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Sample records for wall crossing formula

  1. Formula Estimation of Cross-Validated Multiple Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Neal

    A review of cross-validation shrinkage formulas is presented which focuses on the theoretical and practical problems in the use of various formulas. Practical guidelines for use of both formulas and empirical cross-validation are provided. A comparison of results using these formulas in a range of situations is then presented. The result of these…

  2. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS states contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as such to the geometry at the Planck scale. In the second part, we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multicentered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  3. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    2010-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS state contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as to the geometry at the Planck scale.In the second part we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multi-centered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  4. 8. VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF THE EASTERNMOST WALL SEGMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF THE EASTERNMOST WALL SEGMENT THAT SHOWS THE TRENCHING AND 1960 PIPELINE CORRIDOR BETWEEN THE WALL SEGMENTS, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST - Rock Wall, North side of Battle Creek Canyon, Shingletown, Shasta County, CA

  5. An experimental study of wall adaptation and interference assessment using Cauchy integral formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study of combined wall adaptation and residual interference assessment using the Cauchy integral formula. The experiments were conducted on a supercritical airfoil model in the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel solid flexible wall test section. The ratio of model chord to test section height was about 0.7. The method worked satisfactorily in reducing the blockage interference and demonstrated the primary requirement for correcting for the blockage effects at high model incidences to correctly determine high lift characteristics. The studies show that the method has potential for reducing the residual interference to considerably low levels. However, corrections to blockage and upwash velocities gradients may still be required for the final adapted wall shapes.

  6. One-photon double ionization of helium: A heuristic formula for the cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Førre, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Without a formal derivation, we propose a formula for the total and single-differential cross sections in the problem of one-photon double ionization of an atom. The formula is benchmarked against accurate experimental data for the total cross section of helium. Furthermore, a direct comparison with ab initio calculations for the double ionization of Li+ suggests that the framework is valid for the entire helium isoelectronic sequence. To this end, we introduce a formula for the double ionization of lithium as well as for the triple ionization of lithium and beryllium.

  7. Universal empirical formula for optical transition energies of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, G. R. Ahmed; Mominuzzaman, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    A general empirical relation for calculating first seven optical transition energies of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is proposed here for the first time. The proposed formula effectively relates first seven optical transition energies of semiconducting SWCNTs with their chiral indices (n, m) through exponential form containing two specific terms (n+2m) and (2n-m). Both mod 1 and mod 2 types of semiconducting tubes are considered here over a wide diameter range from 0.4 nm to 4.75 nm. It was observed that the proposed empirical relations can predict the recent experimental data of those optical transitions with high accuracy.

  8. Wall-crossing, Rogers dilogarithm, and the QK/HK correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Persson, Daniel; Pioline, Boris

    2011-12-01

    When formulated in twistor space, the D-instanton corrected hypermultiplet moduli space in mathcal{N} = {2} string vacua and the Coulomb branch of rigid mathcal{N} = {2} gauge theories on R3 × S 1 are strikingly similar and, to a large extent, dictated by consistency with wall-crossing. We elucidate this similarity by showing that these two spaces are related under a general duality between, on one hand, quaternion-Kähler manifolds with a quaternionic isometry and, on the other hand, hyperkähler manifolds with a rotational isometry, equipped with a canonical hyperholomorphic circle bundle and a connection. We show that the transition functions of the hyperholomorphic circle bundle relevant for the hypermultiplet moduli space are given by the Rogers dilogarithm function, and that consistency across walls of marginal stability is ensured by the motivic wall-crossing formula of Kontsevich and Soibelman. We illustrate the construction on some simple examples of wall-crossing related to cluster algebras for rank 2 Dynkin quivers. In an appendix we also provide a detailed discussion on the general relation between wall-crossing and cluster algebras.

  9. 8. DETAIL OF WEST WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED, CROSS MEMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF WEST WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED, CROSS MEMBER (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  10. Empirical formula on (n,(3)He) reaction cross sections at 14.6MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yiğit, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The systematic behavior of the cross sections of (n,(3)He) nuclear reactions has been studied by various researches at neutron energy of 14.6MeV. A new empirical formula based on the Q-value dependence of the cross sections of the investigated reaction has been proposed. The cross sections obtained from the new formula are compared with the other proposed formulae results and the experimental data. It seems that the present formula based on the Q-value dependence provides the good description for cross sections of neutron-induced (n,(3)He) nuclear reactions at 14.6MeV. PMID:26218596

  11. Proton-nucleus total inelastic cross sections - An empirical formula for E greater than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, J. R.; Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical formula for the total inelastic cross section of protons on nuclei with charge greater than 1 is presented. The formula is valid with a varying degree of accuracy down to proton energies of 10 MeV. At high energies (equal to or greater than 2 GeV) the formula reproduces experimental data to within reported errors (about 2%).

  12. A Model (Formula) for Deriving A Hazard Index of Rail-Highway Grade Crossings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, James Minton

    The purpose of this research was to compile data for use as related information in the education of drivers, and to derive a formula for computing a hazard index for rail-highway intersections. Data for the study were compiled from: (1) all crossings on which field data were collected, (2) reports of 642 accidents, and (3) data collected from…

  13. Lifshitz-type formulas for graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes: van der Waals and Casimir interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2006-11-15

    Lifshitz-type formulas are obtained for the van der Waals and Casimir interaction between graphene and a material plate, graphene and an atom or a molecule, and between a single-wall carbon nanotube and a plate. The reflection properties of electromagnetic oscillations on graphene are governed by the specific boundary conditions imposed on the infinitely thin positively charged plasma sheet, carrying a continuous fluid with some mass and charge density. The obtained formulas are applied to graphene interacting with Au and Si plates, to hydrogen atoms and molecules interacting with graphene, and to single-wall carbon nanotubes interacting with Au and Si plates. The generalizations to more complicated carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  14. (p,α) Reaction Cross Sections Calculations of Fe and Ni Target Nuclei Using New Developed Semi-empirical Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Akca, S.; Kara, A.; Yiğit, M.; Aydın, A.

    2013-10-01

    Iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) are important fusion structural materials in reactor technology. The gas production in the metallic structure arising from many different types of nuclear reactions has been a significant damage mechanism in structural components of fusion reactors. The hydrogen and its isotopes at high temperatures leave out of the metallic lattice but the alpha (α) particles that remain in the lattice generate helium (He) gas bubbles. In other words, the α particles can cause serious changes in the physical and mechanical properties of the fusion structural materials. In this study, the excitation functions of 54,57Fe(p,α) and 58,60,61,64Ni(p,α) reactions have been investigated in the incident proton energy range of 10-40 MeV to estimate the radiation damage effects on fusion structural materials used in the construction of the first walls and core of the reactor. The calculations of (p,α) reaction cross sections on 54,57Fe and 58,60,61,64Ni have been made by using PCROSS code and CEM95 code. The full exciton and cascade exciton model (CEM95) for pre-equilibrium calculations and Weisskopf-Ewing model for equilibrium calculations are used. Besides, the semi-empirical cross section formula with new coefficient obtained by Tel et al. (Pramana J Phys 74:931-943, 2010) has been applied for (p,α) reactions at 17.9 MeV proton incident energy.

  15. Cross-sectional survey shows that follow-up formula and growing-up milks are labelled similarly to infant formula in four low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catherine; Ford, Rosalyn; Feeley, Alison B; Sweet, Lara; Badham, Jane; Zehner, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    This cross-sectional survey assessed the characteristics of labels of follow-up formula (FUF) and growing-up milk (GUM) compared with infant formula (IF), including cross-promotion practices between FUF/GUM and IF manufactured by the same company, sold in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; Dakar Department, Senegal; and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. All products were imported. A wide recommended age/age range for introduction was provided by manufacturers across all sites, with products with an age recommendation of 0-6 months being most prevalent in three sites, representing over a third of all products. Various age categories (e.g. 1, 1+ and Stage 1) commonly appeared on labels. A number of descriptive names (e.g. infant formula and milk formula) per category of age of introduction were used with some appearing across more than one category. Images of feeding bottles were found on most labels across all age categories, but prevalence decreased with older age categories. The majority of FUF/GUM manufactured by IF companies across all sites displayed at least one example of cross-promotion with one or more of the company's IF: two-thirds or more contained similar colour schemes/designs and similar brand names; 20-85% had similar slogans/mascots/symbols. A wide and potentially confusing range of ages/categories of introduction and descriptive names were found, and cross-promotion with IF was common on FUF/GUM labels. Global guidance from normative bodies forms the basis of most low and middle income countries policies and should provide specific guidance to prohibit cross-promotion between FUF/GUM and IF, and all three categories should be classified as breastmilk substitutes. PMID:27061959

  16. A law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers with suction: Stevenson's formula revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigdorovich, Igor

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent velocity field in the viscous sublayer of the boundary layer with suction to a first approximation is homogeneous in any direction parallel to the wall and is determined by only three constant quantities — the wall shear stress, the suction velocity, and the fluid viscosity. This means that there exists a finite algebraic relation between the turbulent shear stress and the longitudinal mean-velocity gradient, using which as a closure condition for the equations of motion, we establish an exact asymptotic behavior of the velocity profile at the outer edge of the viscous sublayer. The obtained relationship provides a generalization of the logarithmic law to the case of wall suction.

  17. Theta Series, Wall-Crossing and Quantum Dilogarithm Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Pioline, Boris

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by mathematical structures which arise in string vacua and gauge theories with {{{N}=2}} supersymmetry, we study the properties of certain generalized theta series which appear as Fourier coefficients of functions on a twisted torus. In Calabi-Yau string vacua, such theta series encode instanton corrections from k Neveu-Schwarz five-branes. The theta series are determined by vector-valued wave-functions, and in this work we obtain the transformation of these wave-functions induced by Kontsevich-Soibelman symplectomorphisms. This effectively provides a quantum version of these transformations, where the quantization parameter is inversely proportional to the five-brane charge k. Consistency with wall-crossing implies a new five-term relation for Faddeev's quantum dilogarithm {Φ_b} at b = 1, which we prove. By allowing the torus to be non-commutative, we obtain a more general five-term relation valid for arbitrary b and k, which may be relevant for the physics of five-branes at finite chemical potential for angular momentum.

  18. Wall-crossing invariants: from quantum mechanics to knots

    SciTech Connect

    Galakhov, D. E-mail: galakhov@physics.rutgers.edu; Mironov, A. Morozov, A.

    2015-03-15

    We offer a pedestrian-level review of the wall-crossing invariants. The story begins from the scattering theory in quantum mechanics where the spectrum reshuffling can be related to permutations of S-matrices. In nontrivial situations, starting from spin chains and matrix models, the S-matrices are operatorvalued and their algebra is described in terms of R- and mixing (Racah) U-matrices. Then the Kontsevich-Soibelman (KS) invariants are nothing but the standard knot invariants made out of these data within the Reshetikhin-Turaev-Witten approach. The R and Racah matrices acquire a relatively universal form in the semiclassical limit, where the basic reshufflings with the change of moduli are those of the Stokes line. Natural from this standpoint are matrices provided by the modular transformations of conformal blocks (with the usual identification R = T and U = S), and in the simplest case of the first degenerate field (2, 1), when the conformal blocks satisfy a second-order Shrödinger-like equation, the invariants coincide with the Jones (N = 2) invariants of the associated knots. Another possibility to construct knot invariants is to realize the cluster coordinates associated with reshufflings of the Stokes lines immediately in terms of check-operators acting on solutions of the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations. Then the R-matrices are realized as products of successive mutations in the cluster algebra and are manifestly described in terms of quantum dilogarithms, ultimately leading to the Hikami construction of knot invariants.

  19. Wall-crossing invariants: from quantum mechanics to knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galakhov, D.; Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2015-03-01

    We offer a pedestrian-level review of the wall-crossing invariants. The story begins from the scattering theory in quantum mechanics where the spectrum reshuffling can be related to permutations of S-matrices. In nontrivial situations, starting from spin chains and matrix models, the S-matrices are operatorvalued and their algebra is described in terms of R- and mixing (Racah) U-matrices. Then the Kontsevich-Soibelman (KS) invariants are nothing but the standard knot invariants made out of these data within the Reshetikhin-Turaev-Witten approach. The R and Racah matrices acquire a relatively universal form in the semiclassical limit, where the basic reshufflings with the change of moduli are those of the Stokes line. Natural from this standpoint are matrices provided by the modular transformations of conformal blocks (with the usual identification R = T and U = S), and in the simplest case of the first degenerate field (2, 1), when the conformal blocks satisfy a second-order Shrödinger-like equation, the invariants coincide with the Jones ( N = 2) invariants of the associated knots. Another possibility to construct knot invariants is to realize the cluster coordinates associated with reshufflings of the Stokes lines immediately in terms of check-operators acting on solutions of the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations. Then the R-matrices are realized as products of successive mutations in the cluster algebra and are manifestly described in terms of quantum dilogarithms, ultimately leading to the Hikami construction of knot invariants.

  20. Theta Series, Wall-Crossing and Quantum Dilogarithm Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Pioline, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by mathematical structures which arise in string vacua and gauge theories with N=2 supersymmetry, we study the properties of certain generalized theta series which appear as Fourier coefficients of functions on a twisted torus. In Calabi-Yau string vacua, such theta series encode instanton corrections from k Neveu-Schwarz five-branes. The theta series are determined by vector-valued wave-functions, and in this work we obtain the transformation of these wave-functions induced by Kontsevich-Soibelman symplectomorphisms. This effectively provides a quantum version of these transformations, where the quantization parameter is inversely proportional to the five-brane charge k. Consistency with wall-crossing implies a new five-term relation for Faddeev's quantum dilogarithm {Φ_b} at b = 1, which we prove. By allowing the torus to be non-commutative, we obtain a more general five-term relation valid for arbitrary b and k, which may be relevant for the physics of five-branes at finite chemical potential for angular momentum.

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes with rectangular or square cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kanako; Kohno, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes with rectangular or square cross-section are formed. The nanotubes are about 50-200 nm in width, and their walls are around 5-30 nm thick. It is very likely that the rectangular cross-section is shaped simultaneously when nanotubes are formed from catalyst Fe nanoparticles during chemical vapor deposition process, and the shape is stabilized by the bonding between adjoining graphene layers in the multi-walled structure.

  2. A formula for the wall-amplified added mass coefficient for a solid sphere in normal approach to a wall and its application for such motion at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.-L.

    2010-12-01

    This work re-examines the potential flow theory for a sphere in normal approach to a wall, based on the classical results derived by Lamb [Hydrodynamics (Dover, New York, 1932)] and Milne-Thomson [Theoretical Hydrodynamics, 5th ed. (Dover, New York, 1968)]. These authors generated an expression in which the kinetic energy for a sphere in an unbounded fluid is augmented by a wall correction function in terms of an infinite series that depends on the scaled center-to-wall distance, h∗=h/a, with a denoting the sphere radius. By truncating the series at the order of h∗-3, the resulting one-term correction function, 3/8h∗-3, is widely employed to approximate the wall-amplified added mass coefficient, CAM(h ∗), in multiphase flow research. Nonetheless, this work shows that this one-term correction deviates greatly from corrections including higher order terms when the interstitial gap drops below the half sphere radius. Thus, an explicit formula is developed, for all h∗, using a near-wall Padé approximation, an intermediate bridging function, and a far-field approximation. This proposed formula provides an efficient and reasonable approximation to the infinite series and thus may serve as an improved wall correction function as compared to the one-term formula. The developed formula is applied to compute the unsteady approach of a nonrotating sphere toward a wall in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number condition. In addition to Brenner's wall correction on the quasisteady viscous force [H. Brenner, "The slow motion of a sphere through a viscous fluid towards a plane surface," Chem. Eng. Sci. 16, 242 (1961)], the current formula is employed to modify both the added mass coefficient, from 1/2, and the history force. This latter force is modified by integrating the wall-modified potential flow theory with the boundary layer theory. If the one-term correction is used in the equation of motion, underestimation of the sphere motion and the force magnitudes are

  3. Generalization of formulas for ionization energy losses and collision cross section in threshold detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yermilova, V. K.; Kotenko, L. P.; Merzon, G. I.; Chekin, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Two types of formulas were obtained for (- dE/dx) and the number of collisions per unit of path length (dN/dx) = const, which depend on W sub m, with due account of the polarization effect of the medium.

  4. In-vitro fermentability of cell walls as influenced by lignin composition and cross-linking.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed how diverse modifications in lignin composition and reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking influence the degradability of cell walls. Cell walls from nonlignified maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with varying ratios of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alco...

  5. Jet through a wall protrusion in a cross-flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.; Murthy, S. N. B.; Warner, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    The flow interactions between a jet issuing out of a protrusion in a wall and a crosswise flow are of interest because of the manner in which the spreading and mixing of the jet are affected by the flow separation, formation of vortices and recirculation zones and the associated flow instabilities. In combustors and in aircraft void spaces adjoining fuel tanks such interactions determine flame stability and propagation characteristics. Results from flow visualization and from predictions based on a three-dimensional viscous flow code are utilized to show the effects of several flow and geometrical parameters on the processes occuring in the vicinity of the protrusion and the jet.

