; Pryor, SC

    2013-04-01

    The primary control on the magnitude of the power losses induced by wind turbine wakes in large wind farms is the hub-height wind speed via its link to the turbine thrust coefficient. Hence, at low to moderate wind speeds (between cut-in and rated turbine wind speeds) when the thrust coefficient is high, wake losses are proportionally larger and decrease to be virtually undetectable at wind speeds above rated wind speeds. Wind direction is also critical. Not only does it determine the effective spacing between turbines but also the wind speed distribution is primarily determined by synoptic forcing and typically has a predominant direction from which wind speeds tend to be higher (from southwest for much of the central United States and northern Europe). Two other interlinked variables, turbulence intensity (TI), and atmospheric stability also dictate wake losses. Quantifying, understanding, modeling, and predicting this complex and interdependent system is therefore critical to understanding and modeling wind farm power losses due to wakes, and to optimizing wind farm layout. This paper quantifies the impact of these variables on the power loss due to wakes using data from the large offshore wind farms located at Horns Rev and Nysted in Denmark.

  20. Characterization of wake effects and loading status of wind turbine arrays under different inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangyu

    The objective of the present work is to improve the accuracy of Actuator Line Modeling (ALM) in predicting the unsteady aerodynamic loadings on turbine blades and turbine wake by assessing different methods used to determine the relative velocity between the rotating blades and wind. ALM is incorporated into a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver in OpenFOAM (Open Field Operations and Manipulations). The aerodynamic loadings are validated by experiment results from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Turbine wakes are validated by predictions of large eddy simulation using exact 3D blade geometries from a two-blade NREL Phase VI turbine. Three different relative velocity calculation methods are presented: iterative process in Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory, local velocity sampling, and Lagrange-Euler Interpolation (LEI). Loadings and wakes obtained from these three methods are compared. It is discovered that LEI functions better than the conventional BEM with iterative process in both loading and wake prediction. Then LES-ALM with LEI is performed on a small wind farm deploying five NREL Phase VI turbines in full wake setting. The power outputs and force coefficients of downstream turbines are evaluated. The LES-ALM with LEI is also performed on a small wind farm deploying 25 NREL Phase VI turbines with different inflow angles (from full wake setting to partial wake setting). The power outputs and force coefficients of each turbine are evaluated under different inflow angles (the angle the rotor has to turn to make the rotor plane face the incoming wind) (0, 5, 15, 30 and 45 degree). The power coefficient distributions and thrust coefficient distributions of the wind farm under each inflow angle are compared. The range of inflow angle which is best for power generation is also discussed. The results demonstrate that the LES-ALM with LEI has the potential to optimize wind farm arrangement and pitch angle of individual turbines.

  1. Effects of a three-dimensional hill on the wake characteristics of a model wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Howard, Kevin B.; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-02-01

    The spatial evolution of a turbine wake downwind of a three-dimensional sinusoidal hill is studied using large-eddy simulations and wind tunnel measurements. The computed flow fields behind the hill show good agreement with wind tunnel measurements. Three different heights of the hill, i.e., hhill = zh - 0.5D, ? zh and =zh + 0.5D (where zh is the turbine hub height and D is the diameter of the turbine rotor), were considered. The effect of the hill turbine spacing was investigated through a comparative analysis with the turbine wake results in the undisturbed turbulent boundary layer. It is observed that the turbine wakes downwind of the hill with hhill ? zh and hhill = zh + 0.5D recover faster because of the increased entrainment of ambient flow into the turbine wake, which is due to the enhanced turbulent transport in both spanwise and vertical directions. In comparison with the turbine only case, significant increases in the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in the turbine wake are observed for the hill-turbine cases with hhill ? zh and hhill = zh + 0.5D. A velocity scale UT, defined in terms of the thrust force acting on the turbine, is introduced for the turbine-added velocity deficit and TKE. For the turbine-added velocity deficit, UT is shown to be an appropriate scale at wake locations sufficiently far downwind of the turbine (i.e., greater than or equal to 8D). The vertical profiles of the turbine-added TKE normalized by UT 2 are shown to nearly collapse in the wake both for the turbine only and hill-turbine cases at all locations greater than 4D downwind of the turbine. A simple model for the turbine-added TKE in complex terrain is also proposed based on the new physical insights obtained from our simulations.

  2. Wake Vortex Tracking Using a 35 GHz Pulsed Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neece, Robert T.; Britt, Charles L.; White, Joseph H.; Mudukutore, Ashok; Nguyen, Chi; Hooper, Bill

    2005-01-01

    A 35 GHz, pulsed-Doppler radar system has been designed and assembled for wake vortex detection and tracking in low visibility conditions. Aircraft wake vortices continue to be an important factor in determining safe following distances or spacings for aircraft in the terminal area. Currently, under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), aircraft adhere to conservative, fixed following-distance guidelines based primarily on aircraft weight classifications. When ambient conditions are such that vortices will either drift or dissipate, leaving the flight corridor clear, the prescribed spacings are unnecessarily long and result in decreased airport throughput. There is a potential for significant airport efficiency improvement, if a system can be employed to aid regulators and pilots in setting safe and efficient following distances based on airport conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Agency, and Volpe National Transportation Systems Center have promoted and worked to develop systems that would increase airport capacity and provide for safe reductions in aircraft separation. The NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS), a wake vortex spacing system that can provide dynamic adjustment of spacings based on real-time airport weather conditions, has demonstrated that Lidar systems can be successfully used to detect and track vortices in clear air conditions. To fill the need for detection capability in low-visibility conditions, a 35 GHz, pulsed-Doppler radar system is being investigated for use as a complimentary, low-visibility sensor for wake vortices. The radar sensor provides spatial and temporal information similar to that provided by Lidar, but under weather conditions that a Lidar cannot penetrate. Currently, we are analyzing the radar design based upon the data and experience gained during the wake vortex Lidar deployment with AVOSS at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. As part of this study, two numerical models were utilized in system simulations. The results of this study improve our understanding of the method of detection, resolution requirements for range and azimuth, pulse compression, and performance prediction. Simulations applying pulse compression techniques show that detection is good in heavy fog to greater than 2000 m. Both compressed and uncompressed short pulses show the vortex structure. To explore operational challenges, siting and scanning strategies were also analyzed. Simulation results indicate that excellent wake vortex detection, tracking and classification is possible in drizzle (+15 dBZ) and heavy fog (- 13 dBZ) using short pulse techniques (<99ns) at ranges on the order of 900 m, with a modest power of 500 W output. At 1600 m, detection can be expected at reflectivities as low as -13 dBZ (heavy fog). The radar system, as designed and built, has the potential to support field studies of a wake vortex spacing system in low-visibility conditions ranging from heavy fog to rain, when sited within 2000m of the flight path.

  3. Coupled wakes behind two circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal, P.; Chauve, M. P.; Lima, R.; Rezende, J.

    1990-04-01

    The wake of a pair of identical cylinders placed side by side in a uniform flow is visualized. Different flows appear when the distance between the cylinders is decreased. For large gaps, the study of the phase difference between the vortex shedding shows that locking occurs and can be associated with asymmetric flows. For small gaps, a new vortex pattern with a separated stagnant zone is visualized. Finally, a classical alternate vortex street is observed at very small gaps. An analogy with coupled oscillators is then presented in order to interpret the asymmetric regimes as beats between the wakes.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options. PMID:26600110

  5. Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder is a circadian rhythm disorder characterized by multiple bouts of sleep within a 24-hour period. Patients present with symptoms of insomnia, including difficulty either falling or staying asleep, and daytime excessive sleepiness. The disorder is seen in a variety of individuals, ranging from children with neurodevelopmental disorders, to patients with psychiatric disorders, and most commonly in older adults with neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment of irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder requires a multimodal approach aimed at strengthening circadian synchronizing agents, such as daytime exposure to bright light, and structured social and physical activities. In addition, melatonin may be useful in some patients. PMID:26568126

  6. Wake effects characterization using wake oscillator model. Comparison on 2D response with experiments

    E-print Network

    Gaurier, Benoît; Cébron, David

    2010-01-01

    A model using wake oscillators is developed to predict the 2D motion in a transverse plan of two rigid cylinders in tandem arrangement. This model of the wake dynamics is validated with experimental data from previous trials which took place at the Ifremer flume tank in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France. The agreement between the model and the experimental results allows using this model as a simple computational tool in the prediction of 2D Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) and, after some futher developments, Wake-Induced Oscillations (WIO) effects.

  7. Effects of incoming surface wind conditions on the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on a wind turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Hu, Hui

    2014-12-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the effects of incoming surface wind conditions on the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on a wind turbine model. The experimental study was performed in a large-scale wind tunnel with a scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine model placed in two different types of Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) winds with distinct mean and turbulence characteristics. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine by using a force-moment sensor, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry system was used to achieve detailed flow field measurements to characterize the turbulent wake flows behind the model turbine. The measurement results reveal clearly that the discrepancies in the incoming surface winds would affect the wake characteristics and dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine dramatically. The dynamic wind loads acting on the model turbine were found to fluctuate much more significantly, thereby, much larger fatigue loads, for the case with the wind turbine model sited in the incoming ABL wind with higher turbulence intensity levels. The turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress levels in the wake behind the model turbine were also found to be significantly higher for the high turbulence inflow case, in comparison to those of the low turbulence inflow case. The flow characteristics in the turbine wake were found to be dominated by the formation, shedding, and breakdown of various unsteady wake vortices. In comparison with the case with relatively low turbulence intensities in the incoming ABL wind, much more turbulent and randomly shedding, faster dissipation, and earlier breakdown of the wake vortices were observed for the high turbulence inflow case, which would promote the vertical transport of kinetic energy by entraining more high-speed airflow from above to re-charge the wake flow and result in a much faster recovery of the velocity deficits in the turbine wake.

  8. Three-Centimeter Doppler Radar Observations of Wingtip-Generated Wake Vortices in Clear Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Robert E.; Mudukutore, Ashok; Wissel, Vicki L. H.; Myers, Theodore

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a high risk, high pay-off experiment with the objective of detecting, for the first time, the presence of aircraft wake vortices in clear air using X-band Doppler radar. Field experiments were conducted in January 1995 at the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) to demonstrate the capability of the 9.33 GHz (I=3 cm) radar, which was assembled using an existing nine-meter parabolic antenna reflector at VVTT and the receiver/transmitter from the NASA Airborne Windshear Radar-Program. A C-130-aircraft, equipped with wingtip smoke generators, created visually marked wake vortices, which were recorded by video cameras. A C-band radar also observed the wake vortices during detection attempts with the X-band radar. Rawinsonde data was used to calculate vertical soundings of wake vortex decay time, cross aircraft bearing wind speed, and water vapor mixing ratio for aircraft passes over the radar measurement range. This experiment was a pathfinder in predicting, in real time, the location and persistence of C-130 vortices, and in setting the flight path of the aircraft to optimize X-band radar measurement of the wake vortex core in real time. This experiment was conducted in support of the NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS).

  9. Efficient Prediction of Helicopter BVI Noise under Different Conditions of Wake and Blade Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Yoshinobu; Yang, Choongmo; Iwanaga, Noriki; Aoyama, Takashi

    Predictions of helicopter BVI noise using three-dimensional Euler code with a single blade grid are conducted under three different conditions: BVI noise caused by (1) interaction between rotating blades and vortex shed from fixed wing vortex generator, (2) interaction between rotating blades and tip vortices shed from preceding blades, and (3) interaction between rotating blades with elastic deformation and shed tip vortices. In the CFD calculation, the Field Velocity Approach (FVA) and Scully’s vortex model are used to import the wake information into the calculation grid and to determine the induced velocity made by tip vortices, respectively (cases 1 3). Beddoes generalized wake model is used to prescribe the tip vortices position in the wake (cases 2 and 3). Information about blade elastic deformation is imported from HART II project experimental data into the calculation (case 3). Acoustic analyses based on Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) equation are conducted subsequently in each case. The results from the calculations show good agreement with experiments in all three cases, indicating that application of FVA, Scully’s model, and Beddoes generalized wake model is effective for BVI noise prediction in this study, which is intended for low calculation cost using a single blade grid. Also, use of blade elastic deformation data in the calculation shows marked improvement in calculation precision. Consequently, the method used in this study can predict BVI noise under various conditions of wake or blade deformation with acceptable precision and low calculation cost.

  10. Detectability of the infrared surface features of the wake behind a moving underwater body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-guang; Li, Ji-cheng

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, by using the theoretical analysis and computer simulation method, the lower boundary requirements of the infrared imaging sensor are analyzed when detecting the thermal surface features of the wake behind a moving underwater body. Firstly, the computer simulation model of the underwater body wake's surface temperature field and the corresponding surface infrared features are established. Secondly, the measures of the sensor's detection performance and the computation method of these measures are described. Thirdly, by using the infrared features' simulation model and the performance measures, we have done simulation tests to analyze the given infrared imaging sensor's detection ability for detecting underwater body wake, and the requirements of infrared sensor to detect the wake's infrared surface feature under some given working states are also investigated. Lastly, the simulation results and the conclusions of the paper are given. The problem-solving flow chart and the simulation results on underwater object wake's detectability given in this paper may be useful for the designment and performance evaluation of the infrared imaging sensors.

  11. Study of the Mutual Interaction Between a Wing Wake and an Encountering Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, A. B.; vanDam, C. P.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to increase airport productivity, several wind-tunnel and flight-test programs are currently underway to determine safe reductions in separation standards between aircraft. These programs are designed to study numerous concepts from the characteristics and detection of wake vortices to the wake-vortex encounter phenomenon. As part of this latter effort, computational tools are being developed and utilized as a means of modeling and verifying wake-vortex hazard encounters. The objective of this study is to assess the ability of PMARC, a low-order potential-flow panel method, to predict the forces and moments imposed on a following business-jet configuration by a vortex interaction. Other issues addressed include the investigation of several wake models and their ability to predict wake shape and trajectory, the validity of the velocity field imposed on the following configuration, modeling techniques and the effect of the high-lift system and the empennage. Comparisons with wind-tunnel data reveal that PMARC predicts the characteristics for the clean wing-body following configuration fairly well. Non-linear effects produced by the addition of the high-lift system and empennage, however, are not so well predicted.

  12. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 ?s and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  13. Sleep-wake behavior in the rat: ultradian rhythms in a light-dark cycle and continuous bright light.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Richard; Lim, Joonbum; Famina, Svetlana; Caron, Aimee M; Dowse, Harold B

    2012-12-01

    Ultradian rhythms are a prominent but little-studied feature of mammalian sleep-wake and rest-activity patterns. They are especially evident in long-term records of behavioral state in polyphasic animals such as rodents. However, few attempts have been made to incorporate ultradian rhythmicity into models of sleep-wake dynamics, and little is known about the physiological mechanisms that give rise to ultradian rhythms in sleep-wake state. This study investigated ultradian dynamics in sleep and wakefulness in rats entrained to a 12-h:12-h light-dark cycle (LD) and in rats whose circadian rhythms were suppressed and free-running following long-term exposure to uninterrupted bright light (LL). We recorded sleep-wake state continuously for 7 to 12 consecutive days and used time-series analysis to quantify the dynamics of net cumulative time in each state (wakefulness [WAKE], rapid eye movement sleep [REM], and non-REM sleep [NREM]) in each animal individually. Form estimates and autocorrelation confirmed the presence of significant ultradian and circadian rhythms; maximum entropy spectral analysis allowed high-resolution evaluation of multiple periods within the signal, and wave-by-wave analysis enabled a statistical evaluation of the instantaneous period, peak-trough range, and phase of each ultradian wave in the time series. Significant ultradian periodicities were present in all 3 states in all animals. In LD, ultradian range was approximately 28% of circadian range. In LL, ultradian range was slightly reduced relative to LD, and circadian range was strongly attenuated. Ultradian rhythms were found to be quasiperiodic in both LD and LL. That is, ultradian period varied randomly around a mean of approximately 4 h, with no relationship between ultradian period and time of day. PMID:23223374

  14. Experimental Study of the Temporal Nature of an Actively Controlled Three Dimensional Turret Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Experimental measurements have been performed to characterize the actively controlled wake of a three-dimensional, non- conformal turret which is a bluff body commonly used for housing optical systems on airborne platforms. As a bluff body, turrets can generate strong turbulent flow fields that degrade the performance of the optical systems and the aircraft. Experiments were performed in a low-speed wind tunnel at Syracuse University using particle image velocimetry and dynamic pressure measurements with the objective of developing a better understanding of the spatial and temporal nature of the wake flow field. Active control was achieved using dynamic suction in the vicinity of the turret aperture and was found to have a significant impact on the structure of the wake as well as the temporal characteristics of the flow field. With a better understanding of the wake characteristics, closed-loop, active flow control systems will be developed to help reduce fluctuating loading and aero- optical distortions associated with the turbulent flow field.

  15. Local Stability Analysis and Eigenvalue Sensitivity of Reacting, Bluff Body Wakes

    E-print Network

    Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    the flame. In all cases, the wake exhibits a sinuous oscillation. Linear stability analysis is performed on the measured time-averaged velocity and density fields. In the first stage of this analysis, a local, spatio-temporal stability analysis is performed...

  16. Laser Doppler velocimeter system simulation for sensing aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, J. A. L.; Meng, J. C. S.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of aircraft vortex wakes in an irregular wind shear field near the ground is developed and used as a basis for modeling the characteristics of a laser Doppler detection and vortex location system. The trailing vortex sheet and the wind shear are represented by discrete free vortices distributed over a two-dimensional grid. The time dependent hydrodynamic equations are solved by direct numerical integration in the Boussinesq approximation. The ground boundary is simulated by images, and fast Fourier Transform techniques are used to evaluate the vorticity stream function. The atmospheric turbulence was simulated by constructing specific realizations at time equal to zero, assuming that Kolmogoroff's law applies, and that the dissipation rate is constant throughout the flow field. The response of a simulated laser Doppler velocimeter is analyzed by simulating the signal return from the flow field as sensed by a simulation of the optical/electronic system.

  17. Vortex research facility improvements and preliminary density stratification effects on vortex wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satran, D. R.; Holbrook, G. T.; Greene, G. C.; Neuhart, D.

    1985-01-01

    Recent modernization of NASA's Vortex Research Facility is described. The facility has a 300-ft test section, scheduled for a 300-ft extension, with constant test speeds of the model up to 100 ft/sec. The data acquisition hardware and software improvements included the installation of a 24-channel PCM system onboard the research vehicle, and a large dedicated 16-bit minicomputer. Flow visualization of the vortex wake in the test section is by particle seeding, and a thin sheet of argon laser light perpendicular to the line of flight; detailed flow field measurements are made with a laser velocimeter optics system. The improved experimental capabilities of the facility were used in a study of atmospheric stratification effects on wake vortex decay, showing that the effects of temperature gradient must be taken into account to avoid misleading conclusions in wake vortex research.

  18. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  19. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  20. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  1. WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STUDENT SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICY (Reynolda Campus)

    E-print Network

    Cook, Greg

    WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STUDENT SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICY (Reynolda Campus) I. Introduction Wake Forest University (hereinafter the University) expects all members of its community to act in respectful and responsible ways towards each other. Wake Forest University is committed to providing programs, activities

  2. Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Effort Certification Policy and Procedures

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    7/01/091 Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Effort Certification Policy and Procedures Principles for Educational Institutions." Effort reports at Wake Forest University are based on after. For this purpose at Wake Forest University, "significant" means a change, or variance, exceeding 5% above or below

  3. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  4. Active Wake Redirection Control to Improve Energy Yield (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Fleming, P.; DeGeorge, E.; Bulder, B; White, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Wake effects can dramatically reduce the efficiency of waked turbines relative to the unwaked turbines. Wakes can be deflected, or 'redirected,' by applying yaw misalignment to the turbines. Yaw misalignment causes part of the rotor thrust vector to be pointed in the cross-stream direction, deflecting the flow and the wake. Yaw misalignment reduces power production, but the global increase in wind plant power due to decreased wake effect creates a net increase in power production. It is also a fairly simple control idea to implement at existing or new wind plants. We performed high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulations of the wake flow of the proposed Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW) that predict that under certain waking conditions, wake redirection can increase plant efficiency by 10%. This means that by applying wake redirection control, for a given watersheet area, a wind plant can either produce more power, or the same amount of power can be produced with a smaller watersheet area. With the power increase may come increased loads, though, due to the yaw misalignment. If misalignment is applied properly, or if layered with individual blade pitch control, though, the load increase can be mitigated. In this talk we will discuss the concept of wake redirection through yaw misalignment and present our CFD results of the FACW project. We will also discuss the implications of wake redirection control on annual energy production, and finally we will discuss plans to implement wake redirection control at FACW when it is operational.

  5. Organisms and Organization Marvalee H. Wake

    E-print Network

    Wake, Marvalee H.

    Organisms and Organization Marvalee H. Wake Department of Integrative Biology and Museum of Vertebrate Zoology University of California Berkeley, CA, USA mhwake@socrates.berkeley.edu Abstract Organisms are organized both internally and externally. The centrality of the organism in examination of the hierarchy

  6. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  7. Technical Notes Formation of Bifurcated Wakes Behind

    E-print Network

    Hu, Hui

    Technical Notes Formation of Bifurcated Wakes Behind Finite Span Flapping Wings Meilin Yu and Z. J, Hz htip = plunge amplitude at the wing tip, m k = CU, reduced frequency lspan = wingspan, m Re = UC, Reynolds number rz = z-directional distance away from the wing tip, m Swing = wing area, m2 St = fhtip

  8. Kerafast at Your Institution: Wake Forest University

    E-print Network

    Berenhaut, Kenneth S.

    D Cysteine oxidation probes Thomas Hollis, PhD Protein-nucleic acid complex crystal screen W. Todd Lowther) antibodies, hybridomas and plasmids S. Bruce King, PhD 1-nitrosocyclohexyl acetate, cysteine oxidation probes, and HNO detectors Leslie B. Poole, PhD Cysteine oxidation probes Wake Forest University partnered

  9. First results from ARTEMIS lunar wake crossing: observations and hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Wiehle, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, H.; Georgescu, E.; Glassmeier, K.; Motschmann, U. M.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    The Moon does not have an intrinsic magnetic field and its conductivity is not sufficient to facilitate the development of an induced magnetosphere. The interaction of the Moon with the unperturbed solar wind (SW) is, hence, dominated by the absorption of SW particles on its surface and the consequent generation of a lunar wake on the night side. The SW magnetic field is basically convected through the Moon; the pressure imbalance in lunar wake, however, accounts for a slight increase in magnetic pressure in the lunar wake center. The wake is slowly filled up with SW particles due to their thermal motion, which generates a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rarefaction wave propagating away from the wake in the SW frame of reference. Over the last 3 years the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) mission provided excellent data helping the scientific community in drawing a detailed picture of the physical processes associated with the development of substorms in the terrestrial magnetotail. Two of the five THEMIS spacecraft are currently being sent into stationary orbits around the Moon in a follow-up mission called Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS). The ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft (formerly THEMIS-B) has recently passed through the lunar wake in a flyby maneuver on February 13, 2010. We show first results of two hybrid code simulations with static and, for the first time, dynamically changing SW input. Adapted SW monitor data of the NASA OMNI database is used as input for the simulations. During the wake crossing the spin stabilized spacecraft P1 was in lunar shadow and, hence, its spin period cannot be determined from sun sensor data. Therefore, an eclipse-spin model is applied to bridge the gap of missing spin period data in order to recover vector measurements. A comparison of the simulation results with correctly despun magnetic field and particle measurements of ARTEMIS P1 allows for a separation of static lunar wake and, due to SW variations, transient features in the observations.

  10. Helicopter rotor wake geometry and its influence in forward flight. Volume 2: Wake geometry charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Isometric and projection view plots, inflow ratio nomographs, undistorted axial displacement nomographs, undistorted longitudinal and lateral coordinates, generalized axial distortion nomographs, blade/vortex passage charts, blade/vortex intersection angle nomographs, and fore and aft wake boundary charts are discussed. Example condition, in flow ratio, undistorted axial location, longitudinal and lateral coordinates, axial coordinates distortions, blade/tip vortex intersections, angle of intersection, and fore and aft wake boundaries are also discussed.

  11. Wind-tunnel measurements in the wakes of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, H. G. C.; Peterka, J. A.; Cermak, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of longitudinal mean velocity, turbulence intensity, space correlations, and spectra made in the wake of two rectangular scaled models in simulated atmospheric boundary-layer winds are presented. The model buildings were 1:50 scale models of two trailers. Results of a flow visualization study of the wake geometry are analyzed with some singular point theorems. Two hypothetical flow patterns of the detailed wake geometry are proposed. Some preliminary studies of the vortex wake, effects of the model size, model aspect ratios, and boundary layer characteristics on the decay rate and extent of the wake are also presented and discussed.

  12. Axisymmetric Turbulent Wakes with New Nonequilibrium Similarity Scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedi?, J.; Vassilicos, J. C.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2013-10-01

    The recently discovered nonequilibrium turbulence dissipation law implies the existence of axisymmetric turbulent wake regions where the mean flow velocity deficit decays as the inverse of the distance from the wake-generating body and the wake width grows as the square root of that distance. This behavior is different from any documented boundary-free turbulent shear flow to date. Its existence is confirmed in wind tunnel experiments of wakes generated by plates with irregular edges placed normal to an incoming free stream. The wake characteristics of irregular bodies such as buildings, bridges, mountains, trees, coral reefs, and wind turbines are critical in many areas of environmental engineering and fluid mechanics.

  13. Vortex shedding in high-speed compressor blade wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Gertz, J. B.; Owen, P. R.; Giles, M. B.

    1988-01-01

    The wakes of highly loaded compressor blades are generally considered to be turbulent flows. Recent work has suggested that the blade wakes are dominated by a vortex streetlike structure. The experimental evidence supporting the wake vortex structure is reviewed. This structure is shown to redistribute thermal energy within the flowfield. The effect of the wake structure on conventional aerodynamic measurements of compressor performance is noted. A two-dimensional, time-accurate, viscous numerical simulation of the flow exhibits both vortex shedding in the wake and a lower-frequency flow instability that modulates the shedding. The numerical results are shown to agree quite well with the measurement from transonic compressor rotors.

  14. Storm-centric view of Tropical Cyclone oceanic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentemann, C. L.; Scott, J. P.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) have a dramatic impact on the upper ocean. Storm-generated oceanic mixing, high amplitude near-inertial currents, upwelling, and heat fluxes often warm or cool the surface ocean temperatures over large regions near tropical cyclones. These SST anomalies occur to the right (Northern Hemisphere) or left (Southern Hemisphere) of the storm track, varying along and across the storm track. These wide swaths of temperature change have been previously documented by in situ field programs as well as IR and visible satellite data. The amplitude, temporal and spatial variability of these surface temperature anomalies depend primarily upon the storm size, storm intensity, translational velocity, and the underlying ocean conditions. Tropical cyclone 'cold wakes' are usually 2 - 5 °C cooler than pre-storm SSTs, and persist for days to weeks. Since storms that occur in rapid succession typically follow similar paths, the cold wake from one storm can affect development of subsequent storms. Recent studies, on both warm and cold wakes, have mostly focused on small subsets of global storms because of the amount of work it takes to co-locate different data sources to a storm's location. While a number of hurricane/typhoon websites exist that co-locate various datasets to TC locations, none provide 3-dimensional temporal and spatial structure of the ocean-atmosphere necessary to study cold/warm wake development and impact. We are developing a global 3-dimensional storm centric database for TC research. The database we propose will include in situ data, satellite data, and model analyses. Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) has a widely-used storm watch archive which provides the user an interface for visually analyzing collocated NASA Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) winds with GHRSST microwave SSTs and SSM/I, TMI or AMSR-E rain rates for all global tropical cyclones 1999-2009. We will build on this concept of bringing together different data near storm locations when developing the storm-centric database. This database will be made available to researchers via the web display tools previously developed for RSS web pages. The database will provide scientists with a single data format collection of various atmospheric and oceanographic data, and will include all tropical storms since 1998, when the passive MW SSTs from the TMI instrument first became available. Initial results showing an analysis of Typhoon Man-Yi will be presented.

  15. ELF magnetic fluctuations detected by Kaguya in deepest lunar wake associated with type-II protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Nakashima, Tatsuya; Wada, Takuya; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Saito, Yoshifumi

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuations in the extremely low-frequency (ELF) range from 0.1 to 10 Hz were found by the Lunar Magnetometer (LMAG) of the magnetic field and plasma experiment (MAP) on board the spacecraft Kaguya in the deepest wake behind the moon, where the magnetic field is usually quiet. The fluctuations were compressional and non-monochromatic, showing no preferred polarization. They were often accompanied by "type-II entry" solar wind protons that were reflected by the dayside lunar surface or crustal magnetic field, gyrated around the solar wind magnetic field, then entered the deepest wake. The ELF waves persisted for 30 s to several minutes. The duration was often shorter than that of the type-II protons. Most of the waves were detected on the magnetic field lines disconnected from the lunar surface, along which the solar wind electrons were injected into the wake. Since a large cross-field velocity difference is expected between the type-II protons and the solar wind electrons injected along the magnetic field, some cross-field current-driven instability such as the lower hybrid two-stream instability is expected to be responsible for the generation of the waves.

  16. Wind turbine wake detection with a single Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Using scanning lidar wind turbine wakes can be probed in three dimensions to produce a wealth of temporally and spatially irregular data that can be used to characterize the wakes. Unlike data from a meteorological mast or upward pointing lidar, the spatial coordinates of the measurements are not fixed and the location of the wake also varies in three dimensions. Therefore the challenge is to provide automated detection algorithms to identify wakes and quantify wake characteristics from this type of dataset. Here an algorithm is developed and evaluated on data from a large wind farm in the Midwest. A scanning coherent Doppler wind lidar was configured to measure wind speed in the wake of a continuously yawing wind turbine for two days during the experiment and wake profiles were retrieved with input of wind direction information from the nearby meteorological mast. Additional challenges to the analysis include incomplete coverage of the entire wake due to the limited scanning domain, and large wind shear that can contaminate the wake estimate because of the height variation along the line-of-sight. However, the algorithm developed in this paper is able to automatically capture wakes in lidar data from Plan Position Indicator (PPI) scans and the resultant wake statistics are consistent with previous experiment's results.

  17. Proceedings of the NASA First Wake Vortex Dynamic Spacing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creduer, Leonard (Editor); Perry, R. Brad (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A Government and Industry workshop on wake vortex dynamic spacing systems was conducted on May 13-15, 1997, at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of the workshop was to disclose the status of ongoing NASA wake vortex R&D to the international community and to seek feedback on the direction of future work to assure an optimized research approach. Workshop sessions examined wake vortex characterization and physics, wake sensor technologies, aircraft/wake encounters, terminal area weather characterization and prediction, and wake vortex systems integration and implementation. A final workshop session surveyed the Government and Industry perspectives on the NASA research underway and related international wake vortex activities. This document contains the proceedings of the workshop including the presenters' slides, the discussion following each presentation, the wrap-up panel discussion, and the attendees' evaluation feedback.

  18. The near wake of a freely flying European starling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhefer, Adam J.; Kopp, Gregory A.; Gurka, Roi

    2013-05-01

    The wake of a freely flying European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) has been measured using high speed, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry, simultaneously with high speed cameras which imaged the bird. These have been used to generate vector maps that can be associated with the bird's location and wing configuration in the wind tunnel. Time series of measurements have been expressed as composite wake plots which depict segments of the wing beat cycle for various spanwise locations in the wake. Measurements indicate that downwash is not produced during the upstroke, suggesting that the upstroke does not generate lift. As well, the wake velocities imply the presence of streamwise vortical structures, in addition to tip vortices. These two characteristics indicate similarities between the wake of a bird and the wake of a bat, which may be general features of the wakes of flapping wings.

  19. Cosmic string wakes and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of structure from infinite cosmic string wakes is modeled for a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM). Cross-sectional slices through the wake distribution tend to outline empty regions with diameters which are not inconsistent with the range of sizes of the voids in the CfA slice of the universe. The topology of the wake distribution is found to be spongy rather than cell-like. Correlations between CDM wakes do not extend much beyond a horizon length, so it is unlikely that CDM wakes are responsible for the correlations between clusters of galaxies. An estimate of the fraction of matter to accrete onto CDM wakes indicates that wakes could be more important in galaxy formation than previously anticipated.

  20. Experimental investigation of an actively controlled three-dimensional turret wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick R.

    Hemispherical turrets are bluff bodies commonly used to house optical systems on airborne platforms. These bluff bodies develop complex, three-dimensional flow fields that introduce high mean and fluctuating loads to the turret as well as the airframe support structure which reduce the performance of both the optical systems and the aircraft. An experimental investigation of the wake of a three-dimensional, non-conformal turret was performed in a low-speed wind tunnel at Syracuse University to develop a better understanding of the fundamental flow physics associated with the turret wake. The flow field was studied at a diameter based Reynolds number of 550,000 using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and dynamic pressure measurements both with and without active flow control. Pressure measurements were simultaneously sampled with the PIV measurements and taken on the surrounding boundary layer plate and at several locations on the turret geometry. Active flow control of the turret wake was performed around the leading edge of the turret aperture using dynamic suction in steady open-loop, unsteady open-loop, and simple closed-loop configurations. Analysis of the uncontrolled wake provided insight into the complex three-dimensional wake when evaluated spatially using PIV measurements and temporally using spectral analysis of the pressure measurements. Steady open-loop suction was found to significantly alter the spatial and temporal nature of the turret wake despite the control being applied locally to the aperture region of the turret. Unsteady open-loop and simple closed-loop control were found to provide similar levels of control to the steady open-loop forcing with a 45% reduction in the control input as calculated using the jet momentum coefficient. The data set collected provides unique information regarding the development of the baseline three-dimensional wake and the wake with three different active flow control configurations. These data can be used to help guide future studies, both experimental and computational, of similar geometries and to provide insight for developing active control systems for complex, three-dimensional flows.

  1. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  2. Practical Use and Risk of Modafinil, a Novel Waking Drug

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Modafinil is a waking drug prescribed to narcolepsy patients, but its usage among healthy individuals is increasing to enhance their alertness or to mitigate fatigue. This study was conducted to investigate practical use and toxic effects on neuro-immune interaction of modafinil. Methods This study reviewed the significance of psychoactive drugs, and discussed the benefits and risks of the application of modafinil, which seems to be ideal as an anti-psychotic or anti-fatigue agent. Results Modafinil is known to have less or no adverse effects than those found in traditional psychostimulants such as amphetamine, methylphenidate or cocaine. It can be applied as an anti-psychotic or anti-fatigue agent. However, the waking mechanism of modafinil is yet to be fully revealed. Recent studies reported that modafinil may be subject to abuse and addiction. In addition prolonged sleeplessness induces stress responses and impairs immune function. Conclusions Modafinil can be used by anyone, who wishes to work late, stay awake, enhance their cognitive reactions, or brighten their moods. Users may already be under a great level of stress, i.e. cancer patients or soldiers in a battle field. A psychoneuroimmunological approach is thus needed to investigate the multi-functional effects of modafinil. PMID:22375280

  3. Viscous effects on a vortex wake in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z.; Ash, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Wake vortex trajectories and strengths are altered radically by interactions with the ground plane. Prediction of vortex strength and location is especially important in the vicinity of airports. Simple potential flow methods have been found to yield reasonable estimates of vortex descent rates in an otherwise quiescent ambient background, but those techniques cannot be adjusted for more realistic ambient conditions and they fail to provide satisfactory estimates of ground-coupled behavior. The authors have been involved in a systematic study concerned with including viscous effects in a wake-vortex system which is near the ground plane. The study has employed numerical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as perturbation techniques to study ground coupling with a descending vortex pair. Results of a two-dimensional, unsteady numerical-theoretical study are presented in this paper. A time-based perturbation procedure has been developed which permits the use of analytical solutions to an inner and outer flow domain for the initial flow field. Predictions have been compared with previously reported laminar experimental results. In addition, the influence of stratification and turbulence on vortex behavior near the ground plane has been studied.

  4. Kinetic instabilities in the lunar wake: ARTEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J. B.; Ergun, R. E.; Newman, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; Andersson, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Cully, C. M.; Auster, H.-U.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Larson, D. E.; Baumjohann, W.; Goldman, M. V.

    2012-03-01

    The Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) mission is a new two-probe lunar mission derived from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. On 13 February 2010, one of the two probes, ARTEMIS P1 (formerly THEMIS-B), made the first lunar wake flyby of the mission. We present detailed analysis of the electrostatic waves observed on the outbound side of the flyby that were associated with electron beams. Halekas et al. (2011) derived a net potential across the lunar wake from observations and suggested that the net potential generated the observed electron beams and the electron beams in turn excited the observed electrostatic waves due to kinetic instabilities. The wavelengths and velocities of the electrostatic waves are estimated, using high-resolution electric field instrument data with cross-spectrum analysis and cross-correlation analysis. In general, the estimated wavelengths vary from a few hundred meters to a couple of thousand meters. The estimated phase velocities are on the order of 1000 km s-1. In addition, we perform 1-D Vlasov simulations to help identify the mode of the observed electrostatic waves. We conclude that the observed electrostatic waves are likely on the electron beam mode branch.

  5. Size of attentional suppressive surround.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Ah; Tsotsos, John; Fallah, Mazyar

    2015-09-01

    The Selective Tuning (ST) model (Tsotsos, 1995) proposed that the visual focus of attention is accompanied by a suppressive surround in spatial and feature dimensions. Follow-up studies have provided behavioural and neurophysiological evidence for this proposal (Carrasco, 2011; Tsotsos, 2011). ST also predicts that the size of the suppressive surround is determined by the level of processing within the visual hierarchy. We, thus, hypothesized that the size of the suppressive surround corresponds to the receptive field size of a neuron that best represents the attended stimulus. We conducted a free-viewing visual search task to test this hypothesis and used two different types of features processed at different levels - (early ventral) orientation and (late ventral) Greebles (Gauthier & Tarr, 1997). The sizes of search displays and stimuli were scaled depending on the feature levels to match the receptive field size of targeted neurons (V2 and LO). We tracked participants' eye movements during free-viewing visual search to find rapid return saccades from a distractor to a target. During search, if attention falls on a distractor (D1) such that a target lies within its suppressive surround, that target is invisible until attention is released. An eye movement then reveals the target and triggers a return saccade (Sheinberg & Logothetis, 2001). In other words, shifting gaze from D1 to another distractor (D2) releases the target from the suppression and a short latency (return) saccade to target occurs. The distribution of distances between the target and D1 when return saccades occur provides a measure for the size of the suppressive surround. Searching for Greebles produced much larger suppressive surrounds than orientation. This indicates that the size of the suppressive surround reflects the processing level of the attended stimulus supporting ST's original prediction. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326949

  6. Separation of circadian and wake duration-dependent modulation of EEG activation during wakefulness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The separate contribution of circadian rhythmicity and elapsed time awake on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during wakefulness was assessed. Seven men lived in an environmental scheduling facility for 4 weeks and completed fourteen 42.85-h 'days', each consisting of an extended (28.57-h) wake episode and a 14.28-h sleep opportunity. The circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin desynchronized from the 42.85-h day. This allowed quantification of the separate contribution of circadian phase and elapsed time awake to variation in EEG power spectra (1-32 Hz). EEG activity during standardized behavioral conditions was markedly affected by both circadian phase and elapsed time awake in an EEG frequency- and derivation-specific manner. The nadir of the circadian rhythm in alpha (8-12 Hz) activity in both fronto-central and occipito-parietal derivations occurred during the biological night, close to the crest of the melatonin rhythm. The nadir of the circadian rhythm of theta (4.5-8 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity in the fronto-central derivation was located close to the onset of melatonin secretion, i.e. during the wake maintenance zone. As time awake progressed, delta frequency (1-4.5 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity rose monotonically in frontal derivations. The interaction between the circadian and wake-dependent increase in frontal delta was such that the intrusion of delta was minimal when sustained wakefulness coincided with the biological day, but pronounced during the biological night. Our data imply that the circadian pacemaker facilitates frontal EEG activation during the wake maintenance zone, by generating an arousal signal that prevents the intrusion of low-frequency EEG components, the propensity for which increases progressively during wakefulness.