  6. Determinants of Murein Hydrolase Targeting to Cross-wall of Staphylococcus aureus Peptidoglycan*

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Matthew B.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Cells of eukaryotic or prokaryotic origin express proteins with LysM domains that associate with the cell wall envelope of bacteria. The molecular properties that enable LysM domains to interact with microbial cell walls are not yet established. Staphylococcus aureus, a spherical microbe, secretes two murein hydrolases with LysM domains, Sle1 and LytN. We show here that the LysM domains of Sle1 and LytN direct murein hydrolases to the staphylococcal envelope in the vicinity of the cross-wall, the mid-cell compartment for peptidoglycan synthesis. LysM domains associate with the repeating disaccharide β-N-acetylmuramic acid, (1→4)-β-N-acetylglucosamine of staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Modification of N-acetylmuramic acid with wall teichoic acid, a ribitol-phosphate polymer tethered to murein linkage units, prevents the LysM domain from binding to peptidoglycan. The localization of LytN and Sle1 to the cross-wall is abolished in staphylococcal tagO mutants, which are defective for wall teichoic acid synthesis. We propose a model whereby the LysM domain ensures septal localization of LytN and Sle1 followed by processive cleavage of peptidoglycan, thereby exposing new LysM binding sites in the cross-wall and separating bacterial cells. PMID:22303016

  7. Cross-Linked Peptidoglycan Mediates Lysostaphin Binding to the Cell Wall Envelope of Staphylococcus aureus†

    PubMed Central

    Gründling, Angelika; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus simulans bv. staphylolyticus secretes lysostaphin, a bacteriocin that cleaves pentaglycine cross bridges in the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. The C-terminal cell wall-targeting domain (CWT) of lysostaphin is required for selective binding of this bacteriocin to S. aureus cells; however, the molecular target for this was unknown. We used purified green fluorescent protein fused to CWT (GFP-CWT) to reveal species-specific association of the reporter with staphylococci. GFP-CWT bound S. aureus cells as well as purified peptidoglycan sacculi. The addition of cross-linked murein, disaccharides linked to interconnected wall peptides, blocked GFP-CWT binding to staphylococci, whereas murein monomers or lysostaphin-solubilized cell wall fragments did not. S. aureus strain Newman variants lacking the capacity for synthesizing polysaccharide capsule (capFO), poly-N-acetylglucosamine (icaAC), lipoprotein (lgt), cell wall-anchored proteins (srtA), or the glycolipid anchor of lipoteichoic acid (ypfP) bound GFP-CWT similar to wild-type staphylococci. A tagO mutant strain, defective in the synthesis of polyribitol wall teichoic acid attached to the cell wall envelope, displayed increased GFP-CWT binding. In contrast, a femAB mutation, reducing both the amount and the length of peptidoglycan cross-linking (monoglycine cross bridges), showed a dramatic reduction in GFP-CWT binding. Thus, the CWT domain of lysostaphin directs the bacteriocin to cross-linked peptidoglycan, which also serves as the substrate for its glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. PMID:16547033

  8. A Low Cross-Polarization Smooth-Walled Horn with Improved Bandwidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Lingzhen; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Corrugated feed horns offer excellent beam symmetry, main beam efficiency, and cross-polar response over wide bandwidths, but can be challenging to fabricate. An easier-to-manufacture smooth-walled feed is explored that approximates these properties over a finite bandwidth. The design, optimization and measurement of a monotonically-profiled, smooth-walled scalar feedhorn with a diffraction-limited approximately 7 degrees full width at half maximum (FWHM) is presented. The feed was demonstrated to have low cross polarization (<-30 dB) across the frequency range 33-45 GHz (30% fractional bandwidth). A return loss better than -28 dB was measured across the band.

  9. A Low Cross-Polarization Smooth-Walled Horn with Improved Bandwidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Lingzhen; Bennette, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Corrugated feed horns offer excellent beam symmetry, main beam efficiency, and cross-polar response over wide bandwidths, but can be challenging to fabricate. An easier-to-manufacture smooth-walled feed is explored that approximates these properties over a finite bandwidth. The design, optimization and measurement of a monotonically-profiled, smooth-walled scalar feedhorn with a diffraction-limited approx. 14deg FWHM beam is presented. The feed was demonstrated to have low cross polarization (<-30 dB) across the frequency range 33-45 GHz (30% fractional bandwidth). A power reflection below -28 dB was measured across the band.

  10. Actin bundles cross-linked with [Formula: see text]-actinin studied by nanobeam X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Töpperwien, M; Priebe, M; Salditt, T

    2016-07-01

    We have performed scanning nano-beam small-angle X-ray scattering (nano-SAXS) experiments on in vitro-formed actin filaments cross-linked with [Formula: see text]-actinin. The experimental method combines a high resolution in reciprocal space with a real space resolution as given by the spot-size of the nano-focused X-ray beam, and opens up new opportunities to study local super-molecular structures of actin filaments. In this first proof-of-concept, we show that the local orientation of actin bundles formed by the cross-linking can be visualized by the X-ray darkfield maps. The filament bundles give rise to highly anisotropic diffraction patterns showing distinct streaks perpendicular to the bundle axes. Interestingly, some diffraction patterns exhibit a fine structure in the form of intensity modulations allowing for a more detailed analysis of the order within the bundles. A first empirical quantification of these modulations is included in the present work. PMID:26715112

  11. Current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with a rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, J. H.; Miao, B. F.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Hu, An; Ding, H. F.

    2011-11-01

    We performed micromagnetic simulations of the current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with rectangular cross-section. In the absence of the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, a threshold current, J{sub c} is required to drive the domain wall moving continuously. We find that J{sub c} is proportional to the maximum cross product of the demagnetization field and magnetization orientation of the domain wall and the domain wall width. With varying both the wire thickness and width, a minimum threshold current in the order of 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} is obtained when the thickness is equivalent to the wire width. With the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, the calculated domain wall velocity {nu} equals to the adiabatic spin transfer velocity u when the current is far above the Walker limit J{sub w}. Below J{sub w}, {nu}=({beta}/{alpha})u, where {beta} is the nonadiabatic parameter and {alpha} is the damping factor. For different {beta}, we find the Walker limit can be scaled as J{sub w}=({alpha}/{beta}-{alpha})J{sub c}. Our simulations agree well with the one dimensional analytical calculation, suggesting the findings are the general behaviors of the systems in this particular geometry.

  12. Pressure field in flow through uniform straight pipes with varying wall cross curvature.

    PubMed

    Naili, Salah; Thiriet, Marc

    2005-10-01

    Pressure fields in rigid smooth straight tubes with an axially uniform cross section, in which an incompressible Newtonian fluid flows steadily, have been determined. Five cross section shapes are used. The reference cross section S0 is slightly elliptic (ellipticity of 1.005). Four cross section shapes, which mimic collapsed vessels in an uniformly frozen state, are defined according to the curvature of their opposite faces (the mid-face is located on the minor axis) Sq (parallel faces), St (face folding), Sc (point contact between faces) and Sl (line contact). These four selected cross shapes are characterized by large changes in both the cross sectional shape and area with respect to S0. The cross shapes are obtained from the computation of the deformation under uniform transmural pressures, without extension, of a thin-walled conduit of infinite length and of homogeneous purely elastic walls of constant thickness. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the finite element method for the five tubes summation operator0, summation operatorq, summation operatort, summation operatorc and summation operatorl, which are associated with S0,Sq,St,Sc and Sl, respectively. The numerical tests are performed with the same value of the volume flow rate whatever the tube configuration for three Reynolds numbers ( [See text] ). The present work is aimed at studying the pressure field for the design of the flow chamber in which endothelial cells are cultured. This field is used not only to define a new relative pressure index to determine the entry length but also to estimate the wall shear stress when the flow is fully developed. PMID:16124988

  13. Accuracy of Population Validity and Cross-Validity Estimation: An Empirical Comparison of Formula-Based, Traditional Empirical, and Equal Weights Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.; Bilgic, Reyhan; Edwards, Jack E.; Fleer, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    Performed an empirical Monte Carlo study using predictor and criterion data from 84,808 U.S. Air Force enlistees. Compared formula-based, traditional empirical, and equal-weights procedures. Discusses issues for basic research on validation and cross-validation. (SLD)

  14. A Simple Formula for the Third Integral of Motion of Disk-crossing Stars in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Ramos-Caro, Javier

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for an approximated third integral of motion associated with nearly equatorial orbits in the Galaxy: I_{3}=Z\\Sigma _{I}^{1/3}, where Z(R) is the vertical amplitude of the orbit at galactocentric distance R and Σ I (R) is the integrated dynamical surface mass density of the disk, a quantity which has recently become measurable. We also suggest that this relation is valid for disk-crossing orbits in a wide variety of axially symmetric galactic models, which range from razor-thin disks to disks with non-negligible thickness, whether or not the system includes bulges and halos. We apply our formalism to a Miyamoto-Nagai model and to a realistic model for the Milky Way. In both cases, the results provide fits for the shape of nearly equatorial orbits which are better than the corresponding curves obtained by the usual adiabatic approximation when the orbits have vertical amplitudes comparable to the disk's scale height. We also discuss the role of this approximate third integral of motion in modified theories of gravity.

  15. A simple formula for the third integral of motion of disk-crossing stars in the galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Ramos-Caro, Javier E-mail: javier@ufscar.br

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for an approximated third integral of motion associated with nearly equatorial orbits in the Galaxy: I{sub 3}=ZΣ{sub I}{sup 1/3}, where Z(R) is the vertical amplitude of the orbit at galactocentric distance R and Σ {sub I}(R) is the integrated dynamical surface mass density of the disk, a quantity which has recently become measurable. We also suggest that this relation is valid for disk-crossing orbits in a wide variety of axially symmetric galactic models, which range from razor-thin disks to disks with non-negligible thickness, whether or not the system includes bulges and halos. We apply our formalism to a Miyamoto-Nagai model and to a realistic model for the Milky Way. In both cases, the results provide fits for the shape of nearly equatorial orbits which are better than the corresponding curves obtained by the usual adiabatic approximation when the orbits have vertical amplitudes comparable to the disk's scale height. We also discuss the role of this approximate third integral of motion in modified theories of gravity.

  16. Investigation of coulomb and pairing effects using new developed empirical formulas for proton-induced reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tel, E. Aydin, E. G.; Aydin, A.; Kaplan, A.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Okuducu, S.

    2010-03-15

    We have investigated Coulomb and pairing effects by using new empirical formulas including the new coefficients for (p, {alpha}) at 17.9 MeV, (p, np) at 22.3 MeV, and (p, n{alpha}) at 24.8 and 28.5 MeV energies. A new formula is obtained by adjusting Levkovskii's original asymmetry parameter formula and also Tel et al. formula for proton-induced reactions. The new coefficients by using least-squares fitting method for the reactions are determined. In addition, the findings of the present study are compared with the available experimental data.

  17. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc; Jablonski, Aleksander; Powell, Cedric J.

    2009-11-01

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  18. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc Jablonski, Aleksander

    2009-11-15

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  19. Investigation of 14-15 MeV ( n, t) Reaction Cross-sections by Using New Evaluated Empirical and Semi-empirical Systematic Formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydın, A.; Kaplan, A.; Şarer, B.

    2008-09-01

    In the hybrid reactor, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. Working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross-sections are of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at energies up to 20 MeV. In this study we have investigated asymmetry term effect for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections at 14-15 neutron incident energy. It has been discussed the odd-even effect and the pairing effect considering binding energy systematic of the nuclear shell model for the new experimental data and new cross-sections formulas ( n, t) reactions developed by Tel et al. We have determined a different parameter groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd and odd-even for ( n, t) reactions cross-sections. The obtained empirical and semi-empirical formulas by fitting two parameter for ( n, t) reactions were given. All calculated results have been compared with the experimental data and the other semi-empirical formulas.

  20. Use of extensively hydrolysed formula for refeeding neonates postnecrotising enterocolitis: a nationwide survey-based, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Matar, Maroun; Adleff, Ariane; Chbihi, Marwa; Kermorvant-Duchemin, Elsa; Campeotto, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of and reasons for using extensively hydrolysed formulas (EHFs) of cow's milk proteins in the French neonatal units as well as the modality of their prescription for refeeding infants recovering from necrotising enterocolitis (NEC). Methods A multicentre nationwide cross-sectional study using a questionnaire to address the prevalence of use and the reasons for prescribing EHF in hospitalised neonates and to examine the protocols and the actual reasons for their use for refeeding infants in recovery from NEC. The questionnaire was sent to only 1 senior neonatologist in each neonatal unit included in the study. Results More than half of the French neonatal units participated in the survey. 91% of the surveyed units used EHF. Of 1969 infants hospitalised on the day the survey was run, 12% were fed on an EHF. 11% of the EHF prescriptions were due to previous NEC. The main reasons for using an EHF to feed infants post-NEC were the absence of human milk (75%) and surgical management of NEC (17%). When given, EHF was mainly prescribed for a period varying between 15 days and 3 months. None of the involved units continued using the EHF after 6 months of age. More than half of the surveyed units acknowledged hospitalising infants for the initiation of weaning EHF but only 21% of them tested these infants for cow's milk allergy. Conclusions The prevalence of EHF use in the French neonatal units is high. Refeeding infants post-NEC is one of the main reasons for such a high prevalence. The main incentive for using an EHF is the absence of human breast milk, either maternal or donor. PMID:27388344

  1. Infant Formula

    MedlinePlus

    ... it okay to feed my baby formula? Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for your ... will probably recommend a formula made from cow's milk. Some formulas are iron-fortified. This means they ...

  2. Cell wall fermentation kinetics impacted more by lignin content and cross-linking than by diverse shifts in lignin composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a biomimetic model system to ascertain how lignification and diverse shifts in lignin cross-linking and composition influence cell wall fermentation. Primary cell walls from nonlignified maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with varying ratios of normal monolignols (coniferyl a...

  3. Cell wall fermentation kinetics are impacted more by lignin content and ferulate cross-linking than by lignin composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: We used a biomimetic model system to ascertain how reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking and shifts in lignin composition influence ruminal cell wall fermentation. Primary walls from maize cell suspensions with normal or reduced feruloylation were artificially lignified with variou...

  4. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, J.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Bayer, D.; Kurde, J.; Heitkamp, B.; Piantek, M.; Kronast, F.; Aeschlimann, M.; Dürr, H. A.; Kuch, W.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  5. Direct Measurement of Polarized Absorption Cross-Section of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Kane, C. L.; Yodh, A. Y.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We use a combination of polarized Raman scattering and linear optical absorption to infer optical absorption cross-sections of single-wall carbon nanotube ensembles for visible light co- and cross-polarized with respect to the nanotube axes. These data reveal a strong linear absorption anisotropy, and provide a rapid method by which linear absorption spectra can be used to quantitatively measure the orientation of dispersed nanotubes, even in strongly absorbing media for which Raman approaches are complicated by anisotropic re-absorption processes. Comparison with theory demonstrates that local field depolarization plays a crucial role in affecting optical spectra of the nanotubes. This work supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  6. Thin-Walled Cross-Linked Acetabular Liners Need Not Exhibit Reduced Locking Strength.

    PubMed

    Murtha, Andrew S; Roy, Marcel E; Whiteside, Leo A; Tilden, David S; Schmitt, Krystal L

    2015-08-01

    Use of larger diameter femoral heads has emerged as a promising strategy to reduce the risk of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty, but thinning the walls of cross-linked ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular liners to accommodate these larger heads may compromise the locking mechanism of the liner. The purpose of this study was to test the mechanical integrity of the locking mechanism in cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE acetabular components with reduced wall thickness. The locking mechanism of cross-linked (100 kGy/re-melted) acetabular liners in sizes 50/28, 50/36, and 52/36 mm of 1 design was evaluated by lever-out tests and torsion tests. Torsion tests were performed at 2 angles to isolate the liner's locking tabs independent of the contribution of its central post. Lever-out testing demonstrated nominally reduced failure strength in 50/36-mm liners (13.3 N · m) compared with 50/28-mm liners (12.3 N · m; P=.0502), whereas the lever-out strength of 52/36-mm liners was 12.2±0.94 N · m. Failure torques were similar between 50/28- and 50/36-mm liners at 45° and 90°, but the failure torque of size 52/36-mm liners was significantly higher at each angle. The use of larger diameter femoral heads does not compromise the locking mechanism of thinned MicroSeal (Signal Medical Corp, Marysville, Michigan) acetabular liners. Use of a cross-linked UHMWPE acetabular liner, with a locking mechanism that is not compromised when the liner is thinned to a thickness of at least 2.86 mm, appears to be a biomechanically sound construct when articulated with large diameter femoral heads. PMID:26270761

  7. Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability of a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk is examined. Specifically it investigates if wall suction transforms the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The experiment is designed so that a suction parameter of a =W0 /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 2 locates the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, Rca = 650 , on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 317 to 696. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The measurement surface is covered by a 20 micron pore size Polyethylene sheet. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets are documented. The present results indicate a rapid transition to turbulence near Rca.