  7. ARTEMIS observations of lunar wake structure compared with hybrid ­kinetic simulations and an analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaee, H.; Rankin, R.; Marchand, R.; Paral, J.

    2014-12-01

    The ARTEMIS mission has made extensive measurements on the density and magnetic field structure of the lunar wake under different solar wind and magnetosphere conditions. Hybrid-kinetic simulations of the lunar wake have been found to be generally in good agreement with observations [Wiehle, S., et al., Planet. Space Sci., 2011], but are not readily available as they require access to large computers and human resources with expertise using this technology. It would be very useful to have an analytic model of the lunar wake, and one such model will be presented. It is based on an approach outlined by Hutchinson [Hutchinson, I., Physics Of Plasmas, 2008], and makes assumptions of cylindrical geometry, a strong and constant magnetic field, and fixed transverse velocity and temperature. Under these approximations the ion fluid equations (with massless electrons assumed) can be solved analytically by the method of characteristics. This paper demonstrates that the analytic model under these assumptions provides excellent agreement with observations and hybrid-kinetic simulations of the lunar wake. The approach outlined by Hutchinson is generalized to include an arbitrary angle between the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind flow. This results in two angle-dependent characteristics for the fluid flow that can be solved for the density inside the wake region. The Density profiles for different orientations of magnetic field with respect to solar wind flow are in a good qualitative agreement with 2D Hybrid simulation results of the model developed by [Paral and Rankin, Nature Comms, 2012], and with ARTEMIS observations. Refrences, -Wiehle, S., et al. (2011), First Lunar wake passage of Artemis: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind flactuations by 3D hybrid simulations, Planet. Space Sci., 59, 661-671, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2011.01.012. -Hutchinson, I. (2008),Oblique ion collection in the drift approximation:How magnetized Mach probes really work, Physics Of Plasmas, 15, 123503, doi:10.1063/1.3028314. - Paral and Rankin (2012),Dawn-dusk asymmetry in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at Mercurry, Nature Communications, 4, 1645, doi:10.1038/ncomms2676.

  8. Suppression of the metal-insulator transition by magnetic field in (Pr{sub 1?y}Y{sub y}){sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 3} (y?=?0.0625)

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, Tomoyuki Fujishiro, Hiroyuki; Nishizaki, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Norio; Hejtmánek, Ji?í; Knížek, Karel; Jirák, Zden?k

    2014-06-21

    The (Pr{sub 1?y}Y{sub y}){sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 3} compound (y?=?0.0625, T{sub MI-SS}=40?K), at the lower limit for occurrence of the first-order metal-insulator (MI) and simultaneous spin-state (SS) transitions, has been studied using electrical resistivity and magnetization measurements in magnetic fields up to 17?T. The isothermal experiments demonstrate that the low-temperature insulating phase can be destabilized by an applied field and the metallic phase returns well below the transition temperature T{sub MI-SS}. The reverse process with decreasing field occurs with a significant hysteresis. The temperature scans taken at fixed magnetic fields reveal a parabolic-like decrease in T{sub MI-SS} with increasing field strength and a complete suppression of the MI-SS transition in fields above 9?T.

  9. IEA-Task 31 WAKEBENCH: Towards a protocol for wind farm flow model evaluation. Part 2: Wind farm wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Patrick; Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Gancarski, Pawel; Chuchfield, Matthew; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Hansen, Kurt S.; Machefaux, Ewan; Maguire, Eoghan; Castellani, Francesco; Terzi, Ludovico; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Ueda, Yuko

    2014-06-01

    Researchers within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 31: Wakebench have created a framework for the evaluation of wind farm flow models operating at the microscale level. The framework consists of a model evaluation protocol integrated with a web-based portal for model benchmarking (www.windbench.net). This paper provides an overview of the building-block validation approach applied to wind farm wake models, including best practices for the benchmarking and data processing procedures for validation datasets from wind farm SCADA and meteorological databases. A hierarchy of test cases has been proposed for wake model evaluation, from similarity theory of the axisymmetric wake and idealized infinite wind farm, to single-wake wind tunnel (UMN-EPFL) and field experiments (Sexbierum), to wind farm arrays in offshore (Horns Rev, Lillgrund) and complex terrain conditions (San Gregorio). A summary of results from the axisymmetric wake, Sexbierum, Horns Rev and Lillgrund benchmarks are used to discuss the state-of-the-art of wake model validation and highlight the most relevant issues for future development.

  10. Wake Shield payload lowered into shuttle bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under the watchful gaze of payload workers in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) free-flying experiment platform is lowered onto a Shuttle payload bay carrier supporting a containment vessel to protect experiment equipment from contamination prior to deployment during the STS-69 Space Shuttle mission. The disk-shaped satellite is primarily designed to generate an 'ultra-vacuum' environment in which to grow and process thin films for next-generation advanced electronics. The ram side of the disk, facing up, houses the avionics platform and other cooperative experiments and space technology applications. Up to seven advanced semiconductor thin films will be grown during the mission on the other side of the disk called the wake side. STS-69 is targeted for a July 20 liftoff aboard Endeavour.

  11. Wake patterns of the wings and tail of hovering hummingbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Douglas L.; Princevac, Marko; Pan, Hansheng; Lozano, Jesse

    The flow fields of slowly flying bats and fasterflying birds differ in that bats produce two vortex loops during each stroke, one per wing, and birds produce a single vortex loop per stroke. In addition, the circulation at stroke transition approaches zero in bats but remains strong in birds. It is unknown if these difference derive from fundamental differences in wing morphology or are a consequence of flight speed. Here, we present an analysis of the horizontal flow field underneath hovering Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) to describe the wake of a bird flying at zero forward velocity. We also consider how the hummingbird tail interacts with the wake generated by the wings. High-speed image recording and analysis from three orthogonal perspectives revealed that the wing tips reach peak velocities in the middle of each stroke and approach zero velocity at stroke transition. Hummingbirds use complex tail kinematic patterns ranging from in phase to antiphase cycling with respect to the wings, covering several phase shifted patterns. We employed particle image velocimetry to attain detailed horizontal flow measurements at three levels with respect to the tail: in the tail, at the tail tip, and just below the tail. The velocity patterns underneath the wings indicate that flow oscillates along the ventral-dorsal axis in response to the down- and up-strokes and that the sideways flows with respect to the bird are consistently from the lateral to medial. The region around the tail is dominated by axial flows in dorsal to ventral direction. We propose that these flows are generated by interaction between the wakes of the two wings at the end of the upstroke, and that the tail actively defects flows to generate moments that contribute to pitch stability. The flow fields images also revealed distinct vortex loops underneath each wing, which were generated during each stroke. From these data, we propose a model for the primary flow structures of hummingbirds that more strongly resembles the bat model. Thus, pairs of unconnected vortex loops may be shared features of different animals during hovering and slow forward flight.

  12. Wake patterns of the wings and tail of hovering hummingbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Douglas L.; Princevac, Marko; Pan, Hansheng; Lozano, Jesse

    2009-05-01

    The flow fields of slowly flying bats and faster-flying birds differ in that bats produce two vortex loops during each stroke, one per wing, and birds produce a single vortex loop per stroke. In addition, the circulation at stroke transition approaches zero in bats but remains strong in birds. It is unknown if these difference derive from fundamental differences in wing morphology or are a consequence of flight speed. Here, we present an analysis of the horizontal flow field underneath hovering Anna’s hummingbirds ( Calypte anna) to describe the wake of a bird flying at zero forward velocity. We also consider how the hummingbird tail interacts with the wake generated by the wings. High-speed image recording and analysis from three orthogonal perspectives revealed that the wing tips reach peak velocities in the middle of each stroke and approach zero velocity at stroke transition. Hummingbirds use complex tail kinematic patterns ranging from in phase to antiphase cycling with respect to the wings, covering several phase shifted patterns. We employed particle image velocimetry to attain detailed horizontal flow measurements at three levels with respect to the tail: in the tail, at the tail tip, and just below the tail. The velocity patterns underneath the wings indicate that flow oscillates along the ventral-dorsal axis in response to the down- and up-strokes and that the sideways flows with respect to the bird are consistently from the lateral to medial. The region around the tail is dominated by axial flows in dorsal to ventral direction. We propose that these flows are generated by interaction between the wakes of the two wings at the end of the upstroke, and that the tail actively defects flows to generate moments that contribute to pitch stability. The flow fields images also revealed distinct vortex loops underneath each wing, which were generated during each stroke. From these data, we propose a model for the primary flow structures of hummingbirds that more strongly resembles the bat model. Thus, pairs of unconnected vortex loops may be shared features of different animals during hovering and slow forward flight.

  13. CFD Simulations for the Effect of Unsteady Wakes on the Boundary Layer of a Highly Loaded Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil (L1A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinci, Samuel, J.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the third part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part was published as NASA/CR-2012-217415. The second part was published as NASA/CR-2012-217416. The study of the very high lift low-pressure turbine airfoil L1A in the presence of unsteady wakes was performed computationally and compared against experimental results. The experiments were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel under high (4.9%) and then low (0.6%) freestream turbulence intensity for Reynolds number equal to 25,000 and 50,000. The experimental and computational data have shown that in cases without wakes, the boundary layer separated without reattachment. The CFD was done with LES and URANS utilizing the finite-volume code ANSYS Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.) under the same freestream turbulence and Reynolds number conditions as the experiment but only at a rod to blade spacing of 1. With wakes, separation was largely suppressed, particularly if the wake passing frequency was sufficiently high. This was validated in the 3D CFD efforts by comparing the experimental results for the pressure coefficients and velocity profiles, which were reasonable for all cases examined. The 2D CFD efforts failed to capture the three dimensionality effects of the wake and thus were less consistent with the experimental data. The effect of the freestream turbulence intensity levels also showed a little more consistency with the experimental data at higher intensities when compared with the low intensity cases. Additional cases with higher wake passing frequencies which were not run experimentally were simulated. The results showed that an initial 25% increase from the experimental wake passing greatly reduced the size of the separation bubble, nearly completely suppressing it.

  14. PKC in rat dorsal raphe nucleus plays a key role in sleep-wake regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Jie; Cui, Su-Ying; Zhang, Xue-Qiong; Yu, Bin; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Huang, Yuan-Li; Cao, Qing; Xu, Ya-Ping; Lin, Zhi-Ge; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Yong-He

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest a tight relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) and circadian clock. However, the role of PKC in sleep-wake regulation remains unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate the role of PKC signaling in sleep-wake regulation in the rat. Our results showed that the phosphorylation level of PKC in dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) was decreased after 6h sleep deprivation, while no alterations were found in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) or locus coeruleus (LC). Microinjection of a pan-PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride (CHEL, 5 or 10nmol), into DRN of freely moving rats promoted non rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) without influences on rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Especially, CHEL application at 5nmol increased light sleep (LS) time while CHEL application at 10nmol increased slow wave sleep (SWS) time and percentage. On the other hand, microinjection of CaCl2 into DRN not only increased the phosphorylation level of PKC, but also reduced NREMS time, especially SWS time and percentage. While CHEL abolished the inhibitory effect of CaCl2 on NREMS and SWS. These data provide the first direct evidence that inhibition of intracellular PKC signaling in DRN could increase NREMS time including SWS time and percentage, while activation of PKC could suppress NREMS and reduce SWS time and percentage. These novel findings further our understanding of the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms of sleep-wake regulation. PMID:25970525

  15. Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Evaluation of Impacts on the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2005-01-01

    This report is one of a series that describes an ongoing effort in high-fidelity modeling/simulation, evaluation and analysis of the benefits and performance metrics of the Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Concept of Operations being developed as part of the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project. A previous study, determined the overall increases in runway arrival rates that could be achieved at 12 selected airports due to WakeVAS reduced aircraft spacing under Instrument Meteorological Conditions. This study builds on the previous work to evaluate the NAS wide impacts of equipping various numbers of airports with WakeVAS. A queuing network model of the National Airspace System, built by the Logistics Management Institute, Mclean, VA, for NASA (LMINET) was used to estimate the reduction in delay that could be achieved by using WakeVAS under non-visual meteorological conditions for the projected air traffic demand in 2010. The results from LMINET were used to estimate the total annual delay reduction that could be achieved and from this, an estimate of the air carrier variable operating cost saving was made.

  16. Relation of dreams to waking concerns.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Rosalind; Agargun, Mehmet Y; Kirkby, Jennifer; Friedman, Julie Kabat

    2006-03-30

    To test that dreams are influenced by the pre-sleep waking emotional concerns of the sleeper and have an effect on waking adaptation, 20 depressed and 10 control subjects, who were all going through a divorce, were enrolled in a repeated measures study lasting 5 months. A Current Concerns test was administered on three occasions before nights when every REM period was interrupted to record recalled mental content. The degree of waking concern about the ex-spouse correlated significantly with the number of dreams in which the former partner appeared as a dream character. Those who were in remission at the follow-up evaluation had a higher percentage of well-developed dreams than those who remained depressed. Dreams of the former spouse reported by those in remission differed from those who remained depressed in the expression of dream affect and in the within-dream linkage among units of associated memory material. Dreams of the former spouse that are reported by those who are not in remission lack affect and connection to other memories. PMID:16497389

  17. Identification of characteristic properties in different vessel wake signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Sheremet, Alex; Torsvik, Tomas; Soomere, Tarmo

    2013-04-01

    The potential threat in terms of environmental protection and safe navigation posed by wake waves from high-speed ferries and fast conventional ships is well documented. Vessels that travel in the near-critical regime (depth Froude number ? 1) at some sections along their ship tracks can generate packets of large, solitonic, very long and long crested waves. The heights and periods of the leading waves, excited at near-critical speeds, may be much larger than those of conventional ferries or vessels travelling at even slightly slower speeds. However, it is difficult to determine a general characterization of such wakes at the coast, due to the transient and nonlinear nature of this phenomenon, and the fact that wake impact is influenced by the local bathymetry and coastline configuration. Such a characterization is required in order to set reasonable limits to wake wash that are sufficient for protection but not excessively restrictive for ship navigation. This paper investigates the potential benefits of wake analysis by means of a time-frequency technique (windowed Fourier transform), which is well known in signal analysis but has only recently been applied in wake analysis. Analysis of ship wakes have been performed based on instrumental data of sea surface elevation recorded at different sites in Tallinn Bay, the Baltic Sea, which is characterized by very intense ship traffic and provides a very rich collection of vessel-wake signals. Results show that the wake signals are easily identified in spectrograms. The method is particularly useful for identification of low frequency signals that may easily be masked by high frequency noise in the wave record. Furthermore, the spectrogram provides an image of the wake that makes it possible to associate wake events with individual ships at a given location. This approach also opens a new direction for the statistical description of wakes, applicable to the characterization of the "wake climate" for sites with intense vessel traffic.

  18. Suppression of Vortex Shedding from a Circular Cylinder by using a Traveling Wave Wall

    E-print Network

    Hu, Hui

    Suppression of Vortex Shedding from a Circular Cylinder by using a Traveling Wave Wall Wenli Chen1 the unsteady vortex shedding from a circular cylinder by using a traveling wave wall (TWW). The leeward, the wake region behind the cylinder model was found to be shortened and the vortex shedding from

  19. Changing and shielded magnetic fields suppress c-Fos expression in the navigation circuit: input from the magnetosensory system contributes to the internal representation of space in a subterranean rodent

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Tomáš; Lucová, Marcela; Moritz, Regina E.; Oelschläger, Helmut H. A.; Druga, Rastislav; Burda, Hynek; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha; N?mec, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The neural substrate subserving magnetoreception and magnetic orientation in mammals is largely unknown. Previous experiments have demonstrated that the processing of magnetic sensory information takes place in the superior colliculus. Here, the effects of magnetic field conditions on neuronal activity in the rodent navigation circuit were assessed by quantifying c-Fos expression. Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli), a mammalian model to study the mechanisms of magnetic compass orientation, were subjected to natural, periodically changing, and shielded magnetic fields while exploring an unfamiliar circular arena. In the undisturbed local geomagnetic field, the exploration of the novel environment and/or nesting behaviour induced c-Fos expression throughout the head direction system and the entorhinal–hippocampal spatial representation system. This induction was significantly suppressed by exposure to periodically changing and/or shielded magnetic fields; discrete decreases in c-Fos were seen in the dorsal tegmental nucleus, the anterodorsal and the laterodorsal thalamic nuclei, the postsubiculum, the retrosplenial and entorhinal cortices, and the hippocampus. Moreover, in inactive animals, magnetic field intensity manipulation suppressed c-Fos expression in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus and the dorsal subiculum, but induced expression in the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that key constituents of the rodent navigation circuit contain populations of neurons responsive to magnetic stimuli. Thus, magnetic information may be integrated with multimodal sensory and motor information into a common spatial representation of allocentric space within this circuit. PMID:20219838

  20. First comparison of LES of an offshore wind turbine wake with dual-Doppler lidar measurement in the offshore wind farm "alpha ventus"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, L.; Trabucchi, D.; Witha, B.; van Dooren, M.; Trujillo, J. J.; Schneemann, J.; Kühn, M.

    2014-12-01

    The planning of offshore wind farms is still tainted with high risks due to unknown power losses and a higher level of fatigue loads due to wake effects. Recently, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are more and more used for simulating offshore wind turbine wakes as they resolve the atmospheric turbulence as well as the wake turbulence.However, for an application of LES wind fields to assess offshore wind farm flow a proper validation with measured data is necessary.Several methods have been investigated at the University of Oldenburg to compare LES wind fields and lidar measurements. In this study we apply one of these methods to validate wake simulations of a single wake of a 5MW wind turbine in the German offshore wind farm "alpha ventus" with processed dual-Doppler lidar measurements in the same wind farm.The simulations are performed with the LES model PALM, which has been enhanced by two different approaches of actuator models to simulate the wake of single wind turbines and the interaction of wakes in wind farms. Effects of tower and nacelle are regarded as well as simple turbine control mechanisms. The simulations are initialized with comparable atmospheric conditions as during the time of lidar operation by using measurements from the adjacent meteorological mast FINO 1.Plan Position Indicator (PPI) measurements have been performed with two long-range wind lidars installed at different opposing platforms at the border of the wind farm. A Cartesian grid was overlapped to the scanned region and a dual-Doppler algorithm was applied in order to estimate the horizontal stationary wind field on the grid nodes. To our knowledge, the presented study is one of the first validations of LES wake simulations with lidar measurements and first which validates offshore LES wake simulations with 2D lidar data.

  1. Nicotine administration in the wake-promoting basal forebrain attenuates sleep-promoting effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Lodhi, Shafi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine and alcohol co-abuse is highly prevalent, although the underlying causes are unclear. It has been suggested that nicotine enhances pleasurable effects of alcohol while reducing aversive effects. Recently, we reported that nicotine acts via the basal forebrain (BF) to activate nucleus accumbens and increase alcohol consumption. Does nicotine suppress alcohol-induced aversive effects via the BF? We hypothesized that nicotine may act via the BF to suppress sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with sleep-recording electrodes and bilateral guides targeted toward the BF. Nicotine (75 pmol/500 nL/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; 500 nL/side) was microinjected into the BF followed by intragastric alcohol (ACSF + EtOH and NiC + EtOH groups; 3 g/kg) or water (NiC + W and ACSF + W groups; 10 mL/kg) administration. On completion, rats were killed and processed to localize injection sites in the BF. The statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of treatment on sleep-wakefulness. While rats exposed to alcohol (ACSF + EtOH) displayed strong sleep promotion, nicotine pre-treatment in the BF (NiC + EtOH) attenuated alcohol-induced sleep and normalized sleep-wakefulness. These results suggest that nicotine acts via the BF to suppress the aversive, sleep-promoting effects of alcohol, further supporting the role of BF in alcohol-nicotine co-use. Alcohol and nicotine are highly co-abused. The underlying mechanism is unclear. One reason why people use nicotine, a stimulant, with alcohol is to enhance recreational/pleasurable sensations while suppressing alcohol's aversive effects such as sleepiness. We have previously observed that nicotine acts via wake-promoting basal forebrain to increase alcohol consumption and activate nucleus accumbens, the pleasure center. Here, we demonstrate that nicotine acts via the basal forebrain to suppress sleep-promoting effects of alcohol further implicating the basal forebrain as a key substrate in nicotine alcohol co-use. PMID:26119352

  2. Decay of the supersonic turbulent wakes from micro-ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Scarano, F.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The wakes resulting from micro-ramps immersed in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer at Ma = 2.0 are investigated by means of particle image velocimetry. Two micro-ramps are investigated with height of 60% and 80% of the undisturbed boundary layer, respectively. The measurement domain is placed at the symmetry plane of the ramp and encompasses the range from 10 to 32 ramp heights downstream of the ramp. The decay of the flow field properties is evaluated in terms of time-averaged and root-mean-square (RMS) statistics. In the time-averaged flow field, the recovery from the imparted momentum deficit and the decay of upwash motion are analyzed. The RMS fluctuations of the velocity components exhibit strong anisotropy at the most upstream location and develop into a more isotropic regime downstream. The self-similarity properties of velocity components and fluctuation components along wall-normal direction are followed. The investigation of the unsteady large scale motion is carried out by means of snapshot analysis and by a statistical approach based on the spatial auto-correlation function. The Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability at the upper shear layer is observed to develop further with the onset of vortex pairing. The average distance between vortices is statistically estimated using the spatial auto-correlation. A marked transition with the wavelength increase is observed across the pairing regime. The K-H instability, initially observed only at the upper shear layer also begins to appear in the lower shear layer as soon as the wake is elevated sufficiently off the wall. The auto-correlation statistics confirm the coherence of counter-rotating vortices from the upper and lower sides, indicating the formation of vortex rings downstream of the pairing region.