  8. New Evaluated Semi-Empirical Formula Using Optical Model for 14-15 MeV ( n, t) Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aydın, A.; Bölükdemir, M. H.; Kaplan, A.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2009-12-01

    In the next century the world will face the need for new energy sources. Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and thus will not contribute to global warming or acid rain. Achieving acceptable performance for a fusion power system in the areas of economics, safety and environmental acceptability, is critically dependent on performance of the blanket and diverter systems which are the primary heat recovery, plasma purification, and tritium breeding systems. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. The hybrid reactor is a combination of the fusion and fission processes. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross-sections are of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at energies up to 20 MeV. In this study, we have calculated non-elastic cross-sections by using optical model for ( n, t) reactions at 14-15 MeV energy. We have investigated the excitation function character and reaction Q-values depending on the asymmetry term effect for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have obtained new coefficients for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have suggested semi-empirical formulas including optical model nonelastic effects by fitting two parameters for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections at 14-15 MeV. We have discussed the odd-even effect and the pairing effect considering binding energy systematic of the nuclear shell model for the new experimental data and new cross-sections formulas ( n, t) reactions developed by Tel et al. We have determined a different parameter groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd and odd-even for ( n, t) reactions cross-sections. The obtained cross-section formulas

  9. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    SciTech Connect

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties. Currently, the genes underlying AX feruloylation have not been identified and the isolation of such genes could be of great importance in manipulating ferulates accretion to the wall. Mutation of the feruloyl transferase gene(s) should lead to less ferulates secreted to the cell wall and reduced ferulate cross-linking. Our current research is based on the hypothesis that controlling the level of total feruloylation will have a direct impact on the level of cross-linking and in turn impact biomass utility for forage and biofuel production. Our results/accomplishments for this project so far include: 1. Mutagenised Brachypodium population. We have developed EMS mutagenized populations of model grass species Brachypodium distachyon. EMS populations have been developed from over 28,000 mutagenized seeds generating 5,184 M2 families. A total of 20,793 plants have been screened and 1,233 were originally selected. 2. Selected Brachypodium mutants: Potential mutants on their levels of cell wall ferulates and cell wall AX ? have been selected from 708 M2 families. A total of 303 back-crosses to no-mutagenized parental stock have been done, followed by selfing selected genotypes in order to confirm heritability of traits and to remove extraneous mutations generated by EMS mutagenesis. We are currently growing 12 F5 and F6 populations in order to assess CW composition. If low level of ferulates are confirmed in the candidate lines selected the mutation could be altered in different in one or several kinds of genes such as genes encoding an AX feruloyl transferase; genes encoding the arabinosyl transferase; genes encoding the synthesis of the xylan backbone; genes encoding enzymes of the monolignol pathway affecting FA

  10. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  11. Wall paintings studied using Raman spectroscopy: a comparative study between various assays of cross sections and external layers.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Robador, Maria Dolores; Centeno, Miguel Angel; Siguenza, Belinda; Duran, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a comparative study between in situ applications of portable Raman spectroscopy and direct laboratory measurements using micro-Raman spectroscopy on the surface of small samples and of cross sections. The study was performed using wall paintings from different sites of the Alcazar of Seville. Little information was obtained using a portable Raman spectrometer due to the presence of an acrylic polymer, calcium oxalate, calcite and gypsum that was formed or deposited on the surface. The pigments responsible for different colours, except cinnabar, were not detected by the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of the surface of small samples taken from the wall paintings due to the presence of surface contaminants. The pigments and plaster were characterised using cross sections. The black colour consisted of carbon black. The red layers were formed by cinnabar and white lead or by iron oxides. The green and white colours were composed of green emerald or atacamite and calcite, respectively. Pb3O4 has also been characterised. The white layers (plaster) located under the colour layers consisted of calcite, quartz and feldspars. The fresco technique was used to create the wall paintings. A wall painting located on a gypsum layer was also studied. The Naples yellow in this wall painting was not characterised due to the presence of glue and oils. This study showed the advantage of studying cross sections to completely characterise the pigments and plaster in the studied wall paintings. PMID:24216251

  12. 'Strengthening the fungal cell wall through chitin-glucan cross-links: effects on morphogenesis and cell integrity'.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Javier; Farkaš, Vladimír; Sanz, Ana Belén; Cabib, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires transglycosylation mechanisms by which preexisting glycosidic linkages are broken and new linkages are created between the polysaccharides. The molecular mechanisms for these processes, which are essential for fungal cell biology, are only now beginning to be elucidated. Recent development of in vivo and in vitro biochemical approaches has allowed characterization of important aspects about the formation of chitin-glucan covalent cell wall cross-links by cell wall transglycosylases of the CRH family and their biological function. Covalent linkages between chitin and glucan mediated by Crh proteins control morphogenesis and also play important roles in the remodeling of the fungal cell wall as part of the compensatory responses necessary to counterbalance cell wall stress. These enzymes are encoded by multigene families of redundant proteins very well conserved in fungal genomes but absent in mammalian cells. Understanding the molecular basis of fungal adaptation to cell wall stress through these and other cell wall remodeling enzymatic activities offers an opportunity to explore novel antifungal treatments and to identify potential fungal virulence factors. PMID:27185288

  13. Bubble Formation from Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross-Flow Under Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flows present a wide variety of applications for spacecraft thermal control systems design. Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter, the gas flow rate, and the liquid cross-flow velocity. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small, the force balance in the liquid flow direction is important, and the bubble detaches when the bubble axis inclination exceeds a certain angle.

  14. Chemical structure, conjugation, and cross-reactivity of Bacillus pumilus Sh18 cell wall polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Coxon, Bruce; Schneerson, Rachel

    2004-10-01

    Bacillus pumilus strain Sh18 cell wall polysaccharide (CWP), cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b, was purified and its chemical structure was elucidated using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and sugar-specific degradation procedures. Two major structures, 1,5-poly(ribitol phosphate) and 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate), with the latter partially substituted by 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-galactopyranose (13%) and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-glucopyranose (6%) on position O-2, were found. A minor component was established to be a polymer of -->3-O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-glucopyranosyl)-1-->4-ribitol-1-OPO3-->. The ratios of the three components were 56, 34, and 10 mol%, respectively. The Sh18 CWP was covalently bound to carrier proteins, and the immunogenicity of the resulting conjugates was evaluated in mice. Two methods of conjugation were compared: (i) binding of 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate-activated hydroxyl groups of the CWP to adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH)-derivatized protein, and (ii) binding of the carbodiimide-activated terminal phosphate group of the CWP to ADH-derivatized protein. The conjugate-induced antibodies reacted in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the homologous polysaccharide and with a number of other bacterial polysaccharides containing ribitol and glycerol phosphates, including H. influenzae types a and b and strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PMID:15466043

  15. Reduction of ferulate ether cross links in maize stover due to selection for low ferulate ester concentrations in seedlings improves cell wall digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that ferulate-mediated cross links between lignin and hemicellulose in the cell walls of grasses could be reduced by inhibition of ferulate ester biosynthesis. Further, a reduction in cross linking should lead to improved digestibility of cell wall polysaccharides. We report here tha...

  16. Cross-Sectional Elasticity Imaging of Carotid Arterial Wall in Short-Axis Plane by Transcutaneous Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    We have developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai, M. Sato, Y. Koiwa and N. Chubachi: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791.] for measuring the minute change in thickness during one heartbeat and the elasticity of the arterial wall with transcutaneous ultrasound. When this method is applied to a plane perpendicular to the axis of the artery (short-axis plane) using a linear-type probe, only an ultrasonic beam which passes through the center of the artery coincides with the direction of the change in thickness. At other beam positions, the wall motion cannot be accurately tracked because the direction of wall expansion slips off the beam. To obtain the cross-sectional image of elasticity in the short-axis plane using transcutaneous ultrasound, in this paper, the directions of ultrasonic beams are designed so that each beam always passes through the center of the artery; thus, they always coincide with the direction of the wall expansion. In basic experiments, the accuracy in elasticity measurement was evaluated using a silicone rubber tube. In in vivo experiments, the minute change in wall thickness was measured along each ultrasonic beam, and the cross-sectional image of elasticity was obtained in the short-axis plane with transcutaneous ultrasound.

  17. Cross-Sectional Elasticity Imaging of Arterial Wall by Comparing Measured Change in Thickness with Model Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiang; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    For the assessment of the elasticity of the arterial wall, we have developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791] for measuring the minute change in thickness due to heartbeats and the elasticity of the arterial wall with transcutaneous ultrasound. For various reasons, for example, an extremely small deformation of the wall, the minute change in wall thickness during one heartbeat is largely influenced by noise in these cases and the reliability of the elasticity distribution obtained from the maximum change in thickness deteriorates because the maximum value estimation is largely influenced by noise. To obtain a more reliable cross-sectional image of the elasticity of the arterial wall, in this paper, a matching method is proposed to evaluate the waveform of the measured change in wall thickness by comparing the measured waveform with a template waveform. The maximum deformation, which is used in the calculation of elasticity, was determined from the amplitude of the matched model waveform to reduce the influence of noise. The matched model waveform was obtained by minimizing the difference between the measured and template waveforms. Furthermore, a random error, which was obtained from the reproducibility among the heartbeats of the measured waveform, was considered useful for the evaluation of the reliability of the measured waveform.

  18. Correlation formulas for the frost thickness and heat transfer coefficient on a cylinder in humid air cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.; Sherif, S.A.; Wong, K.V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on results of an experimental investigation where the emphasis was placed on obtaining empirical correlations for the frost thickness-time history and the heat transfer coefficient-time history for a cylinder in humid air cross flow. The facility employed for the investigation consisted of a low velocity wind tunnel comprised of a rectangular test section, a transition section and a honeycomb placed at the tunnel entrance. An external refrigerator was used to cool an antifreeze solution having a mixture of 90% methanol and 10% ethylene glycol. Measured parameters included, among other things, the heat transfer coefficient as well as the frost thickness.

  19. Formula Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John C.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the mathematical formula devised by George O. Weber on budgeting for physical plants of colleges and universities. Uses four functions of administration, maintenance (operational), housekeeping/custodial, and grounds as a base. (Author/MLF)

  20. Candida albicans cell walls contain the fluorescent cross-linking amino acid dityrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Smail, E H; Briza, P; Panagos, A; Berenfeld, L

    1995-01-01

    Several clinical and laboratory isolates of Candida albicans have a natural blue surface fluorescence when cultured and observed with sensitive optics. The localization and color of the fluorescence are similar to those of the natural fluorescence of sporulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is caused by the generation and surface deposition of the cross-linking amino acid dityrosine. In S. cerevisiae, dityrosine production results from the direct action of at least two genes and is responsible for resistance of the ascospores to lytic enzymes and physicochemical trauma. Among the criteria for the identification of dityrosine is pH sensitivity of the fluorescence intensity and a highly characteristic shift of the fluorescence excitation maximum with a change in pH. Video microscopy of whole Candida organisms revealed the characteristic dityrosine intensity maximum at pH approximately 10 and the intensity minimum at pH approximately 2. Separation of an acid hydrolysate of Candida cell walls by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a fluorescence peak that coelutes with the reagent dityrosine. At pH approximately 10, this peak has a fluorescence excitation maximum of 320 to 325 nm, while at pH approximately 2, the excitation maximum is 285 to 290 nm. This excitation maximum shift and the observed emission maximum of approximately 410 nm are characteristic of dityrosine. Two separate strains of C. albicans were injected intraperitoneally into mice and harvested at 24 h. Blue surface fluorescence was observed, suggesting that dityrosine generation occurs in vivo as well as in vitro. This is the first report of the presence of dityrosine in a human fungal pathogen. PMID:7558322

  1. MMP for moduli of sheaves on K3s via wall-crossing: nef and movable cones, Lagrangian fibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Arend; Macrì, Emanuele

    2014-12-01

    We use wall-crossing with respect to Bridgeland stability conditions to systematically study the birational geometry of a moduli space M of stable sheaves on a K3 surface X: 1. We describe the nef cone, the movable cone, and the effective cone of M in terms of the Mukai lattice of X. 2. We establish a long-standing conjecture that predicts the existence of a birational Lagrangian fibration on M whenever M admits an integral divisor class D of square zero (with respect to the Beauville-Bogomolov form). These results are proved using a natural map from the space of Bridgeland stability conditions Stab(X) to the cone Mov(X) of movable divisors on M; this map relates wall-crossing in Stab(X) to birational transformations of M. In particular, every minimal model of M appears as a moduli space of Bridgeland-stable objects on X.

  2. FIBER DEPOSITION ALONG AIRWAY WALLS: EFFECTS OF FIBER CROSS-SECTION ON ROTATIONAL INTERCEPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne fibers present a threat to human health. athematical model of fiber motion is presented which suggests that significant rotational deposition occurs along airway walls downstream of human lung bifurcations. he predictions are validated by cited experimental data. oth pro...

  3. Fishy Formulas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, William; Sizzo, Jennifer; Curtis, Anita; Klein, Shannon; Micale, Cheryl; Lin, E-Sin

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity presented in sports fishing magazines on developing a formula that predicts the weight in pounds of a game fish given its length in inches by using a TI-83 graphing calculator. Highlights the importance of using real-life problems and mathematical explorations. (ASK)

  4. Vortex dynamics and transport to the wall in a crossed-field plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1987-04-10

    Results of numerical simulations of the time-dependent behavior of a transversely magnetized plasma-wall sheath are presented. These simulations have been conducted with the aim of modelling plasma behavior in the vicinity of the limiters and walls of a fusion device. The two-dimensional, bounded particle simulation code ''ES2'' has been used as a tool for the investigation of these edge effects, in an idealized geometry which retains, however, the essential features of the physics of the edge plasma. The simulations have revealed that the bounded plasma is subject to the so-called ''Kelvin-Helmholtz'' instability, an instability maintained by the non-uniform electric field which is induced by the presence of the material walls. This instability is seen to saturate into large and stable vortices, with e phi/T/sub i/ approx. 1, which exist in the vicinity of the walls, and drift parallel to their surfaces. An important feature of these structures is that they continuously convect particles to the walls, at an ''anomalous'' rate much greater than that induced by collisional diffusion, a feature which seems tied to the mutual interaction of the vortices. In the code ''ES2'', volume ionization of neutrals has been modelled by a uniform electron-ion pair creation in the simulation region, and this results in a steady state, in which the linear edge instability, the nonlinear fluid dynamics of the vortices, and the nonlinear dynamics of the particles scattered by the vortices all balance each other. This steady-state but non-equilibrium configuration, which is a first model of the edge behavior induced by the boundaries, is conceptually analogous to Rayleigh-Benard convection.

  5. Model Stacking (MOST) technique applied in cross-hole ERT field data for the detection of Thessaloniki ancient walls' depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontarakis, Konstantinos; Apostolopoulos, George V.

    2013-06-01

    A cross-hole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) study was undertaken near the center of Thessaloniki in order to detect the depth of the existing city walls in the planned route of the new city underground train. This cross-hole setup was used for a study of measurements with various electrode arrays in real urban field conditions to evaluate the resolution of the models which is produced by each array and the reliability of the models which is produced by the newly published "MOST" technique. The pole-tripole array (C2-C1P1P2) produces high resolution models, even when only borehole electrodes are used. The bipole-bipole C1C2-P1P2 array, when used for cross-hole measurements only, produces higher resolution models compared to the C1P1-C2P2 array, even with a lower signal-to-noise ratio, which can result in extremely high RMS error, when noise, systematic or not, must be faced. The models of both arrays are greatly improved by the use of surface electrodes. The pole-bipole array (C1-P1P2) is proved to be less accurate in imaging and quite unstable to the noisy urban environment and to systematic errors. Furthermore, the Model Stacking (MOST) interpretation technique leads to better results with models of greater resolution and fewer artifacts compared even with the combined data inversion. Finally, the ERT cross-hole analysis has been reliable in detecting the city walls.

  6. Cross-Sectional Elastic Imaging of Arterial Wall Using Intravascular Ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hitoshi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Yoshiro; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2001-07-01

    There have been several studies on the imaging of the distribution of the elasticity of the arterial wall using intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS). In those studies, the elasticity is estimated only during ventricular diastole. However, the viscous characteristics of the smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall are also included in the strain measured during diastole. Alternatively, during systole, the smooth muscle has an almost purely elastic characteristic. However, the IVUS probe moves greatly due to the arrival of the pulsatile wave at the beginning of the ejection period. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method to compensate for the movement of the IVUS probe in order to precisely measure the regional change in thickness of the arterial wall during one cardiac cycle. Basic experiments using a silicone rubber tube, in which pulsatile flow is generated by an artificial heart, determined the two-dimensional (2-D) distribution of the regional change in thickness and the elasticity. The obtained incremental elastic modulus coincides with that determined by the static pressure-strain test. Furthermore, in an in vitro experiment performed on an extracted human iliac artery, the 2-D distribution of elasticity is obtained and compared with pathological results.

  7. Theory of anisotropic thin-walled closed-cross-section beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdichevsky, Victor; Armanios, Erian; Badir, Ashraf

    1992-01-01

    A variationally and asymptotically consistent theory is developed in order to derive the governing equations of anisotropic thin-walled beams with closed sections. The theory is based on an asymptotic analysis of two-dimensional shell theory. Closed-form expressions for the beam-stiffness coefficients, stress and displacement fields are provided. The influence of material anisotropy on the displacement field is identified. A comparison with the displacement fields obtained by other analytical developments is performed. The stiffness coefficients and static response are also compared with finite element predictions, closed-form solutions and test data.

  8. Catheter ultrasound for cross-sectional imaging and drug delivery to vessel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossack, John A.

    2015-05-01

    Current methods for delivery of an anti-restenosis drug to an arterial vessel wall post-percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement are limited in terms of drug choice, dosing level, and ability to assure drug coverage between the struts of a drug eluting stent. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides real-time, radiation-free, imaging and assessment of atherosclerotic disease in terms of anatomical, functional and molecular information. In this presentation, the design of a dual imaging / therapy IVUS catheter is described and results documenting gene and drug delivery reported. Microbubbles and drug / gene (shell associated or co-injected) are dispensed from the catheter tip. Using this approach, it becomes possible to address the need for complete vessel wall coverage and achieve delivery in regions poorly addressed using conventional stent-based approaches. A range of in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo results are presented. Our most recent results involve a demonstration in a pig model of coronary balloon angioplasty that produced a 33% reduction in neointima formation versus a drug plus microbubble, but no ultrasound, control.