  3. Three-dimensional vortex wake structure of flapping wings in hovering flight

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bo; Roll, Jesse; Liu, Yun; Troolin, Daniel R.; Deng, Xinyan

    2014-01-01

    Flapping wings continuously create and send vortices into their wake, while imparting downward momentum into the surrounding fluid. However, experimental studies concerning the details of the three-dimensional vorticity distribution and evolution in the far wake are limited. In this study, the three-dimensional vortex wake structure in both the near and far field of a dynamically scaled flapping wing was investigated experimentally, using volumetric three-component velocimetry. A single wing, with shape and kinematics similar to those of a fruitfly, was examined. The overall result of the wing action is to create an integrated vortex structure consisting of a tip vortex (TV), trailing-edge shear layer (TESL) and leading-edge vortex. The TESL rolls up into a root vortex (RV) as it is shed from the wing, and together with the TV, contracts radially and stretches tangentially in the downstream wake. The downwash is distributed in an arc-shaped region enclosed by the stretched tangential vorticity of the TVs and the RVs. A closed vortex ring structure is not observed in the current study owing to the lack of well-established starting and stopping vortex structures that smoothly connect the TV and RV. An evaluation of the vorticity transport equation shows that both the TV and the RV undergo vortex stretching while convecting downwards: a three-dimensional phenomenon in rotating flows. It also confirms that convection and secondary tilting and stretching effects dominate the evolution of vorticity. PMID:24335561

  4. Unsteady vortex lattice techniques applied to wake formation and performance of the statically thrusting propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The application is considered of vortex lattice techniques to the problem of describing the aerodynamics and performance of statically thrusting propellers. A numerical lifting surface theory to predict the aerodynamic forces and power is performed. The chordwise and spanwise loading is modelled by bound vortices fixed to a twisted flat plate surface. In order to eliminate any apriori assumptions regarding the wake shape, it is assumed the propeller starts from rest. The wake is generated in time and allowed to deform under its own self-induced velocity field as the motion of the propeller progresses. The bound circulation distribution is then determined with time by applying the flow tangency boundary condition at certain selected control points on the blades. The aerodynamics of the infinite wing and finite wing are also considered. The details of wake formation and roll-up are investigated, particularly the localized induction effect. It is concluded that proper wake roll-up and roll-up rates can be established by considering the details of motion at the instant of start.

  5. Trailing Vortex Measurements in the Wake of a Hovering Rotor Blade with Various Tip Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Preston B.; Leishman, J. Gordon

    2003-01-01

    This work examined the wake aerodynamics of a single helicopter rotor blade with several tip shapes operating on a hover test stand. Velocity field measurements were conducted using three-component laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The objective of these measurements was to document the vortex velocity profiles and then extract the core properties, such as the core radius, peak swirl velocity, and axial velocity. The measured test cases covered a wide range of wake-ages and several tip shapes, including rectangular, tapered, swept, and a subwing tip. One of the primary differences shown by the change in tip shape was the wake geometry. The effect of blade taper reduced the initial peak swirl velocity by a significant fraction. It appears that this is accomplished by decreasing the vortex strength for a given blade loading. The subwing measurements showed that the interaction and merging of the subwing and primary vortices created a less coherent vortical structure. A source of vortex core instability is shown to be the ratio of the peak swirl velocity to the axial velocity deficit. The results show that if there is a turbulence producing region of the vortex structure, it will be outside of the core boundary. The LDV measurements were supported by laser light-sheet flow visualization. The results provide several benchmark test cases for future validation of theoretical vortex models, numerical free-wake models, and computational fluid dynamics results.

  6. Properties of the lunar wake predicted by analytic models and hybrid-kinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaee, Hossna; Rankin, Robert; Marchand, Richard; Paral, Jan

    2015-05-01

    An approximate model derived by Hutchinson (2008a), describing the interaction between the solar wind and the Moon, is applied to describe plasma in the lunar wake. The model accounts for plasma entering the wake region from two tangent points around the Moon. Cylindrical geometry is assumed, along with a strong constant magnetic field, and fixed transverse velocity and temperature. Under these approximations two angle-dependent equations for fluid flow are obtained, which can be solved using the method of characteristics to provide the density inside the wake region. It is demonstrated that the model valid under these assumptions provides excellent agreement with observations from the ARTEMIS mission and with large-scale hybrid-kinetic plasma simulations. The model provides a practical alternative to kinetic simulations and is generally useful for determining properties of the lunar wake under different solar wind conditions. It will be useful as well for predicting properties of the plasma environment around unmagnetized bodies that have not yet been visited by spacecraft.

  7. Detection and Behavior of Pan Wakes in Saturn's A Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Showalter, M. R.; Russell, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    Six previously unseen Pan wakes are found interior and exterior to the Encke gap in Saturn's A ring, one in the Voyager 2 photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultation data and five in the Voyager 1 radio science (RSS) Earth occultation data. Pan orbits at the center of the Encke gap and maintains it...The detection of Pan wakes at longitudes greater than 360(deg) demonstrates that wakes persist for much longer than originally hypothesized and may interact with one another.

  8. Initialization and Simulation of Three-Dimensional Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zheng, Z. C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of axial velocity profiles on vortex decay, in order to properly initialize and simulate three-dimensional wake vortex flow. Analytical relationships are obtained based on a single vortex model and computational simulations are performed for a rather practical vortex wake, which show that the single vortex analytical relations can still be applicable at certain streamwise sections of three-dimensional wake vortices.

  9. Wake coupling to full potential rotor analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.; Chang, I-Chung; Oh, Byung K.

    1990-01-01

    The wake information from a helicopter forward flight code is coupled with two transonic potential rotor codes. The induced velocities for the near-, mid-, and far-wake geometries are extracted from a nonlinear rigid wake of a standard performance and analysis code. These, together with the corresponding inflow angles, computation points, and azimuth angles, are then incorporated into the transonic potential codes. The coupled codes can then provide an improved prediction of rotor blade loading at transonic speeds.

  10. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Current fast-time wake models are reviewed and three basic types are defined. Predictions from several of the fast-time models are compared. Previous statistical evaluations of the APA-Sarpkaya and D2P fast-time models are discussed. Root Mean Square errors between fast-time model predictions and Lidar wake measurements are examined for a 24 hr period at Denver International Airport. Shortcomings in current methodology for evaluating wake errors are also discussed.

  11. Quantifying error of remote sensing observations of wind turbine wakes using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Churchfield, M.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wind-profiling lidars are now regularly used in wind energy for wind resource assessment, inflow characterization, and wake measurements. Lidar wind profilers exploit the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered from particulates carried by the wind to measure a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity. The Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS) technique, used by many commercial systems, considers measurements of this LOS velocity in multiple radial directions in order to estimate horizontal and vertical winds. The method relies on the assumption of homogeneous flow across the region sampled by the beams. Use of such a system in inhomogeneous flow, such as wind turbine wakes or complex terrain, will result in error which may or may not be significant. To quantify the error expected from such violation of the assumption of horizontal homogeneity, we simulate inhomogeneous flow in the atmospheric boundary layer, notably stably-stratified flow past a wind turbine using large-eddy simulation. This slightly stable case results in 15 degrees of wind direction change across the turbine rotor disk. The resulting flow-field is sampled in the same fashion that a lidar samples the atmosphere with the DBS approach, enabling quantification of the error in the DBS observations. The observations from the instruments located upwind have small error, which is further ameliorated with time-averaging. However, the downwind observations, particularly within the first two rotor diameters downwind from the wind turbine, suffer from errors due to the heterogeneity of the wind turbine wake. Errors in the stream-wise component of the flow are generally small, less than 0.5 m s-1. Errors in the cross-stream and vertical velocity components are much larger: cross-stream component errors are on the order of 1.0 m s-1, while errors in the vertical velocity exceed the actual values of the vertical velocity. DBS-based assessments of wake wind speed deficits based on the stream-wise velocity can be relied upon even within the near wake within 0.5 m s-1, but cross-stream and vertical velocity estimates in the near wake are compromised. Measurements of inhomogeneous flow such as wind turbine wakes are susceptible to these errors, and interpretations of field observations should account for this uncertainty.

  12. Numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent transition in a spatially-developing flat plate wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dratler, D. I.; Fasel, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition of an incompressible flat-plate wake is investigated by direct numerical integration of the Navier-Stokes equations. For the numerical integration, a combination of finite-difference and spectral methods along with an ADI/Crank-Nicolson/Adams-Bashforth time integration scheme is employed. Subject to 2D forcing, the wake exhibited a rapidly-growing fundamental disturbance that quickly saturated. This saturation was due partly to the stabilizing effect of the mean flow distortion. Downstream of the saturation point, disturbance energy was concentrated in the fundamental disturbance, the second harmonic, and the mean flow distortion component. At large amplitude levels, a Karman vortex street formed. Variations in the 2D forcing level did not alter the qualitative behavior of the disturbances. Simulations of 3D breakdown indicates that the presence of large-amplitude, 2D disturbances tends to initially suppress small-amplitude 3D disturbance growth. Following this initial suppression, a resumption of 3D growth is observed that may have been due to a secondary instability mechanism. For high levels of 3D disturbance energy, lambda-shaped vortical structures formed between adjacent Karman vortices.

  13. Using the coupled wake boundary layer model to evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on wind farm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use the recently introduced coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model to predict the effect of turbulence intensity on the performance of a wind farm. The CWBL model combines a standard wake model with a “top-down” approach to get improved predictions for the power output compared to a stand-alone wake model. Here we compare the CWBL model results for different turbulence intensities with the Horns Rev field measurements by Hansen et al., Wind Energy 15, 183196 (2012). We show that the main trends as function of the turbulence intensity are captured very well by the model and discuss differences between the field measurements and model results based on comparisons with LES results from Wu and Porté-Agel, Renewable Energy 75, 945-955 (2015).

  14. Flow visualization study of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu H.T.; Waite, J.W.; Hiester, T.R.; Tacheron, P.H.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The specific objectives of the study reported were: to determine the geometry of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake in terms of wake height and width as a function of downstream distance under two conditions of atmospheric stability; to estimate the mean velocity deficit at several downstream stations in the turbine wake; and to investigate the behavior of the rotor-generated vortices, particularly their configuration and persistence. The background of the wake problem is briefly examined, including a discussion of the critical issues that the flow visualization study addresses. Experimental techniques and data analysis methods are described in detail. (LEW)

  15. The three-dimensional evolution of a plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, H.; Moser, R. D.; Mansour, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    In the past three decades, linear stability analysis has led to a comprehensive understanding of the linear stages of transition in plane wakes. Our understanding of the nonlinear and turbulent stages is less developed. Nonlinear theory developed by Papageorgiou and Smith was used to study the long-wavelength regime in wakes. The nonlinear and turbulent stages were investigated experimentally, and few numerical studies examined the early nonlinear stages of forced wakes. The evolution of three dimensional disturbances in an incompressible wake is investigated using direct numerical simulations. The instantaneous three-dimaensional structures and corresponding statistics are presented.

  16. Wake shape and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emdad, H.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    The wake shape under symmetrical flight conditions and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics are examined. In addition, the effect of wake shape in sideslip and discrete vortices such as strake or forebody vortex on lateral characteristics is presented. The present numerical method for airplane configurations, which is based on discretization of the vortex sheet into vortex segments, verified the symmetrical and asymmetrical roll-up process of the trailing vortices. Also, the effect of wing wake on tail planes is calculated. It is concluded that at high lift the assumption of flat wake for longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics should be reexamined.

  17. Quantitative three-dimensional low-speed wake surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of conducting three-dimensional wake measurements in large wind tunnels are reviewed with emphasis on applications in low-speed aerodynamics. Such quantitative wake surveys furnish separate values for the components of drag, such as profile drag and induced drag, but also measure lift without the use of a balance. In addition to global data, details of the wake flowfield as well as spanwise distributions of lift and drag are obtained. The paper demonstrates the value of this measurement technique using data from wake measurements conducted by Boeing on a variety of low-speed configurations including the complex high-lift system of a transport aircraft.

  18. An experimental investigation on wind turbine aeromechanics and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ahmet

    A comprehensive experimental study was conducted to investigate wind turbine aeromechanics and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines sited in onshore and offshore wind farms. The experiments were carried out in a large-scale Aerodynamic/Atmospheric Boundary Layer (AABL) Wind Tunnel available at Iowa State University. An array of scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine (HAWT) models were placed in atmospheric boundary layer winds with different mean and turbulence characteristics to simulate the situations in onshore and offshore wind farms. The effects of the important design parameters for wind farm layout optimization, which include the mean and turbulence characteristics of the oncoming surface winds, the yaw angles of the turbines with respect to the oncoming surface winds, the array spacing and layout pattern, and the terrain topology of wind farms on the turbine performances (i.e., both power output and dynamic wind loadings) and the wake interferences among multiple wind turbines, were assessed in detail. The aeromechanic performance and near wake characteristics of a novel dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) design with co-rotating or counter-rotating configuration were also investigated, in comparison to a conventional single rotor wind turbine (SRWT). During the experiments, in addition to measuring dynamic wind loads (both forces and moments) and the power outputs of the scaled turbine models, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system was used to conduct detailed flow field measurements (i.e., both free-run and phase-locked flow fields measurements) to reveal the transient behavior of the unsteady wake vortices and turbulent flow structures behind wind turbines and to quantify the characteristics of the wake interferences among the wind turbines sited in non-homogenous surface winds. A miniature cobra anemometer was also used to provide high-temporal-resolution data at points of interest to supplement the full field PIV measurement results. The detailed flow field measurements are correlated with the dynamic wind loads and power output measurements to elucidate underlying physics in order to gain further insight into the characteristics of the power generation performance, dynamic wind loads and wake interferences of the wind turbines for higher total power yield and better durability of the wind turbines sited in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) winds.

  19. Helicopter rotor wake geometry and its influence in forward flight. Volume 1: Generalized wake geometry and wake effect on rotor airloads and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic investigation to generalize wake geometry of a helicopter rotor in steady level forward flight and to demonstrate the influence of wake deformation in the prediction of rotor airloads and performance is described. Volume 1 presents a first level generalized wake model based on theoretically predicted tip vortex geometries for a selected representative blade design. The tip vortex distortions are generalized in equation form as displacements from the classical undistorted tip vortex geometry in terms of vortex age, blade azimuth, rotor advance ratio, thrust coefficient, and number of blades. These equations were programmed to provide distorted wake coordinates at very low cost for use in rotor airflow and airloads prediction analyses. The sensitivity of predicted rotor airloads, performance, and blade bending moments to the modeling of the tip vortex distortion are demonstrated for low to moderately high advance ratios for a representative rotor and the H-34 rotor. Comparisons with H-34 rotor test data demonstrate the effects of the classical, predicted distorted, and the newly developed generalized wake models on airloads and blade bending moments. Use of distorted wake models results in the occurrence of numerous blade-vortex interactions on the forward and lateral sides of the rotor disk. The significance of these interactions is related to the number and degree of proximity to the blades of the tip vortices. The correlation obtained with the distorted wake models (generalized and predicted) is encouraging.

  20. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, L.; Ramos-García, N.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-06-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the separation point. A calibration of the code through comparison with experiments has been performed using one set of airfoils. A second set of airfoils has been used for the validation of the calibrated model. Predicted aerodynamic forces for a wide range of angles of attack (0 to 90 deg) are in overall good agreement with wind tunnel measurements.

  1. Thermal wake/vessel detection technique

    DOEpatents

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10

    A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

  2. Wakes from arrays of buildings. [flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Lin, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a small wind tunnel in which atmospheric flow around buildings was simulated. Arrays of one, two, three, and four model buildings were tested, and wake profiles of velocity and turbulence were measured. The data indicate the effect of the buildings on the wind environment encountered by aircraft during landing or takeoff operations. It was possible to use the results to locate the boundaries of the air regions affected by the obstacles and to recommend preferred arrangements of buildings to maximize light safety.

  3. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  4. Thermal-noise suppression in nano-scale Si field-effect transistors by feedback control based on single-electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Kensaku; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Yamahata, Gento; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Fujiwara, Akira

    2015-08-01

    We perform feedback (FB) control for suppressing thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a silicon single-electron (SE) device composed of a small transistor and capacitor. SEs enter and leave the capacitor via the transistor randomly at thermal equilibrium, which is monitored in real time using a high-charge-sensitivity detector. In order to suppress such random motion or thermal fluctuation of the electrons, SEs are injected and removed using the transistor according to the monitored change in the number of electrons in the capacitor, which is exactly the FB control. As a result, thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a SE device is suppressed by 60%, which corresponds to the so-called FB cooling from 300 to 110 K. Moreover, a thermodynamics analysis of this FB cooling reveals that entropy in the capacitor is reduced and the device is at non-equilibrium; i.e., the free energy of the device increases. Since this entropy reduction originates from information about the electrons' motion monitored by the detector, our results by the FB control represent one type of information-to-energy conversion.

  5. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePLUS

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Temporally Evolving Incompressible Plane Wake: Effect of Initial Conditions on Evolution and Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergaard, R.; Cantwell, B.; Mansour, N.

    1997-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been used to examine the effect of the initial disturbance field on the development of three-dimensionality and the transition to turbulence in the incompressible plane wake. The simulations were performed using a new numerical method for solving the time-dependent, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in flows with one infinite and two periodic directions. The method uses standard Fast Fourier Transforms and is applicable to cases where the vorticity field is compact in the infinite direction. Initial disturbances fields examined were combinations of two-dimensional waves and symmetric pairs of 60 deg oblique waves at the fundamental, subharmonic, and sub-subharmonic wavelengths. The results of these simulations indicate that the presence of 60 deg disturbances at the subharmonic streamwise wavelength results in the development of strong coherent three-dimensional structures. The resulting strong three-dimensional rate-of-strain triggers the growth of intense fine scale motions. Wakes initiated with 60 deg disturbances at the fundamental streamwise wavelength develop weak coherent streamwise structures, and do not develop significant fine scale motions, even at high Reynolds numbers. The wakes which develop strong three-dimensional structures exhibit growth rates on par with experimentally observed turbulent plane wakes. Wakes which develop only weak three-dimensional structures exhibit significantly lower late time growth rates. Preliminary studies of wakes initiated with an oblique fundamental and a two-dimensional subharmonic, which develop asymmetric coherent oblique structures at the subharmonic wavelength, indicate that significant fine scale motions only develop if the resulting oblique structures are above an angle of approximately 45 deg.