  9. Vortex Partition Functions, Wall Crossing and Equivariant Gromov-Witten Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we identify the problem of equivariant vortex counting in a (2,2) supersymmetric two dimensional quiver gauged linear sigma model with that of computing the equivariant Gromov-Witten invariants of the GIT quotient target space determined by the quiver. We provide new contour integral formulae for the and -functions encoding the equivariant quantum cohomology of the target space. Its chamber structure is shown to be encoded in the analytical properties of the integrand. This is explained both via general arguments and by checking several key cases. We show how several results in equivariant Gromov-Witten theory follow just by deforming the integration contour. In particular, we apply our formalism to compute Gromov-Witten invariants of the orbifold, of the Uhlembeck (partial) compactification of the moduli space of instantons on , and of A n and D n singularities both in the orbifold and resolved phases. Moreover, we analyse dualities of quantum cohomology rings of holomorphic vector bundles over Grassmannians, which are relevant to BPS Wilson loop algebrae.

  10. LytN, a Murein Hydrolase in the Cross-wall Compartment of Staphylococcus aureus, Is Involved in Proper Bacterial Growth and Envelope Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Matthew B.; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle progression for the spherical microbe Staphylococcus aureus requires the coordinated synthesis and remodeling of peptidoglycan. The majority of these rearrangements takes place at the mid-cell, in a compartment designated the cross-wall. Secreted polypeptides endowed with a YSIRK-G/S signal peptide are directly delivered to the cross-wall compartment. One such YSIRK-containing protein is the murein hydrolase LytN. lytN mutations precipitate structural damage to the cross-wall and interfere with staphylococcal growth. Overexpression of lytN also affects growth and triggers rupture of the cross-wall. The lytN phenotype can be reversed by the controlled expression of lytN but not by adding purified LytN to staphylococcal cultures. LytN harbors LysM and CHAP domains, the latter of which functions as both an N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase and d-alanyl-glycine endopeptidase. Thus, LytN secretion into the cross-wall promotes peptidoglycan separation and completion of the staphylococcal cell cycle. PMID:21784864

  11. The Wall Interference of a Wind Tunnel of Elliptic Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tani, Itiro; Sanuki, Matao

    1944-01-01

    The wall interference is obtained for a wind tunnel of elliptic section for the two cases of closed and open working sections. The approximate and exact methods used gave results in practically good agreement. Corresponding to the result given by Glauert for the case of the closed rectangular section, the interference is found to be a minimum for a ratio of minor to major axis of 1:square root of 6 This, however, is true only for the case where the span of the airfoil is small in comparison with the width of the tunnel. For a longer airfoil the favorable ellipse is flatter. In the case of the open working section the circular shape gives the minimum interference.

  12. Silylesterification of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes by catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling between carboxylic and hydrosilane functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, J.-F.; Detriche, S.; Nagy, J. B.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Surface modification of oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNTs) with silicon based anchoring groups (R-SiR3) is a relatively uncommon approach of the CNTs functionalization. Hydrosilane derivatives constitute an attractive subclass of compounds for silanization reactions on the CNTs surface. In this work, we report on the ZnCl2 catalytically controlled reaction (hydrosilane dehydrogenative cross-coupling, DHCC) of fluorinated hydrosilane probes with the carboxylic functions present on the surface of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with essentially alcohol groups are also used to compare the selectivity of zinc chloride toward carboxylic groups. To assess the efficiency of functionalization, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to determine the qualitative and quantitative composition of the different samples. Solubility tests on the oxidized and silanized MWNTs are also carried out in the framework of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) theory to apprehend at another scale the effect of DHCC.

  13. Covalent cross-linking of cell-wall polysaccharides through esterified diferulates as a maize resistance mechanism against corn borers.

    PubMed

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Santiago, Rogelio; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Malvar, Rosa A

    2015-03-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that cross-linking of cell-wall polymers through ester-linked diferulates has a key role in plant resistance to pests; however, direct experimentation to provide conclusive proof is lacking. This study presents an evaluation of the damage caused by two corn borer species on six maize populations particularly selected for divergent diferulate concentrations in pith stem tissues. Maize populations selected for high total diferulate concentration had 31% higher diferulates than those selected for low diferulates. Stem tunneling by corn borer species was 29% greater in the population with the lowest diferulates than in the population with the highest diferulates (31.7 versus 22.6 cm), whereas total diferulate concentration was negatively correlated with stem tunneling by corn borers. Moreover, orthogonal contrasts between groups of populations evaluated showed that larvae fed in laboratory bioassays on pith stem tissues from maize populations with higher diferulates had 30-40% lower weight than larvae fed on the same tissues from maize populations with lower diferulates. This is the first report that shows a direct relationship between diferulate deposition in maize cell walls and corn borer resistance. Current findings will help to develop adapted maize varieties with an acceptable level of resistance against borers and be useful in special kinds of agriculture, such as organic farming. PMID:25619118

  14. Prediction of Bubble Diameter at Detachment from a Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross Flow Under Reduced and Normal Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two-phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to theoretically investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate embodied in the momentum flux force, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. A two-dimensional one-stage theoretical model based on a global force balance on the bubble evolving from a wall orifice in a cross liquid flow is presented in this work. In this model, relevant forces acting on the evolving bubble are expressed in terms of the bubble center of mass coordinates and solved simultaneously. Relevant forces in low gravity included the momentum flux, shear-lift, surface tension, drag and inertia forces. Under normal gravity conditions, the buoyancy force, which is dominant under such conditions, can be added to the force balance. Two detachment criteria were applicable depending on the gas to liquid momentum force ratio. For low ratios, the time when the bubble acceleration in the direction of the detachment angle is greater or equal to zero is calculated from the bubble x and y coordinates. This time is taken as the time at which all the detaching forces that are acting on the bubble are greater or equal to the attaching forces. For high gas to liquid momentum force ratios, the time at which the y coordinate less the bubble radius equals zero is calculated. The bubble diameter is evaluated at this time as the diameter at detachment from the fact that the bubble volume is simply given by the product of the gas flow rate and time elapsed. Comparison of the model s predictions was also made with predictions from a two-dimensional normal gravity model based on Kumar-Kuloor formulation and such a comparison is presented in this work.

  15. The Pore Size of Non-Graminaceous Plant Cell Walls Is Rapidly Decreased by Borate Ester Cross-Linking of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II1

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Axel; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Ehwald, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan II (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH ≤ 2.0 or by treatment with Ca2+-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca2+, but not by Na+ or Mg2+ ions at pH 1.5. The Ca2+-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Our results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed. PMID:10557231

  16. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; O'Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  17. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Schnoor, Michael; Alcaide, Pilar; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers. PMID:26568666

  18. Influence of non-adiabatic wall conditions on the cross-flow around a circular cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Macha, J.M.; Shafa, K.S.

    1984-02-01

    The drag and heat transfer of a finite length circular cylinder in a cross-flow have been investigated in a wind tunnel at surface-to-freestream temperature ratios from 1.0 to 2.1 for freestream Reynolds numbers of 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ and 4.4 x 10/sup 5/. The measured surface pressures were integrated to determine the effect of cylinder temperature on the drag coefficient, and the average Nusselt number was calculated from the electrical power required to heat the cylinder. For the freestream Reynolds number of 4.4 x 10/sup 5/, the experimental data show that increasing the cylinder temperature caused a reverse-transition from supercritical to subcritical flow. As a result of the increased size of the low-velocity wake region, C /SUB D/ increased by 21 percent and Nu /SUB d/ decreased by 26 percent.

  19. Optical Absorption Cross Section of Individual Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Visible Region.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad Imran; Shahzad, Nadia; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to determine the optical absorption cross section for visible radiation of various types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) having different dimensions through macroscopic optical measurements. This is achieved by dispersing MWCNTs in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and preparing composite films. Different percentages (0.0% to 1.5%) of each MWCNTs type were mixed into the PDMS matrix using high speed mechanical stirring (~1000 rpm) and ultrasonication (~37 kHz) to reach optimal dispersion. By using doctor blading technique, 100 µm thick uniform films were produced on glass. They were then thermally cured and detached from the glass to get flexible and self-standing films. Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis of cryo-fractured composite samples was used to check the dispersion of MWCNTs in PDMS, while Raman spectroscopy and FTIR were employed to rule out possible structural changes of the polymer in the composite that would have altered its optical properties. Total and specular reflection and transmission spectra were measured for all films. The absorption coefficient, which represents the fractional absorption per unit length and is proportional to the concentration of absorbing sites (i.e., MWCNTs at photon energies upon which PDMS is non-absorbing), was extracted. For each MWCNTs type, the absorption cross section of an individual MWCNT was obtained from the slope of absorption coefficient versus MWCNTs number density curve. It was found to be related with MWCNT volume. This method can be applied to all other nanoparticles as far as they can be dispersed in a host transparent matrix. PMID:27398474

  20. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-09

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  1. Cross polarization caused by perturbed circular cross sections of waveguides and horn antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lier, Erik

    1987-03-01

    The cross polarization caused by a perturbed cross section of the conical hybrid-mode horn is analyzed. The perturbed cross section is assumed to be slightly elliptical. The theory of Lier and Bergh (1986) for cross polarization in a smooth-walled waveguide supporting the TE11-mode is referred and applied to the HE11 mode as well. Simple analytical formulas which are sufficiently accurate for small ellipticites of the cross-section ellipse are presented. These show that the tolerances on the waveguide diameter are extremely strong, typically on the order of 0.02-0.04 mm in the horn throat for typical horn geometries at 12 GHz.

  2. Mass transfer through laminar boundary layer in 2-d microchannels with nonuniform cross section: the effect of wall curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedacchia, Augusta; Adrover, Alessandra

    2012-11-01

    We provide an analytical solution for the combined diffusive and convective 2-d mass transport from a surface film (of arbitrary shape at a given uniform concentration) to a pure solvent flowing in creeping flow conditions into a microchannel, delimited by a flat no-slip surface and by the releasing film itself. Such a problem arises in the study of swelling and dissolution of polimeric thin films under the action of a solvent tangential flow simulating the oral thin film dissolution for drug relase towards the buccal mucosa or oral cavity. We present a similarity solution for laminar forced convection mass (or heat) transfer that generalizes the classical boundary layer solution of the Graetz-Nusselt problem (valid for straight channels or pipes) to a solvent flowing in creeping flow conditions into a 2-d channel with cross-section continuously varying along the axial coordinate x. Close to the releasing boundary, parametrized by a curvilinear abscissa s, both tangential and normal velocity components play a role and their scaling behavior, as a function of wall distance r, should be taken into account in order to have an accurate description of the concentration profile in the boundary layer and of the dependence of the Sherwood number on the curvilinear abscissa s.

  3. A Cross Structured Light Sensor and Stripe Segmentation Method for Visual Tracking of a Wall Climbing Robot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liguo; Sun, Jianguo; Yin, Guisheng; Zhao, Jing; Han, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal welds, weld line tracking is usually performed outdoors, where the structured light sources are always disturbed by various noises, such as sunlight, shadows, and reflections from the weld line surface. In this paper, we design a cross structured light (CSL) to detect the weld line and propose a robust laser stripe segmentation algorithm to overcome the noises in structured light images. An adaptive monochromatic space is applied to preprocess the image with ambient noises. In the monochromatic image, the laser stripe obtained is recovered as a multichannel signal by minimum entropy deconvolution. Lastly, the stripe centre points are extracted from the image. In experiments, the CSL sensor and the proposed algorithm are applied to guide a wall climbing robot inspecting the weld line of a wind power tower. The experimental results show that the CSL sensor can capture the 3D information of the welds with high accuracy, and the proposed algorithm contributes to the weld line inspection and the robot navigation. PMID:26110403

  4. A Cross Structured Light Sensor and Stripe Segmentation Method for Visual Tracking of a Wall Climbing Robot

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liguo; Sun, Jianguo; Yin, Guisheng; Zhao, Jing; Han, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal welds, weld line tracking is usually performed outdoors, where the structured light sources are always disturbed by various noises, such as sunlight, shadows, and reflections from the weld line surface. In this paper, we design a cross structured light (CSL) to detect the weld line and propose a robust laser stripe segmentation algorithm to overcome the noises in structured light images. An adaptive monochromatic space is applied to preprocess the image with ambient noises. In the monochromatic image, the laser stripe obtained is recovered as a multichannel signal by minimum entropy deconvolution. Lastly, the stripe centre points are extracted from the image. In experiments, the CSL sensor and the proposed algorithm are applied to guide a wall climbing robot inspecting the weld line of a wind power tower. The experimental results show that the CSL sensor can capture the 3D information of the welds with high accuracy, and the proposed algorithm contributes to the weld line inspection and the robot navigation. PMID:26110403

  5. Finite-element modelling of low-temperature autofrettage of thick-walled tubes of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L: Part II. Thick-walled tube with cross-bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H.; Donth, B.; Mughrabi, H.

    1998-01-01

    In part I, the autofrettage of a smooth thick-walled tube of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L was studied by finite-element (FE) modelling. It was shown that low- temperature autofrettage is more efficient than autofrettage at room temperature, since it produces a larger beneficial compressive residual tangential (hoop) stress at the inner bore of the tube and hence permits a more significant enhancement of the fatigue resistance against pulsating internal pressure. The objective of the present study (part II) was to investigate the technically more relevant case of a thick-walled tube with a cross-bore made of the same steel. For this purpose, three-dimensional FE calculations were performed in order to characterize the influences of the autofrettage pressure and temperature on the stress and strain changes, in particular at the site of the cross-bore, also taking into account the effects of work hardening and reverse yielding. The results indicate that low-temperature autofrettage can also be applied advantageously in the case of thick-walled tubes with a cross-bore by virtue of the significantly larger residual compressive stresses, compared to room temperature autofrettage. From the quantitative FE calculations, the optimal combination of autofrettage temperature and pressure were concluded to lie in the range of 0965-0393/6/1/007/img1 to 0965-0393/6/1/007/img2, respectively. The calculated results were found to be in fair agreement with the measured values.

  6. Photodetachment of H- near a hard wall with arbitrary laser polarization direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Azmat; Afaq, A.

    2015-08-01

    The photodetachment of H- near a hard wall is investigated with linear polarized laser light travelling in arbitrary direction θL with respect to the z axis. An analytical formula for the total cross section is derived using semi-classical closed orbit theory, which consists of two terms, i.e., the smooth background term and the oscillatory term with an extra factor 2(θL). This factor controls oscillations in the total photodetachment cross section. The amplitude of oscillation is maximum at θL = 0 when the laser polarization direction is perpendicular to the wall and it approaches zero at θL = π /2 when the laser polarization direction is parallel to the wall. It is also observed that the total cross section depends on the source-wall distance and it reduces to a free space case when the wall is at infinite distance from the source.

  7. Infant formulas - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... meet all their nutritional needs. Infant formulas include powders, concentrated liquids, and ready-to-use forms. ... it. Reflux formulas are pre-thickened with rice starch. They are usually needed only for infants with ...

  8. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... breastfeed your baby or bottle feed using infant formula . Health experts agree that breastfeeding is the healthiest ... is hungry. You do not need to make formula before feeding, worry about clean water, or carry ...

  9. Infant formulas - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... 6 months of life, infants need only breast milk or formula to meet all their nutritional needs. ... 12 months old who are not drinking breast milk . While there are some differences, infant formulas sold ...