  7. Observing the Multiverse with Cosmic Wakes

    E-print Network

    Matthew Kleban; Thomas S. Levi; Kris Sigurdson

    2011-09-15

    Current theories of the origin of the Universe, including string theory, predict the existence of a multiverse containing many bubble universes. These bubble universes will generically collide, and collisions with ours produce cosmic wakes that enter our Hubble volume, appear as unusually symmetric disks in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and disturb large scale structure (LSS). There is preliminary observational evidence consistent with one or more of these disturbances on our sky. However, other sources can produce similar features in the CMB temperature map and so additional signals are needed to verify their extra-universal origin. Here we find, for the first time, the detailed three-dimensional shape and CMB temperature and polarization signals of the cosmic wake of a bubble collision in the early universe consistent with current observations. The predicted polarization pattern has distinctive features that when correlated with the corresponding temperature pattern are a unique and striking signal of a bubble collision. These features represent the first verifiable prediction of the multiverse paradigm and might be detected by current experiments such as Planck and future CMB polarization missions. A detection of a bubble collision would confirm the existence of the Multiverse, provide compelling evidence for the string theory landscape, and sharpen our picture of the Universe and its origins.

  8. Observing the multiverse with cosmic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Levi, Thomas S.; Sigurdson, Kris

    2013-02-01

    Current theories of the origin of the Universe, including string theory, predict the existence of a multiverse with many bubble universes. These bubble universes may collide, and collisions with ours produce cosmic wakes that enter our Hubble volume, appear as unusually symmetric disks in the cosmic microwave background, and disturb large scale structure. There is preliminary evidence consistent with one or more of these disturbances on our sky. However, other sources can produce similar features in the cosmic microwave background, and so additional signals are needed to verify their extra-universal origin. Here we find, for the first time, the detailed three-dimensional shape, temperature, and polarization signals of the cosmic wake of a bubble collision consistent with current observations. The polarization pattern has distinct features that when correlated with the corresponding temperature pattern are a unique and striking signal of a bubble collision. These features represent a verifiable prediction of the multiverse paradigm and might be detected by current or future experiments. A detection of a bubble collision would confirm the existence of the multiverse, provide compelling evidence for the string theory landscape, and sharpen our picture of the Universe and its origins.

  9. The Structure of Cosmic String Wakes

    E-print Network

    Sornborger, A T; Fryxell, B; Olson, K

    1996-01-01

    The clustering of baryons and cold dark matter induced by a single moving string is analyzed numerically making use of a new three-dimensional Eulerian cosmological hydro code$^{1)}$ which is based on the PPM method to track the baryons and the PIC method to evolve the dark matter particles. A long straight string moving with a speed comparable to $c$ induces a planar overdensity (a``wake"). Since the initial perturbation is a velocity kick towards the plane behind the string and there is no initial Newtonian gravitational line source, the baryons are trapped in the center of the wake, leading to an enhanced baryon to dark matter ratio. The cold coherent flow leads to very low post--shock temperatures of the baryonic fluid. In contrast, long strings with a lot of small-scale structure (which can be described by adding a Newtonian gravitational line source) move slowly and form filamentary objects. The large central pressure due to the gravitational potential causes the baryons to be expelled from the central ...

  10. Investigation on 3D t wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.-X.; Tan, G.-K.; Lai, G.-J.

    2012-10-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field, using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV). The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution. The study was performed in a water channel. A robot fish model was designed and built. The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method, with twelve stretched wires. The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom, mainly in carangiform mode, by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively. The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner, measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices. Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs, allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field. Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained. The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish, including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings", allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  11. Relationship between vortex ring in tail fin wake and propulsive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Naoto; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) vortex ring in the wake of a tail fin and to clarify the propulsion mechanism of dolphins and fish. In this study, we replaced a tail fin in pitching motion with an oscillating wing having a drive unit. The flow fields around the wing were measured by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. To visualize the 3D structure of the vortex in the wake, we determined the flow fields in equally spaced cross-sectional planes. We reconstructed the 3D velocity fields from the velocity data with three components in two dimensions. We visualized the 3D vortex structure from these velocity data and plotted an iso-vorticity surface. As a result, we found that the vortex ring was generated by the kick-down and kick-up motions of the wing and that the wake structure was comparable with that obtained numerically. Moreover, we calculated the propulsive forces from the temporal variations in circulation and in the area surrounded by the vortex ring.

  12. Formation of Wakes by Chiral, Conducting Cosmic Strings

    E-print Network

    M. C. B. Abdalla; A. A. Bytsenko; M. E. X. Guimaraes

    2004-09-27

    Chiral cosmic strings are naturally produced at the end of D-term inflation and they present very interesting cosmological consequences. In this work, we investigate the formation and evolution of wakes by a chiral string. We show that, for cold dark matter, the mechanism of forming wakes by a chiral string is similar to the mechanism by an ordinary string.

  13. Wake Forest U. Joins Ranks of Test-Optional Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric; Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    Wake Forest University will no longer require applicants to submit standardized test scores, the university announced last week. The move makes Wake Forest, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, one of the most prominent institutions with a "test optional" admissions policy. The university's decision reveals the increasing complexity of the national…

  14. On the investigation of cascade and turbomachinery rotor wake characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, R.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the investigation reported in this thesis is to study the characteristics of a turbomachinery rotor wake, both analytically and experimentally. The constitutive equations for the rotor wake are developed using generalized tensors and a non-inertial frame of reference. Analytical and experimental investigation is carried out in two phases; the first phase involved the study of a cascade wake in the absence of rotation and three dimensionality. In the second phase the wake of a rotor is studied. Simplified two- and three-dimensional models are developed for the prediction of the mean velocity profile of the cascade and the rotor wake, respectively, using the principle of self-similarity. The effect of various major parameters of the rotor and the flow geometry is studied on the development of a rotor wake. Laws governing the decay of the wake velocity defect in a cascade and rotor wake as a function of downstream distance from the trailing edge, pressure gradient and other parameters are derived.

  15. Dynamics of the vortex wakes of flying and swimming vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rayner, J M

    1995-01-01

    The vortex wakes of flying and swimming animals provide evidence of the history of aero- and hydrodynamic force generation during the locomotor cycle. Vortex-induced momentum flux in the wake is the reaction of forces the animal imposes on its environment, which must be in equilibrium with inertial and external forces. In flying birds and bats, the flapping wings generate lift both to provide thrust and to support the weight. Distinct wingbeat and wake movement patterns can be identified as gaits. In flow visualization experiments, only two wake patterns have been identified: a vortex ring gait with inactive upstroke, and a continuous vortex gait with active upstroke. These gaits may be modelled theoretically by free vortex and lifting line theory to predict mechanical energy consumption, aerodynamic forces and muscle activity. Longer-winged birds undergo a distinct gait change with speed, but shorter-winged species use the vortex ring gait at all speeds. In swimming fish, the situation is more complex: the wake vortices form a reversed von Kármán vortex street, but little is known about the mechanism of generation of the wake, or about how it varies with speed and acceleration or with body form and swimming mode. An unresolved complicating factor is the interaction between the drag wake of the flapping fish body and the thrusting wake from the tail. PMID:8571221

  16. Characteristics of lightly loaded fan rotor blade wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, B.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1979-01-01

    Low subsonic and incompressible wake flow downstream of lightly loaded rotor was studied. Measurements of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, Reynolds stress, and static variations across the rotor wake at various axial and radial locations were investigated. Wakes were measured at various rotor blade incidences to discern the effect of blade loading on the rotor wake. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements were carried out with a triaxial hot wire probe both rotating with the rotor and stationary behind the rotor. Results indicate that increased loading slows the decay rates of axial and tangential mean velocity defects and radial velocities in the wake. The presence of large radial velocities in the rotor wake indicate the extent of the interactions between one radius and another. Appreciable static pressure variations across the rotor wake were found in the near wake region. Similarity in the profile shape was found for the axial and tangential components of the mean velocity and in the outer layer for axial, tangential, and radial turbulence intensities.

  17. Measuremants in the wake of an infinite swept airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, C. J.; Ramaprian, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report of the measurements in the trailing edge region as well as in the report of the developing wake behind a swept NACA 0012 airfoil at zero incidence and a sweep angle of 30 degrees. The measurements include both the mean and turbulent flow properties. The mean flow velocities, flow inclination and static pressure are measured using a calibrated three-hole yaw probe. The measurements of all the relevant Reynolds stress components in the wake are made using a tri-axial hot-wire probe and a digital data processing technique developed by the authors. The development of the three dimensional near-wake into a nearly two dimensional far-wake is discussed in the light of the experimental data. A complete set of wake data along with the data on the initial boundary layer in the trailing edge region of the airfoil are tabulated in an appendix to the report.

  18. Interactions in the far wake behind a pair of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Tanveer; Georgiev, Daniel; Vigil, Jesse; Vorobieff, Peter

    2002-11-01

    We present an experimental study of far wakes behind a pair of cylinders (diameter D) separated by a cross-flow axis-to-axis distance S in a quasi-two-dimensional gravity-driven soap-film flow. A secondary vortex street forms in the far wake of each cylinder. As we decrease S, we observe coupling between the structures in the far wake. Visualization of the far wake behind the cylinder pair reveals interactions between the secondary vortex streets, where the streets first synchronize out-of-phase and then change to in-phase synchronization as S/D decreases. This synchronization is achieved at higher S/D values than those observed for similar synchronization between the near-wake vortices.

  19. Dynamics of Sleep-Wake Transitions During Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung-Chuan, Lo; Nunes Amaral, Luis A.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Penzel, Thomas; Peter, Joerg-Hermann; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2002-03-01

    We study the dynamics of the awakening during the night for healthy subjects and find that the wake and the sleep periods exhibit completely different behavior: the durations of wake periods are characterized by a scale-free power-law distribution, while the durations of sleep periods have an exponential distribution with a characteristic time scale. We find that the characteristic time scale of sleep periods changes throughout the night. In contrast, there is no measurable variation in the power-law behavior for the durations of wake periods. We develop a stochastic model, which agrees with the data and suggests that the difference in the dynamics of sleep and wake states arises from the constraints on the number of microstates in the sleep-wake system.

  20. Dynamics of sleep-wake transitions during sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C.-C.; Nunes Amaral, L. A.; Havlin, S.; Ivanov, P. Ch.; Penzel, T.; Peter, J.-H.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-03-01

    We study the dynamics of the awakening during the night for healthy subjects and find that the wake and the sleep periods exhibit completely different behavior: the durations of wake periods are characterized by a scale-free power law distribution, while the durations of sleep periods have an exponential distribution with a characteristic time scale. We find that the characteristic time scale of sleep periods changes throughout the night. In contrast, there is no measurable variation in the power law behavior for the durations of wake periods. We develop a stochastic model which agrees with the data and suggests that the difference in the dynamics of sleep and wake states arises from the constraints on the number of microstates in the sleep-wake system.

  1. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Ferrari, Loris L.; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E.; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  2. What to do With Wake-Up Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Wake-up stroke, defined as the situation where a patient awakens with stroke symptoms that were not present prior to falling asleep, represents roughly 1 in 5 acute ischemic strokes and remains a therapeutic dilemma. Patients with wake-up stroke were excluded from most ischemic stroke treatment trials and are often not eligible for acute reperfusion therapy in clinical practice, leading to poor outcomes. Studies of neuroimaging with standard noncontrast computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and multimodal perfusion-based CT and MRI suggest wake-up stroke may occur shortly before awakening and may assist in selecting patients for acute reperfusion therapies. Pilot studies of wake-up stroke treatment based on these neuroimaging features are promising but have limited generalizability. Ongoing randomized treatment trials using neuroimaging-based patient selection may identify a subset of patients with wake-up stroke that can safely benefit from acute reperfusion therapies. PMID:26288674

  3. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P; Ferrari, Loris L; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  4. Fermionic suppression of dipolar relaxation.

    PubMed

    Burdick, Nathaniel Q; Baumann, Kristian; Tang, Yijun; Lu, Mingwu; Lev, Benjamin L

    2015-01-16

    We observe the suppression of inelastic dipolar scattering in ultracold Fermi gases of the highly magnetic atom dysprosium: the more energy that is released, the less frequently these exothermic reactions take place, and only quantum spin statistics can explain this counterintuitive effect. Inelastic dipolar scattering in nonzero magnetic fields leads to heating or to loss of the trapped population, both detrimental to experiments intended to study quantum many-body physics with strongly dipolar gases. Fermi statistics, however, is predicted to lead to a kinematic suppression of these harmful reactions. Indeed, we observe a 120-fold suppression of dipolar relaxation in fermionic versus bosonic Dy, as expected from theory describing universal inelastic dipolar scattering, though never before experimentally confirmed. Similarly, low inelastic cross sections are observed in spin mixtures, also with striking correspondence to predictions. The suppression of relaxation opens the possibility of employing fermionic dipolar species in studies of quantum many-body physics involving, e.g., synthetic gauge fields and pairing. PMID:25635544

  5. Effect of Relative Submergence on the Flow Structure in the Wake of Wall-Mounted Spherical Obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajimirzaie, Seyed; Tsakiris, Achilleas; Buchholz, James; Papanicolaou, Athanasios

    2012-11-01

    To understand the flow around submerged boulders in open channels, a study of a spherical obstacle on a rough bed in shallow open channel is conducted. In steep mountain streams, relative submergence (d/H, d being flow depth and H obstacle height) is introduced. In this study, through the use of PIV and thermal anemometry, the flow field surrounding a wall-mounted sphere with diameter D=5cm in two different relative submergences has been investigated on a smooth plate as a boundary layer (BL) as well as on a rough bed in shallow open channel flow. Flow patterns (velocity, vorticity) in the streamwise symmetry plane are different between the open channel and BL flow. Streamwise features are observed in the mean wakes of the sphere. In high relative submergence, an upwash (base structure) is observed in the wake of sphere in open channel flow but not in BL tests. The horseshoe vortex is not observed in the wake of the sphere in either case. Dye visualization, spectral analysis and cross-correlation show in d/H <=1, the wake in both cases has the appearance of a Karman vortex street, while in d/H > 1, the wakes are quite symmetric. A weak dominant shedding frequency is observed in BL experiments with a Strouhal number of St=fsD/U ~0.35. This work is supported by NSF grant number CBET-1033732.

  6. The sleep-wake cycle and motor activity, but not temperature, are disrupted over the light-dark cycle in mice genetically depleted of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Solarewicz, Julia Z; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role that serotonin has in the modulation of sleep and wakefulness across a 12-h:12-h light-dark cycle and determined whether temperature and motor activity are directly responsible for potential disruptions to arousal state. Telemetry transmitters were implanted in 24 wild-type mice (Tph2(+/+)) and 24 mice with a null mutation for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2(-/-)). After surgery, electroencephalography, core body temperature, and motor activity were recorded for 24 h. Temperature for a given arousal state (quiet and active wake, non-rapid eye movement, and paradoxical sleep) was similar in the Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice across the light-dark cycle. The percentage of time spent in active wakefulness, along with motor activity, was decreased in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice at the start and end of the dark cycle. This difference persisted into the light cycle. In contrast, the time spent in a given arousal state was similar at the remaining time points. Despite this similarity, periods of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and wakefulness were less consolidated in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice throughout the light-dark cycle. We conclude that the depletion of serotonin does not disrupt the diurnal variation in the sleep-wake cycle, motor activity, and temperature. However, serotonin may suppress photic and nonphotic inputs that manifest at light-dark transitions and serve to shorten the ultraradian duration of wakefulness and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Finally, alterations in the sleep-wake cycle following depletion of serotonin are unrelated to disruptions in the modulation of temperature. PMID:25394829

  7. Study of wake meandering by means of fixed point lidar measurements: Spectral analysis of line-of-sight wind component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabucchi, Davide; Steinfeld, Gerald; Bastine, David; Trujillo, Juan-José; Schneemann, Jörge; Kühn, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The validation of dynamic wake meandering models by full field measurements is an important but challenging task. Recently a new approach has been proposed, where a long range lidar was employed to analyse the power spectral density of the line of sight wind component measured across the wake trajectory. The method is promising, but the number of useful time series within a measurement campaign depends to a large extent on a favourable geometrical setup of the lidar position and the wind direction. In the first part of the paper the approach is further investigated. To this avail, lidar simulations based on large eddy simulation results are analysed. In the second part, the approach is applied to real measurement data from a campaign with a long range lidar windscanner in the offshore wind farm "alpha ventus". Eventually results about the wake dynamics are discussed.

  8. On the transient dynamics of the wake and trajectory of free falling cones with various apex angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ali M.; Jin, Yaqing; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The early free fall stages of cones with a density ratio 1.18 and apex angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° were studied using a wireless 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer to describe the cone 3D motions, while particle image velocimetry was used to capture the induced flow in the near wake. The Reynolds number based on the cones diameter and the velocity at which the cone reaches the first local velocity maximum is found to consistently set the limit between two distinctive states. Relatively rapid growth in the cone nutation and departure from the vertical axis is observed after this Re is reached. Sequences of vertical velocity, swirling strength, LES-decomposed velocity, and pressure fields show the formation and growth of a large and initially symmetric recirculation bubble at the cone base. Those also highlight the presence of a symmetric 3D vortex rollup dominating the near wake in the early stages of the fall. A shear layer develops at the edge of the wake and manifests in the periodic shedding of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices that, due to the nature of the recirculation bubble, reorganize to constitute a part of the rollup. Later in the fall, the wake loses symmetry and shows high population of vortical structures leading to turbulence. The asymmetric wake leads to strong interactions between the flow field and the cone evidenced by the shedding of a part of the 3D large-scale vortex rollup. This shedding process along with the cone rotation around its own axis provides a possible explanation of the helical wake structure observed in other studies.

  9. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Near-wake Flow Dynamics of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Tari, P.; Siddiqui, K.; Refan, M.; Hangan, H.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments conducted in a large wind tunnel set-up investigate the 3D flow dynamics within the near-wake region of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements quantify the mean and turbulent components of the flow field. Measurements are performed in multiple adjacent horizontal planes in order to cover the area behind the rotor in a large radial interval, at several locations downstream of the rotor. The measurements were phase-locked in order to facilitate the re-construction of the threedimensional flow field. The mean velocity and turbulence characteristics clearly correlate with the near-wake vortex dynamics and in particular with the helical structure of the flow, formed immediately behind the turbine rotor. Due to the tip and root vortices, the mean and turbulent characteristics of the flow are highly dependent on the azimuth angle in regions close to the rotor and close to the blade tip and root. Further from the rotor, the characteristics of the flow become phase independent. This can be attributed to the breakdown of the vortical structure of the flow, resulting from the turbulent diffusion. In general, the highest levels of turbulence are observed in shear layer around the tip of the blades, which decrease rapidly downstream. The shear zone grows in the radial direction as the wake moves axially, resulting in velocity recovery toward the centre of the rotor due to momentum transport.

  10. Effect of wake structure on blade-vortex interaction phenomena: Acoustic prediction and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Schultz, Klaus J.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Buchholz, Heino

    1995-01-01

    During the Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test, extensive measurements of the rotor aerodynamics, the far-field acoustics, the wake geometry, and the blade motion for powered, descent, flight conditions were made. These measurements have been used to validate and improve the prediction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The improvements made to the BVI modeling after the evaluation of the test data are discussed. The effects of these improvements on the acoustic-pressure predictions are shown. These improvements include restructuring the wake, modifying the core size, incorporating the measured blade motion into the calculations, and attempting to improve the dynamic blade response. A comparison of four different implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is presented. A common set of aerodynamic input has been used for this comparison.

  11. Slow-? Rhythms Coordinate Cingulate Cortical Responses to Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples during Wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Remondes, Miguel; Wilson, Matthew A

    2015-11-17

    Behavioral changes in response to reward require monitoring past behavior relative to present outcomes. This is thought to involve a fine coordination between the hippocampus (HIPP), which stores and replays memories of past events, and cortical regions such as cingulate cortex, responsible for behavioral planning. Sharp-wave ripple (SWR)-mediated memory replay in the HIPP of awake rodents contributes to learning, but cortical responses to hippocampal SWR during wakefulness are not known. We now show that in rats, during quiet-wakefulness, cingulate neurons exhibit significant responses to SWR, as well as increased modulation by the accompanying hippocampal local field potential slow-? oscillation, a rhythm associated with intra-hippocampal information processing. The magnitude of cingulate neurons' responses to SWR is significantly correlated with the degree of their modulation by HIPP slow-?. We hypothesize that during pauses cingulate neurons transiently access episodic information concerning previous choices, replayed by HIPP SWR, to evaluate past trajectories in light of their outcome. PMID:26549454

  12. Prediction of BVI noise patterns and correlation with wake interaction locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Martin, Ruth M.; Lorber, Peter F.; Egolf, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution fluctuating airloads data were acquired during a test of a contemporary design United Technologies model rotor in the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel (DNW). The airloads are used as input to the noise prediction program WOPWOP, in order to predict the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise field on a large plane below the rotor. Trends of predicted advancing and retreating side BVI noise levels and directionality as functions of flight condition are presented. The measured airloads have been analyzed to determine the BVI locations on the blade surface, and are used to interpret the predicted BVI noise radiation patterns. Predicted BVI locations are obtained using the free wake model in CAMRAD/JA, the UTRC Generalized Forward Flight Distorted Wake Model, and the UTRC FREEWAKE analysis. These predicted BVI locations are compared with those obtained from the measured pressure data.

  13. Rosetta - waking up and then some

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Altobelli, N.; Jansen, F.; Kueppers, M.; Schwehm, G.; Alexander, C.; Barthelemy, M.; Geiger, B.; Moissl, R.; Vallat, C.; Grieger, B.; Schmidt, A.

    2013-09-01

    The Rosetta Mission is the third cornerstone mission (after XMM and Cluster/SOHO) of the ESA programme Horizon 2000. The aim of the mission is to map the comet 67-P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by remote sensing, to examine its environment insitu and its evolution in the inner solar system. The lander Philae will be the first device to land on a comet and perform in-situ science on the surface. Launched in March 2004 and after a number of gravity assists and various asteroid fly -bys, the spacecraft entered deep space hibernation in June 2011. Nearly 10 years after launch on 20th January 2014 at 10:00 UTC the spacecraft will wake up for comet rendez-vous preparation. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the mission up to date and provide an insight into the exciting years we have ahead of us as Rosetta reaches and studies its target.

  14. Determination of rotor wake induced empennage airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangwani, S. T.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program has been developed that predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces that impinge on the empennage surface due to its interactions with the main rotor wake. The program was utilized to determine the vibration airloads acting on the Black Hawk horizontal stabilizer and on the CH-53A stabilizer under high speed forward flight conditions. The results demonstrate that it is possible to compute the high frequency empennage vibration airloads efficiently by utilizing suitable analysis techniques; a CH-53A case required only 1.3 minutes of computer time. Numerical problems associated with the unsteady Kutta condition have been minimized. Even though the analysis is of transient nature, the results for harmonic cases show a very fast convergence to periodicity. In general, good correlation was shown between the predicted vibratory airloads and the measured stabilizer airloads for a CH-53A helicopter operating at high speed flight conditions.

  15. Rotor Wake Development During the First Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.

    2003-01-01

    The wake behind a two-bladed model rotor in light climb was measured using particle image velocimetry, with particular emphasis on the development of the trailing vortex during the first revolution of the rotor. The distribution of vorticity was distinguished from the slightly elliptical swirl pattern. Peculiar dynamics within the void region may explain why the peak vorticity appeared to shift away from the center as the vortex aged, suggesting the onset of instability. The swirl and axial velocities (which reached 44 and 12 percent of the rotor-tip speed, respectively) were found to be asymmetric relative to the vortex center. In particular, the axial flow was composed of two concentrated zones moving in opposite directions. The radial distribution of the circulation rapidly increased in magnitude until reaching a point just beyond the core radius, after which the rate of growth decreased significantly. The core-radius circulation increased slightly with wake age, but the large-radius circulation appeared to remain relatively constant. The radial distributions of swirl velocity and vorticity exhibit self-similar behaviors, especially within the core. The diameter of the vortex core was initially about 10 percent of the rotor-blade chord, but more than doubled its size after one revolution of the rotor. According to vortex models that approximate the measured data, the core-radius circulation was about 79 percent of the large-radius circulation, and the large-radius circulation was about 67 percent of the maximum bound circulation on the rotor blade. On average, about 53 percent of the maximum bound circulation resides within the vortex core during the first revolution of the rotor.

  16. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1993-01-01

    Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

  17. First Results from ARTEMIS, a New Two-Spacecraft Lunar Mission: Counter-Streaming Plasma Populations in the Lunar Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Russell, C. T.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Larson, D.; Ergun, R. E.; Plaschke, F.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present observations from the first passage through the lunar plasma wake by one of two spacecraft comprising ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun), a new lunar mission that re-tasks two of five probes from the THEMIS magnetospheric mission. On Feb 13, 2010, ARTEMIS probe P1 passed through the wake at 3.5 lunar radii downstream from the Moon, in a region between those explored by Wind and the Lunar Prospector, Kaguya, Chandrayaan, and Chang'E missions. ARTEMIS observed interpenetrating proton, alpha particle, and electron populations refilling the wake along magnetic field lines from both flanks. The characteristics of these distributions match expectations from self-similar models of plasma expansion into vacuum, with an asymmetric character likely driven by a combination of a tilted interplanetary magnetic field and an anisotropic incident solar wind electron population. On this flyby, ARTEMIS provided unprecedented measurements of the interpenetrating beams of both electrons and ions naturally produced by the filtration and acceleration effects of electric fields set up during the refilling process. ARTEMIS also measured electrostatic oscillations closely correlated with counter-streaming electron beams in the wake, as previously hypothesized but never before directly measured. These observations demonstrate the capability of the comprehensively instrumented ARTEMIS spacecraft and the potential for new lunar science from this unique two spacecraft constellation.

  18. Ribbon Surface Pressure and Wake Velocity Data for the Experimental Validation of a Vortex-Based Parachute Inflation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MCBRIDE,DONALD DEAN; CLARK JR,EDWARD LEE; HENFLING,JOHN F.

    2001-06-01

    An experiment to measure surface pressure data on a series of three stainless steel simulated parachute ribbons was conducted. During the first phase of the test, unsteady pressure measurements were made on the windward and leeward sides of the ribbons to determine the statistical properties of the surface pressures. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were simultaneously made to establish the velocity field in the wake of the ribbons and its correlation with the pressure measurements. In the second phase of the test, steady-state pressure measurements were made to establish the pressure distributions. In the third phase, the stainless steel ribbons were replaced with nylon ribbons and PIV measurements were made in the wake. A detailed error analysis indicates that the accuracy of the pressure measurements was very good. However, an anomaly in the flow field caused the wake behind the stainless steel ribbons to establish itself in a stable manner on one side of the model. This same stability was not present for the nylon ribbon model although an average of the wake velocity data indicated an apparent 2{degree} upwash in the wind tunnel flow field. Since flow angularity upstream of the model was not measured, the use of the data for code validation is not recommended without a second experiment to establish that upstream boundary condition.

  19. First Results from ARTEMIS, A New Two-Spacecraft Lunar Mission: Counter-Streaming Plasma Populations in the Lunar Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Russell, C. T.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Larson, D.; Ergun, R. E.; Plaschke, F.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations from the first passage through the lunar plasma wake by one of two spacecraft comprising ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun), a new lunar mission that re-tasks two of five probes from the THEMIS magnetospheric mission. On Feb 13, 2010, ARTEMIS probe P1 passed through the wake at approximately 3.5 lunar radii downstream from the Moon, in a region between those explored by Wind and the Lunar Prospector, Kaguya, Chandrayaan, and Chang'E missions. ARTEMIS observed interpenetrating proton, alpha particle, and electron populations refilling the wake along magnetic field lines from both flanks. The characteristics of these distributions match expectations from self-similar models of plasma expansion into vacuum, with an asymmetric character likely driven by a combination of a tilted interplanetary magnetic field and an anisotropic incident solar wind electron population. On this flyby, ARTEMIS provided unprecedented measurements of the interpenetrating beams of both electrons and ions naturally produced by the filtration and acceleration effects of electric fields set up during the refilling process. ARTEMIS also measured electrostatic oscillations closely correlated with counter-streaming electron beams in the wake, as previously hypothesized but never before directly measured. These observations demonstrate the capability of the comprehensively instrumented ARTEMIS spacecraft and the potential for new lunar science from this unique two spacecraft constellation.

  20. Vortex wake alleviation studies with a variable twist wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, G. T.; Dunham, D. M.; Greene, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Vortex wake alleviation studies were conducted in a wind tunnel and a water towing tank using a multisegmented wing model which provided controlled and measured variations in span load. Fourteen model configurations are tested at a Reynolds number of one million and a lift coefficient of 0.6 in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel and the Hydronautics Ship Model Basin water tank at Hydronautics, Inc., Laurel, Md. Detailed measurements of span load and wake velocities at one semispan downstream correlate well with each other, with inviscid predictions of span load and wake roll up, and with peak trailing-wing rolling moments measured in the far wake. Average trailing-wing rolling moments are found to be an unreliable indicator of vortex wake intensity because vortex meander does not scale between test facilities and free-air conditions. A tapered-span-load configuration, which exhibits little or no drag penalty, is shown to offer significant downstream wake alleviation to a small trailing wing. The greater downstream wake alleviation achieved with the addition of spoilers to a flapped-wing configuration is shown to result directly from the high incremental drag and turbulence associated with the spoilers and not from the span load alteration they cause.

  1. Armodafinil in the treatment of sleep/wake disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jonathan RL; Roth, Thomas; Drake, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Excessive sleepiness (ES) is a major but underestimated public health concern associated with significant impairments in alertness/wakefulness and significant morbidity. The term ES has been used in the sleep medicine literature for years, but due to its nonspecific symptoms (ie tiredness or fatigue), it frequently goes unrecognized or is misdiagnosed in primary care. In some cases ES arises due to poor sleep habits or self-imposed sleep deprivation; however, ES is also a key component of a number of sleep/wake disorders and multiple medical and psychiatric disorders. Identification and treatment of ES is critical to improve the quality of life and well-being of patients and for the safety of the wider community. The inability of patients to recognize the nature, extent, and symptomatic profile of sleep/wake disorders requires vigilance on the part of healthcare professionals. Interventions to address ES and its associated impairments, treatment of the underlying sleep/wake disorder, and follow-up are a priority given the potential for serious consequences if left untreated. Wakefulness-promoting agents are available that treat ES associated with sleep/wake disorders. This review examines current approaches for managing this debilitating and potentially life-threatening condition, focusing on the place of armodafinil as a wakefulness-promoting agent. PMID:20856606

  2. Basal forebrain circuit for sleep-wake control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Chung, Shinjae; Zhang, Siyu; Zhong, Peng; Ma, Chenyan; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Weissbourd, Brandon; Sakai, Noriaki; Luo, Liqun; Nishino, Seiji; Dan, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian basal forebrain (BF) has important roles in controlling sleep and wakefulness, but the underlying neural circuit remains poorly understood. We examined the BF circuit by recording and optogenetically perturbing the activity of four genetically defined cell types across sleep-wake cycles and by comprehensively mapping their synaptic connections. Recordings from channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-tagged neurons revealed that three BF cell types, cholinergic, glutamatergic and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) GABAergic neurons, were more active during wakefulness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (wake/REM active) than during non-REM (NREM) sleep, and activation of each cell type rapidly induced wakefulness. By contrast, activation of somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons promoted NREM sleep, although only some of them were NREM active. Synaptically, the wake-promoting neurons were organized hierarchically by glutamatergic?cholinergic?PV+ neuron excitatory connections, and they all received inhibition from SOM+ neurons. Together, these findings reveal the basic organization of the BF circuit for sleep-wake control. PMID:26457552

  3. Neuroligin-1 links neuronal activity to sleep-wake regulation

    PubMed Central

    El Helou, Janine; Bélanger-Nelson, Erika; Freyburger, Marlène; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Curie, Thomas; La Spada, Francesco; Gaudreault, Pierre-Olivier; Beaumont, Éric; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Frank, Marcos G.; Franken, Paul; Mongrain, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining wakefulness is associated with a progressive increase in the need for sleep. This phenomenon has been linked to changes in synaptic function. The synaptic adhesion molecule Neuroligin-1 (NLG1) controls the activity and synaptic localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, which activity is impaired by prolonged wakefulness. We here highlight that this pathway may underlie both the adverse effects of sleep loss on cognition and the subsequent changes in cortical synchrony. We found that the expression of specific Nlg1 transcript variants is changed by sleep deprivation in three mouse strains. These observations were associated with strain-specific changes in synaptic NLG1 protein content. Importantly, we showed that Nlg1 knockout mice are not able to sustain wakefulness and spend more time in nonrapid eye movement sleep than wild-type mice. These changes occurred with modifications in waking quality as exemplified by low theta/alpha activity during wakefulness and poor preference for social novelty, as well as altered delta synchrony during sleep. Finally, we identified a transcriptional pathway that could underlie the sleep/wake-dependent changes in Nlg1 expression and that involves clock transcription factors. We thus suggest that NLG1 is an element that contributes to the coupling of neuronal activity to sleep/wake regulation. PMID:23716671

  4. Measurements of Unsteady Wake Interference Between Tandem Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Neuhart, Dan H.; McGinley, Cahterine B.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-phase, experimental study in the Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center has provided new insight into the unsteady flow interaction around cylinders in tandem arrangement. Phase 1 of the study characterized the mean and unsteady near-field flow around two cylinders of equal diameter using 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and hot-wire anemometry. These measurements were performed at a Reynolds number of 1.66 x 10(exp 5), based on cylinder diameter, and spacing-to-diameter ratios, L/D, of 1.435 and 3.7. The current phase, Phase 2, augments this dataset by characterizing the surface flow on the same configurations using steady and unsteady pressure measurements and surface flow visualization. Transition strips were applied to the front cylinder during both phases to produce a turbulent boundary layer upstream of the flow separation. For these flow conditions and L/D ratios, surface pressures on both the front and rear cylinders show the effects of L/D on flow symmetry, pressure recovery, and the location of flow separation and attachment. Mean streamlines and instantaneous vorticity obtained from the PIV data are used to explain the flow structure in the gap and near-wake regions and its relationship to the unsteady surface pressures. The combination of off-body and surface measurements provides a comprehensive dataset to develop and validate computational techniques for predicting the unsteady flow field at higher Reynolds numbers.

  5. Inviscid Interactions Between Wake Vortices and Shear Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft trailing vortices can be influenced significantly by atmospheric conditions such as crosswind, turbulence, and stratification. According to the NASA 1994 and 1995 field measurement program in Memphis, Tennessee, the descending aircraft wake vortices could stall or be deflected at the top of low-level temperature inversions that usually produce pronounced shear zones. Numerical simulations of vortex/shear interactions with ground effects have been performed by several groups. Burnham used a series of evenly spaced line vortices at a particular altitude to model the ground shear layer of the cross- wind. He found that the wind shear was swept up around the downwind vortex and caused the downwind vortex to move upward, and claimed that the effect was actually produced by the vertical gradient in the wind shear rather than by the wind shear directly, because uniformly distributed wind-shear vortices would have no effect on the trailing vortex vertical motion. Recently, Proctor et al. numerically tested the effects of narrow shear zones on the behavior of the vortex pair, motivated by the observation of the Memphis field data. The shear-layer sensitivity tests indicated that the downwind vortex was more sensitive and deflected to a higher altitude than its upwind counterpart. The downstream vortex contained vorticity of opposite sign to that of the shear. There was no detectable preference for the downwind vortex (or upwind vortex) to weaken (or strengthen) at a greater rate.

  6. Effect of surface tension on global modes of confined wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammisola, Outi; Lundell, Fredrik; Söderberg, L. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Many wake flows are susceptible to self-sustained oscillations, such as the well-known von Kármán vortex street behind a cylinder that makes a rope beat against a flagpole at a distinct frequency on a windy day. One appropriate method to study these global instabilities numerically is to look at the growth rates of the linear temporal global modes. If all growth rates for all modes are negative for a certain flow field then a self-sustained oscillation should not occur. On the other hand, if one growth rate for one mode is slightly positive, the oscillation will approximately obtain the frequency and shape of this global mode. In our study, we first introduce surface tension between two fluids to the wake-flow problem. Then we investigate its effects on the global linear instability of a spatially developing wake with two co-flowing immiscible fluids. The inlet profile consists of two uniform layers, which makes the problem easily parametrizable. The fluids are assumed to have the same density and viscosity, with the result that the interface position becomes dynamically important solely through the action of surface tension. Two wakes with different parameter values and surface tension are studied in detail. The results show that surface tension has a strong influence on the oscillation frequency, growth rate, and shape of the global mode(s). Finally, we make an attempt to confirm and explain the surface-tension effect based on a local stability analysis of the same flow field in the streamwise position of maximum reverse flow.

  7. Effects of Sleep and Wake on Oligodendrocytes and Their Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Bellesi, Michele; Pfister-Genskow, Martha; Maret, Stephanie; Keles, Sunduz; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of differential gene expression in sleep and wake pooled transcripts from all brain cells and showed that several genes expressed at higher levels during sleep are involved in the synthesis/maintenance of membranes in general and of myelin in particular, a surprising finding given the reported slow turnover of many myelin components. Other studies showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are responsible for the formation of new myelin in both the injured and the normal adult brain, and that glutamate released from neurons, via neuron–OPC synapses, can inhibit OPC proliferation and affect their differentiation into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes. Because glutamatergic transmission is higher in wake than in sleep, we asked whether sleep and wake can affect oligodendrocytes and OPCs. Using the translating ribosome affinity purification technology combined with microarray analysis in mice, we obtained a genome-wide profiling of oligodendrocytes after sleep, spontaneous wake, and forced wake (acute sleep deprivation). We found that hundreds of transcripts being translated in oligodendrocytes are differentially expressed in sleep and wake: genes involved in phospholipid synthesis and myelination or promoting OPC proliferation are transcribed preferentially during sleep, while genes implicated in apoptosis, cellular stress response, and OPC differentiation are enriched in wake. We then confirmed through BrdU and other experiments that OPC proliferation doubles during sleep and positively correlates with time spent in REM sleep, whereas OPC differentiation is higher during wake. Thus, OPC proliferation and differentiation are not perfectly matched at any given circadian time but preferentially occur during sleep and wake, respectively. PMID:24005282

  8. Dynamic wake distortion model for helicopter maneuvering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinggen

    A new rotor dynamic wake distortion model, which can be used to account for the rotor transient wake distortion effect on inflow across the rotor disk during helicopter maneuvering and transitional flight in both hover and forward flight conditions, is developed. The dynamic growths of the induced inflow perturbation across rotor disk during different transient maneuvers, such as a step pitch or roll rate, a step climb rate and a step change of advance ratio are investigated by using a dynamic vortex tube analysis. Based on the vortex tube results, a rotor dynamic wake distortion model, which is expressed in terms of a set of ordinary differential equations, with rotor longitudinal and lateral wake curvatures, wake skew and wake spacing as states, is developed. Also, both the Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model and the Peters-He finite state inflow model for axial or forward flight are augmented to account for rotor dynamic wake distortion effect during helicopter maneuvering flight. To model the aerodynamic interaction among main rotor, tail rotor and empennage caused by rotor wake curvature effect during helicopter maneuvering flight, a reduced order model based on a vortex tube analysis is developed. Both the augmented Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model and the augmented Peters-He finite state inflow model, combined with the developed dynamic wake distortion model, together with the interaction model are implemented in a generic helicopter simulation program of UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and the simulated vehicle control responses in both time domain and frequency domain are compared with flight test data of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in both hover and low speed forward flight conditions.

  9. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  10. Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples in waking and sleeping states.