  10. Cross-hole radar scanning of two vertical, permeable, reactive-iron walls at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Joesten, P.K.; Savoie, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted by the U.S. Army National Guard (USANG) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to assess the use of a hydraulic-fracturing method to create vertical, permeable walls of zero-valent iron to passively remediate ground water contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The study was conducted near the source area of the Chemical Spill-10 (CS-10) plume, a plume containing chlorinated solvents that underlies the MMR. Ground-water contamination near the source area extends from about 24 m (meters) to 35 m below land surface. The USANG designed two reactive-iron walls to be 12 m long and positioned 24 to 37 m below land surface to intersect and remediate part of the CS-10 plume.Because iron, as an electrical conductor, absorbs electromagnetic energy, the US Geological Survey used a cross-hole common-depth, radar scanning method to assess the continuity and to estimate the lateral and vertical extent of the two reactive-iron walls. The cross-hole radar surveys were conducted in boreholes on opposite sides of the iron injection zones using electric-dipole antennas with dominant center frequencies of 100 and 250 MHz. Significant decreases in the radar-pulse amplitudes observed in scans that traversed the injection zones were interpreted by comparing field data to results of two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain numerical models and laboratory-scale physical models.The numerical and physical models simulate a wall of perfectly conducting material embedded in saturated sand. Results from the numerical and physical models show that the amplitude of the radar pulse transmitted across the edge of a conductive wall is about 43 percent of the amplitude of a radar pulse transmitted across background material. The amplitude of a radar pulse transmitted through a hole in a conductive wall increases as the aperture of the hole increases. The modeling results indicate that holes with an aperture of less than 40

  11. Designing State Aid Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Bo; Bradbury, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    This paper designs a new equalization-aid formula based on fiscal gaps of local communities. When states are in transition to a new local aid formula, the issue of whether and how to hold existing aid harmless poses a challenge. The authors show that some previous studies and the formulas derived from them give differential weights to existing and…

  12. The Texas Formula System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Ralph W.; And Others

    Explained and illustrated is the formula funding system used for colleges and universities in Texas. This system is considerably more complicated than the formulas used in other states. Data for institutions in the state system for fiscal 1978 are presented; actual appropriations are used rather than requests, and formula-produced amounts are…

  13. Study by micro-Raman spectroscopy of wall paints (external parts and cross-sections) from reales alcazares of Seville (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, José Luis; Centeno, Miguel Angel; Robador, María Dolores; Siguenza, Belinda; Durán, Adrián

    2013-04-01

    The Reales Alcazares of Sevilla was originally builded by the Arabic in the year 913. The Mudejar Palace was built by Christian King Pedro I between 1364 and 1366. At the end of XV century the Catholic Kings, Isabel and Fernando made important transformations especially in the Mudejar Palace. Recently, wall paints from Catholic Kings periods were found during works of conservations in the first floor of the Palace. The study of these paints by non-destructive techniques was considered of great interest in order to determine the technology of manufacture and the originality of the artwork. The main objective of this work was to apply the Raman spectroscopy technique on the surface of the wall and on the different layers of the cross-sections prepared in order to characterize the pigments and the plaster present in these wall paints. Little information was obtained using a portable Raman spectrometer. In this case the dispersive integrated Horiba Jobin-Yvon LabRaman HR800 system was employed. Small samples of black, red, yellow, white and green colour were taken from the artwork. The surface of the samples were directly studed by the Raman spectroscopy instrument using red (785 nm) and green (522 nm) lasers, similarly to non-invasive experimental technique. This technique showed the presence of gypsum (SO4Ca.2H2O) and calcite (CaCO3) in all the studied samples However, the pigments responsible of different colours were not detected. The surface of these wall paints was covered with gypsum and calcite due to contamination. These mineras were also characterized by XRD and SEM-EDX. The presence of these compounds and the heterogeneous surface did not permit the characterization of the pigments responsible of the colour. In order to better characterization of the pigments and plaster used the study was carried out on cross-sections. The black colour was performed using carbon black. Two different red layers were detected one constituted by cinnabar and lead carbonate and

  14. Short and long term predictive value of admission wall motion score in acute myocardial infarction. A cross sectional echocardiographic study of 345 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kan, G; Visser, C A; Koolen, J J; Dunning, A J

    1986-01-01

    A score of left ventricular segmental wall motion was used as a convenient rapid way to assess overall left ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction. Its success in risk stratification at admission was assessed by a blind review of cross sectional echocardiographic tape recordings from multiple acoustic windows. Sixty nine (20%) of the 345 patients died during hospital stay or within a one year follow up. The mean (SD) wall motion score in those who died was significantly higher than in those who survived (16.2 (5.9) vs 5.7 (3.9)). There were no differences between the group that died in hospital within three months of discharge and the group that died between three months and one year after discharge. Among the 31 patients who died in hospital, however, wall motion score was highest in 15 patients dying of cardiogenic shock (19.2 (4.2)). In 16 patients with lethal ruptures it was 13.5 (6.1). The nine patients with free wall ruptures had higher wall motion scores than those with ventricular septal rupture or papillary muscle rupture (15.7 (6.9) vs 8.5 (5.3)). Eight (3.3%) of 245 patients with a score less than 10 died, compared with 61 (61%) of 100 scoring greater than or equal to 10. The sensitivity of a score of greater than or equal to 10 in predicting death within one year was 88%, the specificity was 86%, the positive predictive value was 61%, and the negative predictive value was 97%. PMID:3790378

  15. A load factor formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Roy G

    1927-01-01

    The ultimate test of a load factor formula is experience. The chief advantages of a semi rational formula over arbitrary factors are that it fairs in between points of experience and it differentiates according to variables within a type. Structural failure of an airplane apparently safe according to the formula would call for a specific change in the formula. The best class of airplanes with which to check a load factor formula seems to be those which have experienced structural failure. Table I comprises a list of the airplanes which have experienced failure in flight traceable to the wing structure. The load factor by formula is observed to be greater than the designed strength in each case, without a single exception. Table II comprises the load factor by formula with the designed strength of a number of well-known service types. The formula indicates that by far the majority of these have ample structural strength. One case considered here in deriving a suitable formula is that of a heavy load carrier of large size and practically no reserve power.

  16. Design of Advanced MnO/N-Gr 3D Walls through Polymer Cross-Linking for High-Performance Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Quang; Kang, Bong Kyun; Tiruneh, Sintayehu Nibret; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-01-26

    Three-dimensional, vertically aligned MnO/nitrogen-doped graphene (3D MnO/N-Gr) walls were prepared through facile solution-phase synthesis followed by thermal treatment. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was strategically added to generate cross-links to simultaneously form 3D wall structures and to incorporate nitrogen atoms into the graphene network. The unique wall features of the as-prepared 3D MnO/N-Gr hybirdes provide a large surface area (91.516 m(2) g(-1)) and allow for rapid diffusion of the ion electrolyte, resulting in a high specific capacitance of 378 F g(-1) at 0.25 A g(-1) and an excellent charge/discharge stability (93.7% capacity retention after 8000 cycles) in aqueous 1 m Na2 SO4 solution as electrolyte. Moreover, the symmetric supercapacitors that were rationally designed by using 3D MnO/N-Gr hybrids exhibit outstanding electrochemical performance in an organic electrolyte with an energy density of 90.6 Wh kg(-1) and a power density of 437.5 W kg(-1). PMID:26689298

  17. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  18. Selected Baking Formulas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdany, Melvin

    This manual is designed to help baking students learn to use formulas in the preparation of baking products. Tested and proven formulas are, for the most part, standard ones with only slight modifications. The recipes are taken mainly from bakery product manufacturers and are presented in quantities suitable for school-shop use. Each recipe…

  19. Calculation of Centrally Loaded Thin-Walled Columns Above the Buckling Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinitzhuber, F.

    1945-01-01

    When thin-walled columns formed from flanged sheet, such as used in airplane construction, are subjected to axial load, their behavior at failure varies according to the slenderness ratio. On long columns the axis deflects laterally while the cross section form is maintained; buckling results. The respective breaking load in the elastic range is computed by Euler's formula and for the plastic range by the Engesser- Karman formula. Its magnitude is essentially dependent upon the length. On intermediate length columns, especially where open sections are concerned, the cross section is distorted while the cross section form is preserved; twisting failure results. The buckling load in twisting is calculated according to Wagner and Kappus. On short columns the straight walls of low-bending resistance that form the column are deflected at the same time that the cross section form changes - buckling occurs without immediate failure. Then the buckling load of the total section computable from the buckling loads of the section walls is not the ultimate load; quite often, especially on thin-walled sections, it lies considerably higher and is secured by tests. Both loads, the buckling and the ultimate load are only in a small measure dependent upon length. The present report is an attempt to theoretically investigate the behavior of such short, thin-walled columns above the buckling load with the conventional calculating methods.

  20. Reflections on Online Learning Designs and Cross-Institutional Research Collaborations: Revisiting "Classrooms without Walls" in Two Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Dolene; van Rensburg, Henriette; Clark, Damien; Harreveld, R. E.; Beer, Colin; Danaher, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article on which this paper reflects ["Exploring a Cross-Institutional Research Collaboration and Innovation: Deploying Social Software and Web 2.0 Technologies to Investigate Online Learning Designs and Interactions in Two Australian Universities"] presented elements of a research project investigating learning interactions in…

  1. Identities for Generalized Appell Functions and the Blow-up Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringmann, Kathrin; Manschot, Jan; Rolen, Larry

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we prove identities for a class of generalized Appell functions which are based on the {A_2} root lattice. The identities are reminiscent of periodicity relations for the classical Appell function and are proven using only analytical properties of the functions. Moreover, they are a consequence of the blow-up formula for generating functions of invariants of moduli spaces of semi-stable sheaves of rank 3 on rational surfaces. Our proof confirms that in the latter context, different routes to compute the generating function (using the blow-up formula and wall-crossing) do arrive at identical q-series. The proof also gives a clear procedure on how to prove analogous identities for generalized Appell functions appearing in generating functions for sheaves with rank {r>3}.

  2. Cottingham formula and nucleon polarisabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, J.; Hoferichter, M.; Leutwyler, H.; Rusetsky, A.

    2015-08-01

    The difference between the electromagnetic self-energies of proton and neutron can be calculated with the Cottingham formula, which expresses the self-energies as an integral over the electroproduction cross sections - provided the nucleon matrix elements of the current commutator do not contain a fixed pole. We show that, under the same proviso, the subtraction function occurring in the dispersive representation of the virtual Compton forward scattering amplitude is determined by the cross sections. The representation in particular leads to a parameter-free sum rule for the nucleon polarisabilities. We evaluate the sum rule for the difference between the electric polarisabilities of proton and neutron by means of the available parameterisations of the data and compare the result with experiment.

  3. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding KidsHealth > For Parents > Breastfeeding vs. ... for you and your baby. continue All About Breastfeeding Nursing can be a wonderful experience for both ...

  4. Readability Formulas: Pluses and Minuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rygiel, Mary Ann

    1982-01-01

    Examines readability formulas and examples of their misuse. Analyzes an essay by George Orwell which was given a grade 10 readability level by one formula and discusses characteristics of Orwell's style that refute the accuracy of formula rating. (HTH)

  5. Cross-polarized optical absorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes probed by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, UV-Vis-IR and polarized Raman Scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-03-01

    Because of the depolarization effect, or so-called antenna effect, optical absorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is weak when excited by light polarized perpendicular to the nanotube axis. However, in photoluminescence (PL) excitation spectra of isolated SWNTs, PL peaks due to cross-polarized excitation can be clearly identified. By decomposing the cross-polarized component, the optical transition energy of E12 or E21 can be? measured, and the smaller exciton binding energy for perpendicular excitations is concluded [1]. Cross-polarized absorption is dominant in the absorption of a vertically aligned film of SWNTs [2] when excited from the top of the film. In our previous study, a pi-plasmon absorption at 5.25 eV was revealed in contrast to 4.5 eV for parallel excitation [3]. Resonant Raman scattering from such a film is also influenced by the cross-polarized excitation [4]. Even though a Kataura plot for the E33 and E44 range has been proposed by using such a vertically aligned film [5], polarized Raman scattering spectra reveal more complicated features in the system because of the small bundle size, typically 5-8 nanotubes [6]. References: [1] Y. Miyauchi, M. Oba, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 205440. [2] Y. Murakami, S. Chiashi, Y. Miyauchi, M. Hu, M. Ogura, T. Okubo, S. Maruyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 385 (2004) 298. [3] Y. Murakami, E. Einarsson, T. Edamura, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 087402. [4] Y. Murakami, S. Chiashi, E. Einarsson, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. B 71 (2005) 085403. [5] P. T. Araujo, S. K. Doorn, S. Kilina, S. Tretiak, E. Einarsson, S. Maruyama, H. Chacham, M. A. Pimenta, A. Jorio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2007) 067401. [6] E. Einarsson, H. Shiozawa, C. Kramberger, M. H. Ruemmeli, A. Gruneis, T. Pichler, S. Maruyama, J. Phys. Chem. C (2007) published on Web.

  6. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L.) subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH) has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected) and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES) and post-elongation stem (PES) internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV) regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs), the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes suggested co

  7. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  8. A Simple Approach to the Landau-Zener Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vutha, Amar C.

    2010-01-01

    The Landau-Zener formula provides the probability of non-adiabatic transitions occurring when two energy levels are swept through an avoided crossing. The formula is derived here in a simple calculation that emphasizes the physics responsible for non-adiabatic population transfer. (Contains 2 figures.)

  9. Direct calculation of wall interferences and wall adaptation for two-dimensional flow in wind tunnels with closed walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amecke, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    A method for the direct calculation of the wall induced interference velocity in two dimensional flow based on Cauchy's integral formula was derived. This one-step method allows the calculation of the residual corrections and the required wall adaptation for interference-free flow starting from the wall pressure distribution without any model representation. Demonstrated applications are given.

  10. The Mystical "Quadratic Formula."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Uses projectile motion to explain the two roots found when using the quadratic formula. An example is provided for finding the time of flight for a projectile which has a negative root implying a negative time of flight. This negative time of flight also has a useful physical meaning. (MVL)

  11. The Formula Essay Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haluska, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Bruce Pirie offers the following criticism about formula essays: "What does a five-paragraph essay teach about writing? It teaches that there are rules, and that those rules take the shape of a preordained form, like a cookie-cutter, into which we can pour ideas and expect them to come out well shaped." He goes on to discredit such essays as being…

  12. Research Timeline: Formulaic language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Creating a timeline for formulaic language is far from simple, because several partially independent lines of research have contributed to the emerging picture. Each exhibits cycles of innovation and consolidation over time: domains take a leading role in developing new knowledge and then fall back, while another area comes to the fore. Thus, some…

  13. Profiling and comparison of color body wall transcriptome of normal juvenile sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) and those produced by crossing albino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Deyou; Yang, Hongsheng; Sun, Lina

    2014-12-01

    Sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) is one of the most important aquaculture animals in China. Usually its normal body color is black that fits its living environment. The juvenile individuals obtained by crossing albino sea cucumber segregated in body color. To document the transcriptome difference between albino associating sea cucumber and the control, we sequenced their transcriptomes with RNA-seq. Approximately, 4.790 million (M) and 4.884 M reads, 200 nt in length, were generated from the body wall of albino associating sea cucumber and the control, respectively, from them, 9550 (46.81%) putative genes were identified. In total, 583 genes were found to express differentially between albino associating sea cucumber and the control. Of these differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 4.8% changed more than five-folds. The expression levels of eight DEGs were confirmed with real-time PCR. The changing trend of these DEGs detected with real-time PCR agreed well with that detected with RNA-seq, although the change degree of some DEGs was different. Four significantly enriched pathways were identified for DEGs, which included phagocytosis, Staphylococcus aureus infection, ECM-receptor interaction and focal adhesion. These pathways were helpful for understanding the physiological difference between albino associating sea cucumber and the control.

  14. Calculations of Laminar Heat Transfer Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section and Transpiration-Cooled Walls with Application to Turbine Blade Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Livingood, J N B

    1955-01-01

    An approximate method for the development of flow and thermal boundary layers in the laminar region on cylinders with arbitrary cross section and transpiration-cooled walls is obtained by the use of Karman's integrated momentum equation and an analogous heat-flow equation. Incompressible flow with constant property values throughout the boundary layer is assumed. The velocity and temperature profiles within the boundary layer are approximated by expressions composed of trigonometric functions. Shape parameters for these profiles and functions necessary for the solution of the boundary-layer equations are presented as graphs so that the calculation for any specific case is reduced to the solution of two first-order differential equations. This method is applied to determine local heat-transfer coefficients and surface temperatures in the laminar flow region of the transpiration-cooled turbine blades for a given coolant flow rate, or to calculate the coolant flow distribution which is necessary in order to keep the blade temperature uniform along the surface.

  15. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  16. Budget Formulas and Model Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Robert G.

    Selected budget formulas currently in use for university operations are described as a background for examining a budgetary model that would provide for the integration of separate formulas. Data on the formulas were collected from states with system-wide coordinating boards that are responsible for budgetary reviews. The most common formula…

  17. Altered extent of cross-linking of beta1,6-glucosylated mannoproteins to chitin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with reduced cell wall beta1,3-glucan content.

    PubMed Central

    Kapteyn, J C; Ram, A F; Groos, E M; Kollar, R; Montijn, R C; Van Den Ende, H; Llobell, A; Cabib, E; Klis, F M

    1997-01-01

    The yeast cell wall contains beta1,3-glucanase-extractable and beta1,3-glucanase-resistant mannoproteins. The beta1,3-glucanase-extractable proteins are retained in the cell wall by attachment to a beta1,6-glucan moiety, which in its turn is linked to beta1,3-glucan (J. C. Kapteyn, R. C. Montijn, E. Vink, J. De La Cruz, A. Llobell, J. E. Douwes, H. Shimoi, P. N. Lipke, and F. M. Klis, Glycobiology 6:337-345, 1996). The beta1,3-glucanase-resistant protein fraction could be largely released by exochitinase treatment and contained the same set of beta1,6-glucosylated proteins, including Cwp1p, as the B1,3-glucanase-extractable fraction. Chitin was linked to the proteins in the beta1,3-glucanase-resistant fraction through a beta1,6-glucan moiety. In wild-type cell walls, the beta1,3-glucanase-resistant protein fraction represented only 1 to 2% of the covalently linked cell wall proteins, whereas in cell walls of fks1 and gas1 deletion strains, which contain much less beta1,3-glucan but more chitin, beta1,3-glucanase-resistant proteins represented about 40% of the total. We propose that the increased cross-linking of cell wall proteins via beta1,6-glucan to chitin represents a cell wall repair mechanism in yeast, which is activated in response to cell wall weakening. PMID:9335273

  18. Transcript Profiling of Two Alfalfa Genotypes with Contrasting Cell Wall Composition in Stems Using a Cross-Species Platform: Optimizing Analysis by Masking Biased Probes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stem cell walls of alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L.) ssp. sativa] genotype 252 have high cellulose and lignin concentrations, while stem cell walls of genotype 1283 have low cellulose and lignin concentrations. The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable pla...

  19. Positive quadrature formulas III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peherstorfer, Franz

    2008-12-01

    First we discuss briefly our former characterization theorem for positive interpolation quadrature formulas (abbreviated qf), provide an equivalent characterization in terms of Jacobi matrices, and give links and applications to other qf, in particular to Gauss-Kronrod quadratures and recent rediscoveries. Then for any polynomial t_n which generates a positive qf, a weight function (depending on n ) is given with respect to which t_n is orthogonal to mathbb{P}_{n-1} . With the help of this result an asymptotic representation of the quadrature weights is derived. In general the asymptotic behaviour is different from that of the Gaussian weights. Only under additional conditions do the quadrature weights satisfy the so-called circle law. Corresponding results are obtained for positive qf of Radau and Lobatto type.

  20. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanov, Borislav; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives.

  1. On generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple numerical method for constructing the optimal (generalized) averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas which are the optimal stratified extensions of Gauss quadrature formulas. These extensions exist in many cases in which real positive Kronrod formulas do not exist. For the Jacobi weight functions w(x)equiv w^{(alpha,beta)}(x)D(1-x)^alpha(1+x)^beta ( alpha,beta>-1 ) we give a necessary and sufficient condition on the parameters alpha and beta such that the optimal averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas are internal.

  2. Bone mineralization and vitamin D/calcium daily intake of infants fed breast-milk, milk-based formula or soy-based formula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cross-sectional analysis of bone mineralization during the first year of life of infants (N=107) exclusively fed breast-milk (BF), milk-based formula (MF), or soy-based formula (SF) for at least the first 4 months of life was conducted. Participants were part of the longitudinal Beginnings study. ...

  3. A note on generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalevic, Miodrag

    2007-11-01

    We have recently proposed a very simple numerical method for constructing the averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas. These formulas exist in many more cases than the real positive Gauss?Kronrod formulas. In this note we try to answer whether the averaged Gaussian formulas are an adequate alternative to the corresponding Gauss?Kronrod quadrature formulas, to estimate the remainder term of a Gaussian rule.

  4. A Salary Formula for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Michael B.

    1975-01-01

    When each administrative salary contract is negotiated individually, inequities creep in, many administrators feel. This article suggests a formula for determining principals' salaries based on education and experience, days of work, and responsibilities. (Editor)

  5. Formulas for Image Factor Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph

    1973-01-01

    Formulas are presented in this paper for computing scores associated with factors of G, the image covariance matrix, under three conditions. The subject of the paper is restricted to "pure" image analysis. (Author/NE)

  6. A Formula for Writing Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Peter O.

    1983-01-01

    Presents the formula for writing poetry as containing three elements: the content of the poet's mind; the poetic medium--language; and the creative spark that fuses experience and language, or content and medium, into poetry. (MM)

  7. Summation formulae on trigonometric functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, De-Yin

    2007-11-01

    Trigonometric sums over the angles equally distributed on the upper half plane are investigated systematically. Their generating functions and explicit formulae are established through the combination of the formal power series method and partial fraction decompositions.

  8. Heron's Remarkable Triangle Area Formula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Bernard M.

    1993-01-01

    Presents Heron's original geometric proof to his formula to calculate the area of a triangle. Attempts to improve on this proof by supplying a chain of reasoning that leads quickly from premises to the conclusion. (MDH)

  9. An energy loss straggling formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novković, D.; Subotić, K.; Milošević, Z.; Manić, S.; Stojanović, M.

    1994-12-01

    The analytical formulae for straggling widths were obtained solving Symon's equations for the second and third order central moments of the straggling distributions in non-relativistic approximation, enabling prediction of peak widths and asymmetry parameters of charged particle energy loss distributions for thick targets. The respective calculations based on these formulae were found to be in good agreement with experimental values for particle energy losses of light ions up to 70% of the nominal projectile energy value.

  10. Infant Formula - Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000806.htm Infant Formula – Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding To use the ... using infant formula . Buying, Preparing, and Storing Infant Formula The following tips can help you buy, prepare, ...

  11. Migration: Wall to Wall?

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    It is no news to anyone that health transcends national borders, driven by cross-border movement of vectors, populations, health professionals, climate, even policy trends. There is an increasing recognition that it is, in fact, a small world: we are affected by and affect what happens to our neighbors, whether they live around the corner or on the other side of the globe. This conception underpins the shift from the term international health to global health in policy discussions. The new terminology reflects change across several dimensions: from an approach in which there is one medicine for the developed world and another for developing countries, to an appreciation that we all have a stake in one another's wellbeing; from a primarily biomedical focus on treatment to a more multidisciplinary, population health focus taking into consideration a range of interventions to improve health and well-being, including the social and environmental determinants of health; and from a vertical bilateral-aid approach focused on specific diseases, to systems and ecological approaches addressing the complexities of health, involving multiple partnerships. PMID:26947274

  12. Longitudinal displacement of the carotid wall and cardiovascular risk factors: associations with aging, adiposity, blood pressure and periodontal disease independent of cross-sectional distensibility and intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Alibay, Djhianne; Bartold, Mark; Brown, Alex; Durand, Marion; Jamieson, Lisa M; Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; O'Dea, Kerin; Moulin, Philippe; Celermajer, David S; Skilton, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    The recently discovered longitudinal displacement of the common carotid arterial wall (i.e., the motion along the same plane as the blood flow), may be associated with incident cardiovascular events and represents a novel and relevant clinical information. At present, there have only been a few studies that have been conducted to investigate this longitudinal movement. We propose here a method to assess noninvasively the wall bi-dimensional (two-dimensional [2-D], cross-sectional and longitudinal) motion and present an original approach that combines a robust speckle tracking scheme to guidance by minimal path contours segmentation. Our method is well suited to large clinical population studies as it does not necessitate strong imaging prerequisites. The aim of this study is to describe the association between the longitudinal displacement of the carotid arterial wall and cardiovascular risk factors, among which periodontal disease. Some 126 Indigenous Australians with periodontal disease, an emerging risk factor, and 27 healthy age- and sex-matched non-indigenous control subjects had high-resolution ultrasound scans of the common carotid artery. Carotid intima-media thickness and arterial wall 2-D motion were then assessed using our method in ultrasound B-mode sequences. Carotid longitudinal displacement was markedly lower in the periodontal disease group than the control group (geometric mean (IQR): 0.15 mm (0.13) vs. 0.42 mm (0.30), respectively; p < 0.0001), independent of cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional distensibility and carotid intima-media thickness (p < 0.0001). A multivariable model indicated that the strongest correlates of carotid longitudinal displacement in adults with periodontal disease were age (β-coefficient = -.235, p = .03), waist (β-coefficient = -.357, p = 0.001), and pulse pressure (β-coefficient = .175, p = 0.07), independent of other cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional distensibility and pulse wave velocity. Carotid

  13. Experimental and modal verification of an integral equation solution for a thin-walled dichroic plate with cross-shaped holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L. W.; Stanton, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    In order to add the capability of an X-band uplink onto the 70-m antenna, a new dichroic plate is needed to replace the Pyle-guide-shaped dichroic plate currently in use. The replacement dichroic plate must exhibit an additional passband at the new uplink frequency of 7.165 GHz, while still maintaining a passband at the existing downlink frequency of 8.425 GHz. Because of the wide frequency separation of these two passbands, conventional methods of designing air-filled dichroic plates exhibit grating lobe problems. A new method of solving this problem by using a dichroic plate with cross-shaped holes is presented and verified experimentally. Two checks of the integral equation solution are described. One is the comparison to a modal analysis for the limiting cross shape of a square hole. As a final check, a prototype dichroic plate with cross-shaped holes was built and measured.

  14. Resistive-wall wake effect in the beam delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Delayen; Juhao Wu; T.O. Raubenheimer; Jiunn-Ming Wang

    2004-08-16

    General formulae for resistive-wall induced beam dilution are presented and then applied to the final beam delivery system of linear colliders. Criteria for the design of final beam delivery systems are discussed.

  15. The Gluckstern-Hull formula for electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, H.E.

    1980-05-01

    The Gluckstern-Hull formula for the electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung cross section, containing the emitted photon angular dependence with the recoil electron angular dependence integrated out, is shown to be correct. This formula is required to calculate continuum x-ray spectra radiated from anisotropic relativistic beam-plasma systems.

  16. A Comparative SEM Investigation of Smear Layer Remaining on Dentinal Walls by Three Rotary NiTi Files with Different Cross Sectional Designs in Moderately Curved Canals

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Pooja; Vats, Asit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the smear layer formed on root canal walls during canal preparation of extracted human teeth by Twisted, Mtwo, and ProTaper rotary nickel titanium instruments. Materials and Methods: Sixty single rooted human premolar teeth with root curvature <250 were selected and randomly divided into three Groups (n= 20 teeth per Group). Three types of rotary nickel titanium instruments were used, Twisted (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA), Mtwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ProTaper (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) according to manufacturer’s instructions to instrument the root canals. Irrigation for all groups was performed after each instrument change with 3ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite followed by Glyde (File Prep, Dentsply, Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) as chelator paste and lubricant. Three different areas (coronal, middle and apical thirds) of the root canal were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The canal wall of each sample was assessed and compared using a predefined scale for the presence or absence of smear layer. Data were analysed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey HSD test Results: All three groups showed statistically significant more smear layer in the apical thirds of the canal as compared to the coronal and middle thirds (p<0.001). Mtwo rotary file system produced significantly less smear layer (p<0.001) compared to Twisted and ProTaper rotary instruments in the apical portion. Twisted Files resulted in less smear layer formation in the apical thirds of the canal compared to ProTaper rotary instruments but were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Completely clean root canals were not found after instrumentation with any of the three instruments. Under the confines of this study Mtwo instruments produced significantly cleaner dentin wall surfaces throughout the canal length in comparison to Twisted and ProTaper rotary files. Twisted Files proved to be comparable to Pro

  17. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  18. 24 CFR 92.50 - Formula allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Formula allocation. 92.50 Section 92.50 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Allocation Formula § 92.50 Formula allocation. (a) Jurisdictions eligible for a formula allocation. HUD...

  19. Readability Formulas--Fact or Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Arthur V.

    Four readability formulas were analyzed to determine the reading grade equivalence of instructional materials at the middle grades and above: the Dale-Chall formula, the Gunning-Fog Index, the Flesch Reading Ease Formula, and the McLaughlin SMOG Grading. In addition, Spache and Wheeler/Smith formulas were analyzed for evaluating primary grade…

  20. 27 CFR 17.121 - Product formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Product formulas. 17.121... PRODUCTS Formulas and Samples § 17.121 Product formulas. (a) General. Except as provided in §§ 17.132 and 17.182, manufacturers shall file quantitative formulas for all preparations for which they intend...

  1. 27 CFR 25.57 - Formula information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula information. 25.57... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Miscellaneous Provisions Formulas § 25.57 Formula information. (a) Ingredient information. (1) For each formula you must list each separate ingredient and the specific...

  2. Breastfeeding versus infant formula: the Kenyan case.

    PubMed

    Elliot, T C; Agunda, K O; Kigondu, J G; Kinoti, S N; Latham, M C

    1985-02-01

    An Infant Feeding Practices Study (IFPS) in 1982 in Kenya, which included a cross-sectional survey of a weighted sample of 980 low and middle income Nairobi mothers who had given birth in the previous 18 months, found that most women breastfeed their infants for long periods, but many introduce alternate feeding, especially infant formula, in the 1st 4 months (86 and 50% of the infants were breastfed at 6 and 15 months respectively, but 50% of the 2 month-olds and 63% of the 4 month-olds were receiving substitutes, mostly formula). This is done largely out of the belief that infant formula is an additional health benefit. A workshop to discuss the findings of the IFPS and other available data, and to make policy recommendations urged the adoption of a policy of protection, support and promotion of breastfeeding. Since breastfeeding is already widely prevalent in Kenya, protection of breastfeeding should receive the 1st priority in policy related to infant feeding. Attention should be directed at at least 2 influences which help undermine breastfeeding: widespread availability and promotion of breast milk substitutes. Support for breastfeeding is viewed as the 2nd policy priority. Situations where support can play a helpful role are, women's paid employment outside the home, hospital practices, maternal morbidity, and difficulties in breastfeeding. Since promotion is the least cost effective of the 3 options, and most Kenyan women are already motivated to breastfeed, this should be the last priority. Promotion includes reeduction of mothers to make them better aware of the benefits of breastfeeding. The workshop recommended the dissemination of appropriate information, consisting of standarized messages based on clearcut guidelines, using mass media techniques. PMID:12280100

  3. Cell wall monoglycine cross-bridges and methicillin hypersusceptibility in a femAB null mutant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Strandén, A M; Ehlert, K; Labischinski, H; Berger-Bächi, B

    1997-01-01

    The femAB operon is involved in the formation of the characteristic pentaglycine side chain of the staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Allele replacement of the femAB operon with the tetracycline resistance determinant tetK in a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain resulted in impaired growth, methicillin hypersusceptibility, and lysostaphin resistance. The usual pentaglycine cross-bridges were replaced by monoglycine bridges exclusively, and cross-linking of the peptidoglycan strands was drastically reduced. Complementation of the femAB null mutant by either femA or femAB resulted in the extension of the cross-bridges to a triglycine or a pentaglycine, respectively. This finding suggests that FemA is responsible for the formation of glycines 2 and 3, and FemB is responsible for formation of glycines 4 and 5, of the pentaglycine side chain of the peptidoglycan precursor. Moreover, it can be deduced that addition of the first glycine must occur by a femAB-independent mechanism. PMID:8981974

  4. Double-Walled Microparticles-Embedded Self-Cross-Linked, Injectable, and Antibacterial Hydrogel for Controlled and Sustained Release of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, Pooya; Ng, Wei Cheng; Yan, Wei Cheng; Srinivasan, Madapusi P; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-09-01

    First-line cancer chemotherapy has been prescribed for patients suffered from cancers for many years. However, conventional chemotherapy provides a high parenteral dosage of anticancer drugs over a short period, which may cause serious toxicities and detrimental side effects in healthy tissues. This study aims to develop a new drug delivery system (DDS) composed of double-walled microparticles and an injectable hydrogel for localized dual-agent drug delivery to tumors. The uniform double-walled microparticles loaded with cisplatin (Cis-DDP) and paclitaxel (PTX) were fabricated via coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) technique and subsequently were embedded into injectable alginate-branched polyethylenimine. The findings show the uniqueness of CEHDA technique for simply swapping the place of drugs to achieve a parallel or a sequential release profile. This study also presents the simulation of CEHDA technique using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that will help in the optimization of CEHDA's operating conditions prior to large-scale production of microparticles. The new synthetic hydrogel provides an additional diffusion barrier against Cis-DDP and confines premature release of drugs. In addition, the hydrogel can provide a versatile tool for retaining particles in the tumor resected cavity during the injection after debulking surgery and preventing surgical site infection due to its inherent antibacterial properties. Three-dimensional MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer) spheroid studies demonstrate a superior efficacy and a greater reduction in spheroid growth for drugs released from the proposed composite formulation over a prolonged period, as compared with free drug treatment. Overall, the new core-shell microparticles embedded into injectable hydrogel can serve as a flexible controlled release platform for modulating the release profiles of anticancer drugs and subsequently providing a superior anticancer response. PMID:27530316

  5. CHY formula and MHV amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Teng, Fei; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between the Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula and the maximal-helicity-violating (MHV) amplitudes of Yang-Mills and gravity in four dimensions. We prove that only one special rational solution of the scattering equations found by Weinzierl supports the MHV amplitudes. Namely, localized at this solution, the integrated CHY formula produces the Parke-Taylor formula for MHV Yang-Mills amplitudes as well as the Hodges formula for MHV gravitational amplitudes, with an arbitrary number of external gluons/gravitons. This is achieved by developing techniques, in a manifestly Möbius covariant formalism, to explicitly compute relevant reduced Pfaffians/determinants. We observe and prove two interesting properties (or identities), which facilitate the computations. We also check that all the other ( n - 3)! - 1 solutions to the scattering equations do not support the MHV amplitudes, and prove analytically that this is indeed true for the other special rational solution proposed by Weinzierl, that actually supports the anti-MHV amplitudes. Our results reveal a mysterious feature of the CHY formalism that in Yang-Mills and gravity theory, solutions of scattering equations, involving only external momenta, somehow know about the configuration of external polarizations of the scattering amplitudes.

  6. Stature estimation formulae for Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Didia, Blessing C; Nduka, Ethelbert C; Adele, Okechukwu

    2009-01-01

    In stature estimation, long limbs and the stature formula of Trotter and Gleser easily come to mind. In the recent past, a lot of workers have established formulae specific to their populations using whole length of limbs, fragmented bones, circumference of long bones, and even length of the vertebrae. We have in this work used tibia length, height of subjects, and the regression models to establish formulae specific to Nigerians. We measured height and tibia length of 200 (96 male and 104 female) adult Nigerians. The tibia length was measured from upper limit of the medial condoyle to the tip of medial malleolus using a measuring tape calibrated in meters while the height of individuals were also measured using meter scales. All measurements were made by one person, to avoid interobserver error, and repeatedly until a constant value is obtained. We obtained general formulae for males and females which compares favorably with that of Duyar and Pelin, and can be relied upon. PMID:19018931

  7. Developing the Vertex Formula Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebesniak, Amy L.; Burgoa, A. Aaron

    2015-01-01

    As teachers working with students in entry-level algebra classes, authors Amy Nebesniak and A. Aaron Burgoa realized that their instruction was a major factor in how their students viewed mathematics. They often presented students with abstract formulas that seemed to appear out of thin air. One instance occurred while they were teaching students…

  8. Financial Formulas for Library Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Phoebe F.

    Formulas for the fiscal support of library networks are discussed against the perspective of present patterns of library funding. Provisions for financing current cooperative library programs are illustrative of the problems which might be encountered in networks. Several proposals for network development have been concerned with and provide some…

  9. Formulas for determining rotational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelachvili, G.

    This document is part of Subvolume B `Linear Triatomic Molecules', Part 9, of Volume 20 `Molecular Constants mostly from Infrared Spectroscopy' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'. Part of the introduction, it states formulas for determining rotational constants, band center, band origin, and quadrupole coupling. Specific comments relate to BHO (HBO) and COS (OCS).