    PubMed

    Roumis, Demetris K; Frank, Loren M

    2015-12-01

    Waking and sleeping states are privileged periods for distinct mnemonic processes. In waking behavior, rapid retrieval of previous experience aids memory-guided decision making. In sleep, a gradual series of reactivated associations supports consolidation of episodes into memory networks. Synchronized bursts of hippocampal place cells during events called sharp-wave ripples communicate associated neural patterns across distributed circuits in both waking and sleeping states. Differences between sleep and awake sharp-wave ripples, and in particular the accuracy of recapitulated experience, highlight their state-dependent roles in memory processes. PMID:26011627

  11. Numerical modeling studies of wake vortex transport and evolution within the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed research involves four tasks. The first of these is to simulate accurately the turbulent processes in the atmospheric boundary layer. TASS was originally developed to study meso-gamma scale phenomena, such as tornadic storms, microbursts and windshear effects in terminal areas. Simulation of wake vortex evolution, however, will rely on appropriate representation of the physical processes in the surface layer and mixed layer. This involves two parts. First, a specified heat flux boundary condition must be implemented at the surface. Using this boundary condition, simulation results will be compared to experimental data and to other model results for validation. At this point, any necessary changes to the model will be implemented. Next, a surface energy budget parameterization will be added to the model. This will enable calculation of the surface fluxes by accounting for the radiative heat transfer to and from the ground and heat loss to the soil rather than simple specification of the fluxes. The second task involves running TASS with prescribed wake vortices in the initial condition. The vortex models will be supplied by NASA Langley Research Center. Sensitivity tests will be performed on different meteorological environments in the atmospheric boundary layer, which include stable, neutral, and unstable stratifications, calm and severe wind conditions, and dry and wet conditions. Vortex strength may be varied as well. Relevant non-dimensional parameters will include the following: Richardson number or Froude number, Bowen ratio, and height to length scale ratios. The model output will be analyzed and visualized to better understand the transport, decay, and growth rates of the wake vortices. The third task involves running simulations using observed data. MIT Lincoln Labs is currently planning field experiments at the Memphis airport to measure both meteorological conditions and wake vortex characteristics. Once this data becomes available, it can be used to validate the model for vortex behavior under different atmospheric conditions. The fourth task will be to simulate the wake in a more realistic environment covering a wider area. This will involve grid nesting, since high resolution will be required in the wake region but a larger total domain will be used. During the first allocation year, most of the first task will be accomplished.

  12. Direct observations of a mini-magnetosphere in the lunar plasma wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yonghui; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-04-01

    In this report, we present direct observations of a mini-magnetosphere when ARTEMIS P2 is passing through the lunar wake, where the lunar surface and crustal fields are shielded from the solar wind flows. We find the magnetic field amplification simultaneously with the dropout of plasma density and particle energy fluxes when the orbit of P2 is just over the margin of Imbrium antipode anomaly which is centered at 162o E, 33o S. The observational interval of these characteristic features is merely 95 seconds (from 1413:15 UT to 1414:50 UT on December 9th 2012) and the orbit altitude of P2 is ~226 km. The strength of magnetic field at P2 orbit altitude (~226 km) can reach ~9 nT over the anomaly region compared to the relatively small value of ~6 nT in the neighboring regions. In addition to these, we also detect the moderate ion and electron temperature increase inside the mini-magnetosphere as well as the rotation in the magnetic field direction near the boundary of mini-magnetosphere. These field and plasma parameters demonstrate that the vertical size of the mini-magnetosphere near lunar surface can at least extend to ~230 km in the near-vacuum lunar wake without the interaction with the solar wind. We also try to explain the detailed plasma dynamics performed within this mini-magnetosphere by dipole model or non-dipolar model. This study may open up a new view of studying lunar mini-magnetosphere by spacecraft observations in the lunar wake where magnetic anomaly fields are almost undisturbed.

  13. Wake models are used to improve predictions of Annual Energy Production (AEP) of wind farms.

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    up to 20-30%. ·Experimental data is required to improve wake models, thereby reducing risks and costs of wind project development. I. Motivation Wind Turbine Performance and Aerodynamics in Wakes Within Wind. The measurements show losses up to 45% due to wakes. IVa. The velocity distribution in the wake is azimuthally

  14. Circadian Sleep-Wake Rhythm of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with ID to that of older adults in the general…

  15. Suppression of Beam-Ion Instability in Electron Rings with Multi-Bunch Train Beam Fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Fukuma, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-08-18

    The ion-caused beam instability in the future light sources and electron damping rings can be serious due to the high beam current and ultra-small emittance of picometer level. One simple and effective mitigation of the instability is a multi-bunch train beam filling pattern which can significantly reduce the ion density near the beam, and therefore reduce the instability growth rate up to two orders of magnitude. The suppression is more effective for high intensity beams with low emittance. The distribution and the field of trapped ions are benchmarked to validate the model used in the paper. The wake field of ion-cloud and the beam-ion instability is investigated both analytically and numerically. We derived a simple formula for the build-up of ion-cloud and instability growth rate with the multi-bunch-train filling pattern. The ion instabilities in ILC damping ring, SuperKEKB and SPEAR3 are used to compare with our analyses. The analyses in this paper agree well with simulations.

  16. Wind Turbine Wake-Redirection Control at the Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M.; Fleming, P.; Bulder, B.; White, S.

    2015-05-06

    In this paper, we will present our work towards designing a control strategy to mitigate wind turbine wake effects by redirecting the wakes, specifically applied to the Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW), proposed for deployment off the shore of Atlantic City, New Jersey. As wind turbines extract energy from the air, they create low-speed wakes that extend behind them. Full wake recovery Full wake recovery to the undisturbed wind speed takes a significant distance. In a wind energy plant the wakes of upstream turbines may travel downstream to the next row of turbines, effectively subjecting them to lower wind speeds, meaning these waked turbines will produce less power.

  17. Characterization of High-Frequency Excitation of a Wake by Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Alan B.; Rogers, Michael M.; Kibens, Valdis; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Insights into the effects of high-frequency forcing on free shear layer evolution are gained through analysis of several direct numerical simulations. High-frequency forcing of a fully turbulent plane wake results in only a weak transient effect. On the other hand, significant changes in the developed turbulent state may result when high-frequency forcing is applied to a transitional wake. The impacts of varying the characteristics of the high-frequency forcing are examined, particularly, the streamwise wavenumber band in which forcing is applied and the initial amplitude of the forcing. The high-frequency excitation is found to increase the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, to reduce the turbulent kinetic energy production rate, and to reduce the turbulent kinetic energy suppression increases with forcing amplitude once a threshold level has been reached. For a given initial forcing energy, the largest reduction in turbulent kinetic energy density was achieved by forcing wavenumbers that are about two to three times the neutral wavenumber determined from linear stability theory.

  18. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnipper, Teis; Andersen, Anders; Bohr, Tomas

    2008-11-01

    We present an experimental study of an oscillating, symmetric foil in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we explore and visualize a variety of wake structures, including von Kármán wake, reverse von Kármán wake, 2P wake, and 2P+2S wake. We characterize the transition from the von Kármán wake (drag) to the reverse von Kármán wake (thrust) and discuss the results in relation to fish swimming. We visualize the time evolution of the vortex shedding in detail, identify the origins of the vortices comprising the wake, and propose a simple model to account for the transition from von Kármán like wakes to more exotic wake structures.

  19. Bulletins of Wake Forest University (USPS 078-320) are mailed in August, September, October, November and December by the Office of Communications and External Relations, Wake Forest University, PO Box 7205 (1834 Wake Forest Rd.), Winston-Salem, NC

    E-print Network

    Cook, Greg

    Bulletins of Wake Forest University (USPS 078-320) are mailed in August, September, October, November and December by the Office of Communications and External Relations, Wake Forest University, PO Box 7205 (1834 Wake Forest Rd.), Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7205. Periodicals postage paid at Winston

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wake Dynamics in the Stable Boundary Layer Using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Kosovic, B.; Mirocha, J. D.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    To thoroughly verify the actuator disk model recently implemented in WRF for large eddy simulation (LES) of wind turbine wakes, simulations of various types of turbines and atmospheric conditions must be compared to full-scale field measurements of the real atmosphere. Here, numerical simulations are compared to nacelle-based scanning lidar measurements taken in stable atmospheric conditions during a field campaign conducted at a wind farm in the western United States. Using several wake characteristics—such as the velocity deficit, centerline location, and wake width—as metrics for model verification, the simulations show good agreement with the observations. Notably, the average velocity deficit was seen to be quite high in both the experiment and simulation, resulting from a low average wind speed and therefore high average turbine thrust coefficient. Moreover, new features—namely rotor tilt and drag from the nacelle and tower—were added to the existing actuator disk model in WRF-LES. Compared to the rotor, the effect of the tower and nacelle on the flow is relatively small but nevertheless important for an accurate representation of the entire turbine. Adding rotor tilt to the model causes the vertical location of the wake center to shift upward. Continued advancement of the actuator disk model in WRF-LES will help lead to optimized turbine siting and controls at wind farms.

  1. Some wake-related operational limitations of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyson, H. H.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements show that the wake of a rotor, except at near hovering speeds, is not like that of a propeller. The wake is more like that of a wing except that, because of the slow speeds, the wake velocities may be much greater. The helicopter can produce a wake hazard to following light aircraft that is disproportionately great compared to an equivalent fixed wing aircraft. This hazard should be recognized by both pilots and airport controllers when operating in congested areas. Ground effect is generally counted as a blessing since it allows overloaded takeoffs; however, it also introduces additional operation problems. These problems include premature blade stall in hover, settling in forward transition, shuddering in approach to touchdown and complicatons with yaw control. Some of these problems were treated analytically in an approximate manner and reasonable experiment agreement was obtained. An awareness of these effects can prepare the user for their appearance and their consequences.

  2. Free-wake analysis of a rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. S.; Velkoff, H. R.; Tung, C.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical method based on the axisymmetric, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is combined with a lifting surface code to predict the vortex wake of hovering rotors. The lifting surface code, AMI Hover, is used to obtain the circulation distribution on the blade. This circulation distribution is fed into the Navier-Stokes code to compute the vortex wake under this specified circulation distribution. An iteration approach is used between these two codes to converge the circulation distribution and the shape of the vortex wake. A relaxation scheme is developed to resolve the instability encountered among the tip vortices. A reconcentration scheme is used to solve the diffusion problem due to the strong artificial viscosity. The results from the present method are compared with experimental data obtained by smoke-flow visualization and hot-wire measurements for several rotor blade configurations. The comparisons show that the present method is able to predict the complex wake system shed by a hovering rotor.

  3. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  4. Proceedings of the ARO Rotorcraft Wake Prediction Basic Research Workshop

    E-print Network

    In Hovering Rotor Tip Vortex Dynamics 3 H.Tadghighi Boeing Current Assessments Of Boeing-Mesa CFD Tools For Applications To Rotor Performance /Wake Computation In Hover Flight 4 R.Narducci Boeing Comparison Of Blade Tip

  5. The Wake of a Single Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) pose various advantages over traditional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs), including their smaller size and footprint, quiet operation, and ability to produce power under a greater variety of wind directions and wind speeds. To determine the optimal spacing of an array of VAWTs for maximum power output, an understanding of the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT is needed. This study is among the first attempts to experimentally visualize the wake of a VAWT using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). A scale VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel and a motor rotates the scale model at a constant rotational speed. Wake data at several Reynolds numbers and tip speed ratios indicate that vortices are shed by each blade of the spinning VAWT, demonstrating significant differences between the wake of a VAWT and a spinning cylinder.

  6. Passive wake detection using seal whisker-inspired sensing

    E-print Network

    Beem, Heather Rachel

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is motivated by a series of biological experiments that display the harbor seal's extraordinary ability to track the wake of an object several seconds after it has swum by. They do so despite having auditory ...

  7. Bulletin of Wake Forest University The Graduate School

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    or actual sexual orientation. In affirming its commitment to this principle, Wake Forest does not limit-student orientation/registration August 10-14 Monday-Friday Orientation for Scientific Integrity and Professionalism

  8. Plume and wake dynamics, mixing, and chemistry behind an HSCT aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical evolution and mixing and vortical motion of a High Speed Civil Transport's engine exhausts must be analyzed in order to track the gas and its speciation as emissions are mixed to atmospheric scales. Attention is presently given to an analytic model of the wake dynamical processes which accounts for the roll-up of the trailing vorticity, its breakup due to the Crow instability, and the subsequent evolution and motion of the reconnected vorticity. The concentrated vorticity is noted to wrap up the buoyant exhaust and suppress its continued mixing and dilution. The species tracked encompass those which could be heterogeneously reactive on the surfaces of the condensed ice particles, and those capable of reacting with exhaust soot particle surfaces to form active contrail and/or cloud condensation nuclei.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Methods for Wake Flow Analysis in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Piccioni, Emanuele; Terzi, Ludovico

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and interpretation of the quality of wind farms power output is a non-trivial task, which poses at least three main challenges: reliable comprehension of free wind flow, which is stretched to the limit on very complex terrains, realistic model of how wake interactions resemble on the wind flow, awareness of the consequences on turbine control systems, including alignment patterns to the wind and, consequently, power output. The present work deals with an onshore wind farm in southern Italy, which has been a test case of IEA- Task 31 Wakebench project: 17 turbines, with 2.3 MW of rated power each, are sited on a very complex terrain. A cluster of machines is investigated through numerical and experimental methods: CFD is employed for simulating wind fields and power extraction, as well as wakes, are estimated through the Actuator Disc model. SCADA data mining techniques are employed for comparison between models and actual performances. The simulations are performed both on the real terrain and on flat terrain, in order to disentangle the effects of complex flow and wake effects. Attention is devoted to comparison between actual alignment patterns of the cluster of turbines and predicted flow deviation.

  10. The structure of the wake generated by a submarine model in yaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, A.; Van Buren, T.; Smits, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a submarine model in yaw was investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at The model (DARPA SUBOFF idealized submarine geometry) is mounted in a low-speed wind tunnel using a support that mimics the sail, and it is yawed so that the body moves in the plane normal to the support. The measurements reveal the formation of a pair of streamwise vortices that are asymmetric in strength. The weaker vortex quickly diffuses, and in the absence of further diffusion, the stronger vortex maintains its strength even at the furthest downstream location. It is suggested that the flow fields obtained here using a semi-infinite sail as a support will be similar to those obtained using a finite length sail since its tip vortex would not interact significantly with the body vortices present in the wake, at least for a considerable distance downstream of the stern Hence, a submarine in yaw is expected to generate wakes which are inherently more persistent than one in pitch, and the strong asymmetries in yaw are expected to produce a net rolling moment on the body.

  11. Characterization of turbulent wake of wind turbine by coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Li, Rongzhong; Wang, Xitao; Feng, Changzhong; Zhuang, Quanfeng; Zhang, Kailin

    2014-11-01

    The indispensable access to real turbulent wake behavior is provided by the pulsed coherent Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) which operates by transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. The Doppler shift in the frequency of the backscattered signal is analyzed to obtain the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity component of the air motion. From the LOS velocities the characteristic of the turbulent wake can be deduced. The Coherent Doppler LIDAR (CDL) is based on all-fiber laser technology and fast digital-signal-processing technology. The 1.5 µm eye-safe Doppler LIDAR system has a pulse length of 200ns and a pulse repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The speed measurement range is ±50m/s and the speed measurement uncertainty is 0.3 m/s. The 2-axis beam scanner and detection range of 3000m enable the system to monitor the whole wind farming filed. Because of the all-fiber structure adoption, the system is stable, reliable and high-integrated. The wake vortices of wind turbine blades with different spatial and temporal scales have been observed by LIDAR. In this paper, the authors discuss the possibility of using LIDAR measurements to characterize the complicated wind field, specifically wind velocity deficit and terrain effects.

  12. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  13. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Sensors for Application in a Wake Vortex Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rutishauser, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric boundary layer has advanced in recent years with the development of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radar, sodar, and lidar wind profiling technology. Radio acoustic sounding systems for vertical temperature profiles of high temporal scales (when compared to routine balloon soundings- (radiosondes) have also become increasingly available as COTS capabilities. Aircraft observations during landing and departures are another source of available boundary layer data. This report provides an updated assessment of available sensors, their performance specifications and rough order of magnitude costs for a potential future aircraft Wake Vortex Avoidance System (WakeVAS). Future capabilities are also discussed. Vertical profiles of wind, temperature, and turbulence are anticipated to be needed at airports in any dynamic wake avoidance system. Temporal and spatial resolution are dependent on the selection of approach and departure corridors to be protected. Recommendations are made for potential configurations of near-term sensor technologies and for testing some of the sensor systems in order to validate performance in field environments with adequate groundtruth.

  14. The Plasma Wake Downstream of Lunar Topographic Obstacles: Preliminary Results from 2D Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.; Farrell, W. M.; Snubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Anticipating the plasma and electrical environments in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) of the moon is critical in understanding local processes of space weathering, surface charging, surface chemistry, volatile production and trapping, exo-ion sputtering, and charged dust transport. In the present study, we have employed the open-source XOOPIC code [I] to investigate the effects of solar wind conditions and plasma-surface interactions on the electrical environment in PSRs through fully two-dimensional pattic1e-in-cell simulations. By direct analogy with current understanding of the global lunar wake (e.g., references) deep, near-terminator, shadowed craters are expected to produce plasma "mini-wakes" just leeward of the crater wall. The present results (e.g., Figure I) are in agreement with previous claims that hot electrons rush into the crater void ahead of the heavier ions, fanning a negative cloud of charge. Charge separation along the initial plasma-vacuum interface gives rise to an ambipolar electric field that subsequently accelerates ions into the void. However, the situation is complicated by the presence of the dynamic lunar surface, which develops an electric potential in response to local plasma currents (e.g., Figure Ia). In some regimes, wake structure is clearly affected by the presence of the charged crater floor as it seeks to achieve current balance (i.e. zero net current to the surface).

  15. Exquisitely sensitive seal whisker-like sensors detect wakes at large distances

    E-print Network

    Beem, Heather R

    2015-01-01

    Blindfolded harbor seals are able to use their uniquely shaped whiskers to track vortex wakes left by moving animals and objects that passed by up to 30 seconds earlier; this is an impressive feat as the flow features they detect may have velocity as low as 1 mm/s, and the seals have some capacity to identify the shape of the object as well. They do so while swimming forward at high speed, hence their whiskers are sensitive enough to detect small-scale changes in the external flow field, while rejecting self-generated flow noise. Here we identify and illustrate a novel flow mechanism that allows artificial whiskers with the identical unique geometry as those of the harbor seal to detect the features of minute flow fluctuations in wakes produced by objects far away. This is shown through the study of a model problem, consisting of a harbor seal whisker model interacting with the wake of an upstream circular cylinder. We show that whereas in open water the whisker geometry results in very low vibration, once it...

  16. Flight Data Reduction of Wake Velocity Measurements Using an Instrumented OV-10 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Stuever, Robert A.; Stewart, Eric C.; Rivers, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A series of flight tests to measure the wake of a Lockheed C- 130 airplane and the accompanying atmospheric state have been conducted. A specially instrumented North American Rockwell OV-10 airplane was used to measure the wake and atmospheric conditions. An integrated database has been compiled for wake characterization and validation of wake vortex computational models. This paper describes the wake- measurement flight-data reduction process.

  17. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input file, with preferred parameters values, is given in Appendix A. An example of the plot generated at a normal completion of the inversion is shown in Appendix B.

  18. Turbulent large-scale structure effects on wake meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Y.-A.; Masson, C.; Aubrun, S.

    2015-06-01

    This work studies effects of large-scale turbulent structures on wake meandering using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) over an actuator disk. Other potential source of wake meandering such as the instablility mechanisms associated with tip vortices are not treated in this study. A crucial element of the efficient, pragmatic and successful simulations of large-scale turbulent structures in Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is the generation of the stochastic turbulent atmospheric flow. This is an essential capability since one source of wake meandering is these large - larger than the turbine diameter - turbulent structures. The unsteady wind turbine wake in ABL is simulated using a combination of LES and actuator disk approaches. In order to dedicate the large majority of the available computing power in the wake, the ABL ground region of the flow is not part of the computational domain. Instead, mixed Dirichlet/Neumann boundary conditions are applied at all the computational surfaces except at the outlet. Prescribed values for Dirichlet contribution of these boundary conditions are provided by a stochastic turbulent wind generator. This allows to simulate large-scale turbulent structures - larger than the computational domain - leading to an efficient simulation technique of wake meandering. Since the stochastic wind generator includes shear, the turbulence production is included in the analysis without the necessity of resolving the flow near the ground. The classical Smagorinsky sub-grid model is used. The resulting numerical methodology has been implemented in OpenFOAM. Comparisons with experimental measurements in porous-disk wakes have been undertaken, and the agreements are good. While temporal resolution in experimental measurements is high, the spatial resolution is often too low. LES numerical results provide a more complete spatial description of the flow. They tend to demonstrate that inflow low frequency content - or large- scale turbulent structures - is an important parameter when simulating wake meandering and plays a significant role.

  19. The Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University

    Cancer.gov

    The Wake Forest University (WFU) School of Medicine was founded in 1902 and North Carolina Baptist Hospital opened in 1923. It has grown into a large academic medical center with 900 faculty members, more than 100 buildings on 290 acres, and 900 licensed beds. The Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University (CCCWFU) started in the early 1960’s and became an NCI-designated cancer center in 1972 and a comprehensive center in 1990.

  20. Use of Plasma Actuators as a Moving-Wake Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.; Klapetzky Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The work documented in this report tests the concept of using plasma actuators as a simple and easy way to generate a simulated moving-wake and the disturbances associated with it in turbines. This wake is caused by the blades of the upstream stages of the turbine. Two types of devices, one constructed of arrays of NACA 0018 airfoils, and the one constructed of flat plates were studied. The airfoils or plates were equipped with surface mounted dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators, which were used to generate flow disturbances resembling moving-wakes. CTA hot-wire anemometry and flow visualization using a smoke-wire were used to investigate the wake independence at various spacings and downstream locations. The flat plates were found to produce better results than the airfoils in creating large velocity fluctuations in the free-stream flow. Different dielectric materials, plasma actuator locations, leading edge contours, angles of attack and plate spacings were investigated, some with positive results. The magnitudes of the velocity fluctuations were found to be comparable to existing mechanical moving-wake generators, thus proving the feasibility of using plasma actuators as a moving-wake generator.

  1. A quantitative comparison of bird and bat wakes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L Christoffer; Wolf, Marta; Hedenström, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative comparison of bird and bat wakes has demonstrated significant differences in the structure of the far wake. Birds have been found to have a unified vortex wake of the two wings, while bats have a more complex wake with gradients in the circulation along the wingspan, and with each wing generating its own vortex structure. Here, we compare quantitative measures of the circulation in the far wake of three bird and one bat species. We find that bats have a significantly stronger normalized circulation of the start vortex than birds. We also find differences in how the circulation develops during the wingbeat as demonstrated by the ratio of the circulation of the dominant start vortex and the total circulation of the same sense. Birds show a more prominent change with changing flight speed and a relatively weaker start vortex at minimum power speed than bats. We also find that bats have a higher normalized wake loading based on the start vortex, indicating higher relative induced drag and therefore less efficient lift generation than birds. Our results thus indicate fundamental differences in the aerodynamics of bird and bat flight that will further our understanding of the evolution of vertebrate flight. PMID:19324669

  2. Turbulence characteristics in a supersonic cascade wake flow

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, P.L.; Ng, W.F. )

    1994-10-01

    The turbulent character of the supersonic wake of a linear cascade of fan airfoils has been studied using a two-component laser-doppler anemometer. The cascade was tested in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University intermittent wind tunnel facility, where the Mach and Reynolds numbers were 2.36 and 4.8 [times] 10[sup 6], respectively. In addition to mean flow measurements, Reynolds normal and shear stresses were measured as functions of cascade incidence angle and streamwise locations spanning the near-wake and the far-wake. The extremities of profiles of both the mean and turbulent wake properties were found to be strongly influenced by upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions, the strength of which varied with cascade incidence. In contrast, the peak levels of turbulence properties within the shear layer were found to be largely independent of incidence, and could be characterized in terms of the streamwise position only. The velocity defect turbulence level was found to be 23%, and the generally accepted value of the turbulence structural coefficient of 0.30 was found to be valid for this flow. The degree of similarity of the mean flow wake profiles was established, and those profiles demonstrating the most similarity were found to approach a state of equilibrium between the mean and turbulent properties. In general, this wake flow may be described as a classical free shear flow, upon which the influence of upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions has been superimposed.

  3. Simulation of wake vortex radiometric detection via jet exhaust proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  4. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  5. Approaches to Measuring the Effects of Wake-Promoting Drugs: A Focus on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Christopher J.; Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Wesnes, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In clinical drug development, wakefulness and wake-promotion maybe assessed by a large number of scales and questionnaires. Objective assessment of wakefulness is most commonly made using sleep latency/maintenance of wakefulness tests, polysomnography and/or behavioral measures. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the degree of overlap in the assessment of wakefulness and cognition, with consideration of assessment techniques and the underlying neurobiology of both concepts. Design Reviews of four key areas were conducted: commonly used techniques in the assessment of wakefulness; neurobiology of sleep/wake and cognition; targets of wake promoting and/or cognition enhancing drugs; and ongoing clinical trials investigating wake promoting effects. Results There is clear overlap between the assessment of wakefulness and cognition. There are common techniques which may be used to assess both concepts; aspects of the neurobiology of both concepts may be closely related; and wake promoting drugs may have nootropic properties (and vice-versa). Clinical trials of wake promoting drugs often, though not routinely, assess aspects of cognition. Conclusions Routine and broad assessment of cognition in the development of wake promoting drugs may reveal important nootropic effects, which are not secondary to alertness/wakefulness, whilst existing cognitive enhancers may have under explored or unknown wake promoting properties. PMID:19565524

  6. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120?m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18?m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02?m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  7. Computation of rotor wake turbulence noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Envia, E.

    2005-04-01

    A major source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of rotor wake turbulence with the fan outlet guide vanes. A broadband noise model that utilizes computed rotor flow turbulence from a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code is used to predict fan broadband noise spectra. The noise model is employed to examine the broadband noise characteristics of the 22-in source diagnostic test fan rig for which broadband noise data were obtained in wind tunnel tests at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A 9-case matrix of three outlet guide vane configurations at three representative fan tip speeds are considered. For all cases inlet and exhaust spectra of acoustic power are computed and compared with the measured spectra where possible. The acoustic power levels and shape of the predicted spectra are in good agreement with the measured data for the fan exhaust duct radiation at approach condition where direct comparisons are possible. The predicted spectra show the experimentally observed trends with fan tip speed, vane count and vane sweep. The results also demonstrate the validity of using computational fluid dynamics based turbulence information for fan broadband noise calculations.

  8. Wakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Retroactive interference (RI)--the disruptive influence of events occurring after the formation of a new memory--is one of the primary causes of forgetting. Placing individuals within an environment that postpones interference should, therefore, greatly reduce the likelihood of information being lost from memory. For example, a short period of wakeful rest should diminish interference-based forgetting. To test this hypothesis, participants took part in a foreign language learning activity and were shown English translations of 20 Icelandic words for immediate recall. Half of the participants were then given an 8-min rest before completing a similar or dissimilar interfering distractor task. The other half did not receive a rest until after the distractor task, at which point interference had already taken place. All participants were then asked to translate the Icelandic words for a second time. Results revealed that retention was significantly worse at the second recall test, but being allowed a brief rest before completing the distractor task helped reduce the amount of forgetting. Taking a short, passive break can shield new memories from RI and alleviate forgetting. PMID:24410154

  9. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120?m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18?m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02?m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  10. Measurements of Aircraft Wake Vortex Separation at High Arrival Rates and a Proposed New Wake Vortex Separation Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutishauser, David; Donohue, George L.; Haynie, Rudolph C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents data and a proposed new aircraft wake vortex separation standard that argues for a fundamental re-thinking of international practice. The current static standard, under certain atmospheric conditions, presents an unnecessary restriction on system capacity. A new approach, that decreases aircraft separation when atmospheric conditions dictate, is proposed based upon the availability of new instrumentation and a better understanding of wake physics.

  11. Separated flow over bodies of revolution using an unsteady discrete-vorticity cross wake. Part 2: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Deffenbaugh, F. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method is developed to determine the flow field of a body of revolution in separated flow. The computer was used to integrate various solutions and solution properties of the sub-flow fields which made up the entire flow field without resorting to a finite difference solution to the complete Navier-Stokes equations. The technique entails the use of the unsteady cross flow analogy and a new solution to the two-dimensional unsteady separated flow problem based upon an unsteady, discrete-vorticity wake. Data for the forces and moments on aerodynamic bodies at low speeds and high angle of attack (outside the range of linear inviscid theories) such that the flow is substantially separated are produced which compare well with experimental data. In addition, three dimensional steady separated regions and wake vortex patterns are determined. The computer program developed to perform the numerical calculations is described.

  12. Management of Verticillium wilt with disease-suppressive crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of potential disease-suppressive rotation crops to reduce potato disease problems and increase crop productivity in a field severely infested with Verticillium wilt was evaluated over three field seasons in Maine. Disease-suppressive rotation treatments consisted of 1) a high glucosinola...

  13. Influence of fungicides on a nematode-suppressive soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified a field in Georgia, USA that was moderately suppressive to Meloidogyne spp. In the greenhouse, reproduction of both M. incognita on cotton and M. arenaria on peanut was greater in microwave-heated soil than in natural soil from this field suggesting that nematode suppression was cause...

  14. Effects of Aircraft Wake Dynamics on Measured and Simulated NO(x) and HO(x) Wake Chemistry. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution numerical large-eddy simulations of the near wake of a B757 including simplified NOx and HOx chemistry were performed to explore the effects of dynamics on chemistry in wakes of ages from a few seconds to several minutes. Dilution plays an important basic role in the NOx-O3 chemistry in the wake, while a more interesting interaction between the chemistry and dynamics occurs for the HOx species. These simulation results are compared with published measurements of OH and HO2 within a B757 wake under cruise conditions in the upper troposphere taken during the Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission in May 1996. The simulation provides a much finer grained representation of the chemistry and dynamics of the early wake than is possible from the 1 s data samples taken in situ. The comparison suggests that the previously reported discrepancy of up to a factor of 20 - 50 between the SUCCESS measurements of the [HO2]/[OH] ratio and that predicted by simplified theoretical computations is due to the combined effects of large mixing rates around the wake plume edges and averaging over volumes containing large species fluctuations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using three-dimensional unsteady large-eddy simulations with coupled chemistry to study such phenomena.

  15. An Operational Wake Vortex Sensor Using Pulsed Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Koch, Grady J.; Nguyen, D. Chi

    1998-01-01

    NASA and FAA initiated a program in 1994 to develop methods of setting spacings for landing aircraft by incorporating information on the real-time behavior of aircraft wake vortices. The current wake separation standards were developed in the 1970's when there was relatively light airport traffic and a logical break point by which to categorize aircraft. Today's continuum of aircraft sizes and increased airport packing densities have created a need for re-evaluation of wake separation standards. The goals of this effort are to ensure that separation standards are adequate for safety and to reduce aircraft spacing for higher airport capacity. Of particular interest are the different requirements for landing under visual flight conditions and instrument flight conditions. Over the years, greater spacings have been established for instrument flight than are allowed for visual flight conditions. Preliminary studies indicate that the airline industry would save considerable money and incur fewer passenger delays if a dynamic spacing system could reduce separations at major hubs during inclement weather to the levels routinely achieved under visual flight conditions. The sensor described herein may become part of this dynamic spacing system known as the "Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System" (AVOSS) that will interface with a future air traffic control system. AVOSS will use vortex behavioral models and short-term weather prediction models in order to predict vortex behavior sufficiently into the future to allow dynamic separation standards to be generated. The wake vortex sensor will periodically provide data to validate AVOSS predictions. Feasibility of measuring wake vortices using a lidar was first demonstrated using a continuous wave (CW) system from NASA Marshall Space Flight Sensor and tested at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center's wake vortex test site at JFK International Airport. Other applications of CW lidar for wake vortex measurement have been made more recently, including a system developed by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar has been used for detailed measurements of wake vortex velocities in support of wake vortex model validation. The first measurements of wake vortices using a pulsed, lidar were made by Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) using a 2 micron solid-state, flashlamp-pumped system operating at 5 Hz. This system was first deployed at Denver's Stapleton Airport. Pulsed lidar has been selected as the baseline technology for an operational sensor due to its longer range capability.

  16. Simulating Virtual Terminal Area Weather Data Bases for Use in the Wake Vortex Avoidance System (Wake VAS) Prediction Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Lin, Yuh-Lang

    2004-01-01

    During the research project, sounding datasets were generated for the region surrounding 9 major airports, including Dallas, TX, Boston, MA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, St. Louis, MO, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, San Francico, CA, and Los Angeles, CA. The numerical simulation of winter and summer environments during which no instrument flight rule impact was occurring at these 9 terminals was performed using the most contemporary version of the Terminal Area PBL Prediction System (TAPPS) model nested from 36 km to 6 km to 1 km horizontal resolution and very detailed vertical resolution in the planetary boundary layer. The soundings from the 1 km model were archived at 30 minute time intervals for a 24 hour period and the vertical dependent variables as well as derived quantities, i.e., 3-dimensional wind components, temperatures, pressures, mixing ratios, turbulence kinetic energy and eddy dissipation rates were then interpolated to 5 m vertical resolution up to 1000 m elevation above ground level. After partial validation against field experiment datasets for Dallas as well as larger scale and much coarser resolution observations at the other 8 airports, these sounding datasets were sent to NASA for use in the Virtual Air Space and Modeling program. The application of these datasets being to determine representative airport weather environments to diagnose the response of simulated wake vortices to realistic atmospheric environments. These virtual datasets are based on large scale observed atmospheric initial conditions that are dynamically interpolated in space and time. The 1 km nested-grid simulated datasets providing a very coarse and highly smoothed representation of airport environment meteorological conditions. Details concerning the airport surface forcing are virtually absent from these simulated datasets although the observed background atmospheric processes have been compared to the simulated fields and the fields were found to accurately replicate the flows surrounding the airport where coarse verification data were available as well as where airport scale datasets were available.

  17. Behavioral Sleep-Wake Homeostasis and EEG Delta Power Are Decoupled By Chronic Sleep Restriction in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Richard; Caron, Aimee M.; Famina, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) is prevalent in society and is linked to adverse consequences that might be ameliorated by acclimation of homeostatic drive. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the sleep-wake homeostat will acclimatize to CSR. DESIGN: A four-parameter model of proportional control was used to quantify sleep homeostasis with and without recourse to a sleep intensity function. Setting: Animal laboratory, rodent walking-wheel apparatus. Subjects: Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: Acute total sleep deprivation (TSD, 1 day × 18 or 24 h, N = 12), CSR (10 days × 18 h TSD, N = 6, or 5 days × 20 h TSD, N = 5). Measurements and Results: Behavioral rebounds were consistent with model predictions for proportional control of cumulative times in wake, nonrapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM). Delta (?) energy homeostasis was secondary to behavioral homeostasis; a biphasic NREM ? power rebound contributed to the dynamics (rapid response) but not to the magnitude of the rebound in ? energy. REM behavioral homeostasis was little affected by CSR. NREM behavioral homeostasis was attenuated in proportion to cumulative NREM deficit, whereas the biphasic NREM ? power rebound was only slightly suppressed, indicating decoupled regulatory mechanisms following CSR. Conclusions: We conclude that sleep homeostasis is achieved through behavioral regulation, that the nonrapid eye movement sleep behavioral homeostat is susceptible to attenuation during chronic sleep restriction and that the concept of sleep intensity is not essential in a model of sleep-wake regulation. Citation: Stephenson R, Caron AM, Famina S. Behavioral sleep-wake homeostasis and EEG delta power are decoupled by chronic sleep restriction in the rat. SLEEP 2015;38(5):685–697. PMID:25669184

  18. Human occipital cortices differentially exert saccadic suppression: intracranial recording in children

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Mitsugu; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Brown, Erik C.; Kojima, Katsuaki; Asano, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    By repeating saccades unconsciously, humans explore the surrounding world every day. Saccades inevitably move external visual images across the retina at high velocity; nonetheless, healthy humans don’t perceive transient blurring of the visual scene during saccades. This perceptual stability is referred to as saccadic suppression. Functional suppression is believed to take place transiently in the visual systems, but it remains unknown how commonly or differentially the human occipital lobe activities are suppressed at the large-scale cortical network level. We determined the spatial-temporal dynamics of intracranially-recorded gamma activity at 80–150 Hz around spontaneous saccades under no-task conditions during wakefulness and those in darkness during REM sleep. Regardless of wakefulness or REM sleep, a small degree of attenuation of gamma activity was noted in the occipital regions during saccades, most extensively in the polar and least in the medial portions. Longer saccades were associated with more intense gamma-attenuation. Gamma-attenuation was subsequently followed by gamma-augmentation most extensively involving the medial and least involving the polar occipital region. Such gamma-augmentation was more intense during wakefulness and temporally locked to the offset of saccades. The polarities of initial peaks of perisaccadic event-related potentials (ERPs) were frequently positive in the medial and negative in the polar occipital regions. The present study, for the first time, provided the electrophysiological evidence that human occipital cortices differentially exert peri-saccadic modulation. Transiently suppressed sensitivity of the primary visual cortex in the polar region may be an important neural basis for saccadic suppression. Presence of occipital gamma-attenuation even during REM sleep suggests that saccadic suppression might be exerted even without external visual inputs. The primary visual cortex in the medial region, compared to the polar region, may be more sensitive to an upcoming visual scene provided at the offset of each saccade. PMID:23792979

  19. CFD modeling and analysis of rotor wake in hover interacting with a ground plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Tarandeep Singh

    The action of the rotor wake on loose sediment on the ground is primarily responsible for inducing the rotorcraft brownout phenomenon. Therefore, any simulation of brownout must be capable of accurately predicting the velocity field induced by the rotor when it is operating in ground effect. This work attempts to use a compressible, structured, overset Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based solver to simulate hovering rotors in ground effect (IGE) to demonstrate the capability of the code to provide accurate tip vortex flow field predictions, and provide a good understanding of the ground-wake interactions. The computations are performed for a micro-scale rotor (0.086m radius, aspect ratio of 4.387 operating at a tip Mach number of 0.08 and Reynolds number of 32,500) and a sub-scale rotor (0.408m radius, aspect ratio of 9.132 operating at a tip Mach number of 0.24 and Reynolds number of 250,000) in order to compare to experimental measurements. The micro-scale rotor has a rectangular tip shape and is simulated three rotor heights: 1.5R, 1.0R and 0.5R above ground (R = Rotor radius). The sub-scale rotor is simulated at one particular rotor height (i.e. 1R) but with four different tip shapes: rectangular, swept, BERP-like and slotted tip. Various mesh placement strategies are devised to efficiently capture the path of the tip vortices for both regimes. The micro-scale rotor simulations are performed using the Spalart Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model. The examination of the IGE tip vortex flow field suggests high degree of instabilities close to the ground. In addition, the induced velocities arising from the proximity of the rotor tip vortices causes flow separation at the ground. The sub-scale rotor simulations show a smeared out flow field even at early wake ages due to excessive turbulence levels. The distance function in the S-A turbulence model is modified using the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) approach and a correction to length scaling is included for anistropic grids. The resulting computational flow field after these modifications compares well with the experiments. The slotted tip is seen to diffuse the tip vortices at early wake ages through injection of momentum and increased turbulence, and generates the least amount of unsteady pressure variation at the ground plane when compared with other three tip shapes.

  20. Comparison of two LES codes for wind turbine wake studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlak, H.; Pierella, F.; Mikkelsen, R.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-06-01

    For the third time a blind test comparison in Norway 2013, was conducted comparing numerical simulations for the rotor Cp and Ct and wake profiles with the experimental results. As the only large eddy simulation study among participants, results of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) using their in-house CFD solver, EllipSys3D, proved to be more reliable among the other models for capturing the wake profiles and the turbulence intensities downstream the turbine. It was therefore remarked in the workshop to investigate other LES codes to compare their performance with EllipSys3D. The aim of this paper is to investigate on two CFD solvers, the DTU's in-house code, EllipSys3D and the open-sourse toolbox, OpenFoam, for a set of actuator line based LES computations. Two types of simulations are performed: the wake behind a signle rotor and the wake behind a cluster of three inline rotors. Results are compared in terms of velocity deficit, turbulence kinetic energy and eddy viscosity. It is seen that both codes predict similar near-wake flow structures with the exception of OpenFoam's simulations without the subgrid-scale model. The differences begin to increase with increasing the distance from the upstream rotor. From the single rotor simulations, EllipSys3D is found to predict a slower wake recovery in the case of uniform laminar flow. From the 3-rotor computations, it is seen that the difference between the codes is smaller as the disturbance created by the downstream rotors causes break down of the wake structures and more homogenuous flow structures. It is finally observed that OpenFoam computations are more sensitive to the SGS models.