  10. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  11. Quadrature formulae for classes of functions of low smoothness

    SciTech Connect

    Nursultanov, E D; Tleukhanova, N T

    2003-10-31

    For Sobolev and Korobov spaces of functions of several variables a quadrature formula with explicitly defined coefficients and nodes is constructed. This formula is precise for trigonometric polynomials with harmonics from the corresponding step hyperbolic cross. The error of the quadrature formula in the classes W{sup {alpha}}{sub p}[0,1]{sup n}, E{sup {alpha}}[0,1]{sup n} is o((ln M){sup {beta}}/M{sup {alpha}}), where M is the number of nodes and {beta} is a parameter depending on the class. The problem of the approximate calculation of multiple integrals for functions in W{sup {alpha}}{sub p}[0,1]{sup n} is considered in the case when this class does not lie in the space of continuous functions, that is, for {alpha}{<=}1/p.

  12. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  13. Carrageenan analysis. Part 1: Characterisation of the carrageenan test material and stability in swine-adapted infant formula.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, William R; Davis, Steven R; Hroncich, Maggie M; Vurma, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed and validated in support of a 28-day feeding study of swine-adapted infant formula stabilised with carrageenan administered to neonatal piglets. Carrageenan concentrations in the test formulations were 0, 300, 1000 and 2250 mg kg(-1) formula. Extraction of carrageenan from swine-adapted infant formula was achieved by breaking carrageenan-protein cross-linkages using saturated sodium chloride, followed by separation of the non-gelling carrageenan fraction via centrifugation. The extraction of carrageenan from formula was successful with respect to consistent recovery of the non-gelling carrageenan fraction from both test and control formula samples. Molecular weight analysis (Mw) of the recovered carrageenan fractions from the test and control formula samples confirmed that the carrageenan used to manufacture the formula was not degraded during the infant formula production process and subsequent storage for 4 months covering the 28-day piglet dietary feeding study. Carrageenan has excellent stability in infant formulations. PMID:25167218

  14. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  15. Script N = 8 dyon partition function and walls of marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2008-07-01

    We construct the partition function of 1/8 BPS dyons in type II string theory on T6 from counting of microstates of a D1-D5 system in Taub-NUT space. Our analysis extends the earlier ones by Shih, Strominger and Yin and by Pioline by taking into account the walls of marginal stability on which a 1/8 BPS dyon can decay into a pair of half-BPS dyons. Across these walls the dyon spectrum changes discontinuously, and as a result the spectrum is not manifestly invariant under S-duality transformation of the charges. However the partition function is manifestly S-duality invariant and takes the same form in all domains of the moduli space separated by walls of marginal stability, the spectra in different domains being obtained by choosing different integration contours along which we carry out the Fourier transform of the partition function. The jump in the spectrum across a wall of marginal stability, calculated from the behaviour of the partition function at an appropriate pole, reproduces the expected wall crossing formula.

  16. Blackhole formula and example relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Philip

    Black hole formula 1) Second dimension (x,y) f(x)=y Energy E=m*c2 2) Third dimension (x,y,z) really x=y=z Black hole formula Root(c2)=c=Root(E/m) As mass go the velocity of light, mass become black hole so there are energy as multiply by mass. Example relativity When E=m*c2 1) Root(c2)=c=Root(E/m) 2) 3*c*Root(c2)=3*c*Root(E/m)=3*c2 From 1) to 2) as an example, As velocity is faster, mass increased. It means when velocity is increased, sec(time) is slower, and m(distance) is increased. The number is good to study physics.

  17. Trace formula for broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Creagh, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    We derive a trace formula for systems that exhibit an approximate continuous symmetry. It interpolates between the sum over continuous families of periodic orbits that holds in the case of exact continuous symmetry, and the discrete sum over isolated orbits that holds when the symmetry is completely broken. It is based on a simple perturbation expansion of the classical dynamics, centered around the case of exact symmetry, and gives an approximation to the usual Gutzwiller formula when the perturbation is large. We illustrate the computation with some 2-dimensional examples: the deformation of the circular billiard into an ellipse, and anisotropic and anharmonic perturbations of a harmonic oscillator. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  18. Discretization formulas for unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    The Galerkin weighted residual technique using linear triangular weight functions is employed to develop finite difference formula in cartesian coordinates for the Laplacian operator, first derivative operators and the function for unstructured triangular grids. The weighted residual coefficients associated with the weak formulation of the Laplacian operator are shown to agree with the Taylor series approach on a global average. In addition, a simple algorithm is presented to determine the Voronoi (finite difference) area of an unstructured grid.

  19. Hydrolyzed Formula for Every Infant?

    PubMed

    Fleischer, David M; Venter, Carina; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Presently, hydrolyzed formulas (HF) are used primarily in infants that cannot be exclusively breastfed, those with cow's milk allergy and for primary prevention of allergic disease, but HFs are increasingly being used worldwide, begging the question if they may be recommended as the optimal choice for all standard-risk, full-term, non-exclusively breastfed infants. Data regarding the nutritional adequacy of modern-day HFs are scarce and lack long-term data suggesting that growth in infants fed HF versus an intact protein formula (IPF) is different. While human breast milk is the optimal source of nutrition for multiple reasons, a 2006 systematic review determined there were no comparable long-term studies regarding prolonged use of HFs versus breastfeeding. Meta-analyses of formula consumption and risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) have found that infants fed partially HF compared to IPF had a lower risk of AD, but there are significant limitations to these studies, making conclusions about the general use of HFs problematic. Costs should be considered in decision-making regarding the choice of the formula, but global comparison of this is difficult given large cost differences in different countries. Despite the issues raised here, the desire to provide concrete recommendations of widespread HF use needs to be balanced carefully in order not to overstate claims of benefit. Long-term studies are needed to investigate the feasibility of HF as a routine feeding option for healthy, standard-risk infants. Because of the paucity of data, routine use of HF as an equivalent option to breastfeeding or IPF cannot be supported at present based on available scientific evidence. PMID:27336594

  20. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism.

  1. Composition formulas of binary eutectics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y P; Dong, D D; Dong, C; Luo, L J; Wang, Q; Qiang, J B; Wang, Y M

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1(st)-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)(1 or 3). A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  2. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  3. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  4. Simple and Clear Proofs of Stirling's Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niizeki, Shozo; Araki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to show two simpler and clearer methods of proving Stirling's formula than the traditional and conventional ones. The distinction of our method is to use the simple trapezoidal formula.

  5. Analytic formulas for magnetron characteristic curves

    SciTech Connect

    Riyopoulos, S.

    1995-12-31

    A closed non-linear set of equations is obtained based on the guiding center fluid model to describe steady-state magnetron operation. Spoke charge effects are included self-consistently, by introducing a mean-field approximation so that the effective AC potential preserves the geometric similarity with the vacuum solutions. New characteristic equations, relating the anode current 1 and the RF power P to the applied DC voltage V at given RF frequency, are obtained. Previously obtained V-I equations disagree with experiments in that (a) anode current and RF power go to zero when the resonance condition V = V{sub s} is met, (b) the operation voltage V is a double-valued function of the current I; there exist two nearly symmetric operation points around V{sub s} at the same current I. Yet magnetrons, and the related crossed-field amplifiers, are known to exhibit stable operation with single valued V-I characteristics well below V{sub s}. Although zero gain at synchronism applies to other microwave devices (TWT`s, FEL`s), experimental results and particle simulations of crossed field devices suggest otherwise. The new formulas show reasonable agreement with experiments.

  6. Improved Jänecke mass formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.; Bao, M.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we improve an empirical mass formula constructed by Jänecke and collaborators. This formula is enlightened by the Garvey-Kelson mass relations. The new version of the Jänecke formula reproduces 2275 atomic masses with neutron number N ≥10 and proton number Z ≥6 , at an average accuracy of 128 keV, by employing 576 parameters. The predictive power of our formula is exemplified by comparison with predicted results of other mass models.

  7. 24 CFR 92.50 - Formula allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Formula allocation. 92.50 Section 92.50 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Allocation Formula § 92.50 Formula allocation....

  8. 24 CFR 92.50 - Formula allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Formula allocation. 92.50 Section 92.50 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Allocation Formula § 92.50 Formula allocation....

  9. 24 CFR 92.50 - Formula allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Formula allocation. 92.50 Section 92.50 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Allocation Formula § 92.50 Formula allocation....

  10. A Quick Guide to Readability Formulas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Eugene H.

    1978-01-01

    Six of the most widely used readability scales are briefly reviewed and their original source cited: the Dale-Chall Readability Formula, the Flesch "Reading Ease" Formula, the Fog Index, the Fry Readability Graph, the SMOG Grading Plan, and the Spache Readability Formula. (SJL)

  11. 28 CFR 38.2 - Formula grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formula grants. 38.2 Section 38.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EQUAL TREATMENT FOR FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS § 38.2 Formula... cooperative agreement funded by a formula or block grant from the Department. As used in this section,...

  12. 27 CFR 24.196 - Formula required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula required. 24.196... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Special Natural Wine § 24.196 Formula required. Before producing any special natural wine, the proprietor shall receive approval of the formula by which it is...

  13. 27 CFR 20.101 - Drafting formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drafting formulas. 20.101... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Formulas and Statements of Process Approval Policies § 20.101 Drafting formulas. (a) In preparing Form 5150.19, the...

  14. 27 CFR 24.201 - Formula required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula required. 24.201... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Agricultural Wine § 24.201 Formula required. Before producing any agricultural wine, the proprietor shall obtain an approval of the formula and process by...

  15. 15 CFR 923.110 - Allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allocation formula. 923.110 Section... Grants § 923.110 Allocation formula. (a) As required by subsection 306(a), the Secretary may make grants...) Allocation formula factors and weighting. Each State eligible to receive a financial assistance award...

  16. 7 CFR 251.7 - Formula adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Formula adjustments. 251.7 Section 251.7 Agriculture... GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION THE EMERGENCY FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 251.7 Formula adjustments. Formula adjustments. (a) Commodity adjustments. The Department will make annual adjustments...

  17. 10 CFR 455.31 - Allocation formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allocation formulas. 455.31 Section 455.31 Energy... § 455.31 Allocation formulas. (a) Financial assistance for conducting technical assistance programs for... this section. (c) The allocation factor (K) shall be determined by the formula: EC14NO91.086 where,...

  18. 27 CFR 26.31 - Formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula. 26.31 Section 26... States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.31 Formula. (a) The amount of excise.... The formula shall be as follows: (1) Multiply the total excise taxes collected on rum brought into...

  19. 25 CFR 273.31 - Distribution formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution formula. 273.31 Section 273.31 Indians... formula. (a) Funds shall be distributed to eligible contractors based upon the number of eligible Indian... formula. (b) The Assistant Secretary may make exceptions to the provisions of paragraph (a) of...

  20. 24 CFR 574.130 - Formula allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula allocations. 574.130... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS Formula Entitlements § 574.130 Formula allocations. (a) Data sources. HUD will allocate funds based on the number of cases...

  1. 27 CFR 24.211 - Formula required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula required. 24.211... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Other Than Standard Wine § 24.211 Formula required. The proprietor who desires to produce wine other than standard wine shall first obtain approval of the formula...

  2. 27 CFR 19.452 - Formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Denaturation § 19.452 Formulas. Spirits shall be denatured in accordance with formulas as authorized in 27 CFR... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formulas. 19.452 Section 19.452 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...

  3. 27 CFR 20.91 - Formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula. 20.91 Section 20... TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Formulas and Statements of Process § 20.91 Formula. (a) Each article made with specially denatured spirits shall be made in accordance...

  4. 5 CFR 1315.17 - Formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Formulas. 1315.17 Section 1315.17 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.17 Formulas. (a) Rebate formula. (1) Agencies shall determine credit card payment dates based on an analysis of the...

  5. The Funding of Community Colleges: Formulas & Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullin, Christopher M.; Honeyman, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This study identified governing state entities charged with the development of a funding formula for community colleges. Analysis of the data revealed that 40 states utilized a funding formula. Twenty-one states had a "Higher Education" entity with governing control of the formula, 5 states had a "Community College" entity with distinct funding…

  6. Algebraic Formulas for Areas between Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabai, Hyman

    1982-01-01

    Korean secondary school students preparing for college learn about a simple algebraic formula for area bounded by a parabola and line. The approach does not seem well-known among American students. It is noted that, while the formula derivations rely on integration, algebra students could use the formulas without proofs. (MP)

  7. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  8. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  9. Radial Corrugations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Driven by Inter-Wall Nonbonding Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We perform large-scale quasi-continuum simulations to determine the stable cross-sectional configurations of free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We show that at an inter-wall spacing larger than the equilibrium distance set by the inter-wall van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the initial circular cross-sections of the MWCNTs are transformed into symmetric polygonal shapes or asymmetric water-drop-like shapes. Our simulations also show that removing several innermost walls causes even more drastic cross-sectional polygonization of the MWCNTs. The predicted cross-sectional configurations agree with prior experimental observations. We attribute the radial corrugations to the compressive stresses induced by the excessive inter-wall vdW energy release of the MWCNTs. The stable cross-sectional configurations provide fundamental guidance to the design of single MWCNT-based devices and shed lights on the mechanical control of electrical properties.

  10. Exponential Formulae and Effective Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Fernandez, David J. C.

    1996-01-01

    One of standard methods to predict the phenomena of squeezing consists in splitting the unitary evolution operator into the product of simpler operations. The technique, while mathematically general, is not so simple in applications and leaves some pragmatic problems open. We report an extended class of exponential formulae, which yield a quicker insight into the laboratory details for a class of squeezing operations, and moreover, can be alternatively used to programme different type of operations, as: (1) the free evolution inversion; and (2) the soft simulations of the sharp kicks (so that all abstract results involving the kicks of the oscillator potential, become realistic laboratory prescriptions).

  11. Torsional stresses in box beams with cross sections partially restrained against warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebner, Hans

    1934-01-01

    The present report gives a method for computing the torsion of boxes with thin shear-resistant or simply tension-resistant walls under any torsional load, support and dimension. The final stress condition is developed from that of a principal system with unconstrained sectional warping corresponding to Bredt's formula and an additional stress condition due to constrained cross-sectional warping. This is computed by means of the deflection condition of the principal system from a statically indeterminate calculation. Conformably, the torsional rigidity of the final system is derived from that of the principal system with unconstrained sectional buckling.

  12. [Infant formulas and soy protein-based formulas: current data].

    PubMed

    Bocquet, A; Bresson, J L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M L; Ghisolfi, J; Goulet, O; Putet, G; Rieu, D; Turck, D; Vidailhet, M

    2001-11-01

    For many years soy bean-based formulas (SBBF) were the only dietary product used for infants with cow's milk intolerance. At the present time, their place in infant nutrition is reduced as a result of the availability of new dietary products without lactose and/or cow's milk proteins and the recognition of soy bean protein allergy. There is no evidence that SBBF have any efficiency in infant colic. SBBF have no indication in the prevention of allergy, nor in premature infants' nutrition. Their main indication is the feeding of infants of vegetarian parents who do not want to use cow's milk products. Studies have shown that SBBF contain large quantities of phytoestrogens, particularly isoflavone. Because of experimental data suggesting a possible deleterious effect of phytoestrogens on the neuroendocrine maturation, the reduction of their content in SBBF must be considered. PMID:11760676

  13. Formulaic Language in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Kelly Ann; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of productive language in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have focused on formal testing of syntax and semantics but have directed less attention to naturalistic discourse and formulaic language. Clinical observations suggest that individuals with AD retain the ability to produce formulaic language long after other cognitive abilities have deteriorated. Aims This study quantifies production of formulaic expressions in the spontaneous speech of individuals with AD. Persons with early- and late-onset forms of the disease were compared. Methods & Procedures Conversational language samples of individuals with early- (n = 5) and late-onset (n = 6) AD and healthy controls (n = 5) were analyzed to determine whether formulaic language, as measured by the number of words in formulaic expressions, differs between groups. Outcomes & Results Results indicate that individuals with AD, regardless of age of onset, used significantly more formulaic expressions than healthy controls. The early- and late-onset AD groups did not differ on formulaic language measures. Conclusions These findings contribute to a dual process model of cerebral function, which proposes differing processing principles for formulaic and novel expressions. In this model, subcortical areas, which remain intact into late in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, play an important role in the production of formulaic language. Applications to clinical practice include identifying preserved formulaic language and providing informed counseling to patient and family. PMID:24187417

  14. Formulas for the Stress Analysis of Circular Rings in a Monocoque Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Roy A; Wood, Karl D

    1933-01-01

    The formulas given in this report provide a simplified method for the stress-analysis of fuselage bulkheads that are approximately circular rings of uniform cross section. Complicated load systems acting on a ring can usually be resolved into simplified load systems; and formulas for moment, axial force, and shear for such simplified load systems are given in this report. Illustrative examples showing the use of this method in practical stress-analysis work are also included.

  15. Adèlic formulas for string amplitudes in fields of algebraic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, V. S.; Sapuzhak, T. M.

    1996-06-01

    On the basis of the analysis on adèle groups (Tate's formula) for any field of algebraic numbers, a regularization of infinite adèlic products of gamma and beta functions of local fields is proposed. The formulas obtained are applied to representations of the four-point crossing symmetric Veneziano and Virasoro-Shapiro amplitudes through regularized adèlic products of the corresponding string (open and closed, resp.) amplitudes.

  16. Cosmological parallax-distance formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2015-09-01

    The standard cosmological parallax-distance formula, as found in the literature, including text-books and reference books on cosmology, requires a correction. This correction stems from the fact that in the standard text-book derivation it has been ignored that any chosen baseline in a gravitationally bound system does not partake in the cosmological expansion. Though the correction is available in the literature for some time, the text-books still continue to use the older, incorrect formula, and its full implications are not yet fully realized. Apart from providing an alternate correct, closed-form expression that is more suitable and convenient for computations for certain limiting cases of FRW () world models, we also demonstrate how one can compute parallax distance for the currently favored flat-space accelerating-universe (, ) cosmologies. Further, we show that the correction in parallax distance at large redshifts could amount to a factor of three or even more. Moreover, even in an infinite universe the parallax distance does not increase indefinitely with redshift and that even the farthest possible observable point may have a finite parallax angle, a factor that needs to be carefully taken into account when using distant objects as the background field against which the parallax of a foreground object is to be measured. Some other complications that could arise in parallax measurements of a distant source, like that due to the deflection of incoming light by the gravitation field of the Sun and other planetary bodies in the solar system, are pointed out.

  17. Integral formula for the effective diffusion coefficient in two-dimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinay, Pavol

    2016-07-01

    The effective one-dimensional description of diffusion in two-dimensional channels of varying cross section is revisited. The effective diffusion coefficient D (x ) , extending Fick-Jacobs equation, depending on the longitudinal coordinate x , is derived here without use of scaling of the transverse coordinates. The result of the presented method is an integral formula for D (x ) , calculating its value at x as an integral of contributions from the neighboring positions x' depending on h (x') , a function shaping the channel. Unlike the standard formulas based on the scaling, the new proposed formula also describes D (x ) correctly near the cusps, or in wider channels.

  18. 27 CFR 26.225 - Previously approved formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... formulas. 26.225 Section 26.225 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.225 Previously approved formulas. Any formula approved... voluntarily surrendered. Any person holding such a formula is not required to submit a new formula. If...

  19. 27 CFR 26.55 - Previously approved formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... formulas. 26.55 Section 26.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.55 Previously approved formulas. Any formula approved on Form... surrendered. Any person holding such a formula is not required to submit a new formula. If an approved...

  20. Rainfall intensity-duration-frequency formulas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A new general rainfall intensity-duration-frequency formula is presented, utilizing a method similar to, but more accurate than one previously developed. The previously developed formula was based on the average depth-duration ratio of about 40% and the mean depth-frequency ratio of 1.48. It is shown that this formula is only a particular form of the writer's more general formulation. -from Author

  1. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  2. Efficient formulas for efficiency correction of cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-04-01

    Formulas connecting cumulants of particle numbers observed with efficiency losses with the original ones are derived based on the binomial model. These formulas can be applied to quantities given by a linear combination of particle numbers observed with different efficiencies in a compact form. Compared with the presently suggested ones based on factorial moments, these formulas would drastically reduce the numerical cost for the efficiency corrections when the order of the cumulant and the number of different efficiencies are large. The efficiency correction with realistic pT-dependent efficiency would be carried out with the aid of these formulas.

  3. Preclinical assessment of infant formula.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Infant formulas are the sole or predominant source of nutrition for many infants and are fed during a sensitive period of development and may therefore have short- and long-term consequences for infant health. Preclinical safety assessment therefore needs to include both short-term and long-term studies in animals. It is recommended that procedures are instituted by which experts may serve as independent scientists for companies developing novel products, without having their integrity compromised, and later serve the legislative institutions. A two-level assessment approach to determine the potential toxicity of a novel ingredient, its metabolites, and their effects in the matrix on developing organ systems has been suggested by IOM. This appears reasonable, as novel ingredients can be of different levels of concern. The use of modern methods in genomics and proteomics should be considered in these evaluation processes as well as novel methods to evaluate outcomes, including metabolomics and molecular techniques to assess the microbiome. PMID:22699767

  4. Using Programmable Calculators to Evaluate Complicated Formulas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snover, Stephen L.; Spikell, Mark A.

    The application of the programmable calculator to evaluating complicated formulas is illustrated by considering the formula for finding the area of any triangle when only the lengths of the three sides are known. Other advantages of the programmable calculator are discussed such as freeing the student to explore more challenging problems and…

  5. How to Save Money on Infant Formula

    MedlinePlus

    ... months. Here are some ways you can save money on infant formula . ... Here are a few ways to save money on infant formula: DO NOT buy just one type of baby bottle at first. Try a few different types to see which kind ...

  6. 28 CFR 38.2 - Formula grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Formula grants. 38.2 Section 38.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EQUAL TREATMENT FOR FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS § 38.2 Formula grants. (a) Religious organizations are eligible, on the same basis as any other organization, to participate in any Department program for which...

  7. Body surface area formulae: an alarming ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Palkowski, Aleksander; Krawczuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Body surface area (BSA) plays a key role in several medical fields, including cancer chemotherapy, transplantology, burn treatment and toxicology. BSA is often a major factor in the determination of the course of treatment and drug dosage. A series of formulae to simplify the process have been developed. Because easy-to-identify, yet general, body coefficient results of those formulae vary considerably, the question arises as to whether the choice of a particular formula is valid and safe for patients. Here we show that discrepancies between most of the known BSA formulae can reach 0.5 m2 for the standard adult physique. Although many previous studies have demonstrated that certain BSA formulae provide an almost exact fit with the patients examined, all of these studies have been performed on a limited and isolated group of people. Our analysis presents a broader perspective, considering 25 BSA formulae. The analysis revealed that the choice of a particular formula is a difficult task. Differences among calculations made by the formulae are so great that, in certain cases, they may considerably affect patients’ mortality, especially for people with an abnormal physique or for children. PMID:27323883

  8. 10 CFR 905.33 - Extension formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Extension formula. 905.33 Section 905.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.33 Extension formula. (a) The amount of power to be extended to an existing customer shall be determined according...

  9. 10 CFR 905.33 - Extension formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Extension formula. 905.33 Section 905.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.33 Extension formula. (a) The amount of power to be extended to an existing customer shall be determined according...

  10. 10 CFR 905.33 - Extension formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Extension formula. 905.33 Section 905.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.33 Extension formula. (a) The amount of power to be extended to an existing customer shall be determined according...

  11. 10 CFR 905.33 - Extension formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extension formula. 905.33 Section 905.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.33 Extension formula. (a) The amount of power to be extended to an existing customer shall be determined according...

  12. 10 CFR 905.33 - Extension formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Extension formula. 905.33 Section 905.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.33 Extension formula. (a) The amount of power to be extended to an existing customer shall be determined according...

  13. 40 CFR 74.26 - Allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation formula. 74.26 Section 74.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.26 Allocation formula. (a)...

  14. 38 CFR 9.12 - Reinsurance formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reinsurance formula. 9.12 Section 9.12 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.12 Reinsurance formula. The allocation...

  15. Lewis Carroll's Formula for Calendar Calculating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents Lewis Carroll's formula for mentally calculating the day of the week of a given date. The paper concludes that such formulas are too complex for individuals of low intelligence to learn by themselves, and thus "idiots savants" who perform such calendar calculations must be using other systems. (JDD)

  16. Alternative Derivations for the Poisson Integral Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, J. T.; Wu, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Poisson integral formula is revisited. The kernel in the Poisson integral formula can be derived in a series form through the direct BEM free of the concept of image point by using the null-field integral equation in conjunction with the degenerate kernels. The degenerate kernels for the closed-form Green's function and the series form of Poisson…

  17. A Choice of a New Funding Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    This report examines the fiscal neutrality of three funding formulas that have been proposed to replace the current funding formula for Oklahoma's common schools in an attempt to have greater equity in the distribution of funds to the various districts. Using data from SY-03 to SY-07, calculations of state aid for the 540- districts and fiscal…

  18. 27 CFR 5.26 - Formula requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Formula requirements. 5.26 Section 5.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.26...

  19. 27 CFR 5.26 - Formula requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Formula requirements. 5.26 Section 5.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... requirements. (a) General. An approved formula is required to blend, mix, purify, refine, compound, or...

  20. 27 CFR 5.26 - Formula requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Formula requirements. 5.26 Section 5.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... requirements. (a) General. An approved formula is required to blend, mix, purify, refine, compound, or...

  1. 27 CFR 5.26 - Formula requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Formula requirements. 5.26 Section 5.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.26...

  2. Body surface area formulae: an alarming ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Palkowski, Aleksander; Krawczuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Body surface area (BSA) plays a key role in several medical fields, including cancer chemotherapy, transplantology, burn treatment and toxicology. BSA is often a major factor in the determination of the course of treatment and drug dosage. A series of formulae to simplify the process have been developed. Because easy-to-identify, yet general, body coefficient results of those formulae vary considerably, the question arises as to whether the choice of a particular formula is valid and safe for patients. Here we show that discrepancies between most of the known BSA formulae can reach 0.5 m(2) for the standard adult physique. Although many previous studies have demonstrated that certain BSA formulae provide an almost exact fit with the patients examined, all of these studies have been performed on a limited and isolated group of people. Our analysis presents a broader perspective, considering 25 BSA formulae. The analysis revealed that the choice of a particular formula is a difficult task. Differences among calculations made by the formulae are so great that, in certain cases, they may considerably affect patients' mortality, especially for people with an abnormal physique or for children. PMID:27323883

  3. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  4. Formulas for sediment porosity and settling velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formulas of Komura (1963) and Han et al. (1981) for the initial porosity of sediment deposits were tested using data sets collected in different countries and regions. It was found that Komura’s formula slightly underestimates the dry density for sand and gravel deposits and overestimates those ...

  5. Review of "Weighted Student Formula Yearbook 2009"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The new "Weighted Student Formula Yearbook 2009" from the Reason Foundation provides a simple framework for touting the successes of states and urban school districts that grant greater fiscal autonomy to schools. The report defines the Weighted Student Formula (WSF) reform extremely broadly, presenting a variety of reforms under the WSF umbrella.…

  6. Formulas in Physics Have a "Standard" Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moelter, Matthew J.; Jackson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the importance of the ordering of symbols in physics formulas and identify implicit conventions that govern the "standard" form for how formulas are written and interpreted. An important part of writing and reading this form is understanding distinctions among constants, parameters, and variables. We delineate these conventions and…

  7. The health implications of soy infant formula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy formula (SF) has been fed to millions of infants worldwide. It has been shown to promote growth and development as well as milk-based formula (MF) does. Controversy has developed over the adequacy and safety of SF. Most concerns are based on in vivo and in vitro data that raise the possibility o...

  8. Teaching Structural Formulas in Chemistry: How Students Relate Structural Formulas to the Solubility of Substances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goedhart, Martin; van Duin, Yvonne

    Structural formulas give professional chemists information about physical and chemical properties of corresponding compounds. In chemistry education at secondary schools, structural formulas are introduced in the context of chemical bonding. Structural formulas are not introduced as representations of the properties of chemical compounds. This…

  9. A ``fractal'' modification of Torricelli's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maramathas, Athanasios J.; Boudouvis, Andreas G.

    2010-03-01

    A modification is proposed of Torricelli’s (1608-1647) formula for the velocity of water discharging from a small hole at the bottom of a large tank filled with fractal solid material. The new formula takes proper account of the mechanical energy losses due to flow in the solid matrix, thus expanding the area of validity of the classical Torricelli’s formula. Moreover, it offers a convenient alternative to Darcy’s law for estimating the discharge rate from an aquifer. The new formula was derived from laboratory experiments, with a low-Reynolds number discharge flow (Darcian flow). It was tested in a natural karst aquifer where the flow is non-Darcian, at Almiros spring on the island of Crete (Greece). In both cases, the predictive capability of the modified formula is established.

  10. Consistent Numerical Expressions for Precession Formulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, M.

    The precession formulae by Lieske et al. (1977) have been used since 1984 for calculating apparent positions and reducing astrometric observations of celestial objects. These formulae are based on the IAU (1976) Astronomical Constants, some of which deviate from their recently determined values. They are also derived using the secular variations of the ecliptic pole from Newcomb's theory, which is not consistent with the recent planetary theories. Accordingly Simon et al. (1994) developed new precession formulae using the recently determined astronomical constants and also being based on the new planetary theory VSOP87. There are two differing definitions of the ecliptic: ecliptic in the inertial sense and ecliptic in the rotating sense (Standish 1981). The ecliptic given by the VSOP87 theory is that in the inertial sense, but the value for obliquity Simon et al. used is the obliquity in the rotating sense. Therefore their precession formulae has inconsistency. This paper gives corrections for consistent precession formulae.

  11. The Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas-Paredes, Alfredo A.; Doria, Mauro M.; Neto, Jose Abdala Helayeel

    2013-01-15

    We derive the Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula for the two-component order parameter superconductor, which provides a twofold view of the kinetic energy of the superconductor. For the one component order parameter superconductor we review the connection between the Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula and the Ginzburg-Landau theory. For the two-component case we claim that this formula opens a venue to describe inhomogeneous superconducting states intertwined by spin correlations and charged dislocation. In this case the Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula displays local rotational and electromagnetic gauge symmetry (SU(2) Circled-Times U(1)) and relies on local commuting momentum and spin operators. The order parameter lives in a space with curvature and torsion described by Elie Cartan geometrical formalism. The Lichnerowickz-Weitzenboeck formula leads to first order differential equations that are a three-dimensional version of the Seiberg-Witten equations.

  12. Anomalous Quasiparticles on the Domain Wall Between Topological Insulators and Spin Ice Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, I.; Sasaki, T.

    We have discussed the behavior of anomalous quasiparticle with fractional electronic charge on the domain wall between topological insulators and spin ice compounds from the standpoint of the field-theoretical formula.

  13. Cauchy's formulas for random walks in bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzolo, Alain Zoia, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Cauchy's formula was originally established for random straight paths crossing a body B⊂R{sup n} and basically relates the average chord length through B to the ratio between the volume and the surface of the body itself. The original statement was later extended in the context of transport theory so as to cover the stochastic paths of Pearson random walks with exponentially distributed flight lengths traversing a bounded domain. Some heuristic arguments suggest that Cauchy's formula may also hold true for Pearson random walks with arbitrarily distributed flight lengths. For such a broad class of stochastic processes, we rigorously derive a generalized Cauchy's formula for the average length traveled by the walkers in the body, and show that this quantity depends indeed only on the ratio between the volume and the surface, provided that some constraints are imposed on the entrance step of the walker in B. Similar results are also obtained for the average number of collisions performed by the walker in B.

  14. The Processing on Different Types of English Formulaic Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Formulaic sequences are found to be processed faster than their matched novel phrases in previous studies. Given the variety of formulaic types, few studies have compared processing on different types of formulaic sequences. The present study explored the processing among idioms, speech formulae and written formulae. It has been found that in…

  15. 27 CFR 17.137 - Formulas disapproved for drawback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formulas disapproved for... NONBEVERAGE PRODUCTS Formulas and Samples Approval of Formulas § 17.137 Formulas disapproved for drawback. A formula may be disapproved for drawback either because it does not prescribe appropriate ingredients...

  16. 27 CFR 21.52 - Formula No. 27.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 27. 21.52... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.52 Formula No. 27. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  17. 27 CFR 21.45 - Formula No. 20.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 20. 21.45... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.45 Formula No. 20. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  18. 27 CFR 21.44 - Formula No. 19.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 19. 21.44... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.44 Formula No. 19. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  19. 27 CFR 21.54 - Formula No. 27-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 27-B. 21.54... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.54 Formula No. 27-B. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  20. 27 CFR 21.36 - Formula No. 3-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 3-B. 21.36... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.36 Formula No. 3-B. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  1. 27 CFR 17.122 - Amended or revised formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... formulas. 17.122 Section 17.122 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... NONBEVERAGE PRODUCTS Formulas and Samples § 17.122 Amended or revised formulas. Except as provided in this section, amended or revised formulas are considered to be new formulas and shall be numbered...

  2. 27 CFR 21.38 - Formula No. 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 4. 21.38... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.38 Formula No. 4. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol, or to...

  3. 27 CFR 21.24 - Formula No. 20.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 20. 21.24... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Completely Denatured Alcohol Formulas § 21.24 Formula No. 20. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of ethyl alcohol of not less than 195...

  4. 27 CFR 20.115 - Ink general-use formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ink general-use formula..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Formulas and Statements of Process General-Use Formulas § 20.115 Ink general-use formula. Ink general-use formula is...

  5. 27 CFR 25.56 - Filing of formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of formulas. 25.56... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Miscellaneous Provisions Formulas § 25.56 Filing of formulas. (a) What are the general requirements for filing a formula? (1) You must file your formula in writing....

  6. 27 CFR 21.46 - Formula No. 22.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 22. 21.46... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.46 Formula No. 22. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  7. 27 CFR 21.70 - Formula No. 39-A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 39-A. 21.70... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.70 Formula No. 39-A. (a) Formula. To every 100 gallons of alcohol add:...

  8. 27 CFR 24.127 - Adoption of formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adoption of formulas. 24... Establishment § 24.127 Adoption of formulas. The adoption of approved formulas by a successor proprietor will be... formulas for adoption by formula number, name of product, and date of approval. The application...

  9. 27 CFR 24.127 - Adoption of formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adoption of formulas. 24... Establishment § 24.127 Adoption of formulas. The adoption of approved formulas by a successor proprietor will be... formulas for adoption by formula number, name of product, and date of approval. The application...

  10. 27 CFR 24.127 - Adoption of formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adoption of formulas. 24... Establishment § 24.127 Adoption of formulas. The adoption of approved formulas by a successor proprietor will be... formulas for adoption by formula number, name of product, and date of approval. The application...